WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental care procedures

  1. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  2. Time series analysis of dental care procedures in Brazilian public services, 1994-2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Keller Celeste; Jacqueline Furtado Vital; Washington Leite Junger; Michael Eduardo Reichenheim

    2011-01-01

      The objectives of this study were to describe the time series of monthly rates of five dental care procedures in the Brazilian public health system and to assess changes in trends of dental procedures from 1994 to 2007...

  3. Structure of non-reimbursed and reimbursed therapeutic procedures provided at a general dental care office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgardzinska Sylwia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental care in Poland is based both on the public system (reimbursement by the National Health Fund and on the private funding (non-reimbursed. The aim of the paper was an analysis of the structure of non-reimbursed and reimbursed therapeutic procedures provided at a general dental care office. The study material was medical documentation of 669 patients treated for 3 months (the third quarter of 2013 at a general dental care office. The structure of therapeutic procedures, with the exception of orthodontic and prosthetic treatment, was analyzed, taking into account the patients’ gender, age, place of residence, the kind of procedure, and the payment type they made. The procedures reimbursed by the National Health Fund constituted 60.1% of all the procedures provided to patients at a dental office. Both among the procedures reimbursed by the National Health Fund and non-reimbursed procedures, the therapeutic procedures prevailed significantly over the prophylactic ones; in all age groups conservative treatment was predominant. An increase in the number of extractions in patients over 40 years of age, in comparison to younger patients, was found. The number of the dental procedures reimbursed by the National Health Fund, compared to the number of the non-reimbursed ones, increased with the patients’ age.

  4. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  5. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  6. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  7. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... and rinsing daily. It also includes having routine dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, ...

  8. Latex Allergy in Dental Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermata A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber latex is found in numerous medical and dental products. Adverse latex reactions in dental patients and practitioners have significantly increased since the introduction of universal precautions for infection control. These reactions range from contact dermatitis to potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity. Patients with a history of spina bifida, urogenital anomalies, multiple surgical procedures, allergic reactions or atopy, health care personnel and latex production workers are at increased risk of latex allergy. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical history and laboratory tests. Identification of latex sources and the avoidance of latex exposure are critical for protecting both dental patients and dental personnel.

  9. Is endocarditis prophylaxis for dental procedures necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Kathryn A; Wilson, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our purpose is to address whether antimicrobial prophylaxis is necessary before certain dental procedures for patients at increased risk for acquiring infective endocarditis (IE). Methods We reviewed recommendations for IE prophylaxis made by the American Heart Association (AHA) from 1995 to the present time. We also compared and contrasted the current recommendations from the AHA, European Society of Cardiology (ESC), United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and a consortium of French organisations. We further reviewed recent papers that have observed the incidence of IE since these current recommendations were published. Results Beginning in the 1990s, questions were raised about the advisability of using antimicrobial prophylaxis before certain dental procedures to prevent IE. Various groups in Europe and the US were increasingly aware that there were not any clinical trials showing the effectiveness, or lack thereof, of such prophylaxis. In the early to mid-2000s, the AHA, ESC and French consortium published guidelines recommending restriction of prophylaxis before dental procedures to patients with highest risk for developing IE and/or the highest risk for an adverse outcome from IE. The NICE guidelines eliminated recommendations for prophylaxis before dental procedures. Studies published after these changes were instituted have generally shown that the incidence of IE has not changed, although two recent reports have observed some increased incidence (but not necessarily related to an antecedent dental procedure). Conclusion A multi-national randomised controlled clinical trial that would include individuals from both developed and developing countries around the world is needed to ultimately define whether there is a role for antibiotic prophylaxis administered before certain dental procedures to prevent IE.

  10. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  11. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  12. Conscious Sedation Procedures Using Intravenous Midazolam for Dental Care in Patients with Different Cognitive Profiles: A Prospective Study of Effectiveness and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID) compared to dentally anxious patients (DA). Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale), and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS). 50% N2O/O2 was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test). Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test). Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions) and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA) and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA) (p<0.001, Fisher exact test) than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N2O/O2), were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists. PMID:23940729

  13. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam for dental care in patients with different cognitive profiles: a prospective study of effectiveness and safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Collado

    Full Text Available The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID compared to dentally anxious patients (DA. Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale, and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS. 50% N₂O/O₂ was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test. Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test. Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test. Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA (p<0.001, Fisher exact test than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N₂O/O₂, were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists.

  14. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam for dental care in patients with different cognitive profiles: a prospective study of effectiveness and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID) compared to dentally anxious patients (DA). Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale), and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS). 50% N₂O/O₂ was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test). Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test). Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions) and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA) and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA) (p<0.001, Fisher exact test) than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N₂O/O₂), were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists.

  15. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health > Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Main Content ... appointments easier. Back to To Prepare for Every Dental Visit: Your Role Be prepared for every appointment. ...

  16. Epilepsy and dental procedures. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Charles K; Gopinathan, Manju K; Singh, Anuradha; Devinsky, Orrin; Lin, Louis M; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2008-03-01

    This paper is a review of the dental management of patients with epilepsy. It includes discussion of the effects anti-epileptic drugs have on dental procedures and addresses complications and side effects of these drugs. A clinical case photo is presented to show gingival hyperplasia, along with four tables on which common antiepileptic medications are enumerated.

  17. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  18. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  19. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment.

  20. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment. How

  1. [Autism-friendly dental care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, L S; van Gemert-Schriks, M C M; Elhorst, J H

    2016-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) occurs in approximately 1% of the Dutch population. Among the group of patients with this disorder, there is a substantial diversity regarding skills, intelligence and treatability. However, there are also common characteristics; people with ASD often have difficulty with social interaction, communication, and exhibit typical patterns of behaviour. Therefore, problems may arise in the various areas of development, such as language development and responding to sensory stimuli. Dental practitioners will also be confronted with individuals with ASD. Care can be significantly improved, considering that negative experiences and dental anxiety are widespread at this time.

  2. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  3. Dental visits and access to dental care among Maryland schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Wagner, Mark L; Goodman, Harold S; Manz, Michael C; Marrazzo, Ilise D

    2005-04-01

    Regular dental visits afford an opportunity for dentists to provide preventive services and to diagnose and treat disease. Not all children, however, have equal access to these services. The authors conducted this study to describe access to and utilization of oral health care services for Maryland schoolchildren in kindergarten and third grade. They obtained data from a questionnaire filled out by parents or guardians participating in the Survey of the Oral Health Status of Maryland School Children, 2000-2001 (N = 2,642). Outcome variables included having a dental visit in the last year, prophylaxis in the last year, usual source of medical care and usual source of dental care. Descriptor variables included region, grade, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free or reduced-fee meals, parents' or guardians' education and dental insurance status. Overall, general dental visit and dental prophylaxis visit rates were similar (74.1 and 71.3 percent, respectively). Schoolchildren, however, were more likely to have had a usual source of medical care than of dental care (96.0 and 82.9 percent, respectively). Third graders, those ineligible for free or reduced-fee meals and those with some dental insurance coverage were more likely to have received a prophylaxis in the last year and were more likely to have a usual source of dental care. Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black schoolchildren also were more likely to have had a usual source of dental care than were Hispanics. Schoolchildren most likely to have received regular preventive dental care were those who had parents or guardians with financial resources. Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) provide safety nets, but these programs could be improved. Dentistry's challenge is to determine which characteristics are unique to those who visit the dentist regularly and use this information to help meet the needs of the underserved.

  4. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbaraini Alexandra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists’ behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients’ experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients’ experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients and dentists during the provision of preventive care and advice in general dental practices. Methods Seventeen patients were interviewed. Data analysis consisted of transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results Patients described their experiences when visiting dental practices with and without a structured preventive approach in place, together with the historical, biological, financial, psychosocial and habitual dimensions of their experience. Potential barriers that could hinder preventive activities as well as facilitators for prevention were also described. The offer of preventive dental care and advice was an amazing revelation for this group of patients as they realized that dentists could practice dentistry without having to “drill and fill” their teeth. All patients, regardless of the practice they came from or their level of clinical risk of developing dental caries, valued having a caring dentist who respected them and listened to their concerns without “blaming” them for their oral health status. These patients complied with and supported the preventive care options because they were being “treated as a person not as a patient” by their dentists. Patients valued dentists who made

  5. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-07-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities.

  6. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  7. Investing in Preventive Dental Care for the Medicare Population: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the use of preventive dental care services by the US Medicare population, and we assessed whether money spent on preventive dental care resulted in less money being spent on expensive nonpreventive procedures. Methods. We used data from the 2002 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey to estimate a multinomial logistic model to analyze the influence of predisposing, enabling, and need variables in identifying those beneficiaries who used preventive dental care, only nonpreventive dental care, or no dental care in a multiple-variable context. We used regression models with similar controls to estimate the influence of preventive care on the utilization and cost of nonpreventive dental care and all dental care. Results. Our analyses showed that beneficiaries who used preventive dental care had more dental visits but fewer visits for expensive nonpreventive procedures and lower dental expenses than beneficiaries who saw the dentist only for treatment of oral problems. Conclusions. Adding dental coverage for preventive care to Medicare could pay off in terms of both improving the oral health of the elderly population and limiting the costs of expensive nonpreventive dental care for the dentate beneficiary population. PMID:20864712

  8. Provision of specific dental procedures by general dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network: questionnaire findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Korelitz, James J; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Oates, Thomas W; Rindal, D Brad; Gregory, Randall J

    2015-01-22

    Objectives were to: (1) determine whether and how often general dentists (GDs) provide specific dental procedures; and (2) test the hypothesis that provision is associated with key dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. GDs (n = 2,367) in the United States National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed an Enrollment Questionnaire that included: (1) dentist; (2) practice; and (3) patient characteristics, and how commonly they provide each of 10 dental procedures. We determined how commonly procedures were provided and tested the hypothesis that provision was substantively related to the three sets of characteristics. Two procedure categories were classified as "uncommon" (orthodontics, periodontal surgery), three were "common" (molar endodontics; implants; non-surgical periodontics), and five were "very common" (restorative; esthetic procedures; extractions; removable prosthetics; non-molar endodontics). Dentist, practice, and patient characteristics were substantively related to procedure provision; several characteristics seemed to have pervasive effects, such as dentist gender, training after dental school, full-time/part-time status, private practice vs. institutional practice, presence of a specialist in the same practice, and insurance status of patients. As a group, GDs provide a comprehensive range of procedures. However, provision by individual dentists is substantively related to certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. A large number and broad range of factors seem to influence which procedures GDs provide. This may have implications for how GDs respond to the ever-changing landscape of dental care utilization, patient population demography, scope of practice, delivery models and GDs' evolving role in primary care.

  9. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  10. Use of dental services: an analysis of visits, procedures and providers, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J; Moeller, John F

    2002-02-01

    While many studies have provided data on Americans' access to dental care, few have provided a detailed understanding of what specific treatments patients receive. This article provides detailed information about the types of dental services that Americans receive and the types of providers who render them. The authors provide national estimates for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population in several socioeconomic and demographic categories regarding dental visits, procedures performed and the types of providers who performed them, using household data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, or MEPS. Data show that while the combination of diagnostic and preventive services adds up to 65 percent of all dental procedures, the combination of periodontal and endodontic procedures represents only 3 percent. Additionally, while 81 percent of all dental visits were reported as visits to general dentists, approximately 7 percent and 5 percent of respondents who had had a dental visit reported having visited orthodontists or oral surgeons, respectively. MEPS data show the magnitude and nature of dental visits in aggregate and for each of several demographic and socioeconomic categories. This information establishes a nationally representative baseline for the U.S. population in terms of rates of utilization, number and types of procedures and variations in types of providers performing the procedures. These nationally representative estimates include data elements that describe specific dental visits, dental procedures and type of provider, and they offer details that are useful, important and not found elsewhere. By understanding these analyses, U.S. dentists will be better positioned to provide care and better meet the dental care needs of all Americans.

  11. Insure Kids Now (IKN) (Dental Care Providers)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Insure Kids Now (IKN) Dental Care Providers in Your State locator provides profile information for oral health providers participating in Medicaid and Children's...

  12. 2013 AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Steven E; Bellows, Jan; Juriga, Stephen; Knutson, Kate; Niemiec, Brook A; Perrone, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary dentistry is constantly progressing. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and optimize quality of life. Untreated diseases of the oral cavity are painful and can contribute to local and systemic diseases. This article includes guidelines for preventive oral health care, client communication, evaluation, dental cleaning, and treatment. In addition, materials and equipment necessary to perform a medically appropriate procedure are described.

  13. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised ...

  14. Dental Care Utilization among North Carolina Rural Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Chen, Haiying; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Bell, Ronny A.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Reynolds, Teresa; Quandt, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This analysis delineates the predisposing, need, and enabling factors that are significantly associated with regular and recent dental care in a multi-ethnic sample of rural older adults. Methods A cross-sectional comprehensive oral health survey conducted with a random, multi-ethnic (African American, American Indian, white) sample of 635 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older was completed in two rural southern counties. Results Almost no edentulous rural older adults received dental care. Slightly more than one-quarter (27.1%) of dentate rural older adults received regular dental care and slightly more than one-third (36.7%) received recent dental care. Predisposing (education) and enabling (regular place for dental care) factors associated with receiving regular and recent dental care among dentate participants point to greater resources being the driving force in receiving dental care. Contrary to expectations of the Behavioral Model of Health Services, those with the least need (e.g., better self-rated oral health) received regular dental care; this has been referred to as the Paradox of Dental Need. Conclusions Regular and recent dental care are infrequent among rural older adults. Those not receiving dental care are those who most need care. Community access to dental care and the ability of older adults to pay for dental care must be addressed by public health policy to improve the health and quality of life of older adults in rural communities. PMID:22536828

  15. Dental care for the deaf pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat K Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Great strides have been accomplished recently in providing better medical services for handicapped children. As the dentist begins to understand the complexity of each particular form of handicap and its characteristics, he is able to plan more efficiently for satisfactory treatment. Because many dentists do not understand deafness and the unique problems that deaf children exhibit, inadequate dental care for deaf children still ensues. Handicapped persons are at a greater risk for dental disease, for the most part, because of greater neglect or poor oral hygiene and access to routine dental care. Deaf patients in particular often fail to obtain needed care because of communication difficulties experienced in the treatment situation.

  16. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (dental service and show that individual and contextual factors predict common treatments received. Implications of this research include the importance of making provision for our aging population and ensuring that preventative care is available to all. Further research is required to explain the interaction of organisational and system policies, practitioner and patient perspectives on care and, thus, inform effective commissioning and provision of dental services.

  17. Sterilization and Disinfection Procedures by Dental Practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sterilization and Disinfection Procedures by Dental Practitioners in Nigeria. ... At least one HIV/AIDS known and at least one suspected HIV/AIDS patients ... a reasonable percentage of them are conscientious and aware of the risk factors.

  18. Cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema due to a dental procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarine, Mityanand; Dubin, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Dental procedures, though commonplace and usually very safe, are not without complications. We report on a case of extensive cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema after a routine dental procedure, initially masquerading as an allergic reaction in an otherwise young and healthy woman. A review of the relevant literature on this clinical entity is presented, which serves to underscore the need for awareness by the treating clinician of this condition and its potential sequela.

  19. Cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema due to a dental procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mityanand Ramnarine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental procedures, though commonplace and usually very safe, are not without complications. We report on a case of extensive cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema after a routine dental procedure, initially masquerading as an allergic reaction in an otherwise young and healthy woman. A review of the relevant literature on this clinical entity is presented, which serves to underscore the need for awareness by the treating clinician of this condition and its potential sequela.

  20. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants.

  1. Referrals for dental care during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Oral health is essential to overall health in the prenatal period. Pregnancy is not a time to delay dental care. Several studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and poor pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth. Interventions to provide periodontal treatment to pregnant women yield inconsistent results regarding preterm birth but have established the safety of periodontal therapy during pregnancy. Postpartum women in poor dental health readily transmit the tooth decay pathogen Streptococcus mutans from their saliva to their infants, resulting in increased risk of early childhood caries. Preventive services and treatment for acute problems should be recommended, fears allayed, and women referred. Dental radiographs may be performed safely with the use of appropriate shielding. Nonemergent interventions are best provided between 14 and 20 weeks' gestation for comfort and optimal fetal safety. Most gravid women do not seek dental care. Increased interprofessional communication to encourage dentists to treat pregnant women will reduce the number of women without care. In states where it is available, Medicaid coverage of dental services for pregnant women is typically allowed during pregnancy and for 2 months postpartum. Women's health providers should understand the importance of protecting oral health during pregnancy and educate their patients accordingly.

  2. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene.

  3. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  4. Occupational safety among dental health-care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Shimoji

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Shigehiro Shimoji1, Kohji Ishihama1,2, Hidefumi Yamada1, Masaki Okayama1, Kouichi Yasuda1,3, Tohru Shibutani3,4, Tadashi Ogasawara2,5, Hiroo Miyazawa2,3, Kiyofumi Furusawa11Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Matsumoto Dental University, Shiojiri, Japan; 2Infection Control Team, 3Risk Management Working Team, Matsumoto Dental University Hospital, Shiojiri, Japan; 4Department of Dental Anesthesiology, 5Department of Special Care Dentistry, Matsumoto Dental University, Shiojiri, JapanAbstract: Compared to other health-care workers, dental health-care workers come in close contact with patients and use a variety of sharp and high-speed rotating instruments. It is important to understand the characteristics of the occupational accidents that occur. We reviewed incident reports from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010, at Matsumoto Dental University Hospital. In addition, questionnaires dealing with identification of occupational safety issues, especially splash exposures, were conducted for dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses. Thirty-two occupational injuries were reported during the study period, including 23 sharp instrument injuries (71.9%, 6 splash exposures (18.8%, and 3 others. Of the six splash exposures, only two cases involved potential contamination with blood or other potentially infectious patient material. Of the 66 workers who experienced sharps injuries, 20 workers (30.3%, 20/66 reported them to the hospital work safety team. The questionnaire revealed high incident of splash exposures and conjunctiva exposures: 87.9% (51/58 and 60.3% (35/58 in dentists and 88.6% (39/44 and 61.4% (27/44 in dental hygienists. The compliance rate for routine use of protective eyewear was 60.3% (35/58 for dentists and 34.1% (15/44 for hygienists. Of the presented informational items included in the questionnaire, those that strongly persuaded respondents to use protective eyewear were ‘splatters from the patient’s mouth contain blood

  5. Relationship Between Children’s Dental Needs and Dental Care Utilization: United States, 1988–1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Clemencia M.; Ronzio, Cynthia R.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study describes the relationship between dental needs and dental care utilization among children. Methods. Data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) were used to analyze dental care needs and dental care utilization. Results. Younger children with perceived needs (needs perceived by the child or responsible adult) were more likely to be episodic users of dental care than children without perceived needs. Younger children with normative needs (defined by the presence of untreated caries diagnosed by a dentist) were less likely to be regular users. Older children with perceived or normative needs were more likely to be episodic users and less likely to have had a previous-year visit than children with no needs. Conclusions. Despite their presence, dental needs do not drive dental care use among children, and children’s dental care utilization is inadequate. PMID:12406814

  6. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  7. [Special considerations in dental surgery procedures on organ transplantation patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzeisen, R; Eckardt, A; Knoll, M; Girod, S

    1991-01-01

    In 150 patients 366 (95%) of 385 dental surgery procedures performed prior to organ transplantations were free of complications. In 6 patients circumscribed wound infections occurred, and 5 post-operative hemorrhages as well as 2 injection hematomas were observed. In the group of patients where dental surgery was performed after organ transplantation, all 123 procedures were free of complications. Treatment of transplantation patients in the dental office requires a profound understanding of the complex clinical problems these patients might present, a good coordination of the required measures and close cooperation between the transplantation center and the attending dentist. Special considerations of the treatment of organ transplantation patients and the indications for dental surgery are discussed.

  8. Public dental health care program for persons with disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Hede, Børge; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to describe the organization and content of the Danish public oral health care program for persons with disability, and (2) to analyse possible variations in relation to the goals and requirements set by the health authorities. Data were collected by means...... of knowledge of oral health and oral health care for persons with disability were barriers to equal access to the program. Preventive dental services were the most frequent services delivered, although relatively few oral hygienists were involved in the program. Special training was most frequent in large...... municipalities. To secure equal access for persons with disability, it is recommended that joint collaboration between smaller municipalities should be made regarding procedures of such programs. Special training of dental personnel and of the staff responsible for selecting persons for the program should...

  9. Specialist management of routine dental procedures in adults with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransford, N; Soryal, I; McCorry, D; Sander, J W; Duncan, F; Huggins, N

    2014-04-01

    Little published information exists about the management of dental treatment procedures for people with epilepsy who, despite their medication, continue to have seizures. This paper draws on relevant literature in neurology and anaesthetics to provide a multi-speciality consensus on methods of assessment and adjunctive treatment options in order to manage the risk of a clinically significant seizure occurring during a procedure. It aims to enhance current guidelines and practice in the provision of specialist care for this diverse group.

  10. Management of oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing minor dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaali, Yathreb; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Froehlich, James B; Kaatz, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Approximately 4.2 million patients in the United States are taking warfarin, making it the 11th most prescribed drug. Warfarin is primarily used for treatment of venous thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves. Dentists frequently encounter anticoagulated patients and are faced with management decisions in these patients who require dental procedures. Observational studies suggest the risk of thrombosis if anticoagulation is suspended during dental procedures is higher than the risk of bleeding if anticoagulation is not suspended. Several groups now offer guidelines that recommend most minor dental procedures should be performed while on therapeutic warfarin. The recent approval of several new oral anticoagulants has introduced greater complexity to the management of the anticoagulated patient, and this narrative review will discuss current guidelines, the scientific underpinnings of the guidelines, and offer some practical suggestions for patients that are receiving the new agents.

  11. The use of general anesthesia in pediatric dental care of children at multi-dental centers in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba'akdah, Rania; Farsi, Najat; Boker, Abdulaziz; Al Mushayt, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    High caries reports in young Saudi children strongly suggest the need occasionally for general anesthesia to provide quality dental work. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of patients, dental procedures and hospital protocols for Pediatric Dental General Anesthesia (PDGA) procedure at multi-dental centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Study sample included 90 children attending PDGA treatment at three governmental hospitals in Jeddah. Collected data included patient's demographics, medical condition, admission type, intra-operative protocols, and dental procedures. Results showed the mean age of treated children was 5 +/- 2 years and the majority of them (93%) were treated for the first time under general anesthesia (GA). Long waiting duration for PDGA procedure was reported regardless of the patient age and medical status. Being very young with extensive caries was the major indication for GA (58%). Children mean preoperative fasting times were 10 +/- 2 hours. Hospitals were significantly different in some protocols for PDGA procedures. Child behavior during GA induction was significantly related to child's age, premedication use, and hospital admission type. The mean number of treated teeth per child was 14 +/- 3.8 and the treatment mostly included restorations. Age was found to significantly affect the type of dental treatment, while gender and medical status did not. PDGA procedure is used mostly for young children with extensive dental caries. Children treated under GA received a comprehensive dental care in Saudi hospitals. Efforts should be directed to improve some of the existing hospitals protocols with PDGA procedure. The long waiting period for PDGA operation indicated the need to improve available facilities in the three hospitals.

  12. Occupational safety among dental health-care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Shigehiro; Ishihama, Kohji; Yamada, Hidefumi; Okayama, Masaki; Yasuda, Kouichi; Shibutani, Tohru; Ogasawara, Tadashi; Miyazawa, Hiroo; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2010-01-01

    Compared to other health-care workers, dental health-care workers come in close contact with patients and use a variety of sharp and high-speed rotating instruments. It is important to understand the characteristics of the occupational accidents that occur. We reviewed incident reports from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010, at Matsumoto Dental University Hospital. In addition, questionnaires dealing with identification of occupational safety issues, especially splash exposures, were conducted for dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses. Thirty-two occupational injuries were reported during the study period, including 23 sharp instrument injuries (71.9%), 6 splash exposures (18.8%), and 3 others. Of the six splash exposures, only two cases involved potential contamination with blood or other potentially infectious patient material. Of the 66 workers who experienced sharps injuries, 20 workers (30.3%, 20/66) reported them to the hospital work safety team. The questionnaire revealed high incident of splash exposures and conjunctiva exposures: 87.9% (51/58) and 60.3% (35/58) in dentists and 88.6% (39/44) and 61.4% (27/44) in dental hygienists. The compliance rate for routine use of protective eyewear was 60.3% (35/58) for dentists and 34.1% (15/44) for hygienists. Of the presented informational items included in the questionnaire, those that strongly persuaded respondents to use protective eyewear were 'splatters from the patient's mouth contain blood' (90%, 99/110) and 'dental operations at our clinic are performed based only on a questionnaire without serious examinations for HBV, HCV, and HIV' (71.8%, 79/110). The reason of low compliance of protective eyewear among dentists might relate to fine dental procedures. Appropriate information is important for the motive of wearing personal protective equipment, and an early educational program may have a potential to increase compliance with the use of that equipment.

  13. Estimating Demand for and Supply of Pediatric Preventive Dental Care for Children and Identifying Dental Care Shortage Areas, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Gentili, Monica; Griffin, Paul M; Griffin, Susan O; Harati, Pravara; Johnson, Ben; Serban, Nicoleta; Tomar, Scott

    Demand for dental care is expected to outpace supply through 2025. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of pediatric dental care shortages in Georgia and to develop a general method for estimation that can be applied to other states. We estimated supply and demand for pediatric preventive dental care for the 159 counties in Georgia in 2015. We compared pediatric preventive dental care shortage areas (where demand exceeded twice the supply) designated by our methods with dental health professional shortage areas designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. We estimated caries risk from a multivariate analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and national census data. We estimated county-level demand based on the time needed to perform preventive dental care services and the proportion of time that dentists spend on pediatric preventive dental care services from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pediatric preventive dental care supply exceeded demand in Georgia in 75 counties: the average annual county-level pediatric preventive dental care demand was 16 866 hours, and the supply was 32 969 hours. We identified 41 counties as pediatric dental care shortage areas, 14 of which had not been designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. Age- and service-specific information on dental care shortage areas could result in more efficient provider staffing and geographic targeting.

  14. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Practitioners in Tabriz Regarding Infection Control Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taghavi Zenouz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV might be transmitted from one individual to another during dental procedures. Therefore, sterilization and personal protection procedures are of utmost significance in dental offices. The importance of awareness of cross-infection and antiseptic principles lies in the fact that in most cases it is not possible to identify patients with hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate awareness of infection control procedures among dental practitioners in Tabriz.

    Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, 150 dental practitioners working in clinics and private offices of Tabriz were randomly selected. Data was collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire, which included respondents’ personal profile and questions on infection control and sterilization methods.

    Results. There were no statistically significant differences in the level of knowledge between male and female dental practitioners regarding infection control; however, there was a decline in awareness as age increased.

    Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest that in some cases dental practitioners neglect the principles for personal protection and cross-infection control. Therefore, our society is subject to widespread infection in dental offices and clinics. This potential risk necessitates careful monitoring along with government support of treatment procedures, the inclusion of infection control costs into treatment expenses and an emphasis on continuing education about infection control procedures through seminars and congresses.

  15. A virtual reality simulator for teaching and evaluating dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhienmora, P; Haddawy, P; Khanal, P; Suebnukarn, S; Dailey, M N

    2010-01-01

    We present a dental training system with a haptic interface that allows dental students or experts to practice dental procedures in a virtual environment. The simulator is able to monitor and classify the performance of an operator into novice or expert categories. The intelligent training module allows a student to simultaneously and proactively follow the correct dental procedures demonstrated by an intelligent tutor. The virtual reality (VR) simulator simulates the tooth preparation procedure both graphically and haptically, using a video display and haptic device. We evaluated the performance of users using hidden Markov models (HMMs) incorporating various data collected by the simulator. We implemented an intelligent training module which is able to record and replay the procedure that was performed by an expert and allows students to follow the correct steps and apply force proactively by themselves while reproducing the procedure. We find that the level of graphics and haptics fidelity is acceptable as evaluated by dentists. The accuracy of the objective performance assessment using HMMs is encouraging with 100 percent accuracy. The simulator can simulate realistic tooth surface exploration and cutting. The accuracy of automatic performance assessment system using HMMs is also acceptable on relatively small data sets. The intelligent training allows skill transfer in a proactive manner which is an advantage over the passive method in a traditional training. We will soon conduct experiments with more participants and implement a variety of training strategies.

  16. Dental Care Utilization for Examination and Regional Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Sin; Han, Sun-Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Receiving proper dental care plays a significant role in maintaining good oral health. We investigated the relationship between regional deprivation and dental care utilization. Methods: Multilevel logistic regression was used to identify the relationship between the regional deprivation level and dental care utilization purpose, adjusting for individual-level variables, in adults aged 19+ in the 2008 Korean Community Health Survey (n=220 258). Results: Among Korean adults, 12.8% used dental care to undergo examination and 21.0% visited a dentist for other reasons. In the final model, regional deprivation level was associated with significant variations in dental care utilization for examination (pdental care utilization for other reasons in the final model. Conclusions: This study’s findings suggest that policy interventions should be considered to reduce regional variations in rates of dental care utilization for examination. PMID:26265665

  17. Utilization of dental health services by Danish adolescents attending private or public dental health care systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bastholm, Annelise

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were: 1) to describe the choice of dental care system among 16-year-olds, 2) to describe the utilization of dental services among 16-17-year-olds enrolled in either public or private dental care systems, and to compare the dental services provided by the alternative...... systems. The study comprised 1,245 adolescents from 3 municipalities; the historical cohort study design was applied; and data were collected from dental records (public dental service) and dental claims (private practice). At age 16, 12% preferred being enrolled in the private practice system, while 88......% remained in the public dental care system. During the 2-year study period the attendance rate was 99% for the public system, while 90% attended the private practice system (Pdental services were provided more frequently by the public than the private system (P

  18. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage... designated as primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as... seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care,...

  19. Optimizing the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Godoy Iano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, as any other heavy metal, may cause environmental damages due to its accumulation and biotransformation. Dental offices, whether private or institutional, use dental amalgam as a restorative material on a daily basis. Dental amalgam is composed of mercury (50%, silver (30% and other metals. Approximately 30% of the amalgam prepared in dental offices (0.6 g per capsule are wasted and inadequately discarded without any treatment. Methods for mercury recovery have been proposed previously, using high temperatures through exposure to direct flame (650°C, long processing time, and hazardous reagents as potassium cyanide. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to replace the direct flame by an electrical mantle in the process of mercury recovery. Results showed an average mercury recovery of 90% from 2 kg of amalgam after 30 minutes of processing time, thus optimizing the procedure. The proposed modifications allowed a significant reduction in processing time and a mercury recovery with high purity. The modified process also provided minimization of operator exposure to physical, chemical and ergonomic hazards, representing a technological advance compared to the risks inherent to the original method. It also provided environmental health and economy of energy resources by replacing a finite energy source (fossil and organic by a more environmentally appropriate electric source, resulting in significant improvement of the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam.

  20. Clinical Usefulness of Proseal Laryngeal Mask Airway for Anesthesia during Dental Procedures in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Jung-Wook; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chong-Chul; Shin, Teo Jeon; Koo, Yong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Although the Proseal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) has been widely used in anesthesia, little is known about its clinical effectiveness during dental procedures. We describe the clinical feasibility of the PLMA for managing airways in the field of pediatric dentistry. . We reviewed the medical records of children who underwent airway management with the use of the PLMA from January 2011 to December 2012 at an outpatient facility at Seoul National Dental University Hospital. During the study period, the airways of 19 children were managed with the PLMA for dental procedures. During its placement, blood pressure and heart rate were stably maintained. There were no interruptions of the dental procedures. None of the children experienced oxygen desaturation or ventilation difficulty. In one patient, the PLMA was dislodged for a short time, but the problem was easily solved with repositioning. After transferring to the post-anesthetic care unit, there were no incidences of oxygen desaturation or vomiting. All of the children were discharged from the hospital without complications. The PLMA can be successfully used in airway management during dental treatment in children.

  1. Preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled senior adults: from community to nursing facility residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary C; Caplan, Daniel J; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Cowen, Howard J; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Marchini, Leonardo; Momany, Elizabeth T

    2017-09-08

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the utilization rate of preventive oral health care services while senior adults were community-dwelling differed from the rate after those same senior adults were admitted to nursing facilities. A secondary objective was to evaluate other significant predictors of receipt of preventive oral health procedures after nursing facility entry. Iowa Medicaid claims from 2007-2014 were accessed for adults who were 68+ years upon entry to a nursing facility and continuously enrolled in Medicaid for at least three years before and at least two years after admission (n = 874). Univariate, bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. During the five years that subjects were followed, 52.8% never received a dental exam and 75.9% never received a dental hygiene procedure. More Medicaid-enrolled senior adults received ≥1 preventive dental procedure in the two years while residing in a nursing facility compared to the three years before entry. In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictor of preventive oral health care utilization after entry was the receipt of preventive oral health services before entry (p dental procedures in the two years after nursing facility entry was the receipt of dental procedures in the three years before entry while community-dwelling. This underscores the importance of the senior adult establishing a source of dental care while community-dwelling. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  2. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-01-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities...

  3. Do dental procedures affect lung function and arterial oxygen saturation in asthmatic patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Mahmoud Emara

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Asthmatic patients may be at a higher risk of developing oxygen desaturation after dental procedures regardless of their type with and without local anesthesia and a decrease in PEF after dental procedures with local anesthesia.

  4. Finishing procedures in Orthodontics: dental dimensions and proportions (microesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carlos Bodart Brandão

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present article is to describe procedures that can be performed to achieve excellence in orthodontic treatment finishing. The content is limited to microesthetics, which comprises the concept of ideal dental dimensions and proportions (white esthetics and its correlation with the periodontium (pink esthetics. Standards of normality are described both in their real dimensions (dental height and width, and in those effectively perceived by the observer, the virtual dimensions. METHODS: The best scientific evidence was sought in the literature to support the clinical procedures that must guide the professional to obtain maximum esthetic quality on their treatments. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate what the other specialties in Dentistry expect from Orthodontics and, specially, what they have to offer. Clinical cases will be used to illustrate the dental movement that might maximize treatment outcome and to confront the ideal standards with the current state of the art. CONCLUSION: Treatment quality is directly related to the amount of procedures implemented by the orthodontist, associated with concepts and resources from Periodontics and Dental Prosthesis. Microesthetics cannot be seen in isolation, but rather as the key to establish a pleasant smile (miniesthetics in addition to a harmonious face (macroesthetics and a human being with high self-esteem (hyper-esthetics.

  5. Application of fuzzy classification in modern primary dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yauheni Veryha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a framework for implementing fuzzy classifications in primary dental care services. Dental practices aim to provide the highest quality services for their patients. To achieve this, it is important that dentists are able to obtain patients' opinions about their experiences in the dental practice and are able to accurately evaluate this. We propose the use of fuzzy classification to combine various assessment criteria into one general measure to assess patients' satisfaction with primary dental care services. The proposed framework can be used in conventional dental practice information systems and easily integrated with those already used. The benefits of using the proposed fuzzy classification approach include more flexible and accurate analysis of patients' feedback, combining verbal and numeric data. To confirm our theory, a prototype was developed based on the Microsoft TM SQL Server database management system for two criteria used in dental practices, namely making an appointment with a dentist and waiting time for dental care services.

  6. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance com

  7. [Dental care for foreigners in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Péter; Oesterle, August

    2008-10-01

    High quality elective dental care for foreign patients was not exceptional in Hungary before the collapse of the old regime in 1989. Nevertheless, it became business as usual only in the new era thanks to the open state borders and the international competitive market environment. Unfortunately, no scientific study concerning this phenomenon has been conducted so far, however its professional and economic significance has been indicated by day-to-day experience. Additionally, the term "dental tourism" also used in international scientific papers became a commonplace in Hungary with unfavourable connotations. The present survey was the first to study this phenomenon by scientific standards in the most involved areas, namely in the capital city Budapest and in three counties in the Western Hungarian Region. Data collecting was performed by a self-reported questionnaire sent via conventional mail to all members of the Dental Section of the Hungarian Medical Chamber practicing in those indicated regions. Respond rates were 20.65% in Budapest and 25.34% in Western Hungary. The sample obtained this way, clearly indicated dimensions of cross-border patient migration and its economic significance as well. In Western Hungary 80.81% of foreign patients came from the neighbouring Austria and two out of ten practices realized 40 to 100% of their income out of this business. In Budapest foreign patients' nationality was more diversified. The largest group arrived from the United Kingdom (9.93%). Nevertheless the economic impact of dental tourism in Budapest is not relevant and outbalanced by a considerable domestic demand on the local private market.

  8. Factors related to receipt of dental care in Eastern Iowa nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Tariq S; Caplan, Daniel J; Cowen, Howard J; Oliveira, Deise

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors related to nursing facility residents' receipt of dental treatment when it was offered on site. Screening forms that included demographic, general, and dental health information were obtained from residents of 10 nursing facilities in Eastern Iowa, and their dental procedure history for up to 7 years after screening was recorded. Residents were grouped as having received either no procedures; diagnostic procedures only; or nondiagnostic procedures. Of the 586 residents, the mean age was 83.8 years at screening and 31.3% were edentulous. The odds of receiving nondiagnostic procedures were lower among residents who were older (OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.96-0.99) or edentulous (OR = 0.31, 95%CI 0.20-0.46), compared to those who received no dental procedures. Those who were older or edentulous had lower odds of receiving nondiagnostic dental procedures. Well-designed prospective cohort studies are needed to better evaluate barriers to receipt of dental treatment among the institutionalized elderly. © 2015 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cross-sectional study of preventive dental knowledge among adult patients seeking dental care in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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    Salwa A. AlSadhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the current knowledge about oral health and preventive dentistry among adults seeking dental care in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in which 900 questionnaires were randomly distributed to adults seeking dental care in all health settings in Riyadh; 450 questionnaires were distributed in each of the governmental and the private sectors. The questionnaire included questions regarding socio-demographic factors (age, education, occupation, etc and others concerning the patient’s knowledge of preventive dental measures; the oral hygiene procedures, fluoride and sealant applications and the healthy dietary habits. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS and simple descriptive statistics as means and frequency distributions were calculated for the study variables. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square test. Results: Eighty-six percent of the study subjects knew that dental caries could be prevented. Almost 59% were aware of the relation between frequency of sugar intake and dental caries. The prevalence of patients who knew that fluoride prevents dental caries was 50.3%, however, only 34.2% reported previous applications of topical fluoride in dental clinics. About 16% of the participants had received fissure sealants although 42.4% knew about them. The study sample’s dietary knowledge had statistically significant relations with education and occupation (p < 0.0001. Correct knowledge of visiting the dental clinic was statistically significantly related to education (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the majority of adults in Riyadh have the correct preventive dental knowledge, which is mostly related to the individuals’ educational level and occupation.

  10. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  11. Maintaining dental education and specialist dental care during an outbreak of a new coronavirus infection. Part 1: a deadly viral epidemic begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, F C; Samaranyake, L P

    2003-11-22

    During the three months from March 2003 the economically vibrant city of Hong Kong was seriously dislocated after becoming 'second port of call' of the new and potentially fatal disease, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The uncertainties during that period had a significant impact on the provision of dental care. However the city's only dental hospital continued to function and to support the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Hong Kong in educating dental students and other members of the dental team. At the time of writing no transmissions of the disease have been attributed to procedures associated with dental healthcare. This article chronicles the sequence of events during the outbreak from a dental perspective. It highlights information that may be useful to dental colleagues who might someday be confronted with similar outbreaks of newly emerged potentially lethal infections.

  12. Triggered by Medication Used in Dental Procedures: A Case Report

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    Aristo Vojdani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced intestinal permeability and food sensitivity are two of the many proven causes of gastrointestinal disorders. This present report describes a woman with no previous gastrointestinal (GI complaints, who underwent dental root canal, bone graft, and implant procedures. Postsurgery she experienced an allergic reaction to the combined medications. In the weeks that followed, she presented with multiple food intolerances. Four weeks after the final dental procedure, she was assessed serologically for mucosal immune function, salivary, and blood-gluten reactivity, intestinal permeability, and other food sensitivities. Compared to her test reports from two months prior to her first dental procedure, the patient’s results showed high total secretory IgA (SIgA and elevated salivary antibodies to alpha-gliadin, indicating abnormal mucosal immunity and loss of tolerance to gluten. Her serologic assessments revealed immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgA antibodies to a range of wheat/gluten proteins and peptides, gut bacterial endotoxins and tight junction proteins. These test results indicate gut dysbiosis, enhanced intestinal permeability, systemic gluten-reactivity, and immune response to other dietary macromolecules. The present case suggests that patients who experience severe allergic or pseudoallergic reactions to medication should be assessed and monitored for gut dysfunction. If left untreated this could lead to autoimmune reactions to self tissues.

  13. Disparities in children's oral health and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, W E; Wehr, E; Crall, J J

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, professional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride toothpastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral health and access to care. Only 1 in 5 children covered by Medicaid received preventive oral care for which they are eligible. Children from low income and minority families have poorer oral health outcomes, fewer dental visits, and fewer protective sealants. Water fluoridation is the most effective measure in preventing caries, but only 62% of water supplies are fluoridated, and lack of fluoridation may disproportionately affect poor and minority children. Childhood oral disease has significant medical and financial consequences that may not be appreciated because of the separation of medicine and dentistry. The infectious nature of dental caries, its early onset, and the potential of early interventions require an emphasis on preventive oral care in primary pediatric care to complement existing dental services. However, many pediatricians lack critical knowledge to promote oral health. We recommend financial incentives for prioritizing Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment dental services; managed care accountability; integration of medical and dental professional training, clinical care, and research; and national leadership. JAMA. 2000;284:2625-2631.

  14. Evaluation of Glove Damage during Dental Procedures among Dental Specialists in Tabriz

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    Saeed Nezafati

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Dental practitioners are prone to occupational risk of infection. This can be prevented in part by wearing gloves. However, for this to be effective, gloves should be intact during the entire course of dental procedure. Leaky surgical latex gloves have been seen in 0.9% of cases before use. As much as 1.9% of latex gloves have been reported to be damaged during dental procedures. In this study, we decided to assess glove damage during dental procedures among dental specialists in Tabriz.

    Materials and methods. Thirty-six dental specialists were selected for this study. Each practitioner received 40 pairs of intact powdered latex gloves. Upon the completion of dental procedures, the gloves were retrieved and any tears were evaluated separately for right and left hands. Data was analyzed using chi-square test.

    Results. 159 punctures were detected in 144 gloves (5% out of 2880 unpaired gloves used by practitioners. They noticed the tear(s in 60 cases (2%, however, 99 cases (3% of tear(s were not noted during the procedure. The highest rate of glove damage was observed in the prosthodontists’ group (12.3%, which was statistically significant comparing to other groups (p=0.048. The lowest rate of the damage was observed in the oral surgeons’ group (2% which showed no significant difference (p=0.134. The highest rate of punctures in the gloves was observed in the first and second fingers of the non-dominant hand.

    Conclusion. The damage to 5% of the gloves is highly significant, with a potential role in occupational hazards. The higher rate of leaks in the prosthodontists’ group compared to other groups demands for greater prudence in this field. The high rate of leaks in the first and second fingers of the non-dominant hand requires more attention to this area during daily practice.

  15. Evidence-based Update of Pediatric Dental Restorative Procedures: Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Hsu, K L; Coll, J A; Ginsberg, E; Ball, B M; Chhibber, S; Johnson, M; Kim, M; Modaresi, N; Tinanoff, N

    2015-01-01

    The science of dental materials and restorative care in children and adolescent is constantly evolving, and the ongoing search for ideal restorative materials has led to plethora of research. To provide an evidence base to assist dental practitioners choose appropriate restorative care for children and adolescents. This evidence-based review appraises this literature, primarily between the years 1995-2013, for efficacy of dental amalgam, composites, glass ionomer cements, compomers, preformed metal crowns and anterior esthetic restorations. The assessment of evidence for each dental material was based on a strong evidence, evidence in favor, expert opinion, and evidence against by consensus of the authors. There is varying level of evidence for the use of restorative materials like amalgam, composites, glass ionomers, resin-modified glass-ionomers, compomers, stainless steel crowns and anterior crowns for both primary and permanent teeth. A substantial amount data is available on restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry; however, there exists substantial evidence from systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials and clinicians need to examine and understand the available literature evidence carefully to aid them in clinical decision making.

  16. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities among children who receive early dental care. A cross-sectional study of healthy Canadian children seen for primary health care between September 2011 and January 2013 was conducted through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network in Toronto, Canada. Adjusted logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with children who were not seen by a dentist in early childhood and to determine risk factors associated with having dental cavities among children who received early dental care. Of the 2505 children included in the analysis, cavities. Among healthy urban children seen by a primary care provider, those most susceptible to cavities were least likely to receive early dental care. These findings support the need for publicly funded universal early preventive dental care and underscore the importance for primary care physicians to promote dental care in early childhood. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Expanding dental hygiene to include dental therapy: improving access to care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2009-01-01

    Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, and the subsequent National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health contributed significantly to raising the awareness of the American public and the dental profession regarding the lack of access to oral health care by many Americans, especially minorities and low income populations, with resulting disparities in oral health. The problem is particularly acute among children. The current workforce of dentists in the United States is inadequate to meet the oral health care needs of children in terms of numbers of dentists, as well as their distribution, ethnicity, education, and practice orientation. Dental hygienists trained in an expanded scope of practice, can help address the workforce inadequacy. Dental therapists, educated in 2-year programs of postsecondary education, comparable to America's associate degree dental hygiene programs, have been used throughout the world to provide basic, primary oral health care for children. Research has documented that utilizing dental therapists is a cost effective method of improving access to care for children. Countries that have led the way in introducing dental therapists to care for their children are now integrating their separate 2-year curriculum in dental therapy and dental hygiene into a 3-year curriculum to prepare a clinician dually trained in both dental therapy and dental hygiene. This clinician is being designated an oral health therapist. Expanding the education of dental hygienists in the United States to include skills of the internationally acclaimed dental therapist can produce oral health therapists, individuals capable of addressing the basic preventive, restorative, and minor surgical needs of children, but also able to continue to address the preventive and periodontal needs of adults.

  18. Minimising barriers to dental care in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Jennifer E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people are increasingly retaining their natural teeth but at higher risk of oral disease with resultant impact on their quality of life. Socially deprived people are more at risk of oral disease and yet less likely to take up care. Health organisations in England and Wales are exploring new ways to commission and provide dental care services in general and for vulnerable groups in particular. This study was undertaken to investigate barriers to dental care perceived by older people in socially deprived inner city area where uptake of care was low and identify methods for minimising barriers in older people in support of oral health. Methods A qualitative dual-methodological approach, utilising both focus groups and individual interviews, was used in this research. Participants, older people and carers of older people, were recruited using purposive sampling through day centres and community groups in the inner city boroughs of Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham in South London. A topic guide was utilised to guide qualitative data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. The data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. Results Thirty-nine older people and/or their carers participated in focus groups. Active barriers to dental care in older people fell into five main categories: cost, fear, availability, accessibility and characteristics of the dentist. Lack of perception of a need for dental care was a common 'passive barrier' amongst denture wearers in particular. The cost of dental treatment, fear of care and perceived availability of dental services emerged to influence significantly dental attendance. Minimising barriers involves three levels of action to be taken: individual actions (such as persistence in finding available care following identification of need, system changes (including reducing costs, improving information, ensuring appropriate timing and location of

  19. Genetic variations associated with red hair color and fear of dental pain, anxiety regarding dental care and avoidance of dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Catherine J; Beacham, Abbie; Neace, William; Gregg, Ronald G; Liem, Edwin B; Sessler, Daniel I

    2009-07-01

    Red hair color is caused by variants of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene. People with naturally red hair are resistant to subcutaneous local anesthetics and, therefore, may experience increased anxiety regarding dental care. The authors tested the hypothesis that having natural red hair color, a MC1R gene variant or both could predict a patient's experiencing dental care-related anxiety and dental care avoidance. The authors enrolled 144 participants (67 natural red-haired and 77 dark-haired) aged 18 to 41 years in a cross-sectional observational study. Participants completed validated survey instruments designed to measure general and dental care-specific anxiety, fear of dental pain and previous dental care avoidance. The authors genotyped participants' blood samples to detect variants associated with natural red hair color. Eighty-five participants had MC1R gene variants (65 of the 67 red-haired participants and 20 of the 77 dark-haired participants) (P fear of dental pain than did participants with no MC1R gene variants. They were more than twice as likely to avoid dental care as were the participants with no MC1R gene variants, even after the authors controlled for general trait anxiety and sex. Dental care-related anxiety, fear of dental pain and avoidance of dental care may be influenced by genetic variations. Dentists should evaluate all patients, but especially those with naturally red hair, for dental care-related anxiety and use appropriate modalities to manage the patients' anxiety.

  20. Dental Care Coverage and Use: Modeling Limitations and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined why older US adults without dental care coverage and use would have lower use rates if offered coverage than do those who currently have coverage. Methods. We used data from the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to estimate a multinomial logistic model to analyze the influence of personal characteristics in the grouping of older US adults into those with and those without dental care coverage and dental care use. Results. Compared with persons with no coverage and no dental care use, users of dental care with coverage were more likely to be younger, female, wealthier, college graduates, married, in excellent or very good health, and not missing all their permanent teeth. Conclusions. Providing dental care coverage to uninsured older US adults without use will not necessarily result in use rates similar to those with prior coverage and use. We have offered a model using modifiable factors that may help policy planners facilitate programs to increase dental care coverage uptake and use. PMID:24328635

  1. Ethnic classification in primary dental care and dental health services research: time to pause for thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, D J; Malik, S; Murphy, N; Patel, V; Singh, S; Syed, B; Vora, N

    2001-04-01

    'Ethnicity' is an important concept in dental health services research and in enabling general dental practitioners to gain insight into their patients values and expectations. Since more health services research is being undertaken in primary dental care settings it is becoming an important issue for dental professionals and researchers in primary care to be aware of. Ethnicity is thought to be related to dental health inequalities and access and is often used as a stratifying variable in many dental studies. The meaning and use of the term however differs among researchers and among the public. It is clear that researchers and professionals need to pause for thought when considering what this often bandied about term actually means and the impact of different definitions. This is illustrated using examples from the authors' own research and published papers in the medical and dental literature. There is also much debate about whether ethnicity--however defined--is an important predictor of differences in dental health in itself or is merely a marker for other factors such as social deprivation or the impact of 'place' on dental health. While the jury on this debate is out we suggest guidelines on the reporting of ethnicity should be outlined in the dental literature--perhaps updating those published in 1996 in the British Medical Journal.

  2. Evaluating components of dental care utilization among adults with diabetes and matched controls via hurdle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Monica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About one-third of adults with diabetes have severe oral complications. However, limited previous research has investigated dental care utilization associated with diabetes. This project had two purposes: to develop a methodology to estimate dental care utilization using claims data and to use this methodology to compare utilization of dental care between adults with and without diabetes. Methods Data included secondary enrollment and demographic data from Washington Dental Service (WDS and Group Health Cooperative (GH, clinical data from GH, and dental-utilization data from WDS claims during 2002–2006. Dental and medical records from WDS and GH were linked for enrolees continuously and dually insured during the study. We employed hurdle models in a quasi-experimental setting to assess differences between adults with and without diabetes in 5-year cumulative utilization of dental services. Propensity score matching adjusted for differences in baseline covariates between the two groups. Results We found that adults with diabetes had lower odds of visiting a dentist (OR = 0.74, p  0.001. Among those with a dental visit, diabetes patients had lower odds of receiving prophylaxes (OR = 0.77, fillings (OR = 0.80 and crowns (OR = 0.84 (p 0.005 for all and higher odds of receiving periodontal maintenance (OR = 1.24, non-surgical periodontal procedures (OR = 1.30, extractions (OR = 1.38 and removable prosthetics (OR = 1.36 (p  Conclusions Patients with diabetes are less likely to use dental services. Those who do are less likely to use preventive care and more likely to receive periodontal care and tooth-extractions. Future research should address the possible effectiveness of additional prevention in reducing subsequent severe oral disease in patients with diabetes.

  3. Rubber dam use during routine operative dentistry procedures: findings from the dental PBRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Amundson, Craig W; Gordan, Valeria V

    2013-04-01

    Rubber dam use during operative dentistry procedures has been quantified based on questionnaires completed by dentists. However, based on the knowledge of the authors of the current study, there are no reports based on use during actual clinical procedures other than in dental materials studies and none based on routine care. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) quantify how commonly the rubber dam is used during operative dentistry procedures; 2) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, restoration and patient-level factors are associated with its use. A total of 229 dentist practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) participated. DPBRN comprises 5 regions: Alabama/Mississippi, Florida/Georgia, Minnesota, Permanente Dental Associates; and Scandinavia. Practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations done in previously unrestored tooth surfaces from 5,810 patients. Most dentists (63%) did not use a rubber dam for any restoration in this study. A rubber dam was used for only 12% of restorations, 83% of which were used in 1 DPBRN region. With regions accounted for, no other dentist characteristics were significant. A multi-level multiple logistic regression of rubber dam use was done with restoration and patient-level variables modeled simultaneously. In this multi-variable context, these restoration-level characteristics were statistically significant: tooth-arch type, restoration classification and reason for placing the restoration. These patient-level characteristics were statistically significant: ethnicity, dental insurance, and age. These results, obtained fromactual clinical procedures rather than questionnaires, document a low prevalence of usage of the rubber dam during operative dentistry procedures. Usage varied with certain dentist, restoration, and patient level characteristics.

  4. Rubber dam use during routine operative dentistry procedures: findings from the Dental PBRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Amundson, Craig W; Gordan, Valeria V

    2010-01-01

    Rubber dam use during operative dentistry procedures has been quantified based on questionnaires completed by dentists. However, based on the knowledge of the authors of the current study, there are no reports based on use during actual clinical procedures other than in dental materials studies and none based on routine care. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) quantify how commonly the rubber dam is used during operative dentistry procedures; 2) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, restoration and patient-level factors are associated with its use. A total of 229 dentist practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) participated. DPBRN comprises five regions of the USA: Alabama/Mississippi, Florida/Georgia, Minnesota, Permanente Dental Associates and Scandinavia. Practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations done in previously unrestored tooth surfaces from 5,810 patients. Most dentists (63%) did not use a rubber dam for any restoration in this study. A rubber dam was used for only 12% of restorations, 83% of which were used in one DPBRN region. With regions accounted for, no other dentist characteristics were significant. A multi-level multiple logistic regression of rubber dam use was done with restoration and patient-level variables modeled simultaneously. In this multi-variable context, these restoration-level characteristics were statistically significant: tooth-arch type, restoration classification and reason for placing the restoration. These patient-level characteristics were statistically significant: ethnicity, dental insurance and age. These results, obtained from actual clinical procedures rather than questionnaires, document a low prevalence of usage of the rubber dam during operative dentistry procedures. Usage varied with certain dentist, restoration and patient-level characteristics.

  5. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  6. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Hygiene Care for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for dental hygiene curriculum cover the scope and definitions of care for the handicapped, interrelationships between disciplines and courses, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, and…

  7. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  8. Complication risks of invasive dental procedures in HIV/AIDS patients

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    Miftakhul Cahyati

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A total number of people living with HIV reached since it was first reported. Indonesia is on the brink of rapidly worsening AIDS epidemic. Oral health was a frequent problem among HIV-infected person. Opportunistic oral lesions and infections were often one of the first manifestations of HIV. The aim of this literature review was to discuss complication risks and management undergoing invasive dental procedures. Thereby, dentists have been expected to increase awareness of dental treatment needs for HIV-infected patients by pay attention to applied standard procedure. The complications of HIV-infected patients were reported minor, self-limiting, non-life threatening and readily treated. Treatment planning for the patient with HIV follows the same sequences as with other patients priorities are to assuage pain, restore function, prevent further disease and consider esthetic results. We concluded that no different complication risks between HIV-infected and non-infected. Dentists can provide care for HIV-infected patients with assessing the current immunosuppression stage, intake systemic medications, opportunistic infection potential and minimize contagion possibility to dental care professional or other patients.

  9. Parents’ satisfaction with pediatric dental care provided by dental college, Riyadh

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMutairi, Manal A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the level of parents’ satisfaction with pediatric dental care provided by dental students at the College of Dentistry and explore the factors associated with various parents’ demographics. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among parents (n = 150) whose children received dental care in dental colleges in King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh. The parents were asked to fill a self-administered dental satisfaction questionnaire between Februry and April 2016. Data were recorded and analyses using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: Results indicated that only 10.7% of the parents strongly agreed that before being seen they had to wait for a long time in the waiting area, and 36% strongly agreed that one of the causes for which they went to the KSU dental college is that there were inadequate pedodontics in their region. More than half of parents (60%) strongly agreed that the KSU dental clinic is up to date and very modern. Conclusions: The results indicate that the pediatric department has been successful in achieving parents’ satisfaction with dental students, their treatment, as well as operational aspects related to access. There was a strong degree of satisfaction from parents regarding the KSU dental college being modern and up to date. PMID:28032046

  10. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide. Practical Oral Care for People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Taking care of someone with a developmental disability requires patience and skill. As a caregiver, you know this as well as anyone does. You also know how challenging it is to help that person with dental care. It takes planning, time, and the ability to manage physical, mental, and behavioral problems. Dental care isn't always easy, but you can…

  11. STIGMA AROUND HIV IN DENTAL CARE: PATIENTS' EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario A; Phillips, J Craig; Kerston, R Paul; Moniri, Nardin R

    2016-02-01

    Tooth decay and other oral diseases can be highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Even though dental professionals are trained to provide equal and non-judgemental services to all, intentional or unintentional biases may exist with regard to PLWHA. We conducted qualitative descriptive research using individual interviews to explore the experiences of PLWHA accessing dental care services in Vancouver, Canada. We interviewed 25 PLWHA, aged 23-67 years; 21 were men and 60% reported fair or poor oral health. Thematic analysis showed evidence of both self-stigma and public stigma with the following themes: fear, self-stigma and dental care; overcoming past offences during encounters with dental care professionals; resilience and reconciliation to achieve quality care for all; and current encounters with dental care providers. Stigma attached to PLWHA is detrimental to oral care. The social awareness of dental professionals must be enhanced, so that they can provide the highest quality care to this vulnerable population.

  12. Measuring quality of dental care: Caries prevention services for children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herndon, Jill Boylston; Tomar, Scott L; Catalanotto, Frank A; Rudner, Nancy; Huang, I-Chan; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Shenkman, Elizabeth A; Crall, James J

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to validate the following 3 evidence-based, process-of-care quality measures focused on dental caries prevention for children with an elevated risk of experiencing caries...

  13. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Volunteer Efforts Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Information for Parents & ... version of this factsheet, click here How does cleft lip/palate affect the teeth? A cleft of the lip, ...

  14. AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Steven E; Bellows, Jan; Colmery, Ben; Conway, M Lana; Knutson, Kate; Vitoux, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and quality of life. Diseases of the oral cavity, if left untreated, are often painful and can contribute to other local or systemic diseases. This paper includes guidelines for materials and equipment, dental cleaning and evaluation, client communication, and pet home care.

  15. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, David R.; Gallagher, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Methods Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008–2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients’ individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Results Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (tooth extraction’ (3%; p = 0.001), and ‘instruction and advice’ (3%; p = 0.001). Smokers had a higher likelihood of receiving all treatments; and were notably over four times more likely to receive ‘instruction and advice’ than non-smokers (OR 4.124; 95% CI: 3.088–5.508; p = 0.01). A further new finding from the multilevel models was a significant difference in treatment related to area of residence; adults from the most deprived quintile were more likely to receive ‘tooth extraction’ when compared with least deprived, and less likely to receive preventive ‘instruction and advice’ (p = 0.01). Conclusion This is the first study to model patient management data from a

  16. [Users satisfaction with dental care services provided at IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa-Mora, Flora Evelia; Francisco-Méndez, Gustavo; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Mario

    2007-01-01

    To determine users' satisfaction with dental care services provided at Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Veracruz. An epidemiological survey was conducted in 14 family medicine clinics located in the northern part of the state of Veracruz. The clinics were selected by stratified-random sampling. All users older than 20 years seeking medical or dental care services were interviewed; previously, their informed consent was obtained. We used the 6-items United Kingdom dental care satisfaction questionnaire (Spanish version) where question number four evaluates user satisfaction. From October to December 2005, 3601 users were interviewed. We excluded 279 questionnaires because the age of the interviewees was <20 years. The final analysis included 3322 interviews (92%); 73% were female with an average age of 45 +/- 16 years old. 82% were satisfied with dental care services and 91% never felt like making a complaint. Waiting time of less than 30 minutes and last visit to the dentist in the last year were the only variables related to satisfaction (p = 0.0001). There is a high level of satisfaction regarding dental care services among Mexican Institute of Social Security users. However, it would be possible to increase the level of satisfaction if the waiting time is reduced and the number of dental care users attending twice a year increases.

  17. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  18. Postoperative complications of pediatric dental general anesthesia procedure provided in Jeddah hospitals, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almushayt Abdullah

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Review of post-operative morbidity reports for pediatric dental care under general anesthesia (GA show great variations. Until now, no morbidity data has been available to estimate the safety of pediatric patients under GA for dental rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study were to (1 investigate post-operative complications associated with dental care under GA and (2 correlate morbidity reports with patient's characteristics, dental procedures, and hospital protocol. Methods Study sample included 90 children attending GA for dental treatment at major governmental hospitals in Jeddah. Data were collected from every patient on three occasions, intra-operatively at the operating room, and post-operatively via phone calls in the first and third days after operation. Results Results showed that 99% of the children had one or more complaints in the first day in contrast to only 33% in the third day. Inability to eat (86%, sleepiness (71%, and pain (48% were the most common complaints in the first day, followed by bleeding (40%, drowsiness (39%, sore throat (34%, vomiting (26%, psychological changes (24%, fever (21%, cough (12%, and nausea (8%. A great significant complaints reduction was reported by the third post-operative day. Age, gender, admission type of the patients and GA duration were the factors that showed a significant relationship with post-operative complaints. Conclusion Post-operative morbidity was common, but mostly of mild severity and limited to the first day. Hospital staff efforts should be directed to control commonly reported postoperative complaints.

  19. Dental care and children with special health care needs: a population-based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charlotte W

    2009-01-01

    This paper grew out of a project reviewing progress in children's oral health after Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General was published in 2000. It includes a summary of advances in national surveillance of children with special health care needs (CSHCN), and presents more recent data on unmet dental care need among CSHCN. To that end, we used the 2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs to determine the prevalence of unmet dental care need among CSHCN and to compare this within subgroups of CSHCN, as well as to children without special health care needs, and to results from the previous iteration of this survey. Dental care remains the most frequently cited unmet health need for CSHCN. More CSHCN had unmet needs for nonpreventive than preventive dental care. CSHCN who are teens, poorer, uninsured, had insurance lapses, or are more severely affected by their condition had higher adjusted odds of unmet dental care needs. CSHCN who were both low income and severely affected had 13.4 times the adjusted odds of unmet dental care need. In summary, CSHCN are more likely to be insured and to receive preventive dental care at equal or higher rates than children without special health care needs. Nevertheless, CSHCN, particularly lower income and severely affected, are more likely to report unmet dental care need compared with unaffected children. Despite advances in knowledge about dental care among CSHCN, unanswered questions remain. Recommendations are provided toward obtaining additional data and facilitating dental care access for this vulnerable population.

  20. Adults with Disabilities and Proper Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated studies of graduating dental students indicate limited preparation to provide services for individuals with special healthcare needs. By the end of the 1990s and into the present decade, more than half of the U.S. dental schools provided less than five hours of class room presentations and about three quarters of the schools provided 0-5…

  1. Adults with Disabilities and Proper Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated studies of graduating dental students indicate limited preparation to provide services for individuals with special healthcare needs. By the end of the 1990s and into the present decade, more than half of the U.S. dental schools provided less than five hours of class room presentations and about three quarters of the schools provided 0-5…

  2. Dental trauma: restorative procedures using composite resin and mouthguards for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Filho, Paulo César de Freitas; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a step-by-step protocol for emergency care of a patient with a dentoalveolar injury in the anterior region of the mouth as well as the fabrication of a mouthguard to prevent future trauma. Dental trauma is one of the most serious oral health problems in active children and adolescents. Care of traumatized patients requires immediate initial emergency treatment followed by integrated procedures to restore damaged oral structures along with a subsequent trauma prevention strategy. Dentoalveolar injuries in the anterior region of the mouth are often characterized by tooth avulsion and coronal fracture. They are managed using procedures such as dental splinting, endodontic therapy with its unique characteristics, and restorative techniques to re-establish function and esthetics as well as protective mouthguards. A 16-year-old male presented with avulsion of his maxillary central incisors as a result of a direct, unintentional impact with an opponent during a basketball game. The teeth had been stored in physiological serum immediately following the injury and the patient received immediate care. On clinical examination, the right central incisor was fractured at the incisal third of the crown but no bone fractures were found. The teeth were reimplanted and splinted. The fractured right central incisor was restored following endodontic treatment and a mouthguard was fabricated for the patient. The dentist must be knowledgeable about the most efficient and suitable treatment for each traumatic scenario in order to provide appropriate care for dental injuries. Coordinated multi-disciplinary action is fundamental in the successful treatment of these injuries. The dental mouthguard is an effective device for protecting the teeth and supportive structures during physical activities and must be part of the protective equipment used by athletes. It is the responsibility of the dental professional to make parents, trainers, and athletic

  3. Dental care and treatment needs of elderly in nursing homes in Saarland: perceptions of the homes managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbo, Mohammad Abed; Mitov, Gergo; Gebhart, Florian; Pospiech, Peter

    2012-06-01

    To investigate nursing home managers' perceptions and attitudes towards oral health care and access to dental services for aged care facility residents. Questionnaires containing 28 closed-ended questions were mailed to all 114 nursing homes in Saarland, Germany. Descriptive statistics were calculated for response items. Facility response rate was 39%. None of the nursing homes in this study offered systematic dental health care. Initial dental screening was carried out only in one facility. In 81%, dental examinations only took place if required. Although stationary dental equipment was available only in one home, dental treatment was carried out in 71% of the cases by a dentist in the nursing home. Eighty-four per cent of the homes' managements rated the state of the dentition of the inhabitants as satisfying. Over half of the managers indicated satisfaction with the know-how of their nursing staff concerning oral hygiene procedures. The most significant barriers to provision of dental care in the facilities according to their managers were staff shortage, lack of interest of the inhabitants and financial concerns. The results of this study showed an urgent need for estimating a programme for systematic dental care for institutionalised elder people in the federal state of Saarland. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Estimated Costs of Dental Care due to Dental Decay in Mexican High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Estimate the cost of dental care generated by the dental decay prevalence in high school students at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out with a population of 78,870 high schoolers (conducted between the years 2003 and 2005). The need for dental caries treatment was determined by the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT) as it is indicated at the Automated Medical Exam (EMA, acronym in Spanish). The estimation of ...

  5. Differences in utilization of dental procedures by children enrolled in Wisconsin Medicaid and Delta Dental insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Pradeep; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko; Eichmiller, Fredrick; Okunseri, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have directly compared dental procedures provided in public and private insurance plans for enrollees living in dental health professional shortage areas (DHPSAs). We examined the rates for the different types of dental procedures received by 0-18-year-old children living in DHPSAs and non-DHPSAs who were enrolled in Medicaid and those enrolled under Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDW) for years 2002 to 2008. Medicaid and DDW dental claims data for 2002 to 2008 was analyzed. Enrollees were divided into DDW-DHPSA and non-DHPSA and Medicaid-DHPSA and non-DHPSA groups. Descriptive and multivariable analyses using over-dispersed Poisson regression were performed to examine the effect of living in DHPSAs and insurance type in relation to the number of procedures received. Approximately 49 and 65 percent of children living in non-DHPSAs that were enrolled in Medicaid and DDW received at least one preventive dental procedure annually, respectively. Children in DDW non-DHPSA group had 1.79 times as many preventive, 0.27 times fewer complex restorative and 0.51 times fewer endodontic procedures respectively, compared to those in Medicaid non-DHPSA group. Children enrolled in DDW-DHPSA group had 1.53 times as many preventive and 0.25 times fewer complex restorative procedures, compared to children in Medicaid-DHPSA group. DDW enrollees had significantly higher utilization rates for preventive procedures than children in Medicaid. There were significant differences across Medicaid and DDW between non-DHPSA and DHPSA for most dental procedures received by enrollees. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Does Smoking Hamper Oral Self-Care Among Dental Professionals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Smoking may impact oral self-care (OSC.  This study aimed to analyze the role of smoking in OSC among Iranian dental health professionals.Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional data were collected at two annual dental meetings and seven randomly selected dental schools in Iran. A total of 1,459 respond- ents composed of 967 general dental practitioners (GDPs, 229 dental educators (DE, and 263 senior dental students (DS anonymously completed a self-administered ques- tionnaire inquiring about smoking status and OSC.Results: Thirty percent of the men and 12% of women reported smoking with no dif-ference according to their professional status. Women reported better OSC than did men, but only 26% of the women and 17% of the men followed the three most important recommendations for OSC. Smoking was associated with infrequent tooth brushing and flossing, irregular use of fluoride containing toothpaste, consumption of sugary snacks, and weak adherence to the recommended OSC guidelines.Conclusion: Dental health education should place more emphasis on smoking counsel-ing and cessation among dental health professionals.

  7. Longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of children aged 0 to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Frederico Cunha

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "When" and "how" the dentist intervenes have repercussions on children's physical and emotional patterns. The objective of the present study was to conduct a longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of babies aged 0 to 3 years. A total of 216 patients seen at the Baby Clinic of the School of Dentistry at Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, were selected. The selection criterion was attendance at ten dental care sessions at bimonthly intervals for routine procedures such as clinical examination and oral hygiene. There was a predominance of cooperative behavior compared to uncooperative behavior when each visit was analyzed separately. The behavior of the patients must have been directly influenced by their psychomotor development. Constant attendance and exposure of the baby to non-stressful dental stimuli are factors that favor a cooperative behavior.

  8. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Rančić; Nemanja Rančić; Nemanja Majstorović; Vladimir Biočanin; Marko Milosavljević; Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was...

  9. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  10. [Influence of the organization of primary care and the socio-demographic characteristics of the population on the demand for municipal emergency dental care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Dirce Aparecida Valerio; Mialhe, Fabio Luiz; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro

    2014-01-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the influence of the social determinants and the provision of primary care services in relation to the use of emergency dental care services in a medium-sized municipality. Data recorded for the 57,231 users of emergency care between 2007 and 2009, in accordance with age, gender, date and period of dental care, social exclusion indices of the suburb in which they live and the existence of a benchmark oral health team, were used to perform the analysis. Of the total population, 5.24% on average per year used the service during the period under scrutiny, with the 20-49 year age group (63.84%) showing the highest demand and equality between genders for such care. Surgical procedures (54.90%) were the most prevalent with an increasing trend for restorative procedures (62,8%). Users living in areas of greater social exclusion were 4.15 times more likely to seek dental care (p gender or the existence of an oral health team of the suburb in which they live and the demand for emergency dental care. In conclusion, there was greater recourse to emergency municipal dental care by individuals living in vulnerable areas, proving the importance of such care in diminishing oral health inequality.

  11. Dental Education Required for the Changing Health Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita; González-Cabezas, Carlos; de Peralta, Tracy; Johnsen, David C

    2017-08-01

    To be able to meet the demands for care in 2040, dental graduates will need to address challenges resulting from the rapidly changing health care environment with knowledge and sets of skills to build on current standards and adapt to the future. The purposes of this article are to 1) analyze key challenges likely to evolve considerably between now and 2040 that will impact dental education and practice and 2) propose several sets of skills and educational outcomes necessary to address these challenges. The challenges discussed include changes in prevalence of oral diseases, dental practice patterns, materials and technologies, integrated medical-dental care, role of electronic health records, cultural competence, integrated curricula, interprofessional education, specialty-general balance, and web/cloud-based collaborations. To meet these challenges, the dental graduate will need skills such as core knowledge in basic and clinical dentistry, technical proficiency, critical thinking skills for lifelong learning, ethical and professional values, ability to manage a practice, social responsibility, and ability to function in a collegial intra- and interprofessional setting. Beyond the skills of the individual dentist will be the need for leadership in academia and the practice community. Academic and professional leaders will need to engage key constituencies to develop strategic directions and agendas with all parties pointed toward high standards for individual patients and the public at large. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  12. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  13. patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-04

    Apr 4, 2006 ... known with regard to equity, efficiency, geographical equality of access, patient ... (vi) Physical environment features of setting in which care is delivered: (e.g. .... This exercise, which will involve equipping the clinics with the ...

  14. Integrating child dental care at Community Smiles: the director's goals fulfilled....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaer, Paul J; Benjamin, Paul L; Lopez, Manuel G; Patterson, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Community Smiles/Dade County Dental Research Clinic provides dental care to the indigent population of Miami-Dade County. A local board of directors governs the organization, with dental procedures performed by volunteer professionals from the community. The research clinic partners with community organizations to obtain sustained funding from diverse sources. The clinic has a long-term commitment to the growth and development of children in the community. Certainly, changing the structure and focus of the clinic toward children's dental care and seeking community funding and resources to institute this program was an experiment. In his four years as clinic director and chief executive officer (CEO) at Community Smiles, the late Dr. Robert M. Wolf brought increased clinic productivity and organizational change that expanded community involvement. Dr. Wolf's tenure at Community Smiles brought general increases in patients care in terms of patients visits, new patients and number of procedures performed. However, the key to his administration as clinic director and CEO was the production and integration of a children's dentistry program into the mainstream activities of the clinic. Furthermore, he oversaw the successful corporate reorganization of Community Smiles as the clinic emerged under a non-profit corporate structure employing multi-faceted community resources. Emphasizing new dental programs for children in the community is culturally and socially competent--positively impacting the public health. Community Smiles became a venue where disparities were largely eliminated and access to dental treatment increased. Health care was promoted as Community Smiles became a place that helped build a healthier community.

  15. A first look: determinants of dental care for children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, M; Huebner, C E; Chi, D L; Hinderberger, H; Milgrom, P

    2013-01-01

    This hypothesis-generating study sought to identify potential determinants of dental care use and oral health among children living in foster care. Using a grounded theory approach, fourteen key informant interviews were conducted among health and social services professionals experienced with children in foster care and families in western Washington State. The identified potential determinants of oral health and dental use among children living in foster care included: (1) linguistic and cultural barriers; (2) lack of dentists willing to accept children's Medicaid dental insurance; (3) lack of resources available to case workers (i.e., large caseload burden) (4) lack of federal funding for specialized dental care; (5) lack of systematic health record-keeping; (6) child transience, leading to the lack of a dental home; (8) foster parents' competing needs; (7) child behavior problems; and (9) lack of dental "buy in" from adolescents. Additional studies are needed to determine whether children living in foster care achieve oral health, and the extent of their unmet dental need. ©2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis: a review and dental care considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, H S; Gaba, N; Gupta, A; Marya, C M

    2011-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is a chronic multisystem disease of presumed autoimmune etiology. Medical complications due to RA and its treatment may affect the provision of oral health care. Associated syndromes may contribute to a patient's susceptibility to infections and impaired hemostasis. Therefore oral health care providers need to recognize and identify modificationsof dental care based on the medical status of patients with RA. As with many other chronic conditions, early intervention can reduce the severity of the disease. Furthermore, oral health care providers play an important role in the overall care of these patients as it relates to early recognition, as well as control of the disease.

  17. Use of statistical procedures in Brazilian and international dental journals

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Pereira,Antônio Carlos

    2004-01-01

    A descriptive survey was performed in order to assess the statistical content and quality of Brazilian and international dental journals, and compare their evolution throughout the last decades. The authors identified the reporting and accuracy of statistical techniques in 1000 papers published from 1970 to 2000 in seven dental journals: three Brazilian (Brazilian Dental Journal, Revista de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo and Revista de Odontologia da UNESP) and four international jo...

  18. Dental procedures among children age birth to 20, United States, 1999 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J; Vargas, Clemencia M; Brown, Erwin; Carper, Kelly V; Macek, Mark D; Cohen, Leonard A

    2015-01-01

    To describe dental procedures received by US children and adolescents by poverty status and dental insurance coverage. Data for this analysis came from the 1999 and 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. The primary outcome variable represented the types of dental procedures that were received during dental visits in the preceding year. Descriptive variables included dental insurance and poverty status. Analysis was restricted to children from birth to 20 years. Overall, diagnostic (41.2 percent) and preventive (35.8 percent) procedures accounted for most of the procedures received by children from birth to 20 years of age, while restorative procedures accounted for just 5 percent. Children from low-income families received a higher proportion of restorative procedures than children in higher-income families. The proportion of diagnostic and preventive services was lower among uninsured children than among publicly insured children. Orthodontic services, on the other hand, represented a greater percentage of these procedures among uninsured children than among publicly insured children. The vast majority of procedures received by children from birth to 20 years were diagnostic and preventive. Most children with at least one dental visit received a diagnostic or preventive service. Between 1999 and 2009, the proportion of all services received accounted for by diagnostic or preventive services increased. However, the proportion in which each type of procedure was received by children who made at least one visit who received did not change. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. The Influence of Changes in Dental Care Coverage on Dental Care Utilization Among Retirees and Near-Retirees in the United States, 2004–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; St Clair, Patricia A.; Schimmel, Jody; Chen, Haiyan; Pepper, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined dental care utilization transition dynamics between 2004 and 2006 in the context of changing dental coverage status. Methods. We used data from the Health and Retirement Study for persons aged 51 years and older to estimate a multivariable model of dental care use transitions with controls for dental coverage and retirement transitions and other potentially confounding covariates. Results. We found that Americans aged 51 years and older who lost dental coverage between the 2004 and 2006 survey periods were more likely to stop dental care use between periods, and those who gained coverage were more likely to start dental care use between periods, than those without coverage in both periods. Conclusions. Dental coverage transitions and status have a strong effect on transitions in dental care use. Given that retirement is a time when many experience a loss of dental coverage, older adults may be at risk for sporadic dental care and even stopping use, leading to worse dental and potentially overall health. PMID:21852656

  20. Dental health of Spanish children: an investigation in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabián, J L; de Juanes, J R

    1990-03-01

    The oral hygiene of patients between seven and 14 years old from a health centre in Toledo was studied through case-finding from March to December 1987. A total of 304 interviews were held; bad dental care (frequency of teeth brushing with fluoride toothpaste less than once per day and/or daily consumption of chocolate and sweets) was found in 83%, and caries were diagnosed through inspection in 92% of the patients. Seventy three per cent reported washing their teeth only occasionally or never; 40% consumed sweets daily; 53% had never visited the dentist; and 50% had not received preventive care for dental disease. These results contrast with those from the United Kingdom and other developed countries, indicating a precarious state of dental health in Spain, a fact which should be taken into account by the Spanish health organization when comparing the health levels between different countries.

  1. Factor analysis on implementation of domiciliary dental care in Metropolitan Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, SoIchiro; Sakayori, Takaharu; Maki, Yoshinobu; Takano, Naohisa; Ishii, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    The need for domiciliary dental care has increased with the aging of Japanese society. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government and Tokyo Dental Association conducted a survey of dental institutions within Tokyo in order to clarify which factors influenced implementation of domiciliary dental care by dental institutions. The proportion was significantly higher in (1) dentists in their 50s or older, (2) those working in cooperation with primary care physicians, (3) those providing dysphagia rehabilitation, (4) those who give information on prevention of aspiration pneumonia, (5) those who attended training on medical or domiciliary dental care for the elderly in need of nursing care, and (6) those who attended training workshops and seminars provided by the Tokyo Dental Association in 2010. In the logistic regression analysis, a significant odds ratio was obtained for the same items, excluding age. Attendance at training on medical or domiciliary dental care for the elderly in need of nursing care had the highest odds ratio. Those who attended any kind of training course implemented domiciliary dental care significantly more often. Training conducted by the Tokyo Metropolitan Center for Oral Health of Persons with Disabilities, Tokyo Dental Association, and local dental associations showed a significant odds ratio, with the highest by the Tokyo Dental Association. Traditionally, education on domiciliary dental care in the elderly is not provided at the college level. The present results indicate the importance of educating students with regard to the unique challenges such work poses. Attending seminars hosted by the Tokyo Dental Association also significantly influenced implementation of domiciliary dental care. This seems to be an important result, suggesting the effectiveness of training provided by dental associations with regard to the promotion of domiciliary dental care. This indicates the need for dental associations to provide such training throughout Japan.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated prior to dental procedures for prevention of periprosthetic joint infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Willem M H; Walenkamp, Geert H I M; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Hendriks, Johannes G E; Goedendorp, Theo A; Rozema, Frederik R

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - To minimize the risk of hematogenous periprosthetic joint infection (HPJI), international and Dutch guidelines recommended antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental procedures. Unclear definitions and contradictory recommendations in these guidelines have led to unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions. To formulate new guidelines, a joint committee of the Dutch Orthopaedic and Dental Societies conducted a systematic literature review to answer the following question: can antibiotic prophylaxis be recommended for patients (with joint prostheses) undergoing dental procedures in order to prevent dental HPJI? Methods - The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), reviews, and observational studies up to July 2015. Studies were included if they involved patients with joint implants undergoing dental procedures, and either considered HPJI as an outcome measure or described a correlation between HPJI and prophylactic antibiotics. A guideline was formulated using the GRADE method and AGREE II guidelines. Results - 9 studies were included in this systematic review. All were rated "very low quality of evidence". Additional literature was therefore consulted to address clinical questions that provide further insight into pathophysiology and risk factors. The 9 studies did not provide evidence that use of antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the incidence of dental HPJI, and the additional literature supported the conclusion that antibiotic prophylaxis should be discouraged in dental procedures. Interpretation - Prophylactic antibiotics in order to prevent dental HPJI should not be prescribed to patients with a normal or an impaired immune system function. Patients are recommended to maintain good oral hygiene and visit the dentist regularly.

  3. Representation of dental care and oral health in children's drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, D D; Goettems, M L; Cademartori, M G; Fernandez, R R; Bussoletti, D M

    2014-06-01

    Paediatric dentistry requires knowledge of preventive measures, restorative skills and an understanding of child development. This exploratory, descriptive and qualitative study has analysed children's drawings regarding their perception of dental treatment and oral health. Children aged from six to ten years attending a dental school for treatment were randomly invited to create a drawing about 'dental treatment' and 'oral health'. Verbal expressions made by the children whilst drawing were also recorded and attached to the drawings. These representations were analysed and categorised using Vygotsky postulations for context reading. During the drawing analysis different themes emerged. Five categories regarding perceptions of dental treatment were identified: personal relationship; power relation; trauma; childhood resistance; and contextualisation of dental care in the child's life. Three categories relating to oral health were determined: dichotomy of health/sickness; ludic representation of health; and sickness seen as a process. Drawing can be used to understand children's emotions and expectations about dental treatment. Besides possessing technical skills and scientific knowledge, dentists have an obligation to pay attention to children's feelings.

  4. Measuring quality of dental care: Caries prevention services for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Jill Boylston; Tomar, Scott L; Catalanotto, Frank A; Rudner, Nancy; Huang, I-Chan; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Shenkman, Elizabeth A; Crall, James J

    2015-08-01

    The authors conducted a study to validate the following 3 evidence-based, process-of-care quality measures focused on dental caries prevention for children with an elevated risk of experiencing caries: sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds, sealants for 10- to 14-year-olds, and topical fluoride. Using evidence-based guidelines, the Dental Quality Alliance developed measures for implementation with administrative data at the plan and program levels. To validate the measures, the authors used data from the Florida and Texas Medicaid programs and Children's Health Insurance Programs and from national commercial dental benefit plans. Data were extracted from 414 randomly selected dental office records to validate the use of administrative data to accurately calculate the measures. The authors also assessed statistically significant variations in overall measure performance. Agreement between administrative data and dental records was 95% for sealants (κ = 0.82) and 90% for topical fluoride (κ = 0.78). Sensitivity and specificity were 90.7% and 88.5% for topical fluoride and 77.8% and 98.8% for sealants, respectively. Variation in overall measure performance was greatest for topical fluoride (χ(2) = 5,887.1; P caries received at least 2 topical fluoride applications during the reporting year. Although there was greater variation in performance for sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds (range, 21.0-31.3%; χ(2) = 548.6; P caries prevention process-of-care quality measures can be implemented feasibly and validly using administrative claims data. The measures can be used to assess, monitor, and improve the proportion of children with an elevated risk of experiencing dental caries who receive evidence-based caries prevention services. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early Childhood Special Education. Dental and Oral Hygiene Procedures for Young Children with Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, R. S.; Luder, Linda C.

    1995-01-01

    Notes that children with special needs often require specific considerations with regard to dental care. Discusses some of the physical disabilities and how they interfere with dental hygiene, and how child caregivers can modify daily routines and assist disabled children with areas of hygiene the children may find difficult. (HTH)

  6. Use of statistical procedures in Brazilian and international dental journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Pereira, Antônio Carlos

    2004-01-01

    A descriptive survey was performed in order to assess the statistical content and quality of Brazilian and international dental journals, and compare their evolution throughout the last decades. The authors identified the reporting and accuracy of statistical techniques in 1000 papers published from 1970 to 2000 in seven dental journals: three Brazilian (Brazilian Dental Journal, Revista de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo and Revista de Odontologia da UNESP) and four international journals (Journal of the American Dental Association, Journal of Dental Research, Caries Research and Journal of Periodontology). Papers were divided into two time periods: from 1970 to 1989, and from 1990 to 2000. A slight increase in the number of articles that presented some form of statistical technique was noticed for Brazilian journals (from 61.0 to 66.7%), whereas for international journals, a significant increase was observed (65.8 to 92.6%). In addition, a decrease in the number of statistical errors was verified. The most commonly used statistical tests as well as the most frequent errors found in dental journals were assessed. Hopefully, this investigation will encourage dental educators to better plan the teaching of biostatistics, and to improve the statistical quality of submitted manuscripts.

  7. Dental care provided to sickle cell anemia patients stratified by age: A population-based study in Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cyrene Piazera Silva; Aires, Bárbara Tamires Cruz; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Souza, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess differences in the dental care provided to sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients depending on age. This retrospective study used secondary data from the dental records of the Center of Hematology and Hemotherapy in Maranhão (HEMOMAR). Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 574 dental records of patients with SCA treated or under treatment in the Dental Department of HEMOMAR from 2000 to 2011. Data on the gender, age, duration of dental treatment, number of patients submitted to periodontal treatment (PT), number of filled teeth (FT), teeth extracted (EX), endodontically treated teeth (ET), and reason for the dental procedures were collected. The Kruskal–Wallis test together with Dunn's post hoc test, Chi-square test, and Spearman's correlation was used for statistical analysis. An alpha error of 5% was considered acceptable. Results: Significant differences were found for FT, EX (P dental caries (100%) and irreversible pulpitis (55.6%), respectively. The main reasons for teeth extractions were residual roots (21.3%), chronic apical periodontitis (19.7%), and crown destruction (19.3%). There were positive correlations between age and EX (r = 0.93; P = 0.025) and ET (r = 0.92; P = 0.028). Conclusions: FT, ET, EX, and PT procedures become more common in older patients. Tooth decay is the main reason for dental treatment in SCA patients. PMID:27403053

  8. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Rančić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was adopted. Sample size was 752 complete episodes of treatment in 250 patients, selected in 2012/2013 throughout several specialist state- and private-owned dental clinics in Serbia. All direct costs of dental care were taken into account and expressed in Euros (€.Results: Mean total costs of dental care were € 46 ± 156 per single dentist visit while total costs incurred by this population sample were € 34,424. Highest unit utilization of services belongs to conservative dentistry (31.9%, oral surgery (19.5% and radiology (17.4%, while the resource with the highest monetary value belongs to implantology € 828 ± 392, orthodontics € 706 ± 667 and prosthetics € 555 ± 244. The most frequently treated diagnosis was tooth decay (33.8% unit services provided, pulpitis (11.2% and impacted teeth (8.5%, while most expensive to treat were anomalies of tooth position (€ 648 ± 667, abnormalities of size and form of teeth (€ 508 ± 705 and loss of teeth due to accident, extraction or local periodontal disease (€ 336 ± 339.Conclusion: Although the range of dental costs currently falls behind EU average, Serbia’s emerging economy is likely to expand in the long run while market demand for dental services will grow. Due to threatened financial sustainability of current health insurance patterns in Western Balkans, getting acquainted with true size and structure of dental care costs could essentially support informed decision making in future

  9. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Practitioners in Ta-briz Regarding Infection Control Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdipour, Masoomeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Gholizadeh, Narges

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV might be transmitted from one individual to another during dental procedures. Therefore, sterilization and personal protection procedures are of utmost significance in dental offices. The importance of awareness of cross-infection and antiseptic principles lies in the fact that in most cases it is not possible to identify patients with hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate awareness o...

  10. Massive Cervicothoracic Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Developing during a Dental Hygiene Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchialini, Gabriele; Ambrosi, Serena; Castellani, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema is rare during or after dental procedures (usually extractions). Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who developed massive cervicothoracic subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum during a dental hygiene procedure employing an artificial airflow. She was diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and computed tomography (CT). CT revealed massive subcutaneous emphysema extending from the superior left eyelid to the diaphragm. We describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of this rare case.

  11. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Complete Denture Procedures in Second Year of Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary M; Halket, Christine A; Ferguson, Gilda P; Perry, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Second-year dental students are commonly instructed on the process of complete denture fabrication with a traditional didactic lecture and preclinical dental laboratory education model. The problem with this limited mode of instruction is that dental students often fail to understand the various chairside procedures required to fabricate a complete denture. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of standardized dental patients to enhance students' understanding of the procedures involved with each appointment in the complete denture process. The Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona created an event using standardized patients in four simulated chairside dental appointments for complete denture instruction of second-year dental students. Each appointment simulated the various sequential chairside procedures required to fabricate complete dentures. Following the didactic and dental laboratory instruction and the standardized patient event, a survey was conducted requesting the students' response to six statements regarding their understanding of the denture fabrication process. Of the 110 students who participated in the instructional events, 107 responded to the survey (97% response rate). These students responded very favorably to the simulated appointments, with the majority agreeing or strongly agreeing that their best understanding of the complete denture process was obtained through the standardized patient experiences. The use of standardized patients in simulated denture fabrication appointments enhanced the educational experience of these students when added to the traditional didactic lecture and preclinical laboratory education format. The experience has since been incorporated into the school's second-year oral health science laboratory curriculum.

  12. Intensive care unit audit: invasive procedure surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariama Amaral Michels

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and objective: currently, Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs constitute a serious public health problem. It is estimated that for every ten hospitalized patients, one will have infection after admission, generating high costs resulting from increased length of hospitalization, additional diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The intensive care unit (ICU, due to its characteristics, is one of the most complex units of the hospital environment, a result of the equipment, the available technology, the severity of inpatients and the invasive procedures the latter are submitted to. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adherence to specifi c HAI prevention measures in invasive ICU procedures. Methods: This study had a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory approach. Among the risk factors for HAIs are the presence of central venous access, indwelling vesical catheter and mechanical ventilation, and, therefore, the indicators were calculated for patients undergoing these invasive procedures, through a questionnaire standardized by the Hospital Infection Control Commission (HICC. Results: For every 1,000 patients, 15 had catheter-related bloodstream infection, 6.85 had urinary tract infection associated with indwelling catheter in the fi rst half of 2010. Conclusion: most HAIs cannot be prevented, for reasons inherent to invasive procedures and the patients. However, their incidence can be reduced and controlled. The implementation of preventive measures based on scientifi c evidence can reduce HAIs signifi cantly and sustainably, resulting in safer health care services and reduced costs. The main means of prevention include the cleaning of hands, use of epidemiological block measures, when necessary, and specifi c care for each infection site. KEYWORDS Nosocomial infection. Intensive care units.

  13. Ethical Considerations In Dental Care For People With Developmental Disabilities

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    Biris Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental disabilities exist in children and adolescents, enabling them to live an independent and self-governing life, requiring special health related services. We are intended to inform dental professionals in planning and implementing a dental treatment for people with developmental disabilities. Cerebral palsy is defined as being a group of motor abnormalities and functional impairments that affect muscle coordination, and characterized by uncontrolled body movements, intellectual disabilities, balance-related abnormalities or seizure disorders. These patients can be successfully treated in normal dental practices, but because they have problems with movements, care must be tailored accordingly. Down syndrome, a very common genetic disorder, is usually associated with different physical and medical problems, intellectual disabilities, and a developmental delay. These patients can be treated with success in dental offices, this way making a difference in the medical care for people with special needs. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, verbal and non-verbal communication and by restricted and repetitive behavior. Self-injurious behavior, obsessive routines and unpredictable body movements can influence dental care. Because of the coexisting conditions (epilepsy or intellectual disability, one can find this people among the most challenging to treat. There is a need of greater awareness, focus and education in the field of the unique and complex oral health care that people with disabilities need. Making a difference their oral health positively influences an already challenged existence. According to the ethical principles, patients with developmental disabilities should be treated equitably depending on their necessities.

  14. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  15. Access to dental care-parents' and caregivers' views on dental treatment services for people with disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prabhu, Neeta T

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study was to elicit the views of patients or parents\\/caregivers of patients with disabilities regarding access to dental care. A questionnaire was generated both from interviews with patients\\/parents\\/caregivers already treated under sedation or general anesthesia as well as by use of the Delphi technique with other stakeholders. One hundred thirteen patients from across six community dental clinics and one dental hospital were included. Approximately, 38% of the subjects used a general dental practitioner and 35% used the community dental service for their dental care, with only 27% using the hospital dental services. Overall waiting time for an appointment at the secondary care setting was longer than for the primary care clinics. There was a high rate of parent\\/caregiver satisfaction with dental services and only five patients reported any difficulty with travel and access to clinics. This study highlights the need for a greater investment in education and training to improve skills in the primary dental care sector.

  16. Access to dental care-parents' and caregivers' views on dental treatment services for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Neeta T; Nunn, June H; Evans, D J; Girdler, N M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elicit the views of patients or parents/caregivers of patients with disabilities regarding access to dental care. A questionnaire was generated both from interviews with patients/parents/caregivers already treated under sedation or general anesthesia as well as by use of the Delphi technique with other stakeholders. One hundred thirteen patients from across six community dental clinics and one dental hospital were included. Approximately, 38% of the subjects used a general dental practitioner and 35% used the community dental service for their dental care, with only 27% using the hospital dental services. Overall waiting time for an appointment at the secondary care setting was longer than for the primary care clinics. There was a high rate of parent/caregiver satisfaction with dental services and only five patients reported any difficulty with travel and access to clinics. This study highlights the need for a greater investment in education and training to improve skills in the primary dental care sector.

  17. Peran komunikasi interpersonal dalam pelayanan kesehatan gigi (The role of interpersonal communication integrated with medical dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanindio Soelarso

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is a literature study, concerning the interpersonal communication role in conjunction with technical dental and oral health care conducted by the dentists towards the patient individually. In addition, interpersonal communication means to be synergic communication among dentist and the patient. In relation with the verbal or non verbal dental care process, the effectiveness of interpersonal communication is identified through the perception of the messages and it’s translated by recipient perception, and it will be the same meaning as the messager’s perception. In this case, the dentist and the patient will be capable to send or accept mutual messages as messanger and message recipient. In conclusion, in the dental and oral medical care on the procedure point of view, the similar perception determines very much the successfulness of the wholedental and oral health care process toward diagnosis, determination therapy plan, treatment and post treatment process.

  18. Epilepsy in the dental office: concern, care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Jerome S

    2008-04-01

    Epilepsy, also known as seizure disorder, encompasses several different modes of presentation. Patients of all ages, from early childhood to the elderly, who present for dental care may be taking anticonvulsants or may have an unanticipated seizure in the dental office. Dentists should be familiar with the varied manifestations of seizures, the medications used in their treatment and management of a seizure in the dental office. It is estimated that 1% of the population of the United States are afflicted with epilepsy. There is indication that the elderly are becoming included in that number because of their affliction with cardiovascular disorders. The word "epilepsy" raises anxiety in many people because they fear that such an event is life threatening. However, the term epilepsy applies primarily to prolonged or repetitive seizures requiring intervention by trained individuals.

  19. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  20. Washington state foster care: dental utilization and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Molly L R; Chi, Donald L; Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E; Grembowski, David

    2014-01-01

    To identify factors associated with dental utilization and expenditures for children enrolled in Washington State (WA) foster care (FC). This cross-sectional study used 2008 Medicaid enrollment and claims files for children ages Foster Home Care, Kinship Care, Group Care, Other), and urbanicity. Only 43 percent of the children utilized any dental care; the adjusted mean expenditure was $198.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) $181.35, $215.36]. Fewer utilized diagnostic (41 percent), preventive (39 percent), restorative (11 percent), or complex (5 percent) services. Associated with utilization (P ≤ 0.01) were: female [ARR = 1.05, 95% CI(1.01, 1.10)]; 0-2 years [ARR = 0.18, 95% CI(0.15, 0.21)], [3-5 years ARR = 0.78, 95% CI(0.74, 0.83)]; Native American [ARR = 0.85, 95% CI(0.80, 0.91)]; SSI [ARR = 1.10, 95% CI(1.04, 1.17)]; Kinship Care [ARR = 0.94, 95% CI(0.90, 0.98)]; Group Care [ARR = 1.25 95% CI(1.15, 1.37)]; and urban/rural urbanicity with population Care [$28.57 95% CI($14.00, $43.15)]. Most children enrolled in WA FC for ≥11 months during 2008 did not receive dental care. Research is needed to determine the level of unmet need among children in FC and interventions to improve access to oral health of the children. Enforcement of existing federal legislation is needed. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  1. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Alice; Munz, Stephanie M.; Dabiri, Darya

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients. PMID:27847654

  2. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Y. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients.

  3. Dental care and treatments provided under general anaesthesia in the Helsinki Public Dental Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savanheimo Nora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental general anaesthesia (DGA is a very efficient treatment modality, but is considered only in the last resort because of the risks posed by general anaesthesia to patients’ overall health. Health services and their treatment policies regarding DGA vary from country to country. The aims of this work were to determine the reasons for DGA in the Helsinki Public Dental Service (PDS and to assess the role of patient characteristics in the variation in reasons and in the treatments given with special focus on preventive care. Methods The data covered all DGA patients treated in the PDS in Helsinki in 2010. The data were collected from patient documents and included personal background: age ( Results The DGA patients (n=349 were aged 2.3 to 67.2 years. Immigrants predominated in the youngest age group (p Conclusions Extreme non-cooperation, dental fear and an excessive need for treatment were the main reasons for the use of comprehensive, conservative DGA in the Helsinki PDS. The reasons for the use of DGA and the treatments provided varied according to personal and medical background, and immigration status with no gender-differences. Preventive measures formed only a minor part of the dental care given under DGA.

  4. DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN AFTER REPLANTATION OF AVULSED PERMANENT INCISORS

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    Rossitza Kabaktchieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis avulsion of permanent tooth/teeth is an emergency situation which has special requirements in respect of proper storage of the avulsed tooth, the need of urgent medical/dental care, time past till replantation and splinting, the need for endodontic treatment and long term follow up period. Those clinical actions depend on three groups: parents/people who are with the child in the moment when trauma happens and give the first aid; dental specialist- surgeon who replants the tooth/teeth; dental specialist- endodontist who takes care of the endodontic treatment and the long period after treatment for follow up and observation of the replanted teeth. The aim of the paper is to present the dental postoperative care in a couple of cases of children with trauma and replanted avulsed permanent incisors. Material and methods: We present four clinical cases of children who get 6 permanent upper incisors replanted. Replantation is made by the oral surgeon. Treatment and observation after replantation are made by dental specialists of pediatric dentistry and conservative dentistry. All 4 cases get 3 years follow up period. Results: After replantation of 2 central incisors with complete root development (first clinical case the left one has developed a resorption of the root but the right one is in a stable condition. Replantation of 3 teeth with incomplete root development (second and third clinical cases where the patients refer to specialized surgical care less than 60 minutes after injury and store the teeth in different ways lead to different clinical results. In the case of avulsed upper right incisor (second case, it is stored in milk and we observe revascularization followed by partial root canal obliteration. The tooth is scheduled for endodontic treatment. In the case of upper central incisors, both kept dry till replantation in the alveolus filled up with substitute bone, we observe fast root resorption which going to lead to early

  5. Training pediatric health care providers in prevention of dental decay: results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeldin Leslie P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians report willingness to provide preventive dental care, but optimal methods for their training and support in such procedures are not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of three forms of continuing medical education (CME on provision of preventive dental services to Medicaid-enrolled children by medical personnel in primary care physician offices. Methods Practice-based, randomized controlled trial. Setting: 1,400 pediatric and family physician practices in North Carolina providing care to an estimated 240,000 Medicaid-eligible children aged 0–3 years. Interventions: Group A practices (n = 39 received didactic training and course materials in oral health screening, referral, counseling and application of fluoride varnish. Group B practices (n = 41 received the same as Group A and were offered weekly conference calls providing advice and support. Group C practices (n = 41 received the same as Group B and were offered in-office visit providing hands-on advice and support. In all groups, physicians were reimbursed $38–$43 per preventive dental visit. Outcome measures were computed from reimbursement claims submitted to NC Division of Medical Assistance. Primary outcome measure: rate of preventive dental services provision per 100 well-child visits. Secondary outcome measure: % of practices providing 20 or more preventive dental visits. Results 121 practices were randomized, and 107 provided data for analysis. Only one half of Group B and C practices took part in conference calls or in-office visits. Using intention-to-treat analysis, rates of preventive dental visits did not differ significantly among CME groups: GroupA = 9.4, GroupB = 12.9 and GroupC = 8.5 (P = 0.32. Twenty or more preventive dental visits were provided by 38–49% of practices in the three study groups (P = 0.64. Conclusion A relatively high proportion of medical practices appear capable of adopting these preventive dental services

  6. 77 FR 38838 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ..., Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 1... National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, dental, or mental health...

  7. A student's perspective on the ethics of international charity dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Malorie

    2014-01-01

    A senior dental student describes the deep sense of personal satisfaction from participating in a weeklong charity dental care trips to the Dominican Republic. Care, primarily consisting of extractions, was provided to individuals living in conditions that encourage dental disease at the same time the availability of oral healthcare services are essentially nonexistent.

  8. Cruise medicine: the dental perspective on health care for passengers during a world cruise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Bernhard A J; John, Mike T; Nitschke, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Although more than 100 million passengers have taken a cruise since 1980, it is not known what dental treatment needs occur at sea. The routine dental documentation of a 2-month period at sea on a cruise ship carrying 1,619 passengers was analyzed. The subjects for the study were 57 passengers (3.5% of 1,619), with a mean age of 71 years (+/-9.8 y). Age, gender, number of natural teeth and implants, prosthetic status, diagnosis, treatment performed, percentage of emergency and routine procedures, number of appointments, duration of appointment, time since last visit to the dentist, and cabin category as indicator of socioeconomic status were extracted. Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was measured using the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile. Passengers had a mean number of 20 natural teeth plus substantial fixed and removable prosthodontics. Emergency dental treatment accounted for 97% of the chairside time. The three most frequent emergency diagnoses were defective restorations (36%), pulpal disease (20%), and defective prosthesis and caries (both 11.5%). Common emergency therapies provided were complex surgical-prosthodontic rehabilitation, various endodontic treatments, and extractions. Per 1,000 persons/month, passengers required 21.6 emergency plus 2.5 routine appointments; 49% of passengers had seen a dentist within 3 months before going to sea. Passengers do attend their dentist for routine care/checkups before the voyage, yet experience complex dental emergencies. This is due to the presence of a high number of restorations that fail unexpectedly. Some failures are so severe that they would have forced the passenger to abort the cruise had there been no dental service available. The ease of access to quality dental care may explain the relatively low level of perceived problems as characterized by OHRQoL scores.

  9. Qualitative description of dental hygiene practices within oral health and dental care perspectives of Mexican-American adults and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; Aguirre-Zero, Odette; Westerhold, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify dental hygiene themes voiced by adults and teenagers of Mexican origin [or Mexican Americans (MAs)] and place these themes within the larger landscape of oral health and dental care perceptions. Interviews with urban-based MAs were analyzed to identify barriers, beliefs, and behaviors influencing engagement in dental hygiene practices. Adult (n = 16, ages 33-52) and teenage (n = 17, ages 14-19) MAs reported themes pertaining to structural factors (financial and economic-related barriers, the dual challenges of reduced access to care vis-à-vis successfully navigating the dental care system, and the effects of reduced social support derived from migration) and to individual factors (different agendas between MAs and health systems for dental care utilization and indications for oral self-care, including limited dental hygiene instruction from professionals and larger impacts from school-based and mass media). Also, prior experiences with dental hygiene, prevention, and associated themes were characterized by a range of attitudes from fatalistic to highly determined agency. Good family upbringing was instrumental for appropriate dental hygiene, anteceding good oral health; and outlining a loose structure of factors affecting oral health such as diet, having "weak" teeth, or personal habits. Themes from adults and teenagers in the Midwest United States were generally similar to other groups of MA parents and younger children. Dental hygiene was not salient relative to other oral health and dental care matters. Several opportunities for improvement of knowledge and enhancing motivation for dental hygiene practices were identified, both within and outside professional resources. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Vigild, Merete; Nitschke, Ina

    2005-01-01

    care to these patients. One reason may be that the fee for treating these patients is too low, considering high dental office expenses. Another reason may be problems related to management of medically compromised patients. This raises an important question: does inadequate training in geriatric...... dentistry discourage dentists from seeking opportunities to treat geriatric patients? Overall, the availability of dental services, the organization of the dental health care delivery system, and price subsidy for dental treatment are important factors influencing access to dental care among older people......This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In addition...

  11. An overview of the distribution of dental care facilities in Mangalore taluk, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Prashanth Shenoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Equitable distribution of health care facilities is a guiding principle of Primary Heath Care. Although Mangalore taluk is a reputed center for medical education and health care, location of these facilities has not been evaluated to date. Therefore, a systematic survey was conducted to evaluate distribution of dental care facilities in Mangalore taluk, India. Material and Methods: List of Primary Health Centers, Community Health Centers and government hospitals, and details of the dental personnel and dental care facilities available at these centers was obtained from the District Health Officer (DHO. Data on registered private dental practitioners was obtained from the DHO and the Indian Dental Association. Information was obtained from dental colleges in the taluk regarding outreach activities and collaborations with the public sector. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Dentists are posted only at the CHCs and the District Hospital where they provide only basic dental services due to a lack of infrastructure. Of the 189 private dental clinics, 91% are located in urban areas of the taluk. They provide all modalities of dental care but are inaccessible to a majority of the rural population. Dental schools provide dental services to people in their vicinity, conduct outreach camps and have adopted four PHCs. Conclusion: An uneven distribution of dental care facilities exists with an overwhelming majority concentrated in the urban areas of the taluk. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 163-166

  12. DENTAL CARE AND CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL HEALTH CARE NEEDS: A POPULATION-BASED PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Charlotte W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper grew out of a project reviewing progress in children's oral health since the Surgeon General's Report (SGR) on Oral Health. It includes a summary of advances in national surveillance of children with special health care needs (CSHCN), and presents more recent data on unmet dental care need among CSHCN. To that end, we used the 2006-National Survey of CSHCN to determine the prevalence of unmet dental care need among CSHCN and to compare this within subgroups of CSHCN, as well as to ...

  13. Dental Care Presents The Highest Level Of Financial Barriers, Compared To Other Types Of Health Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujicic, Marko; Buchmueller, Thomas; Klein, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act is improving access to and the affordability of a wide range of health care services. While dental care for children is part of the law's essential health benefits and state Medicaid programs must cover it, coverage of dental care for adults is not guaranteed. As a result, even with the recent health insurance expansion, many Americans face financial barriers to receiving dental care that lead to unmet oral health needs. Using data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey, we analyzed financial barriers to a wide range of health care services. We found that irrespective of age, income level, and type of insurance, more people reported financial barriers to receiving dental care, compared to any other type of health care. We discuss policy options to address financial barriers to dental care, particularly for adults.

  14. A land untouched by dentistry - singapore brings dental care to afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng Hui; Chew, Bertrand; Wee, Wee Chee; Tan, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Singapore Armed Forces deployed a Dental Project Team (DPT) to the capital city of the Bamiyan Province in Afghanistan. The team set up the province's first modern dental facility. Besides providing primary dental care to the 60,000 population there, the Singaporeans also trained and prepared a team of Afghan dentist and dental assistants. The Afghan dental team took over the dental clinic and continued to provide care when it was time for the DPT to depart for home. Braving challenging security and austere living conditions, the DPT completed its mission successfully.

  15. Comparison of acceptance, preference and efficacy between pressure anesthesia and classical needle infiltration anesthesia for dental restorative procedures in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetana Sachin Makade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraoral local anesthesia is essential for delivering dental care. Needless devices have been developed to provide anesthesia without injections. Little controlled research is available on its use in dental restorative procedures in adult patients. The aims of this study were to compare adult patients acceptability and preference for needleless jet injection with classical local infiltration as well as to evaluate the efficacy of the needleless anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Twenty non fearful adults with no previous experience of dental anesthesia were studied using split-mouth design. The first procedure was performed with classical needle infiltration anesthesia. The same amount of anesthetic solution was administered using MADA jet needleless device in a second session one week later, during which a second dental restorative procedure was performed. Patients acceptance was assessed using Universal pain assessment tool while effectiveness was recorded using soft tissue anesthesia and pulpal anesthesia. Patients reported their preference for the anesthetic method at the third visit. The data was evaluated using chi square test and student′s t-test. Results: Pressure anesthesia was more accepted and preferred by 70% of the patients than traditional needle anesthesia (20%. Both needle and pressure anesthesia was equally effective for carrying out the dental procedures. Conclusion: Patients experienced significantly less pain and fear (p<0.01 during anesthetic procedure with pressure anesthesia. However, for more invasive procedures needle anesthesia will be more effective.

  16. A political economic theory of the dental care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, J; Douglass, C W

    1982-01-01

    A theory of the dental care market is introduced which proposes that the vertically integrated (local/state/national) structure of the profession services as an organizational vehicle both for intra-professional debate and for developing provider-oriented dental care policy. We suggest that a special relationship exists between professionalism and professional regulation. Such regulation has functioned simultaneously to limit competition and to foster a prized consumption commodity for providers: professionalism and professional esteem. The organized pursuit of this commodity inherently dampens competition. Professionalism itself plays a crucial role in: 1) securing for organized dentistry a form of state regulation in which the providers themselves are the principal decision-makers; and 2) influencing provider and consumer market behavior in several significant respects, the net result being the formation of maintenance of a type of "leadership cartel" in the local market. Thus, a political-economic theory of the dental care market formally acknowledges professionalism as valued by established dentists and recent graduates as a central determining influence. Traditional models of pure competition and monopoly emerge as special, extreme cases of the general theory. Hypotheses are offered regarding consumer and provider behavior, market dynamics, and health policy and regulation. PMID:7091455

  17. Patterns of dental services and factors that influence dental services among 64-65 year-old regular users of dental care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Rosing, Kasper; Merete Lempert, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the pattern of dental services provided to 64-65-year-old Danes who are regular users of dental care over a 5-year period, to analyse whether this pattern is associated with socio-demographic and/or socioeconomic factors, and if different uses of dental services are related......-sectional study of all aged 64-65 (n = 37 234) who received a dental examination in 2009 was conducted. Clinical data comprised dental services received under the National Health Insurance reimbursement scheme, dental status and DMFT. Geographical, socio-demographic and socioeconomic data derived from public...... and social area-based factors and to some degree gender, income, and education must be taken into consideration as all these factors seem to influence the future demand for dental services....

  18. [Dental care and oral hygiene practices in long-term geriatric care institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Schwambach, Carolina Wolff; de Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the activities of dentists, dental care and oral hygiene practices in the long-term care institutions of Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil). A semi-structured questionnaire was handed out to the coordinators of 37 philanthropic and 30 private institutions. The data was compared by the chi-square and Fisher's Exact Tests. 81% of the questionnaires were answered. The majority of the private (74.2%) and philanthropic institutions (87%) do not have a dentist (p=0.21). The location, period of existence, type institution kind and number of residents weren't factors regarding the presence of a dentist (p>0.05). 67% of the philanthropic institutions with equipped consultation rooms had dentists, though there were none when there was no consultation room. Even without consultation rooms, 13% of the private institutions had dentists. When necessary, 69.6% of the philanthropic institutions refer the elderly to public health centers, while 58.1% of the private institutions refer them to their family dentists. A higher percentage of the private institutions adopted systematic oral hygiene procedures (p=0.01), with a considerable divergence of treatment reported. There is a need to include a dentist on the health staff in the institutions and for systematization of oral hygiene practices.

  19. [The dispute and prospect of sedation and analgesia treatments in outpatient dental procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The topic of eliminating the fear or pain of patients during dental therapy is gaining increasing attention from dentists across the country. The field of painless dental therapeutics involves a wide range of subjects, including stomatology, anesthesiology, and hospital management. We summarized the characteristics of sedation and analgesia technology in outpatient oral therapy, reviewed the common sedative and analgesic treatments, and discussed the disputes on the use of sedation and analgesia in dental procedures. We also reviewed the trends and breakthroughs in this area on the basis of our own clinica experiences.

  20. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi M; Patro MN; Kusumvalli S; Kusumdevi V

    2016-01-01

    Malviya Nidhi,1 M Nagaraju Patro,1 Somisetty Kusumvalli,2 Vemula Kusumdevi1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Al-Ameen College of Pharmacy, 2Department of Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry, Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India Abstract: Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and s...

  1. 42 CFR 418.302 - Payment procedures for hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment procedures for hospice care. 418.302... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Payment for Hospice Care § 418.302 Payment procedures for hospice care. (a) CMS establishes payment amounts for specific categories of covered hospice...

  2. Factors related to the performance of Specialized Dental Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Christiane de Azevedo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC have the mission to expand access to public medium complexity dental care and support the primary health care actions at this level of complexity. However, it is necessary to ensure the quality of services and to evaluate such services continuously to identify weaknesses and strengths that support the processes of leadership/management. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of studies on the assessment of oral health in specialized care that may indicate which factors should be investigated. Therefore, this integrated literature review sought to explore the plethora of publications on the evaluation of SDCC in the LILACS and MEDLINE data bases in October 2013 to identify factors possibly related to the performance of such health services. Thus, 13 references were included in this review pointing to forms of organization and management of work processes related to the creation of healthcare networks (operation of regulation centers and setting up of health consortiums. They include the contextual characteristics of the places where SDCCs are located (population size, Family Health Strategy coverage, Municipal Human Development Index, governance, governing capacity were factors that influenced the SDCCs performance.

  3. Stress management for dental students performing their first pediatric restorative procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza-Waggoner, Carrie A; Cohen, Lindsey L; Kohli, Kavita; Taylor, Brandie K

    2003-05-01

    Research has demonstrated that dental students experience considerable stress during their training. Students' anxiety is likely to be especially high when they perform their first pediatric restorative procedure. The aims of this study were to provide a description of dental students' level of anxiety and typical coping strategies and to evaluate the use of a distress management intervention for reducing anxiety around their first pediatric restorative procedure. Dental students were randomly assigned to either an Anxiety Management or an Attention Control group. The management group received training on relaxation strategies (i.e., deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation). The control group attended a lecture on the relation among stress, anxiety, and health. No significant differences were found between group levels of anxiety related to their first pediatric restorative procedure. Information is provided on students' reported level of anxiety and general coping strategies. Limitations of the current study and suggestions for future research are provided.

  4. Ethics as an important determinant of success of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzseid, E E

    1989-01-01

    Ethical aspects of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients--the most complex and the least studied aspects of dentistry--are discussed here. Many articles on dental ethics, as a rule, do not cover the essential ethical aspects of orthopaedic care for the elderly or cover them only partially without reflecting on the problem at large. Understanding of the problem may help to provide more efficient dental care for the elderly population thus improving their quality of life.

  5. Performance indicators used to assess the quality of primary dental care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, G.Z.; Klazinga, N.; Asbroek, G. ten; Delnoij, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    An appropriate quality of medical care including dental care should be an objective of every government that aims to improve the oral health of its population. OBJECTIVES: To determine performance indicators that could be used to assess the quality of primary dental care at different levels of a hea

  6. Access to dental care in two long-term refugee camps in western Tanzania; programme development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucka, Toni M

    2011-04-01

      To analyse the demographics surrounding and the sustainability of a course in Emergency Dental Care and Health Promotion developed and taught by a team of dentists from the United States to refugee camp health-care workers in two long-term refugee camps in Western Tanzania.   Refugee camp dental patient log books from Mtabila and Nyarugusu camps Kigoma, Tanzania were analysed and demographic data collected on each patient visit from the programme inception in November 2007 until August 2009. Data collection included information relevant to 1961 patient visits. Data were entered into SPSS Statistics 17.0 using the Freq application.   Patient visit data included demographics involving both the resident camp populations and the surrounding communities. The distribution of patients treated by nationality was: 58% Burundian (Mtabila), 14% Congolese (Nyarugusu), and 28% Tanzanian citizens residing near both camps. Extractions accounted for 95.5% of procedures performed. Recorded incidences of post-operative complications were 1> % of patient visits. Patient visits were steady over time and a referral system was implemented for complex cases. Health promotion sessions were held in both camps.   This dental programme has been self-sustaining and is providing some access to care where none existed previously. Programmes such as this may be one solution to the access to dental care problem in long-term refugee camps. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  7. Oral health status of children with special health care needs receiving dental treatment under general anesthesia at the dental clinic of Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Chen

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Unmet dental needs and caries experience indices remain high in CSHCN, regardless of the types and severity of disability. However, the younger the age at which CSHCN received their first dental treatment, the more effective the dental rehabilitation was. Parental education regarding early dental intervention and a preventive approach for enhanced oral care is mandatory.

  8. 78 FR 38718 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ..., Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of May 11, 2013, available on the Health Resources... assignment of National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, ] dental, or...

  9. Stimulating the demand for dental care: An application of Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstraten, J.; de Haan, W.; ter Horst, G.

    1985-01-01

    Applied I. Ajzen and M. Fishbein's (1980) attitude-behavior model to the problem of stimulating the demand for dental care with 329 members (aged 21-50 yrs) of health insurance companies who had not received regular dental treatment and/or certificate of dental fitness for at least 2 1/2 yrs. Applyi

  10. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pu Chang

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation.Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls.In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001. After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47. This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26.Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a

  11. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  12. A national analysis of dental waiting lists and point-in-time geographic access to subsidised dental care: can geographic access be improved by offering public dental care through private dental clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudko, Yevgeni; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Australia is one of the least densely populated countries in the world, with a population concentrated on or around coastal areas. Up to 33% of the Australian population are likely to have untreated dental decay, while people with inadequate dentition (fewer than 21 teeth) account for up to 34% of Australian adults. Historically, inadequate access to public dental care has resulted in long waiting lists, received much media coverage and been the subject of a new federal and state initiative. The objective of this research was to gauge the potential for reducing the national dental waiting list through geographical advantage, which could arise from subcontracting the delivery of subsidised dental care to the existing network of private dental clinics across Australia. Eligible population data were collected from the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. Waiting list data from across Australia were collected from publicly available sources and confirmed through direct communication with each individual state or territory dental health body. Quantum geographic information system software was used to map distribution of the eligible population across Australia by statistical area, and to plot locations of government and private dental clinics. Catchment areas of 5 km for metropolitan clinics and 5 km and 50 km for rural clinics were defined. The number of people on the waiting list and those eligible for subsidised dental care covered by each of the catchment areas was calculated. Percentage of the eligible population and those on the waiting list that could benefit from the potential improvement in geographic access was ascertained for metropolitan and rural residents. Fifty three percent of people on the waiting list resided within metropolitan areas. Rural and remote residents made up 47% of the population waiting to receive care. The utilisation of both government and private dental clinics for the delivery of subsidised dental care to the eligible population

  13. Dental care for the homeless over Christmas 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, B

    1991-11-23

    Each year since 1970, the charity CRISIS has provided a place of warmth and shelter for the homeless of London (guests) over the Christmas period. In 1990 they converted a large factory warehouse off the Old Kent Road and set it up to cook meals, provide beds, games, televisions, hairdressing, chiropody, medical and dental care--and information on housing, as well as general advice. Washing and cleaning facilities were provided in Portakabins parked in the yard outside the warehouse. Guests were provided with a complete change of clothing, which were altered to fit if necessary.

  14. Space maintenance in a child dental care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C J; Sorenson, H W; Mink, J R

    1975-04-01

    Five types of space maintainers were placed in 196 children participating in an extensive dental care program during a four-year study. Children with space maintainers were examined at six-month intervals. During the study, some sort of difficulty was encountered with 43% of the appliances inserted. The most common problem encountered was lost or missing appliances. Sixteen appliances had broken arch wires or loop wires; only ten broken bands were noted. Anther problem was distortion of arch wires. Suggestions are made for possible modifications in the space maintainers to reduce the incidence of problems.

  15. Bioassay studies support the potential for iatrogenic transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease through dental procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kirby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence is required to quantify the potential risks of transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD through dental procedures. Studies, using animal models relevant to vCJD, were performed to address two questions. Firstly, whether oral tissues could become infectious following dietary exposure to BSE? Secondly, would a vCJD-contaminated dental instrument be able to transmit disease to another patient? METHODS: BSE-301V was used as a clinically relevant model for vCJD. VM-mice were challenged by injection of infected brain homogenate into the small intestine (Q1 or by five minute contact between a deliberately-contaminated dental file and the gingival margin (Q2. Ten tissues were collected from groups of challenged mice at three or four weekly intervals, respectively. Each tissue was pooled, homogenised and bioassayed in indicator mice. FINDINGS: Challenge via the small intestine gave a transmission rate of 100% (mean incubation 157±17 days. Infectivity was found in both dental pulp and the gingival margin within 3 weeks of challenge and was observed in all tissues tested within the oral cavity before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Following exposure to deliberately contaminated dental files, 97% of mice developed clinical disease (mean incubation 234±33 days. INTERPRETATION: Infectivity was higher than expected, in a wider range of oral tissues, than was allowed for in previous risk assessments. Disease was transmitted following transient exposure of the gingiva to a contaminated dental file. These observations provide evidence that dental procedures could be a route of cross-infection for vCJD and support the enforcement of single-use for certain dental instruments.

  16. Diagnostic procedures employed by dental practitioners in Australia with a focus on endodontic diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Asj; Bennett, G W; Tan, Jcw; Abbott, P V

    2017-09-01

    An accurate diagnosis is the foundation for determining prognosis and appropriate management. This study adds to pre-existing (albeit limited) evidence by exploring the use of diagnostic techniques amongst dental practitioners. The main aim of the study was to identify the availability, usage and clinician preference for specific diagnostic tests. A secondary aim was to investigate the use of diagnostic tests for common clinical scenarios. A cross-sectional survey was distributed online to dental practitioners registered with the Australian Dental Association. Quantitative data on clinician demography, and the availability and preference of diagnostic tests was summarized with Stata 13 software. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to determine associations. General dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists comprised 86% and 14% of the 433 respondents, respectively. Unlike light transillumination, most GDP had radiography, biting tests and pulp sensibility tests available. The electric pulp test and ethyl chloride were first choices of most practitioners despite markedly lower availability relative to cold spray. Symptoms and endodontic assessments generally attracted wider usage of pulp testing. More dental practitioners should utilize diagnostic testing in order to arrive at accurate diagnoses. The availability of diagnostic tests did not completely translate to usage and none of the scenarios presented warranted pulp sensibility testing from all respondents. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Dental management of pediatric HIV patients--state of Israel, Ministry of Health Project at Rambam Health Care Campus, 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavnai, Nirit; Rosen-Walther, Anda; Pery-Front, Yael; Aizenbud, Dror

    2011-01-01

    Over two million children around the world are living with AIDS. Oral health and oral manifestations, such as dental caries and periodontitis, are important issues requiring focus when treating these children. Descriptive data of a project conducted at Rambam Hospital, financed by the Israeli Ministry of Health, are presented in order to investigate and characterize dental treatment for HIV infected children. Thirty-seven infected children, most originating from the Ethiopian community, participated in the project between 2006 and 2011. A total of 724 dental procedures during 185 dental appointments were performed successfully. These children should be provided proactive preventive dental care, while health service providers should undergo further training on prevention and early identification and management of orofacial manifestations. All dental and medical personnel should be made aware of this service in order to refer HIV infected children who can greatly benefit from this special program.

  18. Could conscious sedation with midazolam for dental procedures be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-25

    Apr 25, 2012 ... Minor oral surgical procedures and tooth extraction processes requiring no saline irrigation, however, ..... ketamine conscious ıntravenous sedation on pain, swelling, and trismus after surgical extraction of third molars.

  19. Catalog of Completed Health Care and Dental Care Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Webster University, MEN RSHIP: Nominee: American College of Health Care Executives Member: American Hospital Association Hospital Management System...the needs of the Army, Mil itiry Police Journal, 12-13. 31 Georgoulakis, James M. (1984). The AWOL offender: new findings on an old subject, 26th...Yuille, D., Telepak, R.J., Lamibrecht, R.W., & McAuley, R.J. (1978). Radionuclide nurshmal low swallow for evaluation of dysphagia . Journal of

  20. Clinical profile of orofacial infections: An experience from two primary care dental practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kudiyirickal, Marina G.; Hollinshead, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Orofacial infections are common reasons for dental consultations worldwide. However, there is scarcity of data on clinico-epidemiological profiles reported from primary care dental practices. To address this issue, a study was done to characterize the clinical pattern, age groups affected and sex predilection of orofacial infections in the primary care dental practice. Study design: Clinical data was evaluated from random electronic files of patients for whom antimicrobials were p...

  1. Effectiveness of radio waves application in modern general dental procedures: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Arslan; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Pikos, Michael A; Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to review indexed literature and provide an update on the effectiveness of high-frequency radio waves (HRW) application in modern general dentistry procedures. Indexed databases were searched to identify articles that assessed the efficacy of radio waves in dental procedures. Radiosurgery is a refined form of electrosurgery that uses waves of electrons at a radiofrequency ranging between 2 and 4 MHz. Radio waves have also been reported to cause much less thermal damage to peripheral tissues compared with electrosurgery or carbon dioxide laser-assisted surgery. Formation of reparative dentin in direct pulp capping procedures is also significantly higher when HRW are used to achieve hemostasis in teeth with minimally exposed dental pulps compared with traditional techniques for achieving hemostasis. A few case reports have reported that radiosurgery is useful for procedures such as gingivectomy and gingivoplasty, stage-two surgery for implant exposure, operculectomy, oral biopsy, and frenectomy. Radiosurgery is a relatively modern therapeutic methodology for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia; however, its long-term efficacy is unclear. Radio waves can also be used for periodontal procedures, such as gingivectomies, coronal flap advancement, harvesting palatal grafts for periodontal soft tissue grafting, and crown lengthening. Although there are a limited number of studies in indexed literature regarding the efficacy of radio waves in modern dentistry, the available evidence shows that use of radio waves is a modernization in clinical dentistry that might be a contemporary substitute for traditional clinical dental procedures.

  2. Dental attendance patterns among older people: a retrospective review of records in public and private dental care in Sweden.

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    Derblom, C; Hagman-Gustafsson, M-L; Gabre, P

    2016-11-20

    Nowadays, older people retain their natural teeth more frequently and so are at increased risk of oral disease. At the same time, discontinued contacts with dental services prevent access to preventive care and increase the risk of undetected disease. This study aims to evaluate how often older people discontinue regular dental visits and to establish the reasons. This study is a retrospective review of records of patients aged ≥75 years from seven Swedish clinics, three in the public dental service (PuDS) and four in the private (PrDS). All patients were examined in 2010, and their dental attendance records from 2010 to 2014 studied. Data included gender, dental insurance system, last performed planned examination, emergency visits, registrations in the recall system, cause of discontinued care and number of teeth and implants. In total, 993 records were studied, 303 in PuDS and 690 in PrDS. In both groups, 10% of patients had no complete dental examinations between 2010 and 2014 after baseline examination in 2010. One-quarter were not registered in the recall system after their last examinations, and this was more common in PrDS than PuDS. In many cases, no reason for discontinued regular visits were described in the records. The mean number of natural teeth was 19.0 in both groups, but there were more implants in the PrDS group. A large proportion of the participants risked losing regular contact with dental services. Dental services appeared to lack strategies for maintaining regular dental care for elderly patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Experiences of Dental Care and Dental Anxiety in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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    My Blomqvist

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anxiety is associated with previous distressing dental experiences, such as lack of understanding of the dentist intentions, perceptions of uncontrollability and experiences of pain during dental treatment. People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD are impaired in building flexible predictions and expectations, which is very much needed during a dental visit. The aims of the study were to investigate if people with ASD have more negative dental experiences and a higher level of dental anxiety compared to a matched control group. Forty-seven adults with ASD and of normal intellectual performance, and 69 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls completed questionnaires on previous dental experiences and dental anxiety, the Dental Anxiety Scale, and the Dental Beliefs Survey. The ASD group experienced pain during dental treatments more often than the controls and 22% had repeatedly experienced being forced to dental treatment they were not prepared for, compared to 3% of the controls. A higher level of dental anxiety was reported by the ASD group. Dental treatment and methods for supporting the communication with patients with ASD need to be developed, in order to reduce the negative dental experiences and dental anxiety in people with ASD.

  4. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

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    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p dental care (p dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts.

  5. Towards building the oral health care workforce: who are the new dental therapists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M; Lopez, Naty

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, Minnesota Governor Pawlenty signed into law a bill approving the creation of a new dental team member: the dental therapist. The intent of this legislation was to address oral health disparities by creating a dental professional who would expand access to dental care in Minnesota. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of the first class of dental therapy students at the University of Minnesota and to ascertain the values and motivations that led them to choose a career in dental therapy. Four surveys were used to create the composite profile of the ten students in this first dental therapy class: 1) the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, 2) the Learning Type Measure, 3) the Attitudes Toward Healthcare Survey, and 4) a values and motivation survey that included demographic data. The results of the surveys revealed interacting influences of the students' background, personal self-concept, and environment leading to a career decision to pursue dental therapy.

  6. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan

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    Åstrøm Anne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics, enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV and need related factors (oral health status predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Methods Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH and University of Science and Technology (UST during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH were examined clinically (DMFT and participated in an interview. Results A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5 were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0 for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6 and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7 were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3 were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8. Conclusion Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to

  7. [Adherence to oral hygiene and dental self-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplinger, A

    2010-04-01

    Nearly every person will be in need of dental treatment in his lifetime, whether purely for health causes or alternately for esthetic issues. Yet the main reasons of seeking dental treatment are in fact Caries, Gingivitis and Periodontitis. In spite of the fact that these pathologies occur due to the accumulation of Plaque around the oral cavity and teeth, they are fairly easy to prevent. Using simple techniques such as oral rinsing, flossing and brushing of the teeth, are normally sufficient for obtaining good oral health. If this is actually the case, than how is it that we are witnessing a massive spread of dental problems? How come there are so many incidents of people suffering from dental problems if the preventative care is that easy to manage? The answer lies in the concept of Adherence, referring to the cooperation of an individual with the demands of his treatment regime and the dental staff. The idea of promoting health adherence aims mainly for using medication, attending the periodic inspections and examination, and making lifestyle changes such as preventive care illustrated above. This article exemplifies how one of the current trends in Medical Psychology discipline is to enhance adherence by establishing a secure therapeutic alliance which is based upon a positive relationship between the patient and his doctor, increasing patient's confidence and sense of self-efficacy, and recruiting family members and friends to the patient's process of change. A distinctive emphasis is put on expanding the patient's knowledge about his condition, and raising awareness to the linkage between his medical (to be more specific-dental) problem and its symptoms to the implications. The most modish and putative intervention nowadays is Patient Centered, where the guiding principles used are urging the patient to be responsible for implying the treatment regime, taking active participation, and make decisions regarding his current and future status. This article

  8. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  9. Measuring service quality of public dental health care facilities in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jacob; Yatim, Fekriah Mohd; Mani, Shani Ann

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates patients' expectations and perceptions of service quality in public dental health care and measures their "satisfaction gap." This descriptive study involved 481 dental outpatients in Kelantan, Malaysia. A modified SERVQUAL 20-item instrument was used to assess patients' expectations before and perceptions after receiving dental treatment. The "satisfaction gap" was then measured. showed that patients visiting for management of dental pain were more satisfied (P = .007) than those visiting with appointment. The most significant service quality dimensions were related to responsiveness, assurance, and empathy of the dental health care providers. There was a significant difference between the patients' expectations and their perceptions of service provided (P < .01) with regard to all dimensions. In conclusion, dental service providers should give emphasis to the compassionate and emotional aspects of care and to remember that they are integral components of quality service.

  10. Modelling dental implant extraction by pullout and torque procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A; Shemtov-Yona, K

    2017-07-01

    Dental implants extraction, achieved either by applying torque or pullout force, is used to estimate the bone-implant interfacial strength. A detailed description of the mechanical and physical aspects of the extraction process in the literature is still missing. This paper presents 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations of a commercial implant extraction process from the mandible bone. Emphasis is put on the typical load-displacement and torque-angle relationships for various types of cortical and trabecular bone strengths. The simulations also study of the influence of the osseointegration level on those relationships. This is done by simulating implant extraction right after insertion when interfacial frictional contact exists between the implant and bone, and long after insertion, assuming that the implant is fully bonded to the bone. The model does not include a separate representation and model of the interfacial layer for which available data is limited. The obtained relationships show that the higher the strength of the trabecular bone the higher the peak extraction force, while for application of torque, it is the cortical bone which might dictate the peak torque value. Information on the relative strength contrast of the cortical and trabecular components, as well as the progressive nature of the damage evolution, can be revealed from the obtained relations. It is shown that full osseointegration might multiply the peak and average load values by a factor 3-12 although the calculated work of extraction varies only by a factor of 1.5. From a quantitative point of view, it is suggested that, as an alternative to reporting peak load or torque values, an average value derived from the extraction work be used to better characterize the bone-implant interfacial strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adding dental therapists to the health care team to improve access to oral health care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2009-01-01

    Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, and the subsequent National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health, contributed significantly to raising awareness regarding the lack of access to oral health care by many Americans, especially minority and low-income populations, with resulting disparities in oral health. The problem is particularly acute among children. The current dental workforce in the United States is inadequate to meet the oral health care needs of children. It is inadequate in terms of numbers of dentists, as well as their geographic distribution, ethnicity, education, and practice orientation. Dental therapists, paraprofessionals trained in a 2 academic-year program of postsecondary education, have been employed internationally to improve access to oral health care for children. Research has documented that utilizing dental therapists is a cost-effective method of providing quality oral health care for children. Dental therapists have recently been introduced in Alaska by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. Dental therapists could potentially care for children in dental offices, public health clinics, and school systems, as well as in the offices of pediatricians and family physicians. Adding dental therapists to the health care team would be a significant strategy for improving access to care for children and reducing oral health disparities.

  12. Optimisation need of dental radiodiagnostic procedures: results of effective dose evaluation from Rando phantom measurements

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    Borio, R.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Degli Esposti, P.; Rongoni, A.; Sabatini, P.; Saetta, D.M.S. (Perugia Univ. (Italy). Health Physics Lab. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Perugia (Italy)); Regi, L.; Caprino, G. (Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology)

    1994-01-01

    Radiological examinations of different types are needed in dental practice both to make a correct diagnosis and to carry out an adequate therapy. Particularly in orthodentic practices, because of the youth of the majority of the patients, an assessment of the detriment to health (through the effective dose equivalent) caused by medical diagnostic exposure to ionising radiation is needed to make decisions about the optimisation of dental radiodiagnostic procedures. Experimental data from measurements on a Rando phantom were collected for the radiological examinations required for dental and for orthodontic practices (with and without protective apron and collar). The results show the effectiveness of the leaded apron and collar in all the examinations carried out, particularly in reducing thyroid dose. (author).

  13. Flumazenil reversal of midazolam sedation for dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Attar, A; Adu-Gyamfi, Y; Tawfique, K

    1992-06-01

    The efficacy of flumazenil in the reversal of midazolam sedation was assessed in double-blind placebo controlled study. Thirty patients undergoing oral surgical procedures were included. Flumazenil administration was followed by immediate rise of the CNS functions scores to almost the baseline awake values. Compared to control group, patients were significantly more oriented and had better comprehension up to 15 minutes, more alert for 30 minutes and had better memory function up to 60 minutes. Peripheral oxygen saturation was significantly higher up to 15 minutes. Flumazenil allows better utilization and higher turn over rate where space and nursing resources are scarce.

  14. Effect of dental care programme and fluoridation in the prevention of dental caries in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Gulser; Uzuner, Nevin; Karaman, Ozkan

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of a regular dental care programme on the dental health of asthmatic children. This prospective, controlled study was conducted at Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey, between 2012 and 2014, and comprised asthmatic and non-asthmatic children between 4 and 16 years of age who used inhaler corticosteroid treatment for at least 1 year. Patients were examined for dental caries, gingival index, salivary flow rate, and salivary pH values at baseline, 6 months, and at the end of the first year. Demographic features and tooth-brushing habits of the asthmatic and non-asthmatic children were also analysed. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Of the 102 patients, there were 51(50%) each in asthmatic and non-asthmatic groups. Besides, 38(70.6%) participants were boys and 15(29.4%) were girls in the first group compared to 30(58.8%) boys and 21(41.2%) girls in the second group. The mean age was 11.16±3.10 years and 10.33±2.62 years, respectively, in the two groups. The number of asthmatic patients was 45(88.2%) in visit 2 and 37(72.5%) in visit 3, whereas the number of participants for the control group was 41(80.4%) in visit 2 and 36(70.4%) in visit 3. During the first visit, mean values for salivary pH and flow rate were 7.135 0.15 and 3.878 0.71 mL/min among asthma patients, and 7.158 0.14 and 4.684 0.50 among controls. In the first visit, the rate of gingivitis was 31(60.8%) in asthmatic children and 12(23.5%) in the control group. During the third visit, the rate was 4(11.1%) and 5(13.5%) among the two groups, respectively. Decreased salivary flow rates associated with the drugs used by asthmatic patients caused an increase in the rate of dental caries and gingival disorders.

  15. Regional anesthesia and analgesia for oral and dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Judy

    2005-07-01

    Regional anesthesia and analgesia benefit the client, the patient, and the practitioner, and their use is becoming the standard for care. Familiarity with the processes involved in the generation of pain aids in understanding the benefits of preemptive and multimodal analgesia. Local anesthetic blocks should be a key component of a treatment plan, along with opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, and other therapies. Nerve blocks commonly used for dentistry and oral surgery include the infraorbital, maxillary, mental,and mandibular blocks.

  16. The role of tobacco use on dental care and oral disease severity within community dental clinics in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Miki; Hanioka, Takashi; Shimada, Kaoru; Haresaku, Satoru; Yamamoto, Mito; Tanaka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    To examine facilitators of dental smoking intervention practices in Japan, where smokeless tobacco is rarely used, we evaluated the characteristics of dental care for smokers. Community dentists volunteered to record the treated disease or encounter with patients that was principally responsible for their dental care on the survey day. Patients were classified into groups receiving gingival/periodontal treatment (GPT), caries/endodontic treatment (CET), prosthetic treatment (PRT), periodical check-up/orthodontic treatment (POT), or other encounters/treatments. Potential effect of dentist clustering was adjusted by incorporating the complex survey design into the analysis. Data of 2835 current smokers (CS) and 6850 non-smokers (NS) from 753 clinics were analysed. Distribution of treatments significantly differed between CS and NS (P = 0.001). In ad hoc multiple comparisons for each treatment, CS were significantly higher than NS for CET (47.1% vs. 43.6%, P = 0.002), and lower for POT (1.6% vs. 2.7%, P = 0.001), whereas GPT and PRT proportions were equivalent by smoking. When stage of disease progression was compared in the GPT subpopulation, CS were more likely received treatment for advanced stage disease than NS in the age groups of 40-59 years (24.9% vs. 15.3%, P = 0.001) and more than 60 years (40.8% vs. 22.1%, P smoking with type of dental care of CET and GPT severity would warrant the need for dental professionals to engage their patients smoking within clinical practice. The detrimental effects of smoking in dental care for smokers, as evidenced by the distribution of treatment and encounter and stage of treated disease, may not be clearly realized by dental professionals, unless the smoking status of all patients is identified.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanaska Dinkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their accompanying thromboembolic and bleeding risks relative to invasive dental procedures.The aim of this literature review is to evaluate the available evidence on the impact of anticoagulant medications on dental treatment and highlight certain patient management issues closely interrelated to various aspects of dental treatment. For that purpose literature search in the electronic database of Medscape, Pubmed-Medline, Science Direct, and EBSCO host, in the data base of Medical University Plovdiv and specialised published books in general medicine and dentistry was made.A total of 33 publications between 1995 and 2013 were identified: 12 review articles, 11 randomized controlled and non-randomised studies, 6 guidelines and practical guides, 1 meta-analysis and 3 specialised books.

  18. A Hybrid Segmentation Framework for Computer-Assisted Dental Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosntalab, Mohammad; Aghaeizadeh Zoroofi, Reza; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, Ali; Shirani, Gholamreza; Reza Asharif, Mohammad

    Teeth segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images is a major and challenging task for various computer assisted procedures. In this paper, we introduced a hybrid method for quantification of teeth in CT volumetric dataset inspired by our previous experiences and anatomical knowledge of teeth and jaws. In this regard, we propose a novel segmentation technique using an adaptive thresholding, morphological operations, panoramic re-sampling and variational level set algorithm. The proposed method consists of several steps as follows: first, we determine the operation region in CT slices. Second, the bony tissues are separated from other tissues by utilizing an adaptive thresholding technique based on the 3D pulses coupled neural networks (PCNN). Third, teeth tissue is classified from other bony tissues by employing panorex lines and anatomical knowledge of teeth in the jaws. In this case, the panorex lines are estimated using Otsu thresholding and mathematical morphology operators. Then, the proposed method is followed by calculating the orthogonal lines corresponding to panorex lines and panoramic re-sampling of the dataset. Separation of upper and lower jaws and initial segmentation of teeth are performed by employing the integral projections of the panoramic dataset. Based the above mentioned procedures an initial mask for each tooth is obtained. Finally, we utilize the initial mask of teeth and apply a variational level set to refine initial teeth boundaries to final contour. In the last step a surface rendering algorithm known as marching cubes (MC) is applied to volumetric visualization. The proposed algorithm was evaluated in the presence of 30 cases. Segmented images were compared with manually outlined contours. We compared the performance of segmentation method using ROC analysis of the thresholding, watershed and our previous works. The proposed method performed best. Also, our algorithm has the advantage of high speed compared to our previous works.

  19. The Oral Health Self-Care Behavior and Dental Attitudes among Nursing Home Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance; Meckstroth, Richard

    2014-03-01

    The need for nursing home care will increase for the next several decades. Rural areas will be impacted in particular, as many older adults live in rural areas. Daily oral infection control changes when a person moves from independent living to institutional living. Oral care to dependent individuals is influenced by many factors. The purpose of this study is to determine the association of oral health self-care behavior with dental attitudes in nursing home personnel in a rural state. A survey was provided to attendees at an oral health conference. Questions were asked to determine dental knowledge, oral health self-care behavior, and dental care attitudes. Of 128 long term care health care facilities' personnel invited, there were 31 attendees, and 21 of the attendees participated (67.7%). Nursing home personnel had a high level of dental knowledge. Oral health self-care behavior was independently influenced by dental knowledge (β=0.17; p=0.0444) and dental attitudes (β=0.55; p=.0081). Further investigation is needed to determine if oral health self-care attitudes and oral self-care behavior of nursing home personnel are factors in the provision of quality daily oral infection control for dependent nursing home residents living in rural areas.

  20. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

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    Cosmin Sinescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures.

  1. Medical care providers' perspectives on dental information needs in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Amit; Shimpi, Neel; Mahnke, Andrea; Mathias, Richard; Ye, Zhan

    2017-05-01

    The authors conducted this study to identify the most relevant patient dental information in a medical-dental integrated electronic health record (iEHR) necessary for medical care providers to inform holistic treatment. The authors collected input from a diverse sample of 65 participants from a large, regional health system representing 13 medical specialties and administrative units. The authors collected feedback from participants through 11 focus group sessions. Two independent reviewers analyzed focus group transcripts to identify major and minor themes. The authors identified 336 of 385 annotations that most medical care providers coded as relevant. Annotations strongly supporting relevancy to clinical practice aligned with 18 major thematic categories, with the top 6 categories being communication, appointments, system design, medications, treatment plan, and dental alerts. Study participants identified dental data of highest relevance to medical care providers and recommended implementation of user-friendly access to dental data in iEHRs as crucial to holistic care delivery. Identification of the patients' dental information most relevant to medical care providers will inform strategies for improving the integration of that information into the medical-dental iEHR. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Barriers to dental care for children with special needs: General dentists' perception in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adyanthaya, Amith; Sreelakshmi, Natta; Ismail, Sajeela; Raheema, Marium

    2017-01-01

    Special children are among the underserved dental patient groups around the globe. Oral health care for disabled children remain an unmet challenge. One out of two persons with a significant disability cannot find a professional resource to provide appropriate dental care. Identification of barriers can be the first step in addressing the deficiencies in dental care for such patients. To investigate the perception of dental practitioners in Kerala, India regarding the hurdles faced by them in providing dental care to Special Needs Children including the challenges faced by them. 149 dental professionals were interviewed through a questionnaire for their perceived barriers to provide oral health care for children with special needs. The data was obtained and Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression model were assessed using the SPSS version 20.0. All analyses were performed using a level of 0.05 for statistical significance. Greatest barriers as perceived by the practitioners were their level of training and lack of motivation of caretakers. Significant association was found between experience of the dentist with the frequency with which they reported seeing children with special needs (pConclusion: Findings from this study provide a valid picture of barriers to access for children with special needs within general dental private practice system. Recommendations for amendment of undergraduate dental curriculum is made in order to equip future graduates to deal with this group of children better.

  3. Barriers to dental care for children with special needs: General dentists' perception in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amith Adyanthaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Special children are among the underserved dental patient groups around the globe. Oral health care for disabled children remain an unmet challenge. One out of two persons with a significant disability cannot find a professional resource to provide appropriate dental care. Identification of barriers can be the first step in addressing the deficiencies in dental care for such patients. Aim: To investigate the perception of dental practitioners in Kerala, India regarding the hurdles faced by them in providing dental care to Special Needs Children including the challenges faced by them. Materials and Method: 149 dental professionals were interviewed through a questionnaire for their perceived barriers to provide oral health care for children with special needs. Statistical analysis: The data was obtained and Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression model were assessed using the SPSS version 20.0. All analyses were performed using a level of 0.05 for statistical significance. Results: Greatest barriers as perceived by the practitioners were their level of training and lack of motivation of caretakers. Significant association was found between experience of the dentist with the frequency with which they reported seeing children with special needs (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Findings from this study provide a valid picture of barriers to access for children with special needs within general dental private practice system. Recommendations for amendment of undergraduate dental curriculum is made in order to equip future graduates to deal with this group of children better.

  4. Improving the dental fitness of the British Army by changing the strategy for dental care provision for recruits from a vertically equitable model to a horizontally equitable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Sara Jane; Tuck, Jeremy

    2007-11-01

    BACKGROUNDd: The dental health of the British Army has been reported as being in decline for the past 10 years, and this is having a significant impact on operations. One of the major factors in the decline is the increasing number of recruits who enlist with outstanding dental treatment needs. The current policy for provision of routine dental care to recruits targets resources toward those with the worst dental health and provides only emergency dental care for the remainder.AIMSs: The goal was to review recruit dental care provision, to determine whether improvements in the overall dental health of the trained Army could be made during recruit training.RESULTSs: It was found that >85% of recruit dental treatment need could be met with the routine provision of 2 hours of dental treatment during training.CONCLUSIONn: A horizontally equitable model of recruit dental care, whereby all recruits access routine dental care during training, has been recommended to and accepted by the chain of command.

  5. Medical care transition planning and dental care use for youth with special health care needs during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood: a preliminary explanatory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the study were to test the hypotheses that youth with special health care needs (YSHCN) with a medical care transition plan are more likely to use dental care during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and that different factors are associated with dental utilization for YSHCN with and YSHCN without functional limitations. National Survey of CSHCN (2001) and Survey of Adult Transition and Health (2007) data were analyzed (N = 1,746). The main predictor variable was having a medical care transition plan, defined as having discussed with a doctor how health care needs might change with age and having developed a transition plan. The outcome variable was dental care use in 2001 (adolescence) and 2007 (young adulthood). Multiple variable Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate covariate-adjusted relative risks (RR). About 63 % of YSHCN had a medical care transition plan and 73.5 % utilized dental care. YSHCN with a medical care transition plan had a 9 % greater RR of utilizing dental care than YSHCN without a medical care transition plan (RR 1.09; 95 % CI 1.03-1.16). In the models stratified by functional limitation status, having a medical care transition plan was significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN without functional limitations (RR 1.11; 95 % CI 1.04-1.18). Having a medical care transition plan is significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN with no functional limitation. Dental care should be an integral part of the comprehensive health care transition planning process for all YSHCN.

  6. Prevalence of dental caries and dental care utilisation in preschool urban children enrolled in a comparative-effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopycka-Kedzierawski, D T; Billings, R J

    2011-06-01

    To assess dental caries prevalence and dental care utilisation in pre-school children enrolled in urban childcare centres that participated in a comparative effectiveness study. Cross-sectional study. Caries prevalence was determined in a cohort of children 12-60 months of age. Eligible children were randomised into two groups: group one received a traditional visual/tactile oral examination and group two received a teledentistry examination. Questionnaires were administered to the children's parents/guardians to gather demographics and information about using dental and medical services. Of 234 children examined, approximately 28% had caries experience. The mean dfs score was 1.56 with a range of 0-34 carious surfaces. The mean dfs score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 1.75 and for the children examined by means of the traditional visual/tactile method mean dfs was 1.40; the means between the two groups were not significantly different. Twenty-six children showed evidence of being treated for dental caries. According to the parents, 31.5% of the children had never had a dental check-up before, only 3% of the children were lacking dental insurance and majority of the parents (92%) did not perceive accessing dental care for the children as a problem. The Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to assess statistical differences among groups of children. The data showed that 28% of the children had caries and, of these, 61% had never been treated for caries, thus indicating that continued efforts are needed to improve oral health care utilisation by inner-city preschool children.

  7. Assessment of dentally related functional competency for older adults with cognitive impairment--a survey for special-care dental professionals.

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    Chen, Xi; Clark, Jennifer J J

    2013-01-01

    This survey was to study whether and how dental professional assess dental-related function in older adults with cognitive impairment (OACI). An invitation was sent to 525 special-care dental professionals, followed by a reminder in 2 weeks. Thirteen percent of the targeted participants completed the survey. Among them, 88% completed a hospital dentistry, geriatric dentistry, or other postgraduate training program. Nearly 70% of the respondents considered somewhat to very difficult to assess dentally related function; 45% did not ever or did not regularly assess dental-related function for OACI. Dental-related functional assessments were often based on a subjective, unstructured approach. Only 6% of the respondents routinely used standard instruments to assess the patients' function. These results indicate that an objective functional assessment based on a standardized instrument has not been routinely incorporated into dental care for OACI, raising concerns for quality of care in this vulnerable population.

  8. Program for coordinated dental care under general anaesthesia for children with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nova-García, M Joaquín; Martínez, M Rosa Mourelle; Sanjuán, Carmen Martín; López, Nuria E Gallardo; Cabaleiro, Esther Carracedo; García, Yolanda Alonso

    2007-12-01

    To draw up a program for coordination of dental care for children with special needs between the Course at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCMC) (Specialisation in holistic dental care for children with special needs), and the Disabled Children's Oral Health Unit (DCOHU) within the Madrid Health Service (SERMAS). UCMC Protocol for children with special needs. Design of a clinical pathway based on consensus amongst the professionals involved. Algorithm for dental care for children with special needs. Matrix covering all activities and timing for full dental diagnosis in such patients (general health, oral health and behaviour) to facilitate proper referral of patients requiring general anaesthesia. Inclusion in the matrix of those responsible for each activity. Improved team work (University - primary health care) in patient evaluation, in provision of information to parents and guardians and in health care quality. From the teaching point of view, students learn to adopt a systematic approach in the decision-making process.

  9. Access to Dental Care for Rural Children: A Survey of Nebraska General Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Kimberly K.; Salama, Fouad; Yaseen, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pediatric dentists are too few in number to care for all children. Therefore, the level of pediatric dental services provided by general dentists, especially in rural areas, is crucial to improving the dental health of children. Purpose: The objectives of the study were to establish a baseline in regard to the quantity of pediatric…

  10. Everyone Needs Regular Dental Care, but What if You Can't Get to the Dentist?

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    Blumin, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This article features the three-dentist House Call Dentist (HCD) team, a division of the nationally known Blende Dental Group based in San Francisco, headed by Dr. David Blende. Dr. Blende is best known for providing dental care utilizing sleep and sedation modalities, and as a leader in the field of dentistry for patients with special needs. The…

  11. Access to Dental Care for Rural Children: A Survey of Nebraska General Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Kimberly K.; Salama, Fouad; Yaseen, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pediatric dentists are too few in number to care for all children. Therefore, the level of pediatric dental services provided by general dentists, especially in rural areas, is crucial to improving the dental health of children. Purpose: The objectives of the study were to establish a baseline in regard to the quantity of pediatric…

  12. Assessment of the changes in the stress-related salivary cortisol levels to the various dental procedures in children

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    Sharmila J Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fear and pain are the factors producing stress and there is evidence that dental fear acquired in childhood may persist to influence adult behavior. Dental treatment is often considered as anxiety producing and stressful. Aim: To assess the levels of stress displayed by the healthy children undergoing routine dental procedures like oral examination, restoration, and extraction by analyzing salivary levels of cortisol before, during, and after the procedures. Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy children aged between 4 and 8 years having their first dental visit and requiring at least one restoration and one extraction were selected. In each patient, three procedures were carried out: (i Routine dental examination, (ii restoration, and (iii extraction. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected 10 min before, during the procedure, and 30 min after each procedure at three different visits for comparison of cortisol production in response to anxiety and stress over time. Total 180 samples were collected to determine salivary cortisol levels using UBI-MAGIWEL TM kit and the readings were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software with paired t-test, two independent sample t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to analyze the findings. Results: A correlation between salivary cortisol and stress in dental procedure was noticed. Cavity preparation is more stressful procedure in children, so alternative methods can be used in anxious children. Stress associated with extraction persists to a postoperative period. No correlation exists in between Corah′s anxiety scale and salivary cortisol.

  13. Assessment of the changes in the stress-related salivary cortisol levels to the various dental procedures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharmila J; Shah, Preetam P; Patil, Jayakumar A; Shigli, Anand; Patil, Anil T; Tamagond, Sridevi B

    2015-01-01

    Fear and pain are the factors producing stress and there is evidence that dental fear acquired in childhood may persist to influence adult behavior. Dental treatment is often considered as anxiety producing and stressful. To assess the levels of stress displayed by the healthy children undergoing routine dental procedures like oral examination, restoration, and extraction by analyzing salivary levels of cortisol before, during, and after the procedures. Twenty healthy children aged between 4 and 8 years having their first dental visit and requiring at least one restoration and one extraction were selected. In each patient, three procedures were carried out: (i) Routine dental examination, (ii) restoration, and (iii) extraction. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected 10 min before, during the procedure, and 30 min after each procedure at three different visits for comparison of cortisol production in response to anxiety and stress over time. Total 180 samples were collected to determine salivary cortisol levels using UBI-MAGIWEL TM kit and the readings were noted. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software with paired t-test, two independent sample t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the findings. A correlation between salivary cortisol and stress in dental procedure was noticed. Cavity preparation is more stressful procedure in children, so alternative methods can be used in anxious children. Stress associated with extraction persists to a postoperative period. No correlation exists in between Corah's anxiety scale and salivary cortisol.

  14. Dental care of frail older people and those caring for them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Ina; Majdani, Mahsa; Sobotta, Bernhard A J; Reiber, Thomas; Hopfenmüller, Werner

    2010-07-01

    To describe oral health utilisation patterns of frail older people and contrast these with attitudes and utilisation patterns of nursing staff who are caring for them. In view of widespread poor oral health of frail older people in long-term care, staff attitudes have been identified as an area of interest. In addition to data on attitudes, the current study contributes a description of aspects of oral health related behaviour of staff and clients. Cross-sectional study. Structured interviews of a random selection of long-term care staff (n=320) and frail older people (n=172), within the two groups of home-care services (HCS) and long-term care facilities (LTCF). Of staff members, 55·3% attach the same importance to their own oral health compared to that of clients and 35·7% regard their own oral health as more important; 98·4% of staff attended two or more dental examinations per year; 3·4% of HCS and 37·1% of LTCF routinely arranged oral examinations. In 81·4% HCS and in 34·4% of LTCF, there was no routine dental service available. Patterns of oral health service attendance greatly differ between staff and clients. The oral health awareness of the majority of long-term care staff did not translate into adequate oral health care for clients. A gap exists between attitudes supportive of oral health, adequate and prevention driven own oral health related behaviour of staff and actual oral health care delivered to clients. To bridge the gap identified, a concept is suggested for nursing educators and managers of LTCF targeting educational measures while taking into account individual attitudes. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Perceived barriers in accessing dental care among patients attending dental institute using decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory method

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    Ravneet Malhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Utilization of dental service is a concept of expressing the extent of interaction between the service provider and the people for whom it is indented. However, one of the major issues in social welfare is the equitable provision of these services to the population. Aim: To determine the perceived barriers affecting access to the dental services in the dental institute. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the dental institute during the month of February in the year 2014 using decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL method. The study sample included the 364 subjects. The required data were collected using a specially designed and pretested questionnaire. The data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA and MATLAB 7.6.0. The mean, standard deviations were used to describe the data, and inferential statistics included one-way ANOVA and DEMATEL. Results: The five determinants of cost, inconvenience, fear, organization, and patient-dentist relationship were determined as barriers to access dental services. Based on subjects′ responses to the questions, the cost (54.75% agreed or strongly agreed was identified as the most important factor affecting the access to dental health care followed by dentist-patient relationship (48.57%, inconvenience (36.55%, fear (23.70%, and organization (14.02%. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.0001. When the hierarchy of the affecting and affected factors was calculated, based on the factor analysis by using DEMATEL method, the cost (R−J = 0.16 and organization (R−J = 1.15, were certain affecting determinant which influenced the access to dental services and inconvenience. Conclusion: The major barriers to oral health care utilization among our patients were cost, fear, and organization. Policymakers, administrators, and insurance organizations have a major role. Hence, the policies should be fair and

  16. Infection control practices in public dental care services: findings from one South African Province.

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    Mehtar, S; Shisana, O; Mosala, T; Dunbar, R

    2007-05-01

    Infection control practices which increase the risk of blood-borne virus transmission with associated dental practice in one South African province were studied. All 24 state dental clinics were observed for adequate provision to carry out good infection prevention and control (IPC) practice, 75 staff including dentists, nurses and dental assistants were interviewed to assess IPC knowledge and 23 dental procedures were observed. Significant findings were the difference between knowledge and practice, despite adequate provisions for safe infection control practice. The lack of protective eye wear during a dental procedure, not washing hands between patients, not disassembling an item prior to disinfection or sterilization, and not using a sterile drill for each patient were identified. A rapid method for detection of occult blood was used as a marker for inadequate IPC practice. Contaminated dental items of equipment just prior to patient use in 25% of equipment tested and 37% of surfaces and surrounding areas in the dental clinics and units were recorded. This study concludes that, despite provision for safe dental practice available in state dental clinics, there was a lack of knowledge application in clinical practice. The risk of blood-borne virus transmission in a population with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence cannot be ignored.

  17. Dental Care Utilization and Satisfaction of Residential University Students

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    Bamise CT

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to provide information on the level of utilization and satisfaction of residential university students with the dental services provided by the dental clinic of a teaching hospital. Volunteers and Material: A stratified sampling technique was used to recruit volunteers from the outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Information was collected by a self-administered questionnaire composed of questions that measure the level of utilization and satisfaction with the dental services provided. Questionnaires were provided to 650 randomly chosen students residing in the University hostels. There were 39 refusals, and 6 incomplete questionnaires were discarded. This left a sample size of 605 volunteers. Results: Forty seven students (7.8% indicated that they visited the dental hospital within the last 12 months. Males and females utilized the dental services equally, and utilization increased with age and the number of years spent on campus. Anticipation of painful dental treatment, high dental charges, long waiting times and being too busy for a dental visit were cited as the most important impediments to seeking dental treatment. Females expressed greater satisfaction with the services. Conclusion: Dental service utilization among the students was found to be low. Oral health awareness campaigns, improving the quality of the services, and shortening the waiting time are expected to increase service utilization and satisfaction.

  18. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  19. Do children get their fair share of health and dental care?

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    Kopelman, L M; Mouradian, W E

    2001-04-01

    This paper reviews the work of several authors, D.W. Brock, D. Callahan, L. Churchill, L.M. Kopelman, R. Tong who consider assumptions and arguments about how to allocate health and dental care to children fairly. They use various approaches including feminist, rights based, and principled considerations, applying general notions of duty or justice to the issues of children's access to basic health and dental care. Two discuss these issues in relation to the work of David Hume. These authors consider children's greatest unmet health needs, including that of dental care, often mistakenly regarded as medically unimportant in terms of children's wellbeing, opportunities, and self-image. They review possible age bias against children in the allocation of health and dental care, the gap between what we say and do where children are concerned, and whether some fundamental shift in social thinking needs to occur.

  20. ANALISIS KEPUASAN PASIEN TERHADAP KUALITAS PELAYANAN PERAWATAN GIGI DI KLINIK GIGI MY DENTAL CARE SURABAYA

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    Adityarani Putranti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan masyarakat yang semakin tinggi akan jasa layanan kesehatan membuat ekspektasi masyarakat terhadap layanan kesehatan yang baik juga semakin tinggi. Pelayanan gigi dan mulut, merupakan salah satu pelayanan kesehatan dasar pada masyarakat. Klinik gigi My Dental Care Surabaya merupakan salah satu klinik gigi yang terletak di Surabaya Selatan. Klinik Gigi My Dental Care memiliki permasalahan belum tercapainya target jumlah kunjungan pasien sebesar 120 pasien per bulan selama tahun 2013-2014. Jenis penelitian ini adalah penelitian analitik observasional dengan pengumpulan data secara cross sectional. Pengambilan sampel dengan metode simple random sampling dan jumlah sampel sebesar 30 orang. Penelitian ini dilakukan pada pasien yang melakukan perawatan gigi di Klinik Gigi My Dental Care Surabaya. Kata Kunci: Kepuasan Pelanggan, Kualitas Pelayanan, Klinik Gigi My Dental Care Surabaya

  1. Increasing prevalence of emergency department visits for pediatric dental care, 1997-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladrillo, Teresita E; Hobdell, Martin H; Caviness, A Chantal

    2006-03-01

    Hospital emergency department (ED) visits for non-urgent care have been increasing since the late 1950s. This study investigated the prevalence and characteristics of pediatric ED visits for dental problems during a five-year period. This retrospective study included newborns through 17-year-olds with dental complaints identified from the electronic register of the ED of Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, between January 1997 and December 2001. The authors described patient characteristics, diagnoses, factors associated with ED use for nontraumatic problems and annual changes in ED visits for dental and nondental complaints. Of the 1,102 subjects, 809 (73.4 percent) had nontraumatic and 293 (26.6 percent) had traumatic dental complaints. The study revealed a 121 percent increase in ED visits for dental complaints and a 66-fold increase in admissions between 1997 and 2001. Of the inpatient admissions, 68 percent were the result of caries and its sequelae. This study revealed a substantial increase in ED visits and hospital admissions for dental problems during the study period. The majority of dental problems were nontraumatic in nature. Dental care experts should be available in ED settings in which increases in such visits are seen. Studies must be conducted to explore ways of keeping patients from seeking care in EDs inappropriately.

  2. Income inequality, disinvestment in health care and use of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Bishal; Newton, Jonathan T; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    To explore the interrelationships between income inequality, disinvestment in health care, and use of dental services at country level. This study pooled national estimates for use of dental services among adults aged 18 years or older from the 70 countries that participated in the World Health Survey from 2002 to 2004, together with aggregate data on national income (GDP per capita), income inequality (Gini coefficient), and disinvestment in health care (total health expenditure and dentist-to-population ratio) from various international sources. Use of dental services was defined as having had dental problems in the last 12 months and having received any treatment to address those needs. Associations between variables were explored using Pearson correlation coefficients and linear regression. Data from 63 countries representing the six WHO regions were analyzed. Use of dental services was negatively correlated with Gini coefficient (Pearson correlation coefficient -0.48, P dental services was attenuated but remained significant after adjustments for GDP per capita, total health expenditure, and dentist-to-population ratio (regression coefficient -0.36; 95% CI -0.57, -0.15). This study shows an inverse relationship between income inequality and use of dental services. Of the two indicators of disinvestment in health care assessed, only dentist-to-population ratio was associated with income inequality and use of dental services. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Oral health considerations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa. 2. Multidisciplinary management and personalized dental care.

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    Bassiouny, Mohamed A; Tweddale, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines a comprehensive, multidisciplinary strategy for treatment of patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. In this approach, primary medical intervention and emergency dental care are followed by the staging of treatment phases that integrate medical care, psychotherapy, nutritional counseling, and dental management, which may encompass various treatment options for repair of damaged dentition. Emphasis is placed on prevention of further tissue damage during all phases of management and following completion of the treatment course.

  4. Effects of music on sedation depth and sedative use during pediatric dental procedures.

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    Ozkalayci, Ozlem; Araz, Coskun; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru; Kayhan, Zeynep

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of listening to music or providing sound isolation on the depth of sedation and need for sedatives in pediatric dental patients. Prospective, randomized, and controlled study. Tertiary, university hospital. In total, 180 pediatric patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, who were scheduled for dental procedures of tooth extraction, filling, amputation, and root treatment. Patients were categorized into 3 groups: music, isolation, and control. During the procedures, the patients in the music group listened to Vivaldi's The Four Seasons violin concertos by sound-isolating headphones, whereas the patients in the isolation group wore the headphones but did not listen to music. All patients were sedated by 0.1 mg/kg midazolam and 1 mg/kg propofol. During the procedure, an additional 0.5 mg/kg propofol was administered as required. Bispectral index was used for quantifying the depth of sedation, and total dosage of the propofol was used for sedative requirements. The patients' heart rates, oxygen saturations, and Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation Scale and bispectral index scores, which were monitored during the operation, were similar among the groups. In terms of the amount of propofol used, the groups were similar. Prolonged postoperative recovery cases were found to be significantly frequent in the control group, according to the recovery duration measurements (P = .004). Listening to music or providing sound isolation during pediatric dental interventions did not alter the sedation level, amount of medication, and hemodynamic variables significantly. This result might be due to the deep sedation levels reached during the procedures. However, listening to music and providing sound isolation might have contributed in shortening the postoperative recovery duration of the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors associated with the use of dental health services in primary care in northeastern Mexico.

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    Guillermo Cruz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In Mexico, as in many other Latin American countries, the use of dental health services (UDHS has been scarcely studied, especially the one related with groups that are considered at risk in certain areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with UDHS in an at risk population in primary care. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study, involving students (T, pregnant women (PW, workers (W and older adults (OA (n=368. Variables such as the use of dental health services and factors such as geographical, economic, and organizational barriers were measured. Descriptive statistics, Chi Square test and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis were used. Results: 40.2% (95% CI 30.2-50.2 of the W group had a history of UDHS in primary care, 20% (95% CI 11.8-28.2 of the PW group had spent more than a year without visiting the dentist and 33% (95% CI 23.7-43.9 had been treated at a private dental care service. Level of schooling, occupation, federal support from "Programa Oportunidades" and access to dental care services (p<0.01 were factors associated with UDHS, independent of potential confounders. Conclusion: The health system should guarantee health care by offering comprehensive dental health services and removing organizational barriers to promote a more equitable access to dental care.

  6. Pediatric Dental Care: Prevention and Management Protocols Based on Caries Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAMOS-GOMEZ, FRANCISCO J.; CRYSTAL, YASMI O.; NG, MAN WAI; CRALL, JAMES J.; FEATHERSTONE, JOHN D.B.

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in caries prevalence in young children, especially among minorities and the economically disadvantaged, highlight the need for early establishment of dental homes and simple, effective infant oral care preventive programs for all children as part of a medical disease prevention management model.1–3 This article presents an updated approach and practical tools for pediatric dental caries management by risk assessment, CAMBRA, in an effort to stimulate greater adoption of infant oral care programs among clinicians and early establishment of dental homes for young children. PMID:21162350

  7. Update on disparities in oral health and access to dental care for America's children.

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    Edelstein, Burton L; Chinn, Courtney H

    2009-01-01

    This contribution updates federal survey findings on children's oral health and dental care since release of Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General in 2000. Dental caries experience continued at high levels, impacting 40% of all children aged 2 to 11 years, with greater disease and untreated disease burden borne by poor and low-income children and racial/ethnic minorities. Caries rates increased for young children (to 28% of 2- to 5-year-olds in the period 1999-2004) and remained flat for most other ages. The total volume of caries and untreated caries increased as the numbers of children increased. The proportion of US children with a dental visit increased modestly (from 42% to 45% between 1996 and 2004), with the greatest increases occurring among children newly covered by the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Disparities in dental visits continued to be evidenced by age, family income, race/ethnicity, and caregiver education. Parental reports of children's oral health and dental care parallel these findings and also reveal higher unmet dental needs among children with special health care needs. Racial- and income-based disparities in both oral health and dental care continue into adolescence and young adulthood. These disparities can, as in the past, be expected to exacerbate under the forces of growing income disparities and demographic trends.

  8. WEALTH EFFECT AND DENTAL CARE UTILIZATION IN THE U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Richard J.; Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan; Clair, Patricia A. St.; Schimmel, Jody; Pepper, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship of wealth and income and the relative impact of each on dental utilization in a population of older Americans, using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Methods Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed for U.S. individuals aged 51 years and older during the 2008 wave of the HRS. The primary focus of the analysis is the relationship between wealth, income and dental utilization. We estimate a multivariable model of dental use controlling for wealth, income and other potentially confounding covariates. Results We find that both wealth and income each have a strong and independent positive effect on dental care use of older Americans [pdental care utilization as wealth increases depends on a person's income level, or, alternatively, that the impact on dental use as income increases depends on a person's household wealth status [p>.05]. Conclusions Relative to those living in the wealthiest U.S. households, the likelihood of utilizing dental care appears to decrease with a decline in wealth. The likelihood of utilizing dental care also appears to decrease with a decline in income as well. PMID:22515635

  9. Pattern of Utilisation of Dental Health Care Among HIV-positive Adult Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedigba, Michael A; Adekanmbi, Victor T; Asa, Sola; Fakande, Ibiyemi

    2016-01-01

    To determine the pattern of dental care utilisation of people living with HIV (PLHIV). A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 239 PLHIV patients in three care centres was done. Information on sociodemographics, dental visit, risk groups, living arrangement, medical insurance and need of dental care was recorded. The EC Clearinghouse and WHO clinical staging was used to determine the stage of HIV/AIDS infection following routine oral examinations under natural daylight. Multivariate logistic regression models were created after adjusting for all the covariates that were statistically significant at univariate/bivariate levels. The majority of subjects were younger than 50 years, about 93% had not seen a dentist before being diagnosed HIV positive and 92% reported no dental visit after contracting HIV. Among nonusers of dental care, 14.3% reported that they wanted care but were afraid to seek it. Other reasons included poor awareness, lack of money and stigmatisation. Multivariate analysis showed that lack of dental care was associated with employment status, living arrangements, educational status, income per annum and presenting with oral symptoms. The area under the receiver operating curve was 84% for multivariate logistic regression model 1, 70% for model 2, 67% for model 3 and 71% for model 4, which means that the predictive power of the models were good. Contrary to our expectations, dental utilisation among PLHIV was generally poor among this group of patients. There is serious and immediate need to improve the awareness of PLHIVs in African settings and barriers to dental care utilisation should also be removed or reduced.

  10. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  11. Dental Health Care Models of Southwest Cultures. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettibone, Timothy J.; Solis, Enrique, Jr.

    The major goal of this research was the development and validation of cultural models of dental health practices. The specific objectives were to determine if 3 cultural groups (American Indians, Mexican Americans, and Anglo Americans) differ in the dental health hygiene indices, characteristics, psychological factors, or social factors; to…

  12. PROVIDING DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

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    Diana MURARU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorders, it is realistic to assume that dental professionals are likely to treat individuals with this diagnosis. Understanding the complexities of this disorder and its behavioral manifestations is indispensable for dentists. The present article presents several characteristics of autism spectrum disorder that impact dental interventions, along with medical and behavioral alternatives to better manage the dental problems of children with autism spectrum disorder. A multidisciplinary approach and family support are important for planning a dental intervention for these patients in order to avoid anxiety. Knowledge on autism, the dentist-patient relationship and the individual preparation for dental interventions is useful for constructing a controllable medical experience

  13. The effect of health and dental insurance on US children's dental care utilization for urgent and non-urgent dental problems - 2008.

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    Naavaal, Shillpa; Barker, Laurie K; Griffin, Susan O

    2017-12-01

    We examined the association between utilization of care for a dental problem (utilization-DP) and parent-reported dental problem (DP) urgency among children with DP by type of health care insurance coverage. We used weighted 2008 National Health Interview Survey data from 2,834 children, aged 2-17 years with at least one DP within the 6 months preceding survey. Explanatory variables were selected based on Andersen's model of healthcare utilization. Need was considered urgent if DP included toothache, bleeding gums, broken or missing teeth, broken or missing filling, or decayed teeth and otherwise as non-urgent. The primary enabling variable, insurance, had four categories: none, private health no dental coverage (PHND), private health and dental (PHD), or Medicaid/State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Predisposing variables included sociodemographic characteristics. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to identify explanatory variables' association with utilization-DP. Using logistic regression, we obtained adjusted estimates of utilization-DP by urgency for each insurance category. In bivariate analyses, utilization-DP was associated with both insurance and urgency. In multivariate analyses, the difference in percent utilizing care for an urgent versus non-urgent DP among children covered by Medicaid/SCHIP was 32 percentage points; PHD, 25 percentage points; PHND, 12 percentage points; and no insurance, 14 percentage points. The difference in utilization by DP urgency was higher for children with Medicaid/SCHIP compared with either PHND or uninsured children. Expansion of Medicaid/SCHIP may permit children to receive care for urgent DPs who otherwise may not, due to lack of dental insurance. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. Compliance & dexterity, factors to consider in home care and maintenance procedures Adherencia e destreza: factores a considerar en programas preventivos

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Criado; Andrew Tawse-Smith

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical plaque control appears to be the primary means of controlling supragingival dental plaque build-up. Although daily oral hygiene practices and periodic professional care are considered the basis for any program aimed at the prevention and treatment of oral diseases, these procedures are technically demanding, time consuming and can be affected by the compliance and manual dexterity of the patient. Individual skills and acquired behavior patterns determine effectiveness of a preventi...

  15. Affordability of population towards dental care in Mathura City—A household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Kundan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the factors of affordability towards dental care in Mathura city. Material and Methods The present study included 100 households from which 100 persons were interviewed above the age group of 25 years. Data was collected with the help of structured Questionnaires & Face interviews. Information was collected regarding Socio-demographic variables & attitudes of the subjects towards the utilization of dental service and the affordability of the dental services. The data was then statistically analyzed using chi square test. Results In the present study it was found that the income and education were significantly associated with the affordability of the dental services. Individuals having an income of above Rs 20, 000/ were found to afford the available dental care. Individuals having educational qualification of graduate and above were utilizing the dental services better than others. Conclusion Within the limitation of this study, we can conclude that the utilization of dental services is not very high among Mathura city population. The affordability factor such as income, education and occupation were identified as the major factor towards utilization of dental services. However place of visit differs according to income, education and occupation.

  16. A systematic review of complication risks for HIV-positive patients undergoing invasive dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lauren L; Shugars, Daniel A; Bonito, Arthur J

    2002-02-01

    This systematic literature review determined the strength of evidence regarding whether patients with human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, are at higher risk of developing complications from invasive oral procedures than similar patients without HIV. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches of the English literature from the early 1980s through April 2000 yielded five articles meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria: original research, concurrent treatment of HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects, presence of complications (for example, local or systemic infection, bleeding, alveolitis, delayed healing) resulting from extractions, orthognathic surgery, periodontal therapy, endodontic therapy, placement of dental implants, prophylaxis, or scaling and root planing. The authors found no studies involving orthognathic surgery, periodontal therapy, dental implants, prophylaxis, or scaling and root planing, and only one study reporting few immediate endodontic therapeutic complications. Thus, the evidence is insufficient with respect to any additional risk associated with these procedures among people with HIV/AIDS. Because of the few studies, low overall complication rates and variability in results from different analytic approaches, the authors consider the evidence to be too poor to rule in or out a meaningful relationship between HIV status and complications from tooth extractions. Limited published scientific evidence is available to guide clinicians in regard to possible increased risks of invasive oral procedures associated with the HIV status of the patient.

  17. Teaching nightguard bleaching and other tooth-whitening procedures in North American dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, K B; Haywood, V B

    2000-05-01

    Tooth-whitening using carbamide peroxide delivered in a custom-fitted tray (nightguard bleaching) is a relatively new procedure, yet it is currently one of the most commonly used types of esthetic dental treatment in private practice. This study determined the extent that nightguard bleaching (NGB) has been included in dental school curricula. All sixty-five dental schools in North America were surveyed about curriculum content and treatment protocol for the use of nightguard and other bleaching procedures, generating an 82 percent response. The survey covered eighteen subject areas related to NGB ranging from clinical requirements and indications to products and recall intervals used. The most commonly taught tooth-whitening procedure was NGB, which was most often taught by operative and restorative faculty. Although no schools had clinical requirements for NGB, 92 percent taught it. The most common indications for NGB were esthetic shade change and pre-restorative lightening of teeth. Unrestored caries, defective restorations, and pre-existing sensitivity were common contraindications. Most schools do not use a specific NGB consent form, but most use written patient instructions. Most schools use at least two different NGB products, bleach for two to four weeks, and use reservoired and scalloped trays. An average of 25 percent of NGB patients were estimated to develop sensitivity, for which treatment recommendations include fluoride, desensitizing toothpaste, and reduced exposure time. Curriculum time and safety concerns were reasons for not teaching NGB (8 percent schools). Most schools indicated that the relative importance of NGB in the curriculum was increasing.

  18. Mercury in dental amalgam: Are our health care workers at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, M; Sulaiman, N S; Tan, B S; Yahya, N A; Anual, Z F; Mahiyuddin, W R Wan; Khan, M F; Muttalib, K A

    2016-11-01

    Dental amalgam in fillings exposes workers to mercury. The exposure to mercury was investigated among 1871 dental health care workers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of mercury exposure among dental compared to nondental health care workers and to determine other risk factors for mercury exposure. Respondents answered questionnaires to obtain demographic, personal, professional, and workplace information and were examined for their own amalgam fillings. Chronic mercury exposure was assessed through urinary mercury levels. In total, 1409 dental and 462 nondental health care workers participated in the study. Median urine mercury levels for dental and nondental health care workers were 2.75 μg/L (interquartile range [IQR] = 3.0175) and 2.66 μg/L (IQR = 3.04) respectively. For mercury exposure, there were no significant risk factor found among the workers involved within the dental care. The Mann-Whitney test showed that urine mercury levels were significantly different between respondents who eat seafood more than 5 times per week compared to those who eat it less frequently or not at all (p = 0.003). The urinary mercury levels indicated significant difference between dental workers in their practice using squeeze cloths (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.03). Multiple logistic regression showed that only the usage of cosmetic products that might contain mercury was found to be significantly associated with the urinary mercury levels (odds ratio [OR] = 15.237; CI: 3.612-64.276). Therefore, mean urinary mercury levels of health care workers were low. Exposure to dental amalgam is not associated with high mercury exposure. However, usage of cosmetic products containing mercury and high seafood consumption may lead to the increase of exposure to mercury.

  19. A new primary dental care service compared with standard care for child and family to reduce the re-occurrence of childhood dental caries (Dental RECUR): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Cynthia; Adair, Pauline; Burnside, Girvan; Robinson, Louise; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Albadri, Sondos; Curnow, Morag; Ghahreman, Marjan; Henderson, Mary; Malies, Clare; Wong, Ferranti; Muirhead, Vanessa; Weston-Price, Sally; Whitehead, Hilary

    2015-11-04

    In England and Scotland, dental extraction is the single highest cause of planned admission to the hospital for children under 11 years. Traditional dental services have had limited success in reducing this disease burden. Interventions based on motivational interviewing have been shown to impact positively dental health behaviours and could facilitate the prevention of re-occurrence of dental caries in this high-risk population. The objective of the study is to evaluate whether a new, dental nurse-led service, delivered using a brief negotiated interview based on motivational interviewing, is a more cost-effective service than treatment as usual, in reducing the re-occurrence of dental decay in young children with previous dental extractions. This 2-year, two-arm, multicentre, randomised controlled trial will include 224 child participants, initially aged 5 to 7 years, who are scheduled to have one or more primary teeth extracted for dental caries under general anaesthesia (GA), relative analgesia (RA: inhalation sedation) or local anaesthesia (LA). The trial will be conducted in University Dental Hospitals, Secondary Care Centres or other providers of dental extraction services across the United Kingdom. The intervention will include a brief negotiated interview (based on the principles of motivational interviewing) delivered between enrollment and 6 weeks post-extraction, followed by directed prevention in primary dental care. Participants will be followed up for 2 years. The main outcome measure will be the dental caries experienced by 2 years post-enrollment at the level of dentine involvement on any tooth in either dentition, which had been caries-free at the baseline assessment. The participants are a hard-to-reach group in which secondary prevention is a challenge. Lack of engagement with dental care makes the children and their families scheduled for extraction particularly difficult to recruit to an RCT. Variations in service delivery between sites have

  20. Provision of dental care in aged care facilities, NSW, Australia - part 1 as perceived by the directors of nursing (care providers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Bettine C; Whittle, Terry; Schwarz, Eli

    2013-09-01

    To ascertain the Directors of Nursing (DONs) perception of the provision of dental care and the difficulties in oral health maintenance for residents in New South Wales (NSW) aged care facilities (ACFs). There were no specific figures relating to DONs' perceptions of oral health needs and dental care nor obstructions to dental care of residents. A total of 414 questionnaires, encoded for confidentiality, were posted to all DONs of ACFs in NSW and the data analysed. Questionnaires were returned from 255 ACFs (response rate 61.6%) representing 16 861 residents with a male-to-female ratio of 1:3.45. Of these residents, 48% had a dental assessment on admission by qualified dental staff. In 74.2% of facilities, no regular visits by dental staff took place, and 58.6% considered the perceived unwillingness of dental professionals to visit residents a barrier to good oral health. DONs reported that 53.6% of residents had dentures only, while 18.3% had natural teeth only. The most frequent difficulties reported by staff were residents' use of abusive language (78.2%) and residents refusing to open mouth (60.9%). Lack of involvement of dental professionals in admission assessment and in ongoing programmes was of concern to DONs in ACFs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Users’ dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; dos Santos, Pedro Eleutério; Carreiro, Danilo Lima; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigênia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users’ dissatisfaction with such are. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users’ dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable), demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables). Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect) were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms. CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units. PMID:26270017

  2. Political or dental power in private and public service provision: a study of municipal expenditures for child dental care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L. B.; Bech, M.; Lauridsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Both professionals and politicians may affect expenditures for highly professional services provided in the public and private sector. We investigated Danish publicly financed child dental care with a special focus on the influence of politicians and dentists on the expenditure level. By studying...... spatial patterns in expenditure levels across municipalities, we are able to test the influences of these two main actors and the networks through which learning is achieved. Four hypotheses on the existence of different spatial spillover effects are tested. The empirical analysis is based on annual data...... from 1996 to 2001 for 226 Danish municipalities, thus allowing for the control for heterogeneity between municipalities and for intra-municipal correlations across time. The results point to differences in expenditures between municipalities with privately and publicly produced dental care. Furthermore...

  3. Gaps in need, demand, and effective demand for dental care utilization among residents of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Y.; Chakravarty, Kalyan K.; Simhadri, Kavya; Ghenam, Alexis; Naidu, Guntipalli M.; Vundavalli, Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To identify the relation between need, demand, and effective demand for dental services in Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed among populations residing in the rural and urban areas of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Data were collected from 3102 individuals who were selected through multiphase random sampling. Data regarding self-perceived dental need, dental service utilization, and barriers for utilization were collected through s pretested questionnaire followed by type-III clinical examination to assess the normative need of the individuals. Chi-square test was used to compare independent and dependent variables, and further comparison was done with multivariate logistic regression analysis for significant variables. Results: Less than half (40%) of the participants perceived a need for dental care. Among the people who perceived need for care, only 21.4% utilized dental care and 78.6% of them had unmet dental needs. The two main reasons for not seeking dental care was lack of money, i.e., unaffordable dental treatment (48%) and having the perception that they do not have any dental problem (19.4%). Conclusions: There is an enormous difference between normative need, demand, and actual utilization rates in dental care, and hindrances for effective demand need to be addressed to improve dental care delivery system. PMID:27652242

  4. Two-stage dental implants inserted in a one-stage procedure : a prospective comparative clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijdenrijk, Kees

    2002-01-01

    The results of this study indicate that dental implants designed for a submerged implantation procedure can be used in a single-stage procedure and may be as predictable as one-stage implants. Although one-stage implant systems and two-stage.

  5. Two-stage dental implants inserted in a one-stage procedure : a prospective comparative clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijdenrijk, Kees

    2002-01-01

    The results of this study indicate that dental implants designed for a submerged implantation procedure can be used in a single-stage procedure and may be as predictable as one-stage implants. Although one-stage implant systems and two-stage.

  6. Patients' Perceptions of Dental Students' Empathic, Person-Centered Care in a Dental School Clinic in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Muneer Gohar; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Yong, Wong Mei; Mitha, Shahid; Al-Waeli, Haider Abdulameer

    2017-04-01

    Empathy has been identified as a crucial foundation in building an effective dentist-patient relationship. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of dental students' empathic care in the primary oral health care clinic at International Medical University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in May-October 2014. The study also assessed the validity and reliability of the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure in this setting; the association between number of encounters and students' CARE Measure scores; and the association between students' empathy (measured by the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire) and CARE Measure scores. Participants were 283 patients (aged ≥18 years) who were asked to self-complete the ten-item CARE Measure immediately after their clinical encounter with students who provided care under supervision of the teaching staff. The results showed that the CARE Measure demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.95). A single factor solution emerged, accounting for 69% of the variance. The mean CARE Measure score in the consultations was 43.55±6.14, and 26% of the students achieved the maximum possible score of 50. The mean number of encounters with each student was 2.33±2.78. An increase of one episode was associated with an insignificant average CARE score decrease of 0.05 (-0.28, 0.38), whereas students' empathy was associated with a small increase in average CARE Measure score of 0.63 (0.08, 1.18). These results provide evidence of the measure's ability to support feedback to dental students on their empathy when interacting with patients.

  7. Medicaid Meets Its Equal Access Requirement For Dental Care, But Oral Health Disparities Remain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Jaffer A; Edelstein, Burton L

    2016-12-01

    Most US children today have public or private dental health insurance, yet oral health among publicly insured children remains a policy concern. We analyzed data for 2011-12 from the National Survey of Children's Health to compare oral health status and the use of dental care among publicly and privately insured children. After we adjusted for demographic and parent characteristics, we found no differences between the two groups in parent-reported use of dental care or unmet need for dental care. However, compared to parents of privately insured children, parents of publicly insured children were less likely to report that the condition of their child's teeth was excellent or very good and more likely to report that the child had had a dental problem in the past twelve months. Family income differences between the groups accounted for much of this disparity. Our findings suggest that Medicaid is meeting its mandate to ensure that dental care is as available for children in the program as it is for privately insured children, but refinements in Medicaid policy are needed to improve poor children's oral health. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  8. Access to dental care and dental ill-health of people with serious mental illness: views of nurses working in mental health settings in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David; Hanley, Christine

    2015-01-01

    People with serious mental illness experience higher rates of oral and dental health problems than the wider population. Little is known about how dental health is viewed or addressed by nurses working with mental health consumers. This paper presents the views of nurses regarding the nature and severity of dental health problems of consumers with serious mental illness, and how often they provide advice on dental health. Mental health sector nurses (n=643) completed an online survey, including questions on dental and oral health issues of people with serious mental illness. The majority of nurses considered the oral and dental conditions of people with serious mental illness to be worse than the wider community. When compared with a range of significant physical health issues (e.g. cardiovascular disease), many nurses emphasised that dental and oral problems are one of the most salient health issues facing people with serious mental illness, their level of access to dental care services is severely inadequate and they suffer significantly worse dental health outcomes as a result. This study highlights the need for reforms to increase access to dental and oral health care for mental health consumers.

  9. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  10. Anaesthesia for procedures in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet-Rivier, M; Chioléro, R L

    2001-08-01

    Taking in charge severely ill patients in the intensive care environment to manage complex procedures is a performance requiring highly specific knowledge. Close collaboration between anaesthetists and intensive care specialists is likely to improve the safety and quality of medical care. Three forms of anaesthetic care should be considered in clinical practice: sedation and analgesia; monitored anaesthetic care; and general anaesthesia or conduction block anaesthesia. Even in the field of sedation and analgesia, the anaesthesiologist can offer expertise on new anaesthetic techniques like: the most recent concepts of balanced anaesthesia in terms of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, favouring the use of short-acting agents and of sedative-opioid combinations. New modes of administration and monitoring intravenous anaesthesia have been developed, with potential application in the intensive care unit. These include the use of target-controlled administration of intravenous drugs, and of electroencephalographic signals to monitor the level of sedation.

  11. Dental care protocol based on visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) have often difficulties to accept dental treatments. The aim of this study is to propose a dental care protocol based on visual supports to facilitate children with ASDs to undergo to oral examination and treatments. Material and Methods 83 children (age range 6-12 years) with a signed consent form were enrolled; intellectual level, verbal fluency and cooperation grade were evaluated. Children were introduced into a four stages path in...

  12. A qualitative study of extended care permit dental hygienists in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delinger, Janette; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Williams, Karen B

    2014-06-01

    Currently, 37 states allow some type of alternative practice settings for dental hygienists. This qualitative study was designed to explore the experiences of the Extended Care Permit (ECP) dental hygienist in the state of Kansas. As a first ever study of this workforce model, a qualitative research design was chosen to illuminate the education and experiences of extended dental hygiene practitioners in order to understand the impact ECP legislation has had on increasing the public's access to oral health care services and define the advantages and limitation of this model as one potential solution to access to oral care. Snowball sampling was used to identify study participants who were actively engaged in extended care practice. Nine subjects, which included one ECP consultant and eight ECP providers, participated in this study. Data obtained via personal interviews and through document analysis data were subsequently coded and thematically analyzed by three examiners. An independent audit was conducted by a fourth examiner to confirm dependability of results. Seven major categories emerged from the data analysis: entrepreneur dental hygienist, partnerships, funding, barriers, sustainability, models of care and the impact of the ECP. The findings of this study revealed that ECP hygienists are making an impact with underserved populations, primarily children, the elderly and special needs patients. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  13. Let Them In: Family Presence during Intensive Care Unit Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Francis, Leslie; Chapman, Diane; Johnson, Joclynn; Johnson, Nathanael; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    Families have for decades advocated for full access to intensive care units (ICUs) and meaningful partnership with clinicians, resulting in gradual improvements in family access and collaboration with ICU clinicians. Despite such advances, family members in adult ICUs are still commonly asked to leave the patient's room during invasive bedside procedures, regardless of whether the patient would prefer family to be present. Physicians may be resistant to having family members at the bedside due to concerns about trainee education, medicolegal implications, possible effects on the technical quality of procedures due to distractions, and procedural sterility. Limited evidence from parallel settings does not support these concerns. Family presence during ICU procedures, when the patient and family member both desire it, fulfills the mandates of patient-centered care. We anticipate that such inclusion will increase family engagement, improve patient and family satisfaction, and may, on the basis of studies of open visitation, pediatric ICU experience, and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, decrease psychological distress in patients and family members. We believe these goals can be achieved without compromising the quality of patient care, increasing provider burden significantly, or increasing risks of litigation. In this article, we weigh current evidence, consider historical objections to family presence at ICU procedures, and report our clinical experience with the practice. An outline for implementing family procedural presence in the ICU is also presented.

  14. A New Approach to Ensuring Oral Health Care for People Living With HIV/AIDS: The Dental Case Manager

    OpenAIRE

    Lemay, Celeste A.; Cashman, Suzanne B.; McDonald, Anne; Graves, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The American Dental Association has identified several barriers to adequate dental care for vulnerable populations, including appropriate case management. The objective of this study was to examine the perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs of dental patients living with HIV/AIDS on the role and value of the dental case manager (DCM) and the effect of DCM services on their oral or overall health. Methods We used a qualitative descriptive study design and focus groups. Twenty-five pe...

  15. Patient satisfaction analysis on service quality of dental health care based on empathy and responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Fellani Danasra; Sudjana, Grita; Oesman, Yevis Marty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transformation of health care is underway from sellers’ market to consumers’ market, where the satisfaction of the patients’ need is a primary concern while defining the service quality. Hence, commitment to provide a high-quality service and achieving patients’ satisfaction becomes an important issue for dental health care provider. The aim of this research is to investigate the quality of dental health care service based on empathy and responsiveness aspects. Methods: A total of 90 questionnaires were completed by the dental patients who came to dental polyclinic located in Government Hospital, West Java, Indonesia. The questionnaire was concerned on two dimensions of service quality model, i.e. empathy and responsiveness. The obtained data were analyzed using inferential statistics (t test) and also descriptive statistics with importance–performance analysis. Results: All the attributes tested by t test showed that perception and expectation differed significantly, except for responsiveness, i.e. ability of dental assistants in assisting the dentist (t test 0.505dentist (t test 4.700). Conclusion: It can be inferred from IPA that priority should be given to dentist's communication and dental assistant's knowledge toward patient's needs to enhance the service quality. PMID:22135687

  16. Future demand for dental care in Norway; a macro-economic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Lund, E

    1999-10-01

    The future demand for dental care in Norway is discussed on the basis of economic theory. During the next 30 years gross national income will increase substantially due to a marked increase in national income from the sale of oil and gas. On the basis of the model we predict that this increase in income will lead to an increase in demand for dental services in the short run, say for the next 10-15 years. To a large extent this increase in demand is supported by evidence from dental epidemiology. In particular, an increasing proportion of elderly dentate people will demand more services. This picture is different in the long run, say from the year 2010-15 and onwards. Evidence from dental epidemiology indicates that at that stage there will be a fairly high proportion of disease-free individuals in the population who will demand less dental care. Such a trend is also supported by economic theory as long as disease-free individuals consume less dental care irrespective of their income.

  17. A Retrospective Study of Treatment Complexity and Efficiency in a Brazilian Undergraduate Comprehensive Dental Care Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristina Guimarães Bahia Reis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore treatment efficiency in an undergraduate comprehensive dental care program (CDCP. The study sample consisted of the records of 652 patients from the CDCP of the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Goias, Brazil, who were treated in the period from 2004 through 2009. A total of 45 clinical procedures performed by the students was listed and a panel of 19 judges, graded the perceived complexity of each procedure on a 11-point scale using an adaptation of the Thurstone method. Spearman's correlation, one-way Anova, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression were used to build a predictive model for time-to-event data—completion of treatment (CT. Treatment time for CT was correlated with complexity scores (=0.60; <0.001. The average estimated median months for CT was 23.0 (95%CI = 19.6–26.3 and was significantly different (<0.001 among complexity levels (low 13.0, intermediary 19.0, high 47.0. When low complexity was the reference category, estimated changes in risk for incomplete treatment were greater for intermediary (HR=0.54; 95%CI = 0.40–0.75 and high complexity cases (HR=0.32; 95%CI = 0.23–0.45. The results indicated that treatment complexity has a large influence on undergraduate CDCP efficiency and should be considered when planning organizational strategies for the clinical environment.

  18. Dental education and changing oral health care needs: disparities and demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E N; Inglehart, Marita R; Tedesco, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    The population of the United States has changed dramatically over recent decades and, with it, the oral health care needs of the nation. Most notably, the racial/ethnic composition of the population has shifted from a European American majority to what is now a much more diverse population, comprising a variety of racial/ethnic groups that, taken together, will become the majority by mid-century. The proportion of children from minority racial groups will represent more than half of all U.S. children by 2025. These groups are overrepresented among those living below the poverty level and have higher levels of oral disease and are less likely to have access to care than the European American segment of the U.S. population. Most of the population needing dental care in the future will be comprised of these now underserved groups, along with other groups who can be described in terms of the health and social challenges of aging, disabilities, or other special health care conditions. This article provides an overview of these various needs and what they will mean for the dental practitioners of tomorrow and suggests that dental education has not adapted to the changing population and its oral health needs as quickly as it should. As a result, we identify major gaps in current dental curricula and make some recommendations for change. Research has shown that dental education has a crucial influence on future providers' professional attitudes and behavior related to providing care for patients from underserved patient groups. Acknowledging the specific needs of patients and ensuring that future providers are optimally prepared to respond to these challenges must be a major goal of dental education in the twenty-first century. The Journal of Dental Education will continue to play a critical role in informing readers about innovative approaches and best practices that ensure this goal can be met.

  19. Political or dental power in private and public service provision: a study of municipal expenditures for child dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Bech, Mickael; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2012-07-01

    Both professionals and politicians may affect expenditures for highly professional services provided in the public and private sector. We investigated Danish publicly financed child dental care with a special focus on the influence of politicians and dentists on the expenditure level. By studying spatial patterns in expenditure levels across municipalities, we are able to test the influences of these two main actors and the networks through which learning is achieved. Four hypotheses on the existence of different spatial spillover effects are tested. The empirical analysis is based on annual data from 1996 to 2001 for 226 Danish municipalities, thus allowing for the control for heterogeneity between municipalities and for intra-municipal correlations across time. The results point to differences in expenditures between municipalities with privately and publicly produced dental care. Furthermore, dentists appear to be the most important actors for the spatial spillover effects, and these effects are especially strong for municipalities situated in the same county that use private dental clinics. There is no evidence of political spatial spillover effects between municipalities.

  20. Design and Outcomes of a Comprehensive Care Experience Level System to Evaluate and Monitor Dental Students' Clinical Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Sorin T; Roperto, Renato; Alonso, Aurelio A; Lang, Lisa A

    2016-06-01

    A Comprehensive Care Experience Level (CCEL) system that is aligned with Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) standards, promotes comprehensive care and prevention, and addresses flaws observed in previous Relative Value Units (RVU)-based programs has been implemented at the School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University since 2011. The purpose of this article is to report on the design, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of this novel clinical evaluation system. With the development of the CCEL concept, it was decided not to award points for procedures performed on competency exams. The reason behind this decision was that exams are not learning opportunities and are evaluated with summative tools. To determine reasonable alternative requirements, production data from previous classes were gathered and translated into CCEL points. These RVU points had been granted selectively only for restorative procedures completed after the initial preparation stage of the treatment plan, and achievement of the required levels was checked at multiple points during the clinical curriculum. Results of the CCEL system showed that low performing students increased their productivity, overall production at graduation increased significantly, and fluoride utilization to prevent caries rose by an order of magnitude over the RVU system. The CCEL program also allowed early identification and remediation of students having difficulty in the clinic. This successful implementation suggests that the CCEL concept has the potential for widespread adoption by dental schools. This method also can be used as a behavior modification tool to achieve specific patient care or clinical educational goals as illustrated by the way caries prevention was promoted through the program.

  1. Dental Anxiety and the Use of Oral Health Services Among People Attending Two HIV Primary Care Clinics in Miami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Richard; Cardenas, Gabriel; Xavier, Jessica; Jeanty, Yves; Pereyra, Margaret; Rodriguez, Allan; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We examined factors associated with dental anxiety among a sample of HIV primary care patients and investigated the independent association of dental anxiety with oral health care. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected in 2010 from 444 patients attending two HIV primary care clinics in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Corah Dental Anxiety Scores and use of oral health-care services were obtained from all HIV-positive patients in the survey. Results The prevalence of moderate to severe dental anxiety in this sample was 37.8%, while 7.9% of the sample was characterized with severe dental anxiety. The adjusted odds of having severe dental anxiety were 3.962 times greater for females than for males (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.688, 9.130). After controlling for age, ethnicity, gender, education, access to dental care, and HIV primary clinic experience, participants with severe dental anxiety had 69.3% lower adjusted odds of using oral health-care services within the past 12 months (vs. longer than 12 months ago) compared with participants with less-than-severe dental anxiety (adjusted odds ratio = 0.307, 95% CI 0.127, 0.742). Conclusion A sizable number of patients living with HIV have anxiety associated with obtaining needed dental care. Routine screening for dental anxiety and counseling to reduce dental anxiety are supported by this study as a means of addressing the impact of dental anxiety on the use of oral health services among HIV-positive individuals. PMID:22547875

  2. Access to dental care for HIV patients: does it matter and does discrimination exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett, T; Slide, C; Mallick, F; Lau, R

    2009-11-01

    A number of surveys highlight a shortage of dentists in the UK. There is also evidence of discrimination against those with HIV reported within the dental profession and service users. We decided to assess the extent of this problem in our HIV outpatients by conducting a cross-sectional survey, asking them to complete a questionnaire exploring issues related to dental care access, and using clients attending the routine genitourinary (GU) medicine outpatient clinic as controls. A total of 241 outpatients completed the survey, of whom 51 (21%) were HIV patients. Significantly, more HIV patients reported difficulty registering with a dentist than GU patients (58.8% versus 18.2%, chi(2) with Yates correction = 8.76, P = 0.0031). They also report significantly more dental health problems compared with controls (54.9% versus 32.1%, chi(2) with Yates correction = 8.02, P = 0.0046). In total, 34.6% of HIV patients who had declared their status to a dentist thought that it had negatively impacted on their care, with 6.2% being refused treatment. Our small survey confirms that discrimination in relation to access and level of dental care exists, with black African women being at most risk. Efforts are needed to raise professional standards and HIV awareness to prevent continuing inequalities in dental care provision.

  3. Standard operating procedures approach for the implementation of the evidence-based dentistry concept in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clóvis M; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2007-09-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is a concept that when applied to clinical practice may improve the quality of dental treatment. However, dentists' reluctance to change their behavior may be a barrier to the implementation of the process. The main purpose of this study was to demonstrate that standard operating procedures (SOPs) may help dentists to apply scientific evidence to their dental practice. SOPs are written instructions on how to execute some specific tasks. A flowchart model demonstrated how an ordinary clinical procedure (composite restoration) can be performed using evidence-based information to support each executed step. Implementing the model into daily practice is straightforward, and the results are accessible to the whole dental team. In addition, the flowchart can be regularly updated with high-quality dental literature such as systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials and randomized controlled trials. This proposed model may help to bridge the gap between research and clinical dental practice by serving as a practical tool to improve the knowledge of dental practitioners and the quality of treatment.

  4. Unmet Dental Needs and Barriers to Dental Care among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bien; Milano, Michael; Roberts, Michael W.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mail-in pilot-tested questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 1,500 families from the North Carolina Autism Registry. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the significance of unmet dental needs and other predictors. Of 568 surveys returned (Response Rate = 38%), 555 were complete and usable. Sixty-five…

  5. Unmet Dental Needs and Barriers to Dental Care among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bien; Milano, Michael; Roberts, Michael W.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mail-in pilot-tested questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 1,500 families from the North Carolina Autism Registry. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the significance of unmet dental needs and other predictors. Of 568 surveys returned (Response Rate = 38%), 555 were complete and usable. Sixty-five…

  6. Knowledge and attitudes of Japanese dental health care workers towards HIV-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, H; Adachi, N; Kobayashi, K; Yamada, T

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate knowledge of AIDS and HIV infection among Japanese dental health care workers, the source of that knowledge and attitudes of dental workers towards infected patients. The study population surveyed by means of a self-administered questionnaire consisted of 174 dental health workers at Nagasaki University Dental Hospital, including students and trainee hygienists. Most respondents (100% response) claimed their major source of AIDS knowledge to be derived from the media. Almost all considered their knowledge of AIDS and HIV infection to be more than moderate but still inadequate. The majority of respondents would be hesitant about performing dental treatment on HIV-positive patients. It was widely anticipated that dental patients infected with HIV would increase in the next few years and many were anxious about the increasing occupational risk of HIV infection. Only 22.4% of respondents had the same attitude towards treating HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Most also considered that they would be able to take care of the oral opportunistic diseases associated with HIV. Over 90.0% of respondents requested additional education about HIV, particularly information about the prevention and spread of the virus and cross-infection requirements. It is concluded that further training in the medical and psychological aspects of treating HIV-positive patients is indicated in Japan.

  7. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  8. Dental Care Issues for African Immigrant Families of Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Cecilia S.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines dental health issues for African immigrant families of preschoolers living in the United States. The study was done within the framework of narrative inquiry and ethnographic impressionism. Through personal interviews and questionnaire completion, 125 parents of children ages 3 to 5 answered questions about ways in which…

  9. INTRODUCTION Dental care utilization can be defined as the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the population who access dental services over a specified period of ... problem with universal distribution and affecting all age ... The younger age groups were noticed to be more ..... income African-American children: J.Am Dent Ass. 2007 ...

  10. Dental care needs in the child population of a megapolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Ulitovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the reports of examination preschool and school-aged children for the 2008-2014 year we can conclude that nowadays the issue of prevention of dental diseases among the inspected groups of children is actually

  11. Racial and ethnic disparities in dental care for publicly insured children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Finocchio, Len

    2010-07-01

    Poor oral health has important implications for the healthy development of children. Children in Medicaid, especially Latinos and African Americans, experience high rates of tooth decay, yet they visit dentists less often than privately insured children. Even Latino and African American children with private insurance are less likely than white children to visit dentists and have longer intervals between dental visits. Furthermore, Latino and African American children in Medicaid are more likely than white children in Medicaid to have longer intervals between visits. These findings raise concerns about Medicaid's ability to address disparities in dental care access and, more broadly, in health care.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia with 2% lignocaine in various minor pediatric dental procedures: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Dhindsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most distressing aspects of dentistry for pediatric patients is the fear and anxiety caused by the dental environment, particularly the dental injection. The application and induction of local anesthetics has always been a difficult task, and this demands an alternative method that is convenient and effective. Electronic dental anesthesia, based on the principal of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS, promises to be a viable mode of pain control during various pediatric clinical procedures. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS and to compare its efficacy with 2% lignocaine during various minor pediatric dental procedures. Pain, comfort and effectiveness of both the anesthetics were evaluated using various scales and no significant difference was observed between 2% lignocaine and TENS in the various pain scales, while TENS was perceived to be significantly effective in comfort and efficacy as judged by the operator and quite comfortable as judged by the patient himself/herself.

  13. Questionnaire for measuring organisational attributes in dental-care practices: psychometric properties and test-retest reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Hasse, Philipp; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen M

    2016-04-01

    The consideration of organisational aspects, such as shared goals and clear communication, within the health care team is important to ensure good quality care. In primary health care, the instrument Survey of Organizational Attributes for Primary Care (SOAPC) is available to measure organisational attributes of care. However, there is no instrument available for dental care. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychometric properties and test-retest reliability of the version of SOAPC adapted for dental care, namely the Survey of Organizational Attributes in Dental Care (SOADC). The SOADC consists of 21 items in the following four subscales: communication; decision making; stress/chaos; and history of change. Convergent construct validity was measured using the job satisfaction scale. A total of 287 dental-care practices were asked to participate in the validation study. Psychometric properties and test-retest reliability were observed. A total of 43 dental-care practices responded to the survey. At baseline, 178 dental-care staff completed the questionnaire, and 4 weeks later 138 did so. Internal consistency, measured by Cronbach's alpha, was 0.718 or higher in the subscales. The test-retest reliability for each subscale and the overall SOADC score demonstrated good correlations over the 4-week test-retest interval, except for 'history of change'. A strong correlation with the aggregated job-satisfaction scale showed high convergent construct validity of SOADC. The consideration of organisational aspects from the perspective of dental-care teams is important for providing good quality of care. The SOADC is a reliable instrument with good psychometric properties and is suitable for the evaluation of organisational attributes in dental-care practices. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  14. Changes in Socioeconomic Inequalities in the Use of Dental Care Following Major Healthcare Reform in Chile, 2004–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Ovalle, Marco; Paraje, Guillermo; Vásquez-Lavín, Felipe; Pérez, Glòria; Palència, Laia; Borrell, Carme

    2015-01-01

    The study examines changes in the distribution and socioeconomic inequalities of dental care utilization among adults after the major healthcare reform in Chile, 2004–2009. We evaluated the proportion of people who visited the dentist at least once in the previous two years, and the mean number of visits. These outcome variables were stratified by sex, age (20–39, 40–59, 60–63; ≥64 years), educational level (primary, secondary, higher), type of health insurance (public, private, uninsured), and socioeconomic status (quintiles of an asset-index). We also used the concentration index (CIndex) to assess the extent of socioeconomic inequalities in the use of dental care, stratified by age and sex as a proxy for dental care needs. The use of dental care significantly increased between 2004 and 2009, especially in those with public health insurance, with lower educational level and lower socioeconomic status. The CIndex for the total population significantly decreased both for the proportion who used dental care, and also the mean number of visits. Findings suggest that the use of dental care increased and socioeconomic-related inequalities in the utilization of dental care declined after a Major Health Reform, which included universal coverage for some dental cares in Chile. However, efforts to ameliorate these inequalities require an approach that moves beyond a sole focus on rectifying health coverage. PMID:25749319

  15. Demand for orthodontic treatment among 9-18 year-olds seeking dental care in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugonzibwa, E.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kikwilu, E.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the demand for orthodontic treatment among 9-18 olds seeking dental care in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. DESIGN: Case-control, interview and clinical study. SETTINGS: Children seeking dental care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demand for orthodontic treatment. RESULTS: Most of the chi

  16. The determinants of quality in procedural rural medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard B; Veitch, Craig; Evans, Rebecca J

    2005-01-01

    A substantial proportion of health services for rural Australians is provided in rural health facilities by rurally based generalist health professionals. These services include procedural care within smaller rural hospitals, where teams of health professionals--medical practitioners, nurses and other support staff--work in teams to deliver a range of procedural services, both elective and urgent, that reduce the need for rural people to travel to major centres. Recent debate over the training of rural medical practitioners has focused on whether or not they need to provide procedural services, because current health service management policy appears to support the rationalisation and centralisation of service delivery in larger centres to contain costs and ensure high quality. Hence there is an assumption, without much evidence, that the quality of care in rural hospitals is lower than that provided in larger urban hospitals, although there is little agreement on just what aspects of care should be measured to indicate its quality. This article reports an exploration of multiple perspectives on what constitutes quality of care in rural procedural medical practice, as part of a broader study of the quality of care of a series of real clinical cases. During the collection of a series of 91 individual patient cases involving anaesthetic, obstetric or surgical procedures conducted in small rural hospitals, interviews were conducted with several participants in each case: the rural doctors; rural nurses; the rural patients; and family members of those patients. In addition to issues pertaining to each case, interviews explored the perspectives of individuals in each group on the broader question of what constitutes quality of care in a general sense. Their comments were subjected to qualitative thematic analysis using Atlas.ti software (Muhr T, ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development; Berlin, Germany). In order to consider how to measure rural health care, the

  17. Surface roughness of a novel dental porcelain following different polishing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Chen, Ji-Hua; Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the surface roughness of a novel dental porcelain following different polishing procedures. One hundred twenty Imagine Reflex porcelain disks were prepared and randomly assigned into six groups according to different treatments: Group 1: CeraMaster polishing system (CP); Group 2: CP + diamond polishing paste (DP); Group 3: Sof-Lex polishing system (SS); Group 4: SS + DP; Group 5: SiC paper polishing; Group 6: reglazing (control). After the respective treatments, surface roughness values were measured using a profilometer. Qualitative analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Results demonstrated that a combination of the CeraMaster polishing system and a diamond polishing paste could produce similar superficial smoothness to that of the reglazed surface of the tested porcelain.

  18. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Gaia, Bruno Felipe; Cheng, Cheong Kuo; Trindade, Paulo Alceu Kiemle; Bastos, José Carlos da Cunha; Mattos, Beatriz Silva Câmara

    2012-02-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  19. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1 to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2 to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3 to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  20. Assessment of cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures under the effect of benzodiazepines: a double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laércio; Simone, José Leonardo; Tortamano, Nicolau

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures: systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures, and heart rate. Nineteen healthy normotensive patients (18-56 years of age) received restorative treatment on three maxillary molars. The patients were continuously monitored by a non-invasive automatic monitor for blood pressure and heart rate during the pre-, trans-, and post-operative periods at the following stages: 15 min prior to anesthesia; during topical anesthesia; during infiltrative anesthesia; for 5 minutes immediately after; during cavity preparation; during restorative procedure; for 10 min after completion. Patients were divided into three groups: A (without pre-medication), B (preceded by 10 mg diazepam), and C (preceded by placebo). All patients received infiltrative anesthesia containing 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine (36 mg) with epinephrine 1:100,000 (18 microg). There were no changes in the parameters during the clinical procedures. When groups were compared, there were significant differences in diastolic arterial pressures during anesthesia.

  1. Assessment of cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures under the effect of benzodiazepines: a double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraco Fatima Neves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures: systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures, and heart rate. Nineteen healthy normotensive patients (18-56 years of age received restorative treatment on three maxillary molars. The patients were continuously monitored by a non-invasive automatic monitor for blood pressure and heart rate during the pre-, trans-, and post-operative periods at the following stages: 15 min prior to anesthesia; during topical anesthesia; during infiltrative anesthesia; for 5 minutes immediately after; during cavity preparation; during restorative procedure; for 10 min after completion. Patients were divided into three groups: A (without pre-medication, B (preceded by 10 mg diazepam, and C (preceded by placebo. All patients received infiltrative anesthesia containing 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine (36 mg with epinephrine 1:100,000 (18 µg. There were no changes in the parameters during the clinical procedures. When groups were compared, there were significant differences in diastolic arterial pressures during anesthesia.

  2. High educational attainment moderates the association between dental health-care supply and utilization in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Maike; Kunst, Anton E; Brockmann, Hilke

    2016-02-01

    In line with the theory of supplier-induced demand, an increased physician density often goes along with a higher utilization of medical services, including dental services. This study aimed to assess whether dentist density and self-employment are related to dental care use, and whether these relationships are moderated by patients' educational attainment. We used data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) from over 20,000 respondents, 50 + yr of age, in 13 countries. We conducted multilevel logistic regressions with probability and type of dental treatment on individual education, country-specific dentist density, and dentist remuneration, and their cross-level interaction. Patients with a high educational level were more likely to report a dentist visit (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.912-2.305) and to receive preventive care (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.697-2.043) than those with a low educational level (reference category). Cross-level interaction effects indicated that high dentist density decreases dental care utilization differences between patients with high (OR = 0.996, 95% CI: 0.993-0.999), medium (OR = 0.995, 95% CI: 0.991-0.999), and low education levels. This was also true for prevention use (OR = 0.996, 95% CI: 0.992-0.999 for patients with a high education level, and OR = 0.996, 95% CI: 0.993-1.000 for patients with a medium education level). The findings suggest that although dentist density is positively associated with dental care utilization, patients have differing susceptibilities to dental care supply.

  3. Clinical profile of orofacial infections: An experience from two primary care dental practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinshead, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Orofacial infections are common reasons for dental consultations worldwide. However, there is scarcity of data on clinico-epidemiological profiles reported from primary care dental practices. To address this issue, a study was done to characterize the clinical pattern, age groups affected and sex predilection of orofacial infections in the primary care dental practice. Study design: Clinical data was evaluated from random electronic files of patients for whom antimicrobials were prescribed at two Dental Practices in UK between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: 200 case records were studied. 104 (52%) cases were females. Mean age was 37.2 (+/-15.1) years. 107 (53.5%) cases belonged to age group 21-40 years. Posterior teeth were involved in 112 (56%) cases. Types of disease were as follows: dentoalveolar abscess 63(31.5%), pulpitis 27(13.5%), apical periodontitis 21(10.5%), pericoronitis 21(10.5%), dry socket 13(6.5%), periodontitis 9(4.5%) infected root stump 5(2.5%), facial swelling 5(2.5%) and infections unspecified 36(18%) cases. Conclusions: Orofacial infections affect both sexes equally. 21-40 years is the commonest age-group affected. Dentoalveolar abscess is the commonest infection followed by unspecified infections and pulpitis. Key words:Orofacial infections, primary care dental practice, dentoalveolar abscess and pulpitis. PMID:22322492

  4. Self-Reported Obstacles to Regular Dental Care among Information Technology Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, L. Swetha; Reddy, B. Srikanth; Kulkarni, Suhas; Reddy, M. Padma; Satyanarayana, D.; Baldava, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Good oral health is important for an individual as well as social well-being. Occupational stress and work exhaustion in Information Technology (IT) professionals may influence the oral health and oral health related quality of life. Aim To assess and compare self-reported obstacles for regular dental care and dental visits among IT professionals based on age, gender, dental insurance and working days per week. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,017 IT professionals to assess the self-reported obstacles to regular oral health care in Hyderabad city, Telangana, India. The Dental Rejection of Innovation Scale (DRI-S) was employed in this study. Comparison between means of DRI-S based on variables was done using t-test and ANOVA. The association between variables and DRI-S was determined using Chi-square test. Results A total of 1017 participants comprising of 574 (56%) males and 443 (44%) females participated in the study. As age increased, a significant increase in mean DRI-S scores was seen for total and individual domains except for the “Situational” domain wherein higher mean score (9.42±2.5; p=0.0006) was observed among 30–39 years age group. Even though females reported higher mean scores for total and individual domains when compared to males, nevertheless significant difference was seen only for total (p=0.03) and “Lack of Knowledge” (p=0.001) domain. Conclusion Self-reported obstacles to regular dental care was more with increasing age, increased number of working days per week, irregular dental visits and absence of dental insurance facility. PMID:27891475

  5. Dental education and care for underserved patients: an analysis of students' intentions and alumni behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carlos S; Ester, Todd V; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. surgeon general's report on oral health stressed the importance of providing dental care to underserved patients. The objectives of this study were to explore a) dental students' intentions and dentists' behavior concerning treating underserved patients, b) their perceptions of their education concerning these patients, and c) the relationship between dental education and their attitudes and behavior. Data were collected from 328 dental students (response rate: 77.5 percent) and 234 alumni (response rate: 43.7 percent). Only 67.4 percent of the students and 38 percent of the alumni indicated that their education had prepared them well to treat patients from different socioeconomic backgrounds; 71.3 percent of students and 55.2 percent of alumni responded that they had been well educated to treat patients from different ethnic/racial groups. The findings showed a positive relationship between the degree of curriculum focus on the importance of treating patients from all aspects of society and students' and alumni intentions to provide inclusive patient care to patients from diverse backgrounds. The more students agreed that their dental education had prepared them well to treat patients from different ethnic backgrounds, the more likely they were to report that they intended to treat these patients (r=.12; p=.033). In a similar manner, the more the alumni agreed that their dental education had prepared them well to treat patients in different communities, the more likely they were to treat patients from different socioeconomic backgrounds (r=.18; p=.009). In conclusion, these findings showed that access to oral health care for underserved patients could potentially be increased if dental students were more overtly educated about the importance of treating patients from all segments of society.

  6. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of headache in dental students of a tertiary care teaching dental hospital in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Nandha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic headache is as much as a problem in India as elsewhere in the world with a rising trend in young adults which negatively affects the quality of life of the affected person. In current scenario of increasing prevalence of headache in students, most of them have been found to practice self medication leading to inappropriate management and sometimes analgesic overuse causing treatment refractoriness. Methods: A questionnaire based survey was done on undergraduate dental students at a tertiary care dental teaching hospital in Northern India. Severity of headache was assessed by Numeric Rating Scale. Data collected was analyzed to assess the prevalence, pattern & triggering factors of headache along with awareness of dental students regarding treatment. Prevalence and characteristics of migraine were also assessed along with the therapeutic strategies opted by students. Results: Our study (n=186 demonstrated headache prevalence of 63.9% which was higher in females (74.3% as compared to males (32.6%. Headache experienced by majority of student population was bilateral (36.13%, sharp stabbing (38.65% and of moderate intensity (57.98%. Common associated symptoms were nausea/ vomiting (24.36% and scalp tenderness (22.68%. Stress (82.3% &irregular sleep (81.5% were the most common triggering factors. Prevalence of migraine was 13.44% with female preponderance (87.5%. Practice of self medication was reported by 88.2% of students. Most commonly used drugs were paracetamol (36.76%, aspirin (26.47% and combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol (25%. Specific medication use in migraineurs was found to be low (25% showing inadequate management of migraine headache in our study population. Conclusions: The results in this study demonstrate high headache prevalence in dental students with self medication being practiced by the majority. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(1.000: 51-55

  7. Dental hygiene students' views on a service-learning residential aged care placement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Janet P; Blinkhorn, Fiona A; Blinkhorn, Anthony S

    2014-10-01

    To record the views of final year dental hygiene students from the University of Newcastle, Australia about a placement in 17 residential aged care facilities, on the NSW Central Coast. Final year dental hygiene students undertook a 12 week placement, 1 day per week, in 1 of 17 residential aged care facilities. They were asked to participate in focus group discussions after the placement to determine their ability to transition from the classroom to the real-life experience of the residential aged care facility placement. Students felt ill-equipped for the aged care placement program even though they had attended a pre-placement orientation. Students expressed feelings of being overwhelmed by the residential aged care environment, particularly by the smells and unexpected sights of the aged, fragile and cognitively impaired residents, and the difficulties in providing them with oral hygiene care. To enable students to transition from the classroom to the aged care environment in a more effective manner, a more realistic pre-placement orientation program is necessary. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  8. A survey of dental school's emergency departments in Ireland and the UK: provision of undergraduate teaching and emergency care

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aim Emergency dental care is a vital service that new graduates should be prepared to offer. There are few published data relating to emergency dental care education. To assess this, and to gain a profile of accident and emergency departments (A&E) in dental schools, an online survey was sent to all of the dental schools in the Republic of Ireland and the UK. Setting The survey addressed the school's A&E curriculum, teaching methods, undergraduate exposure and departmental details. Results Th...

  9. Modeling Dental Health Care Workers' Risk of Occupational Infection from Bloodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilouto, Eli; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The brief paper offers a model which permits quantification of the dental health care workers' risk of occupationally acquiring infection from bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus. The model incorporates five parameters such as the probability that any individual patient is infected and number of patients…

  10. [The impact of frailty on the oral care behaviour and dental service use of elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, D.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Gerritsen, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore how the level of frailty and various frailty factors affect the dental service use and oral self-care behaviour of frail elderly people, 51 frail elderly people were interviewed. Additional information on age, gender, living situation, prosthetic status, self-reported health and

  11. Dental Care Knowledge and Practice of a Group of Health Workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Sep-Oct 2014 | Vol 4 | Special Issue 3 |. 307. Address ... assess the knowledge and practice of health workers in a private medical health facility on dental care. ..... J Hosp Tourism. Educ 2011 ...

  12. Oral and dental health care practices in pregnant women in Australia: a postnatal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middleton Philippa F

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to assess women's knowledge and experiences of dental health in pregnancy and to examine the self-care practices of pregnant women in relation to their oral health. Methods Women in the postnatal ward at the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, completed a questionnaire to assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices to periodontal health. Pregnancy outcomes were collected from their medical records. Results were analysed by chi-square tests, using SAS. Results Of the 445 women enrolled in the survey, 388 (87 per cent completed the questionnaire. Most women demonstrated reasonable knowledge about dental health. There was a significant association between dental knowledge and practices with both education and socio-economic status. Women with less education and lower socio-economic status were more likely to be at higher risk of poor periodontal health compared with women with greater levels of education and higher socioeconomic status. Conclusion Most women were knowledgeable about oral and dental health. Lack of knowledge about oral and dental health was strongly linked to women with lower education achievements and lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Whether more intensive dental health education in pregnancy can lead to improved oral health and ultimately improved pregnancy outcomes requires further study.

  13. Receipt of preventive dental care among special-needs children enrolled in Medicaid: a crisis in need of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jean M; Gaskin, Darrell J

    2008-10-01

    Although not widely recognized, tooth decay is the most common childhood chronic disease among children ages five to seventeen. Despite higher rates of dental caries and greater needs, low-income minority children enrolled in Medicaid are more likely to go untreated relative to their higher income counterparts. No research has examined this issue for children with special needs. We analyzed Medicaid enrollment and claims data for special-needs children enrolled in the District of Columbia Medicaid program to evaluate receipt of recommended preventive dental care. Use of preventive dental care is abysmally low and has declined over time. Enrollment in managed care rather than fee for service improves the likelihood that special-needs children receive recommended preventive dental services, whereas residing farther from the Metro is an impediment to receipt of dental care.

  14. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  15. [Waste management from dental care in the health districts of Dakar, Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, D; Mbacké Lo, C M; Kanouté, A

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical waste is becoming an increasing public health concerns, especially as these waste treatment methods can themselves create both health and environmental risks. The objective of the study was to evaluate the management of waste from dental care in Dakar. A cross-sectional, descriptive study of dental services in Dakar, based on a questionnaire was used to determine the knowledge and attitudes of dentists on the management of dental waste. All practitioners stated that their offices had waste bins, 81.2% using plastic bags; 73.2% reported that the bins were washed and disinfected an average of once a day. Only 7.2% of the offices or facilities had an autoclave, and 5.8% an incinerator. Three quarters of the respondents did not know how to dispose of contaminated waste and none of them had conducted a study to estimate the quantity of their departmental waste. The management of waste from dental care is not structured in Senegal nor in most developing countries. Moreover, the gaps and ineffectiveness of legislation result in major threats to public health and the environment. The government should focus, among other things, on stakeholder awareness and training, by providing facilities with the resources necessary to contribute to sustainable development through the management of dental waste.

  16. Caring for cancer patients in the general dental office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, I.

    Modern therapeutic modalities and emphasis on early detection have made oral cancer a treatable, and in many cases, a curable disease. The role of the dentist in cancer patient management is two-fold. Early detection of oral lesions during routine dental examination has been shown to be a significant factor in cancer diagnosis. The dentist's other role comes after cancer treatment, specifically therapeutic radiation. Ionizing radiation can have permanent effects on both hard and soft tissues. Prescription and use of fluoride gel in topical applicators can aid in assuring oral health for post-cancer patients.

  17. Factors associated with utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Amin, Summar; Salme, Marc; Tezal, Mine

    2017-03-01

    To describe factors associated with the utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Western New York. A descriptive cross-sectional study reviewed the dental and medical records of residents of an LTCF discharged between January 1, 2008 and December 30, 2012. Information on demographic and health variables at admission was extracted from electronic health records. Information on oral health variables was extracted from patient charts. A total of 2,516 residents were discharged between 2008 and 2012. From those, 259 (10.3%) utilized dental services at least once during their stay. Those who utilized dental services were significantly older at admission (78.5 vs. 82.0 years, p dental services. Dental services appear to be underutilized by residents of LTCF. Significant differences exist in demographic and health variables between residents who utilize these services compared to those who do not. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Parents' Traditional Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Young Adults' Routine Health and Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Wheeler, Lorey A

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prospective associations between Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' traditional cultural values and young adults' health and dental care utilization and to test the moderating role of youth gender. Mexican-origin parents and youth (N = 246 families) participated in home interviews and provided self-reports of parents' cultural values (time 1) and young adults' health status and routine health and dental care (time 2; 5 years later). Logistic regressions tested parents' traditional cultural values as predictors of routine health and dental care, accounting for parent nativity, parent acculturation, family socioeconomic status, youth gender, youth age, and youth physical health status. We also tested whether youth gender moderated the associations between parents' cultural values and young adults' routine care. Young adults whose mothers endorsed strong familism values when they were in mid-to-late adolescence were more likely to report at least one routine physician visit in the past year as young adults (odds ratio [OR] = 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-9.83, p = .019). Furthermore, for females only, mothers' more traditional gender role attitudes predicted reduced odds of receiving routine health (OR = .22; 95% CI: .08-.64, p = .005) and dental care (OR = .26; 95% CI: .09-.75, p < .012) in young adulthood. Our findings highlight the importance of examining intragroup variability in culturally specific mechanisms to identify targets for addressing ethnic/racial disparities in health care utilization among Mexican-origin young adults, during a period of increased risk for health-compromising behaviors and reduced access to care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Children with Hemophilia and their Dental Care by Pediatric Stomatology. Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Grandas Ramírez, Ángela Liliana; Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Bogotá, Colombia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Purpose: To carry out systematic review of literature about diagnostics, severity, and dental treatment considerations of children with Hemophilia A. Methods: The search for articles and other document was conducted through the databases available at the National Library System of the National University of Colombia. The English and Spanish terms used in the search were “pediatric dentistry,” “hemophilia A,” dental care,” “coagulation factors,” and/or “coagulation disorders.” Result...

  20. Fraser Syndrome-Oral Manifestations and a Dental Care Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Lopes de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic malformation with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and an incidence of consanguinity ranging from 15% to 25%. A 5-year-old male patient who is a carrier of Fraser syndrome initiated treatment in the pediatric dentistry sector. The patient was fed parenterally since birth, experienced recurring bouts of chronic lung disease, and was referred to the pediatric dentistry sector by the medical team. Radiographic examination revealed the presence of all permanent teeth. Supragingival dental calculus, halitosis, and gingival inflammation were also observed. Dental calculus was removed by manual scraping, and chemotherapeutic agents were used, chlorhexidine 0,12%, chlorhexidine gel 2%, and PVP-I, to control the bacterial flora. The patient is still being monitored after an 8-year follow-up period, the complications associated with periodontal disease decreased, and since the initiation of treatment, the patient has not needed to be hospitalized because of chronic lung disease. This study reports the case of a patient diagnosed with Fraser syndrome and describes the clinical manifestations (general and oral.

  1. The development, implementation, utilization and outcomes of a comprehensive dental program for older adults residing in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Chris C L; So, Frankie H C; Williams, P Michele; Mithani, Akber; Zed, Christopher M; Yen, Edwin H K

    2006-06-01

    This paper documents the experience of the University of British Columbia's Geriatric Dentistry Program (GDP) with emphasis on the dental treatment needs of patients during its first year of operation. The GDP provided access to dental care for residents of longterm care facilities, education for hospital staff concerning daily mouth care, education of dental students and an opportunity for research. The first year of clinical activity saw a small, yet significant, improvement in oral health for residents using the dental services. We hope that the outcomes of this new dental program for long-term care facilities will encourage dentists to provide care for this vulnerable population.

  2. Compliance & dexterity, factors to consider in home care and maintenance procedures Adherencia e destreza: factores a considerar en programas preventivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Criado

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical plaque control appears to be the primary means of controlling supragingival dental plaque build-up. Although daily oral hygiene practices and periodic professional care are considered the basis for any program aimed at the prevention and treatment of oral diseases, these procedures are technically demanding, time consuming and can be affected by the compliance and manual dexterity of the patient. Individual skills and acquired behavior patterns determine effectiveness of a preventive program and oral hygiene practice. Successful preventive programs and home care procedures clearly depend on the interaction and commitment between the dental professional and the patient. Identifying the capacity of the individual to comply with the professional recommendations and evaluating the dexterity of the patient to remove supragingival dental plaque will permit the implementation of an adequate preventive program and can help on the selection of adjunctive antimicrobial agents and devices needed to reach an effective oral care routine.El control de la placa dental parece ser el mecanismo primario para controlar el crecimiento de la placa dental supragingival. Aunque la práctica diaria de la higiene bucal y el cuidado profesional periódico, son considerados la base para cualquier programa dirigido a la prevención y tratamiento de las enfermedades de la cavidad bucal, estos procedimientos son técnicamente exigentes, consumen tiempo y pueden ser afectados por la aceptación y la destreza manual del paciente. Las destrezas individuales y los patrones de comportamiento adquiridos, determinan la efectividad de un programa preventivo y la práctica de la higiene bucal. El éxito de los programas preventivos y los procedimientos del cuidado bucal en el hogar dependen claramente de la interacción y compromiso entre el odontólogo y el paciente. La importancia de identificar la capacidad del individuo para cumplir con las recomendaciones y la

  3. Improving access to dental care for vulnerable children; further development of the Back2School programme in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, D; Pearson, N; Evans, P; Wallace, T; Eke, M; Wright, D

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a service evaluation of a dental treatment programme providing care to children not normally taken to the dentist. It explains the extension of the Back2School programme from the pilot phase and assesses if a mobile dental unit (MDU) can provide a high quality service. The public health competencies it illustrates include oral health improvement, developing and monitoring quality dental services, and collaborative working.

  4. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. A...

  5. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after dental care: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Zoppelletto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcus salivarius is a common commensal of the oral mucosa, associated with infections in different sites. Meningitis due to this species are described in a few occasions . In this study refer to a case recently diagnosed in our hospital for treatment of a subsequent dental caries. Case report. A man of 35 years, presents to the emergency room with fever, headache, confusion, marked nuchal rigor.Anamnesis is the treatment of dental caries on the previous day.The blood count showed 24.7x109 / L with WBC 22.9x109 / L (92.9% neutrophils. The lumbar puncture CSF noted cloudy with 15.0 x 109 / L WBC, glicorrachia 5 g / L, protidorrachia 6.5 g / L. Microscopic examination showed numerous granulocytes and prevalence of Gram-positive cocci.The pneumococcal antigen was negative.The blood cultures before starting antibiotic therapy, were negative. CSF was isolated from the culture of a Streptococcus salivarius. To antibiotic therapy started in the ED, after lumbar puncture is associated with the Ampicillin Ceftriaxone and continued for 15 days to improve the patient’s general condition, then resigned in the 17 th day. Materials and methods. From CSF inoculated in blood agar plates and chocolate agar alpha hemolytic colonies were isolated, catalysis negative, optochin resistant. The biochemical identification performed with Phoenix (BD and confirmed by PCR Pan bacterial (16S rDNA bacterial strain identified as Streptococcus salivarius.The antibiogram performed with Phoenix (BD according to the CLSI guidelines indicated sensitivity to penicillin, vancomycin, cefotaxime, cefepime, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions. Meningitis by Streptococcus salivarius was found in a few cases, mainly related to the transmission of health personnel from the oral cavity during lumbar punctures performed without the use of surgical masks. The following bacterial meningitis in dental treatment having a low incidence and often fatal course be suspected by

  6. Impact of Early Head Start in North Carolina on Dental Care Use Among Children Younger Than 3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgette, Jacqueline M; Preisser, John S; Weinberger, Morris; King, Rebecca S; Lee, Jessica Y; Rozier, R Gary

    2017-04-01

    To examine the effects of North Carolina Early Head Start (EHS), an early education program for low-income children younger than 3 years and their families, on dental care use among children. We performed a quasi-experimental study in which we interviewed 479 EHS and 699 non-EHS parent-child dyads at baseline (2010-2012) and at a 24-month follow-up (2012-2014). We estimated the effects of EHS participation on the probability of having a dental care visit after controlling for baseline dental care need and use and a propensity score covariate; we included random effects to account for EHS program clustering. The odds of having a dental care visit of any type (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74, 3.48) and having a preventive dental visit (adjusted OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.84, 3.63) were higher among EHS children than among non-EHS children. In addition, the adjusted mean number of dental care visits among EHS children was 1.3 times (95% CI = 1.17, 1.55) the mean number among non-EHS children. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that EHS participation increases dental care use among disadvantaged young children.

  7. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  8. Skin-to-skin care for procedural pain in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Celeste; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Disher, Timothy; Benoit, Britney; Fernandes, Ananda; Streiner, David; Inglis, Darlene; Zee, Rebekah

    2017-02-16

    Skin-to-skin care (SSC), often referred to as 'kangaroo care' (KC) due to its similarity with marsupial behaviour of ventral maternal-infant contact, is one non-pharmacological intervention for pain control in infants. The primary objectives were to determine the effect of SSC alone on pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonates compared to no intervention, sucrose or other analgesics, or additions to simple SSC such as rocking; and to determine the effects of the amount of SSC (duration in minutes), method of administration (e.g. who provided the SSC) of SSC in reducing pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonatesThe secondary objectives were to determine the safety of SSC care for relieving procedural pain in infants; and to compare the SSC effect in different postmenstrual age subgroups of infants. For this update, we used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 1); MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 25 February 2016); Embase (1980 to 25 February 2016); and CINAHL (1982 to 25 February 2016). We also searched clinical trials' databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials. Studies with randomisation or quasi-randomisation, double- or single-blinded, involving term infants (≥ 37 completed weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA) to a maximum of 44 weeks' PMA and preterm infants (term effects of SSC are needed. Of interest would be to study synergistic effects of SSC with other interventions.

  9. Dental care in children with developmental disabilities: attention deficit disorder, intellectual disabilities, and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Jane M

    2010-01-01

    The Federal government reports that 13% of Americans between birth and 18 years of old meet the definition of a child with special health care needs. These children and young adults present unique challenges for both pediatric and general dentists to provide access to the oral health care system--establishing a treatment plan for those with unique medical, behavioral and dental needs and maintaining oral health over the lifetime. The purpose of this article was to describe the characteristics of 3 common developmental disabilities and the challenges these issues present to the oral health care practitioner.

  10. [Do long-term care residents benefit from the dental bonus system?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, I; Bär, C; Hopfenmüller, W; Roggendorf, H; Stark, H; Sobotta, B; Reiber, Th

    2011-06-01

    Oral health of long-term care (LTC) residents is often poor. From 30 random German LTC facilities, 242 random residents (Berlin n=75, Northrhine-Westfalia (NRW) n=94, Saxony n=73) (median age: 82 years, female: 78.5%) were interviewed as to their use of dental services, possession of a bonus booklet (BB), and completeness of records. Only 18.6% possessed a BB. Significant regional differences were observed (Berlin=5.3%, NRW=18.1%, Saxony=32.9%) (χ(2) test p<0.01). The number of teeth was higher (Mann-Whitney test p=0.01) and the time since last dental visit shorter (p<0.01) for all residents with a BB. Only 18.6% of people possessing a BB declared not having had a dental appointment within the previous 12 months (LTC residents without BB 51.3%). As a means towards improved quality management in nursing, better oral infection control of residents and increased oral health and general quality of life, the introduction of a regular annual preventive dental screening program including the use of a dental bonus system are suggested.

  11. Evidence Based Dental Care: Integrating Clinical Expertise with Systematic Research

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Clinical dentistry is becoming increasingly complex and our patients more knowledgeable. Evidence-based care is now regarded as the “gold standard” in health care delivery worldwide. The basis of evidence based dentistry is the published reports of research projects. They are, brought together and analyzed systematically in meta analysis, the source for evidence based decisions. Activities in the field of evidence-based dentistry has increased tremendously in the 21st century, more and more p...

  12. MEDICO-SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF POPULATION GROUPS SEEKING FOR DENTAL CARE IN POLYCLINICS SMOLENSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Николаевна Дехнич

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research’s aim is to give health-social characteristic of contingents of the urban population, seeking for outpatient dental care, including a comparative estimation of stomatological index of life quality (SILQ by doctors and patients.Novelty: Was installed the difference in the estimation of work sets SILQ by doctors and patients.Methodology of the research work. It was used an advantage «Card of studying the dental health» for holding the research, including the objective and subjective expert estimations of the dental patient’s status by doctors. This information was comparing with the subjective estimation of SILQ by patients. The sample volume was about 400 people out of number of people, seeking for outpatient dental care in state budget dental clinics during 2011-2012 years.Results. Was installed mostly very high level of prevalence of caries, the destruction of fabrics of parodont reaches 100 % with the age. The stomatological index of life quality among the patients, seeking for outpatient care is low. One of the reasons- a low population’s sanitary culture. A big part of patients seek in case of acute pain(40%. Out of three components of SILQ the criteria of social welfare got rather high estimation. The lowest estimation was given to moral psychological well-being criteria. In this case the moral psychological well-being criteria was given a higher estimation by doctors then by patients (in 1,8. The criteria of the physical and social well-being is lower compared with the patient’s (in 1,8 and 1,2 times respectively.Practical implication: Indicators SILQ may be the basis for planning activities of stomatological polyclinics, including the preventive dentists’ work.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-46

  13. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malviya Nidhi,1 M Nagaraju Patro,1 Somisetty Kusumvalli,2 Vemula Kusumdevi1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Al-Ameen College of Pharmacy, 2Department of Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry, Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India Abstract: Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs of diclofenac (Dic diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP

  14. Periodontal status and dental care in HIV seropositive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sueli Marques Soares

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between CD4+ cell count and viral load with periodontal and dental status in HIV seropositive patient. Methods: Forty HIV seropositive patients were selected from the dental clinic of the Clementino Fraga Hospital in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. The Community Periodontal Index, Simplified Oral Hygiene Index and Decayed, Missing or Filled Teeth Index were determined. The values of CD4+ lymphocyte count and viral load were collected from the medical records. Descriptive analysis was made and Spearman’s correlation test was applied, with values of p<0.05 being significant. Results: HIV seropositive patients were aged 33 to 47 years (mean = 40 years, 26 were men and 14 women. The mean CD4+ lymphocyte count was 507.82±306.4 cells/mm3, with 41% being a high, 38.5% a medium and 20.5% a low level. Sixty-five percent of the patients had undetectable viral load, 12.5% had a high, 5% a low and 5% a medium viral load. Most patients (87.5% presented with periodontal disease, calculus was the most frequent condition (40%. The mean Decayed, Missing or Filled Tooth Index was 19.7±6.8, with prevalence of the missing component. There was significant statistical correlation between the CD4+ count and the periodontal condition, p=0.046. There was no significant correlation between the CD4+ count and the Decayed, Missing or Filled Teeth Index (p=0.469 and the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (p=0.189 indexes, and between viral load and Decayed, Missing or Filled Teeth Index (p=0.452, the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (p=0.158 and Community Periodontal Index (p=0.216. Conclusion: The periodontal condition was influenced to a greater by the CD4+ cell count than the viral load, while there was no correlation between the decayed condition and the CD4+ cell count or the viral load condition.

  15. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  16. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  17. Patients' choice of payment system in the Swedish Public Dental Service--views on dental care and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostberg, Anna-Lena; Ahlström, Birgitta; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate new knowledge of considerations and factors having impacted the patients' choice of payment system and their views on oral health. Moreover, their later attitudes to the prepaid risk-related payment system, having been enrolled or not, were explored. A qualitative design was chosen and data was collected through semi-structured interviews.Twenty patients in the Public Dental Service (PDS) in western Sweden were strategically sampled with reference to gender, age (older/younger adults), residence (rural/urban), and choice of payment system:fee-for-service or capitation plan.The interview guide covered areas concerning the payment systems, patient considerations before choosing system, views of their own oral health and experiences of received dental care within the chosen system.The analysis was performed according to basic principles of qualitative content analysis. The results revealed two themes expressing the latent content. In the theme "The individual's relation to the PDS", expectations of the care, feelings of safety and aspects of responsibility emerged.The theme"Health-related attitudes and perceptions" revealed that views on health and self-assessment of oral health influenced the patients' considerations. Moreover, the perceived influence on oral health and risk thinking emerged as important factors in this theme. The conclusion was that the individual's relation to the PDS together with his/her health-related attitudes and perceptions were the main factors impacting the choice of payment system in the PDS. A health promotion perspective should be applied, empowering the patients to develop their risk awareness and their own resources.

  18. Evaluating quality of dental care among patients with diabetes: Adaptation and testing of a dental quality measure in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Ana; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Ramoni, Rachel; Yansane, Alfa; Tokede, Bunmi; Etolue, Jini; Vaderhobli, Ram; Simmons, Kristen; Even, Joshua; Mullins, Joanna; Kumar, Shwetha; Bangar, Suhasini; Kookal, Krishna; White, Joel; Walji, Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of developing oral complications, and annual dental examinations are an endorsed preventive strategy. The authors evaluated the feasibility and validity of implementing an automated electronic health record (EHR)-based dental quality measure to determine whether patients with diabetes received such evaluations. The authors selected a Dental Quality Alliance measure developed for claims data and adapted the specifications for EHRs. Automated queries identified patients with diabetes across 4 dental institutions, and the authors manually reviewed a subsample of charts to evaluate query performance. After assessing the initial EHR measure, the authors defined and tested a revised EHR measure to capture better the oral care received by patients with diabetes. In the initial and revised measures, the authors used EHR automated queries to identify 12,960 and 13,221 patients with diabetes, respectively, in the reporting year. Variations in the measure scores across sites were greater with the initial measure (range, 36.4-71.3%) than with the revised measure (range, 78.8-88.1%). The automated query performed well (93% or higher) for sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for both measures. The results suggest that an automated EHR-based query can be used successfully to measure the quality of oral health care delivered to patients with diabetes. The authors also found that using the rich data available in EHRs may help estimate the quality of care better than can relying on claims data. Detailed clinical patient-level data in dental EHRs may be useful to dentists in evaluating the quality of dental care provided to patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Carolina; Buono Vicente; Mota Joao Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm) of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B) to composite resin (InTen-S) blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok). Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydroflu...

  20. User evaluation on dental care in the Unified Health System: an approach from the standpoint of humanization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suzely Adas Saliba Moimaz; Arinilson Moreira Chaves Lima; Clea Adas Saliba Garbin; Jose Eduardo Corrente; Nemre Adas Saliba

    2016-01-01

      The scope of this study was to assess user evaluation about dental care in the Unied Health System and analyze the associations between this evaluation, sociodemographic characteristics, and aspects...

  1. Evaluation of children′s behavior aged 0-3 years during dental care: A longitudinal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina SF

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Child temperament has been studied in various researches and may be useful to predict how a child responds to dental treatment, especially very young children. The purpose of the present longitudinal study was to evaluate the behavioral manifestation of children aged 0 to 3 years, considering different types of dental situation. A total of 169 children were selected and the following data were collected: the age of the child, gender, age of the mother, number of dental visits and their respective dates, stimuli offered to the child, and behavioral response to these stimuli. The children and their respective behaviors were divided into five groups according to the dental situation offered: control, missed visits, fluoride varnish, restoration, and dental trauma. The data were submitted to descriptive and inferential analysis using the chi-square test, with the level of significance set at 5%. Analysis of the different situation offered to infants during routine dental care revealed a predominance of collaborating and partially collaborating behavior, and age at the time of dental care influenced the behavior of the infants, irrespective of the stimulus group. The different types of dental situation provoked changes in the behavioral response of the children of certain age groups, especially in the dental trauma group.

  2. Comparison of the pain perception in children using comfort control syringe and a conventional injection technique during pediatric dental procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Langthasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the pain perception by the pediatric patients, while experiencing computerized injection device comfort control syringe (CCS and the conventional injection technique during dental clinical procedures. Materials and Methods: Fifty children (31 boys and 19 girls aged 6-14 years requiring local anaesthesia on both sides of the dental arch for various treatment procedures were selected for this study. The patients served as their own control, and on the appointed day CCS was used on one side of the dental arch and on the subsequent appointment, i.e., the very next day conventional injection technique was used. Visual analogue scale (VAS and faces pain rating scale (FRS were used to assess the child′s pain perception to each of the techniques immediately after the injection. Various physiological parameters were measured before, during and after the two injection procedures and compared for statistical variation. Results : Paired t-test revealed a statistically significant difference in the pain perception by children using VAS and FRS between computerized and conventional technique. No statistically significant difference was observed when physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and temperature were compared at various intervals between the computerized and the conventional technique. Conclusion: Computerized injection device (CCS provides less painful injections when compared to the conventional injection technique.

  3. Provision of dental care for special care patients: the view of Irish dentists in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, G

    2010-04-01

    Part 2 of the Disability Act 2005 requires that all people with a disability are entitled to a needs assessment and, by implication, provision of identified care needs. This process started with children aged 0-6 in 2007 and will roll out to all people with disabilities by 2011. Oral health is part of that needs assessment but it may be that dentists are not in a position to provide that care, by virtue of a lack of education, training or facilities. The majority of dental care delivered would seem, from information gathered as part of this study, to be of an emergency nature. This study aimed to identify the shortfalls in service provision, and their potential causes, to inform what it is hoped will be a positive directive on special care dentistry (SCD) in the proposed National Oral Health Strategy.

  4. Provision of dental care for special care patients: the view of Irish dentists in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, G

    2010-04-01

    Part 2 of the Disability Act 2005 requires that all people with a disability are entitled to a needs assessment and, by implication, provision of identified care needs. This process started with children aged 0-6 in 2007 and will roll out to all people with disabilities by 2011. Oral health is part of that needs assessment but it may be that dentists are not in a position to provide that care, by virtue of a lack of education, training or facilities. The majority of dental care delivered would seem, from information gathered as part of this study, to be of an emergency nature. This study aimed to identify the shortfalls in service provision, and their potential causes, to inform what it is hoped will be a positive directive on special care dentistry (SCD) in the proposed National Oral Health Strategy.

  5. General dental practitioners' opinions on orthodontics in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, J A

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 232 general dental practitioners was undertaken by the purchasing authorities in Hereford and Worcester, England, in 1993, to establish local practitioners' views on primary and secondary care orthodontics. The response rate was 90.1%. The dentists overestimated their orthodontic case-load: 66.6% of contract holders submitted no claims for upper removable appliances (URA) treatment, but 70.8% claimed they undertook removable appliance therapy. Dentists believed orthodontics should be a feature of the General Dental Services (GDS) but did not seem inclined to commit themselves to providing it. A majority of GDPs (54.9%) felt orthodontics was uneconomic under the GDS. There was support for the treatment planning role of hospitals, but although this was available locally it did not appear to have stimulated primary care provision. Consultant outreach clinics were not generally supported but there was a desire for more opportunities for hospital clinical attachments in orthodontics. The implications for the policies of National Health Service (NHS) purchasers are considered: purchasing health authorities need to carry out systematic assessment of the views of their general dental practitioners and take account of their desired patterns of specialist provision. Policies encouraging the shift of orthodontics into primary care are called into question by this study. If demand for orthodontics is to be met, policy should concentrate on the development of hospital services and specialist practitioners.

  6. Comparative evaluation of bispectral index system after sedation with midazolam and propofol combined with remifentanil versus ketamine in uncooperative during dental procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that intravenous sedation technique with PMR combination induces effective and safe sedation, with less pain and more forgetfulness and a shorter recovery time for children 3-7 years of age during dental procedures.

  7. Influence of polishing procedures on the surface roughness of dental ceramics made by different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Junior, Osmir Batista; Buso, Leonardo; Fujiy, Fábio Hiroshi; Lombardo, Geraldo Henrique Leao; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio Assuncao

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different surface polishing procedures-glazing and manual polishing-on the roughness of ceramics processed by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and conventional systems (stratification technique). Eighty ceramic discs (diameter: 8 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared and divided among 8 groups (n = 10) according to the type of ceramic disc and polishing method: 4 GZ and 4 MP. Specimens were glazed according to each manufacturer's recommendations. Two silicone polishing points were used on the ceramic surface for manual polishing. Roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester. The roughness measurements were made along a distance of 2 mm on the sample surface and the speed of reading was 0.1 mm/s. Three measurements were taken for each sample. The data (μm) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Qualitative analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean (± SD) roughness values obtained for GZ were: 1.1 ± 0.40 μm; 1.0 ± 0.31 μm; 1.6 ± 0.31 μm; and 2.2 ± 0.73 μm. For MP, the mean values were: 0.66 ± 0.13 μm; 0.43 ± 0.14 μm; 1.6 ± 0.55 μm; and 2.0 ± 0.63 μm. The mean roughness values were significantly affected by the ceramic type (P = 0.0001) and polishing technique (P = 0.0047). The SEM images confirmed the roughness data. The manually polished glass CAD/CAM ceramics promoted lower surface roughness than did the glazed feldspathic dental ceramics.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  9. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion-evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box-Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN "S8" were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in C max and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the developed

  10. Effect of the video output of the dental operating microscope on anxiety levels in a pediatric population during restorative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Abrar; Ranna, Vinisha; Padawe, Dimple; Takate, Vilas

    2016-01-01

    Adapting a child to the alien settings of a dental operatory is a major challenge to the dentist. Fear of the unknown and preconceived notions of dental pain causes anxiety in the pediatric patient. This often leads to disruptive and uncooperative behavior in the dental operatory. Many methods of behavior management have been described, of which the Tell-Show-Do (TSD) is an established and time-tested technique of behavior management. To determine if a live visual output of the dental operating microscope (DOM) could be used as an adjunct to the TSD technique, to involve the child more completely in the procedure and reduce the fear of the unknown. The study was a randomized, controlled, crossover, and cross-sectional clinical trial. Data were obtained from two visits. 90 children having carious lesions on both lower first molars, in the 7-9 years age group were selected and divided randomly into two groups. Restorative procedures were performed on one tooth per visit, with visits 1 week apart. Live display of the procedure was shown to the patient using video output of the DOM displayed on a 72 inch LCD monitor, angled for best visibility of the child. Anxiety levels were evaluated using Venhams picture selection test and pulse oximetry. Student's t-test was used to compare the anxiety scores obtained from the two groups. The results showed there was a decrease in the anxiety from the first visit to the second visit. (P = 0.05 for Group A and P = 0.003 for Group B). The patients preferred the visit in which the DOM was used. The operator reported an increased patient compliance and reduced patient movement in the visits in which the DOM was used. There is a reduction in anxiety from the first visit to the second visit for restorative treatment when the DOM is used.

  11. Effect of the video output of the dental operating microscope on anxiety levels in a pediatric population during restorative procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Sayed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adapting a child to the alien settings of a dental operatory is a major challenge to the dentist. Fear of the unknown and preconceived notions of dental pain causes anxiety in the pediatric patient. This often leads to disruptive and uncooperative behavior in the dental operatory. Many methods of behavior management have been described, of which the Tell-Show-Do (TSD is an established and time-tested technique of behavior management. Aim: To determine if a live visual output of the dental operating microscope (DOM could be used as an adjunct to the TSD technique, to involve the child more completely in the procedure and reduce the fear of the unknown. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, crossover, and cross-sectional clinical trial. Data were obtained from two visits. 90 children having carious lesions on both lower first molars, in the 7-9 years age group were selected and divided randomly into two groups. Restorative procedures were performed on one tooth per visit, with visits 1 week apart. Live display of the procedure was shown to the patient using video output of the DOM displayed on a 72 inch LCD monitor, angled for best visibility of the child. Anxiety levels were evaluated using Venhams picture selection test and pulse oximetry. Statistical Analysis: Student′s t-test was used to compare the anxiety scores obtained from the two groups. Results: The results showed there was a decrease in the anxiety from the first visit to the second visit. (P = 0.05 for Group A and P = 0.003 for Group B. The patients preferred the visit in which the DOM was used. The operator reported an increased patient compliance and reduced patient movement in the visits in which the DOM was used. Conclusion: There is a reduction in anxiety from the first visit to the second visit for restorative treatment when the DOM is used.

  12. Oral Care in the Long-Term Care of Older Patients: How Can the Dental Hygienist Meet the Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Tracee S; Bruhn, Ann; LeMaster, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    It is estimated that the older population, aged 65 and older, will make up over 20% of the U.S. population by the year 2030. Research acknowledges about 4% of the older population resides in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), where the long-term older patient (LTOP) is under the formal supervised care or custody of institutions with skilled nurses. By the year 2040, 4 million geriatric residents are predicted to move into LTCFs in the U.S. In 2000, the Surgeon General reported LTOPs in LTCFs have greater oral hygiene needs than any other segment of the population to include: root caries, periodontal disease, xerostomia, fungal infections and other oral health concerns. Serious systemic health conditions occurring at high incidence rates have been linked to poor oral hygiene in the LTOP. The purpose of this manuscript is to identify systemic health conditions, oral health conditions, barriers to oral care for LTOPs and to offer recommendations for increased access to care within LTCFs through the use of registered dental hygienists (RDHs). Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  13. [Association between coverage by oral health teams in the family health and the increase in dental care output in Brazilian municipalities, 1999 and 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Gabriel Trevizan; Celeste, Roger Keller

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between population coverage by oral health teams under the Family Health Strategy (FHS) and the difference in 1999 and 2011 in rates of use of public dental services in Brazilian municipalities. The sample included all 5,507 municipalities in both years. Data were used from government information systems to perform logistic regression for modeling the increase in procedure rates. By 2011, 85% of Brazil's municipalities had oral health teams under the FHS and there had been an increase in infrastructure, human and financial resources. Dental care output increased 49.5% from 1999 to 2011. Municipalities that incorporated more than 3 oral health teams per 10,000 inhabitants showed higher odds of increasing their rates of community procedures (OR = 1.61, 95%CI: 1.23-2.11), prophylactic procedures (OR = 2.05, CI95%: 1.56-2.69), restorations (OR = 2.07, 95%CI: 1.58-2.71), and extractions (OR = 1.53, 95%CI: 1.19-1.97) after adjusting for socio-demographic factors and variations in physical, human and financial resources. The incorporation of oral health teams into the FHS appears more effective for increasing indicators of the use of dental services.

  14. THE INVASIVE DENTAL PROCEDURES IN PATIENTS TREATING WITH WARFARIN: POSSIBILITIES AND PROSPECTS FOR SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Kozlova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Details of the management of patients receiving oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists for a long time and needed in dental treatment are discussed. Assessment of bleeding and thromboembolism risk in the perioperative continuation or termination of warfarin therapy is shown. Potential of the local hemostatic agents is specified. Modifications of the patient dental health card are offered to prevent complications associated with blood clotting disorders.

  15. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    OpenAIRE

    Atanaska Dinkova; Donka G. Kirova; Delyan Delev

    2013-01-01

    Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their a...

  16. Prevalence and Factors Associated with the Utilization of Dental Care Services among Factory Workers in Nava Nakorn Industrial Estate, Pathumthani Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaidee, Jeeratip; Ratanasiri, Amornrat; Chatrchaiwiwatana, Supaporn; Soonthon, Surasak

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to find out the utilization prevalence of dental care services among factory workers over a period of one year and factors associated with utilization of dental care services. This was a cross-sectional analytic study. The study population was factory workers in Nava Nakorn Industrial Estate randomly sampled using Probability Proportion to Size Cluster Sampling Method. The tool was a questionnaire about utilization of dental care services. Among the sample group of 1,500 workers from 16 factories, almost 2/3 (63.9%) had never used any dental care services in the previous year while only 36.1% did. A multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that workplace, accommodation, tooth decay, toothache history, transportation, experience in using social security fund for dental care services, availability and accessibility of dental care services, brushing teeth regularly after meals, using dental care services regularly in a dental clinic, and agreement with the idea that a tooth extraction and medication by a dentist could reduce the risk of progression of disease, statistical significance (p-value factory workers who did not use dental care services during the last one year was 63.9 percent. This study identified three groups of factors associated with the utilization of dental care services as: 1) Predisposing factors, 2) Enabling factors, and 3) Need factors.

  17. Interprofessional education: the inclusion of dental hygiene in health care within the United States – a call to action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderbilt AA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Allison A Vanderbilt,1 Kim T Isringhausen,2 Patricia Brown Bonwell2,3 1Center on Health Disparities and School of Medicine, 2Department of Oral Health Promotion and Community Outreach, School of Dentistry, 3Dental Hygiene Program, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: There is a lack of access to oral health care in the United States for rural, underserved, uninsured, and low-income populations. There are widely recognized problems with the US health care system, including rapidly increasing costs and access to oral health. During the last decade, there has been a huge influx and push toward interprofessional education programs; however, these programs conveniently leave out dental hygiene. Interprofessional education can bring forth the collaboration, communication, and teamwork necessary to provide a comprehensive health care plan to treat oral health care needs in patients. As the advanced practice for dental hygiene emerges, it is imperative that the educational qualifications of dental hygienists are sufficient to enable them to safely provide the scope of services and care encompassed in these new expanded roles and to effectively participate as an interprofessional team member. Keywords: interprofessional education, dental hygiene programs, dental hygiene education, oral health education

  18. Antenatal Health Care and Postnatal Dental Check-Ups Prevent Early Childhood Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yukie; Mori, Yukako; Tamaoka, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    The first stage of early childhood caries (ECC) is infection by mutans streptococci, of which the primary infection source is the child's mother. Early intervention programs including antenatal and postnatal phases are effective for reducing ECC. This study was conducted to assess the respective effects of antenatal health care and postnatal care such as regular dental check-ups on reducing ECC among 3-year-old Japanese children. This nested case-control study of 155 three-year-old children (49.0% boys) was conducted at a dental clinic that provides collaborative health services with the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, Okayama. Child characteristics and the mothers' antenatal data were collected retrospectively from the dental charts. They were divided into two groups: caries-free children (n = 77) and children without ECC (n = 78). Most of the children (81.9%) received regular check-ups with topical fluoride application. Most of the mothers reported morning sickness during pregnancy (81.3%), normal delivery (72.9%), and used antenatal health care (80.6%). Over half (55.5%) were primigravida. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidential interval (95% CI) were computed to assess the strength of association using logistic regression analysis. Receiving antenatal health care (AOR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.30-8.24) and child's having regular check-ups (AOR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.35-8.69) were significantly associated with caries-free status among three-year old children. For ECC prevention, antenatal health care is as effective as regular check-ups up to three years of age. The results of this retrospective study demonstrate that maternal health education during pregnancy is effective for ECC prevention.

  19. Interprofessional education: the inclusion of dental hygiene in health care within the United States - a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Allison A; Isringhausen, Kim T; Bonwell, Patricia Brown

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of access to oral health care in the United States for rural, underserved, uninsured, and low-income populations. There are widely recognized problems with the US health care system, including rapidly increasing costs and access to oral health. During the last decade, there has been a huge influx and push toward interprofessional education programs; however, these programs conveniently leave out dental hygiene. Interprofessional education can bring forth the collaboration, communication, and teamwork necessary to provide a comprehensive health care plan to treat oral health care needs in patients. As the advanced practice for dental hygiene emerges, it is imperative that the educational qualifications of dental hygienists are sufficient to enable them to safely provide the scope of services and care encompassed in these new expanded roles and to effectively participate as an interprofessional team member.

  20. Pittsburgh as a High Risk Population: The Potential Savings of a Personalized Dental Care Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Little evidence exists for the current standard of two annual preventative care visits. The purpose of this study was investigate this claim by modeling the potential savings of implementing a personalized care plan for high risk individuals in the Pittsburgh region. Methods. Using radiographs from 39 patients in the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository database, two models were created to analyse the direct savings of implementing a more aggressive preventative treatment plan and to view the longitudinal cost of increased annual yearly visits. Results. There is a significant decrease (p < 0.001) between original and modeled treatment cost when treatment severity is reduced. In addition, there is a significant decrease in adult lifetime treatment cost (p < 0.001) for up to four annual visits. Conclusions. Patients in high risk populations may see significant cost benefits in treatment cost when a personalized care plan, or higher annual preventative care visits, is implemented. PMID:27006657

  1. Pittsburgh as a High Risk Population: The Potential Savings of a Personalized Dental Care Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Ng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Little evidence exists for the current standard of two annual preventative care visits. The purpose of this study was investigate this claim by modeling the potential savings of implementing a personalized care plan for high risk individuals in the Pittsburgh region. Methods. Using radiographs from 39 patients in the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository database, two models were created to analyse the direct savings of implementing a more aggressive preventative treatment plan and to view the longitudinal cost of increased annual yearly visits. Results. There is a significant decrease (p<0.001 between original and modeled treatment cost when treatment severity is reduced. In addition, there is a significant decrease in adult lifetime treatment cost (p<0.001 for up to four annual visits. Conclusions. Patients in high risk populations may see significant cost benefits in treatment cost when a personalized care plan, or higher annual preventative care visits, is implemented.

  2. Oral health services in primary care nursing centers: opportunities for dental hygiene and nursing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellona, M O; DeVore, L R

    1999-01-01

    The basic oral health needs of more than 100 million Americans are not being met, which places them at an increased risk for serious oral and systemic health consequences. Primary care nursing centers, a comparatively new method of health care delivery, provide health care screening, education, and referral services to person typically underserved in the traditional health care delivery system. Primary care nursing centers were surveyed to determine to what extent they provide oral health screening, education, and referral services for clients, and to identify factors that discourage and encourage the integration of these services. Nurses from 158 primary care nursing centers in the United States made up the study population. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data from 59 primary care nursing centers were analyzed using frequency distributions and measures of central tendency. Almost half of the responding nurses at primary care nursing centers "almost always" screen their clients for gum infections (49%) and oral lesions (48%). Fewer teach their clients how to perform oral cancer self-examinations (20%); or educate them regarding use of athletic mouth protectors (15%), the effects of xerostomia (19%), and the benefits of fluoride (38%). The majority do not always refer clients needing treatment for dental decay (55%), gum infections (61%), missing teeth (80%), oral lesions (67%), oral pain (64%), or oral trauma (65%). Lack of referral sources (64%) and unavailability of oral health professionals to provide on site basic oral health services (63%) were the leading factors that discourage the integration of oral health services in the centers. An appreciation for the benefits of oral health (73%) and a knowledgeable clinician to perform oral health services (68%) were the leading factors that encourage the integration of oral health services into primary care nursing centers. These data could be useful in planning, implementing, and

  3. Attitudes of Korean Dental Students Toward Individuals with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Seol; Jung, Hoi In; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Jiyoen; Doh, Re Mee; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to ascertain the attitudes of dental students toward individuals with special health care needs (SHCNs) in Korea and to elucidate the characteristics associated with these attitudes. The authors recruited students from four of the 11 dental schools in Korea to participate in a survey; these schools were selected for regional balance. The Scale of Attitudes toward Disabled Persons (SADP) was used as the primary survey instrument, and ten independent variables were included. Of the 1,100 possible participants, 1,057 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 96.1%. The results showed that although the students' attitudes did not differ significantly by gender, their attitudes did show statistically significant differences on nine other variables: age, year, religion, self-esteem, friends with a disability, volunteering, admission course, concern for individuals with SHCNs, and intention to treat individuals with SHCNs (all p<0.05). The attitudes of these Korean dental students toward individuals with SHCNs were relatively unfavorable, showing lower SADP scores than reported in Western countries and likely reflecting Eastern cultural values in general. Future efforts should place greater emphasis on special care dentistry education and encourage the development of more favorable attitudes regarding the treatment of individuals with SHCNs.

  4. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  5. Improving access to oral health care services among underserved populations in the U.S.: is there a role for mid-level dental providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaefer, H Luke; Miller, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    Nearly one-third of U.S. citizens lack access to basic preventive and primary oral health care services, which is primarily the result of the high costs of care and the uneven geographic distribution of dental providers. This article examines the case for and against one possible solution to address these barriers to oral health care: the introduction of a mid-level dental provider (MDP) position within the dental field.

  6. The Effect of Dental Insurance on the Use of Dental Care For Older Adults: A Partial Identification Analysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Brent; Moeller, John; Manski, Richard J.; Pepper, John

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of dental insurance on the use of dental services using a potential outcomes identification framework designed to handle uncertainty created by unknown counterfactuals – that is, the endogenous selection problem – as well as uncertainty about the reliability of self-reported insurance status. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we estimate that utilization rates of adults older than 50 would increase from 75% to around 80% under universal dental coverage. PMID:24890257

  7. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the

  8. Perceptions of autistic children’s parents about dental care: Preliminary study. Concepción, 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of parents of children with autistic disorder (AD of the school of Association of Parents and Friends of Autistics (ASPAUT Chiguayante. A cross-sectional and exploratory study was conducted. The target population were the parents of 60 schoolchildren at ASPAUT school. The measuring instrument was a survey of thirty closed questions and one open question. Of the 60 surveys sent out 26 were recovered with varying degrees of response to each of the questions. Almost all children with AD receives dental care, about 1 time per year and mostly by pediatric dentists. There is generally a good perception of the care provided, but the need for specialized in autism spectrum disorders professionals, the existence of specific dental programs and reducing the associated costs are recognized. The issues identified by parents as most relevant for improving care were: a specialized dental care (26.9%, more humane treatment (19.2% and using distracting techniques (11.5%. 15.4% of parents believe good dental care as well as excellent. In Chile the dental care of this population is just beginning and there are many areas that need improvements.

  9. Japanese Preschoolers' Understanding of Biological Concepts Related to Procedures for Animal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Noriko; Lee, Yuu Mei; Muto, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    Studied whether 41 Japanese 6-year olds' voluntary participation in animal care activities in school was associated with children's understanding of animal care procedures. Found that children experienced in such activities had better understanding of animal care procedures than those who were not, but levels of participation were not associated…

  10. Comparative clinical evaluation of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator over conventional local anesthesia in children seeking dental procedures: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Varadharaja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study to evaluate the effectiveness of pain control by employing transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS over conventional injectable local anesthesia for children requiring restorative procedures under rubber dam. Materials and Methods: The study design considered was the split mouth design, in experiment (right side, dental procedures under rubber dam was performed under TENS and in control (left side, dental procedures under rubber dam was performed under conventional injectable local anesthetic (LA. The level of comfort and discomfort experienced during TENS and conventional LA was determined using visual analog scale (VAS and heart rate. Result: Increase in mean heart rate associated with TENS (0.78% was significantly less compared to increase in heart rate with administration of conventional local anesthesia (11.78%. In VAS, the mean values for pain indicate that minimum pain was felt with TENS, which was closely followed by LA. Conclusion: TENS can offer many safer and psychological advantages and is a valuable alternative to conventional LA for children.

  11. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2016-11-25

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered.

  12. Surgical procedure of Free Flap. Main nursing care

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    Manuel Molina López

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The free flap surgical technique is used to cover extensive skin loss areas and situations where no flap is available, or in axial zones. The great breackthrough in the field of reconstructive surgical techniques and the creation of new units where these complex techniques are used, means that the nursing staff who work in these hospital units are adquiring greater protagonism in caring for, and the subsequent success of this type of surgery in which the problems of collaboration in all the perioperative phases depend entirely on the nursing team.The collaborative nursing problems could be defined as real or potential health problems, where users need nursing staff to follow the treatment and control procedures prescribed by other professional, generally doctors, who control and are responsible for the final outcome.While planning collaborative objectives and activities it should be taken into account that the function of the nursing staff is twofold: on the one hand, the patient must be taken care of as prescribed by other professionals and, on the other hand, it should bring into play cognitive elements (knowledge and know-how and clinical judgment when executing these in controlling the patients evolution.In this article our intention is to give an interesting and comprehensive description of the free flap surgical technique, its pros and cons, and identify the principal collaborative problems which nursing will have to deal with in each one of the perioperative phases, the number and specific nature of such oblige nursing on many occasions, to update and/or acquire new skills.

  13. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

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    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  14. Paget-Schroetter syndrome after a dental procedure in a patient with factor V Leiden (R506Q) heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabin

    2017-04-01

    : Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort thrombosis is characterized by spontaneous thrombosis of the upper extremity venous system, commonly seen in a young healthy patient after repetitive use of the upper extremities. It is rarely associated with coagulopathy and thus, hypercoagulable work-up is not usually a part of the investigation. We present a first case of a young woman, who was diagnosed with left upper extremity effort thrombosis following a dental procedure. Interestingly, she was also noted to be heterozygous for factor V Leiden mutation.

  15. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  16. Dental procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis, and endocarditis among people with prosthetic heart valves: nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Sarah; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Hoen, Bruno; Lesclous, Philippe; Millot, Sarah; Rudant, Jérémie; Weill, Alain; Coste, Joel; Alla, François; Duval, Xavier

    2017-09-07

    Objective To assess the relation between invasive dental procedures and infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci among people with prosthetic heart valves.Design Nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.Setting French national health insurance administrative data linked with the national hospital discharge database.Participants All adults aged more than 18 years, living in France, with medical procedure codes for positioning or replacement of prosthetic heart valves between July 2008 and July 2014.Main outcome measures Oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was identified using primary discharge diagnosis codes. In the cohort study, Poisson regression models were performed to estimate the rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis during the three month period after invasive dental procedures compared with non-exposure periods. In the case crossover study, conditional logistic regression models calculated the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals comparing exposure to invasive dental procedures during the three month period preceding oral streptococcal infective endocarditis (case period) with three earlier control periods.Results The cohort included 138 876 adults with prosthetic heart valves (285 034 person years); 69 303 (49.9%) underwent at least one dental procedure. Among the 396 615 dental procedures performed, 103 463 (26.0%) were invasive and therefore presented an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis, which was performed in 52 280 (50.1%). With a median follow-up of 1.7 years, 267 people developed infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci (incidence rate 93.7 per 100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval 82.4 to 104.9). Compared with non-exposure periods, no statistically significant increased rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was observed during the three months after an invasive dental procedure (relative rate 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1

  17. Association between depressive symptoms and dental care-seeking behavior among elderly Brazilian people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ádima de Camargo ÁVILA

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent among the elderly population (10%. These symptoms frequently appear when there is a loss of quality of life associated with social exclusion and the appearance of severe diseases. Feelings of sadness, discouragement, despondency and deception, and events such as the loss of close friends and family can also be related to these symptoms. The consequences of depressive symptoms include negative oral health outcomes, such as a decrease in the frequency of toothbrushing, greater prevalence of caries and higher probability of the appearance of periodontitis. Aim This study aimed to evaluate the association between the presence of depressive symptoms and problem-oriented oral healthcare behavior, as well as the absence of healthcare-seeking behavior. Material and method 872 elderly people living in two health districts in Porto Alegre were evaluated. They provided information on socioeconomic variables at an interview, and responded to the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 and to a questionnaire assessing dental care-seeking behavior. In addition, an oral examination was performed. When analyzed using Poisson regression with robust variance, the variables of male sex, less schooling, lower income, reduced number of teeth, presence of root remnants and presence of depressive symptoms were found to be independently associated with the outcome. Result There was a significant difference regarding dental care-seeking behavior in relation to elderly people presenting depressive symptoms and those in low socioeconomic strata having poor oral status. Conclusion It was concluded that these factors need to be taken into consideration when evaluating dental care-seeking behavior.

  18. Efficacy of Preventive Dental Treatment Procedures on Oral Tissues in Naval Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study is an attempt to evaluate new and current clinical methods, agents and techniques employed for the treatment of dental caries, periodontal ...supragingival calculus in relation to the composition of serum and saliva , respectively; (d) study the calculus-tooth structure interface with the

  19. Effect of Aloe Vera mouthwash on dental plaque index in patients with endotracheal tube hospitalized in intensive care unite

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    Nasrin Mirbastegan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral health is an important aspect of caring for hospitalized patients in intensive care unit (ICU. Typically, 48 hours after admission to Intensive care unit, there is a change in mouth flora and dental plaque will be created subsequently. These events make an ideal environment for microbial growth. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Aloe Vera mouthwash on dental plaque index in patients with tracheal intubation at ICU. Material and Methods: This randomized double blind trail was performed on 79 patients with Tracheal intubation at ICU. Data were gathered using purposive sampling. Participant divided in to the two groups. The experimental group received Aloe Vera mouth wash and control group received Normal Saline mouth wash. The study period was four days. O’leary Plaque index used for collecting data. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Chi square, paired t-test and independent ttest were used for analyzing data by SPSS 20. Result: The experimental and control groups had similar characteristics except gender. The experimental dental plaque index (56.58±11.91 and Control dental plaque index (56.04±10.46 were similar. The dental plaque index had a significant decrease in experimental group (57.51±9.08 comparing to the control group (62.46±9.46. Conclusion: Aloe Vera mouth wash along with tooth brushing have a significant effect on reducing dental plaque index.

  20. Efficacy of panoramic radiography as a screening procedure in dental examination compared with clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Seo Young; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [Kyungpook National Univ. School of Dentistry, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of panoramic radiography by comparing the results of clinical examination with radiographic findings. We studied 190 patients (20 men and 170 women; mean age, 40 years; range, 22 to 68 years) who visited the health promotion center of Korea Medical Science Institute and were examined both clinically and by panoramic radiography. We compared results from both examinations. Treatment options by clinical examination were described as 'no treatment indicated', 'treatment of dental caries', 'removal of calculus', 'treatment of periodontal disease'. 'prothodonic treatment' and 'extraction of the third molar'. Findings taken from the panoramic radiography were: dental caries, peroapical lesion, alveolar bone loss, calculus deposition, retained root, impaction of the third molar, disease of maxillary sinus, bony change of mandibular condyle, etc. The prevalence of panoramic findings were: 37.9% of dental caries, 17.4% of periapical lesions, 44.7% of alveolar bone losses, 62.6% of calculi deposition. 7.9% of retained roots, 26.8% of third molar impactions, 6.3% of disease of maxillary sinus, 2.1% of bony changes of mandibular condlye and 35.8% of miscellaneous lesions. Abnormal conditions revealed by panoramic radiography which had not been discovered on clinical examination were: 24.2% of the patients had dental caries, 17.4% had periapical lesions, 7.4% had calculi deposition, 5.3% had retained roots, 15.3% had third molar impactions. The opposite cases were: 5.2% had dental caries, 12.6% had calculi deposition, and 9.5% had third molar impactions. The use of panoramic radiography as a supplement to the clinical examination might be a valuable screening technique.

  1. Effect of Pre-Procedural Chair-Side Finger Stretches on Pinch Strength amongst Dental Cohort- A Biomechanical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Ashvini Mukul; Gupta, Himani Swatantrakumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Ergonomics is the essential principle behind the health and successful practice for a dentist and dental hygienist. During the procedure of dental Scaling and Root Planing (SRP), a high level of pinch force is exerted by the finger muscles resulting in early muscle fatigue. Aim This pilot study comparatively evaluated the Pinch Strength (PS) of the finger muscles, prior to and after SRP, amongst dental cohort performing chair-side hand and finger stretches to those not performing the same. Materials and Methods Forty dental professionals were recruited by purposive sampling for the study and allocated into a test and control group. PS was recorded for both groups following which the test group performed finger stretches comprising of rubber band stretch, tendon glide, finger flexion and extension, thumb flexion and finger webbing. The subjects of both the groups carried out SRP for 30 minutes after which PS was again recorded. Inter-group difference was analysed for variability at baseline and 30 minutes after SRP using independent samples/unpaired t-test. Within group comparison of PS measurement was done using paired t-test. Results The PS for the test group declined from 14.425±2.577 pounds (lbs) to 13.725±2.557 lbs, while for the control group, a decline in PS from 13.65±2.636 lbs to 10.675±2.478 lbs after SRP was noted. On comparing the difference of means of both groups, a statistically significant result was obtained. Conclusion Work-related musculoskeletal disorders can be reduced by performing a few simple chair-side stretches. These stretches can help prevent the finger muscle fatigue during SRP and thus, increase its efficacy. PMID:28571269

  2. Maximum opening of the mouth by mouth prop during dental procedures increases the risk of upper airway constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ito

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Ito1, Hiroyoshi Kawaai1, Shinya Yamazaki1, Yosuke Suzuki21Division of Systemic Management, Department of Oral Function, 2Division of Radiology and Diagnosis, Department of Medical Sciences, Ohu University, Post Graduate School of Dentistry, Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, JapanAbstract: From a retrospective evaluation of data on accidents and deaths during dental procedures, it has been shown that several patients who refused dental treatment died of asphyxia during dental procedures. We speculated that forcible maximum opening of the mouth by using a mouth prop triggers this asphyxia by affecting the upper airway. Therefore, we assessed the morphological changes of the upper airway following maximal opening of the mouth. In 13 healthy adult volunteers, the sagittal diameter of the upper airway on lateral cephalogram was measured between the two conditions; closed mouth and maximally open mouth. The dyspnea in each state was evaluated by a visual analog scale. In one subject, a computed tomograph (CT was taken to assess the three-dimensional changes in the upper airway. A significant difference was detected in the mean sagittal diameter of the upper airway following use of the prop (closed mouth: 18.5 ± 3.8 mm, maximally open mouth: 10.4 ± 3.0 mm. All subjects indicated upper airway constriction and significant dyspnea when their mouth was maximally open. Although a CT scan indicated upper airway constriction when the mouth was maximally open, muscular compensation was admitted. Our results further indicate that the maximal opening of the mouth narrows the upper airway diameter and leads to dyspnea. The use of a prop for the patient who has communication problems or poor neuromuscular function can lead to asphyxia. When the prop is used for patient refusal in dentistry, the respiratory condition should be monitored strictly, and it should be kept in mind that the “sniffing position” is effective for avoiding upper airway

  3. HIV transmission in the dental setting and the HIV-infected oral health care professional: workshop 1C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flint, S R

    2011-04-01

    This workshop addressed two important issues: first, the global evidence of HIV transmission from health care provider to patient and from patient to health care provider in the general health care environment and the dental practice setting; second, in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, whether oral health care professionals living with HIV pose a risk of transmission to their patients and whether standard infection control is adequate to protect both the patient and the oral health care professional in dental practice. The workshop culminated in a general discussion and the formulation of a consensus statement from the participating delegates, representing more than 30 countries, on the criteria under which an HIV-infected oral health care professional might practice dentistry without putting patients at risk. This consensus statement, the Beijing Declaration, was agreed nem con.

  4. Knowledge, awareness, and practices of complementary and alternative medicine for oral health-care management among dental students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newadkar, Ujwala Rohan; Chaudhari, Lalit; Khalekar, Yogita K

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the awareness and practices of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for oral health-care management among dental students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 200 dental students of final year and internship selected by simple random sampling using a close-ended questionnaire. Results: Among the total respondents, 52% were females and 48% were males. Nearly, 14% of the students were not aware of the different categories of the CAM and 12% of them were not aware of its implication in oral health-care management. Conclusion: Majority of the students was aware of CAM, yet they do not follow the use of the same for their patient's oral health-care management. Hence, a small provision regarding the knowledge of CAM should be imposed under the undergraduate curriculum for the dental students so that it should be implemented in their practice in future.

  5. NHS dental care and the issues of public service ethos, governance, accountability and probity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Paul

    2009-06-01

    A decision by any government to intervene in dental care requires that accountability arrangements exist and that the public has faith in them. Such arrangements require a range of governance mechanisms that in turn create routes of accountability. If accountability is to have meaning an appropriate probity system is necessary. Existing probity arrangements in the NHS dental care system are far from ideal: the checks on claims are far less vigorous than under the previous contractual agreement. While the Dental Reference Service continues to refine its probity activities there are few, if any, assessments of the quality of diagnosis and treatment planning let alone the quality of the treatment provided, along with financial shortfalls. The nature of the contract introduced in April 2006 means that, even with compliance, its use as a quality assurance mechanism is substantially weaker. To address these shortfalls requires improvements in the governance arrangements a key element of which is clarity in accountability. Accountability provides an understanding of how a delivery system works, the pressures and incentives facing its actors and allows for better reform design and implementation. If a public dental service is to have excellent outcomes, be fair and equitable and offer value for money the present failings must be addressed. As has been identified in other public services: "...certain assumptions appear to be based on a belief that these standards were general throughout the public sector and would be maintained or adapted during periods of change. Little attention was given to what compromises the standards, how they are perceived and implemented across the public sector and who monitors or polices them, particularly in times of change." (Doig, 1995). The development of improved probity arrangements and a suitable contract through which the service delivered is specified would be a starting point. Perhaps then both the public and the profession can begin to

  6. Health care professionals' perspectives on oral care for long-term care residents: nursing staff, speech-language pathologists and dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Minn N; Steele, Catriona M

    2012-06-01

    Oral health has been identified as a key factor in general health and systemic disease in long-term care populations. To optimise oral health of this population, it is important to understand the oral care perspectives held by health care professionals involved in oral care provision. To explore perspectives regarding oral care held by nursing staff, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and dental hygienists (DHs) in long-term care institutions and to understand how their perspectives impact activities and processes involved in the delivery of oral care. A focus group methodology was utilised. Separate focus groups for each targeted profession were held. Transcribed data were analysed using constant comparative analysis. Daily oral health maintenance and monitoring was considered a role of nursing staff. SLPs and DHs have roles focusing on advocacy, education and supplemental care. Social factors motivate nursing staff to provide oral care, whereas factors related to the general health consequences of poor oral health underlined the motivations of SLPs and DHs. Education and training initiatives incorporating social aspects of oral health may be more effective for motivating nursing staff than approaches emphasising physical risk factors. Organisations can foster environments that support collaboration and communication amongst the members of multidisciplinary teams in order to promote oral health as a priority. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Expanding a professional dental care system: experiences of Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion during Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Frank L; Smith, Gregory M; Cobb, James W; Patterson, Craig G; Smith, Mark A; Pollard, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09, Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion managed an extensive dental care system stretching throughout the Iraq theater of operations. We illustrate several of the unique challenges faced by Task Force 261's headquarters and its dental and area support companies, and describe the remedies emplaced by the Task Force. Personnel structure, the evacuation chain, supply and facility management, dental civil-military operations, detainee care, information technology applications, and public health initiatives are discussed in detail.

  8. Management of orthodontic emergencies in primary care - self-reported confidence of general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, H; Thomas, K; Farnell, D J J

    2016-07-08

    Objective To determine general dental practitioners' (GDPs) confidence in managing orthodontic emergencies.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary dental care.Subjects and methods An online survey was distributed to dentists practicing in Wales. The survey collected basic demographic information and included descriptions of ten common orthodontic emergency scenarios.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported confidence in managing the orthodontic emergency scenarios on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences between the Likert responses and the demographic variables were investigated using chi-squared tests.Results The median number of orthodontic emergencies encountered by respondents over the previous six months was 1. Overall, the self-reported confidence of respondents was high with 7 of the 10 scenarios presented scoring a median of 4 indicating that GDPs were 'confident' in their management. Statistical analysis revealed that GDPs who saw more orthodontic emergencies in the previous six months were more confident when managing the presented scenarios. Other variables such as age, gender, geographic location of practice and number of years practising dentistry were not associated with self-reported confidence.Conclusions Despite GDPs encountering very few orthodontic emergencies in primary care, they appear to be confident in dealing with commonly arising orthodontic emergency situations.

  9. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad;

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify components of patient satisfaction with restorative dental care and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient and procedure factors are associated with patient satisfaction.......The authors conducted a study to identify components of patient satisfaction with restorative dental care and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient and procedure factors are associated with patient satisfaction....

  10. Availability of hospital dental care services under sedation or general anesthesia for individuals with special needs in the Unified Health System for the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG), Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jacqueline Silva; Valle, Déborah Andrade; Palmier, Andréa Clemente; do Amaral, João Henrique Lara; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2015-02-01

    This study identified the demographic characteristics of individuals and dental treatment care under sedation/general anesthesia in a hospital environment in the Unified Health System in the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG). All Hospitalization Authorizations (AIHs) for Dental Treatment for Patients with Special Needs procedures were evaluated between July 2011 and June 2012. Demographic and health care variables for treatment were also assessed. Hospitalization rates per 10,000 inhabitants, and health care coverage provided in the state of Minas Gerais and in each of the Broader Health Regions were calculated. Descriptive analysis of data was carried out by calculating the central trend and variability frequency and measurements. All 1,063 AIHs paid during the study period were evaluated, which is equivalent to a rate of 0.54 hospitalizations per 10,000 individuals. The majority of the patients were adult, male, diagnosed with mental or behavioral disorders and resident in 27.7% of the municipalities in Minas Gerais. The procedures were performed in 39 municipalities and the care coverage was equal to 1.58%. The study reveals a classic demographic and clinical profile of patient attendance. Difficulties in establishing a network of dental care were identified.

  11. Exploring the association of dental care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) - a prospective study of ageing people in Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülcan, Ferda; Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven; Klock, Kristin S; Lie, Stein Atle; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2017-09-10

    To explore the association of dental health care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) across time focusing ageing Norwegian and Swedish adults adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need related-factors as defined by Andersen's model. Data were based on Norwegian and Swedish 1942 birth-cohorts conducted in 2007 (age 65) and 2012 (age 70). In Norway, the response rates ranged from 54% to 58%. Corresponding figures in Sweden were from 72% to 73%. Self-administered questionnaires assessed OIDP, dental care utilization and predisposing, enabling and need related factors. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation was used to adjust for clustering in repeated data. Significant covariates of OIDP were satisfaction with dental services, dental care avoidance due to financial constraints, frightening experience with dental care during childhood and patient initiated dental visiting. Frequency and regularity of dental attendance were associated with OIDP in the Swedish cohort, only. In spite of country differences in the public co-financing of dental care, dental care utilization indicators were associated with OIDP across time in both cohorts. Encouraging regular and dentist initiated visiting patterns and strengthening beliefs in keeping own teeth could be useful in attempts to reduce poor oral health related quality of life in ageing people.

  12. Availability of dental treatment is associated with satisfaction derived from Primary Health Care Services accessed by elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Blaya MARTINS

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This research evaluated whether having dental treatment available in the primary health care centers of the Brazilian Unified Health System was associated with greater satisfaction with the services accessed. The offering of dental care within the health service that elders usually access may improve their satisfaction with the services as a whole. Material and method In this cross-sectional study, 401 elders living in the districts of Lomba do Pinheiro and Partenon in Porto Alegre, Brazil were interviewed. Elders were selected using a cluster sampling design process from census tract drawings. Result Poisson Regression revealed that age and dental treatment supply were associated with outcome, and age, number of teeth, and the presence of dental treatment were associated with a higher prevalence of satisfaction with health services. Conclusion These results provide new contributions for health system qualification because this study demonstrated the importance of having dental treatment available to improve the satisfaction of older people with the Primary Health Care (PHC services accessed.

  13. Oral health status, treatment needs, and obstacles to dental care among noninstitutionalized children with severe mental disabilities in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, Ad; van Houtem, Caroline; van der Schoof, Mariëlle; Resida, Gail; Broers, Dyonne

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the oral health status, treatment needs, and barriers to dental care of noninstitutionalized children in The Netherlands who have severe disabilities. The oral health status of 61 children (38% female; 4-12 years of age; M = 7.7, SD = 2.2), randomly selected from seven different daycare centers, was evaluated. Caretakers (n = 126) and dentists (n = 40) completed questionnaires concerning demographic information, oral hygiene, frequency of dental visits, and possible barriers to the daily oral care of the children. Of all the children, 57.4% had untreated caries (mean dmft/DMFT = 3.0; SD = 3.1). The proportion of caries-free children was 29.5%. In comparison to Dutch children, a significantly higher proportion of children with disabilities belonging to an ethnic minority did not receive any routine dental care (53.1% and 23.8%, respectively). Caretakers considered the noncooperation of their patients as the most troublesome aspect of their daily oral care (68%). Dentists considered communication problems as the most important barrier to treatment (75%). In conclusion, Dutch noninstitutionalized children with severe disabilities still receive a relatively low degree of quality dental care. This is particularly true for children from ethnic minority groups.

  14. Physical, mental and cognitive disabilities in relation to utilization of dental care services by nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Fidaa M; Bani-Issa, Wegdan

    2017-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate factors affecting dental care utilization among nursing home residents in Jordan. A total of 221 subjects with a mean age of 62.4 years (121 males and 100 females) taken from among nursing home residents across Jordan were recruited and composed a convenience sample for this study. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Tinetti Assessment Battery for gait and balance (TAB), Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand test (DASH) were administered and oral health status was assessed for all subjects and examined as expected correlates of dental care utilization among nursing home residents. The response rate was about 88%. One-third of residents suffered from total edentulism and most of the remaining dentate residents exhibited periodontal disease (90%). Of the dentate sample, 90% of residents had bleeding upon probing, 85% were diagnosed with tooth mobility, 88% had presence of dental calculus, and 30% were diagnosed with root caries. Of the denture wearers, 59.1 % reported having soreness with their dentures and 32% of denture wearers reported having poor quality dentures. MMSE score, suffering from tooth sensitivity and having diabetes mellitus were identified to be indicators for utilization of dental care services among the study population. Regular oral care, assessments, and rehabilitation services are considered to be limited for nursing home residents in Jordan. Based upon these findings, future interventions should address oral health among nursing home residents in Jordan. © 2017 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Use of INR to assess degree of anticoagulation in patients who have dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, M J; Moores, J F

    1995-08-01

    Dental professionals frequently treat patients who are receiving anticoagulation therapy. Proper treatment may require adjustment of the anticoagulant dose usually on the basis of the patient's current prothrombin time. This test has been shown to be less accurate than previously thought. The international normalized ratio is another method that attempts to standardize the degree of anticoagulation and to improve reproducibility of results. This system is slowly being implemented in laboratories in the United States. Practitioners who treat patients taking anticoagulants need to be aware of this system in order to make appropriate management decisions.

  16. Determinants of procedural pain intensity in the intensive care unit. The Europain® study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puntillo, Kathleen A; Max, Adeline; Timsit, Jean-Francois;

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Intensive care unit (ICU) patients undergo several diagnostic and therapeutic procedures every day. The prevalence, intensity, and risk factors of pain related to these procedures are not well known. OBJECTIVES: To assess self-reported procedural pain intensity versus baseline pain, ex...

  17. The political culture of healthcare: why substantial dental care in Canada is covered by government insurance only in Québec - lessons for the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaer, P J; Younis, M Z; Benjamin, P L; Al-Hajeri, M

    2011-06-10

    This opinion paper explains the unique and favourable terms of dental health insurance coverage available to residents (both permanent and temporary) of the Province of Québec, Canada. In comparison, the United States and British Canada are the poor stepchildren of government-mediated provision of dental health coverage. The differences in dental healthcare provision between these regions are a question of culture - more specifically, of differing socio-political cultures and different perspectives on the importance of dental care. Lawmakers in the United States can learn from this policy of government-administered dental insurance that appears to work well in Québec.

  18. Knowledge and Self Perception among Dental Students (Interns) about Procedures Involved in Complete Denture Fabrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Swathy; Ashish R Jain; M D A C U Varma

    2017-01-01

    .... Introduction Fabrication of complete dentures include various steps that include primary impression making, border moulding, final impression, laboratory procedures, jaw relation, teeth selection...

  19. Oral health in Brazil: the challenges for dental health care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Sônia Cristina Lima

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses adult oral health in Brazil according to three perspectives: 1) the available epidemiological evidence about the population's oral-health-related epidemiological situation, especially adults and the elderly population, in relation to two high prevalence oral injuries (dental caries and tooth loss), 2) the main health care models for dealing with this situation, by analyzing the related historical processes in order to reveal the likely social, political and epidemiological implications of the different models, and 3) lastly, the possible challenges to Brazilian dentistry or collective oral health in overcoming these obstacles. The main results of the study indicate that, from an epidemiological point of view, Brazil is undergoing a transition in dental caries and tooth loss, which is not yet reflected in the profile of the elderly, but which is tentatively evidenced in young adults. Tooth loss remains high. Certain aspects of society's economic and political superstructure have an important impact on oral health indicators and existing inequalities. Oral health care models have a relative importance and must not be neglected. Vestiges of ideological movements, like preventive medicine, may explain the current impasse in collective oral health practices, such as the preeminence of Finalized Treatment (FT) in clinics and of preventive care in schools fostered by community-based programs. It is therefore important to develop conceptual, theoretical reflections and to increase the objects of intervention, their purposes and their modus operandi. The practice of dentistry according to these alternative models is still being constructed. New studies related to the different formats of these new practices are recommended.

  20. Integrating a primary oral health care approach in the dental curriculum: a Tanzanian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumghamba, Elifuraha G

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on a conference presentation made during the inauguration of the Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care (POHC) on November 27-28, 2012. The aim of this paper is to review how the POHC approach has been integrated into the dental curriculum, sharing the Tanzanian experience as a case presentation from a developing country. The burden of oral diseases worldwide is high, and the current oral health workforce is inadequate to meet the challenges. Curative oral health care is very costly and not accessible to the poor and minorities. To tackle the problem, the POHC approach rooted in primary health care that emphasizes equity, community involvement, prevention, appropriate technology and a multi-sectorial approach was developed and has been operating for more than 3 decades now. Execution of a comprehensive POHC requires a trained oral health workforce mix with essential competencies. For this case study, a literature search was done using the search engines subscribed to by the library of Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, including PubMed, Cochrane, ScienceDirect and Scopus, Wiley-Blackwell Interscience, Sage and the Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative (HINARI) that gives access to Scirus and Google Scholar. Challenges are discussed with an emphasis more on addressing the common risk factors and determinants of oral health. Integration of the POHC approach in the dental curriculum for training a competent workforce is crucial in attaining better oral health. Resources are still a major challenge, and the impact of the POHC approach in the curriculum is yet to be evaluated.

  1. Impact of Technique-Specific Operative Videos on First-Year Dental Students' Performance of Restorative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalizeh A; Barros, Juliana A; Clark, Christina M; Frey, Gary N; Streckfus, Charles F; Quock, Ryan L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of psychomotor operative video demonstrations on first-year dental students who are performing specific procedures for the first time in a preclinical setting. The class was randomly divided into two groups, and three restorative procedures were selected. On the date on which each procedure was to be performed in the preclinical laboratory for the first time, one group (experimental, n=50) was shown a technique video for that specific procedure immediately before commencing the exercise; the control cohort (n=50) did not view the video. Technical performance on procedures was evaluated by students and two calibrated and blinded examiners. The students' perceptions of the experience were also collected in a survey. All first-year students participated in the study, for a 100% response rate. A Mann-Whitney U test did not show any group differences in technical performance (mean values on preparation: 77.1 vs. 77.8; amalgam: 82.7 vs. 82.8; composite: 79.7 vs. 78.0). A Spearman rho test revealed a significantly higher correlation in 13 out of 25 evaluation categories between student self-assessment and blinded examiner assessment for the experimental group. A chi-square test of questionnaire responses revealed a positive student perception of administering these videos for the preparation (X(2)=4.8, pstudent performance on preclinical operative procedures, but they were well received by students and augmented self-assessment ability. These findings suggest that videos can be a useful teaching aid in a preclinical environment, especially regarding comprehension of concepts.

  2. A Comparison of US and Japanese Dental Restorative Care Present on Service Members Recovered from the WWII Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2017-02-20

    The documentation of dental materials used in the USA during the WWII era is readily available, while references for the Japanese are minimal. It was therefore important to build a photographic database of Japanese restorative care which could be utilized as a comparison tool for the deployed odontologist. The dental restorative care of approximately 400 US and 100 Japanese sets of remains was evaluated. Both countries share many similar restorative techniques to include collared crowns, full-coverage restorations, cantilever bridge/pontics to close spaces; restorative materials such as amalgam, gold, and zinc phosphate (temporary) restorations; and removable prostheses. The dental restorative materials most commonly used by US dentists include the amalgam and silicate cement, while the full-coverage crown was the type of restoration most frequently seen on the Japanese remains. Silicates, porcelain and replaceable crowns, and partial-coverage prepared crowns were not observed on the recovered Japanese remains.

  3. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care without...) Status while undergoing hospitalization. The ARNG status of an individual is not affected by virtue of his hospitalization. The provisions of AR 135-200 will apply. Determination of requirement for...

  4. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia with 2% lignocaine in various minor pediatric dental procedures: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Dhindsa; I K Pandit; Nikhil Srivastava; Neeraj Gugnani

    2011-01-01

    One of the most distressing aspects of dentistry for pediatric patients is the fear and anxiety caused by the dental environment, particularly the dental injection. The application and induction of local anesthetics has always been a difficult task, and this demands an alternative method that is convenient and effective. Electronic dental anesthesia, based on the principal of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), promises to be a viable mode of pain control during various pediatri...

  5. The Effect of Oral Dexmedetomidine Premedication on Preoperative Cooperation and Emergence Delirium in Children Undergoing Dental Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Keles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of 1 μg/kg of oral dexmedetomidine (DEX as premedication among children undergoing dental procedures. Materials and Methods. The study involved 100 children between 2 and 6 years of age, ASA I, who underwent full-mouth dental rehabilitation. The DEX group (n=50 received 1 μg/kg DEX in apple juice, and the control group (n=50 received only apple juice. The patients’ scores on the Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS, parental separation anxiety scale, mask acceptance scale, and pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale (PAEDS and hemodynamic parameters were recorded. The data were analyzed using chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Student’s t-test, and analysis of variance in SPSS. Results. RSS scores were significantly higher in the DEX group than group C at 15, 30, and 45 min (p<0.05. More children (68% easy separation, 74% satisfactory mask acceptance in the DEX group showed satisfactory ease of parental separation and mask acceptance behavior (p<0.05. There was no significant difference in the PAEDS scores and mean hemodynamic parameters of both groups. Conclusions. Oral DEX administered at 1 μg/kg provided satisfactory sedation levels, ease of parental separation, and mask acceptance in children but was not effective in preventing emergence delirium. The trial was registered (Protocol Registration Receipt NCT03174678 at clinicaltrials.gov.

  6. Current trends in use of intracanal medications in dental care facilities: questionnaire-based survey on training dental hygienists at educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Hosokawa, Souhei; Ariizumi, Yuugo

    2013-01-01

    The success of root canal therapy is dependent not only on removal of infected pulp (pulpectomy) followed by root canal enlargement, but also on the pharmacological effects of intracanal medications. Various intracanal medications are used. Formaldehyde preparations such as formocresol were common in the past, but these are no longer used in Europe or the US due to the biological toxicity of formaldehyde. In this study, a questionnaire was used to determine current trends in the use of intracanal medications at dental care facilities where dental hygiene students undergo practical training. The questionnaire comprised questions regarding the types of frequently used intracanal medications and their methods of application at dental care facilities in Saitama and Shizuoka prefectures. The results indicated that calcium hydroxide preparations were more commonly used in Europe or the US. However, these results also revealed that formaldehyde preparations were frequently used, which slightly differs from the scenario in Europe and the US. This study revealed that multiple intracanal medications were used for root canal therapy. Furthermore, it was also observed that cotton plugs were generally used as applicator tips for intracanal medications, whereas the use of absorbent paper points was relatively uncommon. The results suggest that the cost of absorbent paper points needs to be reduced.

  7. Participant recruitment to FiCTION, a primary dental care trial - survey of facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, A; Clarkson, J; Maguire, A; Speed, C; Innes, N

    2014-11-01

    To identify reasons behind a lower than expected participant recruitment rate within the FiCTION trial, a multi-centre paediatric primary dental care randomised controlled trial (RCT). An online survey, based on a previously published tool, consisting of both quantitative and qualitative responses, completed by staff in dental practices recruiting to FiCTION. Ratings from quantitative responses were aggregated to give overall scores for factors related to participant recruitment. Qualitative responses were independently grouped into themes. Thirty-nine anonymous responses were received. Main facilitators related to the support received from the central research team and importance of the research question. The main barriers related to low child eligibility rates and the integration of trial processes within routine workloads. These findings have directed strategies for enhancing participant recruitment at existing practices and informed recruitment of further practices. The results help provide a profile of the features required of practices to successfully screen and recruit participants. Future trials in this setting should consider the level of interest in the research question within practices, and ensure trial processes are as streamlined as possible. Research teams should actively support practices with participant recruitment and maintain enthusiasm among the entire practice team.

  8. Oral health status, treatment needs, and obstacles to dental care among noninstitutionalized children with severe mental disabilities in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; van der Schoof, M.; Resida, G.; Broers, D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the oral health status, treatment needs, and barriers to dental care of noninstitutionalized children in The Netherlands who have severe disabilities. The oral health status of 61 children (38% female; 4-12 years of age; M = 7.7, SD = 2.2), randomly selected

  9. Role of ethical beliefs and attitudes of dental students in providing care for HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Ahmed Khan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Dental students’ ethical beliefs about HIV/AIDS were not consistent with the ethical principles as stated in the code of ethics and they held negative attitudes towards PLWHAs. Ethical beliefs were found to be a determinant that may influence future attitudes of these students towards individuals with HIV/AIDS when providing care.

  10. The routine utilization of dental care during pregnancy in Eastern China and the key underlying factors: a Hangzhou City study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, W.; Guo, J.; Li, X.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, H.; Wu, G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Oral diseases are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The routine utilization of dental care (RUDC) during pregnancy is an effective way to improve pregnant women’s oral health, and thus safeguard the health of their babies. As China has one fifth of the world’s population, it is

  11. Networked remote area dental services: a viable, sustainable approach to oral health care in challenging environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Kate; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the cost effectiveness of a model of remote area oral health service. Retrospective financial analysis. Rural and remote primary health services. Clinical activity data and associated cost data relating to the provision of a networked visiting oral health service by the Centre for Rural and Remote Oral Health formed the basis of the study data frameset. The cost-effectiveness of the Centre's model of service provision at five rural and remote sites in Western Australia during the calendar years 2006, 2008 and 2010 was examined in the study. Calculations of the service provision costs and value of care provided were made using data records and the Fee Schedule of Dental Services for Dentists. The ratio of service provision costs to the value of care provided was determined for each site and was benchmarked against the equivalent ratios applicable to large scale government sector models of service provision. The use of networked models have been effective in other disciplines but this study is the first to show a networked hub and spoke approach of five spokes to one hub is cost efficient in remote oral health care. By excluding special cost-saving initiatives introduced by the Centre, the study examines easily translatable direct service provision costs against direct clinical care outcomes in some of Australia's most challenging locations. This study finds that networked hub and spoke models of care can be financially efficient arrangements in remote oral health care. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  12. Public and private dental services in NSW: a geographic information system analysis of access to care for 7 million Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie-Stephens, Jenny; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the distribution of public and private dental practices in NSW in relation to population distribution and socioeconomic status. Dental practices (public and private) were mapped and overlayed with Census data on Collection District population and Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA). Overall, there was an uneven geographic distribution of public and private dental practices across NSW. When the geographic distribution was compared to population socioeconomics it was found that in rural NSW, 12% of the most disadvantaged residents lived further than 50km from a public dental practice, compared to 0% of the least disadvantaged. In Sydney, 9% of the three most disadvantaged groups lived greater than 7.5km from a public dental practice, compared to 21% of the three least disadvantaged groups. The findings of this study can contribute to informing decisions to determine future areas for focus of dental resource development (infrastructure and workforce) and identifying subgroups in the population (who are geographically isolated from accessing care) where public health initiatives focused on amelioration of disease consequences should be a focus.

  13. Cognitive Impairment, Oral Self-care Function and Dental Caries Severity in Community-dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Clark, Jennifer JJ; Chen, Hong; Naorungroj, Supawadee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether oral self-care function mediates the associations between cognitive impairment and caries severity in community-dwelling older adults. Background Cognitive impairment significantly affects activities of daily living and compromises oral health, systemic health and quality of life in older adults. However, the associations among cognitive impairment, oral self-care capacity and caries severity remain unclear. This increases difficulty in developing effective interventions for cognitively impaired patients. Materials and methods Medical, dental, cognitive and functional assessments were abstracted from the dental records of 600 community-dwelling elderly. 230 participants were selected using propensity score matching and categorised into normal, cognitive impairment but no dementia (CIND) and dementia groups based on their cognitive status and a diagnosis of dementia. Multivariable regressions were developed to examine the mediating effect of oral self-care function on the association between cognitive status and number of caries or retained roots. Results Cognitive impairment, oral self-care function and dental caries severity were intercorrelated. Multivariable analysis showed that without adjusting for oral self-care capacity, cognition was significantly associated with the number of caries or retained roots (p = 0.003). However, the association was not significant when oral self-care capacity was adjusted (p = 0.125). In contrast, individuals with impaired oral self-care capacity had a greater risk of having a caries or retained root (RR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.15, 2.44). Conclusion Oral care capacity mediates the association between cognition and dental caries severity in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:23758583

  14. Waiting times before dental care under general anesthesia in children with special needs in the Children's Hospital of Casablanca

    OpenAIRE

    Badre, Bouchra; Serhier, Zineb; El Arabi, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral diseases may have an impact on quality of children's life. The presence of severe disability requires the use of care under general anesthesia (GA). However, because of the limited number of qualified health personnel, waiting time before intervention can be long. Aim: To evaluate the waiting time before dental care under general anesthesia for children with special needs in Morocco. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in pediatric dentistry unit of the Univ...

  15. Developing Dental Students' Awareness of Health Care Disparities and Desire to Serve Vulnerable Populations Through Service-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying; Roberts, Kellie W; Gibbs, Micaela; Catalanotto, Frank A; Hudson-Vassell, Charisse M

    2015-10-01

    Service-learning in dental education helps students integrate knowledge with practice in an underserved community setting. The aim of this study was to explore how a service-learning experience affected a small group of dental students' beliefs about cultural competence, professionalism, career development, desire to practice in a community service setting, and perceptions about access and disparities issues. Prior to beginning their first year of dental school, five first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school participated in a six-week service-learning program in which they interned at one of three at-risk settings in order to experience health care delivery there. After the program, 60 reflective writing assignments completed by the participants were analyzed using grounded theory methods; interviews with the students were used to corroborate the findings from that analysis. Seven themes identified in the journal reflections and interview findings showed enhanced awareness of social health care issues and patient differences, as well as a social justice orientation and desire to address disparities. Building on this study, future research should explore the curricular components of service-learning programs to ensure students receive ample opportunity to reflect upon their experiences in order to integrate previously held assumptions with their newfound knowledge.

  16. A new approach to ensuring oral health care for people living with HIV/AIDS: the dental case manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Celeste A; Cashman, Suzanne B; McDonald, Anne; Graves, John R

    2012-01-01

    The American Dental Association has identified several barriers to adequate dental care for vulnerable populations, including appropriate case management. The objective of this study was to examine the perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs of dental patients living with HIV/AIDS on the role and value of the dental case manager (DCM) and the effect of DCM services on their oral or overall health. We used a qualitative descriptive study design and focus groups. Twenty-five people who had received DCM services on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, attended 1 of 5 focus groups in 2009 and 2010. Digital recordings of the groups were transcribed verbatim. Textual data were categorized using directed qualitative content analysis techniques. We identified major themes and representative quotes. The following themes emerged from discussions on the DCM's role: being available, knowledgeable about clients and insurance, and empathetic; increasing access; and providing comfort. Most participants credited their oral and overall health improvements to the DCM. All participants believed that the DCM was a valuable addition to the clinic and noted that other at-risk populations, including the elderly and developmentally disabled, likely would benefit from working with a DCM. The addition of a DCM facilitated access to dental care among this sample of people living with HIV/AIDS, providing them with an advocate and resulting in self-reported improvements to oral and overall health.

  17. Racial and Ethnic Variations in Preventive Dental Care Utilization among Middle-aged and Older Americans, 1999-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei eWu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study examined recent trends of preventive dental care utilization among Americans aged 50 and above, focusing on variations across racial and ethnic groups including Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians. Methods: Self-reported information on oral health behaviors was collected from 644,635 participants in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS between 1999 and 2008.Results: Despite a significant upward trend of frequency of dental cleaning from 1999 to 2008 (OR=1.02, in 2008 still only 56 to 77% of any ethnic or racial group reported having had a dental cleaning in the previous 12 months. Relative to Whites, Blacks (OR=.64 were less likely to have a dental cleaning in the previous 12 months. These variations persisted even when SES, health conditions, health behaviors, and number of permanent teeth were controlled. In contrast, Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives did not differ from Whites in dental cleanings. Discussion: This is the first study to provide national estimates of the frequency of dental cleaning and associated trends over time for five major ethnic groups aged 50 and above in the U.S. simultaneously. Our findings suggest that public health programs with an emphasis on educating middle-aged and older minority populations on the benefits of oral health could have a large impact, as there is much room for improvement. Given the importance of oral health and a population that is rapidly becoming older and more diverse, the need for improved dental care utilization is significant.

  18. Consensus statement by hospital based dentists providing dental treatment for patients with inherited bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewson, I. D.; Daly, J.; Hallett, K. B.; Liberali, S. A.; Scott, C. L. M.; Spaile, G.; Widmer, R.; Winters, J.

    2011-01-01

    Avoidance of dental care and neglect of oral health may occur in patients with inherited bleeding disorders because of concerns about perioperative and postoperative bleeding, but this is likely to result in the need for crisis care, and more complex and high-risk procedures. Most routine dental car

  19. Consensus statement by hospital based dentists providing dental treatment for patients with inherited bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewson, I. D.; Daly, J.; Hallett, K. B.; Liberali, S. A.; Scott, C. L. M.; Spaile, G.; Widmer, R.; Winters, J.

    Avoidance of dental care and neglect of oral health may occur in patients with inherited bleeding disorders because of concerns about perioperative and postoperative bleeding, but this is likely to result in the need for crisis care, and more complex and high-risk procedures. Most routine dental

  20. Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hashem, Atef A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). RESULTS: Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. CONCLUSION: Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.

  1. The Role of Ghrelin, Salivary Secretions, and Dental Care in Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Inui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders, including anorexia and bulimia nervosa, are potentially life-threatening syndromes characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior. An effective treatment strategy for these conditions remains to be established, as patients with eating disorders tend to suffer from multiple relapses. Because ghrelin was originally discovered in the stomach mucosa, it has been widely studied over the past decade in an effort to uncover its potential roles; these studies have shed light on the mechanism by which ghrelin regulates food intake. Thus, studying ghrelin in the context of eating disorders could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of eating disorders, possibly resulting in a promising new pharmacological treatment strategy for these patients. In addition, early detection and treatment of eating disorders are critical for ensuring recovery of young patients. Oral symptoms, including mucosal, dental, and saliva abnormalities, are typically observed in the early stages of eating disorders. Although oral care is not directly related to the treatment of eating disorders, knowledge of the oral manifestations of eating disorder patients may aid in early detection, resulting in earlier treatment; thus, oral care might contribute to overall patient management and prognosis. Moreover, ghrelin has also been found in saliva, which may be responsible for oral hygiene and digestion-related functions. This review discusses the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in regulating food-intake and the role of saliva and oral care in young patients with eating disorders.

  2. Cause of Subclavian Catheter Malposition and Technical Procedures to Take Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Gürkök

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter application is a minor surgical procedure for patients in care unit and for patients who was planned for major operation. This procedure performs commonly on bad side with local anesthesia. In spite of minor surgical procedure, it can cause serious complications due to technical mistakes. The complications rate decrease if the professional person performed. The malposition is the most common complication. It generally associated with application mistakes. The aim of this article is to uncover the mistakes of subclavian catheter application that used commonly and the technical procedure to take care.

  3. Relationship between Primary and Secondary Dental Care in Public Health Services in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Clarice Magalhães Rodrigues; da Matta Machado, Antonio Thomaz Gonzaga; do Amaral, João Henrique Lara

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between primary and secondary oral health care in Brazil. For this purpose, data from the National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care were used. Dentists from 12,403 oral health teams (OHTs) answered a structured questionnaire in 2012. The data were analyzed descriptively and by cluster analysis. Of the 12,387 (99.9%) OHTs that answered all the questions, 62.2% reported the existence of Dental Specialties Centers (DSCs) to which they could refer patients. The specialties with the highest frequencies were endodontics (68.4%), minor oral surgery (65.8%), periodontics (63.0%), radiology (46.8%), oral medicine (40.2%), orthodontics (20.5%) and implantology (6.2%). In all percentiles, the shortest wait time for secondary care was for radiology, followed by oral medicine and the other specialties. In the 50th percentile, the wait for endodontics, periodontics, minor oral surgery and orthodontics was 30 days, while for implantology, the wait was 60 days. Finally, in the 75th percentile, the wait for endodontics, orthodontics and implantology was 90 days or more. Two clusters, with different frequencies of OHT access to specialties, were identified. Cluster 1 (n = 7,913) included the OHTs with lower frequencies in all specialties except orthodontics and implantology compared with Cluster 2 (n = 4,474). Of the Brazilian regions, the South and Southeast regions had the highest frequencies for Cluster 2, with better rates for the relationship between primary and secondary care. This study suggests certain difficulties in the relationship between primary and secondary care in specific specialties in oral health, with a great number of OHTs with limited access to DSCs, in addition to different performance in terms of OHT access to DSCs across Brazilian regions. PMID:27755603

  4. Factors associated with dental health care coverage in Mexico: Findings from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Medina-Solis, Carlo Eduardo; Maupomé, Gerardo; Vargas-Palacios, Armando

    2006-10-01

    To determine the level of dental health care coverage in people aged > or =18 years across the country, and to identify the factors associated with coverage. Using the instruments and sampling strategies developed by the World Health Organization for the World Health Survey, a cross-sectional national survey was carried out at the household and individual (adult) levels. Dental data were collected in 20 of Mexico's 32 states. The relationship between coverage and environmental and individual characteristics was examined through logistic regression models. Only 6098 of 24 159 individual respondents reported having oral problems during the preceding 12 months (accounting for 14 284 621 inhabitants of the country if weighted). Only 48% of respondents reporting problems were covered, although details of the appropriateness, timeliness and effectiveness of the intervention(s) were not assessed. The multivariate regression model showed that higher level of education, better socioeconomic status, having at least one chronic disease and having medical insurance were positively associated with better dental care coverage. Age and sex were also associated. Overall dental health care coverage could be improved, assuming that ideal coverage is 100%. Some equality of access issues are apparent because there are differences in coverage across populations in terms of wealth and social status. Identifying the factors associated with sparse coverage is a step in the right direction allowing policymakers to establish strategies aimed at increasing this coverage, focusing on more vulnerable groups and on individuals in greater need of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

  5. A qualitative analysis of oral health care needs in arkansas nursing facilities: the professional role of the dental hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardgraves, Virginia M; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Hanson, Carrie-Carter; Simmer-Beck, Melanie

    2014-12-01

    Frail elders and nursing home residents are vulnerable to poor oral health and frequently lack access to dental care. The purpose of this study was to determine why residents in Arkansas skilled nursing facilities have limited access to oral health care. This study utilized qualitative research methodology. Data was collected from oral health care personnel through open-ended responses in a written survey (n=23) and through telephone interviews (n=21). The investigators applied the constant comparative method to analyze and unitize the data and ultimately reach consensus. Data analysis resulted in consensus on 2 emergent themes: policy and access. This qualitative case study suggests access to oral health care for residents living in both long-term care (LTC) and assisted living I and II facilities in Arkansas is affected by public and facility policies and access to oral health care as a function of the patient's health status and availability of oral health care providers. Access for residents residing in assisted living I and II facilities is also limited by the residents' inability to assume responsibility for accessing oral health care. The outcomes from this study may serve to inform policymakers and advocates for access to oral health care as they develop new policies to address this growing need. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  6. Can evaluation of a dental procedure at the outset of learning predict later performance at the preclinical level? A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, Ioannis

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of conventional pre-clinical training in dentistry and to determine if evaluation of a dental procedure at the beginning of dental training can be a predictor for future performance. A group of second year dental students with no previous experience in operative dentistry were asked to prepare a conventional class I cavity on a lower first molar typodont. Their first preparation was carried out after an introductory lecture and a demonstration and their second at the end of conventional training. The prepared typodonts were coded and blindly scored for the traditional assessment criteria of outline form, retention form, smoothness, cavity depth and cavity margin angulation. Once the codes were broken, a paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the means of before and after scores (P<0.0001) and a Pearson\\'s linear correlation to test the association (r=0.4). From the results of this study, we could conclude that conventional preclinical training results in a significant improvement in the manual skills of the dental students and that the dental procedure used had only a limited predictive value for later performance at the preclinical level.

  7. Patient-reported outcomes for immediate identification of dental care needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güneri, P.; Epstein, J.B.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Çankaya, H.; Boyacıoğlu, H.; Barasch, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Dental treatment is necessary in oncology patients since pre-existing oro-dental disease may influence cancer treatment and prognosis. This study investigated the applicability of two indices in reflecting the actual oral health status of 100 non-cancer patients who were admitted for dental com

  8. Patient-reported outcomes for immediate identification of dental care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güneri Pelin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Dental treatment is necessary in oncology patients since pre-existing oro-dental disease may influence cancer treatment and prognosis. This study investigated the applicability of two indices in reflecting the actual oral health status of 100 non-cancer patients who were admitted for dental complaints/routine controls.

  9. Child dental care and serial extraction: a long-term survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, H

    1986-07-01

    Serial Extraction is a useful means of improving the shape and function of the developing dento-alveolar system in selected cases. However, it requires an ability to recognise departures from normal development and to predict growth changes. This may be beyond the skill of the average practitioner. Much depends upon careful monitoring with the aid of study casts and radiographs. It is often necessary to carry out simple interceptive measures such as grinding of deciduous teeth or simple tooth movements at carefully selected ages. The selection of suitable cases and the procedures for managing them are illustrated by examples of treated cases.

  10. Assessment of oral self-care in patients with periodontitis: a pilot study in a dental school clinic in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Hitomi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral hygiene education is central to every stage of periodontal treatment. Successful management of periodontal disease depends on the patient's capacity for oral self-care. In the present study, the oral self-care and perceptions of patients attending a dental school clinic in Japan were assessed using a short questionnaire referring to existing oral health models. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of sixty-five patients (age range 23-77 with chronic periodontitis. The pre-tested 19-item questionnaire comprised 3 domains; 1 oral hygiene, 2 dietary habits and 3 perception of oral condition. The questionnaire was used as a part of the comprehensive assessment. Results Analyses of the assessment data revealed no major problems with the respondents' perceived oral hygiene habits, although their actual plaque control levels were not entirely adequate. Most of the respondents acknowledged the importance of prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases, but less than one third of them were regular users of the dental care system. Twenty-five percent of the respondents were considered to be reluctant to change their daily routines, and 29% had doubts about the impact of their own actions on oral health. Analyzing the relationships between patient responses and oral hygiene status, factors like 'frequency of tooth brushing', 'approximal cleaning', 'dental check-up' and 'compliance with self-care advice' showed statistically significant associations (P Conclusion The clinical utilization of the present questionnaire facilitates the inclusion of multiple aspects of patient information, before initiation of periodontal treatment. The significant associations that were found between some of the self-care behaviors and oral hygiene levels document the important role of patient-centered oral health assessment in periodontal care.

  11. National Policy on Health Care Hearing: an evaluative study from covering services and diagnostic procedures

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the National Policy on Hearing Health Care (PNASA) based on the coverage of specialized services and diagnostic procedures in hearing health care in Brazil. METHODS: This is an evaluation study focused on the coverage of specialized services that offer moderate- and high-complexity diagnostic procedures by region and in Brazil as a whole. We analyzed the data for the period of 2004-2011 collected from the Unified Health System's Informatics Department database (DATASUS), ...

  12. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  13. A register-based study of variations in services received among dental care attenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Kasper; Hede, Børge; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2016-01-01

    . Materials and methods . This retrospective register-based study followed two Danish cohorts, aged 25 and 40, with a dental examination in 2009 (n = 32,351). The dental service data were registered during 2005–2009. The number of dental examinations, individual preventive services (IPS), tooth extractions......Objectives . To investigate whether receipt of dental services, among attenders, reflects variations in dental health or whether and to what degree it is associated with socioeconomic status, with irregular or regular dental attendance and with the availability of dentists in residential areas......, root fillings and composite fillings were analyzed in relation to socioeconomic status, irregular/regular dental attendance, inhabitant/dentist ratio and to DMFT at age 15 (DMFT15) and change in DMFT (ΔDMFT) from age 15 to age 25 and age 40, respectively. Poisson regression and negative binomial...

  14. Analysis of the effectiveness of different hygiene procedures used in dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Marisa Bagiotto; Unfer, Beatriz; May, Lilana Gressler; Braun, Katia Olmedo

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of bacterial plaque removal of six denture hygiene procedures used by patients to clean their dentures. Fifteen students randomly divided into groups G1, G2, G3, G4, G5 and G6 used maxillary intraoral appliances for 24 h without cleaning them. Afterwards, the appliances were submitted to the following procedures: P1: washing under running water for 20 s; P2 and P3: cleaning with alkaline peroxide (Corega Tabs®) for 5 and 30 min, respectively; P4: brushing with water and liquid soap for 40 s; P5: alkaline hypochlorite for 10 minutes; P6: home use chlorine solution (Q'boa® at 0.45% for 10 min), throughout a period of 6 consecutive weeks. The procedures followed a circulating scheme, so that all the appliances were submitted to all the hygiene methods studied. After the hygiene procedures, the appliances were stained, photographed and submitted to the weighing method. After ANOVA and Tukey's test, differences were observed: P5 = 0.73 ± 0.3 (b), P6 = 1.27 ± 0.4(b,c), P4 = 1.92 ± 0.5 (b,c), P3 = 2.24 ± 1.0 (b,c), P2 = 7.53 ± 2.5 (c) and P1 = 26.86 ± 15. 3 (a). From the results of the study, it could be concluded that the use of alkaline hypochlorite is the best way to remove bacterial plaque, followed by the home-use chlorine solution and brushing with water and liquid soap. Corega Tabs® must be used for 30 min of immersion to have a cleaning effectiveness similar to that of alkaline hypochlorite.

  15. 42 CFR 405.1206 - Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hospital care. 405.1206 Section 405.1206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... Hospital Discharges § 405.1206 Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. (a... expedited determination by the QIO when a hospital (acting directly or through its utilization review...

  16. 20 CFR 702.418 - Procedure for requesting medical care; employee's duty to notify employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for requesting medical care; employee's duty to notify employer. 702.418 Section 702.418 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS... medical care; employee's duty to notify employer. (a) As soon as practicable, but within 30 days after...

  17. [Nature and magnitude of the need for dental care in Belgium: the point of view of dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Micheline; Deliège, Denise

    2007-01-01

    In most countries, oral and dental problems (decay, gingivitis, parodontitis,..) are frequent and impact on overall health. Such problems can often be avoided and treated. Health professionals and patients become gradually more aware of the importance of oral health. Oral hygiene and other measures may prevent several problems, which is beneficial to individuals and to public health, since the consequences of oral diseases are very expensive for all. Our study aims to analyze the features of the profession and to assess their possible evolution in the future. The design of our study combines two approaches: a quantitative study -based on data of the national health insurance scheme regarding utilization of care- and a qualitative study based on deep-interviews of dentists. According to the latter, dental care is expensive for the patient and also for professionals. The workload becomes heavier because patients expect too much. It is expanding, due to longer life expectancy and to medical progress which enables to conserve natural dentition, thus requiring extra care for the surviving teeth. These factors explain the increase of dental services which we highlight for the last 20 years; for the future, most of services are expected to expand, mainly for elderly (65 + years), One exception is noticeable: a probable decrease of "traditional care" for young and adult populations (hygiene; professionals denounce these gaps of the system and suggest improvements. Education about oral hygiene should also be promoted; consequently, the profession of oral hygienist should obtain an official license.

  18. Evidence summary: why is access to dental care for frail elderly people worse than for other groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caines, Beth

    2010-02-13

    In August 2009, members of the newly redeveloped Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (http://www.dentistryresearch.org) took part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question which received the most votes formed the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting will take place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website.This paper details a summary of the findings of the first critical appraisal. In conclusion, the critical appraisal has identified that primary research is needed to look at the subject of access to dental care for frail elderly people. Similar barriers to accessing care for this group of people are still being reported today as they were 20 years ago.

  19. Impact of a dental care program on the quality of life of children with and without caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Janice Simpson de; Sarracini, Karin Luciana Migliato; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Pereira, Antônio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz

    2016-12-22

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term effects of the caries treatment provided by a dental care program on changes in schoolchildren's OHRQoL. A one-year follow-up was conducted with a sample of 372 children aged 8 to 10 years which were clinically examined and divided into two matched groups according to their caries experience: dental treatment group (DTG) and group without caries (GWC). Both groups were assessed three times (at baseline, at 4 weeks, and at 1 year) using the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ8-10). The normality test was performed for the statistical analyses; the Friedman test was used for the dependent variables (longitudinal assessment repeated three times for the same group); and the Mann-Whitney test was used for the independent variables (test and control groups in each time period). There was improvement in all domains and in overall CPQ8-10 (p 0.05) were observed at baseline for overall CPQ8-10 and for the emotional well-being domain in the GWC. The comparison between groups demonstrated that OHRQoL was persistently better for the GWC (p dental caries treatment has a long-term positive impact on schoolchildren's OHRQoL, highlighting the importance of health policies that promote access to dental care for this population.

  20. Dental care knowledge and practices among secondary school adolescents in Ibadan North Local Government Areas of Oyo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde Joshua Ogunrinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the dental care knowledge, and practice of secondary school adolescents in Ibadan North Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. Methodology: Four hundred and twelve secondary school adolescents were assessed using interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data on dental care knowledge and practice obtained through the questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics with level of significance set at 5%. Result: Consumption of sticky, sugary and chocolaty food items was perceived by a majority (81.8% as unhealthy to dental health and 66.3% perceived consumption of fruits and vegetables as healthy to the teeth. Vertical brushing technique was mentioned by 69.7% of respondents as the best method of brushing the teeth, and 89.6% stated that teeth should be brushed twice daily. Majority 57.0% of respondents open caps of soft drink bottles with their teeth and 74.3% used toothpicks to remove food trapped in between teeth. Majority (82.8% perceived that dentist should be visited for check-up once in 6 months, however, only 31.6% of respondents had visited dentists before. There was a statistically significant relationship between tooth brushing technique and type of school attended by the respondents (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Majority of the respondents have good oral health knowledge but poor dental health practice.

  1. Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. It might be expected that in the context of a high-cost healthcare intervention for which

  2. Análise do impacto econômico-assistencial de duas abordagens para redução de custos em um plano odontológico de autogestão The impact on costs and care of two approaches to reduce employees' dental plan expenses in a private company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cesar da Costa Filho

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo avaliou a assistência odontológica fornecida a cerca de 4 mil funcionários e dependentes de um hospital privado. A análise foi dividida em três momentos: (1 linha de base (controle: quando a assistência odontológica fornecida era terceirizada por uma empresa que operava com rede credenciada, (2 quando houve uma renegociação de preços com a prestadora original e (3 quando a assistência era feita por um serviço de odontologia próprio sem a intermediação de uma prestadora e com profissionais remunerados através de valores fixos. Foram coletados mensalmente dados econômicos e sobre o tipo e número de procedimentos realizados. A renegociação de preços reduziu os custos em cerca de 37% em relação à linha de base, ao passo que o serviço próprio reduziu os custos em 50%. A renegociação de preços provocou uma diminuição de 31% no número de procedimentos realizados sem modificar o perfil da assistência, ao passo que o serviço próprio não causou diminuição na quantidade de serviços, mas modificou o padrão da assistência, pois se aumentaram os procedimentos relacionados com as causas das patologias e reduziram-se os procedimentos cirúrgico-restauradores.The present study evaluated the dental care plan offered to 4,000 employees of a private hospital and their respective families. The analysis covered three stages: (1 baseline (control, when dental care was provided by an outsourced company with a network of dentists paid for services, (2 a renegotiation of costs with the original dental care provider, and (3 provision of dental care by the hospital itself, through directly hired dentists on regular salaries. Monthly economic and clinical data were collected for this research. The dental plan renegotiation reduced costs by 37% in relation to baseline, and the hospital's own dental service reduced costs by 50%. Renegotiation led to a 31% reduction in clinical procedures, without altering the dental

  3. Epidemiology and phospholipase activity of oral Candida spp. among patients with central nervous system diseases before and after dental cleaning procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Silva Ribeiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering of diseases that affect central nervous system may be considered more susceptible to the infectious diseases of mouth. Sixty-nine patients suffering of cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation were submitted to saliva examination for the presence of Candida spp. before and after a procedure of dental cleaning. The isolates were submitted to assay for verifying phospholipase production. 55.10% of the patients provided isolation of Candida spp. The frequency of isolation obtained before dental procedure was: C. albicans (83.33%, C. krusei (8.33% and C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (2.78% each. The frequency after the procedure was: C. albicans (68.57%, C. parapsilosis (11.43%, C. krusei and C. kefyr (8.57% each and Candida glabrata (2.86%. We verified significantly difference (p < 0.01 between populations obtained at the two examinations. Phospholipase production was verified only among C. albicans strains and the proportion of producers was higher when testing isolates obtained after dental cleaning procedure. Studies focused on Candida spp. isolation are useful for better comprehension of the role of these yeasts on the oral flora from patients with cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation.

  4. Dental Assistant Specialty, AFS 981X0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    from radiation Irrigate root canals Wear and maintain film badges Take dental impressions Mix acrylics Mix impression pastes Cut or remove sutures...patients Mix silver alloys Irrigate oral cavities Remove subgingival calculus, stains, or plaque from teeth Polish teeth Advise patients on home care...PROCEDURES 12J(3). ASSIST IN ENDODONTIC PROCEDURES 12K(2). PREPARE PERIODONTIC MATERIALS 12K(3). ASSIST IN PERIODONTIC PROCEDURES 12L(2). ASSIST IN

  5. Changes in Socioeconomic Inequalities in the Use of Dental Care Following Major Healthcare Reform in Chile, 2004–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Cornejo-Ovalle; Guillermo Paraje; Felipe Vásquez-Lavín; Glòria Pérez; Laia Palència; Carme Borrell

    2015-01-01

    The study examines changes in the distribution and socioeconomic inequalities of dental care utilization among adults after the major healthcare reform in Chile, 2004–2009. We evaluated the proportion of people who visited the dentist at least once in the previous two years, and the mean number of visits. These outcome variables were stratified by sex, age (20–39, 40–59, 60–63; ≥64 years), educational level (primary, secondary, higher), type of health insurance (public, private, uninsured), a...

  6. Interprofessional education: the inclusion of dental hygiene in health care within the United States – a call to action

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderbilt AA; Isringhausen KT; Bonwell PB

    2013-01-01

    Allison A Vanderbilt,1 Kim T Isringhausen,2 Patricia Brown Bonwell2,3 1Center on Health Disparities and School of Medicine, 2Department of Oral Health Promotion and Community Outreach, School of Dentistry, 3Dental Hygiene Program, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: There is a lack of access to oral health care in the United States for rural, underserved, uninsured, and low-income populations. There are widely recognized problems with the US hea...

  7. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutters, Nico T.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice.Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well.Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100% wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6% gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%. Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100% protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05. In addition, most of female dentists (62.9% and dental assistants (80.7% wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with

  8. Predictors of Dental Care Use: Findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I.; Visotcky, Alexis (Dye); Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine longitudinal trends and associated factors in dental service utilization by adolescents progressing to early adulthood in the United States. Data Source The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health from Waves I (1994-95), II (1996), III (2001-2002) and IV (2007-2008). Study Design This is a retrospective, observational study of adolescents' transition to early adulthood. We obtained descriptive statistics and performed logistic regression analyses to identify the effects of baseline and concurrent covariates on dental service utilization from adolescence to early adulthood over time. Principal Findings Dental service utilization within the prior 12 months peaked at age 16 (72%), gradually decreased until age 21 (57%), and thereafter remained flat. Whites and Asians had a 10-20 percentage points higher proportion of dental service utilization at most ages compared to Blacks and Hispanics. Dental service utilization at later follow-up visits was strongly associated with baseline utilization with OR= 10.7, 2.4 and 1.5 at the 1-year, 7-year and 13-year follow-ups respectively. These effects decreased when adjusted for current income, insurance and education. Compared to Whites, Blacks were consistently less likely to report any dental examination. Conclusion Dental service utilization was highest in adolescents. Gender, education, health insurance and income in young adulthood were significant predictors of reporting a dental examination. Blacks had lower odds of reporting a dental examination either as adolescents or as young adults. PMID:23850156

  9. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  10. Relationship between premature loss of primary teeth with oral hygiene, consumption of soft drinks, dental care, and previous caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gómez, Sandra Aremy; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Ávila-Burgos, Leticia; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Vallejos-Sánchez, Ana Alicia; Lucas-Rincón, Salvador Eduardo; Patiño-Marín, Nuria; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo

    2016-02-26

    We determine the relationship between premature loss of primary teeth and oral hygiene, consumption of soft drinks, dental care and previous caries experience. This study focused on 833 Mexican schoolchildren aged 6-7. We performed an oral examination to determine caries experience and the simplified oral hygiene index. The dependent variable was the prevalence of at least one missing tooth (or indicated for extraction) of the primary dentition; this variable was coded as 0 = no loss of teeth and 1 = at least one lost primary tooth. The prevalence of at least one missing tooth was 24.7% (n = 206) (95% CI = 21.8-27.7). The variables that were associated with the prevalence of tooth loss (p oral hygiene (OR = 3.24), a lower frequency of brushing (OR = 1.60), an increased consumption of soda (OR = 1.89) and use of dental care (curative: OR = 2.83, preventive: OR = 1.93). This study suggests that the premature loss of teeth in the primary dentition is associated with oral hygiene, consumption of soft drinks, dental care and previous caries experience in Mexican schoolchildren. These data provide relevant information for the design of preventive dentistry programs.

  11. An Overview of the Peer Assessment Rating (par) Index for Primary Dental Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James Ij

    2016-11-01

    The Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index is a valid and reliable measure of orthodontic treatment outcome and is the most widely accepted such index. Assessing outcomes with the PAR index requires the examination of pre-treatment and post-treatment orthodontic study models. Beginning with the pre-treatment models, a score is given to each feature that deviates from an ideal occlusion (all anatomical contact points adjacent, good interdigitation between posterior teeth and non-excessive overjet/overbite), the scores are then added together to give a total that represents the severity of the malocclusion. The process is then repeated with the post-treatment models. The difference between the pre-treatment and the post-treatment scores reflects the improvement that has taken place during treatment. A score of zero represents an ideal occlusion and in general the higher the score, the more extensive the malocclusion. It is currently a condition of the NHS orthodontic contract for providers to monitor a proportion of their cases using the PAR index. This paper aims to provide primary dental care practitioners with an overview of the PAR index and should provide a useful guide for those wishing to seek calibration in the use of the index.

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of Contamination on Dental Zirconia Ceramic by Silicone Disclosing Agents after Different Cleaning Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wille

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning procedures for air-abraded zirconia after contamination with two silicone disclosing agents. Air-abraded zirconia ceramic specimens (IPS e.max ZirCAD were contaminated with either GC Fit Checker white or GC Fit Checker II. Untreated zirconia specimens were used as control. Afterwards the surfaces were cleaned either with waterspray or ultrasonically in 99% isopropanol or using a newly developed cleaning paste (Ivoclean. After cleaning X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS was performed and the relative peak intensities of Zr, C and Si were used for a qualitative comparison of the residuals. There was no significant difference between the two different silicone disclosing agents. An additional cleaning step with isopropanol led to a significantly lower amount of residuals on the surface, but an additional cleaning process with Ivoclean did not reduce the amount of carbon residuals in comparison to the isopropanol cleaning. Just the silicone amount on the surface was reduced. None of the investigated cleaning processes removed all residuals from the contaminated surface. Standard cleaning processes do not remove all residuals of the silicone disclosing agent from the surface. This may lead to a failure of the resin-ceramic bonding.

  13. Impact of the 2006 Massachusetts health care insurance reform on neurosurgical procedures and patient insurance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villelli, Nicolas W; Das, Rohit; Yan, Hong; Huff, Wei; Zou, Jian; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Massachusetts health care insurance reform law passed in 2006 has many similarities to the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA). To address concerns that the ACA might negatively impact case volume and reimbursement for physicians, the authors analyzed trends in the number of neurosurgical procedures by type and patient insurance status in Massachusetts before and after the implementation of the state's health care insurance reform. The results can provide insight into the future of neurosurgery in the American health care system. METHODS The authors analyzed data from the Massachusetts State Inpatient Database on patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures in Massachusetts from 2001 through 2012. These data included patients' insurance status (insured or uninsured) and the numbers of procedures performed classified by neurosurgical procedural codes of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Each neurosurgical procedure was grouped into 1 of 4 categories based on ICD-9-CM codes: 1) tumor, 2) other cranial/vascular, 3) shunts, and 4) spine. Comparisons were performed of the numbers of procedures performed and uninsured patients, before and after the implementation of the reform law. Data from the state of New York were used as a control. All data were controlled for population differences. RESULTS After 2008, there were declines in the numbers of uninsured patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures in Massachusetts in all 4 categories. The number of procedures performed for tumor and spine were unchanged, whereas other cranial/vascular procedures increased. Shunt procedures decreased after implementation of the reform law but exhibited a similar trend to the control group. In New York, the number of spine surgeries increased, as did the percentage of procedures performed on uninsured patients. Other cranial/vascular procedures decreased. CONCLUSIONS After the Massachusetts health care

  14. Transurethral Cystolithotripsy of Large Bladder Stones by Holmium Laser as a Day Care Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naorem, Salinita; Faridi, M.S.; Akoijam, Kaku Singh; Sinam, Rajendra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bladder stones constitute around 5% of bladder stones in the developed countries. Holmium laser lithotripsy has revolutionised the treatment of urinary lithiasis. Aim The aim of this study was to report the outcome of transurethral cystolithotripsy with Holmium Laser under Local Anaesthesia (LA) as a day care procedure in patients with bladder stones. Materials and Methods Patients with bladder stone greater than 1.5cm attending urology Outpatient Department underwent transurethral cystolithotripsy with Holmium Laser under LA as day care procedure. The results were analysed on aspects of peri-operative pain, completion of procedure, stone clearance, hospital stay, complications and patient compliance. Results A total of 85 patients with bladder stone ≥1.5cm underwent transurethral cystolithotripsy LA. The mean age of the patient was 52±7 years. There were 80 males. The mean size of stone was 3±1.2cm. Mean operation time was 40±10 minutes. Complete stone clearance was achieved in all the patients. None of the patients required hospital stay following the procedure. Conclusion Transurethral holmium laser lithotripsy is an effective and safe procedure for large bladder stones. This procedure can be easily performed as a day care procedure. PMID:28208921

  15. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  16. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  17. Access to Dental Care for Children in Rhode Island. Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Linda; Fontes, Janice; Ross, Maureen; Lawrence, Robin; Andrews, John; Kernan, Sharon; Leddy, Tricia; O'Bara, Joan; Young, John

    Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home, and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who are low income or uninsured. Noting that dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common preventable chronic childhood disease, this Kids Count issue brief considers the extent to…

  18. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu .... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals in ... and upper class) and the expressed willingness to care for.

  19. Dental caries experience and barriers to care in young children with disabilities in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagheri, Darius; McLoughlin, Jacinta; Nunn, June H

    2013-02-01

    Dental caries among preschool children remains a significant dental public health problem. In Ireland, there are no national data available regarding dental caries levels in preschool children. Furthermore, the number of young children with disabilities and their dental caries levels remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to measure the dental caries levels in a sample of preschool children with disabilities. A team of trained and calibrated dentists examined a sample of all 0- to 6-year old preschool children with disabilities in two health service administrative areas under standardized conditions. Dental caries was recorded using WHO criteria. Of a total of 422 participants, 337 datasets were included in the study. Of these 337 examined children, approximately 75.1% had a cognitive disability and 12.9% had a noncognitive disability. In 12% of the children, a diagnosis had not yet been established. Dental caries at dentin level was detected from the age of 4 years. The overall mean decayed/missing/ filled teeth (dmft) was 0.49 (SD, 1.39). The analysis of mean dmft levels in children with positive (dmft > 0) scores revealed a mean dmft of 1.14. The evidence from this study demonstrated that dental caries levels in preschool children with disabilities in Ireland are low when compared with the general population. Furthermore, children aged 3 years or younger exhibited no dental caries at dentin level and therefore were not affected by early childhood caries. An adjustment of current oral health prevention practice may lead to a further reduction in dental caries levels in this section of the child population.

  20. The impact of integrated team care taught using a live NHS contract on the educational experience of final year dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Holmes, S; Woolford, M J; Dunne, S M

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the responses of the dental student body in the first three years of outreach education (2010-13) at the University of Portsmouth Dental Academy in the areas of integrated team work and use of a current NHS contact. Use of a questionnaire to allow both quantitative and qualitative data to be obtained, administered to the three cohorts of students at the end of their longitudinal attendance at the Academy in their final year of education at King's College London Dental Institute. Data were obtained from 227 students which represented a 95% return rate. Sixty-four percent of students strongly agreed with both statements: 'I am confident with working with a dental nurse' and 'I now understand properly the scope of practice of dental hygiene-therapists'. Sixty-seven percent strongly agreed with the statement 'I have had useful experience of working in NHS primary care during the final year'. Eighty percent either strongly agreed or agreed with the statement 'My experience of real Units of Dental Activity and Key Performance Indicators has encouraged me to positively consider NHS high street dentistry as a career option'. Within the limitations of this study the dental students reported having gained useful experience of working in integrated team care dentistry. They expressed strong support for the education that is being delivered in an outreach environment and, most importantly, the student body was looking forward to entering general dental practice in the UK.

  1. The awareness and attitudes of students of one indian dental school toward information technology and its use to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathanna, Vinod R; Jathanna, Ramya V; Jathanna, Roopalekha

    2014-01-01

    Many obstacles need to be overcome if digital and electronic technologies are to be fully integrated in the operation of dental clinics in some countries. These obstacles may be physical, technical, or psychosocial barriers in the form of perceptions and attitudes related to software incompatibilities, patient privacy, and interference with the patient-practitioner relationship. The objectives of the study are to assess the perceptions of Indian dental students of one school toward the usefulness of digital technologies in improving dental practice; their willingness to use digital and electronic technologies; the perceived obstacles to the use of digital and electronic technologies in dental care setups; and their attitudes toward Internet privacy issues. The study population consisted of 186 final year undergraduate dental students from the A. B. Shetty Memorial institute of Dental Sciences, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Mangalore, India. Survey data were analyzed descriptively . Most students indicated that information technology enhances patient satisfaction, the quality of dental record, diagnosis, treatment planning, and doctor-doctor communication. Cost of equipment and need for technical training were regarded as major obstacles by substantial proportions of respondents. Most dental students at our school feel that the information technology will support their decision making in diagnoses and devising effective treatment plans, which in turn increase patient satisfaction and quality of care. Students also perceived that lack of technical knowledge and the high cost of implementation are major barriers to developing information technology in India.

  2. Anxiety level differentiation in 6-12 years old children before and after loss dental care using topical anasthesy at Dental Hospital Hasanuddin University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Malik Hamudeng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety is a psychological and physiological condition which signed by emotion, cognitive, and someone’s behavioral component. Anxiety behavior has long been recognized as the most difficult aspect in the management of patients and may frustrate a dental treatment that will be carried out, especially in children ages 6-12 years. Fear of treatment tooth extraction and local anesthesia is the main reason for kids disliking dental care. This type of research is observational analytic with nonprobability sampling technique, because this study used a population of pediatric patients who visited the location of the research that has been determined. Total sample of this research are 30 people who fulfill the criteria. The sample consist of 16 boys and 14 girls with age range of 6 to 12 years old. The level of anxiety before and after tooth extraction assessed using Facial Image Scale (FIS. Facial Image Scale (FIS has five criteria which describe the level of anxiety in children, very happy by point 1, happy by point 2, normal by point 3, unhappy by point 4, and very unhappy by point 5. The results of the analysis of differences in anxiety with FIS measurement tools show there are differences in the level of anxiety in children before and after tooth loss based on the location of the jaw, the type of anesthesia applied topically, gender, and overall. Overall, there is a difference in children before and after tooth loss and the difference is significant

  3. AIDS and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbert, B; Badner, V; Maguire, B

    1988-01-01

    Dental health care workers (DHCWs) can provide important diagnostic, treatment, and referral services for patients with AIDS and at risk for AIDS. They also have a responsibility to protect all patients in their practices, and themselves, from infectious disease transmission through the use of infection control. To determine the extent to which DHCWs are prepared to assume these responsibilities, a randomized survey of California DHCWs was conducted. Responses were obtained from 297 dentists, 128 hygienists, and 177 dental assistants. DHCWs who expressed a greater willingness to treat people with AIDS or HIV infection also practiced more thorough infection control. Respondents in all groups who perceived a greater percent of their patients to be at risk for AIDS were more likely to use infection control procedures (P less than .0001). They also were more willing to treat such patients (P less than .004) and were more likely to assess patients for AIDS by taking a thorough medical history (P less than .02) and sexual history (P less than .04). Since attitudes toward AIDS and perception of the percent of patients at risk in one's practice affect patient assessment and infection control procedures used by dental health care workers, educational programs designed to enhance DHCWs' response to the HIV epidemic should alert them to the extent of the problem and help them cope with their concerns.

  4. Evaluation of patients' satisfaction from dental care services: TUMS, school of dentistry, 1385-86

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidi D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Association between patient satisfaction and success of the treatment determines the quality of health care. Measuring the level of satisfaction is an important factor for improving the quality of services provided by a system, so it is necessary to determine the expectations of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient satisfaction from services provided by the dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences."nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive and cross-sectional study, 385 patients were randomly selected from different departments of dental faculty including prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics, operative dentistry, radiology and oral medicine. A two-part questionnaire including demographic characteristics of patients and satisfaction from reception process, infection control, student and personnel behavior, and the outcome of treatment was filled out by patients. Data were analyzed using SPSS software."nResults: The most dissatisfying factor was the time wasted in paying the cost and the most satisfying factor was student behavior. General satisfaction form the process was evaluated (complete satisfaction 51.9%, partial satisfaction 38.4% and dissatisfaction 9.6%, and 62.9% of patients were completely agree with introducing dental faculty to others."nConclusion: The most satisfying item was student behavior which indicates that this factor is of great importance in increasing the quality of treatment. The deficiencies determined by patient can provide reliable data for determination and regulation of health care policies.

  5. Oral health care for children in countries using dental therapists in public, school-based programs, contrasted with that of the United States, using dentists in a private practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita R; Friedman, Jay W; Nash, David A

    2013-09-01

    The United States faces a significant problem with access to oral health care, particularly for children. More than 50 countries have developed an alternative dental provider, a dental therapist, practicing in public, school-based programs, to address children's access to care. This delivery model has been demonstrated to improve access to care and oral health outcomes while providing quality care economically. We summarize elements of a recent major review of the global literature on the use of dental therapists, "A Review of the Global Literature on Dental Therapists: In the Context of the Movement to Add Dental Therapists to the Oral Health Workforce in the United States." We contrast the success of a school-based model of caring for children by dental therapists with that of the US model of dentists providing care for children in private practices.

  6. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  7. Anesthetic management of dental procedures in patients with special needs: A retrospective analysis of 519 patients in North of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Mehmet; ÇAĞLAR TORUN, Aysun; Baş, Burcu; DURAN, Hatice; KÖSE, İlyas; FURUNCUOĞLU, Halit

    2015-01-01

    Special need patients have increased risk for oral diseases throughout their life. Sedation and general anesthesia is generally the preferred treatment for special needs patients though it provides optimal conditions for dental treatment. This study was aimed to describe our anesthetic experience in dental treatments of 519 special needs patients at a dental faculty in the north side of Turkey during a three-year period. The data referring to patient’s demographic information, anesthetic tech...

  8. U.S. predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry: its impact on access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2003-01-01

    This study sought to identify faculty, organization, patient pool, and procedures taught in predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs using a questionnaire sent to all fifty-five U.S. dental schools in 2001. Forty-eight (87 percent) programs reported an average of 3.9 full-time and 2.1 part-time FTE faculty, resulting in a mean faculty to student ratio of 1:6.4. One-third employ general dentists to teach pediatric dentistry, and 36 percent report fewer faculty than five years ago. Two-thirds were stand-alone departments. Over half (55 percent) reported increases in patient pools, but also a lack of patients with restorative needs. Half of the programs supplemented school-based pools with special populations, and two-thirds sent students on external rotations, most often to treat high-caries children. Those not using external rotations cited lack of faculty. Accepted patients averaged about four years, with only 6 percent of the pool under three years. Low-income or Medicaid-covered children accounted for 88 percent of school patient pools. Half of the schools felt the pool inadequate to meet competencies, attributable to lack of patients' restorative needs or inadequate intake numbers. Fewer than half of the programs (48 percent) provided hands-on experience with disabled patients, and one-third afforded every student with this experience. Pediatric dentistry was mentioned in fewer than half of the competency documents. Results suggest that U.S. pediatric dentistry predoctoral programs have faculty and patient pool limitations that affect competency achievement and adversely affect training and practice.

  9. Waiting times before dental care under general anesthesia in children with special needs in the Children's Hospital of Casablanca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badre, Bouchra; Serhier, Zineb; El Arabi, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases may have an impact on quality of children's life. The presence of severe disability requires the use of care under general anesthesia (GA). However, because of the limited number of qualified health personnel, waiting time before intervention can be long. To evaluate the waiting time before dental care under general anesthesia for children with special needs in Morocco. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in pediatric dentistry unit of the University Hospital of Casablanca. Data were collected from records of patients seen for the first time between 2006 and 2011. The waiting time was defined as the time between the date of the first consultation and intervention date. 127 children received dental care under general anesthesia, 57.5% were male and the average age was 9.2 (SD = 3.4). Decay was the most frequent reason for consultation (48%), followed by pain (32%). The average waiting time was 7.6 months (SD = 4.2 months). The average number of acts performed per patient was 13.5. Waiting times were long, it is necessary to take measures to reduce delays and improve access to oral health care for this special population.

  10. Patient satisfaction- comparison of the comprehensive care model with traditional model of delivering dental services in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Pakdaman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: One of the important aspects for evaluating an organization is assessing the level of satisfaction of the clients. This study was conducted to compare the level of satisfaction between traditional and new methods of delivering dental care in the clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.   Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 patients received dental care at the dental clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in spring 2010. Data were collected from Comprehensive Care Unit (CCU in addition to 7 isolated clinics including restorative, periodontics, endodontics, radiology, and prosthodontics (fix and removable using translated version of the Dental Satisfaction Questionnaire (DSQ, consisted of 19 questions in three main domains in addition to demographic questions. Descriptive statistics was used as percentage of answers. In order to compare the mean score between domains ANOVA test was used.   Results: The standardized mean scores in each domain were: pain control 58±17, access 59±12, quality 68±11 and total Dental Satisfaction Index (DSI score of 62±10. 92.5% of the respondents reported that students were very careful when examining their patients. 96.8% reported that they treat their patients with respect . The most common reasons for dissatisfaction apart from waiting time and getting appointments were not providing preventive care and pain control.   Conclusion: The results of this study shows acceptable level of satisfaction with dental care in teaching clinics of this dental school, however efforts on implementing preventive care and pain control strategies are suggested.

  11. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  13. Dental Hygiene Students' Attitudes and Self-confidence in the Care of the Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruythuysen, R. J. M.

    1987-01-01

    A study measured the influence of treating disabled persons during the practical training period on the dental hygiene student's attitude toward the disabled, and studied whether attitude and self-confidence are related to certain student characteristics. (MSE)

  14. 45 CFR 84.55 - Procedures relating to health care for handicapped infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... disability organization, a practicing nurse, and other individuals. A suggested model ICRC is set forth in..., Welfare, and Social Services § 84.55 Procedures relating to health care for handicapped infants. (a... action to be taken to effect compliance, and its continuing opportunity to comply voluntarily. (f) Model...

  15. [Training in emergency procedures and care and management of elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahr, Amaël

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of skills-based training reference frameworks for the training of nursing assistants and student nurses, certification in training in emergency procedures and care is an integral part of the initial training of future healthcare professionals. The elderly person is a great example for learning rightgestures.

  16. Developing a new assessment procedure of social information processing in adolescents within secure residential care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rest, Maaike M.; van Bokhoven, Irene; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Maroesjka; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Vriens, Aart; Matthys, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a new assessment procedure of social information processing (SIP) for adolescents, to explore its validity and to examine whether it differentiated between IQ groups. Ninety-four adolescents within secure residential care were administered the SIP inst

  17. Retrospective Clinical Trial of Fusidic Acid versus Petrolatum in the Postprocedure Care of Clean Dermatologic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Dong Young; Yoon, So Young; Park, Hyun Sun; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Cho, Soyun

    2015-02-01

    Clean dermatologic procedures create wounds with a low risk of infection (usually up to 5%). Whether the use of topical antibiotics is advocated, with regard to its efficacy and safety issues such as antibiotic resistance and sensitizing potential, is controversial. Fusidic acid, a topical antibiotic against gram-positive bacteria, is a rare sensitizer and commonly used in postprocedure care in Korea. This is a retrospective study aimed at comparing the efficacy and safety between fusidic acid and petrolatum for the postprocedure care of clean dermatologic procedures. Patients were treated with either fusidic acid or petrolatum ointment, applied on the wound created during clean dermatologic procedures such as biopsy of the punch, incisional, excisional, and shave types. The efficacy, adverse events, and subjective level of satisfaction were retrieved from medical records. A total of 414 patients with a total of 429 wounds were enrolled. The overall rate of adverse events was 0.9%, and the rates of adverse events in the fusidic acid group and the petrolatum group were 1.4% and 0.5%, respectively (p=0.370). There was no wound discharge, pain, tenderness, swelling, induration, or dehiscence in both groups. The patients' self-assessment of the wound was not significantly different between the two treatment groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that the routine prophylactic use of topical antibiotics is not indicated for clean dermatologic procedures. We recommend the use of petrolatum in the postoperative care of clean dermatologic procedures because of its equivalent efficacy and superior safety profiles.

  18. Factors affecting utilization of dental care among 6–12-year-old school children in Bangarpet taluk, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Priyadarshini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral diseases qualify as major public health problems owing to their high prevalence and incidence worldwide. Access to oral healthcare refers to patient's ability to obtain or utilize oral healthcare. Aim: To assess the dentition status and treatment needs among 6–12-year-old school children and to assess the factors affecting utilization of dental care among parents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 420 school children (6–12 years in Bangarpet taluk. Factors affecting utilization of dental care were assessed using a validated questionnaire and dentition status and treatment needs was recorded according to WHO 1997 proforma. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Results: The proportion of children with dmft was 62 (30% and 54 (26% in urban and rural children, respectively whereas the proportion of children with DMFT was 48 (23% and 79 (38% in urban and rural children, respectively. Among urban children 99 (47% did not need any treatment when compared to 87 (41% rural children. Around 32 (15.2% needed one surface filling in urban children and 20 (9.52% in rural children. About 30 (14.28% urban and 40 (19.04 in rural children needed preventive care, respectively. Most of the parents were not aware of fluoride content in the toothpaste. Parents agreed that maintenance of oral health is their duty. There was a significant difference between urban and rural parents for the barriers "no time to visit" (P = 0.0002, "affects my work" (P = 0.048 and "scared of injection" (P = 0.0033. Dental visits were found to be low in both urban 37 (18% and rural 56 (27% children. Conclusion: The caries experience was similar among urban and rural children. Most of the children required restorative and preventive care. Fear of injection and lack of time to visit dentist were the major barriers to parents for utilization of dental care. Hence, integrated approach is suggested to strengthen preventive and

  19. Utilization of dental health-care services and its barriers among the patients visiting community health centers in Nellore District, Andhra Pradesh: A cross-sectional, questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nagarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The primary health centers and community health centers (CHCs offer an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, dental health education, and institution of preventive measures in the remote areas. Aim: To assess the level of utilization of dental health care services and to determine barriers that prevent utilization of dental health-care services among the patients visiting CHCs in Nellore District, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 600 patients aged 20 years and above visiting the randomly selected 10 CHCs during May 2015 in Nellore District. A multistage sampling method was followed. The source of data was primary in nature and it was obtained through self-administered questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed using a software program IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp (P < 0.05. Results: Only 36% of patients had visited the dentist in the last 12 months. Males (54% visited dentist more frequently than females (46%. The most common reported reasons for the last dental visit were pain or a dental emergency (71%, followed by restorative treatment (17% and other reasons (12%. The most commonly reported reasons for not seeking dental care were “Not needed unless having pain” by 360 (60%, “I do not think dental diseases are very serious” by 304 (51%, “I have fear of dental procedures” by 290 (48.6%,“Lack of time” by 235 (45.6%, “Dental treatment is expensive” by 200 (33.3%, and “The dentist is at a long distance” by 158 (26.8%. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that only a small portion of population visited a dentist in previous year. Most of them believe that visiting dentist is necessary only for pain relief.

  20. Effects of Waxed Dental Floss Inclusion in the Regimen of Oral Health of Antarctic Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral health indices were compared for two groups of subjects. One group was trained to use dental floss, the other was not. Professional guidance was...inference drawn from the data gathered suggests that dental floss, used regularly as an adjunct to other home care procedures, can aid in achieving and...maintaining a significantly higher level of gingival health than is attainable without the use of dental floss.

  1. Health care transition in Germany – standardization of procedures and improvement actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieper C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Claudia Pieper, Izabela KolankowskaInstitute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital of Essen, Essen, North Rhine-Westphalia, GermanyAbstract: Previous studies have assessed an increase in the number of people in need and emphasized the advantages of structured discharge management and health care transition. Therefore, our study evaluated the status quo of transition in a major German city after standardization of procedures and implementation of standard forms. Satisfaction with handling of standard forms and improvement of procedures was evaluated. Additionally, patients who had recently been hospitalized were asked about the hospital discharge process. The results show that the recent efforts of standardization helped to improve interface management for health care workers and patients and showed further improvement options.Keywords: hospital discharge process, standard forms, long-term care, aftercare

  2. Comparative evaluation of bispectral index system after sedation with midazolam and propofol combined with remifentanil versus ketamine in uncooperative during dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Mehrnaz; Kaviani, Nasser; Tahririan, Dana; Akhlaghi, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Proper analgesic agents should be used in combination with sedative agents. Remifentanil is a synthetic narcotic/analgesic agent with a short duration effect and decreases the risk of apnea during recovery. Bispectral index system (BIS) is a new noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the depth of sedation. The aim of present clinical trial was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of intravenous sedation with propofol/midazolam/remifentanil (PMR) in comparison to propofol/midazolam/ketamine (PMK) for dental procedures in children 3-7 years of age. In this clinical trial, 32 healthy uncooperative children who were candidates for dental treatments under sedation were randomly divided into two groups. Intravenous sedation was induced with PMR in one group and with PMK in the other group. After injection and during procedure BIS index, heart rate and respiratory rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation was evaluated every 5 min. After the procedure, recovery time was measured. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Friedman, Wilcoxon, and t-test. The BIS value was significantly low in ketamin group (P = 0.003) but respiratory rates and heart rates were same in both groups with no statistical difference (P = 0.884, P = 0.775). The recovery time was significantly shorter in remifentanil group (P = 0.008 and P = 0.003). It can be concluded that intravenous sedation technique with PMR combination induces effective and safe sedation, with less pain and more forgetfulness and a shorter recovery time for children 3-7 years of age during dental procedures.

  3. Associação entre atenção básica em saúde bucal e indicadores socioeconômicos municipais Association between primary dental care and municipal socioeconomic indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Simara Fernandes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Testar associações entre indicadores de atenção básica em saúde bucal e indicadores municipais socioeconômicos e de provisão de serviços odontológicos. MÉTODOS: Estudo ecológico realizado nos 293 municípios do Estado de Santa Catarina, no período 2000 a 2003. Foram utilizados indicadores de atenção básica a saúde bucal: (1 Cobertura; (2 Razão entre procedimentos odontológicos coletivos e a população de zero a 14 anos de idade; (3 razão entre exodontias de dentes permanentes e procedimentos odontológicos individuais na atenção básica. As variáveis investigadas foram: razão entre o número total de dentistas por mil habitantes, razão entre o número total de dentistas cadastrados no Sistema Único de Saúde por mil habitantes, fluoretação da água de abastecimento, índice de desenvolvimento infantil, índice de desenvolvimento humano municipal e a população do município. Foram realizadas as análises pelos testes de Kruskall-Wallis, qui-quadrado e o teste de Spearman para avaliar a correlação entre as variáveis. RESULTADOS: A cobertura foi de 21,8%, a razão de procedimentos coletivos na população entre zero a 14 anos foi de 0,37 e a proporção de exodontias em relação ao total de procedimentos odontológicos individuais foi de 11,9%. Menores proporções de exodontias foram associadas às maiores proporções de dentistas no Sistema (pOBJECTIVE: To test associations between primary dental care indicators and municipal socioeconomic and dental service provision indicators. METHODS: An ecological study was carried out in the 293 municipalities of the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, between 2000 and 2003. The primary dental care indicators utilized were: (1 coverage; (2 the ratio between preventive dental procedures and the size of the population aged zero to 14 years; and (3 the ratio between the numbers of extractions of permanent teeth and individual dental procedures within primary dental

  4. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems; Elaboracao de um procedimento para controle de qualidade em sistemas de radiodiagnostico odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-07-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  5. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  6. Factors influencing the need for dental care amongst the elderly in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, N

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the socio-economic, demographic and behavioural determinants of dental treatment needs of those aged 65 and over in the Republic of Ireland. DESIGN: The treatment needs data is based on detailed clinical oral examinations in the NSAOH carried out between October 2000 and June 2002. To determine factors influencing treatment needs, three measures are used: a dichotomous variable expressing the need for any dental treatment, a dichotomous variable expressing the need for dentures, and a dichotomous variable expressing a Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Need (CPITN) score of three or greater representing a need for periodontal treatment. METHODS: Factors such as age, gender, dental services eligibility status, fluoridation, employment status, educational attainment, anxiety about dental visits, frequency of brushing, and attendance patterns were regressed on a dichotomous version of prevalence of Decayed Missing Filled Surfaces, DMFS including the visual component, and CPITN scores. Associations were estimated using multivariate logistic regression and expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Goodness of fit was evaluated by estimating sensitivity, specificity, positive\\/negative predictive values and accuracy. RESULTS: Being female, smoking, frequent snacking and anxiety about dental visits increased the odds of having a periodontal treatment need. Having primary education only, and being a smoker increased the odds of having a need for any treatment including dentures, whereas being female, regular usage of dental services, and access to fully fluoridated water supplies reduced the odds. CONCLUSIONS: Socio-economic factors such as lower levels of educational attainment, demographic factors such as age and gender and not having access to fully fluoridated water supplies, and behavioural factors such as smoking, frequent snacking, anxiety about dental visits, influence above average treatment needs amongst the

  7. The relationship between access to and use of dental services following expansion of a primary care service to embrace dental team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, K L; Radford, D R; Gallagher, J E

    2013-11-01

    To investigate changes in the patient population and treatment case-mix within an expanded primary care dental training facility in Southern England. Cross-sectional analysis of patient management system data. Electronic data for patients with a closed/completed treatment plan in the 12-month period prior to, and following, dental service expansion were extracted for analysis (n = 4343). Descriptive analysis involved age, sex, payment status, deprivation status and treatment activity. Logistic regression was used to model the likelihood of treatment involving laboratory constructed devices (crowns, bridges, dentures), in relation to demography and deprivation in each time period. The volume of patients using the service increased by 48.3% (1749 cf 2594). The average age increased from 31.97 (95%CI: 30.8, 32.5) to 36.4 years (95%CI: 35.6, 37.1); greatest increase was in the over 75 years age-group (96%). The patient base became less deprived: patients exempt from payment reduced from 43.2% (n = 755) to 28.6% (n = 741) (P = 0.001) and the mean population deprivation score (IMD) reduced from 24.5 (95%CI: 23.8, 25.2) to 22.3 (95%CI: 21.7, 22.8). The volume and proportion of care involving laboratory constructed devices increased from 8.3% (n = 145) to 15.8% (n = 411) whilst assessments without interventive care decreased (34.5%-26.3%). On a logistic regression, the odds of having treatment involving laboratory constructed devices, increased with increasing age in both time periods 7% (95% CI: 1.06-1.08) and 6% (95% CI: 1.05-1.07) respectively. Furthermore, the odds increased by 38% OR: 1.38 (95% CI: 1.01-1.89) in period 2, for white patients. After adjusting for these effects, the odds of having care that involved laboratory constructed devices were less in period 2 than period 1 (100% cf 43%) for those who were technically exempt from payment (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.34 to 2.90 cf, OR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.13-1.81). The patient population altered in relation to age and socio

  8. Oral health and oral implant status in edentulous patients with implant-supported dental prostheses who are receiving long-term nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Rita; Becktor, Jonas P; Brown, Andrew; Laurizohn, Christer; Isaksson, Sten

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral health and oral implant status in a group of edentulous patients receiving long-term residential or nursing care (LTC), all of whom had implant-supported fixed or removable dental prostheses. A dental examination was performed on a total of 3310 patients receiving LTC and from this population 35 edentulous patients in whom dental implants had been placed formed the cohort for this study. All examinations were performed by a specialist in hospital dentistry and took place in the patients' own home environment. Oral health was assessed by means of a protocol which evaluated oral hygiene status, possible oral mucosal inflammation and oral mucosal friction levels. Any problems with the implant-supported prosthesis, implant mobility or other complications were also assessed. In addition, patients were asked about any oral symptoms and their usual oral hygiene procedures. About half of the subjects (17/35) were registered as having no/mild inflammation with 18 of 35 having moderate/severe inflammation. Twelve of the 35 patients had good/acceptable oral hygiene and 23 of 35 had poor/bad oral hygiene. Twenty-one of the 35 patients depended on help from the nursing personnel for their daily oral hygiene procedures. Obvious problems with food impaction were noted in 11 patients. A total of 229 implants had been placed in 43 jaws supporting 40 full arch-fixed prostheses and three implant-borne overdentures. There was no evidence of mobility or fractures of either the implants or the prostheses. Fifteen implants showed some exposed screw threads. Pus was exuding from one implant site and general peri-implant gingival hyperplasia was noted in two patients. Twenty-four patients were completely satisfied with the function and appearance of their implant-supported prostheses. Two patients were totally dissatisfied. This study indicates that oral implant therapy can be considered as a treatment of choice in elderly patients, even if

  9. Ventilator withdrawal: procedures and outcomes. Report of a collaboration between a critical care division and a palliative care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Sean; McHugh, Marlene; Zallman, Leah; Selwyn, Peter

    2003-10-01

    To describe an institutional procedure for ventilator withdrawal and to analyze patient responses to terminal extubation, the medical records of 21 patients who underwent withdrawal of mechanical ventilation according to the process followed by an interdisciplinary palliative care team were retrospectively reviewed. The cohort was a convenience sample of sequentially treated patients in a 1048-bed urban university-affiliated medical center. Sixteen of the 21 patients were on medical or surgical floors and five patients were in critical care units. Patients were assessed for discomfort, such as dyspnea, agitation, or anxiety. Sedative and analgesic medications were administered based on clinical parameters. Palliative care clinician observations of patient reports, tachypnea,use of accessory muscles, and signs of discomfort such as agitation or anxiety were recorded for the first 4 hours after extubation. Medication use and length of survival were recorded. Fifty-seven percent were symptomatic during the extubation process and required administration of either a benzodiazepine or opioid medication. The median survival of the 18 patients who died post-extubation was 0.83 hours (interquartile range 0.5-43.8). Bolus doses of opioid or benzodiazepine medications were effective for management of symptoms in about two-thirds of patients. One-third of patients required continuous infusions. Eighteen patients died following extubation in the medical center, and three of these patients were transferred to an inpatient hospice unit. Three patients (14%) survived to discharge from the hospital. The procedure followed provides a foundation for collaboration between palliative care and critical care services to ensure continuity of care across clinical settings/units.

  10. [Nursing care in ambulatory surgery at a teaching hospital: patients, procedures and biological and psychosocial needs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tatiane Vegette; Araújo, Izilda Esmênia Muglia; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed to characterize the profile of 167 subjects who were treated at the Ambulatory Surgical Center of a University Hospital in São Paulo State and procedures realized at the Ambulatory Surgical Center, as well as to identify the biological and psychosocial needs of these patients. Data were obtained through a semistructured interview and patients' files and were subject to descriptive analysis. The group was characterized by an equal number of individuals from both genders; average age was 51 years and socioeconomic levels were poor. The most common surgical and anesthetic procedures were ophthalmologic procedures and use of local anesthesia with or without sedation. The biological needs were: altered arterial pressure, electrocardiographic alterations, use of medication, allergy to medication, prolonged fasting, nausea, vomiting and pain. The psychosocial needs were: worry, fear, anxiety, discomfort caused by waiting for the realization of procedures and doubts or lack of information concerning perioperative care.

  11. Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Martin; Milsom, Keith M; Donaldson, Michael; Killough, Seamus; O'Neill, Ciaran; Crealey, Grainne; Sutton, Matthew; Noble, Solveig; Greer, Margaret; Worthington, Helen V

    2011-10-10

    Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education) with dental health education alone in young children. A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years), fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F) (supplied twice per year), a toothbrush (supplied twice a year) or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit). 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group.The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine) or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs which will be obtained from parental

  12. Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tickle, Martin

    2011-10-10

    Abstract Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education) with dental health education alone in young children. Methods\\/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years), fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F) (supplied twice per year), a toothbrush (supplied twice a year) or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit). 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine) or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs which will

  13. Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Solveig

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education with dental health education alone in young children. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years, fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F (supplied twice per year, a toothbrush (supplied twice a year or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit. 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs

  14. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  15. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  16. The rise and fall of dental therapy in Canada: a policy analysis and assessment of equity of access to oral health care for Inuit and First Nations communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leck, Victoria; Randall, Glen E

    2017-07-20

    Inequality between most Canadians and those from Inuit and First Nations communities, in terms of both access to oral health care services and related health outcomes, has been a long-standing problem. Efforts to close this equity gap led to the creation of dental therapy training programs. These programs were designed to produce graduates who would provide services in rural and northern communities. The closure of the last dental therapy program in late 2011 has ended the supply of dental therapists and governments do not appear to have any alternative solutions to the growing gap in access to oral health care services between most Canadians and those from Inuit and First Nations communities. A policy analysis of the rise and fall of the dental therapy profession in Canada was conducted using historical and policy documents. The analysis is framed within Kingdon's agenda-setting framework and considers why dental therapy was originally pursued as an option to ensure equitable access to oral health care for Inuit and First Nations communities and why this policy has now been abandoned with the closure of Canada's last dental therapy training school. The closure of the last dental therapy program in Canada has the potential to further reduce access to dental care in some Inuit and First Nations communities. Overlaps between federal and provincial jurisdiction have contributed to the absence of a coordinated policy approach to address the equity gap in access to dental care which will exacerbate the inequalities in comparison to the general population. The analysis suggests that while a technically feasible policy solution is available there continues to be no politically acceptable solution and thus it remains unlikely that a window of opportunity for policy change will open any time soon. In the absence of federal government leadership, the most viable option forward may be incremental policy change. Provincial governments could expand the scope of practice for

  17. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  18. The emergency department as a 'last resort': why parents seek care for their child's nontraumatic dental problems in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostajer Haqiqi, Azadeh; Bedos, Christophe; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2016-10-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing trend in the number of families using emergency departments (EDs) for treating their children's nontraumatic dental problems. We do not know why families use the ED in this way; to date, little research has addressed parents' decisions. The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons that lead parents to select the ED over a dental clinic for their child's nontraumatic dental problem. Using a qualitative descriptive design, we conducted semi-structured interviews with parents of children under age 10 who sought care for nontraumatic dental problems in an ED of a pediatric hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for thematic analysis using Grembowski's dental care process model as a sensitizing construct. Fifteen parents were recruited (ten mothers and five fathers). Three salient themes were identified: (i) parental beliefs and socioeconomic challenges which contributed to their care seeking, (ii) barriers parents faced in finding oral healthcare options for their children in their communities (e.g., poor access to care and poor quality of care), and (iii) parent's high satisfaction with the care provided through the ED. The ED was families' last resort; parents took their child to the ED because of the lack of other options in their communities rather than a belief that the ED was the best choice for dental care. The current pattern of ED use resulted in stress for these parents and repercussions for the children (e.g., pain, longer waiting, and increased complications); further, it has been shown in the literature to be an economic strain on the health system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dental implant treatment following trauma: An investigation into the failure to complete Accident Compensation Corporation funded care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R; Murray, C; Leichter, J

    2016-03-01

    Among other restorative strategies, the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) provides benefits for dental implant treatment to replace teeth lost as a result of trauma. While ACC has funded over 15,000 dental implants since 2002, the outcomes of this treatment and patient perceptions of this treatment have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of the dental implant treatment outcomes and reasons for failure to complete restorative treatment in patients who had undergone trauma-related implant surgery funded by ACC between February 2006 and September 2009, but had not completed the prosthetic component of the treatment. A randomly selected sample of 399 patients, who had undergone dental implant surgery but not completed the crown restoration, was identified from the ACC database. These individuals were contacted by mail for expressions of interest and 181 clients were interviewed by telephone. Responses to open-ended questions were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and analysed using a general inductive technique. A common emergent theme was the high level of satisfaction expressed by participants with the implant process, however just under half of those responding felt they had been pushed into having implants and were given the impression that this was the only treatment ACC paid for. The cost of the prosthetic phase of the treatment and surgical complications were identified as the primary reasons why participants failed to complete the restorative phase of treatment, after completing the surgical phase. The results highlighted the need to better inform patients of their treatment options and to allow time for them to process this information before progressing with care. A patient decision tool may help to give greater ownership of the treatment options. Newly implemented protocols to assist dentists to better assess treatment needs may also assist in achieving improvements in perceived treatment outcomes for

  20. Use of radiography in public dental care for children and adolescents in northern Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk Kieri, Catarina; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    -oral radiographs with a mean number of 19+/-4 exposures. There was a statistically significant difference (pgender-related differences were displayed. During preschool ages, bitewing radiographs were taken in less than 10......The primary aims were to investigate the total number of radiographs and the reason for dental radiography in children and adolescents in the Public Dental Health Service. Secondary aims were to study the influence of caries experience and orthodontic treatment on the number of radiographs....... For this retrospective study, 544 adolescents regularly attending three Public Dental Health clinics in the county of Västerbotten, northern Sweden were selected. The number of radiographs exposed each year from 3 to 19 years of age was registered. Information on reason for the radiographic examination was extracted...

  1. Oral self-care practices, dental attendance and self-perceived oral health status among internal medicine residents in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Omozehio Iwuala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health is important for well-being and chronic disease prevention. Physician′s confidence and willingness to counsel patients on lifestyle practices is related to their personal behavior. Limited data exists regarding oral self-care practices among physicians in developing countries, as the majority seeks oral health advice and care from doctors rather than dentists. Aim: To determine the oral self-care practices, dental attendance, and self-perceived oral health status of internal medicine residents in Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among internal medicine resident doctors attending an update course using a self-administered structured questionnaire, which included oral care practices. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 21.0, P male, P = 0.002. A higher proportion of junior compared to senior residents strongly agreed/agreed and strongly disagreed/disagreed that their oral health status was excellent (P = 0.026. Conclusion: The oral self-care practices of these doctors involved in managing patients with medical conditions linked to oral health is inadequate. There is a need for better education on oral self-care among physicians.

  2. Surface roughness and morphology of dental nanocomposites polished by four different procedures evaluated by a multifractal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Lainović, Tijana; Vilotić, Marko; Blažić, Larisa; Alb, Sandu Florin; Kakaš, Damir

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different dental polishing methods on surface texture parameters of dental nanocomposites. The 3-D surface morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Two representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were investigated: a nanofilled and a nanohybrid composite. The samples were polished by two dental polishing protocols using multi-step and one-step system. Both protocols were then followed by diamond paste polishing. The 3-D surface roughness of samples was studied by AFM on square areas of topography on the 80 × 80 μm2 scanning area. The multifractal spectrum theory based on computational algorithms was applied for AFM data and multifractal spectra were calculated. The generalized dimension Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of dental nanocomposites polished by four different dental polishing protocols at nanometer scale. The results showed that the larger the spectrum width Δα (Δα = αmax - αmin) of the multifractal spectra f(α), the more non-uniform was the surface morphology. Also, the 3-D surface topography was described by statistical parameters, according to ISO 25178-2:2012. The 3-D surface of samples had a multifractal nature. Nanofilled composite had lower values of height parameters than nanohybrid composites, due to its composition. Multi-step polishing protocol created a better finished surface, for both tested materials, than one-step polishing protocol, even when it was followed by diamond paste polishing. Diamond paste polishing created smooth surface and reduced roughness of tested materials.

  3. Surface roughness and morphology of dental nanocomposites polished by four different procedures evaluated by a multifractal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ţălu, Ştefan, E-mail: stefan_ta@yahoo.com [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of AET, Discipline of Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics, 103-105 B-dul Muncii St., Cluj-Napoca 400641, Cluj (Romania); Stach, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.stach@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, Institute of Informatics, Department of Biomedical Computer Systems, Będzińska 39, 41-205 Sosnowiec (Poland); Lainović, Tijana, E-mail: tijana.lainovic@gmail.com [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, School of Dentistry, Hajduk Veljkova 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Vilotić, Marko, E-mail: markovil@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Department for Production Engineering, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Blažić, Larisa, E-mail: larisa.blazic@gmail.com [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, School of Dentistry, Clinic of Dentistry of Vojvodina, Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontics, Hajduk Veljkova 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Alb, Sandu Florin, E-mail: albflorin@yahoo.com [“Iuliu Haţieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, 8 Victor Babeş St., 400012 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Kakaš, Damir, E-mail: kakasdam@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Department for Production Engineering, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Multifractals are good indicators of polished dental composites 3-D surface structure. • The nanofilled composite had superior 3-D surface properties than the nanohybrid one. • Composite polishing with diamond paste created improved 3-D multifractal structure. • Recommendation: polish the composite with diamond paste if using the one-step tool. • Multifractal analysis could become essential in designing new dental surfaces. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different dental polishing methods on surface texture parameters of dental nanocomposites. The 3-D surface morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Two representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were investigated: a nanofilled and a nanohybrid composite. The samples were polished by two dental polishing protocols using multi-step and one-step system. Both protocols were then followed by diamond paste polishing. The 3-D surface roughness of samples was studied by AFM on square areas of topography on the 80 × 80 μm{sup 2} scanning area. The multifractal spectrum theory based on computational algorithms was applied for AFM data and multifractal spectra were calculated. The generalized dimension D{sub q} and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of dental nanocomposites polished by four different dental polishing protocols at nanometer scale. The results showed that the larger the spectrum width Δα (Δα = α{sub max} − α{sub min}) of the multifractal spectra f(α), the more non-uniform was the surface morphology. Also, the 3-D surface topography was described by statistical parameters, according to ISO 25178-2:2012. The 3-D surface of samples had a multifractal nature. Nanofilled composite had lower values of height parameters than nanohybrid composites, due to its composition. Multi-step polishing protocol

  4. Oral health in Brazil - Part II: Dental Specialty Centers (CEOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pedrazzi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during the 1970s and, since then, their application has grown rapidly in the developed world, showing evidence of effectiveness. In spite of this, a major part of the population in the developing countries still has no access to specialized dental care such as endodontic treatment, dental care for patients with special needs, minor oral surgery, periodontal treatment and oral diagnosis. This review focuses on a program of the Brazilian Federal Government named CEOs (Dental Specialty Centers, which is an attempt to solve the dental care deficit of a population that is suffering from oral diseases and whose oral health care needs have not been addressed by the regular programs offered by the SUS (Unified National Health System. Literature published from 2000 to the present day, using electronic searches by Medline, Scielo, Google and hand-searching was considered. The descriptors used were Brazil, Oral health, Health policy, Health programs, and Dental Specialty Centers. There are currently 640 CEOs in Brazil, distributed in 545 municipal districts, carrying out dental procedures with major complexity. Based on this data, it was possible to conclude that public actions on oral health must involve both preventive and curative procedures aiming to minimize the oral health distortions still prevailing in developing countries like Brazil.

  5. A hypertext information system for standard operating procedures in haematological intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, A; Sokol, R; Heneka, D; Lasic, G

    1997-01-01

    In times of cost reduction efforts the role of standard operating procedures for both medical and nursing procedures gets increasing importance. Such standards are necessary if the quality of patient care shall not suffer but even improve. While some sophisticated approaches are coming up with generation of clinical processes from formal protocol models in connection with documentation systems the clinical practice actually looks quite different: Paper-based "operating standards" are used in day-to-day work, if any. In this paper a simple and powerful WWW-based hypertext information system for easy provision and maintenance of nursing standards is presented.

  6. Association Between Intensive Care Unit Utilization During Hospitalization and Costs, Use of Invasive Procedures, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong W; Shapiro, Martin F

    2016-10-01

    Maximizing the value of critical care services requires understanding the relationship between intensive care unit (ICU) utilization, clinical outcomes, and costs. To examine whether hospitals had consistent patterns of ICU utilization across 4 common medical conditions and the association between higher use of the ICU and hospital costs, use of invasive procedures, and mortality. Retrospective cohort study of 156 842 hospitalizations in 94 acute-care nonfederal hospitals for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), pulmonary embolism (PE), upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), and congestive heart failure (CHF) in Washington state and Maryland from 2010 to 2012. Hospitalizations for DKA, PE, UGIB, and CHF were identified from the presence of compatible International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to determine the predicted hospital-level ICU utilization during hospitalizations for the 4 study conditions. For each condition, hospitals were ranked based on the predicted ICU utilization rate to examine the variability in ICU utilization across institutions. The primary outcomes were associations between hospital-level ICU utilization rates and risk-adjusted hospital mortality, use of invasive procedures, and hospital costs. The 94 hospitals and 156 842 hospitalizations included in the study represented 4.7% of total hospitalizations in this study. ICU admission rates ranged from 16.3% to 81.2% for DKA, 5.0% to 44.2% for PE, 11.5% to 51.2% for UGIB, and 3.9% to 48.8% for CHF. Spearman rank coefficients between DKA, PE, UGIB, and CHF showed significant correlations in ICU utilization for these 4 medical conditions among hospitals (ρ ≥ 0.90 for all comparisons; P utilization rate was not associated with hospital mortality. Use of invasive procedures and costs of hospitalization were greater in institutions with higher ICU utilization for all 4 conditions. For medical

  7. The routine utilization of