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Sample records for dental adhesive resin

  1. Water sorption/solubility of dental adhesive resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacarne, Juliana; Carvalho, Ricardo M; de Goes, Mario F; Svizero, Nadia; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Yiu, Cynthia K; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira; de Oliveira Carrilho, Marcela Rocha

    2006-10-01

    This study evaluated the water sorption, solubility and kinetics of water diffusion in commercial and experimental resins that are formulated to be used as dentin and enamel bonding agents. Four commercial adhesives were selected along with their solvent-monomer combination: the bonding resins were of Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) systems, and the "one-bottle" systems, Adper Single Bond (SB) and Excite (EX). Five experimental methacrylate-based resins of known hydrophilicities (R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5) were used as reference materials. Specimen disks were prepared by dispensing the uncured resin into a mould (5.8mm x 0.8mm). After desiccation, the cured specimens were weighed and then stored in distilled water for evaluation of the water diffusion kinetics over a 28-day period. Resin composition and hydrophilicity (ranked by their Hoy's solubility parameters) influenced water sorption, solubility and water diffusion in both commercial and experimental dental resins. The most hydrophilic experimental resin, R5, showed the highest water sorption, solubility and water diffusion coefficient. Among the commercial adhesives, the solvated systems, SB and EX, showed water sorption, solubility and water diffusion coefficients significantly greater than those observed for the non-solvated systems, MP and SE (p<0.05). In general, the extent and rate of water sorption increased with the hydrophilicity of the resin blends. The extensive amount of water sorption in the current hydrophilic dental resins is a cause of concern. This may affect the mechanical stability of these resins and favor the rapid and catastrophic degradation of resin-dentin bonds.

  2. Use of dental adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Piva, Evandro; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Resin adhesives (RA) have been applied between resin composite (RC) increments, but there is no consensus on the impact of this technique on the properties of the final restoration. This study evaluated the effect of the presence of RA between RC layers on physical properties, translucency and long-term color stability of the restorative material. Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose (bond, 3M ESPE) and Adper™ Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) were used as RA, and Filtek™ Z350 (3M ESPE) as RC. Specimens containing RA were prepared by applying 3 layers of the adhesive between 4 increments of RC; adhesive-free specimens were also used (control). Tests of water sorption and solubility, mechanical performance (microtensile cohesive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, after immediate and long-term water storage), and translucency and color stability (after immediate and 1, 7, 90, and 180 days of water or wine storage) were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were also taken from the fractured specimens (flexural strength test). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (padhesive resin (SBMP). This study is the first to show positive results from the use of resin adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composite, which is common in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries.

  4. Effect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epasinghe, D J; Yiu, C K Y; Burrow, M F; Tay, F R; King, N M

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidin (PA) incorporation into experimental dental adhesives on resin-dentine bond strength. Four experimental hydrophilic adhesives containing different PA concentrations were prepared by combining 50wt% resin comonomer mixtures with 50wt% ethanol. Proanthocyanidin was added to the ethanol-solvated resin to yield three adhesives with PA concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0wt%, respectively. A PA-free adhesive served as the control. Flat dentine surfaces from 40 extracted third molars were etched with 32% phosphoric acid. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four adhesive groups. Two layers of one of the four experimental adhesives were applied to the etched dentine and light-cured for 20s. Composite build-ups were performed using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, twenty-four bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm×0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure under tension for bond strength testing. Bond strength data were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Interfacial nanoleakage was examined in the remaining teeth using a field-emission scanning electron microscope and analysed using the Chi-square test (α=0.05). No significant difference in bond strength was found amongst PA-free, 1% and 2% PA adhesives. However, incorporation of 3% PA into the adhesive significantly lowered bond strength as demonstrated by a greater number of adhesive failures and more extensive nanoleakage along the bonded interface. Incorporation of 2% proanthocyanidin into dental adhesives has no adverse effect on dentine bond strength. The addition of proanthocyanidin to an experimental adhesive has no adverse effect on the immediate resin-dentine bond strength when the concentration of proanthocyanidin in the adhesive is less than or equal to 2%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interfacial adhesion of dental ceramic-resin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promotes micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this study is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters of the dental ceramic-resin systems as a function of ceramic surface treatment. The analytical procedures focused on characterizing the microstructure and fracture properties of EmpressRTM ceramics (a leucite-based core ceramic, two lithia disilicate-based core ceramics, and a glass veneer) and determining the ceramic-resin adhesion zone bond strength characteristics. Microstructure and composition are controlling factors in the development of micromechanical retention produced by etching. Silane treated ceramics negated the effect of surface roughening produced by etching, inducing lower surface energy of the ceramic and, reduced bonding effectiveness. There was a positive correlation between WA, tensile bond strength (a), and KA, i.e., higher mean WA value, and higher mean sigma and KA values. This study suggests that (1) the sigma and KA values for ceramic bonded to resin are affected by the ceramic microstructure and the ceramic surface treatments; (2) the definition of the adhesion zone is essential to classify the modes of failure, which should be an integral component of all failure analyses; (3) the microtensile test may be preferable to conventional shear or flexural tests as an indicator of composite-ceramic bond quality; and (4) careful microscopic analysis of fracture surfaces and an x-ray dot map can produce a more consistent and complete description of the fracture process and interpretation of the modes of failure. The mode of failure and fractographic analyses

  6. Influence of hydroxyethyl acrylamide addition to dental adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Stéfani Becker; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Schneider, Luis Felipe Jochims; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Petzhold, Cesar Liberato; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2015-12-01

    to determine the physicochemical properties of experimental adhesive resins containing hydroxyethyl acrylamide. Three groups of experimental resin were formulated, GHEAA33% (33.3wt% HEAA+66.6wt% BisGMA), GHEAA50% (50wt% HEAA+50wt% BisGMA), and GHEAA-FREE (33.3wt% HEMA+66.6wt% of BisGMA). The polymerization process of each adhesive resin group, as well as for the homopolymers, BisGMA, HEMA, HEAA, HEMA* without EDAB, and HEAA* without EDAB, was characterized through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Elution of monomers was evaluated by (1)H NMR. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was used to collect the glass transition temperature (Tg), the storage modulus (E') and the reticulation degree (ρ). Flexural strength was calculated by three-point bending test with 0.75mm/min. Softening in solvent was calculated through hardness before and after immersion in water or ethanol. GHEAA50%, GHEAA33%, GHEAA-FREE presented higher polymerization rate ( [Formula: see text] , 12.3 and 5.3mmolg(-1)s(-1), respectively) than homopolymers HEMA, HEMA* and HEAA*. Group with HEAA presented higher degree of conversion (GHEAA50%=64.07%>GHEAA33%=55.82%>GHEAA-FREE=49.02%; p=0.008) All groups presented low elution of monomers (p>0.05). The values of E' were higher on GHEAA33% than GHEAA-FREE (p=0.034). Tg and flexural strength values of GHEAA-FREE were higher than acrylamide groups (p=0.022 and padhesive resin. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of chlorhexidine incorporation into dental adhesive resin on durability of resin-dentin bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Cynthia K; Hiraishi, Noriko; Tay, Franklin R; King, Nigel M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) incorporation into experimental dentin adhesives with different hydrophilicities on the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin. Flat, deep dentin surfaces were prepared from 60 extracted human third molars. Three ethanol-solvated (50 wt% ethanol/50 wt% comonomers) experimental adhesives with varying degrees of hydrophilicity were prepared for the CHX-free groups. For the CHX-containing groups, chlorhexidine diacetate was further added to the ethanol-solvated adhesives to form a concentration of 2.0 wt% CHX. Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s, rinsed and blot dried before bonding. The adhesives were generously applied to dentin with a microbrush for 15 s. A second application of fresh adhesive was made and light cured for 20 s (600 mW/cm2) after solvent evaporation. Composite buildups were made using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). The bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm x 0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Testing was performed 24 h after specimen preparation and 12 months after storage in artificial saliva. The µTBS data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests. Fractographic analysis was performed by SEM. Significant differences were observed for the three factors "adhesive hydrophilicity" (p adhesives (p > 0.05). After storage in artificial saliva, significant reduction in bond strength was observed in all adhesive groups, except for CHX-containing adhesive I (p adhesive III was significantly higher than the corresponding CHX-free adhesive (p dental adhesives, chlorhexidine can partially reduce the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds.

  8. Adhesion of adhesive resin cements to dental zirconia ceramic and human dentin

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the long-term bond strengths of adhesive resin cements to zirconia ceramic and human dentin were evaluated, and resin-ceramic and resin-dentin bonding mechanisms were investigated. In chapter 3, the influence of surface pre-treatment on the bonding durability of three resin cements (Super-Bond C&B resin cement : SB, Clearfil™ Esthetic cement: CEC, Chemiace II: CH) to zirconia ceramic was studied. Most importantly, the influence of chemical reactions of functional monomers in...

  9. YbF3/SiO2 Fillers as Radiopacifiers in a Dental Adhesive Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neftali L V Carreno; Thiago C S Oliveira; Evandro Piva; Fernanda B Leal; Giana S Lima; Marcelo D Moncks; Cristiane W Raubach; Fabrcio A Ogliari

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of functionalizing a dental adhesive resin with YbF3/SiO2 fillers for use as radiopacifiers. Particles of YbF3/SiO2 were obtained with the high-energy mechanical milling method and characterized by both physical and chemical methods. After characterization, the particles were sieved and silanized prior to being incorporated into an adhesive resin. The stability of the particle suspension was then evaluated. After light activation, the radiopacity, degree of conversion, flexural strength and elastic modulus were determined. The dental adhesive resins with 10 and 15 wt%of filler provided satisfactory radiopacity, while flexural strength and elastic modulus were not affected. The degree of conver-sion was statistically lower than that of the control (p<0.05). The method used for incorporating the tested ytterbium fluoride/silicon dioxide particles at concentrations of 10 and 15 wt%was shown to be feasible for the development of a radiopaque dental adhesive system.

  10. Determining Optimal Fluorescent Agent Concentrations in Dental Adhesive Resins for Imaging the Tooth/Restoration Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bim Júnior, Odair; Cebim, Marco A; Atta, Maria T; Machado, Camila M; Francisconi-Dos-Rios, Luciana F; Wang, Linda

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent dyes like Rhodamine B (RB) have been used to identify the spatial distribution of adhesive restorative materials in the tooth/restoration interface. Potential effects of the addition of RB to dental adhesives were addressed in the past, but no further information is available on how to determine suitable concentrations of RB in these bonding agents for imaging in the confocal laser scanning microscope. This study provides systematical strategies for adding RB to viscous dental adhesive resins, focusing on the determination of the lowest range of dye concentrations necessary to achieve an acceptable image of the dentin/adhesive interface. It was demonstrated that optimized images of the resin distribution in dentin can be produced with 0.1-0.02 mg/mL of RB in the (tested) adhesives. Our approaches took into account aspects related to the dye concentration, photophysical parameters in different host media, specimen composition and morphology to develop a rational use of the fluorescent agent with the resin-based materials. Information gained from this work can help optimize labeling methods using dispersions of low-molecular-weight dyes in different monomer blend systems.

  11. Therapeutic polymers for dental adhesives: loading resins with bio-active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazato, Satoshi; Ma, Sai; Chen, Ji-hua; Xu, Hockin H K

    2014-01-01

    Many recent adhesives on the market exhibit reasonable clinical performance. Future innovations in adhesive materials should therefore seek out novel properties rather than simply modifying existing technologies. It is proposed that adhesive materials that are "bio-active" could contribute to better prognosis of restorative treatments. This review examines the recent approaches used to achieve therapeutic polymers for dental adhesives by incorporating bio-active components. A strategy to maintain adhesive restorations is the focus of this paper. Major trials on therapeutic dental adhesives have looked at adding antibacterial activities or remineralization effects. Applications of antibacterial resin monomers based on quaternary ammonium compounds have received much research attention, and the loading of nano-sized bioactive particles or multiple ion-releasing glass fillers have been perceived as advantageous since they are not expected to influence the mechanical properties of the carrier polymer. The therapeutic polymer approaches described here have the potential to provide clinical benefits. However, not many technological applications in this category have been successfully commercialized. Clinical evidence as well as further advancement of these technologies can be a driving force to make these new types of materials clinically available. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial adhesion on direct and indirect dental restorative composite resins: An in vitro study on a natural biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Vano, Michele; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Both direct and indirect techniques are used for dental restorations. Which technique should be preferred or whether they are equivalent with respect to bacterial adhesion is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the affinity of bacterial biofilm to dental restorative composite resins placed directly and indirectly. Five direct composite resins for restorations (Venus Diamond, Adonis, Optifil, Enamel Plus HRi, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic) and 3 indirect composite resins (Gradia, Estenia, Signum) were selected. The materials were incubated in unstimulated whole saliva for 1 day. The biofilms grown were collected and their bacterial cells counted. In parallel, the composite resin surface morphology was analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Both bacterial cell count and surface topography parameters were subjected to statistical analysis (α=.05). Indirect composite resins showed significantly lower levels than direct composite resins for bacterial cell adhesion, (P.05). However, within the indirect composite resins a significantly lower level was found for Gradia than Estenia or Signum (Padhesion when the second and particularly the third-order statistical moments of the composite resin height distributions were considered. Indirect dental restorative composite resins were found to be less prone to biofilm adhesion than direct composite resins. A correlation of bacterial adhesion to surface morphology exists that is described by kurtosis; thus, advanced data analysis is required to discover possible insights into the biologic effects of morphology. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  14. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  15. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-29

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated.

  16. [Studies on the pre-treatment of dental alloy for adhesive restorations. 4. Adhesive durability of adhesive resin to various dental alloys treated with composite plating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y; Yamashita, A; Suzuki, K; Omura, I; Yamauchi, J I

    1989-07-01

    In this study, the durability of adhesion between an adhesive resin (Panavia EX) and dental alloys (gold or Ni-Cr) were examined in regard to thermal cycling, immersion, either in water (70 degrees C or 100 degrees C) or in sodium chloride solutions (pH was 3, 7 and 9). An favourable adhesive strength, such as 450-500 kgf/cm2, was obtained even after 24 hours immersion in 37 degrees C water, when the surface pre-treatment of the alloy was done with either Sn- or composite (TMSAC/Sn or PVC/Sn)-plating. However, during the durability test, the adhesive strength has decreased to such on extent, that about 60% of early strength with Sn-plating and 80% with TMSAC/Sn composite plating. But, with PVC/Sn composite-plating, more than 90% of the early strength was maintained. In regard to the pH of the corrosive solution, no apparent difference was observed regarding the above mentioned adhesive characteristics.

  17. [Studies of dental methacrylic resin. (Part 8) Flexural and impact adhesive strength of self-curing methacrylic resin to cross-linked polymethyl methacrylate resins (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, T; Hirabayashi, S; Harashima, I

    1981-10-01

    Heat-curing methacylic resins cross-linked with three kinds of dimethacrylates, i.e. EDMA, tri-EDMA and nona-EDMA, were prepared, and the flexural and the impact adhesive strength of the dough moulding type and the pour type self-curing methacrylic resins to them were examined. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The flexural and the impact adhesive strength of the pour type self-curing resin were higher and more stable than those of the dough moulding type one. (2) The flexural and the impact adhesive strength of self-curing resins to cross-linked adherent resins rised in order of nona-EDMA greater than tri-EDMA greater than EDMA in the range of higher concentration of cross-linking agents. This tendency was marked for the pour type resin. (3) When the dough moulding type resin was used as adhesive resin, to adherent resin cross-linked with EDMA or tri-EDMA which had relatively short chain, the respective adhesive strength of that decreased with increasing the concentration of cross-linking agent. While, to adherent resin cross-linked with nona-EDMA, which had relatively long and more flexible chain, the respective adhesive strength of the dough moulding type resin increased with increasing the concentration of cross-linking agent. (4) When the pour type resin was used as adhesive resin, to adherent resin cross-linked with EDMA or tri-EDMA, the respective adhesive strength of that showed the maximum at the concentration near 2 to 5 mole% and decreased with increasing the concentration. While, to adherent resin cross-linked with nona-EDMA, the flexural adhesive strength of the pour type resin was approximately constant without the effect of the concentration, but the impact adhesive strength of that increased with increasing the concentration. (5) The flexural adhesive strength of the dough moulding and the pour type resin under the wet condition decreased about 30 to 60% compared with under the dry condition, but the percentage of the falling for the impact

  18. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  19. Effect of the applied power of atmospheric pressure plasma on the adhesion of composite resin to dental ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Geum-Jun; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of applied power on dental ceramic bonding of composite resin using nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). A pencil-type APP torch was used to modify the surface chemical composition and hydrophilicity of dental ceramic and to improve the adhesion of composite resin to the surface. The effect of the applied power on chemical changes of the plasma polymer on a ceramic surface and the adhesive strength between the composite resin and feldspathic porcelain were examined. Adhesion was evaluated by comparing shear bond strengths (SBS) using the iris method. The chemical composition of the plasma polymer deposited on the ceramic surface was evaluated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Hydrophilicity was evaluated by contact angle measurements. The fracture mode at the interface was also evaluated. The APP treatment was effective and the SBS of the experimental groups were significantly higher than those of the negative control group (p adhesion by producing carboxyl groups on the ceramic surface and as a result by improving surface hydrophilicity. The carboxyl group contents in the plasma polymer on the ceramic surface increased as the applied power increased.

  20. Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: improved resin adhesive penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6mA, treatment time 30s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5s, and light-cured for 20s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-μm spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and

  1. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Nanoleakage at the resin-dental interface of four self-etching adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhi-qing; Ouyang, Yong; Yang, Jian-zhen

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the nanoleakage and ultramorphology of four self-etching adhesives. Sixteen freshly extracted, caries-free human third molars were selected. A flat dentin surface was exposed by removing occlusal enamel. All teeth were randomly divided into four groups acorrding to four different self-etch adhesive: Adper Prompt (A), iBond (B), Xeno III (C) and SE Bond (D). The dentin were bonded with dentin adhesive system according to manufacturer's directions. Composite layers were built up incrementally. The specimens were sectioned longitudinally across the resin-dentin interface into 4.0 mm×0.9 mm sticks and then traced with ammoniacal silver solution. Epoxy resin-embedded sections were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) to observe nanoleakage. The images were qualitatively compared by NIH software, and data was analyzed by SPSS. Different thickness of hybrid layer and adhesives layer were observed for each adhesive. The hybrid layer of A, C was thicker than that of B, D, and adhesive layer of D was thicker than the others. The extent of nanoleakage varied among different adhesives: A (45.02 ± 9.49), B (43.97 ± 8.55), C (27.02 ± 10.86), D (12.94 ± 2.07). D presented significantly less silver deposition than any of the others did (P adhesive layer vary among the four adhesives. The shape and extent of nanoleakage of each adhesive are also different. Two-step system shows less nanoleakage than one-step systems do.

  3. Adhesion between dental ceramic and bonding resin: quantitative evaluation by Vickers indenter methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Sylvie; Tavernier, Bruno; Colon, Pierre; Picard, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adhesion to dental ceramic by Vickers indenter methodology. This technique allows the creation of adhesive fractures and determines the influence of the surface treatment on adhesive capacities. A single bond adhesive system (One Step Bisco) was applied to ceramic Vitapan 3D Master CE 0124 samples. Ceramic samples were polished with 500 or 4000-grit paper, sandblasted or not (Sa/NSa), treated with fluorhydric acid or not (A/NA) and silane or not (Si/NSi). The experimental groups (Gr) were: (Gr 1) 4000; (Gr 2) 4000+Si; (Gr 3) 4000+Sa+A; (Gr 4) 4000+Sa+A+Si; (Gr 5) 500+Sa+A+Si. Each sample was indented with the diamond Vickers indenter Leitz Durimet 2 (Wetzlar, Germany) using a load of 20N for 30s. The surfaces of the debonded areas were observed in an optical microscope providing a digital image of the debonded surface. The adhesion bond strength was calculated according to the formula of Engel and Roshon [Engel PA, Roshon DD. Indentation-debonding of an adhered surface layer. J Adhesion 1979;10(33): 237-53]. The statistical analysis was conducted using Student's t test (padhesion of an adhesive layer on a feldspathic ceramic.

  4. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  5. A review of the development of radical photopolymerization initiators used for designing light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on radical photopolymerization initiators, which are used in the design of light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites, by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literature. The photopolymerization reactivities of acylphosphine oxide (APO) and bisacylphosphine oxide (BAPO) derivatives, and D,L-camphorquinone (CQ)/tertiary amine were investigated, and no significant differences in degree of conversion (DC) were found between BAPO and CQ/amine system (p>0.05). In addition, a novel 7,7-dimethyl-2,3-dioxobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-1-carbonyldiphenyl phosphine oxide (DOHC-DPPO=CQ-APO) was synthesized and its ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) spectral behavior was investigated. CQ-APO possessed two maximum absorption wavelengths (λmax) at 350-500 nm [372 nm (from APO group) and 475 nm (from CQ moiety)], and CQ-APO-containing resins exhibited good photopolymerization reactivity, excellent color tone, relaxed operation time, and high mechanical strength. It was also found that a newly synthesized, water-soluble photoinitiator (APO-Na) improved adhesion to ground dentin.

  6. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  7. Clinical Impact of Dental Adhesives on Postoperative Sensitivity in Class I and Class II Resin-Composite Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Manchorova-Veleva Neshka A.; Vladimirov Stoyan B.; Keskinova Donka А.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-etch adhesives are believed to prevent postoperative sensitivity when used under posterior resin-based composite restorations. STUDY OBJECTIVE: A hypothesis that a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA) would result in less postoperative sensitivity than a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (3-E&RA) was tested. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred restorations were placed with a 1-SEA and 100 restorations with a 3-E&RA. Teeth were restored with Filtek Supreme nanofilled resin-compo...

  8. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  9. Translucency and color stability of resin composite and dental adhesives as modeling liquids - A one-year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of modeling liquids on the translucency and color shade of resin composites (RCs) after one year of storage. RC specimens were prepared using either a conventional insertion technique (control; without modeling liquid) or a restorative dental modeling insertion technique (RDMIT) with dental adhesives as modeling liquids (Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose [SBMP; 3M ESPE] or Adper™ Single Bond 2 [SB; 3M ESPE]). The initial colors of the specimens were obtained with a digital spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* color system, after which specimens were stored (37°C) in distilled water or red wine for 12 months. Color measurements were reassessed after 6 and 12 months of storage, and scanning electron microscopy was performed after 12 months. Translucency and color change (ΔE*) were calculated and analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). RC samples prepared via RDMIT showed a translucency similar to that of control samples. ΔE* was also less intense for RCs containing SBMP than for RCs containing SB. Specimens stored in wine showed a clear pattern of degradation, especially in the control group, and surface degradation seemed to be less intense for specimens prepared with SBMP and SB than for specimens without. Specimens stored in water did not show clear evidence of surface degradation. RDMIT appears to be an interesting approach to reduce ΔE* in RCs over time without negative effects on the translucency of the material. However, the modeling liquid should feature a hydrophobic composition, similar to that used in the SBMP group, the achieve the best results.

  10. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  11. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  12. Self-adhesive resin cements - chemistry, properties and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Stansbury, J W; Burke, F J T

    2011-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were introduced to dentistry within the past decade but have gained rapidly in popularity with more than a dozen commercial brands now available. This review article explores their chemical composition and its effect on the setting reaction and adhesion to various substrates, their physical and biological properties that may help to predict their ultimate performance and their clinical performance to date and handling characteristics. The result of this review of self-adhesive resin cements would suggest that these materials may be expected to show similar clinical performance as other resin-based and non-resin based dental cements. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. An Overview of Dental Adhesive Systems and the Dynamic Tooth-Adhesive Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran-Russo, Ana; Leme-Kraus, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Teixeira, Erica C

    2017-10-01

    From the conception of resin-enamel adhesion to today's contemporary dental adhesive systems, clinicians are no longer afraid of exploring the many advantages brought by adhesive restorative concepts. To maximize the performance of adhesive-based restorative procedures, practitioners must be familiar with the mechanism of adhesion, clinical indications, proper handling, the inherent limitations of the materials and the biological challenges. This review provides an overview of the current status of restorative dental adhesives, their mechanism of adhesion, mechanisms of degradation of dental adhesive interfaces, how to maximize performance, and future trends in adhesive dentistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  15. Clinical Impact of Dental Adhesives on Postoperative Sensitivity in Class I and Class II Resin-Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchorova-Veleva Neshka A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-etch adhesives are believed to prevent postoperative sensitivity when used under posterior resin-based composite restorations. STUDY OBJECTIVE: A hypothesis that a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA would result in less postoperative sensitivity than a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (3-E&RA was tested. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred restorations were placed with a 1-SEA and 100 restorations with a 3-E&RA. Teeth were restored with Filtek Supreme nanofilled resin-composite and were evaluated for sensitivity to cold and masticatory forces at baseline, 7 days, 14 days, 30 days, and 6 months postoperatively. Vitality test scores of the teeth were recorded at the same periods. RESULTS: The evaluation of cold sensitivity intensity (VAS score for all observation periods in both restoration groups did not reveal any statistical significance. The differences in the response time to cold stimulation (0 - 15 sec for the restorations made with a 1-SEA and those made with a separate etch step are statistically insignificant. There are no significant differences in the vitality of the restored teeth at intra- or inter-group comparison. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences in postoperative sensitivity to masticatory forces at postoperative day 14 and day 30 in the 3-E&RA group. CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative sensitivity depends on the type of dentin adhesive used. More intensive complaints of postoperative sensitivity were recorded under masticatory forces at postoperative day 14 and day 30 in 3-E&RA in comparison with 1-SEA.

  16. Indirect resin onlay cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a comprehensive clinical overview

    OpenAIRE

    Bandéca,Matheus Coelho; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues [UNESP; Barros, Érico Damasceno; Pinto,Shelon Cristina Souza; Firoozmand,Leily Macedo; Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi de [UNESP; Saad, José Roberto Cury [UNESP; Maia Filho,Etevaldo Matos; Queiroz, Rejane Christine De Souza

    2012-01-01

    Advances in adhesive technology and esthetic dental materials have permitted clinicians to perform conservative preparation of the dentition for onlay restorations. Indirect resin onlays are a great alternative to dental crowns for reestablishment the function and esthetic in teeth with great destruction.

  17. Requirement for development of dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Alan Boyde and his colleagues first described smear layers-covered dental hard tissues. Later, David Eick and his group examined smear layer-covered dentin and showed how acid-labile are smear layers. A superior bond strength has come to be provided for the resin-dentin interface in the current dental adhesive systems as a result that the acid-etching treatment for the enamel/dentin was examined to remove smear layers. Moreover, latest adhesive systems which gave top priority to convenience i...

  18. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  19. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-05-02

    With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adhesive resins. Alumina ceramic specimens (Techceram Ltd, Shipley, UK) were assigned to three groups. Three types of commercially available prosthodontic resin composites [BelleGlass®, (BG, Kerr, CA, USA), Sinfony® (SF, 3 M ESPE, Dental Products, Germany), and GC Gradia® (GCG, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan)] were bonded to the alumina substrate using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group (N = 40) were stored dry for 24 hours, the remaining were stored for 30 days in water. The bonding strength, so-called shear bond strengths between composite resin and alumina substrate were measured. Data were analysed statistically and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of prosthodontic resin composites. Shear bond strengths of material combinations varied from 24.17 ± 3.72-10.15 ± 3.69 MPa and 21.20 ± 4.64-7.50 ± 4.22 at 24 h and 30 days, respectively. BG resin composite compared with the other resin composites provided the strongest bond with alumina substrate (p resin composite was found to have a lower bond strength than the other composites. The Weibull moduli were highest for BG, which was bonded by using Optibond Solo Plus adhesive resin at 24 h and 30 days. There was no effect of storage time and adhesive brand on bond strength. Within the limitations of this study, the shear bond strengths of composite resins to alumina substrate are related to the composite

  20. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  1. Comparison of depth of dentin etching and resin infiltration with single-step adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mitsuo; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2005-07-01

    Adhesion of resin composites to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to use micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the extent of resin penetration into etched dentin with single-step adhesive systems. Adhesive systems used were One-Up Bond F (Tokuyama Dental) and Reactmer Bond (Shofu, Inc.). A self-etching primer system Mac Bond II (Tokuyama Dental) was employed as a control. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the adhesive systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface in steps of 0.2 microm and the spectra were obtained. SEM observations of the resin-dentin interface were also conducted. The dentin-resin interface of single-step adhesive systems showed a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. The widths of resin penetration into demineralized dentin detected by Raman microscopy were greater than those obtained by the morphological analysis using SEM. From the results of this study, a gradual variation in the composition of the dentin-resin interface was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation observed with SEM observation was less than that detected with the Raman microscopy.

  2. Strengthening of dental adhesives via particle reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Kreppel, Stefan; Petschelt, Anselm; Hornberger, Helga; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The bond between methacrylic polymer adhesives and dental restoratives is not perfect and may fail either in the short or in the long term. This study aims to evaluate the effects of particle incorporation in a self-etch model adhesive on mechanical and physical properties that are relevant during application and service. Filled adhesives containing 5, 10, 15 or 25wt% glass fillers were compared to their unfilled counterpart in terms of water sorption and solubility; viscosity and dynamic viscosity during polymerization were recorded using rheological measurements and compared to FTIR analysis of the real-time degree of cure. Elastic modulus and ultimate tensile strength measurements were performed in uniaxial tension; the energy to fracture was used to calculate the fracture toughness of the adhesives. Finally, the experimental adhesives were applied on dentin substrate to test the bond strength using the microtensile test. Results showed that the incorporation of 5-10wt% nanofiller to self-etching dental adhesives is efficient in accelerating the polymerization reaction and increasing the degree of cure without compromising the film viscosity for good wettability or water sorption and solubility. Fillers increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and fracture toughness to a plateau between 5 and 15wt% filler concentration, and despite the tendency to form agglomerations, active crack pinning/deflection toughening mechanisms have been observed. The bond strength between resin composite and dentin was also improved when adhesives with up to 10wt% fillers were used, with no additional improvements with further packing. The use of fillers to reinforce dental adhesives may therefore be of great practical benefit by improving curing and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biocompatibility of Resin-based Dental Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Keyvan Moharamzadeh; Ian M. Brook; Richard van Noort

    2009-01-01

    Oral and mucosal adverse reactions to resin-based dental materials have been reported. Numerous studies have examined thebiocompatibility of restorative dental materials and their components, and a wide range of test systems for the evaluation of the biological effects of these materials have been developed. This article reviews the biological aspects of resin-based dental materials and discusses the conventional as well as the new techniques used for biocompatibility assessment of dental mat...

  4. Evaluation of bond strength between glass fiber and resin composite using different protocols for dental splinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral R Fabrício

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Many different polymeric materials to chair-side application on pre-impregnated glass fibers (PGF are available and different protocols are used in clinical procedure. Aims: This study evaluated protocols used for dental splinting on adhesion between PGF and resin. Settings and Design: 42 pair of nano composite resin blocks with (6 × 6 × 8 mm 3 were assigned into seven groups (n=6 and bonded according to the protocol: Gar adhesive, resin; Ggr glass fiber, resin; Ggar glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Gfgar flowable resin, glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Ggafr glass fiber, adhesive, flowable resin, resin; Ggfar glass fiber, flowable resin, adhesive, resin; Gfgr flowable resin, glass fiber, resin. Materials and Methods: Micro sticks obtained from each group were submitted to the micro tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically evaluated using ANOVA and Tukey`s test (5%. Results: The protocol had a significant effect on the bond strength results (P=0.00. Gar and Ggar resulted in the highest bond strength with no statistical difference. Conclusions: The use of adhesive agent showed to be efficient to promote initial adhesion between fiber and nano composite resin.

  5. Posterior adhesive composite resin: a historic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusayama, T

    1990-11-01

    Since development of the BIS-GMA composite resin, there have been many innovations to improve the physical properties for posterior use. Subsequent development of a caries detector and chemically adhesive composite resin has further revolutionally raised the value of composite resin restoration, replacing the traditional restorative system of mechanical approach by the new system of biological approach. In this system only the infected irreversibly deteriorated insensitive tissue, stainable with the caries detector, is removed painlessly. The cavity is immediately filled with the composite resin with no further tissue reduction for retention or resistance form or extension for prevention. Both enamel and dentin walls are etched by a single etchant without lining. The chemical adhesion to the cavity margin and wall minimizes the marginal failure in size and prevalence and prevents secondary caries penetration along the wall. The chemically adhesive composite resin is thus a useful restorative material much kinder to teeth than amalgam.

  6. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Saurabh K Gupta; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies h...

  7. Influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-09-28

    The influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etch mode was investigated. A two-step self-etch adhesive and two universal adhesives were used to bond to enamel and dentin in self-etch mode. Initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using the adhesive in self-etch mode were determined. Fatigue testing was used with 20 Hz frequency and cycling periods of 50,000, 100,000 and 1,000,000 cycles, or until failure occurred. For each of the cycling periods, there was no significant difference in shear fatigue strength across the cycling periods for the individual adhesives. Differences in shear fatigue strength were found between the adhesives within the cycling periods. Regardless of the adhesive used in self-etch mode for bonding to enamel or dentin, shear fatigue strength was not influenced by the number of cycles used for shear fatigue strength testing.

  8. Photoacoustic analysis of dental resin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloiano, E. C. R.; Rocha, R.; Martin, A. A.; da Silva, M. D.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we use the photoacoustic technique to monitor the curing process of diverse dental materials, as the resins chemically activated (RCA). The results obtained reveal that the composition of a determined RCA significantly alters its activation kinetics. Photoacoustic data also show that temperature is a significant parameter in the activation kinetics of resins. The photoacoustic technique was also applied to evaluate the polymerization kinetics of photoactivated resins. Such resins are photoactivated by incidence of continuous light from a photodiode. This leads to the polymerization of the resin, modifying its thermal properties and, consequently, the level of the photoacoustic signal. Measurements show that the polymerization of the resin changes the photoacoustic signal amplitude, indicating that photoacoustic measurements can be utilized to monitor the polymerization kinetic and the degree of polymerization of photoactivated dental resins.

  9. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  10. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  11. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  12. Adhesion Analysis of Resin/Resin Interface by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MIYAZAKI, Mariko; KANEGAE, Yoshiharu; IWASAKI, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    .... In this paper, a technique for using a molecular dynamics simulation to analyze the adhesion of the interface between adhesive and polyimide, that is the resin/resin interface, has been proposed...

  13. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a weigh

  14. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  15. Dental adhesion review: aging and stability of the bonded interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Cadenaro, Milena; Di Lenarda, Roberto; De Stefano Dorigo, Elettra

    2008-01-01

    Most of current dental adhesive systems show favorable immediate results in terms of retention and sealing of bonded interface, thereby counteracting polymerization shrinkage that affects resin-based restorative materials. Despite immediate efficacy, there are major concerns when dentin bonded interfaces are tested after aging even for short time period, i.e. 6 months. This study critically discusses the latest peer-reviewed reports related to formation, aging and stability of resin bonding, focusing on the micro and nano-phenomena related to adhesive interface degradation. Most simplified one-step adhesives were shown to be the least durable, while three-step etch-and-rinse and two-step self-etch adhesives continue to show the highest performances, as reported in the overwhelming majority of studies. In other words, a simplification of clinical application procedures is done to the detriment of bonding efficacy. Among the different aging phenomena occurring at the dentin bonded interfaces, some are considered pivotal in degrading the hybrid layer, particularly if simplified adhesives are used. Insufficient resin impregnation of dentin, high permeability of the bonded interface, sub-optimal polymerization, phase separation and activation of endogenous collagenolytic enzymes are some of the recently reported factors that reduce the longevity of the bonded interface. In order to overcome these problems, recent studies indicated that (1) resin impregnation techniques should be improved, particularly for two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives; (2) the use of conventional multi-step adhesives is recommended, since they involve the use of a hydrophobic coating of nonsolvated resin; (3) extended curing time should be considered to reduce permeability and allow a better polymerization of the adhesive film; (4) proteases inhibitors as additional primer should be used to increase the stability of the collagens fibrils within the hybrid layer inhibiting the intrinsic

  16. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  17. Effect of dentine conditioning on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, H H; Burrow, M F; Yiu, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of phosphoric acid as a surface treatment compared to traditional conditioning agents to dentine bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) adhesives. Forty human molars were utilized in microtensile bond strength testing, while another 16 were used for evaluation of the bonded interface with scanning electron microscopy. Three RMGIC adhesives were evaluated: Fuji Bond LC (GC Corp); Riva Bond LC (SDI Ltd); and Ketac N100 (3M-ESPE). Surface treatments were 37% phosphoric acid (5 s) or 25-30% polyacrylic acid (PAA) (10 s), or the manufacturer's method - Fuji Bond LC: Cavity Conditioner (20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 10 s) or Ketac N100 primer: Ketac Nano priming agent (15 s). Teeth were finished with 600-grit SiC paper, surfaces treated and bonded with RMGIC adhesive and stored in distilled water for 24 h then subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed adhesion was affected by the 'type of RMGIC adhesive' and 'method of dentine surface treatment' (p adhesives a brief etch with phosphoric acid does not adversely effect short-term bond strengths, but is no better than traditional conditioning with PAA. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Resin adhesion to enamel and dentin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, Edmond R

    2003-06-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge base regarding resin adhesion to enamel and dentin. A descriptive classification system for adhesive resin products as well as clinical considerations derived from the review are also presented to assist the clinician in the selection and application of these products.

  19. Reducing composite restoration polymerization shrinkage stress through resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, S J; Mutzelburg, P R; Shumack, T G; Thode, Djg; Martin, F E; Ellakwa, A E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether employing resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives can reduce polymerization contraction stress generated at the interface of restorative composite adhesive systems. Five resin based adhesives (G Bond, Optibond-All-in-One, Optibond-Solo, Optibond-XTR and Scotchbond-Universal) and two resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives (Riva Bond-LC, Fuji Bond-LC) were analysed. Each adhesive was applied to bond restorative composite Filtek-Z250 to opposing acrylic rods secured within a universal testing machine. Stress developed at the interface of each adhesive-restorative composite system (n = 5) was calculated at 5-minute intervals over 6 hours. The resin based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RBA-RCS) demonstrated similar interface stress profiles over 6 hours; initial rapid contraction stress development (0-300 seconds) followed by continued contraction stress development ≤0.02MPa/s (300 seconds - 6 hours). The interface stress profile of the resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RMGIBA-RCS) differed substantially to the RBA-RCS in several ways. Firstly, during 0-300 seconds the rate of contraction stress development at the interface of the RMGIBA-RCS was significantly (p resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives can significantly reduce the magnitude and rate of polymerization contraction stress developed at the interface of adhesive-restorative composite systems. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  1. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  2. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250 discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control. In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP. The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9. Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p 0.05 or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001 bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo.

  3. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da Hye

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250) discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness) were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control). In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP). The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9). Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p 0.05) or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001) bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo. PMID:28194363

  4. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  5. Boron nitride nanotubes as novel fillers for improving the properties of dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrazia, Felipe Weidenbach; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the physical-chemical properties of experimental dental adhesives containing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) as inorganic fillers. An experimental adhesive resin was prepared using HEMA-BisGMA, 66/33wt% (control). Inorganic BNNT fillers were first analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and then incorporated into the adhesive at different concentration (0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.15wt%). Degree of conversion (DC), ultimate strength, contact angle, surface free energy (SFE) microhardness, softening in solvent and bioactivity were assessed. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) showed BNNTs with diameter ranging from 5 to 10nm with close end tips. No changes in DC were observed after incorporating BNNTs up to 0.15wt%. The contact angles of water and α-bromonaphthalene increased (padhesive specimens after incorporation of BNNT. The incorporation of BNNTs up to 0.15wt% improved the chemical and mechanical properties of dental adhesives and promoted mineral deposition. Incorporation of boron nitride nanotubes into adhesive resin materials improved physical-chemical properties and increased mineral deposition on its surface allowing enhanced properties of the resin-dentin interface. Thus, the novel adhesive material is promising as a dental adhesive and may contribute to the stability of the dentin-resin bonding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Buonocore memorial lecture. Adhesive dentistry applied to the treatment of traumatic dental injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, J O

    2001-01-01

    Dental adhesive techniques have led to a significant simplification of the immediate and definitive treatment of traumatic dental injuries. Composite restoration of fractured teeth, bonding of tooth fragments, the use of laminate veneers or porcelain onlays and resin retained bridges are some of the ways adhesive techniques are used to treat fractured teeth. Furthermore, splinting of luxated teeth almost entirely relies on the combination of adhesion and a flexible resin which simulates the mobility of a normal periodontal ligament during the healing period. The internal strengthening of immature root-filled teeth with composite using an adhesive technique may possibly prevent late root fractures caused by weakening of the tooth structure resulting from endodontic procedures. Finally, the adhesive principle using a retro-seal with composite after apicoectomy significantly increases the healing rate and healing mode.

  7. Teaching dental anatomy with light-activated resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Y; Denehy, G E; Schulein, T M

    1984-04-01

    A method has been described in which light-activated resins are incorporated into the dental anatomy laboratory. This procedure is a valuable addition to the anatomy course because students (1) work with a restorative material appropriate for anterior teeth, (2) learn the unique properties of the light-activated resins, and (3) apply the principles of dental anatomy to a clinically relevant task.

  8. [Osteosynthesis of mandible by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalyan, G; Zalyan, G

    2006-12-01

    The author presents the method of mandibular fractures treatment--osteosynthesis by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste. The use of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste accelerates the incarnation of wound and prevents the surgical complications.

  9. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  10. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  11. New processable modified polyimide resins for adhesive and matrix applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A broad product line of bismaleimide modified epoxy adhesives which are cured by conventional addition curing methods is described. These products fill a market need for 232 C (450 F) service adhesives which are cured in a manner similar to conventional 177 C (350 F) epoxy adhesives. The products described include film adhesives, pastes, and a primer. Subsequent development work has resulted in a new bismaleimide modified epoxy resin which uses a unique addition curing mechanism. This has resulted in products with improved thermomechanical properties compared to conventional bismaleimide epoxy resins. A film adhesive, paste, and matrix resin for composites using this new technology are described. In all cases, the products developed are heat cured by using typical epoxy cure cycles i.e., 1 hour at 177 C (350 F) followed by 2 hours postcure at 246 C (475 F).

  12. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  13. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  14. Disinfection effect of dental impression tray adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensel, Tobias; Pollak, Rita; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Hey, Jeremias

    2013-03-01

    Iatrogenic infections are serious problems in dental offices. Impression tray adhesives are delivered in glass containers with a fixed brush attached inside the cap. Using the brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on a contaminated impression tray or prostheses, pathogen transmission by replacing the cap with the brush is possible. Bacterial strains (patient strains and in vitro strains) were supervaccinated on Columbia agar. The bacterial solution was diluted with TSB and aerobically grown, and starting concentration was 1 × 10(7) cfu/ml. The stock solution was placed on Columbia agar. Alginate, polyether, and silicon impression tray adhesives were applied to the center of the particular blood agar plates and incubated for 48 h. The expansion of the inhibition zone assays were measured using a microscope. Twenty-one different bacterial strains were selected in the saliva samples of 20 patients. The growth inhibition for alginate impression tray adhesive was 1.1 % (±0.3) of the patient strains. The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 30.6 % (±9.3) and for silicon impression tray adhesive 11.8 % (±5.0). In in vitro strains, alginate impression tray adhesive performed an inhibition of 0.7 % (±0.3). The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 7.0 % (±1.6) and for silicon impression tray adhesive was 6.5 % (±1.3). Using the fixed brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on multiple patients, a cross-contamination cannot be ruled out. An application of the impression tray adhesive with a pipette and a single-use brush would eliminate the contamination.

  15. Irradiation of dental enamel with Q-switched lambda = 355-nm laser pulses: surface morphology, fluoride adsorption, and adhesion to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Cameron R; Fried, Daniel; Featherstone, John D B; Watanabe, Larry G; Le, Charles Q

    2003-01-01

    Lasers can be used to modify the chemical composition of dental enamel to increase the bond strength to restorative materials and to render the mineral phase more resistant to acid dissolution. Previous studies have suggested a synergistic relationship between CO(2) laser irradiation and fluoride treatment on increased resistance to acid dissolution. In this study a near-UV laser operating with lambda = 355-nm laser pulses of 3-5 nanoseconds duration was used to modify the surface morphology of dental enamel to increase the bond strength to restorative materials and increase the uptake of topical fluoride to render the surface more resistant to acid dissolution. We hypothesize that the short UV laser pulses are primarily absorbed by protein and lipid localized between the enamel prisms resulting in removal of intact mineral effectively etching the surface without thermal modification of the mineral phase. Such modification is likely to increase the permeability of the enamel surface and the subsequent absorption of fluoride. In addition, there is an increase in surface roughness without the formation of a layer of loosely adherent, thermally modified enamel that increases the bond strength to composite restorative materials. The surfaces of blocks of bovine enamel, 5 x 5 mm(2), were uniformly irradiated by 355-nm laser pulses and subsequently bonded to composite. The shear bond test was used to assess the bond strength of non-irradiated blocks (negative control), acid etched blocks (positive control), and laser irradiated blocks. The resistance to acid dissolution was evaluated using controlled surface dissolution experiments on irradiated samples, irradiated samples exposed to topical fluoride, and non-irradiated control samples with and without fluoride. The laser surface treatments significantly increased the shear-bond strength of enamel to composite, to a level exceeding 20 MPa which was significantly more than the non-irradiated control samples and

  16. Wetting characteristic of ceramic to water and adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Suck; Shen, Chiayi; Alegre, Brandon; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2002-12-01

    Maximum wetting of ceramic by adhesive resin is required to achieve optimal adhesion of the resin to ceramic. It is unknown whether the adhesion of the resin to the ceramic is affected by the surface topography and wetting by water or the adhesive resin. This study was designed to characterize the effect of surface topography on the wetting of ceramics by water and adhesive resin. Three materials, a veneering ceramic, Eris (ERV), and 2 core ceramics, Empress 1 core ceramic (E1C) and an experimental core ceramic (EXC), were used. Four surface-roughening procedures were used. They included polishing through 1200-grit SiC paper (P), air abrasion with 50 microm Al(2)O(3) (A), etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid gel (E), and a combination of airborne particle abrasion and etching (A/E). Forty bar specimens (15 x 10 x 1.5 mm) were prepared from each material (N=120). Twelve groups of 10 specimens each were prepared for the 4 surface-roughening procedures. Advancing (theta(A)) and receding (theta(R)) contact angles were measured with a CAHN Dynamic Contact Analyzer, on the basis of the Wilhelmy plate technique, with water and adhesive resin. The work of adhesion (W(A)) by the probing media was calculated by use of advancing contact angle data. The data were analyzed by t testing, analysis of variance, and Duncan's tests (alpha=0.05) to determine the statistical significance of differences in the contact angles between ceramic and water or resin as a function of surface roughening. In general, the mean theta(A) values were higher than the mean theta(R) values except for groups of E or A/E specimens with water used as a probing medium. E and A/E treatments yielded the lowest contact angle values, followed by A and P treatments (P<.001). The E1C exhibited the highest mean contact angles, whereas EXC exhibited the lowest mean contact angle except for the theta(R) with resin. The corresponding values for ERV were between those of E1C and EXC except for theta(R) values with resin

  17. [Effect of surface modified nano-diamond on viscosity of dental adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juan; Liang, Jie; Hu, Ai-yun; Liu, Xue-heng

    2012-06-01

    Different surface modified ultrafine-diamond (UFD) was added into dental adhesives as filler ,then the influence of dental adhesive properties was observed. The main matrix of dental adhesive was high polymer resin. Different content of non-modified UFD(n-UFD) or modified UFD(m-UFD) were added into dental adhesives, then the viscosity of materials were measured. The data was processed with SPSS17.0 software package. The viscosity of dental adhesives was decreased when the proportion of UFD was less than 0.1wt%, especially when it was 0.1wt%; but was significantly improved when the proportion was more than 0.1wt%. The effect of UFD and surface-modified UFD on the viscosity was significantly different. The results show that silane coupling was chemically-grafted on the surface of UFD, the dispersion and stability of UFD in ethanol was improved; And a quantity of UFD with special content could reduce the viscosity of dental adhesives and improve the flowability obviously. The m-UFD was superior to n-UFD.

  18. Biophysical characterization of functionalized titania nanoparticles and their application in dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jirun; Petersen, Elijah J; Watson, Stephanie S; Sims, Christopher M; Kassman, Alexander; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav; Skrtic, Drago; Ok, Meryem T; Jacobs, Debbie S; Reipa, Vytas; Ye, Qiang; Nelson, Bryant C

    2017-04-15

    It is demonstrated that carboxylic acid-functionalized titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs produce significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after visible light irradiation (400-800nm, 1600mW/cm(2)) in comparison to nonfunctionalized TiO2 NPs. The level of ROS produced under these irradiation conditions was not capable of generating oxidatively induced DNA damage in a cell-free system for TiO2 concentrations of 0.5mg/L or 5mg/L. In addition, specific incorporation of the acrylic acid-functionalized TiO2 NPs into dental composites allowed us to utilize the generated ROS to enhance photopolymerization (curing and degree of vinyl conversion (DC)) of resin adhesives and create mechanically superior and biocompatible materials for dental applications. Incorporation of the TiO2 NPs into selected dental composites increased the mean DC values by ≈7%. The modified TiO2 materials and dental composite materials were extensively characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. Notably, dental adhesives incorporated with acrylic acid-functionalized TiO2 NPs produced stronger bonds to human teeth following visible light curing in comparison to traditional dental adhesives not containing NPs with an increase in the shear bond strength of ≈29%. In addition, no leaching of the incorporated NPs was detectable from the dental adhesives after 2500 thermal cycles using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, indicating that biocompatibility of the adhesives was not compromised after extensive aging. These findings suggest that NP-induced ROS may be useful to produce enhanced nanocomposite materials for selected applications in the medical device field. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have unique photocatalytic, antibacterial and UV-absorbing properties that make them beneficial additives in adhesives and composites. However, there is concern that

  19. Affordable Resins and Adhesives From Optimized Soybean Varieties (ARA Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Richard WOol; Dr. X. Susan Sun; Rich Chapas

    2004-04-21

    The Mission of the ARA Program was to develop the Corporate Infrastructure to mass-produce new bio-based materials from Soybeans. The resins were integrated with the bio-fuels program. (1) to research, develop, and commercialize low cost adhesives and resins from soy oil and protein, the co-products of the soy bio-diesel process. (2) to study structure-functionality of soy oil and proteins at molecular and genomic levels

  20. Design of a new dental adhesive--effect of a water-soluble sodium acylphosphine oxide with crown ether on adhesion to dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Ichizawa, Kensuke; Fuchigami, Kiyomi; Ito, So; Endo, Takeshi

    2009-05-01

    The behavior of water-soluble photoinitiators with crown ethers in dental adhesives is unknown. This study investigated the effect of sodium acylphosphine oxide (APO-Na) with crown ether in a hydrophobic adhesive on adhesion to teeth. Sodium 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl-phenylphosphine oxide (TMPO-Na = APO-Na) was synthesized in 67.1% yield and identified by 1H NMR. APO-Na was dissolved in hydrophobic resins in the presence of a crown ether (ionophore effect). Thirty kinds of experimental single-step adhesives comprising APO-Na, CE, Bis-GMA, 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA), and 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitic acid (4-MET) were thereby prepared. Shear bond strength to unetched ground teeth was measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min, and the data were analyzed by ANOVA. The shear bond strength results of bonding resins containing APO-Na with 18-crown-6-ether (CE-6) were significantly higher than that without CE-6 (control) (padhesives containing APO-Na, CE-6, 6-MHPA, and 4-MET. Therefore, it was found that APO-Na with CE-6 contributed to the efficient bonding performance of single-step adhesive to teeth. However, in view of the biosafety hazard posed by crown ethers, the search is still on for reagents that are biologically safer than crown ethers--but with ionophor effects--to be used in dental adhesives.

  1. Work of adhesion of resin on treated lithia disilicate-based ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Shen, Chiayi; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2004-05-01

    This study is to test the hypothesis that chemical etching and silane coating of a ceramic surface will influence the work of adhesion (WA) of adhesive resin to dental ceramic. A hot-pressed lithia disilicate-based ceramic was used as a model material to investigate the influence of probing media and surface treatments on WA using a dynamic contact angle analyzer. Eighty ceramic specimens were randomly divided into eight experimental groups and treated as follows: (1 and 3) as polished; (2 and 4) etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 1 min; (5) etched with 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 min; (6) silane coated; (7) etched with HF for 1 min and silane coated; (8) etched with APF for 2 min and silane coated. Advancing and receding contact angles (theta(a) and theta(r)) were measured using high purity water (gamma = 72.6 mN/m) for groups 1 and 2, and a liquid resin (gamma = 39.7) for groups 3-8 as probing liquids. The liquid resin medium yielded a lower WA than water. Silanization produced a significantly lower WA (p < 0.001) than non-silanated surfaces. Etching alone consistently yielded a greater WA for all surface treatments (p < 0.001). The silanated ceramic surface exhibited a lower surface energy and did not enhance bonding to the liquid resin by work of adhesion.

  2. [Influence Factors on Monomer Conversion of Dental Composite Resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yuntao; Wang, Fanghui; Wang, Qingshan

    2015-04-01

    Dental composite resin is a kind of material which has been widely used in dental restoration. Research has found that the influence of residual monomer on the material mechanical, chemical and biological properties cannot be ignored. This paper elaborates these harms of residual monomers. The effects of resin matrix, inorganic filler and initiating system, illumination, secondarily treatment on the degree of conversion were also analyzed. The paper also discusses the effective measures to increase the conversion, and offers theoretical basis for the clinical application and development of composite resin.

  3. Wear of dental resin composites: insights into underlying processes and assessment methods--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; De Moraes Purquerio, Benedito; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2003-05-15

    Given the increased aesthetic demands of patients, along with improvements in the formulation of resin composites, the ability of these materials to bond to tooth structures, and concerns about dental amalgam fillings, the applicability of resin composites in dentistry has become increasingly widespread. As resistance to wear represents an important factor in determining the clinical success of resin composite restoratives, the aim of this article was to define what constitutes wear; the major underlying phenomena involved in this process-adhesion, abrasion, fatigue, and corrosion-being described. Discussions were also focused on factors that contribute both to the magnitude and minimization of resin composite wear. Finally, insights were included on both in vivo and laboratory studies used to determine wear resistance. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 65B: 280-285, 2003

  4. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Carolina; Buono Vicente; Mota Joao Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm) of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B) to composite resin (InTen-S) blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok). Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydroflu...

  5. Synthesis of melamine-glucose resin adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuanhu; ZHANG Lei

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a novel melamine-glucose adhesive that is similar to urea-formaldehyde adhesive is reported in this paper. The conditions of synthesis, such as the initial pH, the quantity of catalyst, the temperature of reaction, the percentage of each reactant and the time of reaction, were optimized by using the orthogonal experimental method.

  6. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining nanoparticles of silver/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry.

  7. Impact of head and neck radiotherapy on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Troconis, Cristhian Camilo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2017-08-08

    To analyze the evidence regarding the impact of head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT) on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems. Searches were conducted on PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ISI Web of Science databases using "Radiotherapy", "Composite resins" and "Adhesive systems" as keywords. Selected studies were written in English and assessed the mechanical behavior of composite resins and/or adhesive systems when bonding procedure was conducted before and/or after a maximum radiation dose ≥50Gy, applied under in vitro or in vivo conditions. In total, 115 studies were found but only 16 were included, from which five evaluated the effect of in vitro HNRT on microhardness, wear resistance, diametral tensile and flexural strength of composite resins, showing no significant negative effect in most of reports. Regarding bond strength of adhesive systems, 11 studies were included from which five reported no meaningful negative effect when bonding procedure was conducted before simulated HNRT. Conversely, five studies showed that bond strength diminished when adhesive procedure was done after in vitro radiation therapy. Only two studies about dental adhesion were conducted after in vivo radiotherapy but the results were not conclusive. The mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems seems not to be affected when in vitro HNRT is applied after bonding procedure. However, bond strength of adhesive systems tends to decrease when simulated radiotherapy is used immediately before bonding procedure. Studies assessing dentin bond strength after in-vivo HNRT were limited and controversial. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adhesion of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A; Ernst, Saskia; Schaper, Katharina; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of five different resin cements to human enamel and dentin under different storage conditions. Five resin cements and their dedicated systems were tested. Teeth were embedded, ground flat to expose enamel or dentin and polished with sandpaper. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturers'instructions. V2A steel cylinders with were silicated, coated, and cemented onto the teeth. Specimens were stored at three different conditions and subsequently thermocycled. SBS was measured. Significant differences were observed between the tested resin cements depending on the tooth surface. Different storage conditions influenced the bond strength, independent of the tooth surface, in all test cements. The bond strength of all experimental materials to enamel is higher than that to dentin surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesiveness decreases after wetness (hydro-) and hydrothermal stress, regardless of the tooth surface.

  9. [Bonding compatibility between adhesive systems and composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachetti, L; Scaminaci Russo, D; Landi, D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse bonding compatibility between photo- and self-polymerising composite resins ad two-step total-etch (one component) adhesive systems with a different activation method. Thirty healthy extracted molars were cut transversally to obtain sixty flat dentin surfaces. The acid conditioned surfaces were bonded with Scotchbond 1 (3M), Excite (Vivadent) or Excite DSC (Vivadent). A cylinder of composite resin (3 mm diameter and 4 mm height) was constructed on each adhesive layer using photopolymerised Tetric Ceram (Vivadend) and dual Luxacore (DMG) but activated only chemically. The samples were subjected to the shear bond test. The fracture surfaces obtained were classified by type and site in the stereomicroscope. Twelve samples representing each group were further prepared for the SEM. The data obtained from the test, the microscopic investigation and statistical analysis (ANOVA and Bonferroni) seem to confirm the presence of a reduced bonding compatibility between one-component adhesive systems and self-polymerising composites. This incompatibility is evident for the adhesive Scotchbond 1 and limited for Excite, while it seems to be overcome by Excite DSC which appears to bond well with both Tetric Ceram and Luxacore. Adhesive-composite incompatibility seems to depend on the activation method of the composite as well as on that of the adhesive system. The chemical compatibility bet-ween these two materials is influenced not only by the chemical composition of the adhesive, but also by that of the composite.

  10. A Histopathological Study of Direct Pulp Capping with Adhesive Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Salhenejad

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recently, it has been proposed that different adhesive materials can be used for direct pulp capping. Previous studies have demonstrated that multi steps dentin adhesives could form reparative dentin similar to calcium hydroxide (CH.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological pulp response of ninety mechanically exposed cat pulps to two adhesive resins (Scotch Bond MP and Single Bond 3M were compared with a calcium hydroxide cement (Dycal, Dentsply.Materials and Methods : Class V facial cavities with similar pulpal exposures were prepared in canines. In the experimental groups phosphoric acid was used to etch the enamel and dentin and pulp exposure, and after it dentin adhesives was applied. The exposure point of the control group was capped with Dycal then the remainder of the cavities was etched and a dentin adhesive (single bond was applied. All of the cavities were restored with a composite resin (Z 100 in usual manner. The animals were scarified after 7, 30 and 60 days (n=30, and the pulp evaluated histologically, statistical analysis was carried out with Kruskal- Wallis test (a=0.05.Results: The data showed that most of the cases had mild inflammation of pulp tissue.There was no significant difference in inflammatory reaction of pulp by Dycal and two adhesive systems, severe inflammatory reaction of pulp was observed only in most of the 30- day Single Bond group. Soft tissue organization of dentin bridge was less than ScotchBond and Dycal groups, the differentiation of dentin bridge was less than Scotch Bond group after 7 days.Conclusion: Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was the main reaction of exposed pulp when two commercially available adhesive resins were placed directly on the exposed pulp.There was no significant difference in inflammatory reaction of pulp between Dycal and two adhesive systems after 7 days and 60 days. After 7 days most of the specimens showed an amount of predentin

  11. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  12. Repair of dental resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Veronika; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-03-01

    The study analyzed the reparability and compatibility of light-curing resin-based composites (RBCs) of the categories "microhybrid," "nanohybrid," and "packable." Six RBCs with different matrix and filler formulation--purely methacrylate-based composites (MBCs), ormocer-based composites (OBCs), and silorane-based composites (SBCs)--were used for the specimens. Every material was combined with itself and with the other five RBCs, resulting in a total of 36 combination groups (n = 20). The specimens were polymerized, aged for 8 weeks in distilled water at 37 °C, and then repaired by means of a repair kit. Shear bond strength and fracture mode were measured after aging of the specimens, undergoing storage for 24 h in distilled water at 37 °C followed by thermocycling (5,000 cycles, 5-55 °C) and an additional 4-week storage in distilled water at 37 °C. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA with TUKEY HSD post hoc test (α = 0.05). On average, the OBC Admira reached the highest value as a substrate material (30.41 MPa), and the SBC Filtek Silorane reached the lowest value (8.14 MPa). Filtek Silorane was identified as the repair material with the highest bond strength value (28.70 MPa), while a packable composite reached the lowest bond strength value (15.55 MPa). The analysis of the break modes showed that adhesive breaks are typical when strength is at its lowest (6.27 MPa). A large number of cohesive fractures are conspicuous when identical materials are used for repair, except Filtek Silorane (2 % cohesive fractures). The study demonstrated that the effect of the different materials on bond strength varies strongly, depending on whether the material is used as filling or as repair material. It is generally advisable but not compulsory to combine identical RBCs.

  13. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment.

  14. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  15. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  16. Degradation, fatigue, and failure of resin dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J L

    2008-08-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  17. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems.

  18. Paucity of Nanolayering in Resin-Dentin Interfaces of MDP-based Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, F; Zhou, L; Zhang, Z; Niu, L; Zhang, L; Chen, C; Zhou, J; Yang, H; Wang, X; Fu, B; Huang, C; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembled nanolayering structures have been reported in resin-dentin interfaces created by adhesives that contain 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP). These structures have been hypothesized to contribute to bond durability. The objective of the present study was to determine the extent of nanolayering in resin-dentin interfaces after application of commercialized 10-MDP-containing self-etch and universal adhesives to human dentin. Seven commercialized adhesives were examined: Adhese Universal (Ivoclar-Vivadent), All-Bond Universal (Bisco, Inc.), Clearfil SE Bond 2, Clearfil S3 Bond Plus, Clearfil Universal Bond (all from Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc.), G-Premio Bond (GC Corp.), and Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE). Each adhesive was applied in the self-etch mode on midcoronal dentin according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Bonded specimens (n = 6) were covered with flowable resin composite, processed for transmission electron microscopy, and examined at 30 random sites without staining. Thin-film glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to detect the characteristic peaks exhibited by nanolayering (n = 4). The control consisted of 15%wt, 10%wt, and 5%wt 10-MDP (DM Healthcare Products, Inc.) dissolved in a mixed solvent (ethanol and water weight ratio 9:8, with photoinitiators). Experimental primers were applied to dentin for 20 s, covered with hydrophobic resin layer, and examined in the same manner. Profuse nanolayering with highly ordered periodicity (~3.7 nm wide) was observed adjacent to partially dissolved apatite crystallites in dentin treated with the 15% 10-MDP primer. Three peaks in the 2θ range of 2.40° (3.68 nm), 4.78° (1.85 nm), and 7.18° (1.23 nm) were identified from thin-film XRD. Reduction in the extent of nanolayering was observed in the 10% and 5% 10-MDP experimental primer-dentin interface along with lower intensity XRD peaks. Nanolayering and characteristic XRD peaks were rarely observed in

  19. Does Adhesive Resin Application Contribute to Resin Bond Durability on Etched and Silanized Feldspathic Ceramic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of adhesive application and aging on the bond durability of resin cement to etched and silanized feldspathic ceramic. Materials and Methods: Twenty blocks (6.4 x 6.4 x 4.8 mm) of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surfaces were conditioned with 10

  20. Silane adhesion mechanism in dental applications and surface treatments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Tsoi, James Kit Hon

    2017-09-29

    To give a current review of silane adhesion chemistry, applications of silane coupling agents and related surface pretreatment methods in contemporary dentistry. Silane coupling agents are adhesion promoters to chemically unify dissimilar materials used in dentistry. Silanes are very effective in adhesion promotion between resin composites and silica-based or silica-coated indirect restorative materials. It is generally accepted that for non-silica-based restorations, surface pretreatment is a mandatory preliminary step to increase the silica content and then, with help of silane, improve resin bonding. This review discusses the silane-based adhesion chemistry, silane applications in dentistry, surface pretreatment methods, and presents the recent development of silane coupling agents. A silane coupling agent is considered a reliable, good adhesion promoter to silica-based (or silica-coated) indirect restorations. Surface pre-treatment steps, e.g., acid etching for porcelain and tribo-chemical silica-coating for metal alloys, is used before silanization to attain strong, durable bonding of the substrate to resin composite. In clinical practice, however, the main problem of resin bonding using silanes and other coupling agents is the weakening of the bond (degradation) in the wet oral environment over time. A silane coupling agent is a justified and popular adhesion promoter (adhesive primer) used in dentistry. The commercial available silane coupling agents can fulfil the requirements in clinical practice for durable bonding. Development of new silane coupling agents, their optimization, and surface treatment methods are in progress to address the long term resin bond durability and are highly important. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental adhesives and strategies for displacement of water/solvents from collagen fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuda, Larissa Sgarbosa de Araújo; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Leme, Ariene Arcas; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of temperature of evaporation in adhesive systems with different solvents on the apparent modulus of elasticity and mass change of macro-hybrid layers modified by proanthocyanidins (PACs). Adhesive resin beams (A) from Single Bond Plus (SB), Excite (EX) and One Step Plus (OS) were prepared after solvent evaporation at 23°C or 40°C (n=12). Macro-hybrid layers (M) (n=12) were prepared using demineralized dentin beams sectioned from extracted human third molars. The demineralized dentin specimens were infiltrated with each one of the three adhesive systems at 23°C or 40°C; with or without prior dentin treatment with PACs for 10min. The apparent modulus of elasticity (E) and mass change (Wmc, %) of adhesives beams and resin-infiltrated specimens were assessed in dry and wet conditions after immersion in water (24h, 1, 3 and 6 months). The E was statistically analyzed by Tukey-Kramer test and the Wmc, % by Kruskal Wallis, and Dunn (α=0.05). Solvent evaporation at 40°C resulted in higher E values for adhesive resin beams at all storage conditions, regardless of the adhesive system (padhesives evaluated over time (p0.05). Improved solvent evaporation at higher temperature, and increased collagen cross-linking induced by PACs, enhanced the mechanical properties resulting in highly stable macro-hybrid layers over 6 months storage. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Permeability of Dental Adhesives - A SEM Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacarne-Zanon, Juliana; de Andrade E Silva, Safira M; Wang, Linda; de Goes, Mario F; Martins, Adriano Luis; Narvaes-Romani, Eliene O; Anido-Anido, Andrea; Carrilho, Marcela R O

    2010-10-01

    To morphologically evaluate the permeability of different commercial dental adhesives using scanning electron microscopy. SEVEN ADHESIVE SYSTEMS WERE EVALUATED: one three-step system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose - MP); one two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond - SE); three two-step etch-and-rinse systems (Single Bond 2 - SB; Excite - EX; One-Step - OS); and two single-step self-etching adhesives (Adper Prompt - AP; One-Up Bond F - OU). The mixture of primer and bond agents of the Clearfil SE Bond system (SE-PB) was also tested. The adhesives were poured into a brass mold (5.8 mm x 0.8 mm) and light-cured for 80 s at 650 mW/cm2. After a 24 h desiccation process, the specimens were immersed in a 50% ammoniac silver nitrate solution for tracer permeation. Afterwards, they were sectioned in ultra-fine slices, carbon-coated, and analyzed under backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscopy. MP and SE showed slight and superficial tracer permeation. In EX, SB, and OS, permeation extended beyond the inner superficies of the specimens. SE-PB did not mix well, and most of the tracer was precipitated into the primer agent. In AP and OU, "water-trees" were observed all over the specimens. Different materials showed distinct permeability in aqueous solution. The extent of tracer permeation varied according to the composition of each material and it was more evident in the more hydrophilic and solvated ones.

  3. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regional bond strengths of adhesive resins to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Ozer, F; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    Microleakage of oral microorganisms, which can occur due to the lack of sealing ability of permanent restorative materials, may cause failure of root canal treatments. Although a great deal of research has been done on sealing enamel and coronal dentin with resins, little research has been done on the adhesion of resins to the walls of pulp chambers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional bond strengths of two adhesive systems to the walls of pulp chambers. A section was made horizontally through the middle of the pulp chamber of extracted human third molars to divide the chamber into upper and lower halves. The pulp tissue was removed and the tooth segments were then divided into treatment subgroups. The pulp chambers were bonded with C&B Metabond (Parkell) or One-Step (Bisco), with or without 5% NaOCI pretreatment. The microtensile bond strengths of these resins to four different pulp chamber regions (bottom, wall, roof, and pulp horn areas) were then measured using an Instron machine. The data were expressed in MPa and were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA. Statistically significant differences were found among the test groups (p < 0.001). One-Step produced higher bond strengths to all pulp chamber regions except the floor, compared with C&B Metabond. The results indicated that high bond strengths can be achieved between adhesive resins and the various regions of the pulp chamber. This should permit the use of a thick layer of unfilled resin along the floor of the pulp chamber and over the canal orifices as a secondary protective seal after finishing root canal therapy.

  5. Microleakage of adhesive resinous materials in root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gilbert Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro micro-leakage resistance of adhesive resin materials to long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers. Materials and Methods: Seven materials, five test (Real Seal, Real Seal XT, Panavia F 2.0, Infinity Syringeable, GCEM and two controls (Tubliseal, AH Plus, were evaluated for micro-leakage resistance in a bovine incisor root model, with 12 roots per material. Teeth were root canal treated, stored in water, artificially aged by thermal-cycling, stained with silver nitrate, sectioned to yield eight measurement points per tooth (four coronal and four apical, giving 672 measurement points. Stain penetration was measured using digital positioners and a toolmakers microscope; then analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons testing ( P < 0.05. Results: All modern adhesive resinous materials leaked significantly less than long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers ( P < 0.05. Mean leakage values and their associated (standard deviations in mm were: Infinity Syringeable 2.5 (1.5, Real Seal XT 3.2 (1.4, Real Seal 3.4 (1.6, Panavia F 2.0 3.8 (2.7, GCEM 4.2 (1.8, Tubli-seal 5.4 (2.8, AH Plus 6.3 (2.3. Overall, more leakage occurred apically than coronally ( P < 0.0001. Many materials exhibited dimensional instability: Marked contraction, expansion, or lack of cohesion. Conclusion: A variety of adhesive resinous materials, endodontic sealers and crown cements, reduced micro-leakage in comparison to long and widely used zinc oxide- eugenol and epoxy sealers.

  6. Initial bacterial adhesion on resin, titanium and zirconia in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byung-Chul; Jung, Gil-Yong; Kim, Dae-Joon; Han, Jung-Suk

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the adhesion of initial colonizer, Streptococcus sanguis, on resin, titanium and zirconia under the same surface polishing condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS Specimens were prepared from Z-250, cp-Ti and 3Y-TZP and polished with 1 µm diamond paste. After coating with saliva, each specimen was incubated with Streptococcus sanguis. Scanning electron microscope, crystal violet staining and measurement of fluorescence intensity resulting fro...

  7. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  8. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... resins. 173.173 Section 173.173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  9. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4(th) and 5(th) generation) to self-etch (6(th), 7(th) and 8(th) generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes.

  10. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  11. Impact of different adhesives on work of adhesion between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Müller-Hahl, Manuel; Eichberger, Marlis; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-09-01

    To determine the impact of pre-treatment of adhesive systems on the work of adhesion (WA) between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements and compare with conventional tests of previous studies. Surface parameters were measured by contact angle measurement (2700 measurements) and WA was calculated. Five CAD/CAM polymers were used for fabrication of specimens (n=75/subgroup): artBloc Temp (A), Telio CAD (B), Nano Composite CFI-C (C), exp. CAD/CAM nanohybrid composite (D), and LAVA Ultimate (E). Then, air-abraded specimens were pre-treated (n=15 per group): Ambarino P60 (I), Monobond Plus/Heliobond (II), visio.link (III), VP connect (IV), and no pre-treatment (V). Resin composite cement specimens (n=75) were smoothed out homogeneously on a glass plate (n=15/group): RelyX ARC (RXA), Variolink II (VAR), Panavia F2.0 (PAN), RelyX Unicem (RXU), and Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Contact angles were determined with 3 drops of distilled water and diiodomethane each. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis-H test and Spearman-Rho correlation (pCAD/CAM materials (B), (A), and (C) showed higher WA compared to (D) and (E). (II) and (IV) resulted in higher WA than (I), (III) and (V). VAR had the significantly lowest WA, followed by RXU, RXA, CSA and PAN. No correlation occurred between WA and TBS/SBS whereas polar component of surface free energy of CAD/CAM resin and spreading coefficient showed significant positive correlation with TBS/SBS. Determination of WA is not a proper method to draw conclusions about the bond between resin materials. Destructive test methods are not dispensable. The successful outcome of fixed dental restorations depends, among others, on the quality of bonding between the tooth and the restoration. Additional pre-treatment of the dental CAD/CAM resin restoration by bonding systems can be recommended for clinical use. Pre-treatment showed a significant impact on the surface properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials.

  13. The application of nanotechnology in the improvement of dental composite resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yang; Xie Haifeng; Zhang Feimin; Gu Ning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, nanotechnology for the improvement of dental composite resins has been reviewed in the back- ground of the existing shortcomings, focusing on the improvement for polymerization shrinkage, anti-bacterial properties and mechanical properties of composite resins. The results show that the use of nanotechnology and nano materials can be an effective method to improve the performance of dental composite resins in a various ways. At last, the paper also discusses the perspective about the dental composite resins.

  14. 四种自酸蚀粘接剂牙本质粘接界面纳米渗漏比较%Nanoleakage at the resin-dental interface of four self-etching adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖志清; 欧阳勇; 杨剑珍

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较4种自酸蚀粘接剂牙本质粘接界面纳米渗漏及微观形态。方法 选取16颗无龋人离体第三磨牙,制备统一的牙本质玷污层,分别用4种自酸蚀粘接剂A( Adper Prompt)、B( iBond)、C(XenoⅢ)及D(SE Bond)按使用说明进行粘接处理,垂直粘接面切成0.9 mmx4.0 mm试件,避光贮存于氨化硝酸银溶液中24 h,经显影固定脱矿后,切成90 nm超薄切片,铀、铅染色后于透射电镜下观察银离子的渗入情况及界面相关结构。结果4种粘接剂形成的混合层及粘接层薄厚不同:粘接剂A、C混合层较B、D厚,粘接层较B、D簿。4种粘接剂粘接界面均有不同程度纳米渗漏:A(45.02 ±9.49);B(43.97±8.55);C(27.02±10.86);D(12.94±2.07)。粘接剂D组纳米渗漏较小,与其他3种粘接剂间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论4种自酸蚀粘接剂混合层和粘接层厚度存在差异,粘接界面的纳米渗漏率不同,一步法自酸蚀粘接系统纳米渗漏较两步法系统明显。%Objective To evaluate the nanoleakage and ultramorphology of four self-etching adhesives. Methods Sixteen freshly extracted, caries-free human third molars were selected. A flat dentin surface was exposed by removing occlusal enamel. All teeth were randomly divided into four groups acorrding to four different self-etch adhesive: Adper Prompt( A), iBond(B) , Xeno Ⅲ (C) and SE Bond (D). The dentin were bonded with dentin adhesive system according to manufacturer's directions. Composite layers were built up incrementally. The specimens were sectioned longitudinally across the resin-dentin interface into 4. 0 mm × 0. 9 mm sticks and then traced with ammoniacal silver .solution. Epoxy resin-embedded sections were prepared for transmission electron microscope( TEM ) to observe nanoleakage. The images were qualitatively compared by NIH software, and data was analyzed by SPSS. Results Different thickness of hybrid layer and adhesives layer

  15. Comparison of the effect of resin infiltrant, fluoride varnish, and nano-hydroxy apatite paste on surface hardness and streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Aziznezhad, Mahdiye; Alaghemand, Homayoon; Shahande, Zahra; Pasdar, Nilgoon; Bijani, Ali; Eslami, Abdolreza; Dastan, Zohre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries is a major public health problem, and Streptococcus mutans is considered the main causal agent of dental caries. This study aimed to compare the effect of three re-mineralizing materials: resin infiltrant, fluoride varnish, and nano-hydroxy apatite paste on the surface hardness and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans as noninvasive treatments for initial enamel lesions. Methods This experimental study was conducted from December 2015 through March 2016 in Babol, Iran. ...

  16. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  17. Degree of conversion and microhardness of dental composite resin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marovic, D.; Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Ristic, M.; Sariri, K.; Demoli, N.; Klaric, E.; Jankovic, B.; Prskalo, K.

    2013-07-01

    Dental composite resins (CRs) are commonly used materials for the replacement of hard dental tissues. Degree of conversion (DC) of CR measures the amount of the un-polymerized monomers in CR, which can cause adverse biological reactions and weakening of the mechanical properties. In the past, studies have determined the positive correlation of DC values determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and microhardness (MH) values. The aim of this study was to establish whether MH can replace FTIR for the determination of DC of contemporary CR.

  18. Water sorption and diffusion coefficient through an experimental dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costella, A M; Trochmann, J L; Oliveira, W S

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric composites have been widely used as dental restorative materials. A fundamental knowledge and understanding of the behavior of these materials in the oral cavity is essential to improve their properties and performance. In this paper we computed the data set of water absorption through an experimental dental resin blend using specimen discs of different thicknesses to estimate the diffusion coefficient. The resins were produced using Bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate, Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate and Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate monomers. The water sorption test method was based on International Standard ISO 4049 "Dentistry-Polymer-based filling materials". Results show a diffusion coefficient around 6.38 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s, within a variance of 0.01%, which is in good agreement with the values reported in the literature and represents a very suitable value.

  19. Do adhesive systems leave resin coats on the surfaces of the metal matrix bands? An adhesive remnant characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhun, Neslihan; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Reestablishing proximal contacts with composite resins may prove challenging since the applied adhesives may lead to resin coating that produces additional thickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface of metal matrix bands after application of adhesive systems and blowing or wiping off the adhesive before polymerization. Seventeen groups of matrix bands were prepared. The remnant particles were characterized by energy dispersive spectrum and scanning electron microscopy. Total etch and two-step self-etch adhesives did not leave any resin residues by wiping and blowing off. All-in-one adhesive revealed resin residues despite wiping off. Prime and Bond NT did not leave any remnant with compomer. Clinicians must be made aware of the consequences of possible adhesive remnants on matrix bands that may lead to a defective definitive restoration. The adhesive resin used for Class II restorations may leave resin coats on metal matrix bands after polymerization, resulting in additional thickness on the metal matrix bands and poor quality of the proximal surface of the definitive restoration when the adhesive system is incorporated in the restoration.

  20. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buruiana, Tinca, E-mail: tbur@icmpp.ro [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Melinte, Violeta [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Aldea, Horia [Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, 16 University Str., 700115 Iasi (Romania); Pelin, Irina M.; Buruiana, Emil C. [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1–F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and {sup 1}H ({sup 13}C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm{sup −3} (F1) and 40.52 μg mm{sup −3} (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82–49.14 μg mm{sup −3} (F1–F3-HAP) and 34.58–45.56 μg mm{sup −3}, respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth. - Highlights: • Fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic units (UF-DMA) was proposed as co-monomer in dental adhesives. • UF-DMA exhibits good photoreactivity in mixture with commercial dental monomers. • Water sorption/solubility and diffusion coefficient depend on the amount of UF-DMA. • The infiltration of adhesive mixture into the dentin tubules was evidenced by SEM.

  1. Cytotoxicity of dental resin composites: an in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausiello, Pietro; Cassese, Angela; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Di Jeso, Bruno; Ulianich, Luca

    2013-06-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials release residual monomers that may affect the vitality of pulp cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of two light-cured restorative materials with and without bis-GMA resin, respectively (Clearfil Majesty Posterior and Clearfil Majesty Flow) and a self-curing one (Clearfil DC Core Automix) when applied to the fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. Samples of the materials were light-cured and placed directly in contact to cells for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by measuring cell death by flow cytometry, cell proliferation by proliferation curves analysis and morphological changes by optical microscopy analysis. All the composite materials tested caused a decrease in cell proliferation, albeit at different degrees. However, only Clearfil DC Core Automix induced cell death, very likely by increasing apoptosis. Morphological alteration of treated cells was also evident, particularly in the Clearfil DC Core Automix-treated cells. The different cytotoxic effects of dental composites should be considered when selecting an appropriate resin-based dental restorative material for operative restorations.

  2. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p composite resin exhibited the lowest shear bond strength values when used with the same adhesive resins. The adhesive mode of failure was higher than cohesive with all laboratory composite resins bonded to the StickNet substructure at both storage times. Water storage had a tendency to lower the bond strengths of all laboratory composites, although the statistical differences were not significant. Within the limitations of this study, it was found that bonding of the veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Survey on the teaching and use in dental schools of resin-based materials for restoring posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Zunliang; Nguyen, Edward; Stella, Rita; Thong, Irene; Yip, Natalia; Zhang, Felix; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2011-02-01

    A survey was conducted of 100 dental schools worldwide to investigate the current teaching of posterior resin composite restorations. A 20 multi-part question questionnaire was emailed to the selected schools. Schools were selected by ability to understand and respond in English. The questionnaire consisted of four open-ended questions and 16 closed questions on topics such as material selection for restoring posterior teeth, preclinical teaching of resin composite for posterior teeth, restoration size, contraindications, matrix placement methods, lining use, adhesive selection and finishing. Forty-six schools responded. The outcomes showed all schools included the teaching of resin composite for posterior restorations but varied. The majority of schools (63%) no longer taught amalgam as the preferred posterior restorative material. Half of the schools surveyed set numerical clinical requirements for restoration placement. Australian schools had no requirements whilst 92% of Asian schools did. There was a consensus that larger restorations were less suitable for resin composite. Selection of adhesives depended on region. Generally, the schools surveyed showed minor variations philosophically in teaching of the use and placement of resin composite restorations. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  4. Effect of Curing Direction on Microtensile Bond Strength of Fifth and Sixth Generation Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nadaf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Composite restorative materials and dental adhesives are usually cured with light sources. The light direction may influence the bond strength of dental adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light direction on the microtensile bond strength of fifth and sixth generation dental adhesives.Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT and Clearfil SE bond were used with different light directions.Sixty human incisor teeth were divided into 4 groups (n=15. In groups A and C, Clearfil SE bond with light curing direction from buccal was used for bonding a composite resin to dentin. In groups B and D, Prime & Bond NT with light curing direction from composite was used. After thermocycling the specimens were subjected to tensile force until debonding occurred and values for microtensile bond strength were recorded. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test.Results: The findings showed that the bond strength of Clearfil SE bond was significantly higher than that of Prime&Bond NT (P<0.001. There was no significant difference between light curing directions (P=0.132.Conclusion: Light curing direction did not have significant effect on the bond strength. Sixth generation adhesives was more successful than fifth generation in terms of bond strength to dentin.

  5. Sorption kinetics of ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Achilias, Dimitris S; Karabela, Maria M

    2007-04-01

    In the present investigation the sorption-desorption kinetics of 75 vol % ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites was studied in detail. The resins examined were made by light-curing of bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA), and mixtures of these monomers. The resin composites were prepared from two commercial light-cured restorative materials (Z100 MP and Filtek Z250), the resin matrix of which is based on copolymers of the above-mentioned monomers. Ethanol/water sorption/desorption was examined in both equilibrium and dynamic conditions in two adjacent sorption-desorption cycles. For all the materials studied, it was found that the amount of ethanol/water sorbed or desorbed was always larger than the corresponding one reported in literature in case of water immersion. It was also observed that the chemical structure of the monomers used for the preparation of the resins directly affects the amount of solvent sorbed or desorbed, as well as sorption kinetics, while desorption rate was nearly unaffected. In the case of composites studied, it seems that the sorption/desorption process is not influenced much by the presence of filler. Furthermore, diffusion coefficients calculated for the resins were larger than those of the composites and were always higher during desorption than during sorption. Finally, an interesting finding concerning the rate of ethanol/water sorption was that all resins and composites followed Fickian diffusion kinetics during almost the whole sorption curve; however, during desorption the experimental data were overestimated by the theoretical model. Instead, it was found that a dual diffusion-relaxation model was able to accurately predict experimental data during the whole desorption curve. Kinetic relaxation parameters, together with diffusion coefficients, are reported

  6. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  7. Evaluate the effect of different mmps inhibitors on adhesive physical properties of dental adhesives, bond strength and mmp substarte activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pei; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-10

    We have evaluated and compare the effect of different exogenous MMP inhibitors on adhesive physical properties of dental adhesives, bond strength, micro permeability and MMP substrate activity. 180-grit Sic paper was used to obtain the superficial dentin surface from each and every tooth after the wet grinding procedure. Dentin was exposed to four different MMP inhibitors to evaluate the effect on resin adhesive dentin interface. The four groups used in study were: 2% chlorhexidine digluconate, 2% doxycycline solution, 5% Proanthocyanidin (PR), Control Group. We evaluated and compared the four groups at each and every step of etching, bonding and resin application. Then, the immunolabeling was done with the help of the secondary antibodies with the pH of 7 and the dilution of 1:20. Amongst all the etching pretreatment groups, CHE group (Chlorhexidine etching group) revealed highest exposure to collagen fibrils than the other groups of etching. Then after the CHE group, the next group which has the second highest exposure DOE group. MMP inhibitor application for time duration of 1 minute after the etching procedures significantly improves the bond strength, exposure to collagen fibres and uniforms the dense form of dentin hybrid layer.

  8. Mechanisms regulating the degradation of dentin matrices by endogenous dentin proteases and their role in dental adhesion. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Pashley, David H

    2014-08-01

    This systematic review provides an overview of the different mechanisms proposed to regulate the degradation of dentin matrices by host-derived dentin proteases, particularly as it relates to their role in dental adhesion. Significant developments have taken place over the last few years that have contributed to a better understanding of all the factors affecting the durability of adhesive resin restorations. The complexity of dentin-resin interfaces mandates a thorough understanding of all the mechanical, physical and biochemical aspects that play a role in the formation of hybrid layers. The ionic and hydrophilic nature of current dental adhesives yields permeable, unstable hybrid layers susceptible to water sorption, hydrolytic degradation and resin leaching. The hydrolytic activity of host-derived proteases also contributes to the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds. Preservation of the collagen matrix is critical to the improvement of resin-dentin bond durability. Approaches to regulate collagenolytic activity of dentin proteases have been the subject of extensive research in the last few years. A shift has occurred from the use of proteases inhibitors to the use of collagen cross-linking agents. Data provided by 51 studies published in peer-reviewed journals between January 1999 and December 2013 were compiled in this systematic review. Appraisal of the data provided by the studies included in the present review yielded a summary of the mechanisms which have already proven to be clinically successful and those which need further investigation before new clinical protocols can be adopted.

  9. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  10. Thermal-lens study of semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in restorative dental resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leandro P.; Pilla, Viviane; Iwazaki, Adalberto N.; Barja, Paulo R.; Munin, Egberto

    2013-02-01

    Thermal Lens (TL) and spectroscopic characterizations were performed in CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) embedded into two commercial dental resin composites. The thermal-optical studies were performed in CdSe/ZnS QDs (core size Φ= 4.1 nm) and PMMA-encapsulated CdSe/ZnS (Φ= 3.7 nm) embedded in restorative dental resins at concentration of 0.025 and 0.42 % in mass, respectively. The thermal diffusivity (D) results are characteristics of the dental resin composites studied. Photoacoustic (PA) technique results for the dental resin composites support the TL results.

  11. Membrane permeability properties of dental adhesive films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Hosaka, Keiichi; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Pashley, David H

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the permeability properties of five experimental resin membranes that ranged from relatively hydrophobic to relatively hydrophilic to seal acid-etched dentin saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents or as solutions solvated with ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). The quality of dentin sealing by these experimental resins was expressed in terms of reflection coefficients calculated as the ratio of the effective osmotic pressure to the theoretical osmotic pressure of test solutions. The effective osmotic pressure produced across resin-bonded dentin was induced in hypertonic solutions (CaCl(2) or albumin) at zero hydrostatic pressure. The outward fluid flow induced by these solutions was brought to zero by applying an opposing negative hydrostatic pressure. The least hydrophilic resins blends, R1 and R2, exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) higher reflection coefficients than the most hydrophilic resins (R4 and R5) in both conditions of dentin saturation (water and ethanol). The reflection coefficients of neat resins were, in general, significantly higher when compared with their corresponding solvated versions in both conditions of dentin saturation. In dentin saturated with ethanol, bonding with neat or solvated resins, resulted in reflection coefficients that were significantly higher when compared with the results obtained in dentin saturated with water. Reflection coefficients of CaCl(2) (ca. 1 x 10(-4)) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for albumin (ca. 3 x 10(-2)). Application of hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentin if the substrate is saturated with ethanol, instead of water.

  12. Dual antibacterial agents of nano-silver and 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide in dental adhesive to inhibit caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Fang; Imazato, Satoshi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Huaibing; Arola, Dwayne D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Dental resins containing 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) showed potent antibacterial functions. Recent studies developed antibacterial resins containing nanoparticles of silver (NAg). The objectives of this study were to develop an adhesive containing dual agents of MDPB and NAg for the first time, and to investigate the combined effects of antibacterial adhesive and primer on biofilm viability, metabolic activity, lactic acid, dentin bond strength, and fibroblast cytotoxicity. MDPB and NAg were incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesive “A” and primer “P”. Five systems were tested: SBMP adhesive A; A+MDPB; A+NAg; A+MDPB+NAg; P+MDPB+NAg together with A+MDPB+NAg. Dental plaque microcosm biofilms were cultured using mixed saliva from ten donors. Metabolic activity, colony-forming units, and lactic acid production of biofilms were investigated. Human fibroblast cytotoxicity of bonding agents was determined. MDPB+NAg in adhesive/primer did not compromise dentin bond strength (p>0.1). MDPB or NAg alone in adhesive substantially reduced the biofilm activities. Dual agents MDPB+NAg in adhesive greatly reduced the biofilm viability compared to each agent alone (padhesive and primer contained MDPB+NAg. Fibroblast viability of groups with dual antibacterial agents was similar to control using culture medium without resin eluents (p>0.1). In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that the antibacterial potency of MDPB adhesive could be substantially enhanced via NAg. Adding MDPB+NAg into both primer and adhesive achieved the strongest anti-biofilm efficacy. The dual agent (MDPB+NAg) method could have wide applicability to other adhesives, sealants, cements and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. PMID:23529901

  13. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan [Department of Electrochemistry, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet [Department of Optoelectonics, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [School of Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@wpi.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  14. Thermal expansion characteristics of light-cured dental resins and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini; Achilias, Dimitris S; Kyrikou, Eleni

    2004-07-01

    The thermal expansion characteristics of dental resins prepared by light-curing of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, Bis-EMA(4) or PCDMA dimethacrylate monomers and of commercial light-cured resin composites (Z-100 MP, Filtek Z-250, Sculpt-It and Alert), the organic matrix resin of which is based on different combinations of the above monomers, were studied by thermomechanical analysis (TMA). This study showed the existence of a glass transition temperature at around 35-47 degrees C for the resins and 40-45 degrees C for the composites; then the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) was calculated at the temperature intervals 0-60 degrees C, 0-T(g) and T(g)-60 degrees C. The CLTE values of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA and UDMA resins are similar and lower than those of Bis-EMA (4) and PCDMA resins. The CLTE values of the composites indicated that the major factor that affects the CLTE of a composite is the filler content, but it also seems to be affected by the chemical structure of the matrix resin. TMA on water-saturated samples showed that water desorption takes place during the measurement and that the residual water acts as a plasticizer decreasing the T(g) and increasing the CLTE values. Furthermore, TMA on post-heated samples for 1, 3 or 6h showed, only for the resins, an initial decrease of CLTE and increase of the T(g) after 1h that was not significantly changed after 6h of heating.

  15. Mechanical and Physical Properties and Adhesion Durability of Flowable Resin Composite

    OpenAIRE

    金丸, 充徳; カナマル, ミツノリ; Mitsunori, KANAMARU

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanical and physical properties and adhesion durability to bovine dentin of the flowable resin composites in comparison with those of conventional resin composites and glass ionomers. In this experiment, four flowable resin composites, two conventional resin composites and two glass ionomers were used. The consistency, thermal expansion coefficiency, compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, brittleness, Vickers hardness, elastic modulus...

  16. Effect of osteopontin on the initial adhesion of dental bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L; Sutherland, Duncan S; Städler, Brigitte

    2012-12-28

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in numerous infections of the human body, including dental caries. While conventional therapy of biofilm diseases aims at eradication and mechanical removal of the biofilms, recent therapeutic approaches target the mechanisms of biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion in particular. The effect of bovine milk osteopontin, a highly phosphorylated whey protein, on adhesion of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Actinomyces naeslundii, three prominent colonizers in dental biofilms, to saliva-coated surfaces was investigated. While adhesion of A. naeslundii was not affected by osteopontin, a strong, dose-dependent reduction in the number of adhering S. mitis was shown. No difference in bacterial adhesion was observed for caseinoglycomacropeptide, another phosphorylated milk protein. Osteopontin did not affect bacterial viability, but changed bacterial surface hydrophobicity, and may be suggested to prevent the adhesins of S. mitis from interacting with their salivary receptors. The antiadhesive effect of osteopontin may be useful for caries prevention.

  17. Modulation of Streptococcus mutans virulence by dental adhesives containing anti-caries agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Fronza, Bruna Marin; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Ferracane, Jack Liborio; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the effect of the incorporation of two anti-caries agents into dental adhesives on the reduction of the virulence of Streptococcus mutans and on the adhesion to dentin. Apigenin (1mM) and tt-Farnesol (5mM) were added separately and in combination to a self-etch adhesive (CS3 - Clearfil S3 Bond Plus) and to an each-and-rinse adhesive (OPT - OptiBond S). Biofilm of S. mutans was grown on adhesive-coated hydroxyapatite disks for 115h and bacterial viability, dry-weight, alkali soluble, water soluble, intracellular polysaccharides and protein were quantified. Bond strength and dentin-adhesive interface were performed to analyze the effects of the incorporation on the physical properties and to identify changes in hybrid layer morphology. Addition of Apigenin and Apigenin+tt-Farnesol to CS3, and Apigenin or tt-Farnesol to OPT reduced the dry-weight of S. mutans biofilm. Insoluble polysaccharide decreased with the addition of Apigenin to CS3 and tt-Farnesol to OPT. Intracellular polysaccharide decreased with addition of Apigenin and Apigenin+tt-Farnesol to CS3. No changes in dentin bond strength, resin-dentin interfacial morphology, total amount of protein and soluble polysaccharide were observed with the additions. Biofilms that are less cariogenic around dental restorations could decrease secondary caries formation; in addition, the reduction of virulence of S. mutans without necessarily killing the microorganism is more unlikely to induce antimicrobial resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adhesion of indirect MOD resin composite inlays luted with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, T; Abe, T; Ito, Y; Pilecki, P; Wilson, R F; Watson, T F; Foxton, R M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loading on the bond strength to dentin and microleakage of MOD indirect composite restorations bonded with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements with or without acid etching of the proximal enamel margins. Class II MOD cavities were prepared in 48 molar teeth into dentin and divided into three groups of 16 teeth. Impressions were taken and indirect composite inlays fabricated (Estenia C & B). The enamel margins of the proximal boxes of half the specimens were phosphoric acid etched, and the inlays were cemented with one of three cements (Panavia F 2.0, SA Cement, or Rely X Unicem). After luting, eight teeth in each cement group were mechanically loaded at 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles. Unloaded teeth acted as controls. Teeth were stored in Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned buccolingually at the proximal boxes to examine microleakage using confocal microscopy, and further sectioned for μTBS testing of the resin-dentin interface. Analysis of variance was performed to assess the effect of loading and acid etching on microleakage and bond strength. Acid etching had no effect on microleakage. No significant difference in the dentin bond strengths between the three cements existed after loading. Panavia F 2.0 exhibited a significant reduction in bond strength. With regard to microleakage at the proximal boxes, loading had no effect on dye penetration at the cavity floor. However, at the axial walls, loading had a significant deleterious effect on Panavia F 2.0. No difference in microleakage existed between the three cements at both sites before and after loading. In conclusion, the two tested self-adhesive cements exhibited similar bond strengths before and after loading to the self-etching resin cement. Loading reduced dentin bond strengths and increased microleakage at the resin-dentin interface. However, acid etching of the enamel margins had no significant effect on microleakage in the approximal regions of

  19. Developing a New Generation of Antimicrobial and Bioactive Dental Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Zhang, K; Zhang, N; Melo, M A S; Weir, M D; Zhou, X D; Bai, Y X; Reynolds, M A; Xu, H H K

    2017-07-01

    Dental caries is prevalent, and secondary caries causes restoration failures. This article reviews recent studies on developing a new generation of bioactive resins with anticaries properties. Extensive effects were made to develop new antimicrobial composites, bonding agents, and other resins containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates to suppress plaque buildup and bacterial acid production. The effects of alkyl chain length and charge density and the antimicrobial mechanisms for chlorhexidine, nano-silver, quaternary ammonium methacrylates, and protein-repellent agents were discussed. Synergistic effects of contact-killing and protein-repellent properties were shown to yield the greatest biofilm-inhibition effects. The combination of antimicrobial, protein-repellent, and calcium phosphate nanoparticle remineralization was suggested to provide maximal anticaries effects. In addition, for use orally, cytotoxicity and biocompatibility were important considerations for the new bioactive materials. Furthermore, rather than kill all bacteria, it would be more desirable to modulate the oral biofilm compositions via bioactive resins to suppress cariogenic/pathogenic species and promote benign species. For widespread clinical use of the new antimicrobial and therapeutic materials, whether they would induce bacterial drug resistance needs to be determined, which requires further study. Nonetheless, the new generation of bioactive anticaries resins with therapeutic and biofilm acid-inhibiting properties has the potential to substantially benefit oral health.

  20. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruiana, Tinca; Melinte, Violeta; Aldea, Horia; Pelin, Irina M; Buruiana, Emil C

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1-F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and (1)H ((13)C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm(-3) (F1) and 40.52 μg mm(-3) (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82-49.14 μg mm(-3) (F1-F3-HAP) and 34.58-45.56 μg mm(-3), respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth.

  1. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2014-02-01

    Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. COMPOSITE DISCS WERE SUBJECT TO ONE OF SIX DIFFERENT SURFACE PRETREATMENTS: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm(2) diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  2. The influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC on the cytotoxicity and mechanical properties of Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA-based dental resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC on cytotoxicity and mechanical properties of Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA dental resins.Methods. Experimental PMMA resin was prepared by incorporating various concentrations of NAC (0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 wt.%. MTT assay was performed to investigate viability of human dental pulp cells after exposure to extract of PMMA resin with or without NAC. Cell adhesion on resin specimens was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Degree of conversion was studied with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. Flexural strength, microhardness and surface roughness was evaluated using a universal testing machine, microhardness tester and optical profilometer, respectively.Results. Incorporation of NAC into PMMA resin significantly reduced its cytotoxicity and enhanced cell adhesion on its surface. NAC induced negative influences on the mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of conversion for all experimental PMMA resins reached as high as 72% after 24 h of polymerization. All the tested properties were maintained when the concentration of incorporated NAC was 0.15 wt.%.Conclusion. The addition of 0.15 wt.% NAC remarkably improved biocompatibility of PMMA resin without exerting significant negative influence on its mechanical and physical properties.

  3. The influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on the cytotoxicity and mechanical properties of Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Yang, Yanwei; Li, Meng; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on cytotoxicity and mechanical properties of Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) dental resins. Methods. Experimental PMMA resin was prepared by incorporating various concentrations of NAC (0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 wt.%). MTT assay was performed to investigate viability of human dental pulp cells after exposure to extract of PMMA resin with or without NAC. Cell adhesion on resin specimens was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Degree of conversion was studied with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Flexural strength, microhardness and surface roughness was evaluated using a universal testing machine, microhardness tester and optical profilometer, respectively. Results. Incorporation of NAC into PMMA resin significantly reduced its cytotoxicity and enhanced cell adhesion on its surface. NAC induced negative influences on the mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of conversion for all experimental PMMA resins reached as high as 72% after 24 h of polymerization. All the tested properties were maintained when the concentration of incorporated NAC was 0.15 wt.%. Conclusion. The addition of 0.15 wt.% NAC remarkably improved biocompatibility of PMMA resin without exerting significant negative influence on its mechanical and physical properties.

  4. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service.......To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service....

  5. Five-year clinical performance of posterior resin composite restorations placed by dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the survival over a five-year period of posterior resin composite restorations placed by students. METHODS: Class I and II resin composite restorations placed by second-fourth year dental students were evaluated. Patients attended the dental school every 6 months for a reg

  6. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (Padhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  7. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque and is identified as a device intended to reduce the presence...

  8. Effect of a novel quaternary ammonium methacrylate polymer (QAMP) on adhesion and antibacterial properties of dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupo, Yasmine M; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Nadal, Jessica M; Simão, Luzia C; Esmerino, Luís Antônio; Gomes, Osnara M M; Gomes, João Carlos

    2014-05-20

    This study investigated the resin-dentin bond strength (μTBS), degree of conversion (DC), and antibacterial potential of an innovative adhesive system containing a quaternary ammonium methacrylate polymer (QAMP) using in situ and in vitro assays. Forty-two human third molars were flattened until the dentin was exposed and were randomly distributed into three groups of self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP (experimental group), Clearfil™ Protect Bond (positive control) and Clearfil™ SE Bond (negative control). After light curing, three 1 mm-increments of composite resin were bonded to each dentin surface. A total of thirty of these bonded teeth (10 teeth per group) was sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens and tested under tensile stress immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Twelve bonded teeth (4 teeth per group) were longitudinally sectioned in a mesio-to-distal direction to obtain resin-bonded dentin slabs. In situ DC was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In vitro DC of thin films of each adhesive system was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro susceptibility tests of these three adhesive systems were performed by the minimum inhibitory/minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC) assays against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces naeslundii. No statistically significant difference in μTBS was observed between Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP and Clearfil™ SE Bond (p>0.05) immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of water storage. However Clearfil™ Protect Bond showed a significant reduction of μTBS after 12 months of storage (p=0.039). In addition, QAMP provided no significant change in DC after incorporating into Clearfil™ SE Bond (p>0.05). Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP demonstrated MIC/MBC values similar to the positive control against L. casei and A. naeslundii and higher than the negative control for all

  9. Degree of conversion and permeability of dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenaro, Milena; Antoniolli, Francesca; Sauro, Salvatore; Tay, Franklin R; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Prati, Carlo; Biasotto, Matteo; Contardo, Luca; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the extent of polymerization of different adhesive films in relation to their permeability. One adhesive of each class was investigated: OptiBond FL; One-Step; Clearfil Protect Bond; and Xeno III. Adhesive films were prepared and cured with XL-2500 (3M ESPE) for 20, 40 or 60 s. Polymerization kinetic curves of the adhesives tested were obtained with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and data were correlated with microhardness. The permeability of the adhesives under the same experimental conditions was evaluated on human extracted teeth connected to a permeability device and analysed statistically. The results showed that the extent of polymerization obtained from DSC exotherms was directly correlated with microhardness. An increased level of polymerization after prolonged light-curing was confirmed for all adhesives. Simplified adhesives exhibited a lower extent of polymerization and showed incomplete polymerization, even after 60 s. An inverse correlation was found between the degree of cure and the permeability. This study supports the hypothesis that the permeability of simplified adhesives is correlated with incomplete polymerization of resin monomers and the extent of light exposure. These adhesives may be rendered less permeable by using longer curing times than those recommended by the respective manufacturer.

  10. Clinical approach to anterior adhesive restorations using resin composite veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio; Putignano, Angelo; Bollero, Raffaele; Madini, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Scientific progress in adhesive dentistry has led to more conservative techniques, both direct and indirect, to solve esthetic problems in anterior teeth. This article will discuss only indirect techniques, which are clearly superior in complex cases in which it will be difficult to recreate harmonious tooth shape and color. After reviewing the literature and highlighting the properties of this technique, the indications and benefits compared to the direct technique will be assessed. This is followed by a step-by-step description of operative procedures, from treatment planning to relining and polishing of the cemented adhesive restoration. The long-term success of veneers depends mainly on the tooth preparation, which should be confined to enamel, involve proximal contact areas, maintain the cervical enamel margin, and incorporate the incisal edge to increase veneer resistance and enable correct placement. Although no clinical follow-up similar to that of ceramic materials is available, the latest-generation resin composites offer interesting features. They can withstand mechanical stress, have excellent esthetic properties, and, most importantly, can be repaired intraorally without impairing their physicochemical and mechanical properties.

  11. Dental adhesives with bioactive and on-demand bactericidal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Ken; Cai, Yanling; Engqvist, Håkan; Strømme, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to perform the first in vitro evaluation of a new interfacial bond-promoting material-and-method concept for on-demand long term bacteria inhibition in dental restoration procedures. The bioactivity, mechanical bonding strength and photocatalytic bactericidal properties, induced by low dose ultraviolet-A (UV-A) irradiation of dental adhesives containing crystalline titania nanoparticles (NPs), were analyzed. Dental adhesives with a NP content of 20wt% were shown to be bioactive in terms of spontaneous hydroxylapatite formation upon storage in simulated body fluid and the bioactivity was found to be promoted by chemical etching of the adhesives. The mechanical bonding strength between the adhesives and a HA tooth model was shown to be unaffected by the NPs up to a NP content of 30wt%. Elimination of Staphylococcus epidermidis in contact with the adhesives was found to depend both on UV photocatalytic irradiation intensity and time. Efficient elimination of the bacteria could be achieved using a UV-A dose of 4.5J/cm(2) which is about 6 times below the safe maximum UV dose according to industry guidelines, and 20 times below the average UV-A dose received during an ordinary sun bed session. The combined features of bioactivity and on-demand bactericidal effect should open up the potential to create dental adhesives that reduce the incidence of secondary caries and promote closure of gaps forming at the interface towards the tooth via remineralization of adjacent tooth substance, as well as prevention of bacterial infections via on-demand UV-A irradiation. 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Composite resin reinforced with silver nanoparticles-laden hydroxyapatite nanowires for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Miao; Du, Zhiyun; Zhu, Siqi; Geng, Hongjuan; Zhang, Xu; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    The object is to find a functional one-dimensional nanofibrous filler for composite resin, which is able to provide both efficient reinforcement and high antibacterial activity. Hydroxyapatite (HA) nanowires were synthesized via hydrothermal technique using calcium oleate as the precursor. Polydopamine (PDA)-coated HA (HA-PDA) nanowires were prepared by soaking HA nanowires in dopamine (DA) aqueous solution. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)-laden HA (HA-PDA-Ag) nanowires were prepared via reduction reaction by adding silver nitrate and glucose into HA-PDA suspensions in DI water. The resulted HA-PDA-Ag nanowires were then mixed into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50, w/w) at 4-10wt.%, thermal-cured, and submitted to characterizations including mechanical properties, interfacial adhesion between filler and resin matrix, distribution of HA nanowires and AgNPs, as well as silver ion release, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity. HA-PDA-Ag nanowires were readily obtained and the loading amounts of AgNPs could be controlled by adjusting the feeding doses of silver nitrate and HA-PDA nanowires. Benefiting from the PDA surface layer, HA-PDA-Ag nanowires could disperse well in composite resin and form good interfacial adhesion with the resin matrix. In comparison with neat resin, significant increases in flexural strength and modulus of cured composites were achieved at the addition amounts of HA-PDA-Ag nanowires being 6-8wt.%. The distribution of AgNPs was homogeneous throughout the resin matrix in all designs, which endowed the composites with high antibacterial activity against streptococcus mutans. Continuous silver ion release from composites was detected, however, it was determined the composites would have insignificant cytotoxicity based on the proliferation of L929 fibroblasts in extracts of HA-PDA-Ag nanowires. The finding proved that HA-PDA-Ag nanowires could serve as functional nanofillers for composite resins, which should help much in developing materials for satisfactory

  13. Novel dental adhesives containing nanoparticles of silver and amorphous calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary Anne S.; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D.; Rodrigues, Lidiany K. A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the main reason for restoration failure, and replacement of the failed restorations accounts for 50–70% of all restorations. Antibacterial adhesives could inhibit residual bacteria in tooth cavity and invading bacteria along the margins. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion release could remineralize the lesions. The objectives of this study were to incorporate nanoparticles of silver (NAg) and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) into adhesive for the first time, and to investigate the effects on dentin bond strength and plaque microcosm biofilms. Methods Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive was used as control. NAg were added into primer and adhesive at 0.1% by mass. NACP were mixed into adhesive at 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Microcosm biofilms were grown on disks with primer covering the adhesive on a composite. Biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU) and lactic acid were measured. Results Human dentin shear bond strengths (n=10) ranged from 26 to 34 MPa; adding NAg and NACP into adhesive did not decrease the bond strength (p > 0.1). SEM examination revealed resin tags from well-filled dentinal tubules. Numerous NACP infiltrated into the dentinal tubules. While NACP had little antibacterial effect, NAg in bonding agents greatly reduced the biofilm viability and metabolic activity, compared to the control (p Dental plaque microcosm biofilm viability and acid production were greatly reduced on bonding agents containing NAg and NACP, without compromising dentin bond strength. The novel method of incorporating dual agents (remineralizing agent NACP and antibacterial agent NAg) may have wide applicability to other dental bonding systems. PMID:23138046

  14. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and palatal aspects of 49 human maxillary premolars, randomly divided into 7 groups (N=14. The cavities in groups 1, 2 and 3 were restored using a composite resin (APX. The cavities in groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 were restored using a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC. Before restoring, adhesive systems (Optibond FL = OFL, three-step etch-and-rinse; One Step Plus = OSP, two-step etch-and-rinse; Clearfil Protect Bond = CPB, two-step self-etch were used as bonding agents in groups 1-6 as follow: OFL in groups 1 and 4, OSP in groups 2 and 5, and CPB in groups 3 and 6, respectively. The specimens in group 7 were restored with GC cavity conditioner and Fuji II LC. All the specimens were thermo-cycled for 1000 cycles. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration method. Statistical analyzes were carried out with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05. Results: There were significant differences in microleakage scores at both enamel and dentinal margins between the study groups (P<0.05. The lowest microleakage scores at enamel and dentin margins of RMGI restorations were observed in group 6. Conclusion: Use of two-step self-etch adhesive, prior to restoring cervical cavities with RMGIC, seems to be more efficacious than the conventional cavity conditioner in decreasing marginal microleakage.

  15. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  16. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  17. Preparation and evaluation of dental resin with antibacterial and radio-opaque functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingwei; Söderling, Eva; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-03-07

    In order to prepare antibacterial and radio-opaque dental resin, a methacrylate monomer named 2-Dimethyl-2-dodecyl-1-methacryloxyethyl ammonium iodine (DDMAI) with both antibacterial and radio-opaque activities was added into a 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropyl)-phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)/methyl methacrylate (MMA) dental resin system. Degree of conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), water sorption (WS) and solubility (WSL), antibacterial activity, and radio-opacity (ROX) of the obtained dental resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/MMA resin system without DDMAI was used as a control. The results showed that DDMAI could endow BIS-GMA/MMA resin system with good antibacterial (p 0.05). However, incorporating DDMAI into Bis-GMA/MMA resin could reduce mechanical properties (p < 0.05) and increase WS and WSL (p < 0.05), thus further work is needed in order to optimize the resin formulation.

  18. Preparation and Evaluation of Dental Resin with Antibacterial and Radio-Opaque Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka K. Vallittu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to prepare antibacterial and radio-opaque dental resin, a methacrylate monomer named 2-Dimethyl-2-dodecyl-1-methacryloxyethyl ammonium iodine (DDMAI with both antibacterial and radio-opaque activities was added into a 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropyl-phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA/methyl methacrylate (MMA dental resin system. Degree of conversion (DC, flexural strength (FS and modulus (FM, water sorption (WS and solubility (WSL, antibacterial activity, and radio-opacity (ROX of the obtained dental resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/MMA resin system without DDMAI was used as a control. The results showed that DDMAI could endow BIS-GMA/MMA resin system with good antibacterial (p 0.05. However, incorporating DDMAI into Bis-GMA/MMA resin could reduce mechanical properties (p < 0.05 and increase WS and WSL (p < 0.05, thus further work is needed in order to optimize the resin formulation.

  19. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  20. Analysis of adhesion characteristics of liner dental materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive characteristics of materials used in dental practice are determined by indirect methods, by measuring mechanical properties of liner materials. In that procedure, the adhesion is defined by using measured mechanical properties of the bond material-test sample, which has several shortages. In the presented research the focus was based on the multi-component, composite, materials, which have, both organic and inorganic components in their structures. The direct measure of material-dentine bond was used in order to quantify the adhesion properties of investigated liner materials. Artificial saliva was the media for inducing the liner-dentine bond destruction. Destruction measurements were made by applying the quantification of visual information methodology. Obtained results were used to calculate the adhesion coefficient of the liner materials. The results were correlated with the mechanical test. There are no references on comparative testing of adhesion mechanical properties of dental material in the literature with presented methodology. The presented methodology proved to be useful for the functional quality ranking of dental materials.

  1. The physical characteristics of resin composite-calcium silicate interface as part of a layered/laminate adhesive restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Danya F; Foxton, Richard; Manoharan, Andiappan; Watson, Timothy F; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-03-01

    To compare in-vitro micro-shear bond strengths (μSBS) of resin composite to calcium silicate cement (Biodentine™) vs. glass ionomer cement vs. resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) using an adhesive in self-etch (SE)/total etch (TE) mode after aging three substrates and bond and characterizing their failure modes. Resin composite was SE/TE bonded to 920 standardized disks of Biodentine™, GIC & RM-GIC. Dividing samples into two groups, the first underwent early (t=0min, 5min, 20min, 24h) or delayed (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months) substrate aging before bonding and μSBS (t=24h) testing. In the second, adhesive was applied after either early (t=5min) or delayed (t=2wk) substrate aging and then tested after bond aging (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). The failure modes were identified using stereomicroscope. SEM images of selected samples were analyzed. No significant differences were observed between (SE)/(TE) bonding modes (P=0.42). With substrate aging, a significant reduction in μSBS occurred between early and delayed time intervals for Biodentine™ (P=0.001), but none for the GIC/RM-GIC (P=0.465, P=0.512 respectively). With bond aging, there was no significant difference between time intervals for all groups, except at 6 months for the GIC (PBiodentine™ is a weak restorative material in its early setting phase. Placing the overlying resin composite as part of the laminate/layered definitive restoration is best delayed for >2wk to allow sufficient intrinsic maturation to withstand contraction forces from the resin composite. A total-etch or self-etch adhesive may be used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive. As controls, micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites were tested. The universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond. The fracture toughness and flexural properties of resin composites, and shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive with resin composite using both total-etch and self-etch modes were determined. In the results, short fiber-reinforced resin composite showed significantly higher fracture toughness than did micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The flexural strength and modulus of short fiber-reinforced and nano-hybrid resin composites were significantly lower than were those of micro-hybrid resin composites. Regardless of etching mode, the shear bond strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite did not show any significant differences from micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite and micro-hybrid resin composites were significantly higher than that of nano-hybrid resin composites. The results of this study suggest that the mechanical properties of short fiber-reinforced resin composite improve their bond durability with universal adhesive.

  3. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hattar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  4. Rubber-toughening of dimethacrylate dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Valerie A; Cardenas, H Lee; Rawls, H Ralph

    2010-08-01

    Dimethacrylate dental composite resins exhibit inherently low toughness. Toughening of these materials may reduce the incidence of marginal and bulk fracture of composite restorations. To determine if dimethacrylate dental restorative materials can be rubber-toughened, and if so, to identify a possible mechanism. A filler composed of aggregates of polybutadiene/silica as well as irregularly-shaped silica slabs was produced by mixing silica with polybutadiene in dichloromethane. The dried filler was subsequently ground and sieved to composition of the complex filler. Filler was added to a bis-GMA/bis-EMA/TEGDMA resin system and fractured in three-point bend test mode at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. In addition, 1 bar was fractured at a crosshead speed of 0.001 mm/min to identify a possible mechanism for toughening. In specimens fractured at 1 mm/min, flexural modulus is increased or maintained and flexural strength and energy to break increase as the amount of polybutadiene in the aggregates increases. Cavitation of high-rubber-containing aggregates is demonstrated. In the one specimen fractured at 0.001 mm/min, a marked increase in size of high-rubber-containing aggregates along with severe shear damage in the surrounding matrix is shown, suggesting that cavitation with subsequent absorption of energy during shear yielding is the likely mechanism behind the increase in energy to break in bars fractured at 1 mm/min. These results indicate that dimethacrylate dental composite materials can be rubber toughened, which may potentially reduce marginal and bulk fractures of composite restorations, and consequently extend their service lifetime.

  5. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    LIN, JIE; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coat...

  6. Aspects of adhesion between CAD/CAM ceramics and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Tian(Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, China); 田恬

    2016-01-01

    Glass ceramics are one of the preferred choices in the case for preservation of tooth structure. They also exhibit excellent aesthetic outcomes, and life-like translucency. Moreover, glass ceramics can provide better adhesion to the underlying tooth preparation, compared with metal-bonded ceramics and oxide ceramics. This is achieved by application of HF etching and silanization, followed by bonding with resin cement. The resin cement is applied as the means to provide a seal, adhesion and ‘f...

  7. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Handling sticky Resin by Stingless Bees: Adhesive Properties of Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKUS GASTAUER

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Meliponini like Tetragonisca angustula collect resin to defend their nests against intruders like ants or Robber Bees. Small portions of resin are attached to intruders bodies and extremities causing their immobilization. It has been observed that resin is removed easily from the bee's mandible but adheres strongly to the intruder's cuticle. We tested the hypothesis that resin sticks lesser to the mandibles of Stingless Bees than to the surface of intruders due to special surface structures or adhesive properties of these structures. The surface structures of the mandible of T. angustula and the trochanter of Camponotus sericeiventris were studied by scanning electron microscopy. To measure adhesion properties, selected surfaces were fixed on a fine glass pin and withdrawn from a glass tip covered with resin. The deformation of the glass pin indicates adhesion forces operating between the resin and the selective surface. The absolute value of the forces is computed from the glass pin's stiffness. It has been shown that resin sticks more to the smooth mandible of the bee than to the structured trochanter of the ant. A new hypothesis to be tested says that the bees might lubricate their mandibles with nectar or honey to reduce the resin's adhesion temporarily.

  9. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent.

  10. An in vitro microleakage study of class V cavities restored with a new self-adhesive flowable composite resin versus different flowable materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Regarding the importance of sealing ability of restorative dental materials, this study was done to assess the microleakage of class V cavities restored with a new self-adhesive flowable composite resin and compare to different flowable materials. Materials and Methods: Seventy standardized class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of maxillary premolars teeth. The occlusal and the gingival margins of the cavities were located on the enamel and cementum/dentin, resp...

  11. Influence of saliva substitute films on initial Streptococcus mutans adhesion to enamel and dental substrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether saliva substitutes containing antimicrobial agents influence the initial adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to bovine enamel and various dental materials. Specimens of a denture base resin, a veneering composite and a dental ceramic were prepared according to the manufacturers instructions and polished. Standardized bovine enamel slabs were prepared for reference. Surface roughnesss and surface free energy were determined. Fifteen specimens of each substratum were rinsed with four saliva substitutes (Salinum, Aldiamed, Saliva natura and Saliva Orthana), a negative (PBS) and a positive control (protein mixture) for 2h at 37 degrees C in a flow chamber, and were subsequently exposed to S. mutans NCTC 10449 suspension for 4h at 37 degrees C. Adherent bacteria were quantified using a fluorometric assay. Statistical analysis was performed using one- and two-way ANOVA (padhesion of S. mutans were found between substrata that had been exposed to the negative control, the positive control, Saliva Orthana and Aldiamed. On substrata with high surface free energy (ceramic and bovine enamel), significantly higher fluorescence intensities indicating higher adhesion of streptococci were found to specimens that had been exposed to Saliva natura and Salinum. The influence of saliva substitutes on initial S. mutans adhesion appears to be dependent on the substratum surface properties. Only little influence of antimicrobial agents was found.

  12. Effect of a Novel Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylate Polymer (QAMP on Adhesion and Antibacterial Properties of Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine M. Pupo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the resin–dentin bond strength (μTBS, degree of conversion (DC, and antibacterial potential of an innovative adhesive system containing a quaternary ammonium methacrylate polymer (QAMP using in situ and in vitro assays. Forty-two human third molars were flattened until the dentin was exposed and were randomly distributed into three groups of self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP (experimental group, Clearfil™ Protect Bond (positive control and Clearfil™ SE Bond (negative control. After light curing, three 1 mm-increments of composite resin were bonded to each dentin surface. A total of thirty of these bonded teeth (10 teeth per group was sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens and tested under tensile stress immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Twelve bonded teeth (4 teeth per group were longitudinally sectioned in a mesio-to-distal direction to obtain resin-bonded dentin slabs. In situ DC was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In vitro DC of thin films of each adhesive system was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro susceptibility tests of these three adhesive systems were performed by the minimum inhibitory/minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC assays against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces naeslundii. No statistically significant difference in μTBS was observed between Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP and Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05 immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of water storage. However Clearfil™ Protect Bond showed a significant reduction of μTBS after 12 months of storage (p = 0.039. In addition, QAMP provided no significant change in DC after incorporating into Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05. Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP demonstrated MIC/MBC values similar to the positive control against L. casei and A. naeslundii and higher than the negative

  13. Determination of Water Diffusion Coefficients and Dynamics in Adhesive/ Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin Composite Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao; WANG Zhi; WANG Jing; SU Tao

    2007-01-01

    To determinate the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis(EDX) is used to establish the content change of oxygen in the adhesive in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints. As water is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints can be obtained from the change in the content of oxygen in the adhesive during humidity aging, via EDX analysis. The authors have calculated the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints with the aid of both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The determined results with EDX analysis are almost the same as those determined with elemental analysis and the results also show that the durability of the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints subjected to silane coupling agent treatment is better than those subjected to sand paper burnishing treatment and chemical oxidation treatment.

  14. New acid BisGMA analogs for dental adhesive applications with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinte, Violeta; Buruiana, Tinca; Chibac, Andreea; Mares, Mihai; Aldea, Horia; Buruiana, Emil C

    2016-12-01

    To achieve bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) analogs with reduced viscosity to be used in the formulation of dental adhesives containing biocidal components. A series of low-viscosity BisGMA derivatives (η: 39-12Pas) modified with 30, 60 and, respectively 80mol% carboxylic acid units were synthesized and characterized. Hydrogen bonding interactions in our monomers, the photopolymerization behavior and implicitly the conversion degree (DC) for some experimental adhesive formulations containing acid-modified BisGMA, commercial BisGMA (only in F1-F3), triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate were examined by FTIR spectroscopy. The water effects on the photocrosslinked networks together with the flexural strength/modulus were also investigated. The adhesive penetration into the dentin surface was surveyed by SEM analysis, and the antimicrobial activity triggered by the incorporation of 0.5wt% AgNO3, 10wt% zinc methacrylate or 1wt% triclosan methacrylate in selected adhesive formulations on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans strains was evidenced. The contribution of the hydrogen bonding interactions was found to be lower in BisGMA derivatives than in non-modified BisGMA, and the DC varied between 56.5 (F6) and 83.7% (F1) compared with a control formulation based on BisGMA:TEGDMA (DC=58.2%). The flexural strength and flexural modulus varied in the range 33.7MPa (F6)-54.4MPa (F8)MPa and 0.64 (F6)-1.43 (F8)GPa, respectively. SEM observation of adhesive-dentin interface revealed the formation of resin tags for the carboxyl-containing adhesive, while for the control adhesive they are hardly formed. Also, the microorganism development was inhibited, the proposed materials displaying antimicrobial activity. The experimental formulations based on carboxyl-functionalized BisGMA exhibit a similar or even improved behavior over control sample, suggesting their potential applicability as antimicrobial dental adhesives

  15. Effects of MMP inhibitors incorporated within dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahdy, A; Koller, G; Sauro, S; Bartsch, J W; Sherriff, M; Watson, T F; Banerjee, A

    2012-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition has been shown to reduce adhesive bond degradation when applied as a pre-conditioner, adding to clinical steps in the placement of adhesives, but their incorporation within dental adhesives has not been fully explored. This study examined the effect of including 2 MMP inhibitors (BB94 and GM6001) within the primers of 3 commercially available adhesives. Fluorometric assay and zymography showed that adhesives with MMP inhibitors had high affinity toward both synthetic fluorogenic FRET peptides (95%) and dentin powder substrates, respectively. The immediate microtensile bond strength was enhanced for 2 types of adhesives following the addition of both inhibitors. However, no changes were detected between the control and the inhibitor groups following 3-month storage. The modified two-step etch-and-rinse and single-step systems showed less Rhodamine B penetration to the "hybrid layer" and to the "adhesive", respectively. The incorporation of BB94 and GM6001 within the primers resulted in the inhibition of dentin MMPs with improved initial bond strength and enhanced sealing ability.

  16. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments.

  17. Effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bond strength of adhesive layer can absorb unwanted stresses of polymerization shrinkage in composite resin restorations; increased microshear bond strength can prevent failure of restoration materials, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin. Material and Methods Two different types of adhesive systems: universal adhesive (ExciTE) and newly developed adhesive (Nano-Bond), and one type of light-cured resin restorative material (Nanocomposite resin) were used in this study. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human molar teeth were ground perpendicular to the long axis of each tooth to expose a flat dentin surface. The adhesives were applied on dentin surfaces (single application or double application). Nanocomposite resin was then placed and light cured for 40 seconds. After 24 hours of immersion in water at 37°C, then subjected to thermocycling before testing, a microshear bond test was carried out. The data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA. For comparison between groups, Tukey’s post-hoc test was used. Results The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with a single application were 8.8 and 16.6 MPa, respectively. The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with double application were 13.2 and 21.8MPa, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in microshear bond strengths between the single application of Nano-Bond and the double application of ExciTE adhesives. Conclusions Microshear bond strength increased significantly as the applied adhesive layer was doubled. Key words:Adhesive, microshear, bond, strength, nanocomposite. PMID:28210433

  18. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins.

  19. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion

  20. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion fo

  1. Effect of microparticulate silver addition in dental adhesives on secondary caries in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Norbert; Möhwald, Mandy; Lücker, Susanne; Domann, Eugen; Zorzin, José I; Rosentritt, Martin; Frankenberger, Roland

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the effect of microparticulate silver additions in adhesives on secondary caries formation using an artificial mouth model. One hundred eight intact human third molars received standardized Class-V resin composite restorations (Filtek Supreme XTE bonded with Syntac, Scotchbond 1 XT, Futurabond M). Adhesives were charged with different amounts of microparticulate silver (0 %/0.1 %/0.5 %). After storage for 4 weeks at 37 °C, teeth were subjected to 10,000 thermocycles (+5 °C and +55 °C), and impressions were taken. Streptococcus mutans 10449 was used in a nutrition medium for secondary caries simulation in a fully automated artificial mouth. After completion of thermocycling and biological load cycling, impressions were taken and replicas were investigated under a light microscope for gap widths at enamel and dentin margins. Evaluation of fluorescence was carried out using a special FITC filter. The demineralization depths at the cavity margin were evaluated using Xpert for Windows working at a pixel distance of 5 μm. After thermocycling, no difference in gap widths and demineralization depths was found (p > 0.05). After incubation, gap widths and demineralization depths were significantly reduced with higher amounts of silver loading in most of the adhesives (p dental adhesives has the potential of reducing secondary caries. The chosen setup was able to produce secondary caries with a distinct in vivo appearance. Microparticulate silver additions in dental adhesives may have an impact on inhibition of secondary caries.

  2. Immediate adhesive properties to dentin and enamel of a universal adhesive associated with a hydrophobic resin coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Muñoz, M A; Sezinando, A; Luque-Martinez, I V; Staichak, R; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acid etching and application of a hydrophobic resin coat on the enamel/dentin bond strengths and degree of conversion (DC) within the hybrid layer of a universal adhesive system (G-Bond Plus [GB]). A total of 60 extracted third molars were divided into four groups for bond-strength testing, according to the adhesive strategy: GB applied as a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-stepSE); GB applied as in 1-stepSE followed by one coat of the hydrophobic resin Heliobond (2-stepSE); GB applied as a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (2-stepER); GB applied as in 2-stepER followed by one coat of the hydrophobic resin Heliobond (3-stepER). There were 40 teeth used for enamel microshear bond strength (μSBS) and DC; and 20 teeth used for dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and DC. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24 h) and then tested at 0.5 mm/min (μTBS) or 1.0 mm/min (μSBS). Enamel-resin and dentin-resin interfaces from each group were evaluated for DC using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance for each substrate and the Tukey test (α=0.05). For enamel, the use of a hydrophobic resin coat resulted in statistically significant higher mean enamel μSBS only for the ER strategy (3-stepER vs 2-stepER, penamel etching technique, because it improves bond strengths to enamel when applied with the ER strategy and to dentin when used with the SE adhesion strategy. The application of a hydrophobic resin coat may improve DC in resin-dentin interfaces formed with either the SE or the ER strategy. On enamel, DC may benefit from the application of a hydrophobic resin coat over 1-stepSE adhesives.

  3. Effect of incremental filling technique on adhesion of light-cured resin composite to cavity floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikawa, Hirokazu; Inai, Norimichi; Cho, Eitetsu; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Otsuki, Masayuki; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various incremental filling techniques on adhesion between composite and cavity floor using light-cured resin composite. Black ABS resin and hybrid resin composite were used as mold materials--instead of dentin--for the preparation of cavities, and standardized to 5x5x5 mm. Each cavity was then treated with a bonding system (Clearfil SE bond). Resin composite (Clearfil Photo Core) was placed on the bonding resin using different incremental filling techniques or in bulk and irradiated for a total of 80 seconds using a halogen light unit. Specimens were subjected to the micro-tensile bond test at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. The results indicated that an incremental filling technique was more effective in improving adhesion to the cavity floor than a bulk filling technique.

  4. Paired observation on light-cured composite resin and nano-composite resin in dental caries repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoling, Tao; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Yanyan, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    To compare the value of light-cured composite resin with that of nano-composite resin in dental caries repair. 88 patients taking dental caries repair in our hospital from May 2014 to April 2015 were selected, and divided into observation group and control group by coin method with 44 patients in each group. Nano-composite resin was used in observation group, while light-cured composite resin in control group. Then, the occurrence rates of odontohyperesthesia, aesthetic satisfaction with dental caries repair and complications were compared between two groups by visual analogue scale (VAS). The occurrence rate of odontohyperesthesia in observation group is significantly lower than that in control group (9.09% (4/44) vs 31.82% (14/44), 6.82% (3/44) vs 22.73% (10/44), 2.27% (1/44) vs 13.64% (6/44)) with difference of statistical significance (Pcomposite resin can lower the occurrence rate of odontohyperesthesia in dental caries repair, reduce the pain of patients, and improve the satisfaction of patients with tooth appearance.

  5. Focal adhesion kinase maintains, but not increases the adhesion of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuyan; Shao, Meiying; Zou, Wenlin; Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Ran; Hu, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as a key enzyme in the integrin-mediated adhesion-signalling pathway. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of FAK on adhesion of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. We transfected lentiviral vectors to silence or overexpress FAK in HDP cells ex vivo. Early cell adhesion, cell survival and focal contacts (FCs)-related proteins (FAK and paxillin) were examined. By using immunofluorescence, the formation of FCs and cytoskeleton was detected, respectively. We found that both adhesion and survival of HDP cells were suppressed by FAK inhibition. However, FAK overexpression slightly inhibited cell adhesion and exhibited no change in cell survival compared with the control. A thick rim of cytoskeleton accumulated and smaller dot-shaped FCs appeared in FAK knockdown cells. Phosphorylation of paxillin (p-paxillin) was inhibited in FAK knockdown cells, verifying that the adhesion was inhibited. Less cytoskeleton and elongated FCs were observed in FAK-overexpressed cells. However, p-paxillin had no significant difference compared with the control. In conclusion, the data suggest that FAK maintains cell adhesion, survival and cytoskeleton formation, but excessive FAK has no positive effects on these aspects.

  6. [Current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X; Lu, H B; Mao, J; Gong, S Q

    2016-09-01

    The mode of dental antibacterial resin-based materials can be divided into two types, namely, single and combined antibacterial mode. With regard to single antibacterial mode, only one kind of antibacterial agent is added into the resin, which can be released or act as contacting antibacterial agent. The single mode resin has limitation in sterilization methods and effect. As for combined antibacterial mode, it is a combination of different types of biocides and thus maximizes the sterilizing effect, including the releasing antibacterial agent incorporated with the contacting antibacterial agent or antibacterial agents combined with calcium compound possessing biological mineralization function. In this paper, current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties are reviewed from the perspectives of single and combined antibacterial modes to provide guidance for dental antibacterial resin material research.

  7. Bacterial Viability and Physical Properties of Antibacterially Modified Experimental Dental Resin Composites: e79119

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stefan Rüttermann; Taina Trellenkamp; Nora Bergmann; Thomas Beikler; Helmut Ritter; Ralf Janda

    2013-01-01

    ... to experimental dental resin composites. Materials and Methods A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly...

  8. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  9. A 10-Year Clinical Evaluation of Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses on Non-Prepared Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemjai, Morakot; Özcan, Mutlu; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the conditions of the non-invasive resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (FDP) and patient satisfaction up to 10 years of clinical function. A total of 23 patients who required fixed prostheses in the areas of mandibular anterior and premolar, and maxillary anterior region received resin-bonded restorations between 1999-2003. In 13 patients with 14 edentulous areas were restored with an adhesive pontic (natural tooth, acrylic and porcelain). Two indirect proximal veneers using resin composite were placed in each space in 10 patients having 13 edentulous spaces. All prostheses were bonded to the proximal surface of adjacent teeth using resin cement based on 4-META/MMA-TBB. No debonding of proximal veneers but 4 pontic debonding was observed which were rebonded and remained functional until final follow up. The abutments in pontic and proximal veneer groups were free of caries and hypersensitivity. Periodontal health was improved after treatment and was maintained for 10 years except for 4 abutments that still showed some bleeding on probing. Non-invasive resin-bonded FDPs are simple, pain-free, less costly treatment procedures that could provide acceptable clinical longevity with high patient satisfaction.

  10. Predictive algorithms for determination of reflectance data from quantity of pigments within experimental dental resin composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ghinea, Razvan; Pecho, Oscar; Herrera, Luis Javier; Ionescu, Ana Maria; Cardona, Juan de la Cruz; Sanchez, María Purificación; Rade D. Paravina; Perez, María del Mar

    2015-01-01

    Background Being able to estimate (predict) the final spectrum of reflectance of a biomaterial, especially when the final color and appearance are fundamental for their clinical success (as is the case of dental resin composites), could be a very useful tool for the industrial development of these type of materials. The main objective of this study was the development of predictive models which enable the determination of the reflectance spectrum of experimental dental resin composites based ...

  11. Preparation and Evaluation of Dental Resin with Antibacterial and Radio-Opaque Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Pekka K. Vallittu; Lippo V. J. Lassila; Jingwei He; Eva Söderling

    2013-01-01

    In order to prepare antibacterial and radio-opaque dental resin, a methacrylate monomer named 2-Dimethyl-2-dodecyl-1-methacryloxyethyl ammonium iodine (DDMAI) with both antibacterial and radio-opaque activities was added into a 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropyl)-phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)/methyl methacrylate (MMA) dental resin system. Degree of conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), water sorption (WS) and solubility (WSL), antibacterial activity, and radio-opacity...

  12. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (pcomposite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  13. Photocatalytic inactivation of biofilms on bioactive dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanling; Strømme, Maria; Melhus, Asa; Engqvist, Håkan; Welch, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are the most prevalent mode of microbial life in nature and are 10-1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic bacteria. Persistent biofilm growth associated at the margin of a dental restoration often leads to secondary caries, which remains a challenge in restorative dentistry. In this work, we present the first in vitro evaluation of on-demand photocatalytic inactivation of biofilm on a novel dental adhesive containing TiO2 nanoparticles. Streptococcus mutans biofilm was cultured on this photocatalytic surface for 16 h before photocatalytic treatment with ultraviolet-A (UV-A) light. UV-A doses ranging from 3 to 43 J/cm(2) were applied to the surface and the resulting viability of biofilms was evaluated with a metabolic activity assay incorporating phenol red that provided a quantitative measure of the reduction in viability due to the photocatalytic treatments. We show that an UV-A irradiation dose of 8.4 J/cm(2) leads to one order of magnitude reduction in the number of biofilm bacteria on the surface of the dental adhesives while as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude reduction in the corresponding number can be achieved with a dose of 43 J/cm(2). This material maintains its functional properties as an adhesive in restorative dentistry while offering the possibility of a novel dental procedure in the treatment or prevention of bacterial infections via on-demand UV-A irradiation. Similar materials could be developed for the treatment of additional indications such as peri-implantits.

  14. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, A.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design. Materi

  15. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, A.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design.

  16. Integrating dental anatomy and biomaterials: an innovative use of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kenneth L; McAndrew, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    As part of the new integrated curriculum at the New York University College of Dentistry, a pilot program uses composite resins to teach dental anatomy. The Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, in conjunction with the Department of Cariology and Operative Dentistry, has created a teaching module to replicate the morphology of a central incisor through the manipulation and placement of a composite resin.

  17. Effect of laser preparation on bond strength of a self-adhesive flowable resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Agarwal, Ishita; Campillo-Funollet, Marc; Munoz-Viveros, Carlos; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E; Mang, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser treatment on shear bond strength of a self-adhesive flowable resin composite to human dentin. Eighty extracted sound human molar teeth were used for the study. The teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in acrylic blocks. The dentin surfaces were ground wet with 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper. They were randomly divided into two preparation groups: laser (Er:YAG laser, with 12 Hz, 350 mJ energy) and control (SiC). Each group was then divided into two subgroups according to the flowable resin composite type (n = 20). A self-adhesive flowable (Vertise Flow) and a conventional flowable resin (Premise Flow) were used. Flowable resin composites were applied according to the manufacturer's recommendations using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. The bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 °C for 24 h. Shear bond strength was tested at 1 mm/min. The data were logarithmically transformed and analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keul's test at a significance level of 0.05. The self-adhesive flowable resin showed significantly higher bond strength values to laser-prepared surfaces than to SiC-prepared surfaces (p flowable resin did not show such differences (p = 0.224). While there was a significant difference between the two flowable resin composites in SiC-prepared surfaces (p flowable resin composite differs according to the type of dentin surface preparation. Laser treatment increased the dentin bonding values of the self-adhesive flowable resin.

  18. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of adhesively restored custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Luís Leonildo; Oderich, Elisa; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Magne, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance and failure mode of composite resin and porcelain onlays and crowns bonded to premolar custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments. Sixty composite resin mesostructures were fabricated with computer assistance with two preparation designs (crown vs onlay) and bonded to a metal implant abutment. Following insertion into an implant with a tapered abutment interface (Titamax CM), each metal-composite resin abutment was restored with either composite resin (Paradigm MZ100) or ceramic (Paradigm C) (n = 15) and attached with adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a preheated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was then simulated, starting with 5,000 cycles at a load of 50 N, followed by stages of 200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 N (25,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 180,000 cycles. The four groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log-rank test). Previously published data using zirconia abutments of the same design were included for comparison. Paradigm C and MZ100 specimens fractured at average loads of 1,133 N and 1,266 N, respectively. Survival rates ranged from 20% to 33.3% (ceramic crowns and onlays) to 60% (composite resin crowns and onlays) and were significantly different (pooled data for restorative material). There were no restoration failures, but there were adhesive failures at the connection between the abutment and the mesostructure. The survival of the metal-composite resin premolar abutments was inferior to that of identical zirconia abutments from a previous study (pooled data for abutment material). Composite resin onlays/crowns bonded to metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments presented higher survival rates than comparable ceramic onlays/crowns. Zirconia abutments outperformed the metal-composite resin premolar abutments.

  19. Analysis of the enamel/adhesive resin interface with laser Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Sato, Hikaru; Onose, Hideo; Moore, B Keith; Platt, Jeffery A

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of resin composites into enamel is currently believed to rely on infiltration of bonding resin into the porous zone, establishing micromechanical retention to etched enamel. This study investigated the change in chemical composition of the enamel/resin interface using a laser Raman microscopic system (System-2000, Renishaw). Two-step bonding systems, Mac Bond II (Tokuyama Corp), Clearfil Mega Bond and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were employed. Resin composites were bonded to bovine enamel with bonding systems and sectioned through the bonded interface. The sectioned surfaces were then polished with diamond pastes down to 1.0 microm particle size. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the enamel/ resin interface. The sample stage was moved in 0.2 microm increments on a computer-controlled X-Y precision table. Additional spectra from samples of enamel and cured bonding resins were recorded for reference. The relative amounts of the hydroxyapatite (960cm(-1), P-O), bonding agent (640cm(-1), aromatic ring) and alkyl group (1450cm(-1), C-H) in the enamel/resin bonding area were calculated. From Raman spectroscopy, a gradual decrease in hydroxyapatite was observed, and it was estimated to extend 2.2-2.6 microm for Mac Bond II, 1.2-1.6 pm for Clearfil Mega Bond and 5.2-5.6 microm for Single Bond. Furthermore, the enamel/resin interface represents a gradual transition of bonding agent from the resin to tooth side. Evidence of poor saturation of adhesive resin in etched enamel with Single Bond was detected. From the results of this study, non-uniform resin infiltration into etched enamel was detected and the degree of resin infiltration was found to be different among the bonding systems used.

  20. Influencia del tiempo posblanqueamiento sobre la adhesion de una resina compuesta al esmalte dental

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldion Elorza, Paula Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Introduccion: a pesar de las ventajas esteticas del blanqueamiento dental, se ha demostrado que puede producir alteraciones en la adhesion de las resinas compuestas al esmalte dental, proceso dependiente...

  1. Adhesion to zirconia used for dental restorations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Bernasconi, Mira

    2015-02-01

    Currently, no consensus exists regarding the best adhesion protocol for zirconia used in dentistry; this is important particularly for restorations where mechanical retention is deficient. This systematic review analyzed the adhesion potential of resin-based and glass-ionomer luting cements to zirconia and aimed to highlight the possible dominant factors affecting the bond strength results to this substrate. Original scientific papers on adhesion to zirconia published in the MEDLINE (PubMed) database between 01/01/1995 and 01/06/2011 were included in this systematic review. The following MeSH terms, search terms, and their combinations were used: "Dental bonding", "Zirconium", "Zirconia", "Y-TZP", "Y-TZP ceramic", "Materials Testing/methods", "Test", "Cement", and "Resin bonding". Two reviewers performed screening and data abstraction. Descriptive statistics were performed and the frequencies of the studied parameters, means, standard deviations, confidence intervals (95% CI; uncorrected and corrected), median values, and interquartile ranges (IQR) were calculated for the bond strength data reported for different factor levels: surface conditioning methods (control, physicochemical, physical, chemical), cements (bis-GMA-, MDP-, and 4-META-based resin cements, self-adhesive cements, glass ionomer), aging with and without thermocycling (TC), and test methods (macroshear, microshear, macrotensile, and microtensile). The final search provided 177 titles with abstracts. Further abstract screening yielded 72 articles, out of which 54 were found potentially appropriate to be included. After full text evaluation, 2 of these were eliminated. The selection process resulted in the final sample of 52 studies. In total, 169 different surface conditioning methods, mainly combinations of air-abrasion protocols and adhesive promoters (primers or silanes), were investigated. Altogether, the use of 5 types of cements and 4 testing methods was reported. While 26 studies were

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE RESIN TO DENTAL ENAMEL CONDITIONED WITH PHOSPHORIC ACID OR Nd: YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO Carlos de Paula

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been focused on a comparison between the shear bond strength of a composite resin attached to dental enamel surface, after a 35% phosphoric acid etching and after a Nd:YAG laser irradiation with 165.8 J/cm2 of energy density per pulse. After etching and attaching resin to these surfaces, the specimens were thermocycled and then underwent the shearing bond strength tests at a speed of 5 mm/min. The results achieved, after statistical analysis with Student's t-test, showed that the adhesion was significantly greater in the 35% phosphoric acid treated group than in the group treated with the Nd:YAG laser, thus demonstrating the need for developing new studies to reach the ideal parameters for an effective enamel surface conditioning as well as specific adhesives and composite resins when Nd:YAG laser is used

  3. Evaluation of resin adhesion to zirconia ceramic using some organosilanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Heikkinen, Mo; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated and compared the effect of three trialkoxysilane coupling agents on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA-based unfilled resin and a dimethacrylate-based resin composite luting cement to a zirconia ceramics (Procera(R) AllZircon, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden). Methods. S

  4. In Vitro Color Change of Three Dental Veneering Resins in Tea, Coffee and Tamarind Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muttagi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the in vitro color changes of three dental resin veneering materials when immersed in tea, coffee and tamarind extracts.Materials and Methods: The color changes of heat polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin (Stellondetrey, B, F14, DPI Dental products of India Ltd, Mumbai, auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin (DPI, B, QV5, DPI Dental products of India Ltd, Mumbai andlight polymerized resin composite (Herculite XRV, Enamel A2, part no. 22860, lot no. 910437, Kerr Corporation, West Collins Avenue, Orange, CA, USA when immersed in water extracts of tea (Tata Tea Ltd. Bangalore, India, coffee (Tata Coffee Ltd. Coorg, Indiaand tamarind were evaluated using computer vision systems. The color images were recorded in R (red, G (green and B (blue form and converted into H (hue, S (saturationand V (value.Results: Significant color change occurred for auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin in tamarind extract, for heat polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin in tea extract andfor light polymerized resin composite in coffee extract. Auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin samples showed an overall higher color change. However, for all the material samples coffee extract produced more color change.Conclusion: These results suggest that the color stability of the resins is influenced by the presence of secondary metabolites such as tartaric acid, tannins, caffeine, saponins and phenols in tamarind, tea and coffee extracts.

  5. Effect of quaternary ammonium methacrylates incorporation into a dental adhesive on the resistance of enzymatic degradation of resin-dentine interfaces%季铵盐单体改性粘接剂对牙本质粘接界面耐酶解能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宁; 李芳; 陈宇江; 窦祈; 沈丽娟; 陈吉华

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究季铵盐单体改性粘接剂对牙本质粘接界面耐酶解性能的影响,探索提高牙本质粘接耐久性的新方法.方法 30颗无龋人第三磨牙通过随机数字表法随机分为3组(每组10颗):季铵盐单体[2-甲基丙烯酰氧乙基-正十二烷基-甲基溴化铵(2-methacryloxylethyl dodecylmethyl ammonium bromide,MAE-DB)]改性的粘接剂(AdperTM Single Bond 2)组(简称MAE-DB组)、氯己定组和阴性对照组(AdperTM Single Bond 2粘接剂).全酸蚀粘接技术制作标准牙本质粘接试件,37℃水浴浸泡24 h后,制成微拉伸试件,浸泡于酶解液中0、24和120 h(每组每个时间点30个试件).检测各组试件粘接强度、断裂模式和纳米渗漏情况.结果 未经酶解处理的各组试件粘接强度差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).酶解处理24和120 h后,MAE-DB组的粘接强度分别为(31.13 ±8.77)和(24.14±6.64) MPa,分别显著高于阴性对照组相应时间点[(25.63±6.90)和(15.22±6.57) MPa](P<0.05).酶解处理后阴性对照组的断裂多发生于混合层底部,而氯己定组和MAE-DB组断裂多发生于混合层顶部.酶解处理前各组均可见少量的银离子沉积于混合层底部.酶解处理120 h后,扫描电镜显示,氯己定组和MAE-DB组混合层底部的纳米渗漏银离子比阴性对照组少,纳米渗漏分级计数差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 MAE-DB改性牙本质粘接剂可有效提高牙本质粘接界面的耐酶解能力.%Objective To evaluate the effect of quaternary ammonium methacrylates incorporation into a dental adhesive on the resistance of enzymatic degradation of resin-dentine interfaces.Methods Thirty caries-free extracted human third molars were randomly divided into three groups (n =10):2-methacryloxylethyl dodecylmethyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) incorporated adhesive served as the experimental group,pre-treatment with chlorhexidine (CHX) served as a positive control,AdperTM Single Bond 2 served as a negative control

  6. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  7. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of two novel low-shrinkage dental resin matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yih-Dean; Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lin, Chun-Pin; Tseng, Wan-Yu

    2014-06-01

    To reduce the polymerization shrinkage of dental composite resin, we used two different ratios of toluene 2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) or 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as functional side chains of bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) to synthesize two series of new dental resin matrices. This study evaluated the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these two series of new resin matrices. Two series of new dental resin matrices with the ratios of TDI or HDI functional side chain to bis-GMA (defined as B group) being 1:4, 1:2, 1:1 and 3:2 (defined as T1/4, T1/2, T1, T3/2, and H1/4, H1/2, H1, H3/2 groups, respectively) were synthesized. Each resin sample was light cured and immersed in the culture medium for 24 hours to make the extract solution. Then, human gingival fibroblasts were cultured in different extract solutions for 72 hours. The cytotoxicities of different resins were evaluated by microtitertetrazolium (MTT) assay, the levels of cell-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by different extract solutions was measured. Resins of the T1/4 and B groups revealed significantly higher cytotoxicity than resins of other groups. However, resins of the T1 and T3/2 groups exhibited less cytotoxicity. In general, resins of the TDI-modified groups showed equal or less cytotoxicity and induced equal or lower levels of ROS than the corresponding resins of the HDI-modified and B groups. Our results showed that the TDI-modified resin matrices containing more functional side chains were less cytotoxic than the corresponding HDI-modified resin matrices. When the ratio of functional side chain to bis-GMA is increased, the stereo hindrance of resin structure is increased, more toxic resin monomers are trapped in the complicated resin structure, and thus the resin matrix reveals less cytotoxicity. The TDI-modified resin matrices exhibit higher stereo hindrance of resin structure and thus show less cytotoxicity than the corresponding HDI-modified resin matrices

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins/composites containing nano fibrillar silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ming; Gao, Yi; Liu, Yi; Liao, Yiliang; Hedin, Nyle E; Fong, Hao

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the reinforcement of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins (without conventional glass filler) and composites (with conventional glass filler) with various mass fractions of nano fibrillar silicate (FS). Three dispersion methods were studied to separate the silanized FS as nano-scaled single crystals and uniformly distribute them into dental matrices. The photo-curing behaviors of the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/FS resins were monitored in situ by RT-NIR to study the photopolymerization rate and the vinyl double bond conversion. Mechanical properties (flexural strength, elastic modulus and work-of-fracture) of the nano FS reinforced resins/composites were tested, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis of the acquired data. The morphology of nano FS and the representative fracture surfaces of its reinforced resins/composites were examined by SEM/TEM. Impregnation of small mass fractions (1% and 2.5%) of nano FS into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 mass ratio) dental resins/composites improved the mechanical properties substantially. Larger mass fraction of impregnation (7.5%), however, did not further improve the mechanical properties (one way ANOVA, P>0.05) and may even reduce the mechanical properties. The high degree of separation and uniform distribution of nano FS into dental resins/composites was a challenge. Impregnation of nano FS into dental resins/composites could result in two opposite effects: a reinforcing effect due to the highly separated and uniformly distributed nano FS single crystals, or a weakening effect due to the formation of FS agglomerates/particles. Uniform distribution of highly separated nano FS single crystals into dental resins/composites could significantly improve the mechanical properties of the resins/composites.

  9. Development of a novel resin with antimicrobial properties for dental application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Tornavoi de CASTRO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion of biofilm on dental prostheses is a prerequisite for the occurrence of oral diseases. Objective: To assess the antimicrobial activity and the mechanical properties of an acrylic resin embedded with nanostructured silver vanadate (β-AgVO3. Material and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of β-AgVO3 was studied in relation to the species Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. The halo zone of inhibition method was performed in triplicate to determine the inhibitory effect of the modified self-curing acrylic resin Dencor Lay - Clássico®. The surface hardness and compressive strength were examined. The specimens were prepared according to the percentage of β-AgVO3 (0%-control, 0.5%, 1%, 2.5%, 5%, and 10%, with a sample size of 9x2 mm for surface hardness and antimicrobial activity tests, and 8x4 mm for the compression test. The values of the microbiologic analysis were compared and evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05; the mechanical analysis used the Shapiro-Wilk's tests, Levene's test, ANOVA (one-way, and Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: The addition of 10% β-AgVO3 promoted antimicrobial activity against all strains. The antimicrobial effect was observed at a minimum concentration of 1% for P. aeruginosa, 2.5% for S. aureus, 5% for C. albicans, and 10% for S. mutans. Surface hardness and compressive strength increased significantly with the addition of 0.5% β-AgVO3 (p0.05. Conclusions: The incorporation of β-AgVO3 has the potential to promote antimicrobial activity in the acrylic resin. At reduced rates, it improves the mechanical properties, and, at higher rates, it does not promote changes in the control.

  10. Comparison of the effect of resin infiltrant, fluoride varnish, and nano-hydroxy apatite paste on surface hardness and streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziznezhad, Mahdiye; Alaghemand, Homayoon; Shahande, Zahra; Pasdar, Nilgoon; Bijani, Ali; Eslami, Abdolreza; Dastan, Zohre

    2017-03-01

    Dental caries is a major public health problem, and Streptococcus mutans is considered the main causal agent of dental caries. This study aimed to compare the effect of three re-mineralizing materials: resin infiltrant, fluoride varnish, and nano-hydroxy apatite paste on the surface hardness and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans as noninvasive treatments for initial enamel lesions. This experimental study was conducted from December 2015 through March 2016 in Babol, Iran. Artificial enamel lesions were created on 60 enamel surfaces, which were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B (30 subjects per group). Group A was divided into three subgroups (10 samples in each subgroup), including fluoride varnish group, nano-hydroxy apatite paste group (Nano P paste), and resin infiltrant group (Icon-resin). In Group A, the surface hardness of each sample was measured in three stages: First, on an intact enamel (baseline); second, after creating artificial enamel lesions; third, after application of re-mineralizing materials. In Group B, the samples were divided into five subgroups, including intact enamel, demineralized enamel, demineralized enamel treated with fluoride varnish, Nano P paste, and Icon-resin. In Group B, standard Streptococcus mutans bacteria adhesion (PTCC 1683) was examined and reported in terms of colony forming units (CFU/ml). Then, data were analyzed using ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and post hoc tests. In Group A, after treatment with re-mineralizing materials, the Icon-resin group had the highest surface hardness among the studied groups, then the Nano P paste group and fluoride varnish group, respectively (p = 0.035). In Group B, in terms of bacterial adhesion, fluoride varnish group had zero bacterial adhesion level, and then the Nano P paste group, Icon-resin group, intact enamel group, and the de-mineralized enamel group showed bacterial adhesion increasing in order (p enamel and fluoride varnish had the highest reduction level for

  11. Adhesion at the interface in cured graphite fiber epoxy-amine resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, Howard L.; Alger, Kenneth W.; Okamoto, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The effect of high temperature curing on the interface between unsized or epoxy-sized graphite fiber tow and epoxy-amine resin was examined by scanning electron microscopy of compression and freeze fractured specimens. Little or no adhesion was found between the unsized graphite fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin on curing at 165 C for 17 hrs. Epoxy-sized graphite fibers showed a similar lack of adhesion between the fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin at 3 and 17 hr cures, although good penetration of the resin into the sized fiber tows had occurred. Interfacial bond strengths for the composites could not be effectively measured by compression fracture of specimens.

  12. Dentine sealing provided by smear layer/smear plugs vs. adhesive resins/resin tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Sword, Jeremy; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Sadek, Fernanda T; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of five experimental resins, which ranged from hydrophobic to hydrophilic blends, to seal acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents (100% resin) or as solutions solvated with absolute ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). Fluid conductance was measured at 20 cm H(2)O hydrostatic pressure after sound dentine surfaces were: (i) covered with a smear layer; (ii) acid-etched; or (iii) bonded with neat or solvated resins, which were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. In general, the fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine was significantly higher than that of smear layer-covered dentine. However, when the most hydrophobic neat resins (R1 and R2) were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with ethanol, the fluid conductance was as low as that produced by smear layers. The fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine saturated with ethanol was significantly lower than for resin bonded to water-saturated dentine, except for resin R4. Application of more hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentine if the substrate is saturated with ethanol instead of with water.

  13. Antifungal activity of dental resins containing amphotericin B-conjugated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Miguel M; Paulo, Cristiana S O; Vale, Ana C; Vaz, M Fátima; Ferreira, Lino S

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the antifungal activity, biocompatibility and mechanical properties of dental resins containing silica nanoparticles functionalized with amphotericin B (SNP-DexOxAmB) against five species of Candida. Dental resin composites (Spectrum, Dentsply DeTrey, GmbH, Germany) having 2% (w/w) of SNP-DexOxAmB (SNPs of 5 and 80nm, denoted as SNP5 and SNP80) were aged for 10, 20 and 30 days at 37°C, in phosphate buffer saline buffer pH 7.4 (PBS). At different time, the antifungal activity was evaluated by a direct contact assay against 1×10(4)cells of Candida. The biocompatibility of the resins was tested against human fibroblasts, endothelial cells and red blood cells. Dental resins containing SNP5-DexOxAmB have high (1×10(4)cells killed in 5h by ∼70mg of dental resin composite containing 2% (w/w) of SNP-DexOxAmB) and durable (for at least 1 month) antifungal activity against five strains of Candida. The incorporation of the nanoparticles (NPs) had no significant change in the mechanical properties of the resin, specifically the flexural strength and modulus. Our results further show that the antifungal activity is mainly mediated by direct contact and not by leaching of NPs from the resin. Resins incorporating SNP5-DexOxAmB have longer-term antifungal activity than SNP80-DexOxAmB. The antimicrobial activity of resins with SNP5-DexOxAmB persists after 4 cycles of re-use and it is superior to the activity obtained for dental resins containing silver NPs. In addition, dental resins incorporating SNP5-DexOxAmB are non-cytotoxic against human skin fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and non-hemolytic against human red blood cells. The incorporation of SNP5-DexOxAmB in dental resins resulted in a non-cytotoxic composite with high and durable antifungal activity. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  15. [Stress profile during curing contraction of composite resin adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    1990-11-01

    The wall-to-wall curing contraction of thin composite resin layers was recorded with a tensometer. The composite resin was applied to cylindrically shaped ceramic sample holders with diameters of 3 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm. The distances of the sample holders was set at 50 microns, 100 microns, 150 microns, 200 microns and 300 microns. The shrinkage stress recordings clearly show that the shrinkage forces are governed by the distance of the sample holders and not by the volume or the configuration factor of the composite resin layers.

  16. Using a Visible Light-Polymerized Resin to Fabricate an Interim Partial Removable Dental Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Aaron; Yu, Hui Wen; Elkassaby, Heba

    2017-02-01

    An interim partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP) is any dental prosthesis that replaces some teeth in a partially dentate arch designed to enhance esthetics, stabilization, and/or function for a limited period of time, after which it is to be replaced by a definitive dental prosthesis. This article describes a technique that uses a visible light-polymerized (VLP) resin as the base material for an interim partial RDP. This technique can be easily accomplished in a dental office or laboratory and results in a predictable dental prosthesis. This technique eliminates the need for laboratory processing.

  17. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with (1)H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins.

  18. The management of defective resin composite restorations: current trends in dental school teaching in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Hayashi, M; Seow, L L; Blum, I R; Wilson, N H F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the contemporary teaching of the management of defective direct resin composite restorations in dental schools in Japan. A questionnaire relating to the teaching of the management of defective resin composite restorations was developed and e-mailed to 29 dental schools in Japan in 2010. Completed responses were received from 19 of the 29 invited schools (response rate = 66%). Eighteen schools (95%) report that they included the teaching of repair of direct defective resin composite restorations in their dental school programs. Thirteen schools reported that they included both clinical and didactic instruction on the repair of direct resin composite restorations. Fourteen schools did not teach any mechanical roughening of the exposed resin composite restoration surface before undertaking a repair. The most commonly reported treatment was acid etching with phosphoric acid (12 schools). The most commonly taught material for completing repairs was a flowable resin composite (16 schools). The teaching of repair of defective resin composite restorations is well established within many Japanese dental schools, to a greater extent than in some other regions of the world. The impact of this teaching on subsequent clinical practices in Japan should be investigated. Furthermore, it is concluded that there is a need for much stronger leadership in operative and conservative dentistry, ideally at the global level, to resolve differences in key aspects of operative procedures such as repairs.

  19. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to different treated indirect composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M Victoria; Ceballos, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-adhesive and a total-etch resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05). A significant influence of the resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-adhesive resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  20. Study on Curing Kinetics of Heat-resistant Flexible Polyamide Modified Epoxy Resin Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of numerous variables affecting the reaction rate of heat-resistant flexible modified epoxy resin adhesive, the curing kinetics of polyamide modified epoxy resin was studied. The heat-resistant flexible modified epoxy resin adhesive cured at room-temperature was prepared with epoxy resin, polysulfide rubber and organosilicone as adhesive component, polyamide as main curing agent and addition of different modified filler and the curing agent containing benzene ring structure. The curing kinetics of polyamide modified epoxy resin was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC at different heating speeds and the characteristic temperatures of the curing process were analyzed and confirmed. the kinetics parameters of activation energy was calculated using Flynn-Wall-Ozawa equation and Kissinger equation, respectively, then the kinetic model of curing reaction was built as d&alpha/dt = 4.38×107 exp (-57740/RT (1-&alpha0.93, the results show that the two-parameter model is adequate to represent the curing reaction process, the model can well describe the curing reaction process of the studied resin. The DSC curves obtained using the experimental data show a good agreement with that theoretically calculated. The research results will provide theoretical basis for the choice of manufacturing process and the optimization of processing window.

  1. The effect of elevated temperatures on the dentin adhesion of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, William W; Covey, David A; Haisch, Larry D

    2003-01-01

    Although resin composite restorations may undergo relatively extreme temperature changes in the oral cavity, little is known about the effects of temperature on their adhesion to tooth structure. This study evaluated the effect of temperature on shear bond strength to dentin of three commercial resin dentin adhesives through testing of matured specimens over the 20 degrees to 55 degrees C temperature range. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed between 20 degrees C and 55 degrees C for all the materials, and for one of the materials, a significant difference was also observed between 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C.

  2. Effect of the Acidic Dental Resin Monomer 10-methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate on Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Haejin; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-11-01

    Although 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) is frequently used as an acidic resin monomer in dental adhesives, its effect on dental pulp cells (DPCs) has been rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10-MDP on the inflammatory response and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs at minimally toxic concentrations. We found that 10-MDP caused the release of inflammatory cytokines including NO, PGE2, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 10-MDP reduced alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization nodule formation and mRNA expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers such as dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1, osterix and Runx2 in a concentration-dependent manner with low toxicity. In addition, 10-MDP induced activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target gene, haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We evaluated whether the effect of 10-MDP was related to the induction of HO-1 and found that treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the production of 10-MDP-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines and the inhibition of differentiation markers. Pre-treatment with either a GSH synthesis inhibitor or antioxidants blocked 10-MDP-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways. Taken together, the results of this study showed that minimally toxic concentrations of 10-MDP promoted an inflammatory response and suppressed odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction through MAPK and NF-κB signalling.

  3. Induced DNA damage by dental resin monomers in somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arossi, Guilherme Anziliero; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Reguly, Maria Luiza; de Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues

    2010-02-01

    The present in vivo study investigated the genotoxicity of four dental resin monomers: triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA) and bisphenol A-glycidylmethacrylate (BisGMA). The Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster was applied to analyse their genotoxicity expressed as homologous mitotic recombination, point and chromosomal mutation. SMART detects the loss of heterozygosity of marker genes expressed phenotypically on the fly's wings. This fruit fly has an extensive genetic homology to mammalians, which makes it a suitable model organism for genotoxic investigations. The present findings provide evidence that the mechanistic basis underlying the genotoxicity of UDMA and TEGDMA is related to homologous recombination and gene/chromosomal mutation. A genotoxic pattern can correspondingly be discerned for both UDMA and TEGDMA: their genotoxicity is attributed respectively to 49% and 44% of mitotic recombination, as well as 51% and 56% of mutational events, including point and chromosomal alterations. The monomer UDMA is 1.6 times more active than TEGDMA to induce mutant clones per treatment unit. BisGMA and HEMA had no statistically significant effect on total spot frequencies - suggesting no genotoxic action in the SMART assay. The clinical significance of these observations has to be interpreted for data obtained in other bioassays.

  4. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  5. SEM analysis of microstructure of adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microstructure of the adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with a self-etching primer by SEM in order to clarify the adhesive efficiencies of four self-etch type resin cement systems, Bistite II (BII), Linkmax (LM), Panavia F2.0 (PF), and ResiCem (RC) to dentin. The fluidity and inorganic filler content of these cements were also determined to examine their influences on the adhesion. A hybrid layer with 0.5-1.5 µm thickness and many resin tags could be confirmed clearly at the interface between BII cement and dentin, but was not observed distinctly for the other resin cements. It was suggested that the hybrid layer and resin tags might contribute to the high adhesive efficiency for BII. As the fluidity of cement had been adjusted to be suitable for luting in all cements, it did not significantly influence the adhesive efficiency of cement.

  6. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Resin Composite Bond Strength to Enamel and Dentin Using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, J D; Catelan, A; Rodrigues-Filho, U; Marchi, G M; Lima, Danl; Aguiar, Fhb

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of composite resin restorations in dental blocks with or without exposure to cigarette smoke. Eighty bovine dental blocks were divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the type of adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA [SBMP]; Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE [SB]; Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical Inc, Okayama, Japan [CSEB]; Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE [SBU]) and exposure to smoke (no exposure; exposure for five days/20 cigarettes per day). The adhesive systems were applied to the tooth structure, and the blocks received a composite restoration made using a matrix of perforated pasta. Data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey test (α<0.05). For enamel, there was no difference between the presence or absence of cigarette smoke (p=0.1397); however, there were differences among the adhesive systems (p<0.001). CSEB showed higher values and did not differ from SBU, but both were statistically different from SB. The SBMP showed intermediate values, while SB demonstrated lower values. For dentin, specimens subjected to cigarette smoke presented bond strength values that were lower when compared with those not exposed to smoke (p<0.001). For the groups without exposure to cigarette smoke, CSEB showed higher values, differing from SBMP. SB and SBU showed intermediary values. For the groups with exposure to cigarette smoke, SBU showed values that were higher and statistically different from SB and CSEB, which presented lower values of bond strength. SBMP demonstrated an intermediate value of bond strength. The exposure of dentin to cigarette smoke influenced the bonding strength of adhesives, but no differences were noted in enamel.

  7. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  8. Restored viability and function of dental pulp cells on poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin supplemented with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, N; Yamada, M; Paranjpe, A; Tsukimura, N; Kubo, K; Jewett, A; Ogawa, T

    2008-12-01

    This study examines cytotoxicity of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental temporary filling resin to dental pulp cells, and the potential amelioration of the toxicity with an anti-oxidant amino-acid, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Dental pulp cells extracted from rat maxillary incisors were cultured on the resin material with or without NAC incorporation, or on the polystyrene. The cultures were supplied with osteoblastic media, containing dexamethasone. Forty five percent of cells on the PMMA dental resin were necrotic at 24h after seeding. However, this percentage was reduced to 27% by incorporating NAC in the resin, which was the level equivalent to that in the culture on polystyrene. The culture on the untreated resin was found to be negative for alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity at days 5 and 10 or von Kossa mineralized nodule formation at day 20. In contrast, some areas of the cultures on NAC-incorporated resin substrates were ALP and von Kossa positive. Collagen I and dentin sialoprotein genes were barely expressed in day 7 culture on the untreated resin. However, those genes were expressed in the culture on the resin with NAC. These results suggest that the decreased cell viability and the nearly completely suppressed odontoblast-like cell phenotype of dental pulp cells cultured on PMMA dental resin can be salvaged to a biologically significant degree by the incorporation of NAC in the resin.

  9. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials. PMID:24550674

  10. Structure-property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials.

  11. Effect of antibacterial dental adhesive on multispecies biofilms formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K; Wang, S; Zhou, X; Xu, H H K; Weir, M D; Ge, Y; Li, M; Wang, S; Li, Y; Xu, X; Zheng, L; Cheng, L

    2015-04-01

    Antibacterial adhesives have favorable prospects to inhibit biofilms and secondary caries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of dental adhesives containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) on different bacteria in controlled multispecies biofilms and its regulating effect on development of biofilm for the first time. Antibacterial material was synthesized, and Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus sanguinis were chosen to form multispecies biofilms. Lactic acid assay and pH measurement were conducted to study the acid production of controlled multispecies biofilms. Anthrone method and exopolysaccharide (EPS):bacteria volume ratio measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to determine the EPS production of biofilms. The colony-forming unit counts, scanning electron microscope imaging, and dead:live volume ratio decided by confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the biomass change of controlled multispecies biofilms. The TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization imaging were used to study the proportion change in multispecies biofilms of different groups. The results showed that DMADDM-containing adhesive groups slowed the pH drop and decreased the lactic acid production noticeably, especially lactic acid production in the 5% DMADDM group, which decreased 10- to 30-fold compared with control group (P biofilms compared with control group (P biofilm had a more healthy development tendency after the regulation of DMADDM. In conclusion, the adhesives containing DMADDM had remarkable antimicrobial properties to serve as "bioactive" adhesive materials and revealed its potential value for antibiofilm and anticaries clinical applications.

  12. Effects of dental adhesives on micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prica, Dunja; Tadin, Antonija; Marović, Danijela; Katunarić, Marina; Prica, Adriana; Galić, Nada

    2013-09-01

    Dental adhesives come into direct contact with oral tissues. Due to this close and long-term contact, the materials should exhibit a high degree of biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effect of dental adhesives on human lymphocytes in vitro. Polymerized dental adhesives (Excite, Adper Single Bond 2, Prompt L-pop and OptiBond Solo Plus) were eluted in dimethyl sulfoxide for 1 hour, 24 h and 120 h (5 days). Thereafter, lymphocyte cultures were treated with different concentrations of eluates (0.2 microg/mL, 0.5 microg/mL and 5 microg/mL) obtained from each of the tested materials. Genotoxicity was evaluated by micronucleus test. The chi2-test was used on statistical analysis (p dental adhesives causes genotoxic effects in human lymphocytes. Toxic effect of these dental adhesives increases with the tested material concentration and decreases with the length of elution period.

  13. Synthesis of fluorinated dimethacrylate monomer and its application in preparing Bis-GMA free dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mei; Guo, Sen; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei

    2015-11-01

    With the aim to reduce human exposure to Bis-phenol A derivatives, a novel fluorinated dimethacrylate monomer FUDMA was synthesized and mixed with triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to prepare 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloy- loxypropyl)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA) free dental resin system. Physicochemical properties, such as double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (VS), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), and fracture energy of FUDMA/TEGDMA resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system was used as a control. The results showed that, compared with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, FUDMA/TEGDMA had advantages like higher DC, lower VS, and higher fracture energy, but had no disadvantages. Therefore, FUDMA/TEGDMA resin system had better comprehensive physicochemical properties than Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, and FUDMA had potential to be used as a substitute for Bis-GMA.

  14. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems incorporating an antibacterial monomer eugenyl methacrylate (EgMA) for endodontic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Niazi, S A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2017-05-01

    specimens and CLSM examination showed the integrity of the resin-dentin interfaces. For all three bacteria tested, the sizes of the inhibition zones produced by uncured EgMA modified adhesives were significantly greater (padhesives tested. The inclusion of EgMA endows dental adhesives with effective antibacterial effects without influencing their curing properties, bonding ability to root canal dentin, and cytotoxicity against human gingival fibroblasts, indicating the usefulness of their application in endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of adhesive resin type for bonding to zirconia using two surface pretreatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, P.; Hasankhani, A.; Matinlinna, J.P.; Mirmohammadi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This laboratory study evaluated the short-term adhesive properties of one 10-MDP-containing and two MDP-free resin composite cements, using two types of zirconia surface pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Eighteen sintered zirconia disks (Procera, Nobel Biocare) were randomly divided int

  16. Effect of adhesive resin type for bonding to zirconia using two surface pretreatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, P.; Hasankhani, A.; Matinlinna, J.P.; Mirmohammadi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This laboratory study evaluated the short-term adhesive properties of one 10-MDP-containing and two MDP-free resin composite cements, using two types of zirconia surface pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Eighteen sintered zirconia disks (Procera, Nobel Biocare) were randomly divided

  17. Influence of the Oxygen-inhibited Layer on Bonding Performance of Dental Adhesive Systems: Surface Free Energy Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of the oxygen inhibited layer (OIL) on shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin and surface free energy (SFE) characteristics of different adhesive systems. Three adhesive systems were used: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to dentin surfaces to determine SBS with and without OIL of adhesives. The SFE, dispersion force (γSd), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were measured. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test were used for analysis of SBS data, and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for the SFE and contact angle data. The SBS of SM and CS showed no significant differences between specimens with and without the OIL. However, the SBS of SU with the OIL was significantly higher than without the OIL. The SFE, γSp, and γSh of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The SFE, γSp, and γSh of SM and CS with an OIL were significantly higher than those of SU with an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL with a single-step self-etching adhesive promotes higher SBS to dentin, unlike in the other types of adhesive systems. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of dental adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive system.

  18. Photopolymerizable phosphate acrylates as comonomers in dental adhesives with or without triclosan monomer units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinte, Violeta; Buruiana, Tinca; Aldea, Horia; Matiut, Simona; Silion, Mihaela; Buruiana, Emil C

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate diacrylates (CO-DAP, TMP-DAP) based on castor oil or trimethylolpropane were synthesized and evaluated in dental adhesive formulations in comparison with 3-acryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate phosphate (AMP-P). In an attempt to promote antibacterial activity, another photopolymerizable monomer (TCS-UMA) containing 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol moiety (triclosan) was prepared and incorporated in adhesive resins. Each of these monomers had a molecular structure confirmed by spectral methods. The photopolymerization rates for monomers (0.063-0.088s(-1)) were lower than those determined in the monomer combinations (0.116-0.158s(-1)) incorporating phosphate diacrylate (11wt.%), BisGMA (33wt.%), TEGDMA (10wt.%), UDMA (10wt.%) and HEMA (15wt.%), the degree of conversion varying between 63.4 and 74.5%. The formed copolymers showed high values for water sorption (18.65-57.02μg/mm(3)) and water solubility (3.51-13.38μg/mm(3)), and the contact angle was dependent on the presence of CO-DAP (θF1: 66.67°), TMP-DAP (θF2: 55.05°) or AMP-P (θF3: 52.90°) in the photocrosslinked specimens compared to the sample without phosphate monomer (θF4: 82.14°). The scanning electron microscopy image of the dentin-resin composite interface after applying our F1 formulation (pH: 4.1) and its light-curing for 20s supports the evidence of the formation of the hybrid layer with the tooth structure created by self-etching approach, with no gaps or cracks in the adhesive. A comparative analysis of the adhesion achieved with commercial adhesive systems (Single Bond Universal, C-Bond) rather indicates similarities than differences between them. The addition of triclosan methacrylate (1wt.%) into the formulation inhibited the bacterial growth of the Streptococcus mutans and Escherichia coli in the direct contact area due to the covalently linked antibacterial monomer.

  19. Photopolymerizable phosphate acrylates as comonomers in dental adhesives with or without triclosan monomer units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melinte, Violeta [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Buruiana, Tinca, E-mail: tbur@icmpp.ro [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Aldea, Horia [Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, Iasi (Romania); Matiut, Simona [Praxis Medical Investigations, 33 Independence, 700102 Iasi (Romania); Silion, Mihaela; Buruiana, Emil C. [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate diacrylates (CO-DAP, TMP-DAP) based on castor oil or trimethylolpropane were synthesized and evaluated in dental adhesive formulations in comparison with 3-acryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate phosphate (AMP-P). In an attempt to promote antibacterial activity, another photopolymerizable monomer (TCS-UMA) containing 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol moiety (triclosan) was prepared and incorporated in adhesive resins. Each of these monomers had a molecular structure confirmed by spectral methods. The photopolymerization rates for monomers (0.063–0.088 s{sup −1}) were lower than those determined in the monomer combinations (0.116–0.158 s{sup −1}) incorporating phosphate diacrylate (11 wt.%), BisGMA (33 wt.%), TEGDMA (10 wt.%), UDMA (10 wt.%) and HEMA (15 wt.%), the degree of conversion varying between 63.4 and 74.5%. The formed copolymers showed high values for water sorption (18.65–57.02 μg/mm{sup 3}) and water solubility (3.51–13.38 μg/mm{sup 3}), and the contact angle was dependent on the presence of CO-DAP (θ{sub F1}: 66.67°), TMP-DAP (θ{sub F2}: 55.05°) or AMP-P (θ{sub F3}: 52.90°) in the photocrosslinked specimens compared to the sample without phosphate monomer (θ{sub F4}: 82.14°). The scanning electron microscopy image of the dentin–resin composite interface after applying our F1 formulation (pH: 4.1) and its light-curing for 20 s supports the evidence of the formation of the hybrid layer with the tooth structure created by self-etching approach, with no gaps or cracks in the adhesive. A comparative analysis of the adhesion achieved with commercial adhesive systems (Single Bond Universal, C-Bond) rather indicates similarities than differences between them. The addition of triclosan methacrylate (1 wt.%) into the formulation inhibited the bacterial growth of the Streptococcus mutans and Escherichia coli in the direct contact area due to the covalently linked antibacterial monomer. - Highlights: • Synthesis of

  20. Dental Adhesion to Erbium-Lased Tooth Structure: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Raquel Marianna; Trevelin, Lívia Tosi; da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro Barros; de Oliveira, Renata Ferreira; de Andrade Salgado, Daniela Miranda Richarte; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a review of the literature about adhesion on erbium laser prepared cavities, related to the specific conditions of the irradiated dentin substrate and the effects on bond strength values. Advances in adhesive restorative techniques significantly influenced modern restorative dentistry. The concept of "minimally invasive dentistry" aims to perform more conservative treatment of cavities in which the removal of sound dentin is no longer necessary. This approach, which relies on the concept of adhesion of restorative materials to the mineralized dental tissues, is considered to be a contemporary outcome in dentistry. Similarly, laser technology in restorative dentistry opened new possibilities and strategies as alternatives to conventional treatment. Considering the clinical aspects of the use of erbium lasers for caries removal, cavity preparations, and substrate conditioning, treatment with lasers can be considered to be an efficient technique with wide acceptance by patients. Computerized and manual searches were conducted for studies through 2015 that addressed the topic. According to the literature, there is no defined standard protocol concerning the information that articles must provide, making a definitive protocol very difficult to establish. Data varied from the type of adhesive and resin composite used, substrate, and parameters (power, energy density, pulse duration, irradiation time, distance, cooling system) to the bond strength test methodology used. Further studies are necessary in order to define a standard protocol with positive results and higher bond strength values when using erbium lasers. Detailed information concerning laser parameters should be implemented. Also, longitudinal clinical studies should be developed in the search for new parameters that behave favorably in the irradiated substrate.

  1. Apoptotic and necrotic influence of dental resin polymerization initiators in human gingival fibroblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuki, Kouhei; Nomura, Yuji; Bhawal, Ujjal Kumar; Sawajiri, Masahiko; Hirata, Isao; Nahara, Yukinori; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and necrotic influence of four dental resin polymerization initiators--namely benzoyl peroxide (BPO), camphorquinone (CQ), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and dimethyl-para-toluidine (DMPT)--on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. To this end, the growth inhibition of HGF cells with 1 mM BPO, CQ, and DMAEMA, and 500 microM DMPT was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8. Then, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry was used to assess propidium iodide-stained cells (distribution of cells in G0/G1, S, G2/M phases). All four dental resin polymerization initiators induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. As for the patterns of cell death (necrosis and/or apoptosis), they were analyzed using Annexin V-FITC/PI staining with flow cytometry. All four dental resin polymerization initiators most likely induced necrosis.

  2. Effect of resin infiltration on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Soley; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Atalay, Mustafa Altay; Özcan, Suat; Demirbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kansad; Percin, Duygu; Ozer, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of resin infiltration and sealant type on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions. Artificial enamel lesions were produced on the surfaces of 120 enamel specimens, which were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B (n=60 per group). Each group was further divided into four subgroups (n=15 per subgroup) according to sealant type: Group I-Demineralized enamel (control); Group II-Enamel Pro Varnish; Group III-ExciTE F; and Group IV-Icon. In Group A, hardness and surface roughness were evaluated; in Group B, bacterial adhesion was evaluated. Icon application resulted in significantly lower surface roughness and higher hardness than the other subgroups in Group A. In Group B, Enamel Pro Varnish resulted in lowest bacterial adhesion, followed by Icon. This study showed that resin infiltration of enamel lesions could arrest lesion progress.

  3. Photothermal radiometric determination of thermal diffusivity depth profiles in a dental resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez-Torres, P; Alvarado-Gil, J J [Department of Applied Physics, CINVESTAV-Unidad Merida, Antigua Carretera a Progreso Km. 6, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Mandelis, A, E-mail: jjag@mda.cinvestav.m [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2010-03-01

    The depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin is studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consists of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic layer is deposited guaranteeing full opacity of the sample. In this case, purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles can be used. Thermal profiles are obtained by heating the coating with a modulated laser beam and performing a modulation frequency scan. Before each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue LED. However due to the fact that dental resins are highly light dispersive materials, the polymerization process depends strongly on the optical absorption coefficient inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusion in the sample. It is shown that using a robust depth profilometric inverse method one can reconstruct the thermal diffusivity profile of the photopolymerized resin.

  4. Microleakage after Thermocycling of Three Self-Etch Adhesives under Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine O. Geerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate microleakage that appeared on Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement (RMGIC restorations. Sixty class V cavities (h×w×l=2mm×2mm×3mm were cut on thirty extracted third molars, which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups. All the buccal cavities were pretreated with polyacrylic acid, whereas the lingual cavities were treated with three one-step Self-Etch adhesives, respectively, Xeno III (Dentsply Detrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany, iBond exp (Heraeus Kulzer gmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany, and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE AG, Dental products Seefeld, Germany. All cavities were completely filled with RMGIC, teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles, and leakage was evaluated. Results were expressed as means ± standard deviations (SDs. Microleakage scores were analysed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs assuming an ordinal logistic link function. All results were considered to be significant at the 5% critical level (<.05. The results showed that bonding RMGIC to dentin with a Self-Etch adhesive rather than using polyacrylic acid did not influence microleakage scores (=.091, except for one tested Self-Etch adhesive, namely, Xeno III (<.0001. Nevertheless, our results did not show any significant difference between the three tested Self-Etch adhesive systems. In conclusion, the pretreatment of dentin with Self-Etch adhesive system, before RMGIC filling, seems to be an alternative to the conventional Dentin Conditioner for the clinicians as suggested by our results (thermocycling and others (microtensile tests.

  5. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang WG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Wang,1,* Xiang Sun,1,* Li Huang,2,* Yu Gao,1 Jinghao Ban,1 Lijuan Shen,1 Jihua Chen1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS, have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group] and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups] were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials

  6. Synthesis and characterization of new dimethacrylate monomer and its application in dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingwei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a dimethacrylate monomer, 1,4-Bis[2-(4-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)phenyl)-2propyl]benzene (BMPPB) was synthesized to replace 2,2-bis[4-(2'-hydroxyl-3'-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA) as one component of dental restorative materials. The structure of BMPPB and its intermediate product 1,4-bis[2-(4-(oxiranylmethoxy)phenyl)-2propyl]benzene (BOPPB) were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR), and elemental analysis. In order to evaluate the possibility of replacing Bis-GMA with BMPPB in dental resin, double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage, contact angle, water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), and flexural strength (FS) and modulus of BMPPB/tri(ethylene glycol)dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (50/50 wt) resin system and Bis-GMA/BMPPB/TEGDMA (25/25/50 wt) resin system were studied. Commercially used Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 wt) dental resin system was used as reference. The results showed that BMPPB-contained copolymer had higher DC, higher WS and SL than the copolymer that only contained Bis-GMA (p0.05). BMPPB/TEGDMA resin system had lower polymerization shrinkage, higher FS and modulus (p0.05) between Bis-GMA/BMPPB/TEGDMA resin system and Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system. Before and after water immersion, both FS and modulus of every copolymer did not change significantly (p>0.05). Therefore, BMPPB had potential to be used to replace Bis-GMA as base resin in dental restorative materials, but many studies should be undertaken further.

  7. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Cai, Qing, E-mail: caiqing@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Xiaoping [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with {sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins. - Highlights: • Iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes were prepared via nucleophilic substitution. • The cyclotriphosphazenes endowed Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins radiopacity. • The cyclotriphosphazenes caused a minor adverse effect on mechanical properties.

  8. Characterization and Application of Urea-Formaldehyde-Furfural Co-condensed Resins as Wood Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizhi Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Furfural, as an organic compound derived from biomass materials, was used to partially substitute for formaldehyde in the synthesis of UF resin. Urea-formaldehyde-furfural co-condensed (UFFR resins with different substitute ratios of furfural to formaldehyde (FR/F were prepared. The effects of the FR/F substitute ratio on the performances of UFFR resins were investigated. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR were applied to characterize the chemical structures of UFFR resins. Plywood bonded by these resins was manufactured, and its bond strength and formaldehyde emission were measured. The results showed that the substitution of furfural in place of formaldehyde could reduce the free formaldehyde content effectively at the expense of prolongation of the curing time. The spectra of MALDI-TOF and FTIR confirmed the co-condensation of urea-formaldehyde-furfural both in uncured and cured resins. Plywood prepared under optimized parameters could yield high bond strength and low formaldehyde emission, which were 0.84 MPa and 0.23 ppm, respectively. The optimized parameters were as follows: a FR/F substitute ratio of 1/3; 1% (NH42S2O8 as the curing agent; and a hot pressing temperature of 130 °C. Hence, it is feasible to substitute partially formaldehyde by furfural to prepare UFFR resins as wood adhesives for plywood.

  9. Fabrication and evaluation of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins/composites containing halloysite nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Zhao, Yong; Wu, Weidong; Xu, Tao; Fong, Hao

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the reinforcement of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins (without conventional glass filler) and the corresponding composites (with conventional glass filler) containing varied mass fractions of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs). Three dispersion methods were studied to separate the silanized halloysite as individual HNTs and to uniformly distribute them into dental matrices. Photopolymerization induced volumetric shrinkage was measured by using a mercury dilatometer. Real time near infrared spectroscopy was adopted to study the degree of vinyl double bond conversion and the photopolymerization rate. Mechanical properties of the composites were tested by a universal mechanical testing machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis of the acquired data. Morphologies of halloysite/HNTs and representative fracture surfaces of the reinforced dental resins/composites were examined by SEM and TEM. Impregnation of small mass fractions (e.g., 1% and 2.5%) of the silanized HNTs in Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins/composites improved mechanical properties significantly; however; large mass fractions (e.g., 5%) of impregnation did not further improve the mechanical properties. The impregnation of HNTs into dental resins/composites could result in two opposite effects: the reinforcing effect due to the highly separated and uniformly distributed HNTs, and the weakening effect due to the formation of HNT agglomerates/particles. Uniform distribution of a small amount of well-separated silanized HNTs into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins/composites could result in substantial improvements on mechanical properties. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  11. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  12. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (penamel and dentin surfaces (64 out of 80) (padhesion was not ideal. Contamination of the enamel or dentin surfaces

  13. [Influence of surface roughness on oral streptococcal adhesion forces to dental filling materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainan, Zheng; Li, Jiang; Lei, Zhang; Liying, Hao; Lu, Ye; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This study is to determine the common oral streptococcal adhesion forces by using composite resin and glass ionomer cement (GIC) with different degrees of surface roughness via atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. The influence of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion force is also discussed. Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain 300, 200, 100, and 10 nm surfaces of light-cured composite resin and GIC samples. Surface topography was assessed by AFM analysis. Initial colonizers (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis) and cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) were used to obtain bacteria-modified AFM probes. The force-distance curves were also measured by AFM analysis to determine the adhesion forces of bacteria on the surfaces of the composite resin and GIC. Material surface roughness was analyzed using ANOVA, and adhesion forces were subjected to nonparametric analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test). Comparison among groups was performed by Dunn's test. Material surface roughness and bacterial adhesion forces were subjected to correlation analysis. Bacterial adhesion forces increased with increasing material roughness. The adhesion forces of the four bacterial species reached the maximum on the material surface of 300 nm. The adhesion force of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.578 nN to 2.876 nN on GIC surfaces with 10 and 300 nm roughness. The adhesion forces of the four species on the surface of the composite resin were stronger than that of GIC. The initial colonizers exhibited stronger adhesion forces to different materials than the cariogenic strains. Intergroup differences were evident on the 200 and 300 nm material surfaces. The surface roughness of the material significantly affected the bacterial adhesion forces, and a significant linear correlation existed between both factors. The bacterial adhesion forces of the GIC were lower than that of the composite resin. Furthermore, surface roughness

  14. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  15. Two-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 2-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness.......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin...

  16. Micro-Raman spectroscopic studies on the adhesive-dentine interface and the degree of conversion of dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Miletic, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    A series of studies on monomer to polymer conversion in adhesive systems was undertaken using micro-Raman spectroscopy. A database of micro-Raman spectra was compiled for identification of tooth tissues and materials. The degree of conversion was assessed as a function of time and light source. Linear and two-dimensional micro- Raman characterisations of the adhesive-dentine and resin-based composite-adhesivedentine interfaces were performed. The degree of monomer to polymer co...

  17. Effect of Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... changes in the crystalline structure of dental hard tissues. Keywords: Bond strength, irradiation, self-adhesive luting cement. Effect of Irradiation on the ..... Self-adhesive resin cements: A literature review. J Adhes Dent. 2008 ...

  18. The Influence of Nano-Al2O3 Additive on the Adhesion between Epoxy Resin and Steel Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAILan-lan; LINGGuo-ping

    2004-01-01

    The influence of nano-A1203 additive on the adhesion between epoxy resin and steel substrate has been investigated. The results of tensile testing indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles in epoxy resin compared with that of the unmodified resin. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 1 wt% nano-Al2O3 added in epoxy adhesive, more than two times higher than that of the unmodified. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) revealed that a boundary layer exists between epoxy and steel substrate, energy spectrum analysis indicates there is enrichment of the nano-Al2O3 particle. Those results confirmed that the nano-Al2O3 additive was closely related to the change of interface morphology and the improvement of adhesion strength. The reason for adhesion improvement was also be discussed.

  19. The Influence of Nano-Al2O3 Additive on the Adhesion between Epoxy Resin and Steel Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Lan-lan; LING Guo-ping

    2004-01-01

    The influence of nano-Al2O3 additive on the adhesion between epoxy resin and steel substrate has been investigated. The results of tensile testing indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles in epoxy resin compared with that of the unmodified resin. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 1 wt% nano-Al2O3 added in epoxy adhesive, more than two times higher than that of the unmodified. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) revealed that a boundary layer exists between epoxy and steel substrate, energy spectrum analysis indicates there is enrichment of the nano-Al2O3 particle. Those results confirmed that the nano-Al2O3 additive was closely related to the change of interface morphology and the improvement of adhesion strength. The reason for adhesion improvement was also be discussed.

  20. Dental resin curing blue light induced oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Okada, Eizo; Okada, Yasue; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Kishimoto, Sachi; Otsuka, Takero; Nishimura, Tomoko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin curing blue light has been used in the treatment of tooth bleaching and to restore teeth with resin-based composite fillings. However, there has been little consideration of its effect on oral tissues such as dental pulp and oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dental resin curing blue light irradiation affects the dental pulp, especially the blood vessels that are known as the first target of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play an important role in vascular reactivity. We found that blue light irradiation increased the level of lipid peroxidation in isolated rat aorta blood vessels by measuring malondialdehyde. Furthermore, cell proliferative activity was decreased in a time-dependent manner and apoptosis of human aorta vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced. These results indicated that (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals were generated in VSMCs by irradiation with blue light, and they induced cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, which increased lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. In addition, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, which is a typical intracellular antioxidant, protected VSMCs against cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress. These findings suggested that antioxidants may be used to prevent oxidative stress in dental pulp by repeated and/or multiple treatments with blue light irradiation in future dental treatments.

  1. In vitro detection of DNA damage in human leukocytes induced by combined effect of resin composites and adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marovic, Danijela; Tadin, Antonija; Mladinic, Marin; Juric-Kacunic, Danijela; Galic, Nada

    2014-02-01

    To simultaneously evaluate the genotoxicity of dental composites and adhesive systems in vitro using a cytogenetic assay, with respect to the influence of composite shade. Genotoxicity assessment was carried out in human peripheral blood leukocytes using the comet assay. Three resin composite materials, two microhybrids and one nano-hybrid, in shade A1 and A3.5 were used with manufacturer-recommended four adhesive systems. Cultures were treated for 48 hours with samples after elusion for 1 hour, 1 day, 7 days or 30 days, in two different concentrations (4.16 mg/mL, 8.33 mg/mL). Kruskall-Wallis test was used for the statistical analysis (alpha = 0.05). For combinations of micro-hybrid composite (A3.5) with two self-etch adhesives (16.1 +/- 5.50 and 16.2 +/- 9.52) after exposure to samples eluted for 1 day, the incidence of primary DNA damage was significantly higher than for the corresponding negative control (14.7 +/- 2.85). Genotoxicity was also higher after treatment with samples eluted for 1 hour (15.3 +/- 4.70) and 1 day (15.3 +/- 9.10), comprised of nano-hybrid composite (A1) with self-etch adhesive in relation to the control (13.1 +/- 1.70). There was no clear trend of increased DNA damage in material combinations with darker shades of composites. Material composition and higher material concentrations showed greater influence on the genotoxicity.

  2. Influence of a hydrophobic resin coating on the bonding efficacy of three universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Sezinando, Ana; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Szesz, Anna Luiza; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Bombarda, Nara Hellen; Perdigão, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of an additional hydrophobic resin coating (HE) on the resin-dentine microtensile bond strengths (μTBS), nanoleakage (NL), and in situ degree of conversion (DC) of three universal adhesives used in the etch-and-rinse (ER) and the self-etch (SE) modes. Sixty caries-free extracted third molars were divided into 12 groups according to the combination of the factors adhesive (All-Bond Universal [ABU]; G-Bond Plus [GBP] and Scotchbond Universal [SBU]), adhesive strategy (ER and SE), and the use of HE (Heliobond; yes or no). After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h) and sectioned into resin-dentine beams (0.8mm(2)) to be tested under tension (0.5mm/min). Selected beams from each tooth were used for DC quantification and for NL evaluation. Data from each adhesive were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). ABU and GBP resulted in higher μTBS in the ER mode. The use of HE increased the μTBS of ABU and GBP only in the SE mode. Lower NL was observed for SBU and ABU in the ER mode+HE, and for GBP in the SE mode+HE. SBU and GBP showed higher DC when used in the ER mode, which was increased with HE application. The DC of ABU was similar in all conditions. The conversion of 1-step SE to 2-step SE may increase the μTBS and DC of current universal adhesives. The reduction in the NL is more dependent on the adhesive composition than on the bonding strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel etched with hydrochloric or phosphoric acid combined with conventional adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu; Wegehaupt, Florian Just; Wiegand, Annette; Eden, Ece; Attin, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin (Icon) applied after either hydrochloric (HCl) or phosphoric acid (H3PO4) on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel. Failure types were analyzed. The crowns of bovine incisors (N = 20) were sectioned mesio-distally and inciso-gingivally, then randomly assigned to 4 groups according to the following protocols to receive mandibular incisor brackets: 1) H3PO4 (37%)+TransbondXT (3M UNITEK); 2) H3PO4 (37%)+Icon+TransbondXT; 3) HCl (15%)+Icon (DMG)+TransbondXT 4) HCl (15%)+Icon+Heliobond (Ivoclar Vivadent)+TransbondXT. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and thermocycled (5000x, 5°C to 55°C). The shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types were classified according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Contact angles of adhesive resins were measured (n = 5 per adhesive) on ceramic surfaces. No significant difference in SBS was observed, implying no difference between combinations of adhesive resins and etching agents (p = 0.712; ANOVA). The Weibull distribution presented significantly lower Weibull modulus (m) of group 3 (m = 2.97) compared to other groups (m = 5.2 to 6.6) (p group 1 (45.4 ± 7.9) > group 2 (44.2 ± 10.6) > group 3 (42.6 ± 15.5). While in groups 1, 3, and 4 exclusively an ARI score of 0 (no adhesive left on tooth) was observed, in group 2, only one specimen demonstrated score 1 (less than half of adhesive left on tooth). Contact angle measurements were as follows: Icon (25.86 ± 3.81 degrees), Heliobond (31.98 ± 3.17 degrees), TransbondXT (35 ± 2.21 degrees). Icon can be safely used with the conventional adhesives tested on surfaces etched with either HCl or H3PO4.

  4. Polymerization kinetics of dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kyung; Chun, Ju-Na; Kwon, Pyung Cheol; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the chemical polymerization kinetics of commercial dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-curing resin cement. Four adhesive systems comprising simplified-step adhesives and activators (Prime&Bond NT with Self Cure Activator, Excite DSC, AQ Bond Plus, All-Bond SE) were used. The pH values of the adhesives and adhesive/activator blends were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the extent of the chemical polymerization of the adhesives when used alone or directly intermixed with a chemically-cured resin cement (C&B Cement) for 60 min (n = 5). The data derived from the DSC analysis were statistically compared using one-way ANOVA and the Games-Howell post-hoc test (α = 0.05). All the adhesives were highly acidic; when they were blended with the respective activators, their pH values increased. Neither the adhesive/activator blends nor the adhesive alone/cement mixtures showed any detectable heat generation. The Prime&Bond NT/activator showed delayed heat generation only when intermixed with the catalyst/base paste. The other three adhesive systems produced similar exotherms when intermixed with the catalyst paste alone or with the catalyst/base paste (p > 0.05), but at significantly different maximum rates of polymerization (p adhesive system/resin cement interface appears highly dependent on the adhesive system used and may be considerably delayed.

  5. Static and dynamic moduli of posterior dental resin composites under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hirayama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    Dental resin composites are commonly used as restorative materials for dental treatment. To comprehend the static and dynamic moduli of dental resin composites, we investigated the mechanical behaviors of resin composites under static and dynamic loading conditions. Four commercially available resin composites for posterior restorations were evaluated. The percentages, by weight, of inorganic fillers of resin composites were examined by the ashing technique. The static compressive tests were undertaken with a constant loading speed of 1.0 mm/min using a computer-controlled INSTRON testing machine. The dynamic properties of composites were determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique. When inorganic filler content was increased, a remarkable increase in the static modulus and dynamic modulus were observed. Furthermore, there was a strong relationship between the static modulus and dynamic modulus (r(2) = 0.947). The SHPB technique clearly demonstrated the dynamic properties of composites, and was a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of composites under dynamic compressive loading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of antibacterial methacrylate monomer derived from thiazole and its application in dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weixun; Huang, Qiting; Liu, Fang; Lin, Zhengmei; He, Jingwei

    2015-09-01

    A non-quaternary ammonium antibacterial methacrylate monomer MEMT derived from thiazole was synthesized and applied into UDMA/TEGDMA dental resin with a series of mass fraction (10 wt%, 20 wt%, and 30 wt%). Double bond conversion, polymerization shrinkage, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength and modulus, and antibacterial activity of MEMT containing resin formulations were investigated with UDMA/TEGDMA as control resin. The results showed that MEMT containing dental resin had higher double bond conversion than control resin. Compared with control polymer, all MEMT containing polymer had comparable or lower polymerization shrinkage, water sorption and solubility, except for the polymer with 30 wt% of MEMT which had higher water sorption and solubility than control polymer. The MEMT had no influence on flexural strength and modulus before water immersion, but all MEMT containing polymers had lower flexural strength and modulus than control polymer after water immersion. The MEMT could endow dental polymer with obvious antibacterial activity by immobilizing MEMT into the polymeric network.

  7. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  8. Long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants placed in a general dental practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hevinga, M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants applied in a general dental practice. METHODS: Regularly attending patients visiting the practice between July 2006 until November 2007 and who had received sealants befor

  9. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins.

    OpenAIRE

    Naeimi Akbar, H.; Moharamzadeh, K.; Wood, D. J.; van Noort, R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N = 3) and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel ...

  10. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  11. Influence of chlorhexidine on dentin adhesive interface micromorphology and nanoleakage expression of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Menezes, Murilo De Sousa; Barreto, Bruno De Castro Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on adhesive interface morphologic characterization and nanoleakage expression of resin cements bonded to human dentin pretreated with 1% chlorhexidine (CHX). Thirty-two non-carious human third molars were ground flat to expose superficial dentin. Resin composite blocks were luted to the exposed dentin using one conventional (RelyX ARC) and one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100), with/without CHX pretreatment. Four groups (n = 8) were obtained: control groups (ARC and U100); experimental groups (ARC/CHX and U100/CHX) were pretreated with 1% CHX prior to the luting process. After storage in water for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) sticks producing a minimum of 12 sticks per tooth. Four sticks from each tooth were prepared for hybrid layer evaluation by scanning electron microscope analysis. The remaining sticks were immersed in silver nitrate for 24 h for either nanoleakage evaluation along the bonded interfaces or after rupture. Nanoleakage samples were carbon coated and examined using backscattered electron mode. Well-established hybrid layers were observed in the groups luted with RelyX ARC. Nanoleakage evaluation revealed increase nanoleakage in groups treated with CHX for both resin cements. Group U100/CHX exhibited the most pronouncing nanoleakage expression along with porous zones adjacent to the CHX pretreated dentin. The results suggest a possible incompatibility between CHX and RelyX U100 that raises the concern that the use of CHX with self-adhesive cements may adversely affect resin-dentin bond.

  12. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Naeimi Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N=3 and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel shades had the highest translucency. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2 to C2 of regular body shades and also from A4 to C4 of opaque dentine shades of Esthet.X composite resin. Grey enamel shade had a significantly higher diffuse translucency compared to clear and yellow enamel shades. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2B to D2B and also in diffuse translucency from A4D to C6D shades of Filtek Supreme composite resin. It can be concluded that the color of the composite resins tested in this study had a significant effect on their translucency. Information on the translucency of different shades of composite resins can be very useful for the clinicians in achieving optimal esthetic restorative outcome.

  13. Photothermal determination of thermal diffusivity and polymerization depth profiles of polymerized dental resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    The degree and depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin have been studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consisted of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic gold layer was deposited, thus guaranteeing full opacity. Purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles were used. Thermal depth profiles were obtained by heating the gold coating with a modulated laser beam and by performing a frequency scan. Prior to each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue light emitted diode (LED). Due to the highly light dispersive nature of dental resins, the polymerization process depends strongly on optical absorption of the blue light, thereby inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusivity profile in the sample. A robust depth profilometric method for reconstructing the thermal diffusivity depth dependence on degree and depth of polymerization has been developed. The thermal diffusivity depth profile was linked to the polymerization kinetics.

  14. Zirconia enriched dental adhesive: A solution for OCT contrast enhancement. Demonstrative study by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Rominu, M.; A. MANESCU; Sinescu, C; Negrutiu, M.L.; Topala, F.; Rominu, R.O.; Bradu, Adrian; Jackson, David A; Giuliani, A.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The major aim of this study was to prove the capability of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) method in visualizing the integrity of the adhesive fillings and of the interfaces between the adhesive, tooth structures and composite resin. As zirconium dioxide was added to the composition of the adhesive layer in order to strengthen the backscattered light in the OCT investigation, for a better visualization of the interfaces, the determination of a proper zirconia concentration wa...

  15. Zirconia enriched dental adhesive: A solution for OCT contrast enhancement. Demonstrative study by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Rominu, M.; Manescu, A.; Sinescu, C.; Negrutiu, M.L.; Topala, F.; Rominu, R.O.; Bradu, Adrian; David A. Jackson; Giuliani, A.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The major aim of this study was to prove the capability of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) method in visualizing the integrity of the adhesive fillings and of the interfaces between the adhesive, tooth structures and composite resin. As zirconium dioxide was added to the composition of the adhesive layer in order to strengthen the backscattered light in the OCT investigation, for a better visualization of the interfaces, the determination of a proper zirconia concentration wa...

  16. Efecto de la peroxidasa sobre la adhesion de una resina compuesta al esmalte dental posblanqueamiento

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldion Elorza, Paula Alejandra; Viteri Lucero, Laura Nathalia; Lozano Torres, Edilberto

    2012-01-01

    Introduccion: se ha reportado que el oxigeno residual liberado por los agentes blanqueadores interfieren en la adhesion de las resinas compuestas a la estructura dental, razon por la cual se tiene como objetivo...

  17. Surface Treatments and Functional Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement and Bacterial Adhesion Reduction in Dental Implantology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Rivolo, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    ... to improve the performance of dental implants. Improving or accelerating the osseointegration process is usually the main goal of these surface processes, but the improvement of biocompatibility and the prevention of bacterial adhesion are also...

  18. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    ...) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine...

  19. Poly(acrylic acid) grafted montmorillonite as novel fillers for dental adhesives: synthesis, characterization and properties of the adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhi, Laleh; Atai, Mohammad; Nodehi, Azizollah; Imani, Mohammad; Ghaemi, Azadeh; Khosravi, Kazem

    2012-04-01

    This work investigates the graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto nanoclay platelets to be utilized as reinforcing fillers in an experimental dental adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of the adhesive and its shear bond strength to dentin are studied. The effect of the modification on the stability of the nanoparticle dispersion in the dilute adhesive is also investigated. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted onto the pristine Na-MMT nanoclay (Cloisite(®) Na(+)) through the free radical polymerization of acylic acid in an aqueous media. The resulting PAA-g-nanoclay was characterized using FTIR, TGA and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The modified nanoclays were added to an experimental dental adhesive in different concentrations and the morphology of the nanoclay layers in the photocured adhesive matrix was studied using TEM and XRD. Shear bond strength of the adhesives containing different filler contents was tested on the human premolar teeth. The stability of nanoclay dispersion in the dilute adhesive was also studied using a separation analyzer. The results were then statistically analyzed and compared. The results confirmed the grafting reaction and revealed a partially exfoliated structure for the PAA-g-nanoclay. Incorporation of 0.2 wt.% of the modified nanoclay into the experimental adhesive provided higher shear bond strength. The dispersion stability of the modified nanoparticles in the dilute adhesive was also enhanced more than 25 times. Incorporation of the modified particles as reinforcing fillers into the adhesive resulted in higher mechanical properties. The nanofiller containing bonding agent also showed higher shear bond strength due to the probable interaction of the carboxylic acid functional groups on the surface of the modified particles with hydroxyapatite of dentin. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  1. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  2. Effect of thermal cycling on whisker-reinforced dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hockin H K; Eichmiller, Frederick C; Smith, Douglas T; Schumacher, Gary E; Giuseppetti, Anthony A; Antonucci, Joseph M

    2002-09-01

    The mechanical properties of dental resin composites need to be improved in order to extend their use to high stress-bearing applications such as crown and bridge restorations. Recent studies used single crystal ceramic whiskers to reinforce dental composites. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal cycling on whisker-reinforced composites. It was hypothesized that the whisker composites would not show a reduction in mechanical properties or the breakdown of whisker-resin interface after thermal cycling. Silicon carbide whiskers were mixed with silica particles, thermally fused, then silanized and incorporated into resin to make flexural specimens. The filler mass fraction ranged from 0% to 70%. The specimens were thermal cycled in 5 degrees C and 60 degrees C water baths, and then fractured in three-point bending to measure strength. Nano-indentation was used to measure modulus and hardness. No significant loss in composite strength, modulus and hardness was found after 10(5) thermal cycles (family confidence coefficient=0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison test). The strength of whisker composite increased with filler level up to 60%, then plateaued when filler level was further increased to 70%; the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The strength and modulus of whisker composite at 70% filler level were significantly higher than the non-whisker controls both before and after thermal cycling. SEM revealed no separation at the whisker-matrix interfaces, and observed resin remnants on the pulled-out whiskers, indicating strong whisker-resin bonding even after 10(5) thermal cycles. In conclusion, novel dental resin composites containing silica-fused whiskers possessed superior strength and modulus compared to non-whisker composites both before and after thermal cycling. The whisker-resin bonding appeared to be resistant to thermal cycling in water, so that no loss in composite strength or stiffness occurred after

  3. Single color attribute index for shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Commercial dental resin composites under the same shade designations show color discrepancies by brand. Moreover, three Commission Internationale de l′Eclairage (CIE color coordinates show significant variations by measurement method; therefore, direct comparisons of the color coordinates based on different methods are meaningless. This study aimed to assess a hypothesis that a new color attribute index (CAI, which could reduce the color coordinate variations by measurement method, was applicable for the shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites. The Hypothesis: CAI is applicable in the shade conformity judgment of commercial dental resin composites. Using the CIE color coordinates of shade guide tabs and resin composites, combined color indices such as Wa = CIE aFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 and Wb = CIE bFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 were defined, in which DEFNx01 ab was the color difference with a standard white tile. Ratio of Wa/Wb to that of an arbitrary reference shade (A2 in the same brand and measurement was defined as the CAI. The CAI values were significantly different by the shade designation and showed a logical trend by the shade designation number. The CAI of commercial resin composites and the keyed shade guide tabs showed overlaps. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The CAI might be used to judge the shade conformity of resin composites using the values based on different measurement methods. The application of the CAI, instead of conventional three-color coordinates, could efficiently simplify the shade conformity judgment of commercial resin composites. Although the hypothesis of the present study was partially confirmed, further studies for the practical application of this index are highly recommended.

  4. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  5. Preservation of resin-dentin interfaces treated with benzalkonium chloride adhesive blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Ortiz, Pilar A; Pashley, David H

    2015-04-01

    Reducing collagen degradation within hybrid layers may contribute to the preservation of adhesive interfaces. This study evaluated the stability of resin-dentin interfaces treated with benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-modified adhesive blends and assessed collagen degradation in dentin matrices treated with BAC. The etch-and-rinse adhesive, Adper Single Bond Plus, modified with 0.5% and 1.0% BAC, was evaluated for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) after 24 h and 1 yr. Thirty completely demineralized dentin beams from human molars were dipped for 60 s in deionized water (DW; control), or in 0.5% or 1.0% BAC, and then incubated in simulated body fluid (SBF). Collagen degradation was assessed by quantification of the dry mass loss and the amount of hydroxyproline (HYP) released from hydrolyzed specimens after 1 or 4 wk. Although all groups demonstrated a significant increase in NL after 1 yr, adhesive modified with 0.5% BAC showed stable bond strength after 1 yr (9% decrease) relative to the control (44% decrease). Significantly less HYP release and dry mass loss were observed for both 0.5% and 1.0% BAC relative to the control. This in vitro study demonstrates that BAC contributes to the preservation of resin-dentin bonds for up to 1 yr by reducing collagen degradation.

  6. Interface structure and strength in model dental resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard

    Most composites for dental restoration are based on a methacrylate polymer matrix and a ceramic filler, often silanized silica or silicate glasses. A problem with these composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which causes the filling to loosen from the tooth under formation of a crack....... This will facilitate discoloration by colorants from e.g. coffee and red wine entering the crack, or even worse lead to secondary caries and infection of dental pulp due to bacteria. The aim of this study was to develop a low shrinkage dental composite based on an expandable metastable zirconia filler A metastable...... the polymer shrinkage and reduces the overall shrinkage of the composite. In this thesis the zirconia filler is characterized and tested for the potential as a filler for use in dental composites. The zirconia powder is composed of highly agglomerated particles of nanosized crystals. The average particle size...

  7. ARE QUATERNARY AMMONIUM ANTIBACTERIALS SUITABLE FOR DENTAL COMPOSITE RESINS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman MOHAMMADZADEH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to answer the following question: are quaternary ammonium antibacterials suitable for dental materials? Reviewing the literature on quaternary ammonium compounds evidenced that this type of compounds is soluble in water. Our own findings also showed that they are well soluble in water and that their application as dental composites requires to check their solubility level in water.

  8. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubroeck, David, E-mail: David.Schaubroeck@elis.ugent.be [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Mader, Lothar [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Dubruel, Peter [Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4 bis, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanfleteren, Jan [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Surface modifications of epoxy resins with polydopamine and grafted polyamines can significantly increase the adhesion toward electroless deposited copper. • A clear characterization of the copper/epoxy interphase is provided by SEM analyses of cross sections. • Tailored conditions such as etching time (roughness) and electroless deposition temperature are needed to increase the adhesion of the modified surfaces. - Abstract: In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  9. Ester-free Thiol-ene Dental Restoratives – Part A: Resin Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Claudino, Mauro; Flores, Alexander; Shah, Parag K.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To detail the development of ester-free thiol-ene dental resins with enhanced mechanical performance, limited potential for water uptake/leachables/degradation and low polymerization shrinkage stress. Methods Thiol-terminated oligomers were prepared via a thiol-Michael reaction and a bulky tetra-allyl monomer containing urethane linkages was synthesized. The experimental oligomers and/or monomers were photopolymerized using visible light activation. Several thiol-ene formulations were investigated and their performance ranked by comparisons of the thermo-mechanical properties, polymerization shrinkage stress, water sorption/solubility, and reactivity with respect to a control comprising a conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resin. Results The ester-free thiol-ene formulations had significantly lower viscosities, water sorption and solubility than the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. Depending on the resin, the limiting functional conversions were equivalent to or greater than that of BisGMA/TEGDMA. At comparable conversions, lower shrinkage stress values were achieved by the thiol-ene systems. The polymerization shrinkage stress was dramatically reduced when the tetra-allyl monomer was used as the ene in ester-free thiol-ene mixtures. Although exhibiting lower Young’s modulus, flexural strength, and glass transition temperatures, the toughness values associated with thiol-ene resins were greater than that of the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. In addition, the thiol-ene polymerization resulted in highly uniform polymer networks as indicated by the narrow tan delta peak widths. Significance Employing the developed thiol-ene resins in dental composites will reduce shrinkage stress and moisture absorption and form tougher materials. Furthermore, their low viscosities are expected to enable higher loadings of functionalized micro/nano-scale filler particles relevant for practical dental systems. PMID:26360013

  10. The effect of subject age on the microtensile bond strengths of a resin and a resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, William W; Tay, Franklin R; Looney, Stephen W; Ito, Shuichi; Haisch, Larry D; Pashley, David H

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the microtensile bond strengths of an etch-and-rinse resin adhesive to dentin and enamel and a resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive to dentin were determined on teeth known to have originated from subjects over 60 years of age. The same tests were repeated on teeth originating from young subjects. The resin adhesive was Prime & Bond NT (Caulk/Dentsply), while the resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive was Fuji Bond LC (GC America). Both were paired with the same hybrid resin composite, TPH3 (Caulk/Dentsply). Testing was performed after 48 hours using a "non-trimming" microtensile test at a crosshead speed of 0.6 mm/minute. No significant differences were observed between the young and aged teeth for any comparison (p > 0.05). SEM evaluation of the etched dentinal surfaces demonstrated less depth of decalcification in the intertubular areas of aged dentin, but there was no observable difference within the tubules of young and aged dentin.

  11. Influence of ozone and paracetic acid disinfection on adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of paracetic acid (PAA) and ozone disinfection on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of silicone-based resilient liners to acrylic resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred and twenty dumbbell shaped heat-polymerized acrylic resins were prepared. From the mid segment of the specimens, 3 mm of acrylic were grinded off and separated parts were reattached by resilient liners. The specimens were divided into 2 control (control1, control7) and 4 test groups of PAA and ozone disinfection (PAA1, PAA7, ozone1 and ozone7; n=10). While control groups were immersed in distilled water for 10 min (control1) and 7 days (control7), test groups were subjected to PAA (16 g/L) or ozone rich water (4 mg/L) for 1 cycle (10 min for PAA and 60 min for ozone) per day for 7 days prior to tensile tests. Measurements of the TBS were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS Adhesive strength of Mollosil decreased significantly by application of ozone disinfection. PAA disinfection had no negative effect on the TBS values of Mollosil and Molloplast B to acrylic resin. Single application of ozone disinfection did not have any negative effect on TBS values of Molloplast B, but prolonged exposure to ozone decreased its adhesive strength. CONCLUSION The adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic was not adversely affected by PAA disinfection. Immersion in ozonated water significantly decreased TBS of Mollosil. Prolonged exposure to ozone negatively affects adhesion of Molloplast B to denture base materials. PMID:27555898

  12. Anti-Caries Effects of Dental Adhesives Containing Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylates with Different Chain Lengths

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Han; Bolei Li; Xuedong Zhou; Yang Ge; Suping Wang; Mingyun Li; Biao Ren; Haohao Wang; Keke Zhang; Hockin H. K. Xu; Xian Peng; Mingye Feng; Michael D. Weir; Yu Chen; Lei Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of dental adhesives containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) with different alkyl chain lengths (CL) on ecological caries prevention in vitro. Five QAMs were synthesized with a CL = 3, 6, 9, 12, and 16 and incorporated into adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength and surface charge density were used to measure the physical properties of the adhesives. The proportion change in three-species biofilms consisting of Streptococ...

  13. Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique

    OpenAIRE

    Turp, Volkan; Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step self-etc...

  14. Effect of organoclay incorporation on dental resin morphology;Efeito da incorporacao de argila oganofilica na morfologia de resina adontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Nadja M.S.; Reis, Romulo P.B. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Leite, Itamara F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais; Morais, Crislene R.S.; Silva, Suedina M.L., E-mail: suedina@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to incorporate nanosilicates in commercial dental resins in order to prepare dental nanocomposites competitive as commercial nanoparticulates dental resins. Thus, a silicate, Cloisite 20A (C20A), was incorporated in a microhybrid dental resin (Z100) and morphological properties of the nanocomposites evaluated as a function of the incorporation method and the amount of filler employed. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results evidence that nanocomposites have been obtained and according to SEM results, the morphology of microhybrid resin was modified when C20A nanoparticulate was incorporated improve the size distribution and reduce the agglomeration of the particles. (author)

  15. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  16. The effectiveness of potent dental adhesives on the viability of LPS challenged human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Angelia D; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2014-01-01

    Dental adhesives are necessary for the retention of specific dental restorations utilized to repair the anatomy of the tooth after dental decay is removed. Adhesives come into contact with healthy and diseased periodontal tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram negative bacterial pathogen, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) is an endotoxin found in gingival connective tissues of patients who suffer from periodontal disease. The presence of the endotoxin causes inflammation. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of potent dental adhesives when human gingival fibroblasts are challenged with LPS-PG. The fibroblasts were exposed to the dental adhesives polymethly methacrylate (PMMA), OptiBond®, and Prime & Bond® which were purchased from Patterson Dental, a national dental materials supplier. The human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1, ATCC® CRL-2014™) were purchased from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). The porphyromonas gingival lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) was purchased from Fisher Scientific (Pittsburg, PA). No significant differences in metabolic behavior was detected among the groups (padhesives and LPS-PG at 48 hour intervals (p<0.003). No significant changes were noted in cellular morphology at any phases, and all cells demonstrated typical fibroblast spindle shape.

  17. Effect of Dental Chair Light on Enamel Bonding of Orthodontic Brackets Using Light Cure Based Adhesive System: An In-Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Anil; Shyagali, Tarulatha; Kohli, Sarvraj; Joshi, Rishi; Gupta, Abhishek; Tiwari, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the Dental chair light on the bond strength of light cured composite resin. Materials and Methods: Sixty therapeutically extracted human premolar teeth were randomly allocated to two groups of 30 specimens each. In both groups light cured composite resin (Transbond XT) and MBT premolar metal brackets (3M Unitek) was used to bond brackets. In group I and II light curing was done using Light-emitting diode light curing units without and with the dental chair light respectively. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested for shear bond strength and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores. Data was subjected to Mann Whitney U statistical test. Results: Results indicated that there was significantly higher shear bond strength (7.71 ± 1.90) for the Group II (composite cured with LED and dental chair light) compared with Group I (composite cured with LED LCU only) (5.74 ± 1.13).the obtained difference was statistically significant. There was no statistical significant difference between ARI scores in between the groups. Conclusions: light cure bonding with dental chair light switched on will produce greater bond strength than the conventional bonding. However, the ARI score were similar to both the groups. It is advised that the inexperienced orthodontist should always switch off the dental chair light while bonding for enough working time during the bracket placement. PMID:28077886

  18. The effect of resin shades on microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tae-Sung; Kang, Ho-Seung; Kim, Sung-Ki; Kim, Shin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2009-07-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the effect of resin shades on the degree of the polymerization. To this end, response variables affected by the degree of polymerization were examined in this study - namely, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change. Two commercial composite resins of four different shades were employed in this study: shades A3, A3.5, B3, and C3 of Z250 (Z2) and shades A3, A3.5, B3, and B4 of Solitaire 2 (S2). After light curing, the reflectance/absorbance, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of the specimens were measured. On reflectance and absorbance, Z2 and S2 showed similar distribution curves regardless of the resin shade, with shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2 exhibiting the lowest/highest distributions. Similarly for attenuation coefficient and microhardness, the lowest/highest values were exhibited by shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2. On polymerization shrinkage, no statistically significant differences were observed among the different shades of Z2. Similarly for color change, Z2 specimens exhibited only a slight (DeltaE*=0.5-0.9) color change after immersion in distilled water for 10 days, except for shades A3 and A3.5. Taken together, results of the present study suggested that the degree of polymerization of the tested composite resins was minimally affected by resin shade.

  19. Improving a self-curing dental resin by eliminating oxygen, hydroquinone and water from its curing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keh, En-Sheng; Hayakawa, Iwao; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Akihiko; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2002-12-01

    Self-curing dental resins are always manipulated in the presence of curing inhibitory factors such as oxygen, hydroquinone, water and another contaminants such as saliva and blood. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of eliminating these curing inhibitory factors on resin properties. Several clinically relevant characteristics of an experimental resin cured in the absence of inhibitory factors (purified group) were determined and compared with the resin cured conventionally (control group). The purified group showed a significantly shorter induction period and higher reaction exotherm. It also showed significantly higher tensile strength and lower strain to failure. With regard to the amount of residual monomer, fracture toughness and fatigue strength the improvements were not significant. These findings suggest that the polymerization outcomes and mechanical properties of the purified group resin can be improved in general. Dental clinicians should pay attention to the storage and curing environments while manipulating the self-curing resin.

  20. Factors involved in mechanical fatigue degradation of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, U; Belli, R; Ferracane, J L

    2013-07-01

    The design of clinical trials allows for limited insights into the fatigue processes occurring in resin composites and the factors involved therein. In vitro studies, in contrast, can fundamentally narrow study interests to focus on particular degradation mechanisms and, to date, represent the major contributors to the state of knowledge on the subject. These studies show that microstructural features are important in determining strength and fracture toughness, whereas fatigue resistance is mainly related to the susceptibility of the matrix and the filler/matrix interface to mechanical and chemical degradation. In this review, we focus on fracture mechanisms occurring during fatigue, on the methods used to assess them, and on additional phenomena involved in the degradation of initial mechanical properties of resin composites.

  1. Aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene cured epoxy resins and the composites, laminates, adhesives and structures thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes such as hexakis (4-aminophenoxy) cyclotriphosphazene and tris (4-aminophenoxy)-tris phenoxy cyclotriphosphazene are used as curing agents for epoxy resins. These 1,2-epoxy resins are selected from di- or polyepoxide containing organic moieties of the formula (CH2-CHO-CH2) m-W-R-W- (CH2CH-CH2O)m where R is diphenyl dimethylmethane, diphenylmethane; W is a nitrogen or oxygen atom; and m is 1 when W is oxygen and 2 when W is nitrogen. The resins are cured thermally in stages at between about 110 to 135 C for between about 1 and 10 min, then at between about 175 to 185 C for between 0.5 to 10 hr and post cured at between about 215 and 235 C for between 0.1 and 2 hr. These resins are useful for making fire resistant elevated temperature stable composites, laminates, molded parts, and adhesives and structures, usually for aircraft secondary structures and for spacecraft construction.

  2. N-Acetyl cysteine restores viability and function of rat odontoblast-like cells impaired by polymethylmethacrylate dental resin extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kojima, Norinaga; Att, Wael; Hori, Norio; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that dental-resin materials directly loaded on a prepared tooth adversely affect dental pulp tissue by releasing the resin chemicals through dentinal tubes. This study determined whether self-curing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin extract adversely affected the viability and function of odontoblast-like cells and whether the cytotoxicity of this resin, if any, could be eliminated by N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant amino acid derivative. Odontoblast-like cells isolated from rat maxillary incisor dental pulp tissue were exposed to a PMMA resin extract with or without N-acetyl cysteine for 1 h and then cultured in osteoblastic media. The percentage of viable cells 24 h after seeding was 20% in cells exposed to the resin extract without N-acetyl cysteine, whereas 45% of cells were viable after exposure to the N-acetyl cysteine-supplemented extract. The cells that had been exposed to the extract showed a strong tendency for apoptosis associated with the increased reactive oxygen species production and decreased intracellular glutathione level, which was improved by the addition of N-acetyl cysteine. N-Acetyl cysteine supplementation almost completely restored the significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization by the resin extract. These results conclusively demonstrated that exposure of odontoblast-like cells to the resin extract impaired the cell viability and function and, more intriguingly, N-acetyl cysteine supplementation to the extract significantly prevented these toxic effects.

  3. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  4. Effect of laser preparation on adhesion of a self-adhesive flowable composite resin to primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Razmjoei, Faranak; Kianimanesh, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adhesion of a self-adhering flowable composite resin to primary tooth enamel and dentin after silicon carbide paper (SiC) and laser pretreatment. Adhesive properties were evaluated as shear bond strength (SBS) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) characteristics. A total 120 primary canine teeth were randomly divided into two groups to study enamel and dentin. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface preparation (SiC or Er:YAG laser) of enamel or dentin. Three methods were used to build cylinders of restoration on tooth surface: OptiBond All-In-One + Premise Flowable composite, OptiBond All-In-One + Vertise Flow and Vertise flow. After restoration, samples were tested for SBS and failure mode. Twenty eight samples were examined by SEM. The results of the study showed SBS of Vertise Flow was lower than others in enamel and dentin samples pretreated with SiC and in dentin samples pretreated with laser (P < 0.001). Compared to SiC pretreatment, laser pretreatment led to a significantly higher SBS with Vertise Flow on enamel (P < 0.001). Vertise Flow associated with the adhesive led to a higher SBS in enamel and dentin compared to Vertise Flow alone. Adhesive and mixed failure modes were observed more frequently in Vertise Flow groups. SEM images showed that Vertise Flow led to more irregularities on enamel and more open dentinal tubules after laser ablation compared SiC pretreatment.

  5. Predictive algorithms for determination of reflectance data from quantity of pigments within experimental dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinea, Razvan; Pecho, Oscar; Herrera, Luis Javier; Ionescu, Ana Maria; Cardona, Juan de la Cruz; Sanchez, María Purificación; Paravina, Rade D; Perez, María del Mar

    2015-01-01

    Being able to estimate (predict) the final spectrum of reflectance of a biomaterial, especially when the final color and appearance are fundamental for their clinical success (as is the case of dental resin composites), could be a very useful tool for the industrial development of these type of materials. The main objective of this study was the development of predictive models which enable the determination of the reflectance spectrum of experimental dental resin composites based on type and quantity of pigments used in their chemical formulation. 49 types of experimental dental resin composites were formulated as a mixture of organic matrix, inorganic filler, photo activator and other components in minor quantities (accelerator, inhibitor, fluorescent agent and 4 types of pigments). Spectral reflectance of all samples were measured, before and after artificial chromatic aging, using a spectroradiometer. A Multiple Nonlinear Regression Model (MNLR) was used to predict the values of the Reflectance Factors values in the visible range (380 nm-780 nm), before and after aging, from % Pigment (%P1, %P2, %P3 and %P4) within the formulation. The average value of the prediction error of the model was 3.46% (SD: 1.82) across all wavelengths for samples before aging and 3.54% (SD: 1.17) for samples after aging. The differences found between the predicted and measured values of the chromatic coordinates are smaller than the acceptability threshold and, in some cases, are even below the perceptibility threshold. Within the framework of this pilot study, the nonlinear predictive models developed allow the prediction, with a high degree of accuracy, of the reflectance spectrum of the experimental dental resin composites.

  6. [In vitro study of marginal microleakage of Clearfil S3 BOND adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the microleakage of standard box-type cavity filled with Clearfil S3 BOND self-etch adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin. 40 permanent molars were randomly divided into experimental and control groups, 20 of each . The box-type cavities, 3mm in length and width and 2mm in depth, were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction on buccal surface of forty permanent extracted teeth. According to grouping, the experimental group was filled with Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin, and the control group was filled with 3M Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin. After thermal circulation(2000 times, 5 degrees centigrade-55 degrees centigrade) and soaked for 24 hours in 2% methyl blue solution, the samples were cut through the midline of the restoration and the leakage depth was measured with vernier caliper. The microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups were analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package for Mann-Whitney U test and independent-samples t test. Microleakage was observed in both groups. But the microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups had no significant difference (P>0.05). The marginal sealibility of Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin is as good as Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin,it may be an ideal clinical restoration material.

  7. Teaching of direct posterior resin composite restorations in UK dental therapy training programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2010-05-08

    With the numbers of dental therapists involved in the delivery of dental care within the UK on the increase, and the trend towards the use of direct resin composites (composites) for the restoration of posterior teeth, this study was undertaken to describe the teaching of posterior composites in dental therapy training programmes in the UK. A secondary aim was to identify differences in techniques for posterior composites taught within these dental therapy training programmes. In 2008/9, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was distributed by email to 13 centres with dental therapy training programmes in the UK. This questionnaire sought information relating to the teaching of direct posterior composites to dental therapy students, including the amounts of preclinical and clinical teaching in respect of deciduous and permanent teeth, numbers of restorations placed, contraindications to placement, and details in respect of operative techniques. Ten completed responses were received (response rate = 77%). In ten programmes, student dental therapists received clinical training in the placement of composite restorations in the occlusal surfaces of premolar and permanent molar teeth, and nine programmes included such training for two and three surface occlusoproximal restorations. The mean proportions of posterior restorations placed clinically by the trainee dental therapists in permanent teeth using dental amalgam and composite were 52% and 46% respectively (range: amalgam = 20-95%; composite = 5-70%). With the exception of one programme, the teaching of posterior composites is a well established element of dental therapy training. Some variations were noted in the teaching of clinical techniques between respondent training centres. It is suggested that to ensure harmony in approaches to treatments provided by graduated therapists that training centres look to relevant consensus documents, such as those of the British Association

  8. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  9. Cytotoxic effects of bulk fill composite resins on human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişman, Reyhan; Aksoy, Ayça; Yalçın, Muhammet; Karaöz, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Five bulk fill composite resins, including SDR, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEC), X-trafil (XTF), Sonic Fill (SF), Filtek Bulk Fill (FBF), were used in this study. Human dental pulp stem cells were cultured in 12-well culture dishes (3 × 104 cells per cm(2)) and stored in an incubator at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 1 day. On days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of co-culture, viable cells were measured using a WST-1 assay. Lower cell viability was observed with XTF and SDR bulk fill composite resins compared to the control group during the WST-1 assay. Although bulk fill composite resins provide advantages in practical applications, they are limited by their cytotoxic properties. (J Oral Sci 58, 299-305, 2016).

  10. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p 3.3). PMID:27034897

  11. Fracture and Tribological Evaluation of Dental Composite Resins Containing Pre-polymerized Particle Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The fracture and tribological evaluation of dental composite resin containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wereinvestigated. Composite resins, e.g. metafil, silux plus, heliomolar and palfique estelite were selected as specimensin order to evaluate the effects of pre-polymerized particle filler on the fracture and wear characteristics of compositeresins. In the wear tests, a ball-on-flat wear test method was used. The friction coefficient of metafil was quite high.The wear resistance of silux plus and palfique estelite was better than that of metafil and heliomolar underthe sameexperimental condition. The main wear mechanism of composite resins containing pre-polymerized particle fillers wasan abrasive wear by brittle fracture of pre-polymerized particles and by debonding of fillers and matrix.

  12. Effect of adhesive resin application on the progression of cavitated and non-cavitated incipient carious lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kalla, Ibrahim H; Saudi, Hussein I A; El-Agamy, Rizk A I

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the penetration of two different adhesive resin systems into cavitated and non-cavitated artificial carious lesions and the behavior of treated carious lesions under further acid attack. Artificial caries-like lesions were created on the proximal surface of 100 human primary molars by a demineralizing gel. The teeth were assigned to three groups according to the adhesive resin used. Group 1 (G1) was for Single Bond adhesive resin, Group 2 (G2) for Xeno V adhesive resin, and Group 3 (G3) was without any adhesive application. Each group was randomly and equally subdivided into subgroups a and b. In subgroup a, the teeth were kept with intact artificial caries-like lesion surfaces while in the subgroup b, a minute cavity was made at the center of artificial caries-like lesions using a sharp explorer. Each tooth was sectioned occluso-cervically into two halves through the center of the lesion; the sectioned surface was polished and examined under a reflected light microscope for estimating the depth of the carious lesion or penetration of the adhesive resin. All tooth halves were coated at the sectioned surface with two layers of acid resistant nail varnish and returned again to the demineralizing solution to assess the progression or arrest of the carious lesion after the second acid attack. The penetration depth of adhesive resins did not differ significantly between subgroups (P>0.05). After the second acid attack, the infiltrated carious lesions showed no lesion progression while the non-infiltrated lesions showed advanced caries progression.

  13. Bacterial viability and physical properties of antibacterially modified experimental dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Beikler, Thomas; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the antibacterial effect and the effect on the material properties of a novel delivery system with Irgasan as active agent and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan when added to experimental dental resin composites. A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly formulated experimental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard (ST). Material A contained the delivery system providing 4 % (m/m) Irgasan, material B contained 4 % (m/m) methacrylated Irgasan and material C 8 % (m/m) methacrylated Irgasan. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), water sorption (WS), solubility (SL), surface roughness Ra, polymerization shrinkage, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS and its apolar γS (LW), polar γS (AB), Lewis acid γS (+)and base γS (-) term as well as bacterial viability were determined. Significance was p Dental resin composites with small quantities of a novel antibacterially doped delivery system or with an antibacterial monomer provided acceptable physical properties and good antibacterial effectiveness. The sorption material being part of the delivery system can be used as a vehicle for any other active agent.

  14. Novel Ag nanocrystals based dental resin composites with enhanced mechanical and antibacterial properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengwei Liu; Ruili Wang; Yuyuan Shi; Xiaoze Jiang; Bin Sun; Meifang Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of trace addition of oleic acid coated Ag nanocrystals (Ag NCs) on mechanical and antibacterial properties of dental resin composites. Composites (70 wt%of silica loading) with 25 ppm, 50 ppm, 75 ppm and 100 ppm (wt) Ag NCs were prepared and the composite without Ag NCs served as a control. The experimental results showed that the addition of Ag NCs significantly improved the strength and modulus of the resin composite without compromising the shade. For the composite with 50 ppm Ag NCs, flexural strength (140.3 MPa), modulus (13.2 GPa) and compressive strength (347.2 MPa) were increased by 4.1%, 22.2%, 13.3%, respectively, compared with the control. The antibacterial test demonstrated that trace Ag NCs provided the resin composites with an antibacterial effect. Such strong and antibacterial dental resin composites might be advantageous to prevent secondary caries and be potential for future clinical applications.

  15. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to various dental materials in a laminar flow chamber system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Hahnel, Sebastian; Gröger, Gerhard; Mühlfriedel, Bastian; Bürgers, Ralf; Handel, Gerhard

    2008-07-01

    Newly developed dental materials have to be tested for their susceptibility to adhere bacteria causing caries and periodontitis. The objective of this study was to establish an in vitro laminar flow chamber assay for dental material evaluation with regard to the adhesion of oral bacteria. Test specimens of commonly used dental materials (ceramic (five brands of ceramics, n = 15/brand), composite (eight brands of composites, n = 15/brand), and alloy (two brands of alloys, n = 15/brand) specimens) were inserted in a laminar flow chamber system and rinsed with artificial saliva (2 h) and Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10,449 suspension (4 h) successively. The amount of adhered bacteria was quantified using a Resazurin reduction assay (Alamar Blue). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha = 0.05). Regarding adhesion of Streptococcus mutans, significant differences between the various material classes were found. Highest fluorescence values (ranging from 973 to 3145), correlating with high bacterial adhesion, were found on composite samples, and lowest values (173-272) were found on the alloys. Ceramic specimens showed an intermediate adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (fluorescence values from 532 to 1326). Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 adhered differently to the various classes of dental materials. The established laminar flow chamber device provides a suitable method for evaluating the adhesion of oral bacteria to dental material surfaces. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Clinical dental adhesive application: the influence on composite-enamel interface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Ruxandra; Popescu, Mihai Raul; Suciu, Mircea; Rauten, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the adhesion phenomenon is crucial in achieving and maintaining a composite building on dental structure, this phenomenon is not completely understood. On the other hand, adhesion is dependent on the interface quality (the interface between enamel and adhesive). In this study, the authors approached the subject of the influence of adhesive clinical application on the composite-enamel interface, which was less investigated by the scientists. On intact extracted human teeth were prepared enamel areas, and then filled with light-curing composite. The teeth were sectioned and prepared for microscopic investigation, at 10×, 100× and 200× magnifications.

  17. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  18. SEM evaluation of resin-carious dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Marshall, Sally J.; Pinzon, Lilliam M.; Watanabe, Larry; Saiz, Eduardo; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the influence of dentin tubule direction and identifiable zone of carious dentin on the microstructure and the thickness of the hybrid-like layer (HL) formed by self-etch and etch-rinse adhesive systems. Methods An etch-rinse and a self-etching adhesive were bonded to dentin carious zones divided into groups with parallel or perpendicular orientation relative to the dentin tubules at the resin-carious dentin interface (N = 5/variable). Bonds were prepared to each of the four zones of carious dentin apparent after staining with Caries Detector: pink, light pink, transparent and apparently normal Six non-carious third molars were controls. The microstructure and thickness of the HL were determined by SEM.and compared using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (pcarious zone. PMID:18155289

  19. A new x-ray adhesive system with embedded nanoparticulate silver markers for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Bilenko, David I.; Venig, Sergey B.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.; Zacharevich, Andrey M.

    2013-02-01

    In the present study a new adhesive system with embedded PVP-stabilized nano-particulate silver markers has been designed. Nanosized silver was used as a radio-opaque contrast material in SEM examination of adhesive system in dentine. It was studied the impact of nano-particulate silver fillers on rheological properties of adhesive system and its penetration in dentine volume. A SEM comparative evaluation of resin replicas produced using adhesive system with embedded silver nanoparticles and that without ones was carried out. It was shown that embedding of silver nanoparticles into adhesive system did not make its penetration worse. It was established that embedding of nanosized silver changed adhesive system morphology. The methodology that allows visualizing interfaces and intermediate layers between dentine, adhesive system and restorative material using silver nano-particulate markers was developed and approved. Silver nanoparticles were used to compare the objective depth of penetration of adhesive systems of different generations in root dentine with differently oriented dentinal tubules, bonding resin delivery and gravity.

  20. Template assisted surface microstructuring of flowable dental composites and its effect on microbial adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Nadja; Maenz, Stefan; Sanz Beltrán, Vanesa; Völpel, Andrea; Heyder, Markus; Sigusch, Bernd W; Lüdecke, Claudia; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-03-01

    Despite their various advantages, such as good esthetic properties, absence of mercury and adhesive bonding to teeth, modern dental composites still have some drawbacks, e.g., a relatively high rate of secondary caries on teeth filled with composite materials. Recent research suggests that microstructured biomaterials surfaces may reduce microbial adhesion to materials due to unfavorable physical material-microbe interactions. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to test the hypotheses that (i) different surface microstructures can be created on composites by a novel straightforward approach potentially suitable for clinical application and (ii) that these surface structures have a statistically significant effect on microbial adhesion properties. Six different dental composites were initially tested for their suitability for microstructuring by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) templates. Each composite was light-cured between a glass slide and a microstructured PDMS template. The nano-hybrid composite Grandio Flow was the only tested composite with satisfying structurability, and was therefore used for the bacterial adhesion tests. Composites samples were structured with four different microstructures (flat, cubes, linear trapezoid structures, flat pyramids) and incubated for 4h in centrifuged saliva. The bacterial adherence was then characterized by colony forming units (CFUs) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All four microstructures were successfully transferred from the PDMS templates to the composite Grandio Flow. The CFU-test as well as the quantitative analysis of the SEM images showed the lowest bacterial adhesion on the flat composite samples. The highest bacterial adhesion was observed on the composite samples with linear trapezoid structures, followed by flat pyramids and cubes. The microstructure of dental composite surfaces statistically significantly influenced the adhesion of oral bacteria. Modifying the composite surface structure may be

  1. Effect of surface roughness and adhesive system on repair potential of silorane-based resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas H. Mobarak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the influence of surface roughness and adhesive system on the repair strength of silorane-based resin composite. Twenty-four substrate discs from silorane-based FiltekP90 were made and stored for 24 h. Half of the discs were roughened against 320 grit SiC paper while the other half was polished against 4000 grit SiC paper. All discs were etched with phosphoric acid. Repair resin composite, FiltekP90 or FiltekZ250, was bonded to the treated surfaces using their corresponding adhesive; P90 System Adhesive (SA or Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP ending up with four repair groups. The groups were as follows: G1: Smooth + SA + FiltekP90; G2: Roughened + SA + FiltekP90; G3: Smooth + SBMP + FiltekZ250; G4: Roughened + SBMP + FiltekZ250. Additional six unrepaired discs from each resin composite (G5 and G6 were prepared to test the cohesive strength. After 24 h, discs (n = 6/group were serially sectioned to obtain sticks (n = 30/group for microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM evaluation of substrates that received different treatments as well as representative substrate-repair sticks from each group were performed. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA with Repeated-Measures revealed that surface treatment and repair material had no significant effect on repair bond strength of silorane-based composite material. Paired t-test showed that all repair strength values were significantly lower than the cohesive strength of FiltekP90. Adhesive failure was the predominant mode of failure which was confirmed by SEM. Surface treated FiltekP90 composite showed different textures under SEM whereas phosphoric acid did not produce clear changes. An interaction layer between SBMP adhesive and FiltekZ250 repairing composite was detected. Repair of the silorane composite was successful irrespective of the surface roughness and chemistry of the repair

  2. Micro-shear bond strength of adhesive resins to enamel at different relative humidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andaç Barkın; Demir, Erhan; Goktas, Barış; Ozcopur, Betül; Behram, Benin; Eskitascioglu, Gürcan; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    This study tested whether exhaled humid conditions would affect the adhesion of etch-and-rinse, two-step and one-step self-etch adhesive resins to enamel. Enamel surfaces of human maxillary anterior teeth (N=240, n=20) were exposed to four humid conditions (H1: 63-68%, H2: 73-78%, H3: 93-98%, H4: 36-45% RH) during bonding with Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) and Adper Easy Bond (AEB). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 ºC for 24 h and tested to failure using micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (penamel with SB2, CSE and AEB was not significantly affected by humidity parameters. AEB resulted in significantly lower μSBS in all conditions. The frequency of adhesive failures was the highest at H2, H3 for SB2, H3 for CSE and H1-4 for AEB indicating that humidity conditions may decrease adhesion quality to enamel.

  3. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion of self-etching adhesives on dental enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Araby, Alaa Morsy; Talic, Yousef F

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of one total-etch self-priming adhesive and two one-step self-etching adhesive systems on the adhesion of a resin composite to both dentin and enamel. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion was also investigated. The null hypothesis tested was thermocycling would not affect bond strengths to enamel and dentin treated with self-etching adhesives or a total-etch adhesive. Two single-step self-etching adhesives [Xeno III (XE3) and Prompt L-Pop (PP)] and one two-step total-etch adhesive system (Prime & Bond NT) (P&B NT) were used in this study. Thirty caries-free unrestored human third molars were used to make specimens of enamel and dentin. Different adhesives were applied on enamel and dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions then hybrid composite restorative material was condensed on the surface using a mold. The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 masculineC for 24 hours before being tested. Half of the bonded specimens were tested for shear bond strength without thermocycling. The other half of the test specimens were thermocycled using a thermocycling apparatus in water baths held at 5 masculineC and 55 masculineC with a dwell time of one minute each for 10,000 cycles prior to shear testing. The mean shear bond strength before and after thermocycling was calculated, and the results were subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and repeated measure design to show the interaction between different materials and different times. The results showed shear bond strength on both enamel and dentin of the total-etch adhesive and the self-etching adhesives decreased after the specimens were subjected to thermocycling. The null hypothesis tested "thermocycling would not affect bond strengths treated with self-etching adhesives" was rejected. Furthermore, the study revealed the following: 1. The shear bond strength to both enamel and dentin of the total

  4. Saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 associates with dental plaque and caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2007-01-01

    Colonization of enamel surfaces by Streptococcus mutans is thought to be initiated by the attachment of bacteria to a saliva-derived conditioning film (acquired pellicle). However, the clinical relevance of the contribution of saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in biofilm formation has not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to correlate saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion with biofilm formation in humans. We correlated all measurements of salivary factors and dental plaque formation in 70 healthy subjects. Dental plaque development after thorough professional teeth cleaning correlated positively with S. mutans adhesion onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite pellets and the glycoprotein content of either parotid or whole saliva. Saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion and glycoprotein content were also positively correlated with each other in parotid and whole saliva. By contrast, neither salivary mutans streptococci, Lactobacillus nor Candida correlated with biofilm formation. Parotid saliva-mediated S. mutans adhesion was significantly higher in 12 caries-experienced (CE) subjects than in 9 caries-inexperienced (CI) subjects. Salivary S. mutans adhesion was significantly less (p adhesion, modulated by salivary protein adsorption onto the enamel surface, as a possible correlate of susceptibility to dental plaque and caries. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Antimicrobial and mechanical properties of dental resin composite containing bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Emre; Torlak, Emrah; Altunsoy, Mustafa

    2016-07-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy and mechanical properties of dental resin composites containing different amounts of microparticulate bioactive glass (BAG). Experimental resin composites were prepared by mixing resin matrix (70% BisGMA and 30% TEGDMA) and inorganic filler with various fractions of BAG to achieve final BAG concentrations of 5, 10 and 30 wt%. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed in aqueous suspension against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans and in biofilm against S. mutans. The effect of incorporation of BAG on the mechanical properties of resin composite was evaluated by measuring the surface roughness, compressive strength and flexural strength. Under the dynamic contact condition, viable counts of E. coli, S. aureus and S. mutans in suspensions were reduced up to 78%, 57% and 50%, respectively, after 90 minutes of exposure to disc-shaped composite specimens, depending on the BAG contents. In 2-day-old S. mutans biofilm, incorporation of BAG into composite at ratios of 10% and 30% resulted in 0.8 and 1.4 log reductions in the viable cell counts compared with the BAG-free composite, respectively. The surface roughness values of composite specimens did not show any significant difference (p>0.05) at any concentration of BAG. However, compressive and flexural strengths of composite were decreased significantly with addition of 30% BAG (p<0.05). The results demonstrated the successful utilization of BAG as a promising biomaterial in resin composites to provide antimicrobial function.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of unfilled resin after the use of self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the Shear Bond Strength of composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Ehsan Baradaran; Majidinia, Sara; Sharbaf, Davood Aghasizadeh

    2017-05-01

    Based on the frequent application of composite resins as tooth-colored fillings, this method is considered a viable alternative to dental amalgam. However, this method has the low bond strength of the composite to dentin. To solve this issue, various dental adhesive systems with different characteristics have been developed by dentistry experts. To assess the effect of an additional layer of unfilled resin in self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to dentin. Moreover, we assessed the effects of sample storage in artificial saliva on the SBS of composite to dentin. Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 160 freshly extracted human first or second premolar teeth, which were randomly divided into 16 groups. The teeth were prepared from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran (2008-2009). Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP), single bond (SB), Clearfil SE Bond, and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to dentin surface with or without the placement of hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond) in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturers. To expose the coronal dentin, the teeth were abraded with 600 grit SiC paper. Immediately after restoration, half of the samples were tested in terms of SBS, while the other samples were evaluated in terms of SBS after three months of storage in artificial saliva. SBS rates of dental composites evaluated by universal testing machine and samples were studied by optical stereomicroscopy to verify the failure type. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.16 using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and Duncan's logistic regression test. In this study, a significant reduction was observed in the SBS rates of SB and S3 bond adhesive systems after storage with and without hydrophobic resin (p>0.000). Without storage in normal saline, a significant increase was observed in the SBS rate of the SE bond (p=0.013). In addition, SBS rate of SBMP significantly

  7. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of unfilled resin after the use of self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the Shear Bond Strength of composite to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Ehsan Baradaran; Majidinia, Sara; Sharbaf, Davood Aghasizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Based on the frequent application of composite resins as tooth-colored fillings, this method is considered a viable alternative to dental amalgam. However, this method has the low bond strength of the composite to dentin. To solve this issue, various dental adhesive systems with different characteristics have been developed by dentistry experts. Aim To assess the effect of an additional layer of unfilled resin in self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to dentin. Moreover, we assessed the effects of sample storage in artificial saliva on the SBS of composite to dentin. Methods Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 160 freshly extracted human first or second premolar teeth, which were randomly divided into 16 groups. The teeth were prepared from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran (2008–2009). Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP), single bond (SB), Clearfil SE Bond, and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to dentin surface with or without the placement of hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond) in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturers. To expose the coronal dentin, the teeth were abraded with 600 grit SiC paper. Immediately after restoration, half of the samples were tested in terms of SBS, while the other samples were evaluated in terms of SBS after three months of storage in artificial saliva. SBS rates of dental composites evaluated by universal testing machine and samples were studied by optical stereomicroscopy to verify the failure type. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.16 using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and Duncan’s logistic regression test. Results In this study, a significant reduction was observed in the SBS rates of SB and S3 bond adhesive systems after storage with and without hydrophobic resin (p>0.000). Without storage in normal saline, a significant increase was observed in the SBS rate of the SE bond (p=0.013). In addition

  8. Long-Term Fluoride Release from Dental Resins Affects STRO-1+ Cell Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calarco, A; Di Salle, A; Tammaro, L; De Luca, I; Mucerino, S; Petillo, O; Riccitiello, F; Vittoria, V; Peluso, G

    2015-08-01

    Fluoride-releasing restorative dental materials can be beneficial to remineralize dentin and help prevent secondary caries. However, the effects of fluoride release from dental materials on the activity of dental pulp stem cells are not known. Here we investigate whether different fluoride release kinetics from dental resins supplemented with modified hydrotalcite (RK-F10) or fluoride-glass filler (RK-FG10) could influence the behavior of a human dental pulp stem cell subpopulation (STRO-1(+) cells) known for its ability to differentiate toward an odontoblast-like phenotype. The 2 resins, characterized by similar physicochemical properties and fluoride content, exhibited different long-term fluoride release kinetics. Our data demonstrate that long-term exposure of STRO-1(+) cells to a continuous release of a low amount of fluoride by RK-F10 increases their migratory response to transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), both important promoters of pulp stem cell recruitment. Moreover, the expression patterns of dentin sialoprotein (dspp), dentin matrix protein 1 (dmp1), osteocalcin (ocn), and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (mepe) indicate a complete odontoblast-like cell differentiation only when STRO-1(+) cells were cultured on RK-F10. On the contrary, RK-FG10, characterized by an initial fluoride release burst and reduced lifetime of the delivery, did not elicit any significant effect on both STRO-1(+) cell migration and differentiation. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of taking into account fluoride release kinetics in addition to fluoride concentration when designing new fluoride-restorative materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  9. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  10. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Li Yaogang [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Glasses Manufacturing Technology, MOE, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang Qinghong, E-mail: zhangqh@dhu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Glasses Manufacturing Technology, MOE, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang Hongzhi, E-mail: wanghz@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2011-04-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO{sub 2} were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  11. Surface Treatments and Functional Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement and Bacterial Adhesion Reduction in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mandracci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of dental implants is a key process in the production of these medical devices, and especially titanium implants used in the dental practice are commonly subjected to surface modification processes before their clinical use. A wide range of treatments, such as sand blasting, acid etching, plasma etching, plasma spray deposition, sputtering deposition and cathodic arc deposition, have been studied over the years in order to improve the performance of dental implants. Improving or accelerating the osseointegration process is usually the main goal of these surface processes, but the improvement of biocompatibility and the prevention of bacterial adhesion are also of considerable importance. In this review, we report on the research of the recent years in the field of surface treatments and coatings deposition for the improvement of dental implants performance, with a main focus on the osseointegration acceleration, the reduction of bacterial adhesion and the improvement of biocompatibility.

  12. Adhesiveness of opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus to materials used in dental office: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Bekir, Karima; Kadmi, Yassine; Dallel, Ines; Janel, Sébastien; Bovio, Simone; Barois, Nicolas; Lafont, Frank; Mastouri, Maha

    2017-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of several opportunistic microbial pathogens associated with many healthcare problems. In the present study, S. aureus was assessed for its biofilm-forming ability on materials routinely used in dental offices, including stainless steel (SS), polyethylene (PE), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Materials that were tested were characterized for roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE). The adhesion forces exerted by S. aureus to each substratum were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and biofilm formation was quantitatively assessed by crystal violet staining assay. AFM measurements demonstrated that the strongest adhesion forces (20 nN) were exerted on the PE surfaces (P materials when compared to the other materials (P materials used in dental practices is of crucial importance for preventing biofilm formation on dental materials to be used for patients' dental care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  14. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. For the tested cements, the strongest bonds

  15. Improving mechanical properties of flowable dental composite resin by adding silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baloš Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main drawback of flowable dental composite resin is low strength compared to conventional composite resin, due to a low amount of filler, neccessary for achieving low viscosity and ease of handling. The aim of this study was to improve mechanical properties of flowable dental composite resin by adding small amount of nanoparticles, which would not compromise handling properties. Methods. A commercially available flowable dental composite resin material was mixed with 7 nm aftertreated hydrophobic fumed silica and cured by an UV lamp. Four sets of samples were made: control sample (unmodified, the sample containing 0.05%, 0.2% and 1% nanosilica. Flexural modulus, flexural strength and microhardness were tested. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test with the significance value of p < 0.05 was performed to statistically analyze the obtained results. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and SEM analysis were performed. To asses handling properties, slumping resistance was determined. Results. It was found that 0.05% is the most effective nanosilica content. All the tested mechanical properties were improved by a significant margin. On the other hand, when 0.2% and 1% nanosilica content was tested, different results were obtained, some of the mechanical properties even dropped, while some were insignificantly improved. The difference between slumping resistance of unmodified and modified samples was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Low nanosilica addition proved more effective in improving mechanical properties compared to higher additions. Furthermore, handling properties are unaffected by nanosilica addition.

  16. Tensile bond strength of veneering resins to PEEK: impact of different adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Keul, Christine; Beuer, Florian; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    This study tested tensile bond strength (TBS) between veneering resins and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) after pre-treatment with adhesive systems. Five-hundred-seventy-six PEEK disks were fabricated, air-abraded and divided into six pre-treatment groups (n=96/group): Z-Prime Plus, Ambarino P60, Monobond Plus, Visio.link, Signum PEEK Bond, and control group without pre-treatment. Each group was divided into three subgroups of different veneering resins (n=32): Sinfony, GC Gradia and VITA VM LC. After specimen preparation with a bond area of 6.6 mm(2), half of each subgroup (n=16) was tested initially, and the other half was thermo-cycled. TBS measurements were analysed by three-way and one-way ANOVA, t-test and Weibull statistics. Groups without pre-treatment and groups pre-treated by Z-Prime Plus and Ambarino P60 showed no TBS. Pre-treatment with Monobond Plus increased the TBS values. The highest TBS before and after thermo-cycling between PEEK and all tested veneering resins was observed for groups pre-treated with Visio.link and Signum PEEK Bond.

  17. Effects of bleaching agents and adhesive systems in dental pulp: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA,Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho; Quagliatto,Paulo Sérgio; Magalhães,Denildo; BIFFI,João Carlos Gabrielli

    2012-01-01

    The dental pulp may be exposed to several irritants that are potentially noxious to the health and functions of this tissue. Each type of irritant or injury has different effects on the pulp, which are generally characterized by acute inflammation, chronic inflammation or necrosis. Common examples of irritants are dental caries, cavity preparation procedures, traumatic injuries, and chemical substances like bleaching agents and adhesive systems. The present study aimed to review the current k...

  18. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  19. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  20. Rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection in dental-resin composites and zirconia ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Surface properties are essential for a complete characterization of biomaterials. In restorative dentistry, the study of the surface properties of materials meant to replace dental tissues in an irreversibly diseased tooth is important to avoid harmful changes in future treatments. We have experimentally analyzed the surface characterization parameters of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental-resin. All the samples were submitted to rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to gather meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra), the root-mean-square deviation (Rq), the skewness (Rsk), and the kurtosis of the surface height distribution (Rku). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the surface parameters were also determined. With respect to Ra and Rq, significant differences between the composite shades were found. Among the dental resins, the nanocomposite presented the highest values and, for the zirconia ceramics, the pre-sintered sample registered the lowest ones. The composite performance may have been due to cluster-formation variations. Except for the composites with the surface treatment, the sample surfaces had approximately a normal distribution of heights. The surface treatment applied to the composites increased the average roughness and moved the height distribution farther away from the normal distribution. The zirconia-sintering process resulted in higher average roughness without affecting the height distribution.

  1. Metal-composite adhesion based on diazonium chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweis, Yara; Alageel, Omar; Kozak, Paige; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Retrouvey, Jean-Marc; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-08-07

    Composite resins do not adhere well to dental alloys. This weak bond can result in failure at the composite-metal interface in fixed dental prostheses and orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to develop a new adhesive, based on diazonium chemistry, to facilitate chemical bonding between dental alloys and composite resin. Samples of two types of dental alloys, stainless steel and cobalt chromium were primed with a diazonium layer in order to create a surface coating favorable for composite adhesion. Untreated metal samples served as controls. The surface chemical composition of the treated and untreated samples was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the tensile strength of the bond with composite resin was measured. The diazonium adhesive was also tested for shear bond strength between stainless steel orthodontic brackets and teeth. XPS confirmed the presence of a diazonium coating on the treated metals. The coating significantly increased the tensile and shear bond strengths by three and four folds respectively between the treated alloys and composite resin. diazonium chemistry can be used to develop composite adhesives for dental alloys. Diazonium adhesion can effectively achieve a strong chemical bond between dental alloys and composite resin. This technology can be used for composite repair of fractured crowns, for crown cementation with resin based cements, and for bracket bonding. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibacterial Effect of Dental Adhesive Containing Dimethylaminododecyl Methacrylate on the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05. In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives.

  3. Antibacterial effect of dental adhesive containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate on the development of Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-07-18

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives.

  4. Antibacterial Effect of Dental Adhesive Containing Dimethylaminododecyl Methacrylate on the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Weir, Michael D.; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives. PMID:25046750

  5. Anti-Caries Effects of Dental Adhesives Containing Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylates with Different Chain Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of dental adhesives containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs with different alkyl chain lengths (CL on ecological caries prevention in vitro. Five QAMs were synthesized with a CL = 3, 6, 9, 12, and 16 and incorporated into adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength and surface charge density were used to measure the physical properties of the adhesives. The proportion change in three-species biofilms consisting of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Streptococcus gordonii was tested using the TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction. Lactic acid assay, MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, exopolysaccharide staining, live/dead staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transverse microradiography (TMR were performed to study the anti-biofilm and anti-demineralization effects of the dental adhesives. The results showed that incorporating QAMs with different alkyl chain lengths into the adhesives had no obvious effect on the dentin bond strength. The adhesives containing QAMs with a longer alkyl chain developed healthier biofilms. The surface charge density, anti-biofilm, and anti-demineralization effects of the adhesives increased with a CL of the QAMs from 3 to 12, but decreased slightly with a CL from 12 to 16. In conclusion, adhesives containing QAMs with a tailored chain length are promising for preventing secondary caries in an “ecological way”.

  6. A review of chemical-approach and ultramorphological studies on the development of fluoride-releasing dental adhesives comprising new pre-reacted glass ionomer (PRG) fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tay, Franklin R; Endo, Takeshi; Pashley, David H

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on fluoride-releasing adhesives and the related studies in this field based on information from original research papers, reviews, and patent literatures. A revolutionary PRG (pre-reacted glass ionomer) filler technology--where fillers were prepared by the acid-base reaction of a fluoroaluminosilicate glass with polyalkenoic acid in water, was newly developed, and a new category as "Giomer" was introduced into the market. On fluoride release capability, SIMS examination revealed in vitro fluoride ion uptake by dentin substrate from the PRG fillers in dental adhesive. On bonding durability, it was found that the improved durability of resin-dentin bonds might be achieved not only via the strengthened dentin due to fluoride ion uptake from the PRG-Ca fillers, but also due to retention of relatively insoluble 4-AETCa formed around remnant apatite crystallites within the hybrid layer in 4-AET-containing self-etching adhesives. On ultramorphological study of the resin-dentin interface, TEM images of the PRG-Ca fillers revealed that the dehydrated hydrogel was barely distinguishable from normal glass fillers, if not for the concurrent presence of remnant, incompletely reacted glass cores. In conclusion, it was expected that uptake of fluoride ions with cariostatic effect from PRG-Ca fillers would endow dentin substrates with the benefit of secondary caries prevention, together with an effective and durable adhesion to dentin.

  7. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. Statistical analysis One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey’s test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p 0.05). Conclusion The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. How to cite this article Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200. PMID:27843249

  8. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  9. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching.

  10. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Haruyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1 and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2 (Pyrenees® activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2. Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed. These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching.

  11. Hydroxyapatite nanorods as novel fillers for improving the properties of dental adhesives: Synthesis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Shojai, Mehdi; Atai, Mohammad; Nodehi, Azizollah; Khanlar, Leila Nasiri

    2010-05-01

    most specimens showed an adhesive failure from the adhesive-dentin interface. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping confirmed the uniform distribution of nanorods in the adhesive matrix. The colloidal stability studies indicated that synthesized hydroxyapatite nanorods have high colloidal stability in the dental adhesive solution. Indeed, the nanorods are well dispersed and protected from aggregation by their high surface charge confirmed by zeta potential measurement. Hydroxyapatite-based composites have shown promising bioactivity. However, the knowledge about the influence of the nano-sized HAp on the properties of the dental materials, especially dentin bonding adhesives, is yet insufficient. The nanorod containing adhesive system presented here might be considered to have practical applications in dental clinics. 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Properties of a New Dental Photocurable Matrix Resin with Low Shrinkage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jing; JIA Fang; XU Haiping; JI Baohui; LIU Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the amount of volumetric shrinkage that occurs in dental composites as a result of curing, a new kind of dental matrix resin combining bisphenol-S-bis(3-meth acry late-2-hydroxy propyl)ether(BisS-GMA) with the expanding monomer unsaturated spiro orthoesters 2-methylene-1, 4, 6-trispiro[4, 4] nonane (SOE) was prepared, with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) as diluent. CQ (camphorquinone) of 1wt% and DMAEMA (2-(dimethylamino) ethyl meth acrylate) of 2wt% were used as photoinitiation system to initiate the copolymerization of the matrix resins. The performance including volumetric shrinkage, degree of conversion and condition of the ring-opening reaction of SOE, as well as curing time and the tensile bond strength were investigated respectively by the dilatometer, Fourier transfer infrared, the universal testing machine, and so on.The ring-opening polymerization of SOE occurred. Meanwhile, the obtain copolymers were crosslinked. The matrix resin containing BisS-GMA and SOE showed a reduced amount of volumetric shrinkage at 1.52%, which is a promising strategy for obtaining a polymer with a low amount of volumetric shrinkage. Furthermore, the other properties were not compromised.

  13. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    Photopolymerization is a process that depends, among other factors, on the optical properties of polymerized materials. In turn, this process affects longitudinal light transport in these materials, thereby altering their optical absorption coefficient which is thus expected to exhibit depth dependence. Furthermore, polymerization affects the thermal properties of these materials. A robust theoretical approach to the study of the depth-dependent optical absorption coefficient, β(x ), and thermal diffusivity, α(x ), in materials exhibiting depth profiles of these parameters has been developed through the photothermal inverse problem based on the concept of the thermal-harmonic oscillator. Using this concept in the frequency-domain nonhomogeneous photothermal-wave boundary-value problem, the simultaneous reconstruction of arbitrary simultaneous optical and thermal depth profiles was achieved using a multiparameter fitting method to the experimental amplitude and phase. As a first application of the theory to partially polymerized Alert Composite (shade A3) dental resin, with curing induced by a blue light-emitting diode, the β(x ) and α(x ) depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric frequency-scanned data. A strong anticorrelation of these two depth profiles was observed and was interpreted in terms of photochemical processes occurring during the optical (photocuring) creation of long polymeric chains in the resin. The photothermally reconstructed depth profiles may have implications for the optimization of blue light curing methods using such resins in dental clinical practice.

  14. A review of adaptive mechanisms in cell responses towards oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. Monomers like triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are cytotoxic via apoptosis, induce genotoxic effects, and delay the cell cycle. Monomers also influence the response of cells of the innate immune system, inhibit specific odontoblast cell functions, or delay the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization processes in pulp-derived cells including stem cells. These observations indicate that resin monomers act as environmental stressors which inevitably disturb regulatory cellular networks through interference with signal transduction pathways. We hypothesize that an understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena will provide a better estimation of the consequences associated with dental therapy using composite materials, and lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved materials being used at tissue interfaces within the oral cavity. Current findings strongly suggest that monomers enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is most likely the cause of biological reactions activated by dental composites and resin monomers. The aim of the present review manuscript is to discuss adaptive cell responses to oxidative stress caused by monomers. The particular significance of a tightly controlled network of non-enzymatic as well as enzymatic antioxidants for the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant defense in monomer-exposed cells will be addressed. The expression of ROS-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1/2), and catalase in cells exposed to monomers will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role

  15. The postoperative sensitivity of fixed partial dentures cemented with self-adhesive resin cements: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Diaa El-Din; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2010-12-01

    The authors investigated the postcementation sensitivity associated with self-adhesive resin cements used with fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The authors recruited 20 patients who needed posterior porcelain-fused-to-metal FPDs and divided them randomly into three groups. They prepared 50 abutments, then cemented FPDs with one of two self-adhesive resin cements (Breeze Self-Adhesive Resin Cement, Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, Conn., and RelyX Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) or an etch-and-rinse resin cement (RelyX ARC Adhesive Resin Cement, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.). The authors measured participants' tooth sensitivity to cold water, air blast and biting at 24 hours and at two, six and 12 weeks after FPD cementation by using a continuous visual analog scale (VAS). Data were analyzed statistically by means of the Mann-Whitney test. For cold tests, the highest VAS scores occurred 24 hours after cementation. The mean VAS scores associated with RelyX ARC were significantly higher than those associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem (P cold-test VAS scores associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem were not significantly different (P > .05). With all cements, sensitivity to cold decreased significantly after two to six weeks; however, with RelyX ARC, VAS scores stayed above the 30 percent level even after 12 weeks. The biting sensitivity associated with RelyX ARC was significantly higher than that associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem (P benefit from their bonding potential, without fear of patients' developing tooth sensitivity.

  16. Light-curing efficiency of dental adhesives by gallium nitride violet-laser diode determined in terms of ultimate micro-tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; De Munck, Jan; Hatayama, Hitoshi; Haruyama, Akiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Takase, Yasuaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether violet-laser diode (VLD) can be used as light-curing source. The ultimate (micro-)tensile strength (μTS) of three adhesives was determined when cured by VLD in comparison with curing by two different types of commercial LED light-curing units. One VLD (VLM 500) and two LED units (Curenos and G-Light Prima) were used to cure the adhesive resin of the two-step self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond, Tokuso Mac Bond II, and FL-Bond II. A 0.6-mm thick acrylic mould was filled with adhesive resin and cured for 60 s. After 24-h water storage, specimens were trimmed into an hourglass shape with a width of 1.2 mm at the narrowest part, after which the μTS was determined (n=10). In addition, the light transmittance of each adhesive was characterized using a UV-vis-NIR spectrometer. No significant difference in curing efficiency between VLD and LED were observed for both Tokuso Mac Bond II and FL-Bond II (p>0.05). For Clearfil SE Bond, the μTS of VLD-cured specimens was higher than that of the specimens cured by the LED Curenos unit (p<0.05). Spectrometry revealed that this marked difference must be attributed to a different light transmittance of Clearfil SE Bond for visible blue light versus for the lower area of UV and visible violet light. In conclusion, A GaN-based violet laser diode can be used as light-curing source to initiate polymerization of dental resins.

  17. Conversion-dependent shrinkage stress and strain in dental resins and composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Trujillo-Lemon, Marianela; Lu, Hui; Ding, Xingzhe; Lin, Yan; Ge, Junhao

    2005-01-01

    The placement of dental composites is complicated by the contraction that accompanies polymerization of these materials. The resulting shrinkage stress that develops during cure of a bonded restoration can induce defects within the composite, the tooth or at the interface resulting in compromised clinical performance and/or esthetics. In light of the substantial efforts devoted to understanding and attempting to control shrinkage stress and strain in dental composite restoratives, this paper offers a perspective on the conversion dependent development of shrinkage and stress. The relationships between polymer property development and the physical evolution of the network structures associated with dental polymers as well as the interrelated kinetics of the photopolymerization reaction process are examined here. Some of the methods used to assess conversion in dental resins and composites are considered. In particular, newly introduced techniques that allow real time analysis of conversion by near-infrared spectroscopy to be coupled directly to simultaneous dynamic measurements of either shrinkage stress or strain are described. The results are compared with reports from the dental materials literature as well as complementary studies in other related fields of polymer science. The complex, nonlinear correlation between conversion, shrinkage and stress are highlighted. A brief review of some of the materials-based approaches designed to minimize polymerization shrinkage and stress is also provided.

  18. Effect of ceramic dental waste in thermo-physical properties of materials composed with polyester resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Martínez-Maldonado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermophysical properties at room temperature of a composite material based on polyester resins and powders obtained from dental ceramic residues for mixtures with percentage by weight of 50-50, 60-40, 70- 30, 80-20 and 90-10 are recorded, where the minority phase are dental ceramic powders with particle size through sieve No. 200 (75 um, and the majority of pre-accelerated polyester resin brand P-2000, and as catalyst (Meck-Peroxide. The manufacturing process of the specimens was by casting them into cylindrical molds of diameter 3 cm and 6 cm long. The properties of conductivity (k and thermal diffusivity (α and the specific heat per unit volume (ρc, were found using the KD2 Pro® system which operates on the physical principle of linear transient heat flow. Thermal effusivity (ε was determined using data from k and α, and the expression ε = k/√ α. The results show that as the percentage of the ceramic powder is increased, the density of the samples increases, and thus the thermal conductivity (k, which is directly proportional to both heat diffusion rate (α and the amount of heat that the material can store or release (ρc. These results suggest a new material for technological applications, as well as they help to mitigate the environmental impact due to the recycling process of dental ceramic waste.

  19. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  20. Application of solid phase microextraction on dental composite resin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ven-Shing; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lai, Chien-Chen; Chen, San-Yue; Huang, Long-Chen; Chao, Keh-Ping

    2012-08-15

    A direct immersion solid phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method was developed for the analysis of dentin monomers in saliva. Dentine monomers, such as triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and 2,2-bis-[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (Bis-GMA), have a high molecular weight and a low vapor pressure. The polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fiber with a medium polarity was employed for DI-SPME, and 215 nm of detection wavelength was found to be optimum in the chromatogram of HPLC measurement. The calibration range for DI-SPME was 0.30-300 μg/mL with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.998 for each analyte. The DI-SPME method achieved good accuracy (recovery 96.1-101.2%) and precision (2.30-8.15% CV) for both intra- and inter-day assays of quality control samples for three target compounds. Method validation was performed on standards dissolved in blank saliva, and there was no significant difference (p>0.2) between the DI-SPME method and the liquid injection method. However, the detection limit of DI-SPME was as low as 0.03, 0.27 and 0.06 μg/mL for TEGDMA, UDMA and Bis-GMA, respectively. Real sample analyses were performed on commercial dentin products after curing for the leaching measurement. In summary, DI-SPME is a more sensitive method that requires less sample pretreatment procedures to measure the resin materials leached in saliva.

  1. Difference in color and color parameters between dental porcelain and porcelain-repairing resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the differences in color and color parameters between dental porcelain and porcelain-repairing resin composites. The colors of three shades (A2, A3, A3.5) of one brand of dental porcelain, three original shades (A2, A3, A3.5), and three combinations (A2/A3, A3/3.5, A2/A3.5) of three brands of porcelain-repairing resin composites (ABT, FSP, TCR) were measured. The specimens were 2 mm thick, and 1 mm of each shade was layered to make combined shades. Differences in color (DeltaE(ab) (*)), lightness (DeltaL*), chroma (DeltaC(ab) (*)), and hue (DeltaH(*)) between porcelain and resin composite were calculated. Color difference was calculated as DeltaE(ab) (*) = (DeltaL*(2) + Deltaa*(2) + Deltab*(2))(1/2), chroma difference was calculated as DeltaC(ab) (*) = (Deltaa*(2) + Deltab*(2))(1/2), and hue difference was calculated as DeltaH(ab) (*) = (DeltaE(ab) (*2) - DeltaL*(2) - DeltaC(ab) (*2))(1/2). The influence of porcelain shade, brand of resin composites, and shade of resin composites were analyzed by three-way analyses of variance, and the differential influence of color parameters on color difference was analyzed with multiple regression analysis (alpha = 0.05). Differences in color and color parameters were influenced by the porcelain shade, brand and shade of resin composites. The DeltaE(ab) (*) value was in the range of 2.2-16.9. The DeltaE(ab) (*) value was correlated with DeltaC(ab) (*) (standardized correlation coefficient, beta = - 0.85), DeltaL* (beta = - 0.52), and DeltaH(ab) (*) (beta = 0.08). Between the same shade designated pairs of porcelain and repairing composite, color difference was perceptible. Therefore, studies to improve the color matching between porcelain and repairing resin are recommended.

  2. Properties of dental resins submitted to pH catalysed hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Renato; Pereira, Jose Carlos; Prakki, Anuradha

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the surface microhardness (SM) and roughness (SR) alterations of dental resins submitted to pH catalysed degradation regimens. Thirty discs of each TPH Spectrum (Dentsply), Z100 (3M-ESPE), or an unfilled experimental bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin were fabricated, totaling 90 specimens. Each specimen was polymerized for 40 s, finished, polished, and individually stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 7 days. Specimens were randomly assigned to the following pH solutions: 1.0, 6.9 or 13, and for SM or SR evaluations (n = 5). Baseline Knoop-hardness of each specimen was obtained by the arithmetic mean of five random micro-indentations. For SR, mean baseline values were obtained by five random surface tracings (R(a)). Specimens were then soaked in one of the following storage media at 37 °C: (1) 0.1 M, pH 1.0 HCl, (2) 0.1 N, pH 13.0 NaOCl, and (3) deionized water (pH 6.9). Solutions were replaced daily. Repeated SM and SR measurements were performed at the 3-, 7- and 14-day storage time intervals. For each test and resin, data were analysed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). There was significant decrease in SM and increase in SR values of composites after storage in alkaline medium. TPH and Z100 presented similar behaviour for SM and SR after immersion in the different media, whereas unfilled resin values showed no significant change. Hydrolytic degradation of resin composites seems to begin with the silanized inorganic particles and therefore depend on their composition. To accelerate composite hydrolysis and produce quick in vitro microstructural damage, alkaline medium appears to be more suitable than acidic medium. Contemporary resin composite properties seem to withstand neutral and acidic oral environments tolerably well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Color changes of dental resin composites before and after polymerization and storage in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelık, Esra Uzer; Aladağ, Akin; Türkün, L Şebnem; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the A2 shades of various types and brands of resin composites to determine if any color differences occurred before and after polymerization and after 1 month of storage in water and (2) examine the correlation among the color changes and changes in Commission internationale de l'éclairage L*, a*, and b* values after polymerization and after 1 month of storage in water. One submicron-hybrid (Spectrum TPH3, DENTSPLY DeTrey, Milford, DE, USA), one nano-filled (Filtek Supreme XT, 3 M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), three micro-hybrid (Filtek Z250, 3 M ESPE; Esthet X, DENTSPLY DeTrey; and Gradia Direct, GC, Tokyo, Japan), and five nano-hybrid (Ceram X, DENTSPLY DeTrey; Clearfil Majesty Esthetics, Kuraray, Osaka, Japan; Premise, Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA; Tetric Evo Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and Tetric N Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent) light-curing resin composites were tested. The specimens (N = 10 for each composite) were prepared as discs, 12 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness, using round molds. The measurements were performed "before polymerization,"after polymerization," and "after 1 month of storage in water" using a contact type dental spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA). The range of ΔE* values after polymerization (ΔE*1) and storage in water (ΔE*2) were 4.59 to 14.13 and 1.26 to 6.29, respectively. Nested analysis of variance and post hoc tests revealed that the type of resin composites significantly affected Δa*1, Δa*2, Δb*1, Δb*2, ΔE*2-values, whereas the brand of resin composites affected the changes in all color parameters (p compositions and fillers of the contemporary composites, color changes after polymerization were perceptible in all resin composites. However, color changes after storage in water were in the acceptable ranges for all resin composites except Clearfil Majesty Esthetic and Gradia Direct. In spite of many improvements in chemical compositions

  4. Thermal treatments modulate bacterial adhesion to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Ho, B; Lim, C T; Hsu, C S

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of laser-induced heat on demineralization of enamel; however, no studies have investigated the link between heat/laser-induced changes in physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. In this study, we investigated the effects of thermal treatment on surface properties of enamel such as hydrophobicity and zeta potential. Bacterial adhesion to treated surfaces was characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and adhesion force was quantified by atomic force microscopy. The hydrophobicity of enamel increased after heating (p enamel became more negative than that of the control (p enamel after being heated (p adhesion force of both S. mitis and S. oralis to enamel with or without saliva coating. Reduction of adhesion force was statistically significant for S. mitis (p 0.05). Heating did not affect the adhesion of S. sanguis with or without saliva coating. In conclusion, thermal treatment and photothermal/laser treatments may modulate the physicochemical properties of enamel, preventing the adhesion of some bacterial species.

  5. Effect of Partition of Photo-Initiator Components and Addition of Iodonium Salt on the Photopolymerization of Phase-Separated Dental Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Farhana; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Ge, Xueping; Camarda, Kyle; Spencer, Paulette

    2016-04-01

    The polymerization kinetics of physically separated hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases of a model dental adhesive have been investigated. The two phases were prepared from neat resin containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) in the ratio of 45:55 (wt./wt.). Neat resins containing various combinations of popular photo-initiating compounds, e.g., camphoquinone (CQ), ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDMAB), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP), were prepared. To obtain the two phases, 33 wt.% of deuterium oxide (D2O) was added to the neat resins. This amount of D2O exceeded the miscibility limit for the resins. The concentration of each component of the photo-initiating system in the two phases was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). When combined with CQ, DMAEMA is less efficient as a co-initiator compared to EDMAB. The addition of DPIHP as the third component into either CQ/EDMAB or CQ/DMAEMA photo-initiating systems led to comparable performance in both the hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. The addition of the iodonium salt significantly improved the photopolymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase; the latter exhibited extremely poor polymerization when the iodonium salt was not included in the formulation. The partition concentration of EDMAB in the hydrophilic-rich phase was significantly lower than that of DMAEMA or DPIHP. This study indicates the need for a combination of hydrophobic/hydrophilic photosensitizer and addition of iodonium salt to improve polymerization within the hydrophilic-rich phase of the dental adhesive.

  6. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  7. Effect of Biodentine™ on the proliferation, migration and adhesion of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhirong; Li, Dongmei; Kohli, Meetu R; Yu, Qing; Kim, Syngcuk; He, Wen-Xi

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the proliferative, migratory and adhesion effect of Biodentine™, a new tricalcium silicate cement formulation, on the human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). The cell cultures of hDPSCs obtained from impacted third molars were treated with Biodentine™ extract at four different concentrations: Biodentine™ 0.02mg/ml (BD 0.02), Biodentine™ 0.2mg/ml (BD 0.2), Biodentine™ 2mg/ml (BD 2) and Biodentine™ 20mg/ml (BD 20). Human dental pulp stem cells proliferation was evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) and BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) viability analysis at different times. Migration was investigated by microphotographs of wound healing and transwell migration assays. Adhesion assay was performed as well in presence of BD 0.2, BD 2 and blank control, while qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain) was used for further analysis of the mRNA expression of chemokine and adhesion molecules in hDPSCs. Biodentine™ significantly increased proliferation of stem cells at BD 0.2 and BD 2 concentrations while decreased significantly at higher concentration of BD 20. BD 0.2 concentration had a statistically significant increased migration and adhesion abilities. In addition, qRT-PCR results showed that BD 0.2 could have effect on the mRNA expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules in human dental pulp stem cells. The data imply that Biodentine™ is a bioactive and biocompatible material capable of enhancing hDPSCs proliferation, migration and adhesion abilities. Biodentine™ when placed in direct contact with the pulp during pulp exposure can positively influence healing by enhancing the proliferation, migration and adhesion of human dental pulp stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of a dental adhesive using the self-etch and etch-and-rinse approaches: an 18-month clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory investigations have demonstrated that the application of multiple adhesive coats can increase adhesive infiltration, thereby increasing bond strength values. The authors conducted an 18-month, randomized, controlled prospective study to evaluate the clinical performance of a self-etch and an etch-and-rinse adhesive in noncarious cervical lesions. Twenty-nine patients with at least two pairs of similarly sized lesions participated in this study. The authors placed 116 restorations in one of four groups: OS2 (phosphoric acid and dental adhesive [One-Step Plus, Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.], following the manufacturer's recommendation [two coats]); OS4 (phosphoric acid and One-Step Plus, with four coats); TY2 (Tyrian SPE [Bisco] and One-Step Plus, following the manufacturer's recommendation [two coats]); and TY4 (Tyrian SPE and One-Step Plus, with four coats). The authors evaluated the restorations at baseline and at six, 12 and 18 months, according to modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria. (Eight of the 116 restorations were unavailable for follow-up.) The retention rate for the TY2 group (55.5 percent) was statistically lower than that for the TY4 (77.8 percent) and OS4 (88.9 percent) groups. Only teeth in OS4 exhibited a retention rate at 18 months that was similar to that observed at baseline. Marginal discoloration occurred in all groups, and it was statistically significantly worse in TY2. Multiple adhesive coats significantly improved retention rates. Applying multiple coats of adhesive with the etch-and-rinse or self-etch approach can improve retention rates of Class V resin-based composite restorations, although not to the level of the American Dental Association's guidelines for dentin and adhesive materials.

  9. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Wandsher, Vinicius Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil; Valandro, Luis Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin

    2017-04-10

    Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding) and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding), resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation) for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  10. Biofilm inhibition by an experimental dental resin composite containing octenidine dihydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, Stefan; Balkenhol, Markus; Sahrhage, Tim O; Baum, Alexandra; Chromik, Julia N; Ruppert, Klaus; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Maurer, Hans H; Hannig, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate an antimicrobial additive containing experimental resin composite with regards to its impact on biofilm formation under oral conditions. Biofilms were established in situ on composite specimens (n=192) which contained octenidine dihydrochloride (ODH, 3 wt.% or 6 wt.%). Samples without antimicrobial additive served as control (n=96). Composite specimens were fixed on custom made splints and exposed to the oral cavity of six healthy volunteers for three or seven days. Biofilm formation was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy (FM). The biofilm formation was significantly reduced on ODH containing samples compared to controls after three as well as after seven days in situ. FM evaluation additionally showed a lower viability of the reduced biofilms for both ODH concentrations. During this short term investigation, incorporation of ODH into resin based composite materials caused biofilm inhibiting effects in situ. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  12. PHOTOCURING STUDY OF NEW DENTAL RESINS BASED ON MULTIFUNCTIONAL ACRYLIC ISOCYANURATE BY PHOTOCALORIMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Nie; Wen-hui Zhou; Miao-zhen Li; Er-jian Wang; L.A. Linden; J.F. Rabek

    1999-01-01

    Photocuring of new dental resins composed of tri(2-hydroxyethyl) isocyanurate triacrylate (THITA)alone and its mixtures with trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) or pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) initiated by camphorquinone/amine system was studied by photocalorimetry. Among several different amines as coinitiators, 2-ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (AM-3), N,N-dimethylbenzylamine (AM-5) and 2,4,6-[tri(dimethylaminomethyl)]phenol (AM-6) are most effective. Upon irradiation, photopolymerization can occur immediately and no induction period appears in N2 nor in air. Comparing the THITA/TMPTA and THITA/PETA mixtures, the parameters of photopolymerization and hardness of photocured samples show a small difference and only change slightly with varying molar ratios of mixture. In the presence of inorganic filler, the hardness of photocuring resins is almost the same as that for commercial products.

  13. Effect of hydroxyapatite whisker surface graft polymerization on water sorption, solubility and bioactivity of the dental resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengwei; Jiang, Xiaoze; Bao, Shuang; Wang, Ruili; Sun, Bin; Zhu, Meifang

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of poly bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (poly(Bis-GMA)) grafted hydroxyapatite whisker (PGHW) on water sorption, solubility and bioactivity of the dental resin composite. PGHW with different graft ratios was synthesized, by controlling grafting time, and filled into a dental resin matrix respectively. Fracture surface of the resin composites showed that PGHW-matrix interfacial compatibility and bonding were enhanced, and lower amounts of poly(Bis-GMA) on PGHW-1h (graft ratio: 8.5 wt.%) could facilitate the dispersion of PGHW-1 h in the composite. The PGHW-1h filled resin composite absorbed the lowest amount of water (27.16 μg/mm(3), 7 d), whereas the untreated hydroxyapatite whisker (HW) filled resin composite absorbed the highest. PGHW with higher graft ratios induced the decrease of the monomer conversion in the resulting composite, therefore, the PGHW-18 h (graft ratio: 32.8 wt.%) filled resin composite had the highest solubility. In vitro bioactivity of the studied resin composites in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that a dense and continuous apatite layer was formed on the surface of the resin composite, and the surface graft polymerization on the whisker did not significantly affect the apatite forming ability of the resin composite. It was revealed that graft polymerization of an appropriate amount of Bis-GMA onto HW could be an effective method to improve the interfacial properties and stability in water of the dental resin composite without compromising the bioactivity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. 5-year results comparing mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite for root-end sealing in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hänni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2014-01-01

    observers). Two different methods of root-end preparation and filling (primary study parameters) were to be compared (mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] vs adhesive resin composite [COMP]) without randomization. RESULTS: A total of 271 patients and teeth from a 1-year follow-up sample of 339 could be re...

  15. [Solcoseryl--dental adhesive paste--in the treatment of postextraction alveolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryst, L; Kowalik, S; Bartkowski, S; Henning, G

    1990-06-01

    After a study in three maxillofacial surgery teaching hospital departments the authors evaluated the usefulness of Solcoseryl dental adhesive paste as compared to Apernyl in the treatment of postextraction alveolitis. Solcoseryl paste was found to shorten the healing period by about 50% in comparison with Apernyl.

  16. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to dental implant and restorative materials in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; Kulik, Eva M; Weiger, Roland; Decker, Eva-Maria; Von Ohle, Christiane; Meyer, Jürg

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion to tooth surfaces or dental materials starts immediately upon exposure to the oral environment. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to saliva-coated human enamel and dental materials - during a one-hour period - using an in vitro flow chamber system which mimicked the oral cavity. After fluorescent staining, the number of adhered cells and their vitality were recorded. The dental materials used were: titanium (Rematitan M), gold (Neocast 3), ceramic (Vita Omega 900), and composite (Tetric Ceram). The number of adherent bacterial cells was higher on titanium, gold, and ceramic surfaces and lower on composite as compared to enamel. As for the percentage of adherent vital cells, it was higher on enamel than on the restorative materials tested. These results suggested that variations in the number and vitality of the adherent pioneer oral bacteria, S. sanguinis, in the in vitro system depended on the surface characteristics of the substratum and the acquired salivary pellicle. The in vitro adhesion model used herein provided a simple and reproducible approach to investigate the impact of surface-modified dental materials on bacterial adhesion and vitality.

  17. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  18. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for scattering anisotropy coefficient determination in dental-resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Carrasco, Irene M.; Ghinea, Razvan; Pérez, María M.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and its applications. Among the key optical properties of biological media is the angular distribution of the scattered light, characterized by the average cosine of the scattering angle, called the scattering anisotropy coefficient (g). The value of g can be determined by experimentally irradiating the material with a laser beam and making angular-scattering measurements in a goniometer. In this work, an experimental technique was used to determine g by means of goniometric measurements of the laser light scattered off two different dental-resin composites (classified as nano and hybrid). To assess the accuracy of the experimental method, a Mie theory-based computational model was used. Independent measurements were used to determine some of the required input parameters for computation of the theoretical model. The g values estimated with the computational method (nano-filled: 0.9399; hybrid: 0.8975) and the values calculated with the experimental method presented (nano-filled: 0.98297 +/- 0.00021; hybrid: 0.95429 +/- 0.00014) agreed well for both dental resins, with slightly higher experimental values. The higher experimental values may indicate that the scattering particle causes more narrow-angle scattering than does a perfect sphere of equal volume, assuming that with more spherical scattering particles the scattering anisotropy coefficient increases. Since g represents the angular distribution of the scattered light, values provided by both the experimental and the computational methods show a strongly forward-directed scattering in the dental resins studied, more pronounced in the nano-filled composite than in the hybrid composite.

  19. Are linear elastic material properties relevant predictors of the cyclic fatigue resistance of dental resin composites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the linear elastic material properties of direct dental resin composites and correlate them with their fatigue strength under cyclic loading. Bar specimens of twelve resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and tested for elastic modulus (Emod) in 3-point bending (n=10), flexural strength (FS) (n=15) and single-edge-notch-beam fracture toughness (FT) (n=15), both in 4-point bending. Using the same specimen geometry, the flexural fatigue strength (FFS) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz in 4-point bending (n=25). The observation of the fracture surface and fracture profiles was conducted using a scanning electron microscope in order to evaluate the respective fracture mechanisms according to the two different loading conditions. Materials were ranked differently according to the tested parameters. Only weak correlations were found between any of the initial properties and FFS or strength loss. The best correlation to FFS was found to be the Emod (r(2)=0.679), although only slightly. Crack path in both loading conditions was mainly interparticle, with the crack propagating mainly within the matrix phase for fatigued specimens and eventually through the filler/matrix interface for statically loaded specimens. Fracture of large particles or prepolymerized fillers was only observed in specimens of FS and FT. Initial properties were better associated with microstructural features, whereas the fatigue resistance showed to be more dependent on aspects relating to the matrix phase. Our results show that linear elastic properties such as elastic modulus, flexural strength and fracture toughness are not good descriptors of the fatigue resistance of dental resin composite under cyclic bending, and may therefore have limited clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early Adhesion of Candida albicans onto Dental Acrylic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, S; Marshall, H; Pratten, J; Bradshaw, D; Brown, J S; Porter, S R; Spratt, D; Bozec, L

    2017-07-01

    Denture-associated stomatitis is a common candidal infection that may give rise to painful oral symptoms, as well as be a reservoir for infection at other sites of the body. As poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) remains the main material employed in the fabrication of dentures, the aim of this research was to evaluate the adhesion of Candida albicans cells onto PMMA surfaces by employing an atomic force microscopy (AFM) single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) technique. For experiments, tipless AFM cantilevers were functionalized with PMMA microspheres and probed against C. albicans cells immobilized onto biopolymer-coated substrates. Both a laboratory strain and a clinical isolate of C. albicans were used for SCFS experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and AFM imaging of C. albicans confirmed the polymorphic behavior of both strains, which was dependent on growth culture conditions. AFM force-spectroscopy results showed that the adhesion of C. albicans to PMMA is morphology dependent, as hyphal tubes had increased adhesion compared with yeast cells ( P adhesion observed in the tube region. Comparison between strains demonstrated increased adhesion forces for a clinical isolate compared with the lab strain. The clinical isolate also had increased survival in blood and reduced sensitivity to complement opsonization, providing additional evidence of strain-dependent differences in Candida-host interactions that may affect virulence. In conclusion, PMMA-modified AFM probes have shown to be a reliable technique to characterize the adhesion of C. albicans to acrylic surfaces.

  1. Synthesis of a novel tertiary amine containing urethane dimethacrylate monomer (UDMTA) and its application in dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongliang; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-06-01

    A novel tertiary amine containing urethane dimethacrylate monomer UDMTA was synthesized with the aim of replacing Bis-GMA as one component of dental restorative materials. The structure of UDMTA was confirmed by FT-IR and (1)H-NMR spectra. UDMTA was incorporated into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50 wt%/50 wt%) resin system to replace Bis-GMA partly and totally. Double bond conversion, polymerization volumetric shrinkage, water sorption and solubility, flexural strength and modulus of UDMTA containing resin formulations were studied with neat Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin formulation as a reference. Results showed that UDMTA could be used as a coinitiator in photocurable dental resin, UDMTA containing resin had higher double bond conversion and lower polymerization shrinkage than that of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin, and the UDMTA containing copolymer had higher flexural strength and flexural modulus than Bis-GMA/TEGDMA copolymer. When UDMTA was used to replace more than 25 wt% of Bis-GMA, the obtained copolymer had higher water sorption and solubility. The optimized resin composition is by replacing 25 wt% of Bis-GMA in Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 by wt%), for the prepared resin had the best comprehensive properties.

  2. Bacterial viability and physical properties of antibacterially modified experimental dental resin composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rüttermann

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the antibacterial effect and the effect on the material properties of a novel delivery system with Irgasan as active agent and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan when added to experimental dental resin composites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly formulated experimental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard (ST. Material A contained the delivery system providing 4 % (m/m Irgasan, material B contained 4 % (m/m methacrylated Irgasan and material C 8 % (m/m methacrylated Irgasan. Flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, water sorption (WS, solubility (SL, surface roughness Ra, polymerization shrinkage, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS and its apolar γS (LW, polar γS (AB, Lewis acid γS (+and base γS (- term as well as bacterial viability were determined. Significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: The materials A to C were not unacceptably influenced by the modifications and achieved the minimum values for FS, WS and SL as requested by EN ISO 4049 and did not differ from ST what was also found for Ra. Only A had lower FM than ST. Θ of A and C was higher and γS (AB of A and B was lower than of ST. Materials A to C had higher γS (+ than ST. The antibacterial effect of materials A to C was significantly increased when compared with ST meaning that significantly less vital cells were found. CONCLUSION: Dental resin composites with small quantities of a novel antibacterially doped delivery system or with an antibacterial monomer provided acceptable physical properties and good antibacterial effectiveness. The sorption material being part of the delivery system can be used as a vehicle for any other active agent.

  3. Effect of adhesive resin cements and post surface silanization on the bond strengths of adhesively inserted fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Bitter, Kerstin; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strengths and the effect of silanization of fiber posts inserted with different adhesive systems. Sixty DT Light Posts (size 1) were used. Thirty posts were pretreated with silane. The posts were cemented into form-congruent artificial root canals (12 mm) of bovine dentine. Six groups were formed: G1, Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G2, Monobond-S+Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G3, ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G4, Monobond-S+ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G5, RelyX Unicem; and G6, Monobond-S+RelyX Unicem. The mean (standard deviation) tensile bond strengths (megapascals) were 7.69 (0.85) for G1, 7.15 (1.01) for G2, 6.73 (0.85) for G3, 6.78 (0.97) for G4, 4.79 (0.58) for G5, and 4.74 (0.88) for G6. G1 achieved significantly higher bond strengths than G3 and G5; G3 had significantly higher values than G5 (P Silanization had no significant effect (P > .05, one-way analysis of variance). Tensile bond strengths were significantly influenced by the type of resin cement. Silanization of fiber post surfaces seems to have no clinical relevance.

  4. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  5. Effect of metal primers and tarnish treatment on bonding between dental alloys and veneer resin

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, Seung-Sik; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers on the bonding of dental alloys and veneer resin. Polyvinylpyrrolidone solution's tarnish effect on bonding strength was also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS Disk-shape metal specimens (diameter 8 mm, thickness 1.5 mm) were made from 3 kinds of alloy (Co-Cr, Ti and Au-Ag-Pd alloy) and divided into 4 groups per each alloy. Half specimens (n=12 per group) in tarnished group were immersed into polyvinylpyrrolidone solu...

  6. Dynamic measurement of local displacements within curing resin-based dental composite using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Rahman, Mohammed Wahidur; Donnan, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using optical coherence elastography to measure internal displacements during the curing phase of a light-activated, resin-based composite material. Displacement vectors were spatially mapped over time within a commercial dental composite. Measurements revealed that the orientation of cure-induced displacement vectors varied spatially in a complex manner; however, each vector showed a systematic evolution with time. Precision of individual displacements was estimated to be ˜1 to 2 μm, enabling submicrometer time-varying displacements to be detected.

  7. Laser phototherapy enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to the dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ivana Márcia Alves; Matos, Adriana Bona; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm(2), 40 mW, 1 W/cm(2), 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm(2)). After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives.

  8. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Márcia Alves Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm2, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2, 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm2. After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test (P<0.05. Results. Different cell types showed different viabilities in response to the same materials. Substances leached from adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. Conclusion. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives.

  9. Effect of Storage Time on Bond Strength Performance of Multimode Adhesives to Indirect Resin Composite and Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishi, P; André, C B; Silva, Jp Lyra E; Bacelar-Sá, R; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Giannini, M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the bond strength performance of multimode adhesives (MMAs) to indirect resin composite and lithium disilicate glass ceramic after 24 hours or one year of water storage. Thirty flat and polished plates of indirect resin composite (Epricord) and thirty lithium disilicate glass ceramic plates (IPS e.max Press) were prepared. Surfaces were pretreated using sandblasting (indirect resin composite) or hydrofluoric acid (glass-based ceramic). Specimens were bonded with one of two MMAs (Scotchbond Universal [SBU] or All-Bond Universal [ABU]) or ceramic primer and hydrophobic bonding (RelyX Ceramic Primer and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Bond) as a control (n=10). Resin cement cylinders (0.75 mm in diameter × 0.5 mm in height) were bonded to both substrate surfaces using the respective adhesives. After 24 hours or one year of water storage, bonding performance was measured by microshear bond strength (MSBS) testing. Results were analyzed using three-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). For indirect resin composite, significantly higher MSBS values were found for ABU after 24 hours (ABU > SBU = control); however, no significant difference among the adhesives was observed after one year (p>0.05). For glass-based ceramic, significantly different bond strengths were observed among the adhesives after 24 hours (control = ABU > SBU) and one year (control > SBU = ABU; presin composite after aging, as they showed similar bond performance to that of the control group. However, separate bottles of silane bonding resin showed higher MSBS values and more durable bonding for etched glass-based ceramic.

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in human dental pulp: effects of tooth preparation and adhesive application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Bora; Atilla, Pergin; Cakar, Nur; Hasanreisoglu, Ufuk

    2007-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated that restorative procedures can initiate pulpal inflammation. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells mediate the leukocyte-endothelium interaction, which is the fundamental event of inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible changes in the endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of human dental pulp with tooth preparation, and after the application of one-step self-etch adhesive. Twenty healthy human premolars and third molars scheduled to be extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. Group 1 involved sound intact teeth representing the controls. In group 2, teeth were prepared for full crown and extracted within 2h. Groups 3 and 4 comprised the teeth coated with one-step self-etch adhesive, iBond Gluma inside following the preparation and extracted after 24 and 48h, respectively. Tissue distribution and staining intensity of CAMs including E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 was investigated in the pulp samples using monoclonal antibodies and the streptavidin-biotin-horse-radish immunoperoxidase procedure. The assessment of immunohistochemical reactions was performed by two independent observers using a semi-quantitative scale. All the CAMs evaluated were expressed by the healthy pulp tissues. Significant alterations in the distribution and staining intensity of CAMs were detected following tooth preparation. One-step self-etch adhesive tested in the present study induced inflammatory reactions in the pulp (Padhesive on prepared teeth had a potential to interfere with the inflammatory response.

  11. Wear and flexural strength comparisons of alumina/feldspar resin infiltrated dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, A R; Lachman, N; Walker, M; Botha, T

    2008-11-01

    Incorporating a feldspar chemical bond between alumina filler particles is expected to increase the wear-resistant and flexural strength properties. An investigation was carried out to evaluate the influence of the feldspar chemical bonding between alumina filler particles on wear and flexural strength of experimental alumina/feldspar dental composites. It was hypothesized that wear resistance and flexural strength would be significantly increased with increased feldspar mass. Alumina was chemically sintered and bonded with 30% and 60% feldspar mass, silanized and infiltrated with UDMA resin to prepare the dental restorative composite material. Higher wear-resistant characteristics resulted with increased feldspar mass of up to 60% (p 0.05). Feldspar chemical bonding between the alumina particles may improve on the wear-resistance and flexural strength of alumina/feldspar composites.

  12. In vitro evaluation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate effect on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Niloofar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shoul, Maryam Azizi; Sattari, Hasti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is applied for remineralization of early caries lesions or tooth sensitivity conditions and may affect subsequent resin bonding. This in vitro study investigated the effect of CPP-ACP on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molar teeth were selected and randomly divided into three groups and six subgroups. Buccal or lingual surfaces of teeth were prepared to create a flat enamel surface. Adhesives used were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE One F. In three subgroups, before applying adhesives, enamel surfaces were treated with Tooth Mousse CPP-ACP for one hour, rinsed and stored in 37°C temperature with 100% humidity. This procedure was repeated for 5 days and then adhesives were applied and Tetric N-Ceram composite was adhered to the enamel. This procedure was also fulfilled for the other three subgroups without CPP-ACP treatment. After 24 hour water storage, samples were tested for shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance with P 0.05). In non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there were statistically significant differences among all subgroups. Tetric N-Bond had the highest and AdheSE One F had the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusion: CPP-ACP application reduces the shear bond strength of AdheSE and AdheSE One F to enamel but not Tetric N-Bond. PMID:25878683

  13. In vitro evaluation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate effect on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel

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    Niloofar Shadman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is applied for remineralization of early caries lesions or tooth sensitivity conditions and may affect subsequent resin bonding. This in vitro study investigated the effect of CPP-ACP on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molar teeth were selected and randomly divided into three groups and six subgroups. Buccal or lingual surfaces of teeth were prepared to create a flat enamel surface. Adhesives used were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE One F. In three subgroups, before applying adhesives, enamel surfaces were treated with Tooth Mousse CPP-ACP for one hour, rinsed and stored in 37°C temperature with 100% humidity. This procedure was repeated for 5 days and then adhesives were applied and Tetric N-Ceram composite was adhered to the enamel. This procedure was also fulfilled for the other three subgroups without CPP-ACP treatment. After 24 hour water storage, samples were tested for shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance with P 0.05. In non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there were statistically significant differences among all subgroups. Tetric N-Bond had the highest and AdheSE One F had the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusion: CPP-ACP application reduces the shear bond strength of AdheSE and AdheSE One F to enamel but not Tetric N-Bond.

  14. The current state of adhesive dentistry: a guide for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mante, Francis K; Ozer, Fusun; Walter, Ricardo; Atlas, Alan M; Saleh, Najeed; Dietschi, Didier; Blatz, Markus B

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is key to minimally invasive, esthetic, and tooth-preserving dental restorations. These are typically realized by bonding various restorative materials, such as composite resins, ceramics, or even metal alloys, to tooth structures or other materials with composite resin luting agents. For optimal bond strengths and long-lasting clinical success, however, these material and tooth substrates require their respective pretreatment steps, based on their natures and compositions. Today, dental adhesion is used in almost all dental specialties. This article summarizes key aspects and guidelines for clinical success with adhesive dentistry and summarizes information presented at the 5th International Congress on Adhesive Dentistry.

  15. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

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    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  16. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

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    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  17. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  18. The durability of a fluoride-releasing resin adhesive system to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masatoshi; Okuda, Mamiko; Ogata, Miwako; Pereira, Patricia N R; Tagami, Junji; Pashley, David H

    2003-01-01

    The durability of a fluoride-free (SE Bond) and a fluoride-containing (KBF) self-etching primer/ adhesive system were compared by measuring the microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) of these adhesive systems to human dentin in vitro. After bonding, the restored teeth were serially sectioned into multiple slabs that were trimmed to a 1 mm2 cross-sectional area at the bonded interface. For the three and six month specimens, half were fully covered with nail varnish (SE+, KBF+), while the other half were incubated at 37 degrees C in water without any protective varnish (SE-, KBF-). The microTBS of the one-day specimens were 44.6 +/- 11.2 MPa for SE Bond and 39.8 +/- 8.0 MPa for KBF (p > 0.05). When unprotected specimens were incubated in water for three and six months, the microTBS fell to 26.3 +/- 8.8 MPa and 23.6 +/- 10.7 MPa for SE-, respectively, but did not change in the specimens protected with nail varnish (SE+, 41.9 +/- 12.8 MPa and 41.8 +/- 9.8 MPa, respectively). In contrast, in specimens bonded with a fluoride-containing resin, KBF, the bond strengths of the unprotected specimens did not change over three and six months KBF-. Values were 32.4 +/- 6.1 MPa and 36.8 +/- 2.3 MPa, respectively. Similarly, varnish-protected KBF+ specimens did not change over three and six months (39.3 +/- 13.6 MPa and 40.9 +/- 14.7 MPa, respectively). The results indicate that decreases in bond strength over six months' storage are water-dependent but can be prevented by using fluoride-containing resins.

  19. Twelve-year survival of 2-surface composite resin and amalgam premolar restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipur, Safa; Pesun, Igor; Nowakowski, Anthony; Kim, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Composite resin and amalgam restorations are indicated for the restoration of posterior teeth. With increased esthetic demands, long-term clinical studies are required to evaluate the restorative success and reasons for failure of these materials. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the survival and reasons for failure of directly placed 2-surface composite resin restorations and directly placed 2-surface amalgam restorations on premolars placed by Canadian dental students. Using The University of Manitoba's dental management software and paper charts, all 2-surface composite resin and 2-surface amalgam restorations placed on premolars between January 1, 2002, and May 30, 2014, were included. Short-term failure (within 2 years), long-term failure, and reasons for failure were collected. A Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with an associated P value comparing composite resin to amalgam restoration curves was performed using SPSS statistical software. Over 12 years, 1695 composite resin and 1125 amalgam 2-surface premolar restorations were placed. Of these restorations, 134 composite resins (7.9%) and 66 amalgams (5.9%) failed. Short-term failures (2 years or less) consisted of 57 composite resin (4%) and 23 amalgam (2.3%) restorations. Long-term failures (greater than 2 years) consisted of 77 composite resin (4.5%) and 43 amalgam (3.8%) restorations. After 12 years of service, the survival probability of composite resin restorations was 86% and that of amalgam restorations 91.5%. The differences in composite resin and amalgam survival curves were also found to be statistically significant (P=.009 for Log-rank test). The main reasons for failure were recurrent caries and fracture of the tooth being restored. Within the limitations of this study, both composite resin and amalgam restorations had acceptable success rates and similar failure modes. Recurrent caries was still the most common reason for failure. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for

  20. On the improved adhesion of NiTi wires embedded in polyester and vinylester resins

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    Mattia Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effect of different surface treatments on shape memory alloy wires embedded in PolyEster (PE and VinylEster (VE polymeric matrices. In particular, two types of chemical etching and a chemical bonding with a silane coupling agent have been performed on the surfaces of the wires. Pull-out tests have been carried out on samples made from a specifically designed Teflon mould. Considering the best results of the pull-out tests obtained with PE resin, the debonding induced by strain recovery of 4%, 5% and 6% pre-strained NiTi wires has been evaluated with the wires being subjected to different surface treatment conditions and then being embedded in the PE matrix. The results prove that the wires functionalised and embedded in the PE resin show the maximum pull-out forces and the highest interfacial adhesion. Finally, it has been found that debonding induced by strain recovery is strongly related to the propagation towards the radial direction of sharp cracks at the debonding region.

  1. The role of host-derived dentinal matrix metalloproteinases in reducing dentin bonding of resin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modem self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability.

  2. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pcomposites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (pcomposite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (padhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva.

  3. Elution study of unreacted Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, and Bis-EMA from light-cured dental resins and resin composites using HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Achilias, Dimitris S

    2005-07-01

    In the present work the elution of residual monomers from light-cured dental resins and resin composites into a 75% ethanol:water solution was studied using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The resins studied were made by light-curing of bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), ethoxylated bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate [Bis-EMA(4)] and mixtures of these monomers. The resin composites were made from two commercial light-cured restorative materials (Z100 MP and Filtek Z250), the resin matrix of which is based on copolymers of these monomers. The effect of the curing time on the amount of monomers eluted was investigated. The concentration of the extractable monomers was determined at several immersion periods from 3 h to 30 days. For all the materials studied, it was observed that the chemical structure of the monomers used for the preparation of the resins, which defines the chemical and physical structure of the corresponding resin, directly affects the amount of eluted monomers, as well as the time needed for the elution of this amount. In the case of composites, it seems that the elution process it is not influenced by the presence of filler. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dental cavity liners for Class I and Class II resin-based composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Andrew B; Peltz, Ivy; Veitz-Keenan, Analia

    2016-10-25

    Resin-based composite (RBC) is currently accepted as a viable material for the restoration of caries for posterior permanent teeth requiring surgical treatment. Despite the fact that the thermal conductivity of the RBC restorative material closely approximates that of natural tooth structure, postoperative hypersensitivity is sometimes still an issue. Dental cavity liners have historically been used to protect the pulp from the toxic effects of some dental restorative materials and to prevent the pain of thermal conductivity by placing an insulating layer between restorative material and the remaining tooth structure. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of using dental cavity liners in the placement of Class I and Class II resin-based composite posterior restorations in permanent teeth in children and adults. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 25 May 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 4) in the Cochrane Library (searched 25 May 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 25 May 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 25 May 2016) and LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 25 May 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of the use of liners under Class I and Class II posterior resin-based composite restorations in permanent teeth (in both adults and children). We included both parallel and split-mouth designs. We utilized standard methodological procedures prescribed by Cochrane for data collection and analysis. Two review authors screened the search results and assessed the eligibility of studies for

  5. Analytical methods for the measurement of polymerization kinetics and stresses of dental resin-based composites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami-Lahiji, Mehrsima; Hooshmand, Tabassom

    2017-01-01

    Resin-based composites are commonly used restorative materials in dentistry. Such tooth-colored restorations can adhere to the dental tissues. One drawback is that the polymerization shrinkage and induced stresses during the curing procedure is an inherent property of resin composite materials that might impair their performance. This review focuses on the significant developments of laboratory tools in the measurement of polymerization shrinkage and stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization. An electronic search of publications from January 1977 to July 2016 was made using ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar databases. The search included only English-language articles. Only studies that performed laboratory methods to evaluate the amount of the polymerization shrinkage and/or stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization were selected. The results indicated that various techniques have been introduced with different mechanical/physical bases. Besides, there are factors that may contribute the differences between the various methods in measuring the amount of shrinkages and stresses of resin composites. The search for an ideal and standard apparatus for measuring shrinkage stress and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of resin-based materials in dentistry is still required. Researchers and clinicians must be aware of differences between analytical methods to make proper interpretation and indications of each technique relevant to a clinical situation. PMID:28928776

  6. Dentin Bond Strength of Two One-Bottle Adhesives after Delayed Activation of Light-Cured Resin Composites

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    F. Shafiei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adverse surface interactions between one-bottle adhesives and chemical-cured composites may occur with delayed light activation of light-cured composites. The purpose of this study was to assess the Effects of delayed activation of light-cured compositeson shear bond strength of two one-bottle adhesives with different acidity to bovine dentin.Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface was prepared on sixty-six bovine incisors using 600 grit carbide papers. Prime&Bond NT, and One-Step adhesives and resin composite were applied in six groups: 1 immediate curing of the composite, 2 the composite was left 2.5 minutes over the cured adhesive before light activation, 3 prior to delayed activation of the composite, the cured adhesive was covered with a layer of nonacidic hydrophobic porcelain bonding resin (Choice 2 and cured immediately. After thermocycling,shear bond strength (SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed with Friedmans two-way Non-parametric ANOVA.Results: The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond was significantly lower than immediate activated (P<0.05. Decrease in the SBS of One-Step was not statistically significant after delayed activation. The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond and One-Step with an additional resin layer was significantly higher than delayed activation (P<0.001.Conclusion: The bond strength of Prime&Bond might be compromised by the higher acidity of this adhesive during the 2.5 minutes delayed activation of light-cured composite.Addition of a layer of hydrophobic resin compensated the effect of delayed activation andimproved the bond strength.

  7. Cyanoacrylate-POSS nanocomposites: novel adhesives with improved properties for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaie, Parastoo; Atai, Mohammad; Imani, Mohammad; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Ghasaban, Samaneh

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of incorporation of an acrylate polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanostructure (APOSS) on the physical and mechanical properties and hydrolytic stability of octyl cyanoacrylate (CA) adhesives. CA was photopolymerized under irradiation of visible light using 1-phenyle-1,2-propandione (PPD), and 2,3-botanedione (BD) as photoinitiators. Following the polymerization shrinkage kinetics of the adhesives, the initiator concentration was optimized. Mechanical properties of the bulk CA-APOSS nanocomposites, including flexural strength and modulus, were investigated. Miroshear bond strength of dental composite bonded to human dentin applying the CA-APOSS adhesives was also determined. The effect of APOSS on the stability of CA adhesive against hydrolysis studied performing solubility, water uptake, and aging tests. The results revealed higher efficiency of BD in comparison to PPD. A 3% (mol/mol) of BD was obtained as the optimum photoinitiator concentration. The incorporation of APOSS increased the polymerization shrinkage rate of the CA adhesives. The flexural strength of CA adhesive was significantly improved incorporating less than 20 wt.% APOSS while an increasing trend was observed in the flexural modulus with the nanostructures loading. The microshear bond strength to dentin was also enhanced using 10 wt.% APOSS as reinforcing/crosslinking nanofillers. A decrease in the solubility and water sorption was the result of incorporation of APOSS in CA adhesives. Degradation due to the hydrolysis in water was diminished in the specimens containing APOSS nanostructures, revealed after aging in water at 37°C. CA adhesives are good soft tissue adhesives which their low mechanical properties and lack of hydrolytic stability has made them less interesting in the applications deal with hard tissues. The study shows that the incorporation of POSS nanostructures into CA could reduce the drawbacks. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials

  8. Design of new phosphonic acid monomers for dental adhesives--synthesis of (meth) acryloxyalkyl 3-phosphonopropionates and evaluation of their adhesion-promoting functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tay, Franklin R; Nishiyama, Nonrihiro; Pashley, David H; Endo, Takeshi

    2006-09-01

    The aims of this study were to synthesize new phosphonic acid monomers, and to examine their bonding performance. Four kinds of newly designed phosphonic acid monomers were synthesized, and seven experimental composite-type adhesive resins comprising the synthesized monomers (3 wt%), with BPO/DEPT/BPBA initiator were prepared. Tensile bond strengths of the adhesive resins to enamel and metal were measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/ min. The synthesized adhesive monomers were light yellow viscous liquids with 32.5%-49.3% yields, and identified by 1H NMR, IR and elemental analysis to be (meth)acryloxyalkyl 3-phosphonopropionates [R-P(=O) (OH)2] (5-MPPP, 6-MHPP, 6-AHPP, 10-MDPP). It was found that the newly developed phosphonic acid monomers with BPO/DEPT/BPBA initiator attained strong adhesion to both unetched, ground enamel and sandblasted Ni-Cr alloy with good durability. They exhibited significantly higher bond strengths than conventional phosphorous-containing monomers such as MEPP and VBPA (p adhesive resins have potential prosthodontic and orthodontic applications, especially as self-etching, non-rinsing orthodontic adhesive resins.

  9. Use of transparent vinyl polysiloxane in a minimally invasive approach for creating composite resin undercuts for partial removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjão, Fabiana Mansur

    2012-01-01

    A technique using a transparent vinyl polysiloxane material developed for use with light-polymerized composite resin and that does not require a lubricant is presented for creating composite resin undercuts for partial removable dental prosthesis clasps. With a surveyor, the undercut is waxed on the diagnostic cast according to the intended path of insertion. The transparent vinyl polysiloxane is used to fabricate a template for the undercut. The template is used intraorally to create the undercut in composite resin on the abutment tooth.

  10. Influence of artificial ageing on surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of artificial ageing on the surface properties and early Streptococcus mutans adhesion to current dental composites for the direct restoration of class II defects. Three hundred and thirty specimens each were prepared from five dental composites, and were randomly allotted to various artificial ageing protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7/90/365 days; thermal cycling, 6,000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). Prior and after each treatment, surface roughness (R(a)) and hydrophobicity were determined, and S. mutans adhesion (ATCC 25175; 2.5 h, 37 degrees C) was simulated with and without prior exposition to human whole saliva (2 h, 37 degrees C). Adherence of S. mutans was determined fluorometrically. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). For both R(a) and S. mutans adherence to uncoated and saliva-coated specimens, significant influences of the composite material, the ageing medium and the ageing duration have been observed; for surface hydrophobicity, significant influences of the composite material and the ageing duration were found. For uncoated specimens, significant increases in S. mutans adhesion were observed with prolonged artificial ageing, whereas significant decreases in S. mutans adhesion were found for the saliva-coated specimens. The data indicate influences of the artificial ageing method on surface parameters such as R(a) and hydrophobicity as well as microbial adhesion. The results underline the relevance of saliva coating on the outcome of studies simulating microbial adhesion, and highlight differences in the susceptibility of dental composites for the adhesion of oral bacteria.

  11. Influence of dental resin material composition on cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammeier, Carmen; Li, YuPing; Lunos, Scott; Fok, Alex; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Robert S.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) signal attenuation through different resin material compositions. Four distinct composite systems were used: Filtek supreme ultra (FSU) (3M ESPE), IPS empress direct (EMD) (Ivoclar Vivadent), estelite sigma quick (SQK) (Tokuyama Dental), and Z100 (3M ESPE). Cross-sectional images of different composite-demineralized phantoms (n=108) were collected using a 1310-nm intraoral cross-polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) imaging system. %T quantified the CP-OCT signal attenuation. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer chemical analysis was utilized to determine how different matrix/filler compositions affected attenuation of the near infrared (NIR) signal. CP-OCT imaging of dental resin composites showed enormous variation in signal attenuation. For each of our composite systems, there was not a consistent attenuation difference in the NIR signal for A to D shades. The four composites had similar measured backscattering values but attenuated the overall signal to different degrees. When comparing the A2 shades between the four different composite systems, the order of highest to lowest of %T was EMD>Z100, FSU>SQK (ANOVA, Tukey, pcomposite materials affect CP-OCT signal attenuation.

  12. The role of the ionomer glass component in polyacid-modified composite resin dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusei, Gabriel O; Deb, Sanjukta; Nicholson, John W

    2004-07-01

    In order to model the processes that occur within polyacid-modified composite resin ("compomer") dental restoratives, a series of experiments has been carried out with silanated and silane-free ionomer glass G338, and silanated and silane-free unreactive glass (Raysorb T-4000). In an acid-base reaction with dental grade aqueous maleic acid-acrylic acid copolymer solution, the setting time of the silanted G338 was found to be 9 min, compared with 5 min for the silane-free glass. Inclusion of each glass in an experimental composite resin system showed that the formulations which contained G338 absorbed more water than the formulations which contained Raysorb T-4000, regardless of whether or not the glass was silanted. Biaxial flexure strength was superior for experimental composites containing Raysorb T-4000, with highest results being obtained with the silanated glass. Overall these results demonstrate that silanation of the filler is essential for optimal physical properties but that, for the ionomer glass, it inhibits the acid-base reaction. The presence of ionomer glass led to an increase in water uptake compared with the unreactive glass, regardless of the presence of silane.

  13. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  14. Micro-CT evaluation of internal adaptation in resin fillings with different dentin adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hoon Han

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of present study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of composite restorations using different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Typical class I cavities were prepared in 32 human third molars. The teeth were divided into the following four groups: 3-step etch-and-rinse, 2-step etch-and-rinse, 2-step self-etch and 1-step self-etch system were used. After the dentin adhesives were applied, composite resins were filled and light-cured in two layers. Then, silver nitrate solution was infiltrated, and all of the samples were scanned by micro-CT before and after thermo-mechanical load cycling. For each image, the length to which silver nitrate infiltrated, as a percentage of the whole pulpal floor length, was calculated (%SP. To evaluate the internal adaptation using conventional method, the samples were cut into 3 pieces by two sectioning at an interval of 1 mm in the middle of the cavity and they were dyed with Rhodamine-B. The cross sections of the specimens were examined by stereomicroscope. The lengths of the parts where actual leakage was shown were measured and calculated as a percentage of real leakage (%RP. The values for %SP and %RP were compared. Results After thermo-mechanical loading, all specimens showed significantly increased %SP compared to before thermo-mechanical loading and 1-step self-etch system had the highest %SP (p < 0.05. There was a tendency for %SP and %RP to show similar microleakage percentage depending on its sectioning. Conclusions After thermo-mechanical load cycling, there were differences in internal adaptation among the groups using different adhesive systems.

  15. Mechanical fatigue degradation of ceramics versus resin composites for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Geinzer, Eva; Muschweck, Anna; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    For posterior partial restorations an overlap of indication exists where either ceramic or resin-based composite materials can be successfully applied. The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of modern dental ceramic materials versus dental resin composites in order to address such conflicts. Bar specimens of five ceramic materials and resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and stored for 14 days in distilled water at 37°C. The following ceramic materials were selected for testing: a high-strength zirconium dioxide (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar), a machinable lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar), a pressable lithium disilicate ceramic (e-max Press, Ivoclar), a fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar), and a machinable color-graded feldspathic porcelain (Trilux Forte, Vita). The composite materials selected were: an indirect machinable composite (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) and four direct composites with varying filler nature (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray; GrandioSO, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar-Vivadent; and CeramX Duo, Dentsply). Fifteen specimens were tested in water for initial strength (σin) in 4-point bending. Using the same test set-up, the residual flexural fatigue strength (σff) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz (n=25). Weibull parameters σ0 and m were calculated for the σin specimens, whereas the σff and strength loss in percentage were obtained from the fatigue experiment. The zirconium oxide ceramic showed the highest σin and σff (768 and 440 MPa, respectively). Although both lithium disilicate ceramics were similar in the static test, the pressable version showed a significantly higher fatigue resistance after cyclic loading. Both the fluorapatite-based and the feldspathic porcelain showed equivalent initial and cyclic fatigue properties. From the composites, the highest filled direct material Clearfil Majesty Posterior showed superior fatigue performance

  16. The role of MDP in a bonding resin of a two-step self-etching adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Naoko; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) contained in the bonding resin of a two-step self-etch adhesive system. An experimental adhesive (M0) containing MDP only in the primer, but not in the bonding resin was prepared. Clearfil SE Bond (MM) and M0 were compared in terms of microtensile bond strength to dentin, ultimate tensile strength of the bonding resin, and dentin-resin bonding interface morphology under SEM and TEM. The immediate µTBS values of MM significantly decreased after thermal cycles while M0 were stable even after 10,000 cycles. In the SEM observations, formation of erosion was observed beneath the acid-base resistant zone only in M0. The results suggested that MDP in the bonding resin of the two-step self-etching system; 1) improved the immediate bond strength, but caused reduction in long-term bond durability; 2) offered the advantages of acid-base resistance at the ABRZ forefront area.

  17. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dario Acuña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada, green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n=5: purple corn (P, purple corn + bleaching (PB, green tea (T, green tea + bleaching (TB, distilled water (W, and distilled water + bleaching (WB. In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p3.3.

  18. Genetic toxicology of dental composite resin extracts in somatic cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arossi, Guilherme Anziliero; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; Reguly, Maria Luiza; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genetic toxicity associated to nine aqueous extracts from dental composite resins (Charisma, Fill Magic, Fill Magic Flow, Durafill, TPH Spectrum, Concept, Natural Look, Filtek Z250 and Filtek P60) and one random extract. Homologous mitotic recombination, point and chromosomal mutation effects were determined in somatic proliferative cells of Drosophila melanogaster exposed to aqueous extracts of the clinically used composites. Reproducible increases in clone mutant spot frequencies induced by diluted extract of Fill Magic Flow were observed. These increments were exclusively associated to the induction of homologous recombination - a genetic phenomenon involved in the loss of heterozygosis. The other eight composite resins and the random extract had no statistically significant effect on total spot frequencies - suggesting that they are non-genotoxic in the somatic mutation and recombination test assay, which agrees with the applications they have in dentistry. These findings - supported by numerous studies showing a positive correlation between carcinogenicity in man and genotoxicity in the Drosophila wing spot test - point to the potential risks some composite resins pose to the health of patients and dentistry personnel.

  19. Effect of metal primers and tarnish treatment on bonding between dental alloys and veneer resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Seung-Sik; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers on the bonding of dental alloys and veneer resin. Polyvinylpyrrolidone solution's tarnish effect on bonding strength was also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS Disk-shape metal specimens (diameter 8 mm, thickness 1.5 mm) were made from 3 kinds of alloy (Co-Cr, Ti and Au-Ag-Pd alloy) and divided into 4 groups per each alloy. Half specimens (n=12 per group) in tarnished group were immersed into polyvinylpyrrolidone solution for 24 hours. In Co-Cr and Ti-alloy, Alloy Primer (MDP + VBATDT) and MAC-Bond II (MAC-10) were applied, while Alloy Primer and V-Primer (VBATDT) were applied to Au-Ag-Pd alloys. After surface treatment, veneering composite resin were applied and shear bond strength test were conducted. RESULTS Alloy Primer showed higher shear bond strength than MAC-Bond II in Co-Cr alloys and Au-Ag-Pd alloy (Pveneer resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloys. PMID:26576256

  20. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti, E-mail: joserenatocq@hotmail.com [Potiguar University, Department of Biotechnology, Natal (Brazil); Nogueira Junior, Lafayette [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Massi, Marcos [Federal University of São Paulo, Institute of Science and Technology, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva [Technological Institute of Aeronautics, Department of Physics, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Özcan, Mutlu [University of Zurich, Dental Materials Unit, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Materials Science, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  1. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  2. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  3. Applications of total-etch adhesive bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassler, Howard E

    2003-06-01

    The concept of total-etch adhesion for enamel and dentin is well accepted. Although new techniques with self-etching adhesives have been introduced, there needs to be more reported clinical trials before making a complete switch to these systems. Currently, the only adhesive systems with long-term data to support confidence and success with their clinical use are total-etch systems. Applications for using a total-etch adhesive bonding technique include sealants, orthodontic brackets, anterior composite resins, posterior composite resins, bonded dental silver amalgam, resin cementation with posts, all-metal, porcelain-metal, composite resin, and ceramic restorations, splinting, core foundations, and conservative treatment of the worn dentition. This article will review the concepts for clinical success with total-etch adhesion for a wide range of clinical applications.

  4. Effect of random/aligned nylon-6/MWCNT fibers on dental resin composite reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alexandre L S; Münchow, Eliseu A; de Oliveira Souza, Ana Carolina; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to synthesize and characterize random and aligned nanocomposite fibers of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/nylon-6 and (2) to determine their reinforcing effects on the flexural strength of a dental resin composite. Nylon-6 was dissolved in hexafluoropropanol (10 wt%), followed by the addition of MWCNT (hereafter referred to as nanotubes) at two distinct concentrations (i.e., 0.5 or 1.5 wt%). Neat nylon-6 fibers (without nanotubes) were also prepared. The solutions were electrospun using parameters under low- (120 rpm) or high-speed (6000 rpm) mandrel rotation to collect random and aligned fibers, respectively. The processed fiber mats were characterized by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopies, as well as by uni-axial tensile testing. To determine the reinforcing effects on the flexural strength of a dental resin composite, bar-shaped (20×2×2 mm(3)) resin composite specimens were prepared by first placing one increment of the composite, followed by one strip of the mat, and one last increment of composite. Non-reinforced composite specimens were used as the control. The specimens were then evaluated using flexural strength testing. SEM was done on the fractured surfaces. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey׳s test (α=5%). Nanotubes were successfully incorporated into the nylon-6 fibers. Aligned and random fibers were obtained using high- and low-speed electrospinning, respectively, where the former were significantly (presin composite tested was significantly reinforced when combined with nylon-6 fibrous mats composed of aligned fibers (with or without nanotubes) or random fibers incorporated with nanotubes at 0.5 wt%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlative transmission electron microscopy examination of nondemineralized and demineralized resin-dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meerbeek, B; Conn, L J; Duke, E S; Eick, J D; Robinson, S J; Guerrero, D

    1996-03-01

    The resin-dentin interface formed by two dentin adhesives, Optibond (OPTI, Kerr) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP, 3M), was ultramorphologically examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ultrastructural information from nondemineralized and demineralized sections was correlated. It was hypothesized that the different chemical formulations of the two adhesives would result in a different morphological appearance of the hybrid layer. Ultrastructural TEM examination proved that each of the two dentin adhesive systems was able to establish a micromechanical bond between dentin and resin with the formation of a hybrid layer. However, the interfacial hybridization process that took place to produce this resin-dentin bond appeared to be specifically related to the chemical composition and application modes of both systems. OPTI consistently presented with a hybrid layer with a relatively uniform ultrastructure, electron density, and acid resistance. These three parameters were found to be more variable for the hybrid layer formed by SBMP. Characteristic of SBMP was the identification of an amorphous phase deposited at the outer surface of the hybrid layer. Although both adhesive systems investigated follow a total-etch concept, their specific chemical formulations result in different interfacial ultrastructures that are probably related to different underlying bonding mechanisms. The clinical significance of these morphological findings, however, is still unknown.

  6. Influence of drying time of adhesive systems on the bond strength between resin cement and feldspathic ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Feitosa, Sabrina Alves; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Graduate Program in Restorative Dentistry (Prosthetic Dentistry Unit) – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Moura, Isabela Gomes; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Graduate Program in Restorative Dentistry (Operative Dentistry Unit) – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Corazza, Pedro Henrique; Post-graduation Program in Dentistry – Dental School – University of Passo Fundo – Passo Fundo – RS – Brazil.; Bergolli, Cesar Dalmolin; Faculty of Dentistry – Prosthetic Dentistry Unit – Federal University of Pelotas (UFPEL) – RS – Brazil.; Pagani, Clóvis; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Department of Restorative Dentistry – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio A; Department of Restorative Dentistry – Division of Prosthodontics – Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) – Natal – RN – Brazil.; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Rio Grande do Sul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of drying times of two total-etch & rinse adhesives on the resin bond strength to a feldsphatic ceramic, before and after aging. Material and Methods: Feldsphatic-ceramic CAD-CAM bars were cut into blocks (12×10×4 mm) with a cutting machine (N = 32). Impressions were made of each ceramic block with silicone putty material and the negative space was filled with a composite resin. The bonding ceramic surface was etched with hydrofluoric acid, silan...

  7. Effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a dental composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Discacciati José Augusto César

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization shrinkage is a critical factor affecting the longevity and acceptability of dental composite resins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a photo cured dental composite resin by measuring the Vickers hardness number (VHN and the volumetric polymerization shrinkage. Samples were prepared using a dental manual light-curing unit. The samples were submitted to irradiation times of 5, 10, 20 and 40 s, using 200 and 400 mW.cm-2 light intensities. Vickers hardness number was obtained at four different moments after photoactivation (immediate, 1 h, 24 h and 168 h. After this, volumetric polymerization shrinkage values were obtained through a specific density method. The values were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's (p = 0.05. Results showed increase in hardness values from the immediate reading to 1 h and 24 h readings. After 24 h no changes were observed regardless the light intensities or activation times. The hardness values were always smaller for the 200 mW.cm-2 light intensity, except for the 40 s irradiation time. No significant differences were detected in volumetric polymerization shrinkage considering the light intensity (p = 0.539 and the activation time (p = 0.637 factors. In conclusion the polymerization of the material does not terminate immediately after photoactivation and the increase of irradiation time can compensate a lower light intensity. Different combinations between light intensity and irradiation time, i.e., different amounts of energy given to the system, have not affected the polymerization shrinkage.

  8. Effect of Caries Removal Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin and Glass IonomerAdhesives to Primary Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is no enough published data about the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer adhesives on caries-affected primary tooth dentin excavated using minimally invasive systems. Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of 2 different adhesives (one resin modified glass ionomer and one resin using two caries removal tech- niques on healthy and caries-affected primary dentin. Materials and Methods: Two caries removal methods including mechanical (handpiece and chemomechanical (Carisolv techniques and two types of ad- hesives including one resin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond; CSEB, Kuraray and one resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive (Riva Bond LC; RBLC, SDI were used in this study. Ten extracted healthy primary teeth were used for the control group. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally in order to obtain four specimens from each tooth. Thirty suitable specimens were selected as the “control” and randomly divided into two groups of “sound dentin” based on the type of the adhesive used. Sixty extracted caries affected teeth were used for the carious group; sectioned as mentioned above and sixty suitable specimens were selected as the “treatment”. Then the specimens were arbitrarily divided into four groups based on caries removal techniques and the type of ad- hesive used (n = 15. After bonding with either CSEB or RBLC, the specimens were restored with a resin composite by means of PVC tubes and subjected to the shear bond strength test. The data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The specimens in Carisolv group bonded with CSEB (11.68 ± 3.1 showed a statistically significant higher mean bond strength followed by those in handpiece group bonded with CSEB (9.4 ± 2.7, which exhibited higher mean values than those groups with RBLC (p < 0.05. Shear bond strength values for Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly higher than Riva Bond LC when used in sound

  9. Nanoindentation creep versus bulk compressive creep of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Akhtar, R; Watts, D C

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate nanoindentation as an experimental tool for characterizing the viscoelastic time-dependent creep of resin-composites and to compare the resulting parameters with those obtained by bulk compressive creep. Ten dental resin-composites: five conventional, three bulk-fill and two flowable were investigated using both nanoindentation creep and bulk compressive creep methods. For nano creep, disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material by first injecting the resin-composite paste into metallic molds. Specimens were irradiated from top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points to ensure optimal polymerization using a visible light curing unit with output irradiance of 650mW/cm(2). Specimens then were mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. Following grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius), the nano creep was measured at a maximum load of 10mN and the creep recovery was determined when each specimen was unloaded to 1mN. For bulk compressive creep, stainless steel split molds (4mm×6mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens which were thoroughly irradiated at 650mW/cm(2) from multiple directions and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Specimens were loaded (20MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. One-way ANOVA, Levene's test for homogeneity of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test (all at p≤0.05), plus regression plots, were used for statistical analysis. Dependent on the type of resin-composite material and the loading/unloading parameters, nanoindentation creep ranged from 29.58nm to 90.99nm and permanent set ranged from 8.96nm to 30.65nm. Bulk compressive creep ranged from 0.47% to 1.24% and permanent set ranged from 0.09% to 0.38%. There was a significant (p=0.001) strong positive non-linear correlation (r(2)=0.97) between bulk

  10. Bioactivity and properties of a dental adhesive functionalized with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) and bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marta; Hohlfeld, Lisa; Thanh, Loan Tao; Biehl, Ralf; Lühmann, Nicole; Mohn, Dirk; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of infiltrating a commercial adhesive with nanosized bioactive glass (BG-Bi) particles or methacryl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on material properties and bioactivity. An acetone-based dental adhesive (Solobond Plus adhesive, VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was infiltrated with nanosized bioactive glass particles (0.1 or 1wt%), or with monofunctional or multifunctional POSS particles (10 or 20wt%). Unfilled adhesive served as control. Dispersion and hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering. Set specimens were immersed for 28days in artificial saliva at 37°C, and surfaces were mapped for the formation of calcium phospate (Ca/P) precipitates (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Viscosity (rheometry) and the structural characteristic of the networks were studied, such as degree of conversion (FTIR spectroscopy), sol fraction and water sorption. POSS particles showed a good dispersion of the particles for both types of particles being smaller than 3nm, while the bioactive glass particles had a strong tendency to agglomerate. All nanoparticles induced the formation of Ca/P precipitates. The viscosity of the adhesive was not or only slightly increased by POSS particle addition but strongly increased by the bioactive glass particles. The degree of conversion, water sorption and sol fraction showed a maintained or improved network structure and properties when filled with BG-Bi and multifunctional POSS, however, less polymerization was found when loading a monofunctional POSS. Multifunctional POSS may be incorporated into dental adhesives to provide a bioactive potential without changing material properties adversely. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Citotoxicity evaluation of three dental adhesives on vero cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catunda, Raisa-Queiroz; Vieira, Jeymesson-Raphael-Cardoso; de Oliveira, Erwelly-Barros; da Silva, Eliete-Cavalcanti; Brasil, Veruska-Lima-Moura

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate, in vitro, the potential cytotoxicity of three different dental adhesives systems (Adper Single Bond 2 -SB, Silorane System Adhesive Bond -SSAB and Single Bond Universal -SBU) on cultivated Vero cells after different contact times. Material and Methods The cells were cultured in a concentration of 2 x 105 cells/mL for 24h and grown to sub-confluent monolayers. VERO cells were exposed to 25µl of conditioned extracts obtained from 24h, 48h and 72h immersion of adhesive samples in culture medium (DMEM), immediately after polymerization. Fresh DMEM was used as negative control. Cell metabolism was evaluated by the MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide). The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, considering a significance of 5%. Results The values of cell viability ranged from 94.2% at 72h (SBU) to 109.6% at 48h (SB). The mean percentage of viability after exposure to the extracts of SB, SSAB and SBU were 103.2%, 100.63% and 97.43%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (p= 0.342) between the experimental and negative control groups. Conclusions At all exposure times, all adhesives tested in this study presented no cytotoxicity to Vero cells in vitro. Key words:Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity, dental adhesives, Vero cells.

  12. Citotoxicity evaluation of three dental adhesives on vero cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catunda, Raisa-Queiroz; Vieira, Jeymesson-Raphael-Cardoso; de Oliveira, Erwelly-Barros; da Silva, Eliete-Cavalcanti; Brasil, Veruska-Lima-Moura; Perez, Danyel-Elias-da Cruz

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate, in vitro, the potential cytotoxicity of three different dental adhesives systems (Adper Single Bond 2 -SB, Silorane System Adhesive Bond -SSAB and Single Bond Universal -SBU) on cultivated Vero cells after different contact times. The cells were cultured in a concentration of 2 x 105 cells/mL for 24h and grown to sub-confluent monolayers. VERO cells were exposed to 25µl of conditioned extracts obtained from 24h, 48h and 72h immersion of adhesive samples in culture medium (DMEM), immediately after polymerization. Fresh DMEM was used as negative control. Cell metabolism was evaluated by the MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide). The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, considering a significance of 5%. The values of cell viability ranged from 94.2% at 72h (SBU) to 109.6% at 48h (SB). The mean percentage of viability after exposure to the extracts of SB, SSAB and SBU were 103.2%, 100.63% and 97.43%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (p= 0.342) between the experimental and negative control groups. At all exposure times, all adhesives tested in this study presented no cytotoxicity to Vero cells in vitro. Key words:Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity, dental adhesives, Vero cells.

  13. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; Shinya, A.; Lassila, L.V.J.; Vallittu, P.K.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; De Moor, R.J.G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different framework materials on biomechanical behaviour of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). A three-dimensional finite element model of a two-unit cantilever RBFDP replacing a maxillary lateral incisor

  14. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; Shinya, A.; Lassila, L.V.J.; Vallittu, P.K.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; De Moor, R.J.G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different framework materials on biomechanical behaviour of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). A three-dimensional finite element model of a two-unit cantilever RBFDP replacing a maxillary lateral incisor

  15. Is it possible to distinguish the understanding of denture adhesive between Japanese dental students and Indonesian peers by a questionnaire?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Sadamori

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare cross-national differences in the recognition of denture adhesive between dental students. The design of the research was cross-cultural differences. The research was done in Japan and Indonesia. Seventy-seven dental students from Japan and Indonesia were surveyed using a questionnaire regarding knowledge/comprehension of denture adhesive (in Japanese and Indonesian versions respectively. Logistic regression using the Wald method showed that it was possible to distinguish Japanese dental students from Indonesian peers with a probability of 96.1 per cent by using 3 items out of 12. For the question of “How many domestic products denture adhesive do you know?” 85 per cent of the Japanese dentists answered “less than 3”, whereas 10 percent of Indonesian subjects did so. It was concluded that there were big differences between Japanese and Indonesian dental students’ understanding and experience of denture adhesive.

  16. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Bhargavi Dhamaraju; Indira Priyadharsini Bollu; Tandri S Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  17. A new arginine-based dental adhesive system: formulation, mechanical and anti-caries properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldeli, Saulo; Soares, Eveline F; Alvarez, Andres J; Farivar, Tanaz; Shields, Robert C; Sinhoreti, Mario A C; Nascimento, Marcelle M

    2017-08-01

    Secondary caries at the margins of composite restorations has been attributed to adhesive failure and consequent accumulation of cariogenic biofilms. To develop and evaluate an etch-and-rinse adhesive system containing arginine for sustainable release and recharge without affecting its mechanical properties. Arginine metabolism by oral bacteria generates ammonia, which neutralizes glycolytic acids and creates a neutral environmental pH that is less favorable to the growth of caries pathogens, thus reducing the caries risk at the tooth-composite interface. Experimental adhesives were formulated with methacrylate monomers and arginine at 5%, 7%, and 10% or no arginine (control). Adhesives were tested for: (i) mechanical properties of true stress (FS and UTS), modulus of elasticity (E), degree of conversion (DC), Knoop hardness number (KHN) and dentin microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS), (ii) arginine release and recharge, and (iii) antibacterial activities. Data was analyzed by t-test, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. FS and UTS results showed no statistically significant differences between the 7% arginine-adhesive and control, while the results for E, DC, KHN and μ-TBS showed no difference among all groups. The 7% arginine-adhesive showed a high release rate of arginine (75.0μmol/cm(2)) at 2h, and a more sustainable, controlled release rate (up to 0.2μmol/cm(2)) at 30days. Incorporation of 7% arginine did not affect the physical and mechanical properties of the adhesive. Arginine was released from the adhesive at a rate and concentration that exhibited antibacterial effects, regardless of shifts in biofilm conditions such as sugar availability and pH. Secondary caries is recognized as the main reason for failure of dental restorations. The development of an arginine-based adhesive system has the potential to dramatically reduce the incidence and severity of secondary caries in adhesive restorations in a very economical fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  18. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  20. Composite resin's adhesive resistance to dentin: influence of Er:YAG laser focal distance variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Chimello, Daniela Thomazatti; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Dibb, Regina Guenka Palma

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro the influence of Er:YAG laser focal distance variation on tensile bond strength of a composite resin to dentin. Although there are several studies using the Er:YAG laser for dentin treatment, there is a lack of available literature related to the Er:YAG laser focal distance variation. Sixty vestibular and lingual dentin surfaces from extracted human third molars, kept in a 0.4% azide sodium solution, were ground and assigned to six groups. The control group was conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid (CA). In the lased groups, the dentin surface treatment was performed by irradiation with Er:YAG laser (80 mJ/2 Hz), varying the focal distance (11, 12, 14, 16, and 17 mm), followed by acid etching. The Single Bond/Filtek Z250 (3M) resinous system was used for the specimen manufacture. The tensile bond strength tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine with 50 kgf load cell and 0.5 mm/min cross head speed. The averages in MPa were: CA: 18.03 (+/-2.09); 11 mm; 9.92 (+/-3.34); 12 mm: 9.49 (+/-2.29); 14 mm: 10.99 (+/-3.45); 16 mm: 10.56 (+/-1.93); and 17 mm: 17.05 (+/-2.31). It was concluded that the application of Er:YAG laser in a defocused mode (17 mm) associated with acid etching was similar to the treatment of acid solely. Er:YAG laser irradiation in a focused (12 mm) and a defocused (11, 14, and 16 mm) mode coupled with acid conditioning produced the lowest values of adhesion.

  1. Deproteinization technique stabilizes the adhesion of the fiberglass post relined with resin composite to root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Doglas; Almeida, José F A; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C R

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of pretreatment of root dentin by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) alone, associated with 2% chlorhexidine in gel base (CHX) and/or ethanol (EtOH), and the air-drying technique (Air) on the bond strength and adhesive durability of fiberglass post relined with resin composite to root dentin. A total of 100 bovine incisor roots were divided into 10 groups: G1 (control), irrigation with physiologic solution; G2, Air; G3, NaOCl; G4, NaOCl + Air; G5, NaOCl + EtOH; G6, NaOCl + EtOH + Air; G7, NaOCl + CHX; G8, NaOCl + CHX + Air; G9, NaOCl + CHX + EtOH; G10, NaOCl + CHX + EtOH + Air. Fiberglass post relined with resin composite was cemented and each group was randomly divided into two subgroups: 24 h of water storage and 12 months of water storage. The push-out test was performed and bond strength values were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The use of NaOCl alone or associated with CHX had the highest values of bond strength with or without Air in the immediate and stored groups, being statistically similar to the immediate control group (p > 0.05). The groups using EtOH or Air alone had lower bond strength in the immediate and stored groups (p 0.05). The use of NaOCl or NaOCl associated with CHX preserved the bond strength immediate and for 12 months. The air-drying technique and the other associations decreased the immediate bond strength values.

  2. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Dong, Delu; Chen, Yaoyu; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2) were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  3. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Liu

    Full Text Available As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2 were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  4. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  5. Bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material with a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    1996-07-01

    Adhesive bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material (Olympus Castable Ceramics, OCC) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a silane primer in conjunction with an adhesive luting material. The primer contained a silane coupler and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), while the methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based luting agent was initiated with a tri-n-butylborane derivative (TBB) and contained 4-META (4-META/MMA-TBB resin). Ceramic specimens were sanded with No. 600 silicon carbide paper followed by blasting with alumina and/or etching with ammonium bifluoride. The specimens were bonded with various combinations and shear bond strengths were determined. Both priming and alumina blasting enhanced the bond between 4-META resin and OCC. Although etching with ammonium bifluoride roughened the ceramic surface, this procedure did not improve the bond strength. Electron probe microanalysis of the ceramic surface revealed a decrease in silicon and aluminium elements after etching with ammonium bifluoride.

  6. The effects of LPS on adhesion and migration of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Yaqing; Yu, Qing; Ma, Fengle; Wang, Zhihua; Luo, Zhirong; Zhou, Zeyuan; Cooper, Paul R; He, Wenxi

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the migration and adhesion of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and the associated intracellular signalling pathways. hDPSCs obtained from impacted third molars were exposed to LPS and in vitro cell adhesion and migration were evaluated. The effects of LPS on gene expression of adhesion molecules and chemotactic factors were investigated using quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). The potential involvement of nuclear factor NF-k