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Sample records for density-dependent prey mortality

  1. Density-dependent prey mortality is determined by the spatial scale of predator foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Erin K; White, J Wilson

    2016-02-01

    Foraging theory predicts which prey patches predators should target. However, in most habitats, what constitutes a 'patch' and how prey density is calculated are subjective concepts and depend on the spatial scale at which the predator (or scientist) is observing. Moreover, the predator's 'foraging scale' affects prey population dynamics: predators should produce directly density-dependent (DDD) prey mortality at the foraging scale, but inversely density-dependent (IDD) mortality (safety-in-numbers) at smaller scales. We performed the first experimental test of these predictions using behavioral assays with guppies (Poecilia reticulata) feeding on bloodworm 'prey' patches. The guppy's foraging scale had already been estimated in a prior study. Our experimental results confirmed theoretical predictions: predation was IDD when prey were aggregated at a scale smaller than the foraging scale, but not when prey were aggregated at larger scales. These results could be used to predict outcomes of predator-prey interactions in continuous, non-discrete habitats in the field.

  2. Predation, habitat complexity, and variation in density-dependent mortality of temperate reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Darren W

    2006-05-01

    Density dependence in demographic rates can strongly affect the dynamics of populations. However, the mechanisms generating density dependence (e.g., predation) are also dynamic processes and may be influenced by local conditions. Understanding the manner in which local habitat features affect the occurrence and/or strength of density dependence will increase our understanding of population dynamics in heterogeneous environments. In this study I conducted two separate field experiments to investigate how local predator density and habitat complexity affect the occurrence and form of density-dependent mortality of juvenile rockfishes (Sebastes spp.). I also used yearly censuses of rockfish populations on nearshore reefs throughout central California to evaluate mortality of juvenile rockfish at large spatial scales. Manipulations of predators (juvenile bocaccio, S. paucispinus) and prey (kelp, gopher, and black-and-yellow [KGB] rockfish, Sebastes spp.) demonstrated that increasing the density of predators altered their functional response and thus altered patterns of density dependence in mortality of their prey. At low densities of predators, the number of prey consumed per predator was a decelerating function, and mortality of prey was inversely density dependent. However, at high densities of predators, the number of prey killed per predator became an accelerating response, and prey mortality was directly density dependent. Results of field experiments and large-scale surveys both indicated that the strength of density-dependent mortality may also be affected by the structural complexity of the habitat. In small-scale field experiments, increased habitat complexity increased the strength of density-dependent mortality. However, at large scales, increasing complexity resulted in a decrease in the strength of density dependence. I suggest that these differences resulted from scale-dependent changes in the predatory response that generated mortality. Whether

  3. Population-level consequences of heterospecific density-dependent movements in predator-prey systems

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we elucidate how small-scale movements, such as those associated with searching for food and avoiding predators, affect the stability of predator-prey dynamics. We investigate an individual-based Lotka-Volterra model with density dependent movement, in which the predator and prey populations live in a very large number of coupled patches. The rates at which individuals leave patches depend on the local densities of heterospecifics, giving rise to one reaction norm for each of th...

  4. Understanding spatial distributions : Negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, Allert I; MacCurdy, Robert B; Chan, Ying-Chi; Penning, Emma; Gabrielson, Rich M; Cluderay, John; Spaulding, Eric L; Dekinga, Anne; Holthuijsen, Sander; ten Horn, Job; Brugge, Maarten; van Gils, Jan A; Winkler, David W; Piersma, Theunis

    2016-01-01

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The 'functional response' couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases asymptotic

  5. Understanding spatial distributions: negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, A.I.; MacCurdy, R.B.; Chan, Y.-C; Penning, E.; Gabrielson, R.M.; Cluderay, J.; Spaulding, E.L.; Dekinga, A.; Holthuijsen, S.; Ten Horn, J.; Brugge, M.; van Gils, J.A.; Winkler, D.W.; Piersma, T.

    2016-01-01

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The ‘functional response’ couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases asymptotic

  6. Understanding spatial distributions: negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, A.I.; MacCurdy, R.B.; Chan, Y.-C; Penning, E.; Gabrielson, R.M.; Cluderay, J.; Spaulding, E.L.; Dekinga, A.; Holthuijsen, S.; Ten Horn, J.; Brugge, M.; van Gils, J.A.; Winkler, D.W.; Piersma, T.

    2016-01-01

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The ‘functional response’ couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases

  7. Population-level consequences of heterospecific density-dependent movements in predator-prey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Ke; Söderquist, Mårten; Englund, Göran

    2014-02-07

    In this paper we elucidate how small-scale movements, such as those associated with searching for food and avoiding predators, affect the stability of predator-prey dynamics. We investigate an individual-based Lotka-Volterra model with density-dependent movement, in which the predator and prey populations live in a very large number of coupled patches. The rates at which individuals leave patches depend on the local densities of heterospecifics, giving rise to one reaction norm for each of the two species. Movement rates are assumed to be much faster than demographics rates. A spatial structure of predators and prey emerges which affects the global population dynamics. We derive a criterion which reveals how demographic stability depends on the relationships between the per capita covariance and densities of predators and prey. Specifically, we establish that a positive relationship with prey density and a negative relationship with predator density tend to be stabilizing. On a more mechanistic level we show how these relationships are linked to the movement reaction norms of predators and prey. Numerical results show that these findings hold both for local and global movements, i.e., both when migration is biased towards neighbouring patches and when all patches are reached with equal probability. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Density-dependent predation influences the evolution and behavior of masquerading prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelhorn, John; Rowland, Hannah M; Delf, Jon; Speed, Michael P; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2011-04-19

    Predation is a fundamental process in the interaction between species, and exerts strong selection pressure. Hence, anti-predatory traits have been intensively studied. Although it has long been speculated that individuals of some species gain protection from predators by sometimes almost-uncanny resemblances to uninteresting objects in the local environment (such as twigs or stones), demonstration of antipredatory benefits to such "masquerade" have only very recently been demonstrated, and the fundamental workings of this defensive strategy remain unclear. Here we use laboratory experiments with avian predators and twig-mimicking caterpillars as masqueraders to investigate (i) the evolutionary dynamics of masquerade; and (ii) the behavioral adaptations associated with masquerade. We show that the benefit of masquerade declines as the local density of masqueraders relative to their models (twigs, in our system) increases. This occurs through two separate mechanisms: increasing model density both decreased predators' motivation to search for masqueraders, and made masqueraders more difficult to detect. We further demonstrated that masquerading organisms have evolved complex microhabitat selection strategies that allow them to best exploit the density-dependent properties of masquerade. Our results strongly suggest the existence of opportunity costs associated with masquerade. Careful evaluation of such costs will be vital to the development of a fuller understanding of both the distribution of masquerade across taxa and ecosystems, and the evolution of the life history strategies of masquerading prey.

  9. Regional differences in density-dependent mortality and reproduction in Finnish reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilpo Kojola

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Reindeer in the southern and central regions of reindeer husbandry in Finland feed on arboreal lichens or are given supplementary rations from midwinter whereas in the northern region reindeer use snow-covered forage throughout winter. Rates of mortality and reproduction were examined using data from population crashes of semi-domesticated reindeer that occurred in Northern Finland during 1960-1987. The mortality and reproductive rate were density-dependent in the southern region and the mortality was density-dependent in the central region. The density-dependence was most probably due to food competition in forest cutting areas where reindeer gather to feed on arboreal lichens from felled trees. In the northern region mortality was not density-dependent indicating that where reindeer feed on over-utilized winter range the effects of increased feeding competition are masked by very large changes in the availability of forage.

  10. A density dependent delayed predator-prey model with Beddington-DeAngelis type function response incorporating a prey refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Jai Prakash; Abbas, Syed; Thakur, Manoj

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a predator-prey model incorporating a prey refuge. The feeding rate of consumers (predators) per consumer (i.e. functional response) is considered to be of Beddington-DeAngelis type. The Beddington-DeAngelis functional response is similar to the Holling-type II functional response but contains an extra term describing mutual interference by predators. We investigate the role of prey refuge and degree of mutual interference among predators in the dynamics of system. The dynamics of the system is discussed mainly from the point of view of permanence and stability. We obtain conditions that affect the persistence of the system. Local and global asymptotic stability of various equilibrium solutions is explored to understand the dynamics of the model system. The global asymptotic stability of positive interior equilibrium solution is established using suitable Lyapunov functional. The dynamical behaviour of the delayed system is further analyzed through incorporating discrete type gestation delay of predator. It is found that Hopf bifurcation occurs when the delay parameter τ crosses some critical value. The analytical results found in the paper are illustrated with the help of numerical examples.

  11. Extended density-dependent mortality in mature conifer forests: causes and implications for ecosystem management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau-Berthiaume, Benoit; Macdonald, S Ellen; Stadt, J John

    2016-07-01

    Understanding processes driving mortality in forests is important for comprehension of natural stand dynamics and for informing natural disturbance-based ecosystem management. There has been considerable study of mortality in forests during the self-thinning phase but we know much less about processes driving mortality in stands at later successional stages. We addressed this through study of five 1-ha spatially explicit permanent plots in mature (111-186 yr old in 2012) Pinus contorta stands in the Canadian Rocky Mountains using data from repeated measurements over a 45-yr period, dendrochronological information, and point pattern analysis. We tested the hypothesis that these stands had completed the self-thinning/density-dependent mortality stage of succession. Contrary to our expectations, the self-thinning phase can persist for more than 140 yr following stand establishment. Our findings suggest this was attributable to prolonged post-fire establishment periods due to surface fires in three of the plots while in the other two plots moist conditions and slow growth most likely delayed the onset of competition. Several pieces of evidence indicated the importance of density-dependent mortality in these stands over the study period: (1) The diameter distribution of individuals changed from initially right-skewed toward normality as a result of mortality of smaller-diameter stems. (2) Individuals of lower canopy positions were proportionally more affected by mortality. (3) When compared to the pre-mortality pattern, surviving stems in all stands had an increasingly uniform spatial distribution. In two of the plots, recent windthrow and/or ingrowth initially hindered our ability to detect density-dependent mortality but our dendrochronological sampling and permanent plot data allowed us to untangle the different processes at play; in doing so we demonstrate for the first time how density-independent processes can mask underlying density-dependent mortality

  12. Density dependent mortality in the springtail species Orchesella cincta due to predaton by the carabid beetle Notiophilus biguttatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ruiter, P.C.; Ouborg, N.J.; Ernsting, G.

    1988-01-01

    Mortality of the collembole species Orchesella cincta (L.), due to predation by the carabid Notiophilus biguttatus F., has been measured in the laboratory at three levels of prey density. Prey densities were chosen such that the predator's consumption at the lowest prey density was a little above

  13. Age-specific, density-dependent and environment-based mortality of a short-lived perennial herb

    OpenAIRE

    Picó, F Xavier; Retana, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Density-independent and density-dependent processes affect plant mortality. Although less well understood, age-specific mortality can also play an important role in plant mortality. The goal of this study was to analyse sev- eral factors accounting for mortality in the Mediterranean short-lived peren- nial herb Lobularia maritima. We followed three cohorts of plants (from emergence to death) during 4 years in field conditions. We collected data on plant mortality ...

  14. Stability and Hopf Bifurcation of a Delayed Density-Dependent Predator-Prey System with Beddington-DeAngelis Functional Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyin; Meng, Gang; She, Zhikun

    In this paper, we investigate the stability and Hopf bifurcation of a delayed density-dependent predator-prey system with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response, where not only the prey density dependence but also the predator density dependence are considered such that the studied predator-prey system conforms to the realistically biological environment. We start with the geometric criterion introduced by Beretta and Kuang [2002] and then investigate the stability of the positive equilibrium and the stability switches of the system with respect to the delay parameter τ. Especially, we generalize the geometric criterion in [Beretta & Kuang, 2002] by introducing the condition (i‧) which can be assured by the condition (H2‧), and adopting the technique of lifting to define the function S˜n(τ) for alternatively determining stability switches at the zeroes of S˜n(τ)s. Afterwards, by the Poincaré normal form for Hopf bifurcation in [Kuznetsov, 1998] and the bifurcation formulae in [Hassard et al., 1981], we qualitatively analyze the properties for the occurring Hopf bifurcations of the system (3). Finally, an example with numerical simulations is given to illustrate the obtained results.

  15. Restructuring fundamental predator-prey models by recognising prey-dependent conversion efficiency and mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiqiu; Montagnes, David J S

    2015-05-01

    Incorporating protozoa into population models (from simple predator-prey explorations to complex food web simulations) is of conceptual, ecological, and economic importance. From theoretical and empirical perspectives, we expose unappreciated complexity in the traditional predator-prey model structure and provide a parsimonious solution, especially for protistologists. We focus on how prey abundance alters two key components of models: predator conversion efficiency (e, the proportion of prey converted to predator, before mortality loss) and predator mortality (δ, the portion of the population lost though death). Using a well-established model system (Paramecium and Didinium), we collect data to parameterize a range of existing and novel population models that differ in the functional forms of e and δ. We then compare model simulations to an empirically obtained time-series of predator-prey population dynamics. The analysis indicates that prey-dependent e and δ should be considered when structuring population models and that both prey and predator biomass also vary with prey abundance. Both of these impact the ability of the model to predict population dynamics and, therefore, should be included in theoretical model evaluations and assessment of ecosystem dynamics associated with biomass flux.

  16. Adult trees cause density-dependent mortality in conspecific seedlings by regulating the frequency of pathogenic soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Gilbert, Gregory S; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Shan; Huang, Fengmin; Yu, Shixiao

    2016-12-01

    Negative density-dependent seedling mortality has been widely detected in tropical, subtropical and temperate forests, with soil pathogens as a major driver. Here we investigated how host density affects the composition of soil pathogen communities and consequently influences the strength of plant-soil feedbacks. In field censuses of six 1-ha permanent plots, we found that survival was much lower for newly germinated seedlings that were surrounded by more conspecific adults. The relative abundance of pathogenic fungi in soil increased with increasing conspecific tree density for five of nine tree species; more soil pathogens accumulated around roots where adult tree density was higher, and this greater pathogen frequency was associated with lower seedling survival. Our findings show how tree density influences populations of soil pathogens, which creates plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to community-level and population-level compensatory trends in seedling survival.

  17. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra E Benkwitt

    Full Text Available Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion.

  18. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaynes, Sarah; MacNulty, Daniel R; Stahler, Daniel R; Quimby, Kira A; Smith, Douglas W; Coulson, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the population dynamics of top-predators is essential to assess their impact on ecosystems and to guide their management. Key to this understanding is identifying the mechanisms regulating vital rates. Determining the influence of density on survival is necessary to understand the extent to which human-caused mortality is compensatory or additive. In wolves (Canis lupus), empirical evidence for density-dependent survival is lacking. Dispersal is considered the principal way in which wolves adjust their numbers to prey supply or compensate for human exploitation. However, studies to date have primarily focused on exploited wolf populations, in which density-dependent mechanisms are likely weak due to artificially low wolf densities. Using 13 years of data on 280 collared wolves in Yellowstone National Park, we assessed the effect of wolf density, prey abundance and population structure, as well as winter severity, on age-specific survival in two areas (prey-rich vs. prey-poor) of the national park. We further analysed cause-specific mortality and explored the factors driving intraspecific aggression in the prey-rich northern area of the park. Overall, survival rates decreased during the study. In northern Yellowstone, density dependence regulated adult survival through an increase in intraspecific aggression, independent of prey availability. In the interior of the park, adult survival was less variable and density-independent, despite reduced prey availability. There was no effect of prey population structure in northern Yellowstone, or of winter severity in either area. Survival was similar among yearlings and adults, but lower for adults older than 6 years. Our results indicate that density-dependent intraspecific aggression is a major driver of adult wolf survival in northern Yellowstone, suggesting intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms have the potential to regulate wolf populations at high ungulate densities. When low prey availability or high

  19. Dynamics of a Nicholson's Model with a Nonlinear Density-dependent Mortality Term%一类具有非线性物种密度制约死亡率的Nicholson模型解的性态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝平平; 冯春华

    2012-01-01

    本文利用分析不等式方法来研究Berezansky等人在2010年提出的公开问题之一:一类具有非线性物种密度制约死亡率的Nicholson模型的解的有界性、稳定性和振动性.通过这个方法证明了这个模型解的有界性、振动性,并部分解决了解的稳定性.%By using the method of analysis inequality ,this paper mainly deals with the open problem provided by Berezansky et al. The boundedness and oscillations of the solutions for this Nicholson's model with a nonlinear density-dependent mortality term are investigated,and the stability of the solutions for this model is solved partially.

  20. Permanence for a Delayed Nicholson' s Blowflies Model with a Nonlinear Density-dependent Mortality Term%一类具有非线性死亡率的时滞Nicholson 飞蝇方程的持久性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄祖达

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study a generalized Nicholson' s blowflies model with a nonlinear density-dependent mortality term. Under the admissible initial conditions, by using continuous dependence theorem, some criteria to guarantee the positivity and global existence of solutions are obtained. Then, by applying differential inequality techniques, we give the positive lower bound and upper bound of solutions, and get the permanence of this model. Moreover, we present an example to illustrate our main results.%研究了一类具有非线性死亡率的广义时滞Nicholson飞蝇方程.在容许初值的条件下,利用解的延拓定理,首先证明了该方程的所有解是正的并且是整体存在的,然后利用微分不等式的技巧,证明了该方程所有解具有正的上下确界,获得了该方程所有解具有持久性的充分条件.由于所考虑的模型比同类文献中的模型更加广泛,从而改进和推广了已有文献中的相关结果,并给出了一个具体的例子.

  1. Raptor-Powerline Mortality Data, Snake River Birds of Prey Conservation Area - 1999-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a spreadsheet resulting from monthly searches for dead birds along randomly selected power line segments in and near the Snake River Birds of Prey...

  2. Raptor-Powerline Mortality Data, Snake River Birds of Prey Conservation Area - 1999-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — This data set is a spreadsheet resulting from monthly searches for dead birds along randomly selected power line segments in and near the Snake River Birds of Prey...

  3. Mortality Risk of Manufacturing Companies in Guangzhou based on Density Dependence Model%基于密度依赖模型的广州制造业企业死亡风险研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婵; 彭璧玉; 陈有华

    2014-01-01

    分析在同一个产业环境中不同组织形式的演化特征,概括其竞争和协作关系,判断这些关系对制造业中组织演化的影响,在此基础上提出有利于广州制造业持续发展的调控对策和建议。利用种群密度依赖原理、时变变量Cox模型分析广州制造业企业死亡风险,结果表明:(1)2000-2012年期间,广州制造业的种群密度与组织死亡风险呈正向的关系;(2)组织年龄与组织死亡风险呈负向的关系,且组织年龄可以抑制种群密度对组织死亡的影响;(3)在相同的组织年龄水平下多元化企业面临的死亡风险大于专一型企业的死亡风险,并且随着组织年龄的增大,两者的死亡风险差距逐渐扩大;(4)种群密度对外资企业死亡风险的影响大于对内资企业死亡风险的影响。但外资企业一旦存活,随之组织年龄的增大,其死亡风险跟内资企业面临的死亡风险基本相同;(5)种群密度对非劳动密集型企业死亡风险的影响大于对劳动密集型企业的死亡风险。%This paper analyzes the evolution characteristics of different forms in the same industry environment , summarizes the competition and collaboration relationships between them , and determines the impact of these rela-tionships on organizational evolution in manufacturing .Then we propose countermeasures and suggestions which are conducive to the sustainable development of Guangzhou's manufacturing industry .By using the population density dependency theory of organizational ecology and time-varying variables Cox model , the basic conclusions are a-chieved:( 1 ) From 2000 to 2012 , population density of Guangzhou manufacturing industry was positively related to the risk of the population's death.(2) Organization's age has negative relationship with the risk of the population's death and inhibits the effect of the population density on tissue death .(3) In the same age

  4. Demographic Consequences of Poison-Related Mortality in a Threatened Bird of Prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Simone; Adrover, Jaume; Muñoz Navarro, Antoni; Sergio, Fabrizio; Tavecchia, Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for decline or threat of wild populations typically comes from multiple sources and methods that allow optimal integration of the available information, representing a major advance in planning management actions. We used integrated population modelling and perturbation analyses to assess the demographic consequences of the illegal use of poison for an insular population of Red Kites, Milvus milvus. We first pooled into a single statistical framework the annual census of breeding pairs, the available individual-based data, the average productivity and the number of birds admitted annually to the local rehabilitation centre. By combining these four types of information we were able to increase estimate precision and to obtain an estimate of the proportion of breeding adults, an important parameter that was not directly measured in the field and that is often difficult to assess. Subsequently, we used perturbation analyses to measure the expected change in the population growth rate due to a change in poison-related mortality. We found that poison accounted for 0.43 to 0.76 of the total mortality, for yearlings and older birds, respectively. Results from the deterministic population model indicated that this mortality suppressed the population growth rate by 20%. Despite this, the population was estimated to increase, albeit slowly. This positive trend was likely maintained by a very high productivity (1.83 fledglings per breeding pair) possibly promoted by supplementary feeding, a situation which is likely to be common to many large obligate or facultative European scavengers. Under this hypothetical scenario of double societal costs (poisoning of a threatened species and feeding programs), increasing poison control would help to lower the public cost of maintaining supplementary feeding stations. PMID:23155464

  5. Demographic consequences of poison-related mortality in a threatened bird of prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Tenan

    Full Text Available Evidence for decline or threat of wild populations typically comes from multiple sources and methods that allow optimal integration of the available information, representing a major advance in planning management actions. We used integrated population modelling and perturbation analyses to assess the demographic consequences of the illegal use of poison for an insular population of Red Kites, Milvus milvus. We first pooled into a single statistical framework the annual census of breeding pairs, the available individual-based data, the average productivity and the number of birds admitted annually to the local rehabilitation centre. By combining these four types of information we were able to increase estimate precision and to obtain an estimate of the proportion of breeding adults, an important parameter that was not directly measured in the field and that is often difficult to assess. Subsequently, we used perturbation analyses to measure the expected change in the population growth rate due to a change in poison-related mortality. We found that poison accounted for 0.43 to 0.76 of the total mortality, for yearlings and older birds, respectively. Results from the deterministic population model indicated that this mortality suppressed the population growth rate by 20%. Despite this, the population was estimated to increase, albeit slowly. This positive trend was likely maintained by a very high productivity (1.83 fledglings per breeding pair possibly promoted by supplementary feeding, a situation which is likely to be common to many large obligate or facultative European scavengers. Under this hypothetical scenario of double societal costs (poisoning of a threatened species and feeding programs, increasing poison control would help to lower the public cost of maintaining supplementary feeding stations.

  6. A short-term sublethal toxicity assay with zebra fish based on preying rate and its integration with mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-moneim, Ahmed; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Ribeiro, Rui

    2015-02-01

    Contaminant-induced feeding inhibition has direct and immediate consequences at higher levels of biological organization, by depressing the population consumption and thus hampering ecosystem functioning (e.g. grazing, organic matter decomposition). Thus, similarly to lethality and avoidance, feeding is mechanistically linked to ecosystem processes and is therefore an unequivocal ecologically meaningful response. The objective of the present study was to develop a short-term assay with the small freshwater fish Danio rerio, based on feeding. For this, a methodology to easily and precisely quantify feeding was first optimized: each fish was allowed to prey on ten live Daphnia magna juveniles, for 1h, just before the end of a 48-h exposure test period. Secondly, copper sensitivity of feeding relatively to survival and growth was evaluated. At the growth EC20 (40 μg L(-1)), feeding was inhibited by 53%, and at the feeding EC50 (36 μg L(-1)), mortality was negligible (1.3%). Integrating feeding and survival revealed a 97% depression in the population consumption at the LC50 (61 μg L(-1)). Thirdly, the influence of pH, conductivity and hardness on the feeding background variability was assessed by assaying waters collected at eight reference sites and was found to be negligible, within tested ranges. Fourthly, feeding assays with natural waters contaminated with acid mine drainage confirmed the integration of lethality and feeding to be pertinent at estimating contaminant effects at higher levels of biological organization.

  7. Density Dependence of Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Behera, B; Tripathy, S K

    2016-01-01

    High density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of a stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral $n+p+e+\\mu$ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars

  8. Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    High density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of the stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral n + p + e + μ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars.

  9. The allometry of prey preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Kalinkat

    Full Text Available The distribution of weak and strong non-linear feeding interactions (i.e., functional responses across the links of complex food webs is critically important for their stability. While empirical advances have unravelled constraints on single-prey functional responses, their validity in the context of complex food webs where most predators have multiple prey remain uncertain. In this study, we present conceptual evidence for the invalidity of strictly density-dependent consumption as the null model in multi-prey experiments. Instead, we employ two-prey functional responses parameterised with allometric scaling relationships of the functional response parameters that were derived from a previous single-prey functional response study as novel null models. Our experiments included predators of different sizes from two taxonomical groups (wolf spiders and ground beetles simultaneously preying on one small and one large prey species. We define compliance with the null model predictions (based on two independent single-prey functional responses as passive preferences or passive switching, and deviations from the null model as active preferences or active switching. Our results indicate active and passive preferences for the larger prey by predators that are at least twice the size of the larger prey. Moreover, our approach revealed that active preferences increased significantly with the predator-prey body-mass ratio. Together with prior allometric scaling relationships of functional response parameters, this preference allometry may allow estimating the distribution of functional response parameters across the myriads of interactions in natural ecosystems.

  10. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B.; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism’s entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained. PMID:27093056

  11. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Reyes

    Full Text Available Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1 egg survival is density dependent or 2 adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  12. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  13. You can't run but you can hide: refuge use in frog tadpoles elicits density-dependent predation by dragonfly larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossie, Thomas John; Murray, Dennis L

    2010-06-01

    The potential role of prey refuges in stabilizing predator-prey interactions is of longstanding interest to ecologists, but mechanisms underlying a sigmoidal predator functional response remain to be fully elucidated. Authors have disagreed on whether the stabilizing effect of prey refuges is driven by prey- versus predator-centric mechanisms, but to date few studies have married predator and prey behavioural observations to distinguish between these possibilities. We used a dragonfly nymph-tadpole system to study the effect of a structural refuge (leaf litter) on the predator's functional response, and paired this with behavioural observations of both predator and prey. Our study confirmed that hyperbolic (type II) functional responses were characteristic of foraging predators when structural cover was low or absent, whereas the functional response was sigmoidal (type III) when prey were provided with sufficient refuge. Prey activity and refuge use were density independent across cover treatments, thereby eliminating a prey-centric mechanism as being the genesis for density-dependent predation. In contrast, the predator's pursuit length, capture success, and handling time were altered by the amount of structure implying that observed shifts in density-dependent predation likely were related to predator hunting efficiency. Our study advances current theory by revealing that despite fixed-proportion refuge use by prey, presence of a prey refuge can induce density-dependent predation through its effect on predator hunting strategy. Ultimately, responses of predator foraging decisions in response to changes in prey availability and search efficiency may be more important in producing density-dependent predation than the form of prey refuge use.

  14. Growth and mortality of larval and juvenile Japanese seaperch Lateolabrax japonicus in relation to seasonal changes in temperature and prey abundance in the Chikugo estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Jun; Tanaka, Masaru

    2007-07-01

    Japanese seaperch Lateolabrax japonicus migrate from Ariake Bay to the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) zone of the Chikugo River and inhabit there through the post-migration period (15-20 mm in standard length). The feeding, growth and mortality during the post-migration period of Japanese seaperch were analyzed in relation to seasonal changes in temperature and prey concentration. Larvae and juveniles were collected from ten sampling stations at 4-7 day intervals from 24 February to 24 April 2005 in the Chikugo estuary. Based on the otolith microstructure analysis the sampled fish were divided into nine cohorts, each cohort covering a 5 day hatch date period (22 December 2004 to 4 February 2005). The growth coefficient ( G, day -1) was higher and the mortality coefficient ( M, day -1) was lower in the later cohorts. The ratio of G to M as an index of stage-specific survival during the post-migration period significantly increased as the season progressed and exceeded 1.0 in the last cohort examined. Variability in abundance of the major prey organism, Sinocalanus sinensis, had a significant effect on the Japanese seaperch ingestion rate. Increase in temperature and spring bloom of S. sinensis is concluded to provide the later cohorts with a higher survival probability through increasing ingestion and growth rates during their post-migration period in spring 2005.

  15. Density-dependent cladogenesis in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert B Phillimore

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic signature of adaptive radiation is a slowing of the rate of speciation toward the present. On the basis of molecular phylogenies, studies of single clades have frequently found evidence for a slowdown in diversification rate and have interpreted this as evidence for density dependent speciation. However, we demonstrated via simulation that large clades are expected to show stronger slowdowns than small clades, even if the probability of speciation and extinction remains constant through time. This is a consequence of exponential growth: clades, which, by chance, diversify at above the average rate early in their history, will tend to be large. They will also tend to regress back to the average diversification rate later on, and therefore show a slowdown. We conducted a meta-analysis of the distribution of speciation events through time, focusing on sequence-based phylogenies for 45 clades of birds. Thirteen of the 23 clades (57% that include more than 20 species show significant slowdowns. The high frequency of slowdowns observed in large clades is even more extreme than expected under a purely stochastic constant-rate model, but is consistent with the adaptive radiation model. Taken together, our data strongly support a model of density-dependent speciation in birds, whereby speciation slows as ecological opportunities and geographical space place limits on clade growth.

  16. Host range expansion is density dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Jactel, Hervé; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G; Perrette, Nicolas; Larter, Maximilien; Delzon, Sylvain; Piou, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    The realized host range of herbivores is expected to increase with herbivore population density. Theory also predicts that trait similarity and phylogenetic relatedness between native and exotic plants is expected to increase the susceptibility of introduced plants to feeding by native herbivores. Whether the ability of native herbivores to extend their host range to introduced species is density dependent is still unknown. We addressed this question by monitoring pine processionary moth (PPM, Thaumetopoea pityocampa) attacks during nine consecutive years on 41 pine species (8 native and 33 introduced) planted in an arboretum. The survey encompassed latent and outbreak periods. A total of 28 pine species were attacked by PPM. There was no difference in the probability of attack between native and introduced pine species. Host range increased and was more phylogenetically clustered during outbreak than latent periods. When population density increased, PPM expanded its diet breadth by attacking introduced pine species that were closely related to native hosts. This study demonstrates the density dependence of host range expansion in a common pine herbivore. Importantly, it supports the idea that the degree of phylogenetic proximity between host species can be a better predictor of attacks than the introduction status, which may help to predict the outcomes of new plant-herbivore interactions.

  17. Density dependence of clutch size: habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain density- dependent patterns in reproduction. The habitat heterogeneity hypothesis (HHH) explains density-dependent reproduction at the population level from poorer quality territories in heterogeneous environments only being occupied at high densities.

  18. Mutual Mortality of Great Horned Owl and Southern Black Racer: a Potential Risk of Raptors Preying on Snakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger W. Perry; Raymond E. Brown; D. Craig Rudolph

    2001-01-01

    .... There are previous reports of intense physical struggle between Great Horned Owls (and other raptors) and large constrictors but this is the first documented report of mutual mortality between a Great Horned Owl and a snake.

  19. Wildlife disease elimination and density dependence

    KAUST Repository

    Potapov, A.

    2012-05-16

    Disease control by managers is a crucial response to emerging wildlife epidemics, yet the means of control may be limited by the method of disease transmission. In particular, it is widely held that population reduction, while effective for controlling diseases that are subject to density-dependent (DD) transmission, is ineffective for controlling diseases that are subject to frequency-dependent (FD) transmission. We investigate control for horizontally transmitted diseases with FD transmission where the control is via culling or harvest that is non-selective with respect to infection and the population can compensate through DD recruitment or survival. Using a mathematical model, we show that culling or harvesting can eradicate the disease, even when transmission dynamics are FD. Eradication can be achieved under FD transmission when DD birth or recruitment induces compensatory growth of new, healthy individuals, which has the net effect of reducing disease prevalence by dilution. We also show that if harvest is used simultaneously with vaccination, and there is high enough transmission coefficient, application of both controls may be less efficient than vaccination alone. We illustrate the effects of these control approaches on disease prevalence for chronic wasting disease in deer where the disease is transmitted directly among deer and through the environment.

  20. Density dependence in a recovering osprey population: demographic and behavioural processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretagnolle, V; Mougeot, F; Thibault, J-C

    2008-09-01

    1. Understanding how density-dependent and independent processes influence demographic parameters, and hence regulate population size, is fundamental within population ecology. We investigated density dependence in growth rate and fecundity in a recovering population of a semicolonial raptor, the osprey Pandion haliaetus [Linnaeus, 1758], using 31 years of count and demographic data in Corsica. 2. The study population increased from three pairs in 1974 to an average of 22 pairs in the late 1990s, with two distinct phases during the recovery (increase followed by stability) and contrasted trends in breeding parameters in each phase. 3. We show density dependence in population growth rate in the second phase, indicating that the stabilized population was regulated. We also show density dependence in productivity (fledging success between years and hatching success within years). 4. Using long-term data on behavioural interactions at nest sites, and on diet and fish provisioning rate, we evaluated two possible mechanisms of density dependence in productivity, food depletion and behavioural interference. 5. As density increased, both provisioning rate and the size of prey increased, contrary to predictions of a food-depletion mechanism. In the time series, a reduction in fledging success coincided with an increase in the number of non-breeders. Hatching success decreased with increasing local density and frequency of interactions with conspecifics, suggesting that behavioural interference was influencing hatching success. 6. Our study shows that, taking into account the role of non-breeders, in particular in species or populations where there are many floaters and where competition for nest sites is intense, can improve our understanding of density-dependent processes and help conservation actions.

  1. Density dependence triggers runaway selection of reduced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Seymour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of exogenous mortality risks, future reproduction by an individual is worth less than present reproduction to its fitness. Senescent aging thus results inevitably from transferring net fertility into younger ages. Some long-lived organisms appear to defy theory, however, presenting negligible senescence (e.g., hydra and extended lifespans (e.g., Bristlecone Pine. Here, we investigate the possibility that the onset of vitality loss can be delayed indefinitely, even accepting the abundant evidence that reproduction is intrinsically costly to survival. For an environment with constant hazard, we establish that natural selection itself contributes to increasing density-dependent recruitment losses. We then develop a generalized model of accelerating vitality loss for analyzing fitness optima as a tradeoff between compression and spread in the age profile of net fertility. Across a realistic spectrum of senescent age profiles, density regulation of recruitment can trigger runaway selection for ever-reducing senescence. This novel prediction applies without requirement for special life-history characteristics such as indeterminate somatic growth or increasing fecundity with age. The evolution of nonsenescence from senescence is robust to the presence of exogenous adult mortality, which tends instead to increase the age-independent component of vitality loss. We simulate examples of runaway selection leading to negligible senescence and even intrinsic immortality.

  2. Determining the functional form of density dependence: deductive approaches for consumer-resource systems having a single resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Peter A

    2009-09-01

    Consumer-resource models are used to deduce the functional form of density dependence in the consumer population. A general approach to determining the form of consumer density dependence is proposed; this involves determining the equilibrium (or average) population size for a series of different harvest rates. The relationship between a consumer's mortality and its equilibrium population size is explored for several one-consumer/one-resource models. The shape of density dependence in the resource and the shape of the numerical and functional responses all tend to be "inherited" by the consumer's density dependence. Consumer-resource models suggest that density dependence will very often have both concave and convex segments, something that is impossible under the commonly used theta-logistic model. A range of consumer-resource models predicts that consumer population size often declines at a decelerating rate with mortality at low mortality rates, is insensitive to or increases with mortality over a wide range of intermediate mortalities, and declines at a rapidly accelerating rate with increased mortality when mortality is high. This has important implications for management and conservation of natural populations.

  3. Incorporating density dependence into the directed-dispersal hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Orr; Nathan, Ran

    2010-05-01

    The directed-dispersal (DrD) hypothesis, one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of seed dispersal, asserts that enhanced (nonrandom) arrival to favorable establishment sites is advantageous for plant fitness. However, as anticipated by the ideal free distribution theory, enhanced seed deposition may impair site suitability by increasing density-dependent mortality, thus negating the advantage postulated by the DrD hypothesis. Although the role of density effects is thoroughly discussed in the seed-dispersal literature, this DrD paradox remains largely overlooked. The paradox, however, may be particularly pronounced in animal-mediated dispersal systems, in which DrD is relatively common, because animals tend to generate local seed aggregations due to their nonrandom movements. To investigate possible solutions to the DrD paradox, we first introduce a simple analytical model that calculates the optimal DrD level at which seed arrival to favorable establishment sites yields maximal fitness gain in comparison to a null model of random arrival. This model predicts intermediate optimal DrD levels that correspond to various attributes of the plants, the dispersers, and the habitat. We then use a simulation model to explore the temporal dynamics of the invasion process of the DrD strategy in a randomly dispersed population, and the resistance of a DrD population against invasion of other dispersal strategies. This model demonstrates that some properties of the invasion process (e.g., mutant persistence ratio in the population and generations until initial establishment) are facilitated by high DrD levels, and not by intermediate levels as expected from the analytical model. These results highlight the need to revise the DrD hypothesis to include the countering effects of density-dependent mortality inherently imposed by enhanced arrival of seeds to specific sites. We illustrate how the revised hypothesis can elucidate previous results from empirical studies

  4. Density dependence of clutch size : habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.   Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain density-dependent patterns in reproduction. The habitat heterogeneity hypothesis (HHH) explains density-dependent reproduction at the population level from poorer quality territories in hetero geneous environments only being occupied at high

  5. Deterministic and Stochastic Analysis of a Prey-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Alakes; Samanta, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on studies of the deterministic and stochastic behaviours of a predator-prey system with prey-dependent response function. The first part of the paper deals with the deterministic analysis of uniform boundedness, permanence, stability and bifurcation. In the second part the reproductive and mortality factors of the prey and…

  6. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L

    2010-05-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer-resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant-mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  7. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant- mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  8. Density-dependent natal dispersal patterns in a leopard population recovering from over-harvest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Fattebert

    Full Text Available Natal dispersal enables population connectivity, gene flow and metapopulation dynamics. In polygynous mammals, dispersal is typically male-biased. Classically, the 'mate competition', 'resource competition' and 'resident fitness' hypotheses predict density-dependent dispersal patterns, while the 'inbreeding avoidance' hypothesis posits density-independent dispersal. In a leopard (Panthera pardus population recovering from over-harvest, we investigated the effect of sex, population density and prey biomass, on age of natal dispersal, distance dispersed, probability of emigration and dispersal success. Over an 11-year period, we tracked 35 subadult leopards using VHF and GPS telemetry. Subadult leopards initiated dispersal at 13.6 ± 0.4 months. Age at commencement of dispersal was positively density-dependent. Although males (11.0 ± 2.5 km generally dispersed further than females (2.7 ± 0.4 km, some males exhibited opportunistic philopatry when the population was below capacity. All 13 females were philopatric, while 12 of 22 males emigrated. Male dispersal distance and emigration probability followed a quadratic relationship with population density, whereas female dispersal distance was inversely density-dependent. Eight of 12 known-fate females and 5 of 12 known-fate male leopards were successful in settling. Dispersal success did not vary with population density, prey biomass, and for males, neither between dispersal strategies (philopatry vs. emigration. Females formed matrilineal kin clusters, supporting the resident fitness hypothesis. Conversely, mate competition appeared the main driver for male leopard dispersal. We demonstrate that dispersal patterns changed over time, i.e. as the leopard population density increased. We conclude that conservation interventions that facilitated local demographic recovery in the study area also restored dispersal patterns disrupted by unsustainable harvesting, and that this indirectly improved

  9. Density dependence in demography and dispersal generates fluctuating invasion speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren L; Li, Bingtuan; Miller, Tom E X; Neubert, Michael G; Shaw, Allison K

    2017-05-09

    Density dependence plays an important role in population regulation and is known to generate temporal fluctuations in population density. However, the ways in which density dependence affects spatial population processes, such as species invasions, are less understood. Although classical ecological theory suggests that invasions should advance at a constant speed, empirical work is illuminating the highly variable nature of biological invasions, which often exhibit nonconstant spreading speeds, even in simple, controlled settings. Here, we explore endogenous density dependence as a mechanism for inducing variability in biological invasions with a set of population models that incorporate density dependence in demographic and dispersal parameters. We show that density dependence in demography at low population densities-i.e., an Allee effect-combined with spatiotemporal variability in population density behind the invasion front can produce fluctuations in spreading speed. The density fluctuations behind the front can arise from either overcompensatory population growth or density-dependent dispersal, both of which are common in nature. Our results show that simple rules can generate complex spread dynamics and highlight a source of variability in biological invasions that may aid in ecological forecasting.

  10. A mechanistic analysis of density dependence in algal population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eBorlestean

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Population density regulation is a fundamental principle in ecology, but the specific process underlying functional expression of density dependence remains to be fully elucidated. One view contends that patterns of density dependence are largely fixed across a species irrespective of environmental conditions, whereas another is that the strength and expression of density dependence are fundamentally variable depending on the nature of exogenous or endogenous constraints acting on the population. We conducted a study investigating the expression of density dependence in Chlamydomonas spp. grown under a gradient from low to high nutrient density. We predicted that the relationship between per capita growth rate (pgr and population density would vary from concave up to concave down as nutrient density became less limiting and populations experienced weaker density regulation. Contrary to prediction, we found that the relationship between pgr and density became increasingly concave-up as nutrient levels increased. We also found that variation in pgr increased, and pgr levels reached higher maxima in nutrient-limited environments. Most likely, these results are attributable to population growth suppression in environments with high intraspecific competition due to limited nutrient resources. Our results suggest that density regulation is strongly variable depending on exogenous and endogenous processes acting on the population, implying that expression of density dependence depends extensively on local conditions. Additional experimental work should reveal the mechanisms influencing how the expression of density dependence varies across populations through space and time.

  11. Density-dependence as a size-independent regulatory mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vladar, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The growth function of populations is central in biomathematics. The main dogma is the existence of density-dependence mechanisms, which can be modelled with distinct functional forms that depend on the size of the Population. One important class of regulatory functions is the theta-logistic, which

  12. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  13. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  14. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not sup

  15. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not sup

  16. Density-dependence as a size-independent regulatory mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vladar, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The growth function of populations is central in biomathematics. The main dogma is the existence of density-dependence mechanisms, which can be modelled with distinct functional forms that depend on the size of the Population. One important class of regulatory functions is the theta-logistic, which

  17. Leaf damage and density-dependent effects on six Inga species in a neotropical forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Brenes-Arguedas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Many models have been proposed to explain the possible role of pests in the coexistence of a high diversity of plant species in tropical forests. Prominent among them is the Janzen-Connell model. This model suggests that specialized herbivores and pathogens limit tree recruitment as a function of their density or proximity to conspecifics. A large number of studies have tested the predictions of this model with respect to patterns of recruitment and mortality at different life stages, yet only a few have directly linked those density or distance-dependent effects to pest attack. If pest-attack is an important factor in density or distance-dependent mortality, there should be spatial heterogeneity in pest pressure. I studied the spatial distribution of leaf damage in saplings of six common Inga species (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae in the 50ha forest dynamic plot of Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The percent leaf damage of Inga saplings was not heterogeneous in space, and the density of conspecific, congener or confamilial neighbors was uncorrelated with the observed damage levels in focal plants. One of the focal species did suffer density-dependent mortality, suggesting that spatial variation in plant performance in these species is not directly driven by leaf damaging agents. While multiple studies suggest that density-dependent effects on performance are common in tropical plant communities, our understanding of the mechanisms that drive those effects is still incomplete and the underlying assumption that these patterns result from differential herbivore attack deserves more scrutiny.

  18. Density-Dependent Phase Polyphenism in Nonmodel Locusts: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Song

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the specific mechanisms of locust phase transformation are wellunderstood for model locust species such as the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria and the migratory locust Locusta migratoria, the expressions of density-dependent phase polyphenism in other nonmodel locust species are not wellknown. The present paper is an attempt to review and synthesize what we know about these nonmodel locusts. Based on all available data, I find that locust phase polyphenism is expressed in many different ways in different locust species and identify a pattern that locust species often belong to large taxonomic groups which contain mostly nonswarming grasshopper species. Although locust phase polyphenism has evolved multiple times within Acrididae, I argue that its evolution should be studied from a phylogenetic perspective because I find similar density-dependent phenotypic plasticity among closely related species. Finally, I emphasize the importance of comparative analyses in understanding the evolution of locust phase and propose a phylogeny-based research framework.

  19. Limit Theorems for Competitive Density Dependent Population Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, Todd L

    2010-01-01

    Near the beginning of the century, Wright and Fisher devised an elegant, mathematically tractable model of gene reproduction and replacement that laid the foundation for contemporary population genetics. The Wright-Fisher model and its extensions have given biologists powerful tools of statistical inference that enabled the quantification of genetic drift and selection. Given the utility of these tools, we often forget that their model - for mathematical, and not biological reasons - makes assumptions that are violated in most real-world populations. In this paper, I consider an alternative framework that merges P. A. P. Moran's continuous-time Markov chain model of allele frequency with the density dependent models of ecological competition proposed by Gause, Lotka and Volterra, that, unlike Moran's model allow for a stochastically varying -- but bounded -- population size. I require that allele numbers vary according to a density-dependent population process, for which the limiting law of large numbers is a...

  20. Viscosity and density dependence during maximal flow in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, B A; Wilson, T A; Lai-Fook, S J; Rodarte, J R; Hyatt, R E

    1980-02-01

    Maximal expiratory flow curves were obtained from ten healthy subjects white breathing air and three other gas mixtures with different densities and viscosities. From these data, the magnitudes of the dependence of maximal flow on gas density and viscosity were obtained. The scaling laws of fluid mechanics, together with a model for the flow-limiting mechanism, were used to obtain a prediction of the relationship between the density dependence and the viscosity dependence of maximal flow. Although the data for individual subjects were too variable to allow a precise comparison with this prediction, the relationship between the mean density dependence and the mean viscosity dependence of all usbjects agreed with the theoretic prediction. This agreement supports the assumption, which is frequently made, that flow resistance rather than tissue visoelasticity is the dominant contributor to peripheral resistance. Information on the relationships between the pressure drop to the flow-limiting segment and flow, gas density and viscosity, and lung volume were also obtained.

  1. Approximate particle number projection for finite range density dependent forces

    CERN Document Server

    Valor, A; Robledo, L M

    1996-01-01

    The Lipkin-Nogami method is generalized to deal with finite range density dependent forces. New expressions are derived and realistic calculations with the Gogny force are performed for the nuclei ^{164}Er and ^{168}Er. The sharp phase transition predicted by the mean field approximation is washed out by the Lipkin-Nogami approach; a much better agreement with the experimental data is reached with the new approach than with the Hartree-Fock_Bogoliubov one, specially at high spins.

  2. Saturating interactions in /sup 4/He with density dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, S.D.; Resler, D.A.; Moszkowski, S.A.

    1989-05-03

    With the advent of larger and faster computers, as well as modern shell model codes, nuclear structure calculations for the light nuclei (A<16) which include full 2/bar h/..omega.. model spaces are quite feasible. However, there can be serious problems in the mixing of 2/bar h/..omega.. and higher excitations into the low-lying spectra if the effective interaction is non-saturating. Furthermore, effective interactions which are both saturating and density dependent have not generally been used in previous nuclear structure calculations. Therefore, we have undertaken studies of /sup 4/He using two-body potential interactions which incorporate both saturation and density-dependence. Encouraging initial results in remedying the mixing of 0 and 2/bar h/..omega.. excitations have been obtained. We have also considered the effects of our interaction on the /sup 4/He compressibility and the centroid of the breathing mode strength. First indications are that a saturating effective interaction, with a short-range density dependent part and a long-range density independent part, comes close to matching crude predictions for the compressibility of /sup 4/He. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Inducible defenses in prey intensify predator cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Osamu; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Nishimura, Kinya; Ohgushi, Takayuki

    2009-11-01

    Trophic cascades are often a potent force in ecological communities, but abiotic and biotic heterogeneity can diffuse their influence. For example, inducible defenses in many species create variation in prey edibility, and size-structured interactions, such as cannibalism, can shift predator diets away from heterospecific prey. Although both factors diffuse cascade strength by adding heterogeneity to trophic interactions, the consequences of their interactioh remain poorly understood. We show that inducible defenses in tadpole prey greatly intensify cannibalism in predatory larval salamanders. The likelihood of cannibalism was also strongly influenced by asymmetries in salamander size that appear to be most important in the presence of defended prey. Hence, variation in prey edibility and the size structure of the predator may synergistically affect predator-prey population dynamics by reducing prey mortality and increasing predator mortality via cannibalism. We also suggest that the indirect effects of prey defenses may shape the evolution of predator traits that determine diet breadth and how trophic dynamics unfold in natural systems.

  4. Unique coevolutionary dynamics in a predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougi, Akihiko; Iwasa, Yoh

    2011-05-21

    In this paper, we study the predator-prey coevolutionary dynamics when a prey's defense and a predator's offense change in an adaptive manner, either by genetic evolution or phenotypic plasticity, or by behavioral choice. Results are: (1) The coevolutionary dynamics are more likely to be stable if the predator adapts faster than the prey. (2) The prey population size can be nearly constant but the predator population can show very large amplitude fluctuations. (3) Both populations may oscillate in antiphase. All of these are not observed when the handling time is short and the prey's density dependence is weak. (4) The population dynamics and the trait dynamics show resonance: the amplitude of the population fluctuation is the largest when the speed of adaptation is intermediate. These results may explain experimental studies with microorganisms.

  5. Density-dependent acoustic properties of PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Geoffrey W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartline, Ernest L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagelberg, Stephanie I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-07-31

    We have measured the longitudinal and shear acoustic velocities of PBX 9502 as a function of density for die-pressed samples over the range 1.795 g/cc to 1.888 g/cc. The density dependence of the velocities is linear. Thermal cycling of PBX 9502 is known to induce irreversible volume growth. We have measured this volume growth dependence on density for a subset of the pressed parts and find that the most growth occurs for the samples with lowest initial density. The acoustic velocity changes due to the volume growth are significant and reflect damage in the samples.

  6. Effect of the density dependent symmetry energy on fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Vinayak, Karan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the density dependence of symmetry energy on fragmentation is studied using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model(IQMD) Model. We have used the reduced isospin-dependent cross-section with soft equation of state to explain the experimental findings for the system 79_Au^197 + 79_Au^197 for the full colliding geometry. In addition to that we have tried to study the collective response of the momentum dependent interactions(MDI) and symmetry energy towards the multifragmentation

  7. Dynamics of a recovering Arctic bird population: the importance of climate, density dependence, and site quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Jason E; Swem, Ted; Andersen, David E; Kennedy, Patricia L; Nigro, Debora

    2015-10-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affect vital rates and population-level processes, and understanding these factors is paramount to devising successful management plans for wildlife species. For example, birds time migration in response, in part, to local and broadscale climate fluctuations to initiate breeding upon arrival to nesting territories, and prolonged inclement weather early in the breeding season can inhibit egg-laying and reduce productivity. Also, density-dependent regulation occurs in raptor populations, as territory size is related to resource availability. Arctic Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus tundrius; hereafter Arctic peregrine) have a limited and northern breeding distribution, including the Colville River Special Area (CRSA) in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, USA. We quantified influences of climate, topography, nest productivity, prey habitat, density dependence, and interspecific competition affecting Arctic peregrines in the CRSA by applying the Dail-Madsen model to estimate abundance and vital rates of adults on nesting cliffs from 1981 through 2002. Arctic peregrine abundance increased throughout the 1980s, which spanned the population's recovery from DDT-induced reproductive failure, until exhibiting a stationary trend in the 1990s. Apparent survival rate (i.e., emigration; death) was negatively correlated with the number of adult Arctic peregrines on the cliff the previous year, suggesting effects of density-dependent population regulation. Apparent survival and arrival rates (i.e., immigration; recruitment) were higher during years with earlier snowmelt and milder winters, and apparent survival was positively correlated with nesting season maximum daily temperature. Arrival rate was positively correlated with average Arctic peregrine productivity along a cliff segment from the previous year and initial abundance was positively correlated with cliff height. Higher cliffs with documented higher productivity (presumably

  8. Predator-prey oscillations can shift when diseases become endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Andrew M; Hilker, Frank M

    2013-01-07

    In epidemiology, knowing when a disease is endemic is important. This is usually done by finding the basic reproductive number, R(0), using equilibrium-based calculations. However, oscillatory dynamics are common in nature. Here, we model a disease with density dependent transmission in an oscillating predator-prey system. The condition for disease persistence in predator-prey cycles is based on the time-average density of the host and not the equilibrium density. Consequently, the time-averaged basic reproductive number R(0)¯ is what determines whether a disease is endemic, and not on the equilibrium-based basic reproductive number R(0)(*). These findings undermine any R(0) analysis based solely on steady states when predator-prey oscillations exist for density dependent diseases.

  9. The population dynamical consequences of density-dependent prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jennifer J H; White, Andrew; Sherratt, Jonathan A; Boots, Mike

    2011-11-07

    When infectious disease transmission is density-dependent, the risk of infection will tend to increase with host population density. Since host defence mechanisms can be costly, individual hosts may benefit from increasing their investment in immunity in response to increasing population density. Such "density-dependent prophylaxis" (DDP) has now indeed been demonstrated experimentally in several species. However, it remains unclear how DDP will affect the population dynamics of the host-pathogen interaction, with previous theoretical work making conflicting predictions. We develop a general host-pathogen model and assess the role of DDP on the population dynamics. The ability of DDP to drive population cycles is critically dependent on the time delay between the change in density and the subsequent phenotypic change in the level of resistance. When the delay is absent or short, DDP destabilises the system. As the delay increases, its destabilising effect first diminishes and then DDP becomes increasingly stabilising. Our work highlights the significance of the time delay and suggests that it must be estimated experimentally or varied in theoretical investigations in order to understand the implications of DDP for the population dynamics of particular systems.

  10. Development and application of a density dependent matrix ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranging along the Atlantic coast from US Florida to the Maritime Provinces of Canada, the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an important and well-studied model organism for understanding the effects of pollutants and other stressors in estuarine and marine ecosystems. Matrix population models are useful tools for ecological risk assessment because they integrate effects across the life cycle, provide a linkage between endpoints observed in the individual and ecological risk to the population as a whole, and project outcomes for many generations in the future. We developed a density dependent matrix population model for Atlantic killifish by modifying a model developed for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) that has proved to be extremely useful, e.g. to incorporate data from laboratory studies and project effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals. We developed a size-structured model (as opposed to one that is based upon developmental stages or age class structure) so that we could readily incorporate output from a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model, currently under development. Due to a lack of sufficient data to accurately define killifish responses to density dependence, we tested a number of scenarios realistic for other fish species in order to demonstrate the outcome of including this ecologically important factor. We applied the model using published data for killifish exposed to dioxin-like compounds, and compared our results to those using

  11. Predictions of Taylor's power law, density dependence and pink noise from a neutrally modeled time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Petr; Herben, Tomás; Rosindell, James; Storch, David

    2010-07-07

    There has recently been increasing interest in neutral models of biodiversity and their ability to reproduce the patterns observed in nature, such as species abundance distributions. Here we investigate the ability of a neutral model to predict phenomena observed in single-population time series, a study complementary to most existing work that concentrates on snapshots in time of the whole community. We consider tests for density dependence, the dominant frequencies of population fluctuation (spectral density) and a relationship between the mean and variance of a fluctuating population (Taylor's power law). We simulated an archipelago model of a set of interconnected local communities with variable mortality rate, migration rate, speciation rate, size of local community and number of local communities. Our spectral analysis showed 'pink noise': a departure from a standard random walk dynamics in favor of the higher frequency fluctuations which is partly consistent with empirical data. We detected density dependence in local community time series but not in metacommunity time series. The slope of the Taylor's power law in the model was similar to the slopes observed in natural populations, but the fit to the power law was worse. Our observations of pink noise and density dependence can be attributed to the presence of an upper limit to community sizes and to the effect of migration which distorts temporal autocorrelation in local time series. We conclude that some of the phenomena observed in natural time series can emerge from neutral processes, as a result of random zero-sum birth, death and migration. This suggests the neutral model would be a parsimonious null model for future studies of time series data.

  12. Exploration of a modified density dependence in the Skyrme functional

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, J; Reinhard, P -G

    2010-01-01

    A variant of the basic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) functional is considered dealing with a new form of density dependence. It employs only integer powers and thus will allow a more sound basis for projection schemes (particle number, angular momentum). We optimize the new functional with exactly the same adjustment strategy as used in an earlier study with a standard Skyrme functional. This allows direct comparisons of the performance of the new functional relative to the standard one. We discuss various observables: bulk properties of finite nuclei, nuclear matter, giant resonances, super-heavy elements, and energy systematics. The new functional performs at least as well as the standard one, but offers a wider range of applicability (e.g. for projection) and more flexibility in the regime of high densities.

  13. Density dependence of the saturated velocity in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    The saturated velocity of a semiconductor is an important measure in bench-marking performance for either logic or microwave applications. Graphene has been of interest for such applications due to its apparently high value of the saturated velocity. Recent experiments have suggested that this value is very density dependent and can even exceed the band limiting Fermi velocity. Some of these measurements have also suggested that the scattering is dominated by the low energy surface polar mode of the SiO2 substrate. Here, we show that the saturated velocity of graphene on SiO2 is relatively independent of the density and that the scattering is dominated by the high energy surface polar mode of the substrate.

  14. The pasta phase within density dependent hadronic models

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, S S; Marinelli, J R; Peres-Menezes, D; Watanabe de Moraes, M M; Providência, C; Santos, A M

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate the onset of the pasta phase with different parametrisations of the density dependent hadronic model and compare the results with one of the usual parametrisation of the non-linear Walecka model. The influence of the scalar-isovector virtual delta meson is shown. At zero temperature two different methods are used, one based on coexistent phases and the other on the Thomas-Fermi approximation. At finite temperature only the coexistence phases method is used. npe matter with fixed proton fractions and in beta-equilibrium are studied. We compare our results with restrictions imposed on the the values of the density and pressure at the inner edge of the crust, obtained from observations of the Vela pulsar and recent isospin diffusion data from heavy-ion reactions, and with predictions from spinodal calculations.

  15. Density-dependent potential for multi-neutron halo nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuang; CHU Yan-Yun; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2009-01-01

    We apply a simple density-dependent potential model to the three-body calculation of the ground-state structure of drip-line nuclei with a weakly bound core. The hyperspherical harmonics method is used to solve the Faddeev equations. There are no undetermined potential parameters in this calculation. We find that for the halo nuclei with a weakly-bound core, the calculated properties of the ground-state structure are in better agreement with experimental data than the results calculated from the standard Woods-Saxon and Gauss type potentials. We also successfully reproduce the experimental cross sections by using the density calculated from this method. This may be explained by the fact that the simple Fermi or Gaussian function can not exactly describe the density distribution of the drip-line nuclei.

  16. Superdeformed rotational bands with density dependent pairing interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasaki, J. [Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique, Brussels (Belgium); Heenen, P.H. [Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique, Brussels (Belgium); Bonche, P. [SPhT - CE Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dobaczewski, J. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Flocard, H. [Division de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1995-10-09

    The cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method, applied in a previous study to SD bands of even Hg and Pb isotopes, is extended by including pairing correlations described by a zero-range density-dependent interaction. This more realistic description of the pairing channel modifies the balance between the neutron and proton pairing energies and introduces an orbital variation of the pairing gaps. This results in a retarded alignment, significantly improving the agreement with data in both the A=150 and 190 mass regions. The behavior expected for SD bands in odd-N or odd-Z nuclei is discussed on the basis of the quasiparticle routhians calculated for the even-even isotopes. (orig.).

  17. Superdeformed rotational bands with density dependent pairing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, J.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bonche, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Flocard, H.

    1995-02-01

    The cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method, applied in a previous study to SD bands of even Hg and Pb isotopes, is extended by including pairing correlations described by a zero-range density-dependent interaction. This more realistic description of the pairing channel modifies the balance between the neutron and proton pairing energies and introduces an orbital variation of the pairing gaps. This results in a retarded alignment, significantly improving the agreement with data in both the A = 150 and 190 mass regions. The behavior expected for SD bands in odd- N or odd- Z nuclei is discussed on the basis of the quasiparticle routhians calculated for the even-even isotopes.

  18. Prey to predator size ratio influences foraging efficiency of larval Aeshna juncea dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Heikki; Ranta, Esa

    1996-05-01

    We investigated foraging behaviour of larval dragonflies Aeshna juncea in order to examine the significance of prey density and body size in predator-prey dynamics. A. juncea were offered separately three size-classes of Daphnia magna at low and high densities. The data were collected with direct observations of the foraging individuals. We found that large A. juncea larvae could better enhance their intake of prey biomass as prey size and prey density increased than their smaller conspecifics. However, increasing feeding efficiency of both larval instars was constrained by declining attack success and search rate with increasing prey size and density. With small D. magna, in contrast to large A. juncea, small A. juncea increased their searching efficiency as prey density increased keeping D. magna mortality rate at a constant level. In a predator-prey relationship this indicates stabilizing potential and feeding thresholds set by both prey density and prey-predator size ratio. Attack success dropped with prey size and density, but did not change in the course of the foraging bout. For both A. juncea sizes prey handling times increased as more medium and large prey were eaten. The slope of the increase became steeper with increasing prey-predator size ratio. These observations indicate that components of the predator-prey relationship vary with prey density, contrary to the basic assumptions of functional response equations. Moreover, the results suggest that the effects of prey density change during the ontogeny of predators and prey.

  19. Unusual predator-prey dynamics under reciprocal phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougi, Akihiko

    2012-07-21

    Recent theories and experiments have shown that plasticity, such as an inducible defense or an inducible offense in predator-prey interactions, strongly influences the stability of the population dynamics. However, such plastic adaptation has not been expected to cause unusual dynamics such as antiphase cycles, which occur in experimental predator-prey systems with evolutionary adaptation in the defensive trait of prey. Here I show that antiphase cycles and cryptic cycles (a large population fluctuation in one species with almost no change in the population of the other species) can occur in a predator-prey system when both member species can change their phenotypes through adaptive plasticity (inducible defenses and offenses). I consider a familiar type of predator-prey system in which both species can change their morphology or behavior through phenotypic plasticity. The plasticity, that is, the ability to change between distinct phenotypes, is assumed to occur so as to maximize their fitness. I examined how the reciprocal adaptive plasticity influences the population dynamics. The results show that unusual dynamics such as antiphase population cycles and cryptic cycles can occur when both species show inducible plasticity. The unusual dynamics are particularly likely to occur when the carrying capacity of the prey is small (the density dependence of the prey's growth is strong). The unusual predator-prey dynamics may be induced by phenotypic plasticity as long as the phenotypic change occurs to maximize fitness.

  20. A density-dependent endochronic plasticity for powder compaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshiani, A.; Khoei, A. R.; Mofid, M.

    This paper is concerned with the numerical modeling of powder cold compaction process using a density-dependent endochronic plasticity model. Endochronic plasticity theory is developed based on a large strain plasticity to describe the nonlinear behavior of powder material. The elastic response is stated in terms of hypoelastic model and endochronic plasticity constitutive equations are stated in unrotated frame of reference. A trivially incrementally objective integration scheme for rate constitutive equations is established. Algorithmic modulus consistent with numerical integration algorithm of constitutive equations is extracted. It is shown how the endochronic plasticity describes the behavior of powder material from the initial stage of compaction to final stage, in which material behaves as solid metals. It is also shown that some commonly used plasticity models for powder material can be derived as special cases of the proposed endochronic theory. Finally, the numerical schemes are examined for efficiency in the modeling of a plain bush, a rotational-flanged and a shaped tablet powder compaction component.

  1. Balancing selection shapes density-dependent foraging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Joshua S; Brown, Maximillian; Dobosiewicz, May; Ishida, Itzel G; Macosko, Evan Z; Zhang, Xinxing; Butcher, Rebecca A; Cline, Devin J; McGrath, Patrick T; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-11-10

    The optimal foraging strategy in a given environment depends on the number of competing individuals and their behavioural strategies. Little is known about the genes and neural circuits that integrate social information into foraging decisions. Here we show that ascaroside pheromones, small glycolipids that signal population density, suppress exploratory foraging in Caenorhabditis elegans, and that heritable variation in this behaviour generates alternative foraging strategies. We find that natural C. elegans isolates differ in their sensitivity to the potent ascaroside icas#9 (IC-asc-C5). A quantitative trait locus (QTL) regulating icas#9 sensitivity includes srx-43, a G-protein-coupled icas#9 receptor that acts in the ASI class of sensory neurons to suppress exploration. Two ancient haplotypes associated with this QTL confer competitive growth advantages that depend on ascaroside secretion, its detection by srx-43 and the distribution of food. These results suggest that balancing selection at the srx-43 locus generates alternative density-dependent behaviours, fulfilling a prediction of foraging game theory.

  2. A resprouter herb reduces negative density-dependent effects among neighboring seeders after fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, José; Wiegand, Thorsten; Maestre, Fernando T.; de Luis, Martín

    2012-01-01

    Plant communities are often composed of species belonging to different functional groups, but relatively few studies to date have explicitly linked their spatial structure to the outcome of the interaction among them. We investigated if mortality of seeder species during their establishment after fire is influenced by the proximity of the resprouter herb Brachypodium retusum. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean shrubland (00°39' W; 38°43' N), 40 km northwest of Alicante (Spain) with Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus, Helianthemum marifolium, and Ononis fruticosa as dominant obligate seeder species and a herbaceous layer is dominated by the resprouter B. retusum. We followed the fate of mapped seedlings and the biomass of B. retusum one, two, three and nine years after an experimental fire. We used point pattern analyses to evaluate the spatial pattern of mortality of seeder species at these years in relation to the biomass of B. retusum. We hypothesize that B. retusum may initially have a positive impact on seeder survival. We implemented this hypothesis as a point process model that maintains the overall number of dead seeder plants, but seeder survival varied proportionally to the biomass of B. retusum in its neighborhood. We then contrasted this hypothesis with a previous analysis based on a random mortality hypothesis. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that proximity of B. retusum reduced the mortality of seeder plants at their establishment phase (i.e., 2 yrs after fire). However, we found no evidence that B. retusum influenced seeder mortality when plants grow to maturity. We also found that, under the more stressful conditions (fire + erosion scenario), B. retusum had a lower impact on the performance of seeder species. Our results suggest that B. retusum may reduce negative density-dependent effects among neighboring seeder plants during the first years after fire.

  3. Ecoepidemic predator-prey model with feeding satiation, prey herd behavior and abandoned infected prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.W.; Venturino, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyse a predator–prey model where the prey population shows group defense and the prey individuals are affected by a transmissible disease. The resulting model is of the Rosenzweig–MacArthur predator–prey type with an SI (susceptible-infected) disease in the prey. Modeling prey gr

  4. Ecoepidemic predator-prey model with feeding satiation, prey herd behavior and abandoned infected prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.W.; Venturino, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyse a predator–prey model where the prey population shows group defense and the prey individuals are affected by a transmissible disease. The resulting model is of the Rosenzweig–MacArthur predator–prey type with an SI (susceptible-infected) disease in the prey. Modeling prey

  5. Survival of diurnally sub periodic Wuchereria bancrofti in Downsiomyia nivea (Diptera: Culicidae: a density dependent factor from Andaman & Nicobar Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Shriram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In India, diurnally sub periodic Wuchereria bancrofti transmitted by Downsiomyia nivea is prevalent only in the Nicobar district of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The ongoing LF elimination programme aims at transmission interruption by bringing down the microfilarie (mf load in the community, which has implication on the parasite load in mosquito vector. Therefore, understanding density dependent constraints on transmission assumes significance from control perspective. The present study was undertaken in Teressa Island to understand the density dependent parasite mortality and survival probability of the parasite Do. nivea. Methods: The entomological data collected from Teressa Island, endemic for the diurnally sub periodic form of W. bancrofti were used to examine the parasite loss and its survival up to infectivity. Patterns of parasite distribution in Do. nivea were examined. Results: Distribution patterns of microfilariae were found to be over dispersed in Do. nivea. The later stages of the parasite in the vector were randomly distributed. Distribution pattern of various filarial larval stages suggested that the loss of parasites occurred as development progressed and was maximal between the first and second stages. Further, both the prevalence of infection and the degree of parasite aggregation in the vector population have fallen significantly with development of parasite stage. Interpretation & conclusions: Results indicate the operation of parasite density dependent mortality of vectors or parasite loss or combination of both. The present study with Aedes transmitted filariasis conducted before launching LF elimination programme in the study area indicates a comparable level of parasite regulation in the vector which has similar implications on the transmission threshold. Thus, the consideration of Aedes with Culex in deriving the critical level of antigen positive for making decisions on cessation of mass drug

  6. The effect of structural complexity, prey density, and "predator-free space" on prey survivorship at created oyster reef mesocosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin T Humphries

    Full Text Available Interactions between predators and their prey are influenced by the habitat they occupy. Using created oyster (Crassostrea virginica reef mesocosms, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments that created structure and manipulated complexity as well as prey density and "predator-free space" to examine the relationship between structural complexity and prey survivorship. Specifically, volume and spatial arrangement of oysters as well as prey density were manipulated, and the survivorship of prey (grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio in the presence of a predator (wild red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus was quantified. We found that the presence of structure increased prey survivorship, and that increasing complexity of this structure further increased survivorship, but only to a point. This agrees with the theory that structural complexity may influence predator-prey dynamics, but that a threshold exists with diminishing returns. These results held true even when prey density was scaled to structural complexity, or the amount of "predator-free space" was manipulated within our created reef mesocosms. The presence of structure and its complexity (oyster shell volume were more important in facilitating prey survivorship than perceived refugia or density-dependent prey effects. A more accurate indicator of refugia might require "predator-free space" measures that also account for the available area within the structure itself (i.e., volume and not just on the surface of a structure. Creating experiments that better mimic natural conditions and test a wider range of "predator-free space" are suggested to better understand the role of structural complexity in oyster reefs and other complex habitats.

  7. The effect of structural complexity, prey density, and "predator-free space" on prey survivorship at created oyster reef mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Austin T.; La Peyre, Megan K.; Decossas, Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between predators and their prey are influenced by the habitat they occupy. Using created oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reef mesocosms, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments that created structure and manipulated complexity as well as prey density and “predator-free space” to examine the relationship between structural complexity and prey survivorship. Specifically, volume and spatial arrangement of oysters as well as prey density were manipulated, and the survivorship of prey (grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio) in the presence of a predator (wild red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus) was quantified. We found that the presence of structure increased prey survivorship, and that increasing complexity of this structure further increased survivorship, but only to a point. This agrees with the theory that structural complexity may influence predator-prey dynamics, but that a threshold exists with diminishing returns. These results held true even when prey density was scaled to structural complexity, or the amount of “predator-free space” was manipulated within our created reef mesocosms. The presence of structure and its complexity (oyster shell volume) were more important in facilitating prey survivorship than perceived refugia or density-dependent prey effects. A more accurate indicator of refugia might require “predator-free space” measures that also account for the available area within the structure itself (i.e., volume) and not just on the surface of a structure. Creating experiments that better mimic natural conditions and test a wider range of “predator-free space” are suggested to better understand the role of structural complexity in oyster reefs and other complex habitats.

  8. Density dependence, whitebark pine, and vital rates of grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Frank T.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Ebinger, Michael R.; Thompson, Daniel J.; Costello, Cecily M; White, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing changes in population trajectory is important for effective wildlife management, particularly for populations of conservation concern. Annual population growth of the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA has slowed from 4.2–7.6% during 1983–2001 to 0.3–2.2% during 2002–2011. Substantial changes in availability of a key food source and bear population density have occurred. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), the seeds of which are a valuable but variable fall food for grizzly bears, has experienced substantial mortality primarily due to a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak that started in the early 2000s. Positive growth rates of grizzly bears have resulted in populations reaching high densities in some areas and have contributed to continued range expansion. We tested research hypotheses to examine if changes in vital rates detected during the past decade were more associated with whitebark pine decline or, alternatively, increasing grizzly bear density. We focused our assessment on known-fate data to estimate survival of cubs-of-the-year (cubs), yearlings, and independent bears (≥2 yrs), and reproductive transition of females from having no offspring to having cubs. We used spatially and temporally explicit indices for grizzly bear density and whitebark pine mortality as individual covariates. Models indicated moderate support for an increase in survival of independent male bears over 1983–2012, whereas independent female survival did not change. Cub survival, yearling survival, and reproductive transition from no offspring to cubs all changed during the 30-year study period, with lower rates evident during the last 10–15 years. Cub survival and reproductive transition were negatively associated with an index of grizzly bear density, indicating greater declines where bear densities were higher. Our analyses did not support a similar relationship for the

  9. Density-dependent vulnerability of forest ecosystems to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, Alessandra; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Palik, Brian J.; Bradford, John B.; Fraver, Shawn; Battaglia, Mike A.; Asherin, Lance A.

    2017-01-01

    1. Climate models predict increasing drought intensity and frequency for many regions, which may have negative consequences for tree recruitment, growth and mortality, as well as forest ecosystem services. Furthermore, practical strategies for minimizing vulnerability to drought are limited. Tree population density, a metric of tree abundance in a given area, is a primary driver of competitive intensity among trees, which influences tree growth and mortality. Manipulating tree population density may be a mechanism for moderating drought-induced stress and growth reductions, although the relationship between tree population density and tree drought vulnerability remains poorly quantified, especially across climatic gradients.2. In this study, we examined three long-term forest ecosystem experiments in two widely distributed North American pine species, ponderosa pine Pinus ponderosa (Lawson & C. Lawson) and red pine Pinus resinosa (Aiton), to better elucidate the relationship between tree population density, growth and drought. These experiments span a broad latitude and aridity range and include tree population density treatments that have been purposefully maintained for several decades. We investigated how tree population density influenced resistance (growth during drought) and resilience (growth after drought compared to pre-drought growth) of stand-level growth during and after documented drought events.3. Our results show that relative tree population density was negatively related to drought resistance and resilience, indicating that trees growing at lower densities were less vulnerable to drought. This result was apparent in all three forest ecosystems, and was consistent across species, stand age and drought intensity.4. Synthesis and applications. Our results highlighted that managing pine forest ecosystems at low tree population density represents a promising adaptive strategy for reducing the adverse impacts of drought on forest growth in coming decades

  10. Effects of density dependence in a temperate forest in northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Zhang, Xinna; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Xiuhai; von Gadow, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Negative density dependence may cause reduced clustering among individuals of the same species, and evidence is accumulating that conspecific density-dependent self-thinning is an important mechanism regulating the spatial structure of plant populations. This study evaluates that specific density dependence in three very large observational studies representing three successional stages in a temperate forest in northeastern China. The methods include standard spatial point pattern analysis and a heterogeneous Poisson process as the null model to eliminate the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The results show that most of the species exhibit conspecific density-dependent self-thinning. In the early successional stage 11 of the 16 species, in the intermediate successional stage 18 of the 21 species and in the old growth stage all 21 species exhibited density dependence after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The prevalence of density dependence thus varies among the three successional stages and exhibits an increase with increasing successional stage. The proportion of species showing density dependence varied depending on whether habitat heterogeneity was removed or not. Furthermore, the strength of density dependence is closely related with species abundance. Abundant species with high conspecific aggregation tend to exhibit greater density dependence than rare species.

  11. Density-dependent productivity depression in Pyrenean Bearded Vultures: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José A; Margalida, Antoni

    2006-10-01

    The main objective of many conservation programs is to increase population size by improving a species' survival and reproduction. However, density dependence of demographic parameters may confound this approach. In this study we used a 25-year data set on Bearded Vultures (Gypaetus barbatus) in Spain to evaluate the consequences of population growth on reproductive performance. Unlike its coefficient of variation (cv), mean annual productivity decreased with increasing population size. After controlling for territorial heterogeneity, productivity also was negatively related to the distance to the nearest conspecific breeding pair and to supplementary feeding points where floaters congregate. These results suggest that vulture populations are regulated as posited by the site-dependency hypothesis: as the population increases, average productivity decreases because progressively poorer territories are used. The combined effects of the shrinkage of territories and the presence of floaters around supplementary feeding points seem to be the main causes of productivity decline and are therefore the main determinants of territory quality. This has conservation implications, especially concerning the role of supplementary feeding points. Supplementary feeding should be reviewed given that its usefulness in reducing preadult mortality has not yet been proved and its effect on productivity, as our results suggest, is negative.

  12. Diet and prey consumption of breeding Common Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Geng; Xiaojing Zhang; Wei Ou; Hanmei Sun; Fumin Lei; Wei Gao; Haitao Wang

    2009-01-01

    The diet of Common Kestrels Falco tinnunculus was studied during the breeding seasons from 2004 to 2008 in Northeast China. Diet was determined by direct observation of the prey brought to nests, and analysis of prey remains collected from nests. Fifteen vertebrate species from three classes, and two groups of insects were identified as prey items. Rodents were the main prey items, comprising 93.9% of the total prey items (TPI) and 97.0% of total prey biomass (TPB). Birds, frogs and insects were also eaten. The kestrels preferred to prey on small rodents (mean weight 20-40 g) and displayed density-dependent prey selection. Daily prey consumption of an adult and a nestling was 2.6 individual rodents or 87.6 g, and 1.7 individual vertebrates or 48.2 g, respectively. The estimated prey consumption of a breeding pair (adults and nestlings) during the breeding season was 520.1 individual vertebrates or 19.7 kg.

  13. Counterintuitive density-dependent growth in a long-lived vertebrate after removal of nest predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ricky-John; Janzen, Fredric J; Thompson, Michael B

    2006-12-01

    Examining the phenotypic and genetic underpinnings of life-history variation in long-lived organisms is central to the study of life-history evolution. Juvenile growth and survival are often density dependent in reptiles, and theory predicts the evolution of slow growth in response to low resources (resource-limiting hypothesis), such as under densely populated conditions. However, rapid growth is predicted when exceeding some critical body size reduces the risk of mortality (mortality hypothesis). Here we present results of paired, large-scale, five-year field experiments to identify causes of variation in individual growth and survival rates of an Australian turtle (Emydura macquarii) prior to maturity. To distinguish between these competing hypotheses, we reduced nest predators in two populations and retained a control population to create variation in juvenile density by altering recruitment levels. We also conducted a complementary split-clutch field-transplant experiment to explore the impact of incubation temperature (25 degrees or 30 degrees C), nest predator level (low or high), and clutch size on juvenile growth and survival. Juveniles in high-recruitment (predator removal) populations were not resource limited, growing more rapidly than young turtles in the control populations. Our experiments also revealed a remarkably long-term impact of the thermal conditions experienced during embryonic development on growth of turtles prior to maturity. Moreover, this thermal effect was manifested in turtles approaching maturity, rather than in turtles closer to hatching, and was dependent on population density in the post-hatching rearing environment. This apparent phenotypic plasticity in growth complements our observation of a strong, positive genetic correlation between individual body size in the experimental and control populations over the first five years of life (rG - +0.77). Thus, these Australian pleurodiran turtles have the impressive capacity to

  14. Experimental evidence for density-dependent reproduction in a cooperatively breeding passerine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Lyanne; Tinbergen, Joost M.; Both, Christiaan; Bristol, Rachel; Richardson, David S.; Komdeur, Jan; Sauer, J.R.

    Temporal variation in survival, fecundity, and dispersal rates is associated with density-dependent and density-independent processes. Stable natural populations are expected to be regulated by density-dependent factors. However, detecting this by investigating natural variation in density is

  15. Effects of Density-Dependent Bag Constant and Strange Star Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-Er; GUO Hua

    2003-01-01

    With the emphasis on the effects of the density-dependent bag constant and the rotation of strange star the limiting mass of strange star is calculated. The obtained results show that the limiting mass and the corresponding radius of strange star increase as the rotation frequency increases, and tend to be lowered when the density-dependent bag constant is considered.

  16. Density-dependent effects on physical condition and reproduction in North American elk: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley M. Stewart; R. Terry Bowyer; Brian L. Dick; Bruce K. Johnson; John G. Kie

    2005-01-01

    Density dependence plays a key role in life-history characteristics and population ecology of large, herbivorous mammals. We designed a manipulative experiment to test hypotheses relating effects of density-dependent mechanisms on physical condition and fecundity of North American elk (Cervus elaphus) by creating populations at low and high density...

  17. A single predator multiple prey model with prey mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Rory; Abernethy, Gavin M.; Glass, David H.; McCartney, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A multiple species predator-prey model is expanded with the introduction of a coupled map lattice for the prey, allowing the prey to mutate discretely into other prey species. The model is examined in its single predator, multiple mutating prey form. Two unimodal maps are used for the underlying dynamics of the prey species, with different predation strategies being used. Conclusions are drawn on how varying the control parameters of the model governs the overall behaviour and survival of the species. It is observed that in such a complex system, with multiple mutating prey, a large range of non-linear dynamics is possible.

  18. Leaf damage and density-dependent effects on six Inga species in a neotropical forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Brenes-Arguedas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Many models have been proposed to explain the possible role of pests in the coexistence of a high diversity of plant species in tropical forests. Prominent among them is the Janzen-Connell model. This model suggests that specialized herbivores and pathogens limit tree recruitment as a function of their density or proximity to conspecifics. A large number of studies have tested the predictions of this model with respect to patterns of recruitment and mortality at different life stages, yet only a few have directly linked those density or distance-dependent effects to pest attack. If pest-attack is an important factor in density or distance-dependent mortality, there should be spatial heterogeneity in pest pressure. I studied the spatial distribution of leaf damage in saplings of six common Inga species (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae in the 50ha forest dynamic plot of Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The percent leaf damage of Inga saplings was not heterogeneous in space, and the density of conspecific, congener or confamilial neighbors was uncorrelated with the observed damage levels in focal plants. One of the focal species did suffer density-dependent mortality, suggesting that spatial variation in plant performance in these species is not directly driven by leaf damaging agents. While multiple studies suggest that density-dependent effects on performance are common in tropical plant communities, our understanding of the mechanisms that drive those effects is still incomplete and the underlying assumption that these patterns result from differential herbivore attack deserves more scrutiny.Se han propuesto muchos modelos para explicar la coexistencia de una alta diversidad de especies de árboles en bosques tropicales. Prominente, entre estos modelos es el de Janzen-Connell, que sugiere que los herbívoros especialistas limitan la colonización de árboles en función de la densidad o proximidad de con-específicos. Si este efecto es en realidad el

  19. Predator-prey interactions mediated by prey personality and predator hunting mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrad, Benjamin A; Griffen, Blaine D

    2016-04-13

    Predator-prey interactions are important drivers in structuring ecological communities. However, despite widespread acknowledgement that individual behaviours and predator species regulate ecological processes, studies have yet to incorporate individual behavioural variations in a multipredator system. We quantified a prevalent predator avoidance behaviour to examine the simultaneous roles of prey personality and predator hunting mode in governing predator-prey interactions. Mud crabs, Panopeus herbstii, reduce their activity levels and increase their refuge use in the presence of predator cues. We measured mud crab mortality and consistent individual variations in the strength of this predator avoidance behaviour in the presence of predatory blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, and toadfish, Opsanus tau We found that prey personality and predator species significantly interacted to affect mortality with blue crabs primarily consuming bold mud crabs and toadfish preferentially selecting shy crabs. Additionally, the strength of the predator avoidance behaviour depended upon the predation risk from the predator species. Consequently, the personality composition of populations and predator hunting mode may be valuable predictors of both direct and indirect predator-prey interaction strength. These findings support theories postulating mechanisms for maintaining intraspecies diversity and have broad implications for community dynamics.

  20. Predator-prey relationships in a Mediterranean vertebrate system: Bonelli's eagles, rabbits and partridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleón, Marcos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Gil-Sánchez, José M; Ballesteros-Duperón, Elena; Barea-Azcón, José M; Virgós, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    How predators impact on prey population dynamics is still an unsolved issue for most wild predator-prey communities. When considering vertebrates, important concerns constrain a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of predator-prey relationships worldwide; e.g. studies simultaneously quantifying 'functional' and 'numerical responses' (i.e., the 'total response') are rare. The functional, the numerical, and the resulting total response (i.e., how the predator per capita intake, the population of predators and the total of prey eaten by the total predators vary with prey densities) are fundamental as they reveal the predator's ability to regulate prey population dynamics. Here, we used a multi-spatio-temporal scale approach to simultaneously explore the functional and numerical responses of a territorial predator (Bonelli's eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus) to its two main prey species (the rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and the red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa) during the breeding period in a Mediterranean system of south Spain. Bonelli's eagle responded functionally, but not numerically, to rabbit/partridge density changes. Type II, non-regulatory, functional responses (typical of specialist predators) offered the best fitting models for both prey. In the absence of a numerical response, Bonelli's eagle role as a regulating factor of rabbit and partridge populations seems to be weak in our study area. Simple (prey density-dependent) functional response models may well describe the short-term variation in a territorial predator's consumption rate in complex ecosystems.

  1. Long-term persistence, density dependence and effects of climate change on rosyside dace (Cyprinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Grossman; Gary Sundin; Robert E. Ratajczak

    2016-01-01

    SummaryWe used long-term population data for rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides), a numerically dominant member of a stochastically organised fish assemblage, to evaluate the relative importance of density-dependent and density-independent processes to population...

  2. Negative density-dependent emigration of males in an increasing red deer population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leif Egil Loe; Atle Mysterud; Vebjørn Veiberg; Rolf Langvatn

    2009-01-01

    ...), possibly caused by increasing saturation of deer in areas surrounding the marking sites. Our study highlights that pattern of density dependence in dispersal rates may differ markedly between sexes in highly polygynous species...

  3. Density-dependent resistance of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, to its nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    James R. Reilly; Ann E. Hajek

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling disease resistance can strongly influence the population dynamics of insect outbreaks. Evidence that disease resistance is density-dependent is accumulating, but the exact form of this relationship is highly variable from species to species.

  4. The importance of spatial models for estimating the strength of density dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Skaug, Hans J.; Kristensen, Kasper;

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the existence and magnitude of density dependence is one of the oldest concerns in ecology. Ecologists have aimed to estimate density dependence in population and community data by fitting a simple autoregressive (Gompertz) model for density dependence to time series of abundance...... for an entire population. However, it is increasingly recognized that spatial heterogeneity in population densities has implications for population and community dynamics. We therefore adapt the Gompertz model to approximate local densities over continuous space instead of population-wide abundance......, and to allow productivity to vary spatially. Using simulated data generated from a spatial model, we show that the conventional (nonspatial) Gompertz model will result in biased estimates of density dependence, e.g., identifying oscillatory dynamics when not present. By contrast, the spatial Gompertz model...

  5. Density dependence and population dynamics of black rhinos (Diceros bicornis michaeli) in Kenya's rhino sanctuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouma, B.O.; Amin, R.; Langevelde, van F.; Leader-Williams, N.

    2010-01-01

    Density-dependent feedback mechanisms provide insights into the population dynamics and interactions of large herbivores with their ecosystem. Sex ratio also has particularly important implications for growth rates of many large mammal populations through its influence on reproductive potential.

  6. Density-dependent prophylaxis and condition-dependent immune function in Lepidopteran larvae: a multivariate approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cotter, Sheena; Hails, R. S.; Cory, J S; Wilson, K.

    2004-01-01

    1. The risk of parasitism and infectious disease is expected to increase with population density as a consequence of positive density-dependent transmission rates. Therefore, species that encounter large fluctuations in population density are predicted to exhibit plasticity in their immune system, such that investment in costly immune defences is adjusted to match the probability of exposure to parasites and pathogens (i.e. density-dependent prophylaxis).

  7. Habitat- and density-dependent demography of a colonial raptor in Mediterranean agro-ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is considered the major cause of decline in farmland bird populations, especially in the Mediterranean region. Food shortage increased by the interaction between agricultural intensification and density-dependent mechanisms could influence the population dynamics of colonial birds.Weused demographic data on lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni), a key species of Mediterranean pseudo-steppes, to understand the importance of land-use changes and density-dependent mechani...

  8. Dispersal-mediated effect of microhabitat availability and density dependence determine population dynamics of a forest floor web spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mayura B; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-09-01

    Landscapes in nature can be viewed as a continuum of small total habitable area with high fragmentation to widely spreading habitats. The dispersal-mediated rescue effect predominates in the former landscapes, while classical density-dependent processes generally prevail in widely spread habitats. A similar principle should be applied to populations of organisms utilizing microhabitats in limited supply. To test this hypothesis, we examined the population dynamics of a web spider, Neriene brongersmai, in 16 populations with varying degrees of microhabitat availability, and we explored whether: (i) high microhabitat availability improves survival rate during density-independent movement, while the resultant high density reduces survival rate in a density-dependent manner; and (ii) temporal population stability increases with microhabitat availability at the population level. Furthermore, we conducted two types of field experiments to verify whether high microhabitat availability actually reduces mortality associated with web-site movement. Field observations revealed that demographic change in N. brongersmai populations was affected by three factors at different stages, namely the microhabitat limitation from the early to late juvenile stages, the density dependence from the late juvenile to adult stages and the food limitation from the adult to the next early juvenile stages. In addition, there was a tendency for a positive association between population stability and microhabitat availability at the population level. A small-scale experiment, where the frequency of spider web relocation was equalized artificially, revealed that high microhabitat availability elevated the survival rate during a movement event between web-sites. The larger spatiotemporal scale experiment also revealed an improved spider survival rate following treatment with high microhabitat availability, even though spider density was kept at a relatively low level. The population dynamics of N

  9. L-shaped prey isocline in the Gause predator-prey experiments with a prey refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křivan, Vlastimil; Priyadarshi, Anupam

    2015-04-01

    Predator and prey isoclines are estimated from data on yeast-protist population dynamics (Gause et al., 1936). Regression analysis shows that the prey isocline is best fitted by an L-shaped function that has a vertical and a horizontal part. The predator isocline is vertical. This shape of isoclines corresponds with the Lotka-Volterra and the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey models that assume a prey refuge. These results further support the idea that a prey refuge changes the prey isocline of predator-prey models from a horizontal to an L-shaped curve. Such a shape of the prey isocline effectively bounds amplitude of predator-prey oscillations, thus promotes species coexistence.

  10. Prey detection and prey capture in copepod nauplii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruno, Eleonora; Borg, Marc Andersen; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    current that pulls in the prey from behind towards the mouth. The feeding-current feeding nauplius detects prey arriving in the feeding current but only when the prey is intercepted by the setae on the feeding appendages. This elicits an altered motion pattern of the feeding appendages that draws...

  11. Global stability of predator-prey system with alternative prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Banshidhar

    2013-01-01

    A predator-prey model in presence of alternative prey is proposed. Existence and local stability conditions for interior equilibrium points are derived. Global stability conditions for interior equilibrium points are also found. Bifurcation analysis is done with respect to predator's searching rate and handling time. Bifurcation analysis confirms the existence of global stability in presence of alternative prey.

  12. Prey detection and prey capture in copepod nauplii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Bruno

    Full Text Available Copepod nauplii are either ambush feeders that feed on motile prey or they produce a feeding current that entrains prey cells. It is unclear how ambush and feeding-current feeding nauplii perceive and capture prey. Attack jumps in ambush feeding nauplii should not be feasible at low Reynolds numbers due to the thick viscous boundary layer surrounding the attacking nauplius. We use high-speed video to describe the detection and capture of phytoplankton prey by the nauplii of two ambush feeding species (Acartia tonsa and Oithona davisae and by the nauplii of one feeding-current feeding species (Temora longicornis. We demonstrate that the ambush feeders both detect motile prey remotely. Prey detection elicits an attack jump, but the jump is not directly towards the prey, such as has been described for adult copepods. Rather, the nauplius jumps past the prey and sets up an intermittent feeding current that pulls in the prey from behind towards the mouth. The feeding-current feeding nauplius detects prey arriving in the feeding current but only when the prey is intercepted by the setae on the feeding appendages. This elicits an altered motion pattern of the feeding appendages that draws in the prey.

  13. Loss of density-dependence and incomplete control by dominant breeders in a territorial species with density outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylönen Hannu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A territory as a prerequisite for breeding limits the maximum number of breeders in a given area, and thus lowers the proportion of breeders if population size increases. However, some territorially breeding animals can have dramatic density fluctuations and little is known about the change from density-dependent processes to density-independence of breeding during a population increase or an outbreak. We suggest that territoriality, breeding suppression and its break-down can be understood with an incomplete-control model, developed for social breeders and social suppression. Results We studied density dependence in an arvicoline species, the bank vole, known as a territorial breeder with cyclic and non-cyclic density fluctuations and periodically high densities in different parts of its range. Our long-term data base from 38 experimental populations in large enclosures in boreal grassland confirms that breeding rates are density-regulated at moderate densities, probably by social suppression of subordinate potential breeders. We conducted an experiment, were we doubled and tripled this moderate density under otherwise the same conditions and measured space use, mortality, reproduction and faecal stress hormone levels (FGM of adult females. We found that mortality did not differ among the densities, but the regulation of the breeding rate broke down: at double and triple densities all females were breeding, while at the low density the breeding rate was regulated as observed before. Spatial overlap among females increased with density, while a minimum territory size was maintained. Mean stress hormone levels were higher in double and triple densities than at moderate density. Conclusions At low and moderate densities, breeding suppression by the dominant breeders, But above a density-threshold (similar to a competition point, the dominance of breeders could not be sustained (incomplete control. In our experiment, this point

  14. Effective size of density-dependent two-sex populations: the effect of mating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, A M; Engen, S; SAEther, B-E

    2017-08-01

    Density dependence in vital rates is a key feature affecting temporal fluctuations of natural populations. This has important implications for the rate of random genetic drift. Mating systems also greatly affect effective population sizes, but knowledge of how mating system and density regulation interact to affect random genetic drift is poor. Using theoretical models and simulations, we compare Ne in short-lived, density-dependent animal populations with different mating systems. We study the impact of a fluctuating, density-dependent sex ratio and consider both a stable and a fluctuating environment. We find a negative relationship between annual Ne /N and adult population size N due to density dependence, suggesting that loss of genetic variation is reduced at small densities. The magnitude of this decrease was affected by mating system and life history. A male-biased, density-dependent sex ratio reduces the rate of genetic drift compared to an equal, density-independent sex ratio, but a stochastic change towards male bias reduces the Ne /N ratio. Environmental stochasticity amplifies temporal fluctuations in population size and is thus vital to consider in estimation of effective population sizes over longer time periods. Our results on the reduced loss of genetic variation at small densities, particularly in polygamous populations, indicate that density regulation may facilitate adaptive evolution at small population sizes. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  15. An experimental field study of delayed density dependence in natural populations of Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael K Walsh

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus, a species known to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses, is primarily a container-inhabiting mosquito. The potential for pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus has increased our need to understand its ecology and population dynamics. Two parameters that we know little about are the impact of direct density-dependence and delayed density-dependence in the larval stage. The present study uses a manipulative experimental design, under field conditions, to understand the impact of delayed density dependence in a natural population of Ae. albopictus in Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty liter buckets, divided in half prior to experimentation, placed in the field accumulated rainwater and detritus, providing oviposition and larval production sites for natural populations of Ae. albopictus. Two treatments, a larvae present and larvae absent treatment, were produced in each bucket. After five weeks all larvae were removed from both treatments and the buckets were covered with fine mesh cloth. Equal numbers of first instars were added to both treatments in every bucket. Pupae were collected daily and adults were frozen as they emerged. We found a significant impact of delayed density-dependence on larval survival, development time and adult body size in containers with high larval densities. Our results indicate that delayed density-dependence will have negative impacts on the mosquito population when larval densities are high enough to deplete accessible nutrients faster than the rate of natural food accumulation.

  16. Prey selection of Tawny owls (Strix aluco) on Yellow necked mouse and Bank Vole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsom, H. M.; Sunde, P.; Overskaug, K.

    As predators owls may have a strong impact on mortality of their favourite prey, and may therefore act as important selective agents on their prey species. Little is known, however, about whether owls choose prey randomly or if some prey items suffer a higher risk of predation due to certain life...... history traits. The aim of this master thesis study was to investigate any prey selection of tawny owls on two prey species, yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) and bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). Our hypotheses were that the level of exposure might differ between prey items of different sex......, age, and size, causing some individuals to suffer a higher risk of predation from tawny owls than others.The results suggest that males suffer a higher risk of predation from tawny owls than females, and that the different age groups may also experience different risk of predation. It also suggests...

  17. A coarse-grain force field for RDX: Density dependent and energy conserving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joshua D.; Barnes, Brian C.; Izvekov, Sergei; Lísal, Martin; Sellers, Michael S.; Taylor, DeCarlos E.; Brennan, John K.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of a density-dependent transferable coarse-grain model of crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) that can be used with the energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics method. The model is an extension of a recently reported one-site model of RDX that was developed by using a force-matching method. The density-dependent forces in that original model are provided through an interpolation scheme that poorly conserves energy. The development of the new model presented in this work first involved a multi-objective procedure to improve the structural and thermodynamic properties of the previous model, followed by the inclusion of the density dependency via a conservative form of the force field that conserves energy. The new model accurately predicts the density, structure, pressure-volume isotherm, bulk modulus, and elastic constants of the RDX crystal at ambient pressure and exhibits transferability to a liquid phase at melt conditions.

  18. Stochastic seasonality and nonlinear density-dependent factors regulate population size in an African rodent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Steneth, Nils Chr.; Nichols, James D.

    1997-01-01

    no information on actual demographic rates(9,10). Here we report on both density-dependent and density-independent effects in a murid rodent pest species, the multimammute rat Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834), using statistical capture-recapture models, Both effects occur simultaneously, but we also demonstrate......Ecology has long been troubled by the controversy over how populations are regulated(1,2). Some ecologists focus on the role of environmental effects, whereas others argue that density-dependent feedback mechanisms are central(3-6). The relative importance of both processes is still hotly debated......, but clear examples of both processes acting in the same population are rare(7,8). Key-factor analysis (regression of population changes on possible causal factors) and time-series analysis are often used to investigate the presence of density dependence, but such approaches may be biased and provide...

  19. Density dependence of the /s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2002-11-01

    Several mechanisms of density dependence of the s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms, beyond the conventional model, are tested by parameter fits to a large (106 points) set of data from 16O to 238U, including 'deeply bound' states in 205Pb. Special attention is paid to the proper choice of nuclear density distributions. A density-dependent isovector scattering amplitude suggested recently by Weise to result from a density dependence of the pion decay constant is introduced and found to account for most of the so-called anomalous repulsion. The presence of such an effect might indicate partial chiral symmetry restoration in dense matter. The anomalous repulsion is fully accounted for when an additional relativistic impulse approximation term is included in the potential.

  20. Density-dependent nest predation in waterfowl: the relative importance of nest density versus nest dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Ringelman, Kevin M.; Eadie, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    When nest predation levels are very high or very low, the absolute range of observable nest success is constrained (a floor/ceiling effect), and it may be more difficult to detect density-dependent nest predation. Density-dependent nest predation may be more detectable in years with moderate predation rates, simply because there can be a greater absolute difference in nest success between sites. To test this, we replicated a predation experiment 10 years after the original study, using both natural and artificial nests, comparing a year when overall rates of nest predation were high (2000) to a year with moderate nest predation (2010). We found no evidence for density-dependent predation on artificial nests in either year, indicating that nest predation is not density-dependent at the spatial scale of our experimental replicates (1-ha patches). Using nearest-neighbor distances as a measure of nest dispersion, we also found little evidence for “dispersion-dependent” predation on artificial nests. However, when we tested for dispersion-dependent predation using natural nests, we found that nest survival increased with shorter nearest-neighbor distances, and that neighboring nests were more likely to share the same nest fate than non-adjacent nests. Thus, at small spatial scales, density-dependence appears to operate in the opposite direction as predicted: closer nearest neighbors are more likely to be successful. We suggest that local nest dispersion, rather than larger-scale measures of nest density per se, may play a more important role in density-dependent nest predation.

  1. Disentangling density-dependent dynamics using full annual cycle models and Bayesian model weight updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Orin J.; McGowan, Conor; Devers, Patrick K.

    2017-01-01

    Density dependence regulates populations of many species across all taxonomic groups. Understanding density dependence is vital for predicting the effects of climate, habitat loss and/or management actions on wild populations. Migratory species likely experience seasonal changes in the relative influence of density dependence on population processes such as survival and recruitment throughout the annual cycle. These effects must be accounted for when characterizing migratory populations via population models.To evaluate effects of density on seasonal survival and recruitment of a migratory species, we used an existing full annual cycle model framework for American black ducks Anas rubripes, and tested different density effects (including no effects) on survival and recruitment. We then used a Bayesian model weight updating routine to determine which population model best fit observed breeding population survey data between 1990 and 2014.The models that best fit the survey data suggested that survival and recruitment were affected by density dependence and that density effects were stronger on adult survival during the breeding season than during the non-breeding season.Analysis also suggests that regulation of survival and recruitment by density varied over time. Our results showed that different characterizations of density regulations changed every 8–12 years (three times in the 25-year period) for our population.Synthesis and applications. Using a full annual cycle, modelling framework and model weighting routine will be helpful in evaluating density dependence for migratory species in both the short and long term. We used this method to disentangle the seasonal effects of density on the continental American black duck population which will allow managers to better evaluate the effects of habitat loss and potential habitat management actions throughout the annual cycle. The method here may allow researchers to hone in on the proper form and/or strength of

  2. Radial oscillations of magnetized proto strange stars in temperature- and density-dependent quark mass model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Gupta; Asha Gupta; S Singh; J D Anand

    2003-10-01

    We report on the study of the mass–radius (–) relation and the radial oscillations of magnetized proto strange stars. For the quark matter we have employed the very recent modification, the temperature- and density-dependent quark mass model of the well-known density-dependent quark mass model. We find that the effect of magnetic field, both on the maximum mass and radial frequencies, is rather small. Also a proto strange star, whether magnetized or otherwise, is more likely to evolve into a strange star rather than transform into a black hole.

  3. Ecological meta-analysis of density-dependent processes in the transmission of lymphatic filariasis: survival of infected vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Edwin; Snow, Lucy C; Bockarie, Moses J

    2009-07-01

    The survival rate of infected vectors represents one of the fundamental components that influence the transmission dynamics of mosquito-borne diseases. Despite the occurrence of a number of studies investigating mosquito survival after infection with filarial worms, there remains conflicting evidence from both laboratory and field experiments as to the existence and mechanism for parasite-induced mortality among filarial mosquitoes. Here, we used a mixed effects meta-analytical framework to combine the data from all available vector-human host blood feeding experiments to evaluate the evidence for the impact of parasite load on the mortality rates of the three major lymphatic filariasis transmitting mosquito genera, Culex, Aedes, and Anopheles mosquitoes, over the extrinsic incubation period of parasitic infection. The results show that, despite the application of this approach, or in the case of Anopheles using a convention fixed effects logistic regression analysis supplemented with additional survival analysis of longitudinal data, no strong association between mortality rate and microfilariae (mf) uptake for either of the three mosquito genera is apparent in the combined data. Instead, a key finding is that study effects played a more crucial role in determining the levels of mortality observed in these experimental studies. This was most revealing in the case of Culex, given that the largest single study in terms of both the number of data points and range of mf intensities, in contrast to smaller studies, showed a significant positive association between mf intensity and mortality, indicating that in this genus at least, the detrimental effect of infection may be manifested only at the highest mf intakes. Although no density dependence in vector mortality was also observed for Aedes, possibly because of the use of restricted human mf intensity range in previous studies, an intriguing finding was that a significantly higher overall mortality was observed for

  4. Density-dependent state-space model for population-abundance data with unequal time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Ponciano, José Miguel

    2014-08-01

    The Gompertz state-space (GSS) model is a stochastic model for analyzing time-series observations of population abundances. The GSS model combines density dependence, environmental process noise, and observation error toward estimating quantities of interest in biological monitoring and population viability analysis. However, existing methods for estimating the model parameters apply only to population data with equal time intervals between observations. In the present paper, we extend the GSS model to data with unequal time intervals, by embedding it within a state-space version of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a continuous-time model of an equilibrating stochastic system. Maximum likelihood and restricted maximum likelihood calculations for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck state-space model involve only numerical maximization of an explicit multivariate normal likelihood, and so the extension allows for easy bootstrapping, yielding confidence intervals for model parameters, statistical hypothesis testing of density dependence, and selection among sub-models using information criteria. Ecologists and managers previously drawn to models lacking density dependence or observation error because such models accommodated unequal time intervals (for example, due to missing data) now have an alternative analysis framework incorporating density dependence, process noise, and observation error.

  5. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs in strongly diffusive regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.;

    2013-01-01

    In a series of systematic optical pump–terahertz probe experiments, we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in the regime of strong carrier diffusion. The terahertz frequency-resolved transient sheet conductivity spectra are perfectly described by the Drude...

  6. Density dependent hadron field theory for asymmetric nuclear matter and exotic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, F. Keil; Lenske, H.

    2001-01-01

    Published in: Phys. Rev. C 64 (2001) , pp.034314 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: The density dependent relativistic hadron field (DDRH) theory is applied to strongly asymmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei far off stability. A new set of in-medium meson-nucleon vertices

  7. Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. LaManna; Scott A. Mangan; Alfonso Alonso; Norman A. Bourg; Warren Y. Brockelman; Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin; Li-Wan Chang; Jyh-Min Chiang; George B. Chuyong; Keith Clay; Richard Condit; Susan Cordell; Stuart J. Davies; Tucker J. Furniss; Christian P. Giardina; I. A. U. Nimal Gunatilleke; C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke; Fangliang He; Robert W. Howe; Stephen P. Hubbell; Chang-Fu Hsieh; Faith M. Inman-Narahari; David Janík; Daniel J. Johnson; David Kenfack; Lisa Korte; Kamil Král; Andrew J. Larson; James A. Lutz; Sean M. McMahon; William J. McShea; Hervé R. Memiaghe; Anuttara Nathalang; Vojtech Novotny; Perry S. Ong; David A. Orwig; Rebecca Ostertag; Geoffrey G. Parker; Richard P. Phillips; Lawren Sack; I-Fang Sun; J. Sebastián Tello; Duncan W. Thomas; Benjamin L. Turner; Dilys M. Vela Díaz; Tomáš Vrška; George D. Weiblen; Amy Wolf; Sandra Yap; Jonathan A. Myers

    2017-01-01

    Theory predicts that higher biodiversity in the tropics is maintained by specialized interactions among plants and their natural enemies that result in conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). By using more than 3000 species and nearly 2.4 million trees across 24 forest plots worldwide, we show that global patterns in tree species diversity reflect not only...

  8. Investigation of a growth model incorporating density dependence for the mackerel management plan simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunel, T.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a framework to model density dependent growth for the North East Atlantic mackerel. The model used is the classical von Bertalanffy equation, but modified so that growth is reduced when stock size increases. The model developed was able to reproduce quite closely the trends in t

  9. Investigation of a growth model incorporating density dependence for the mackerel management plan simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunel, T.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a framework to model density dependent growth for the North East Atlantic mackerel. The model used is the classical von Bertalanffy equation, but modified so that growth is reduced when stock size increases. The model developed was able to reproduce quite closely the trends in

  10. Density dependent state space model for population abundance data with unequal time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Ponciano, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Gompertz state-space (GSS) model is a stochastic model for analyzing time series observations of population abundances. The GSS model combines density dependence, environmental process noise, and observation error toward estimating quantities of interest in biological monitoring and population viability analysis. However, existing methods for estimating the model parameters apply only to population data with equal time intervals between observations. In the present paper, we extend the GSS model to data with unequal time intervals, by embedding it within a state-space version of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a continuous-time model of an equilibrating stochastic system. Maximum likelihood and restricted maximum likelihood calculations for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck state-space model involve only numerical maximization of an explicit multivariate normal likelihood, and so the extension allows for easy bootstrapping, yielding confidence intervals for model parameters, statistical hypothesis testing of density dependence, and selection among sub-models using information criteria. Ecologists and managers previously drawn to models lacking density dependence or observation error because such models accommodated unequal time intervals (for example, due to missing data) now have an alternative analysis framework incorporating density dependence, process noise and observation error. PMID:25230459

  11. Explaining density-dependent regulation in earthworm populations using life-history analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammenga, J.E.; Spurgeon, D.J.; Svendsen, C.; Weeks, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is little knowledge about how density regulates population growth rate and to what extent this is determined by life-history patterns. We compared density dependent population consequences in the Nicholsonian sense based oil experimental observations and life-history modeling for

  12. Age-specific density-dependent survival in Mediterranean Gulls Larus melanocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Marvelde, Luc; Meininger, Peter L.; Flamant, Renaud; Dingemanse, Niels J.

    2009-01-01

    Survival and reproductive rates often decrease with increasing population density. Such negative density dependence reflects a changing net balance between the benefits and costs of presence of others with increasing density. When densities are low, however, survival and reproductive rates might

  13. A spatial interpretation of the density dependence model in industrial demography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the density dependence model, which was developed in organizational ecology, is compared to the economic-geographical notion of agglomeration economies. There is a basic resemblance: both involve some form of positive feedback between size of the population and growth. The paper explor

  14. Age-specific density-dependent survival in Mediterranean Gulls Larus melanocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Marvelde, Luc; Meininger, Peter L.; Flamant, Renaud; Dingemanse, Niels J.

    2009-01-01

    Survival and reproductive rates often decrease with increasing population density. Such negative density dependence reflects a changing net balance between the benefits and costs of presence of others with increasing density. When densities are low, however, survival and reproductive rates might inc

  15. A spatial interpretation of the density dependence model in industrial demography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the density dependence model, which was developed in organizational ecology, is compared to the economic-geographical notion of agglomeration economies. There is a basic resemblance: both involve some form of positive feedback between size of the population and growth. The paper explor

  16. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a Neotropical palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Visser, Marco D.; Wright, S. Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    2014-01-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a

  17. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a Neotropical palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Visser, Marco D.; Wright, S. Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    2014-01-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a

  18. A spatial interpretation of the density dependence model in industrial demography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the density dependence model, which was developed in organizational ecology, is compared to the economic-geographical notion of agglomeration economies. There is a basic resemblance: both involve some form of positive feedback between size of the population and growth. The paper

  19. Maxwell equation violation by density dependent magnetic fields in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, Débora P

    2016-01-01

    We show that the widely used density dependent magnetic field prescriptions, necessary to account for the variation of the field intensity from the crust to the core of neutron stars violate one of the Maxwell equations. We estimate how strong the violation is when different equations of state are used and check for which cases the pathological problem can be cured.

  20. Density dependence and population dynamics of black rhinos (Diceros bicornis michaeli) in Kenya's rhino sanctuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouma, B.O.; Amin, R.; Langevelde, van F.; Leader-Williams, N.

    2010-01-01

    Density-dependent feedback mechanisms provide insights into the population dynamics and interactions of large herbivores with their ecosystem. Sex ratio also has particularly important implications for growth rates of many large mammal populations through its influence on reproductive potential. The

  1. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a Neotropical palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Visser, Marco D.; Wright, S. Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a

  2. Stochastic seasonality and nonlinear density-dependent factors regulate population size in an African rodent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Steneth, Nils Chr.; Nichols, James D.

    1997-01-01

    , but clear examples of both processes acting in the same population are rare(7,8). Key-factor analysis (regression of population changes on possible causal factors) and time-series analysis are often used to investigate the presence of density dependence, but such approaches may be biased and provide...

  3. Impact of cannibalism on predator-prey dynamics: size-structured interactions and apparent mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W

    2008-06-01

    this difference is species specific. This demonstrates that cannibalism can result in the coupling of predator and prey mortality rates that strongly determines the dynamics of predator-prey systems.

  4. Wolf-prey relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Peterson, Rolf O.; Mech, L. David; Boitani, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    As I (L.D. MECH) watched from a small ski plane while fifteen wolves surrounded a moose on snowy Isle Royale, I had no idea this encounter would typify observations I would make during 40 more years of studying wolf-prey relations.My usual routine while observing wolves hunting was to have my pilot keep circling broadly over the scene so I could watch the wolves’ attacks without disturbing any of the animals. Only this time there was no attack. The moose held the wolves at bay for about 5 minutes (fig. 5.1), and then the pack left.From this observation and many others of wolves hunting moose, deer, caribou, muskoxen, bison, elk, and even arctic hares, we have come to view the wolf as a highly discerning hunter, a predator that can quickly judge the cost/benefit ratio of attacking its prey. A successful attack, and the wolf can feed for days. One miscalculation, however, and the animal could be badly injured or killed. Thus wolves generally kill prey that, while not always on their last legs, tend to be less fit than the conspecifics and thus closer to death. The moose that the fifteen wolves surrounded had not been in this category, so when the wolves realized it, they gave up. This is most often the case when wolves hunt.

  5. Disentangling the effects of climate, density dependence, and harvest on an iconic large herbivore's population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koons, David; Colchero, Fernando; Hersey, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relative effects of climate, harvest, and density dependence on population dynamics is critical for guiding sound population management, especially for ungulates in arid and semi-arid environments experiencing climate change. To address these issues for bison in southern Utah, we...... spring temperature could have a greater ‘relative effect’ on equilibrium abundance than either harvest or the strength of density dependence. Our findings highlight the utility of incorporating elasticity analyses into state-space population models, and the need to include climatic processes in wildlife...... applied a Bayesian state-space model to a 72-year time series of abundance counts. While accounting for known harvest (as well as live removal) from the population, we found that the bison population in southern Utah exhibited strong potential to grow from low density (β0 = 0.26; Bayesian credible...

  6. Hybrid stars Spin polarised nuclear matter and density dependent quark masses

    CERN Document Server

    Maheswari, V S U; Samaddar, S K

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of formation of a droplet phase (DP) inside a star and its consequences on the structural properties of the star are investigated. For nuclear matter (NM), an equation of state (EOS) based on finite range, momentum and density dependent interaction, and which predicts that neutron matter undergoes ferromagnetic transition at densities realisable inside the neutron star is employed. An EOS for quark matter (QM) with density dependent quark masses, the so-called effective mass model, is constructed by correctly treating the quark chemical potentials. It is then found that a droplet phase consisting of strange quark matter and unpolarised nuclear matter sandwiched between a core of polarised nuclear matter and a crust containing unpolarised nuclear matter exists. Moreover, we could explain the mass and surface magnetic field satisfactorily, and as well allow, due to the presence of a droplet phase, the direct URCA process to happen.

  7. Nuclear Density-Dependent Effective Coupling Constants in the Mean-Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Lee, S J; Lee, Jae Hwang; Lee, Young Jae; Lee, Suk-Joon

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the equation of state of nuclear matter can be determined within the mean-field theory of $\\sigma \\omega$ model provided only that the nucleon effective mass curve is given. We use a family of the possible nucleon effective mass curves that reproduce the empirical saturation point in the calculation of the nuclear binding energy curves in order to obtain density-dependent effective coupling constants. The resulting density-dependent coupling constants may be used to study a possible equation of state of nuclear system at high density or neutron matter. Within the constraints used in this paper to $M^*$ of nuclear matter at saturation point and zero density, neutron matter of large incompressibility is strongly bound at high density while soft neutron matter is weakly bound at low density. The study also exhibits the importance of surface vibration modes in the study of nuclear equation of state.

  8. Half lives of spherical proton emitters using density dependent M3Y interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, P R; Basu, D N

    2005-01-01

    The proton radioactivity lifetimes of spherical proton emitters from the ground and the isomeric states are calculated using the microscopic nucleon-nucleus interaction potentials. The daughter nuclei density distributions are folded with a realistic density dependent M3Y effective interaction supplemented by a zero-range pseudo-potential. The density dependence parameters of the interaction are extracted from the nuclear matter calculations. The saturation energy per nucleon used for nuclear matter calculations is determined from the co-efficient of the volume term of Bethe-Weizsacker mass formula which is evaluated by fitting the recent experimental and estimated atomic mass excesses from Audi-Wapstra-Thibault atomic mass table by minimizing the mean square deviation. The quantum mechanical tunneling probability is calculated within the WKB approximation. Spherical charge distributions are used for calculating the Coulomb interaction potentials. These calculations provide good estimates for the observed pro...

  9. Study of Proto Strange Stars (PSS) in Temperature and Density Dependent Quark Mass Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, V K; Singh, S; Anand, J D; Gupta, Asha

    2003-01-01

    We report on the study of the mass-radius (M-R) relation and the radial oscillations of proto strange stars. For the quark matter we have employed the well known density dependent quark mass model and its very recent modification, the temperature and density dependent quark mass model. We find that the maximum mass the star can support increases significantly with the temperature of the star in this model which implies that transition to a black hole at the early stage of formation of the star is inhibited. As for the neutrinos, we find, contrary to the expectation that the M-R and oscillation frequencies are almost independent of the neutrino chemical potentials.

  10. Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$ interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Isaka, M; Rijken, T h A

    2016-01-01

    Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$-interaction in $\\Lambda$ binding energies $B_\\Lambda$ of hypernuclei are studied systematically on the basis of the baryon-baryon interaction model ESC including many-body effects. By using the $\\Lambda\\!N$ G-matrix interaction derived from ESC, we perform microscopic calculations of $B_\\Lambda$ in $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei within the framework of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics under the averaged-density approximation. The calculated values of $B_\\Lambda$ reproduce experimental data within a few hundred keV in the wide mass regions from 9 to 51. It is found that competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$-interaction work decisively for fine tuning of $B_\\Lambda$ values.

  11. Postcatastrophe population dynamics and density dependence of an endemic island duck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seavy, N.E.; Reynolds, M.H.; Link, W.A.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Laysan ducks (Anas laysanensis) are restricted to approximately 9 km2 in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA. To evaluate the importance of density dependence for Laysan ducks, we conducted a Bayesian analysis to estimate the parameters of a Gompertz model and the magnitude of process variation and observation error based on the fluctuations in Laysan duck abundance on Laysan Island from 1994 to 2007. This model described a stationary distribution for the population at carrying capacity that fluctuates around a long-term mean of 456 ducks and is between 316 to 636 ducks 95% of the time. This range of expected variability can be used to identify changes in population size that warn of catastrophic events. Density-dependent population dynamics may explain the recovery of Laysan duck from catastrophic declines and allow managers to identify population monitoring thresholds.

  12. Disentangling the effects of climate, density dependence, and harvest on an iconic large herbivore's population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koons, David; Colchero, Fernando; Hersey, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relative effects of climate, harvest, and density dependence on population dynamics is critical for guiding sound population management, especially for ungulates in arid and semi-arid environments experiencing climate change. To address these issues for bison in southern Utah, we...... applied a Bayesian state-space model to a 72-year time series of abundance counts. While accounting for known harvest (as well as live removal) from the population, we found that the bison population in southern Utah exhibited strong potential to grow from low density (β0 = 0.26; Bayesian credible...... interval based on 95% of the highest posterior density: BCI = 0.19 to 0.33), and weak but statistically significant density dependence (β1 = -0.02, BCI = -0.04 to -0.004). Early spring temperatures also had strong positive effects on population growth (βfebaprtemp1 = 0.09, BCI = 0.04 to 0.14), much more so...

  13. Density dependence and risk of extinction in a small population of sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, L.R.; Buenau, K.E.; VanBlaricom, G.

    2004-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris (L.)) were hunted to extinction off the coast of Washington State early in the 20th century. A new population was established by translocations from Alaska in 1969 and 1970. The population, currently numbering at least 550 animals, A major threat to the population is the ongoing risk of majour oil spills in sea otter habitat. We apply population models to census and demographic data in order to evaluate the status of the population. We fit several density dependent models to test for density dependence and determine plausible values for the carrying capacity (K) by comparing model goodness of fit to an exponential model. Model fits were compared using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). A significant negative relationship was found between the population growth rate and population size (r2=0.27, F=5.57, df=16, pgrowth rate (??). The elasticity values indicate the population is most sensitive to changes in survival rates (particularly adult survival).

  14. Density dependent magnetic field and the equation of state of hyperonic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Casali, Rudiney Hoffmann

    2013-01-01

    We are interested on the effects, caused by strong variable density dependent magnetic fields, on hyperonic matter, its symmetry energy, equations of state and mass-radius relations. The inclusion of the anomalous magnetic moment of the particles involved in a stellar system is performed, and some results are compared with the cases that do not take this correction under consideration. The Lagrangian density used follows the nonlinear Walecka model plus the leptons subjected to an external magnetic field.

  15. Remark on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity and discontinuous initial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Fang, Daoyuan

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we study the free boundary problem for 1D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity. We focus on the case where the viscosity coefficient vanishes on vacuum. We prove the global existence and uniqueness for discontinuous solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations when the initial density is a bounded variation function, and give a decay result for the density as t-->+[infinity].

  16. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  17. Density dependence in an age-structured population of great tits: identifying the critical age classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelon, Marlène; Grøtan, Vidar; Engen, Steinar; Bjørkvoll, Eirin; Visser, Marcel E; Saether, Bernt-Erik

    2016-09-01

    Classical approaches for the analyses of density dependence assume that all the individuals in a population equally respond and equally contribute to density dependence. However, in age-structured populations, individuals of different ages may differ in their responses to changes in population size and how they contribute to density dependence affecting the growth rate of the whole population. Here we apply the concept of critical age classes, i.e., a specific scalar function that describes how one or a combination of several age classes affect the demographic rates negatively, in order to examine how total density dependence acting on the population growth rate depends on the age-specific population sizes. In a 38-yr dataset of an age-structured great tit (Parus major) population, we find that the age classes, including the youngest breeding females, were the critical age classes for density regulation. These age classes correspond to new breeders that attempt to take a territory and that have the strongest competitive effect on other breeding females. They strongly affected population growth rate and reduced recruitment and survival rates of all breeding females. We also show that depending on their age class, females may differently respond to varying density. In particular, the negative effect of the number of breeding females was stronger on recruitment rate of the youngest breeding females. These findings question the classical assumptions that all the individuals of a population can be treated as having an equal contribution to density regulation and that the effect of the number of individuals is age independent. Our results improve our understanding of density regulation in natural populations.

  18. Stochasticity and determinism: how density-independent and density-dependent processes affect population variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlberger, Jan; Rogers, Lauren A; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    A persistent debate in population ecology concerns the relative importance of environmental stochasticity and density dependence in determining variability in adult year-class strength, which contributes to future reproduction as well as potential yield in exploited populations. Apart from the strength of the processes, the timing of density regulation may affect how stochastic variation, for instance through climate, translates into changes in adult abundance. In this study, we develop a life-cycle model for the population dynamics of a large marine fish population, Northeast Arctic cod, to disentangle the effects of density-independent and density-dependent processes on early life-stages, and to quantify the strength of compensatory density dependence in the population. The model incorporates information from scientific surveys and commercial harvest, and dynamically links multiple effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on all life-stages, from eggs to spawners. Using a state-space approach we account for observation error and stochasticity in the population dynamics. Our findings highlight the importance of density-dependent survival in juveniles, indicating that this period of the life cycle largely determines the compensatory capacity of the population. Density regulation at the juvenile life-stage dampens the impact of stochastic processes operating earlier in life such as environmental impacts on the production of eggs and climate-dependent survival of larvae. The timing of stochastic versus regulatory processes thus plays a crucial role in determining variability in adult abundance. Quantifying the contribution of environmental stochasticity and compensatory mechanisms in determining population abundance is essential for assessing population responses to climate change and exploitation by humans.

  19. Stochasticity and Determinism: How Density-Independent and Density-Dependent Processes Affect Population Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Ohlberger; Rogers, Lauren A.; Nils Chr. Stenseth

    2014-01-01

    A persistent debate in population ecology concerns the relative importance of environmental stochasticity and density dependence in determining variability in adult year-class strength, which contributes to future reproduction as well as potential yield in exploited populations. Apart from the strength of the processes, the timing of density regulation may affect how stochastic variation, for instance through climate, translates into changes in adult abundance. In this study, we develop a lif...

  20. Density-dependent nerve growth factor regulation of Gs-alpha RNA in pheochromocytoma 12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, G; Aguanno, A; Kumar, R; Benincasa, D; Gubits, R M; Yu, H; Dolan, K P

    1990-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) affects levels of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gs-alpha) in pheochromocytoma 12 cells in a bidirectional, density-dependent manner. Cells grown at high density responded to NGF treatment with increased levels of Gs-alpha mRNA and protein. Conversely, in cells grown in low-density cultures, levels of this mRNA were lowered by NGF treatment. Images PMID:2160599

  1. Goshawk prey have more bacteria than non-prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Peralta-Sánchez, J M; Nielsen, J T; López-Hernández, E; Soler, J J

    2012-03-01

    1. Predators often prey on individuals that are sick or otherwise weakened. Although previous studies have shown higher abundance of parasites in prey, whether prey have elevated loads of micro-organisms remains to be determined. 2. We quantified the abundance of bacteria and fungi on feathers of woodpigeons Columba palumbus L., jays Garrulus glandarius L. and blackbirds Turdus merula L. that either fell prey to goshawks Accipiter gentilis L. or were not depredated. 3. We found an almost three-fold increase in bacterial load of prey compared with non-prey, while there was no significant difference between prey and non-prey in level of fungal infection of the plumage. 4. The results were not confounded by differences in size or mass of feathers, date of collection of feathers, or date of analysis of feathers for micro-organisms. 5. These findings suggest a previously unknown contribution of bacteria to risk of predation, with important implications for behaviour, population ecology and community ecology. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  2. Native birds and alien insects: spatial density dependence in songbird predation of invading oak gallwasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schönrogge

    Full Text Available Revealing the interactions between alien species and native communities is central to understanding the ecological consequences of range expansion. Much has been learned through study of the communities developing around invading herbivorous insects. Much less, however, is known about the significance of such aliens for native vertebrate predators for which invaders may represent a novel food source. We quantified spatial patterns in native bird predation of invading gall-inducing Andricus wasps associated with introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris at eight sites across the UK. These gallwasps are available at high density before the emergence of caterpillars that are the principle spring food of native insectivorous birds. Native birds showed positive spatial density dependence in gall attack rates at two sites in southern England, foraging most extensively on trees with highest gall densities. In a subsequent study at one of these sites, positive spatial density dependence persisted through four of five sequential week-long periods of data collection. Both patterns imply that invading galls are a significant resource for at least some native bird populations. Density dependence was strongest in southern UK bird populations that have had longest exposure to the invading gallwasps. We hypothesise that this pattern results from the time taken for native bird populations to learn how to exploit this novel resource.

  3. Bayesian Inference on the Effect of Density Dependence and Weather on a Guanaco Population from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubillaga, María; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás; Rabinovich, Jorge E.; Colchero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive population dynamics is fundamental for management of wild populations. The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is one of two wild camelid species in South America. We evaluated the effects of density dependence and weather variables on population regulation based on a time series of 36 years of population sampling of guanacos in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. The population density varied between 2.7 and 30.7 guanaco/km2, with an apparent monotonic growth during the first 25 years; however, in the last 10 years the population has shown large fluctuations, suggesting that it might have reached its carrying capacity. We used a Bayesian state-space framework and model selection to determine the effect of density and environmental variables on guanaco population dynamics. Our results show that the population is under density dependent regulation and that it is currently fluctuating around an average carrying capacity of 45,000 guanacos. We also found a significant positive effect of previous winter temperature while sheep density has a strong negative effect on the guanaco population growth. We conclude that there are significant density dependent processes and that climate as well as competition with domestic species have important effects determining the population size of guanacos, with important implications for management and conservation. PMID:25514510

  4. -selection, -selection, effectiveness, and tolerance in competition: density-dependent selection revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Joshi; N. G. Prasad; Mallikarjun Shakarad

    2001-08-01

    In the Drosophila literature, selection for faster development and selection for adapting to high density are often confounded, leading, for example, to the expectation that selection for faster development should also lead to higher competitive ability. At the same time, results from experimental studies on evolution at high density do not agree with many of the predictions from classical density-dependent selection theory. We put together a number of theoretical and empirical results from the literature, and some new experimental results on Drosophila populations successfully subjected to selection for faster development, to argue for a broader interpretation of density-dependent selection. We show that incorporating notions of -selection, and the division of competitive ability into effectiveness and tolerance components, into the concept of density-dependent selection yields a formulation that allows for a better understanding of the empirical results. We also use this broader formulation to predict that selection for faster development in Drosophila should, in fact, lead to the correlated evolution of decreased competitive ability, even though it does lead to the evolution of greater efficiency and higher population growth rates at high density when in monotypic culture.

  5. A Holling Type II Pest and Natural Enemy Model with Density Dependent IPM Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resource limitations and density dependent releasing of natural enemies during the pest control and integrated pest management will undoubtedly result in nonlinear impulsive control. In order to investigate the effects of those nonlinear control strategies on the successful pest control, we have proposed a pest-natural enemy system concerning integrated pest management with density dependent instant killing rate and releasing rate. In particular, the releasing rate depicts how the number of natural enemy populations released was guided by their current density at the fixed moment. The threshold condition which ensures the existence and global stability of pest-free periodic solution has been discussed first, and the effects of key parameters on the threshold condition reveal that reducing the pulse period does not always benefit pest control; that is, frequent releasing of natural enemies may not be beneficial to the eradication of pests when the density dependent releasing method has been implemented. Moreover, the forward and backward bifurcations could occur once the pest-free periodic solution becomes unstable, and the system could exist with very complex dynamics. All those results confirm that the control actions should be carefully designed once the nonlinear impulsive control measures have been taken for pest management.

  6. Assessing the impact of density dependence in field populations of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, R K; Facchinelli, L; Ramsey, J M; Bond, J G; Gould, F

    2011-12-01

    Although many laboratory studies of intra-specific competition have been conducted with Ae. aegypti, there have been few studies in natural environments and none that examined density dependence in natural containers at normal field densities. Additionally, current mathematical models that predict Ae. aegypti population dynamics lack empirically-based functions for density-dependence. We performed field experiments in Tapachula, Mexico, where dengue is a significant public health concern. Twenty-one containers with natural food and water that already contained larvae were collected from local houses. Each container was divided in half and the naturally occurring larvae were apportioned in a manner that resulted in one side of the container (high density) having four times the density of the second side (low density). Larvae were counted and pupae were removed daily. Once adults emerged, wing span was measured to estimate body size. Density had a significant impact on larval survival, adult body size, and the time taken to transition from 4(th) instar to pupation. Increased density decreased larval survival by 20% and decreased wing length by an average of 0.19 mm. These results provide a starting point for a better understanding of density dependence in field populations of Ae. aegypti.

  7. Travelling Waves for a Density Dependent Diffusion Nagumo Equation over the Real Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A. Van Gorder

    2012-01-01

    We consider the density dependent diffusion Nagumo equation, where the diffusion coefficient is a simple power function. This equation is used in modelling electrical pulse propagation in nerve axons and in population genetics (amongst other areas). In the present paper, the δ-expansion method is applied to a travelling wave reduction of the problem, so that we may obtain globally valid perturbation solutions (in the sense that the perturbation solutions are valid over the entire infinite domain, not just locally; hence the results are a generalization of the local solutions considered recently in the literature). The resulting boundary value problem is solved on the real line subject to conditions at z →±∞. Whenever a perturbative method is applied, it is important to discuss the accuracy and convergence properties of the resulting perturbation expansions. We compare our results with those of two different numerical methods (designed for initial and boundary value problems, respectively) and deduce that the perturbation expansions agree with the numerical results after a reasonable number of iterations. Finally, we are able to discuss the influence of the wave speed c and the asymptotic concentration value α on the obtained solutions. Upon recasting the density dependent diffusion Nagumo equation as a two-dimensional dynamical system, we are also able to discuss the influence of the nonlinear density dependence (which is governed by a power-law parameter m) on oscillations of the travelling wave solutions.

  8. Predator-prey systems depend on a prey refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, W J; Gladstone, W; Herbert, R D; Fuller, M M

    2014-11-07

    Models of near-exclusive predator-prey systems such as that of the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare have included factors such as a second prey species, a Holling Type II predator response and climatic or seasonal effects to reproduce sub-sets of six signature patterns in the empirical data. We present an agent-based model which does not require the factors or constraints of previous models to reproduce all six patterns in persistent populations. Our parsimonious model represents a generalised predator and prey species with a small prey refuge. The lack of the constraints of previous models, considered to be important for those models, casts doubt on the current hypothesised mechanisms of exclusive predator-prey systems. The implication for management of the lynx, a protected species, is that maintenance of an heterogeneous environment offering natural refuge areas for the hare is the most important factor for the conservation of this species.

  9. Ecoepidemic predator-prey model with feeding satiation, prey herd behavior and abandoned infected prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Bob W; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyse a predator-prey model where the prey population shows group defense and the prey individuals are affected by a transmissible disease. The resulting model is of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey type with an SI (susceptible-infected) disease in the prey. Modeling prey group defense leads to a square root dependence in the Holling type II functional for the predator-prey interaction term. The system dynamics is investigated using simulations, classical existence and asymptotic stability analysis and numerical bifurcation analysis. A number of bifurcations, such as transcritical and Hopf bifurcations which occur commonly in predator-prey systems will be found. Because of the square root interaction term there is non-uniqueness of the solution and a singularity where the prey population goes extinct in a finite time. This results in a collapse initiated by extinction of the healthy or susceptible prey and thereafter the other population(s). When also a positive attractor exists this leads to bistability similar to what is found in predator-prey models with a strong Allee effect. For the two-dimensional disease-free (i.e. the purely demographic) system the region in the parameter space where bistability occurs is marked by a global bifurcation. At this bifurcation a heteroclinic connection exists between saddle prey-only equilibrium points where a stable limit cycle together with its basin of attraction, are destructed. In a companion paper (Gimmelli et al., 2015) the same model was formulated and analysed in which the disease was not in the prey but in the predator. There we also observed this phenomenon. Here we extend its analysis using a phase portrait analysis. For the three-dimensional ecoepidemic predator-prey system where the prey is affected by the disease, also tangent bifurcations including a cusp bifurcation and a torus bifurcation of limit cycles occur. This leads to new complex dynamics. Continuation by varying one parameter

  10. Birds of Prey of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerstrom, Frances

    This copiously illustrated document is designed to be a field quide to birds of prey that are common to Wisconsin, as well as to some that enter the state occasionally. An introduction discusses birds of prey with regard to migration patterns, the relationship between common names and the attitudes of people toward certain birds, and natural signs…

  11. Sea otter foraging behavior and hydrocarbon levels in prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroff, Angela M.; Bodkin, James L.; Loughlin, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), Prudhoe Bay crude oil from the vessel spread on the sea surface and covered coastal shores from western Prince William Sound (PWS) to the Alaska Peninsula. In PWS alone. acute mortality of sca otters at the time of the spill was estimated to be greater than 2000 (Doroff et al. 1993; Garrott et al. 1993).Shoreline oiling was observed on approximately 24% of the 1891 km of coastline surveyed within PWS (Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment Geoprocessing Group 1991). The effect of oil on the abundance of nearshore marine invertebrate populations is unclear, and the concentration and persistence of hydrocarbons present in tissues of most of these invertebrate species still remains unknown. What is known is that marine bivalves can accumulate petroleum hydrocarbons from both chronic and acute sources (Blumer et al. 1970; Ehrhardt 1972; Boehun and Quinn 1977). Potential long-term chronic effects of oiled intertidal and subtidal prey on the sea otter population are of concern.Sea otters prey on a wide variety of benthic marine invertebrates (Riedman and Estes 1990) and forage in shallow coastal waters (Wild and Arnes 1974), which vary widely in exposure to the open ocean, substrate type, and community composition. Sea otters have high metabolic demands relative to other marine mammals and can consume 20-25% of their body weight per day in invertebrate prey (Kenyon 1969: Costa and Kooyman 1984). Sca otters have occupied southwestern PWS since at least the early 1950s (Lensink 1962; Garshelis et al. 1986). The sea otter population in the PWS spill region was likely near equilibrium density and limited by prey availability before the oil spill (xcurrel (Estes et al. 1981; Garshelis et al. 1986; Johnson 1987). Sea otters in this region spent 59% of the daylight hours foraging, while otters in recently reoccupied habitats of eastern PWS spent only 27%. (Garshelis et al. 1986). Therefore, small differences in abundance of prey

  12. Prey capture by harbor porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee

    2008-01-01

    their ultrasonic clicks as biosonar for orientation and detection of prey (mostly smaller pelagic and bottom dwelling fish), and for communication.  For studying wild animals, hydrophone arrays [Villadsgaard et al. J.Exp.Biol. 210 (2007)] and acoustic (time/depth) tags [Akamatsu et al. Deep Sea Research II 54...... (2007)] have been used.  For studying captive animals, arrays and video techniques [Verfuss et al. J.Exp.Biol. 208 (2005)] as well as miniature acoustic-behavioral tags [Deruiter et al. JASA 123 (2008)] have been used.  While searching for prey, harbor porpoises use clicks at long intervals (~50 ms......) that progressively decrease when closing on an object.  After detecting the prey, the click interval stabilizes and then becomes progressively shorter while approaching the prey.  The sequence ends in a terminal, high repetition rate buzz (~500 clicks/s) just before capturing the prey (a video will be shown...

  13. COMPLEX LIFE CYCLES AND DENSITY DEPENDENCE: ASSESSING THE CONTRIBUTION OF EGG MORTALITY TO AMPHIBIAN DECLINES. (U915824)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Stabilizing Effect of Prey Refuge and Predator’s Interference on the Dynamics of Prey with Delayed Growth and Generalist Predator with Delayed Gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debaldev Jana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, I study a prey-predator model with multiple time delays where the predator population is regarded as generalist. For this regard, I consider a Holling-Tanner prey-predator system where a constant time delay is incorporated in the logistic growth of the prey to represent a delayed density dependent feedback mechanism and the second time delay is considered to account for the length of the gestation period of the predator. Predator’s interference in predator-prey relationship provides better descriptions of predator's feeding over a range of prey-predator abundances, so the predator's functional response here is considered to be Type II ratio-dependent. In accordance with previous studies, it is observed that delay destabilizes the system, in general, and stability loss occurs via Hopf bifurcation. There exist critical values of delay parameters below which the coexistence equilibrium is stable and above which it is unstable. Hopf bifurcation occurs when delay parameters cross their critical values. When delay parameters are large enough than their critical values, the system exhibits chaotic behavior and this abnormal behavior may be controlled by refuge. Numerical computation is also performed to validate different theoretical results. Lyapunov exponent, recurrence plot, and power spectral density confirm the chaotic dynamical behaviors.

  15. Reconsidering the importance of the past in predator-prey models: both numerical and functional responses depend on delayed prey densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiqiu; Fenton, Andy; Kettley, Lee; Roberts, Phillip; Montagnes, David J S

    2013-10-07

    We propose that delayed predator-prey models may provide superficially acceptable predictions for spurious reasons. Through experimentation and modelling, we offer a new approach: using a model experimental predator-prey system (the ciliates Didinium and Paramecium), we determine the influence of past-prey abundance at a fixed delay (approx. one generation) on both functional and numerical responses (i.e. the influence of present : past-prey abundance on ingestion and growth, respectively). We reveal a nonlinear influence of past-prey abundance on both responses, with the two responding differently. Including these responses in a model indicated that delay in the numerical response drives population oscillations, supporting the accepted (but untested) notion that reproduction, not feeding, is highly dependent on the past. We next indicate how delays impact short- and long-term population dynamics. Critically, we show that although superficially the standard (parsimonious) approach to modelling can reasonably fit independently obtained time-series data, it does so by relying on biologically unrealistic parameter values. By contrast, including our fully parametrized delayed density dependence provides a better fit, offering insights into underlying mechanisms. We therefore present a new approach to explore time-series data and a revised framework for further theoretical studies.

  16. Non-formation of vacuum states for Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We consider the Cauchy problem, free boundary problem and piston problem for one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity. Using the reduction to absurdity method, we prove that the weak solutions to these systems do not exhibit vacuum states, provided that no vacuum states are present initially. The essential requirements on the solutions are that the mass and energy of the fluid are locally integrable at each time, and the Lloc1-norm of the velocity gradient is locally integrable in time.

  17. Bulk viscosity of strange quark matter in density dependent quark mass model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J D Anand; N Chandrika Devi; V K Gupta; S Singh

    2000-05-01

    We have studied the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter in the density dependent quark mass model (DDQM) and compared results with calculations done earlier in the MIT bag model where , masses were neglected and first order interactions were taken into account. We find that at low temperatures and high relative perturbations, the bulk viscosity is higher by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude while at low perturbations the enhancement is by 1–2 order of magnitude as compared to earlier results. Also the damping time is 2–3 orders of magnitude lower implying that the star reaches stability much earlier than in MIT bag model calculations.

  18. Dynamics of prey moving through a predator field: a model of migrating juvenile salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    The migration of a patch of prey through a field of relatively stationary predators is a situation that occurs frequently in nature. Making quantitative predictions concerning such phenomena may be difficult, however, because factors such as the number of the prey in the patch, the spatial length and velocity of the patch, and the feeding rate and satiation of the predators all interact in a complex way. However, such problems are of great practical importance in many management situations; e.g., calculating the mortality of juvenile salmon (smolts) swimming down a river or reservoir containing many predators. Salmon smolts often move downstream in patches short compared with the length of the reservoir. To take into account the spatial dependence of the interaction, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based modeling approach. We found that the mortality of prey depends strongly on the number of prey in the patch, the downstream velocity of prey in the patch, and the dispersion or spread of the patch in size through time. Some counterintuitive phenomena are predicted, such as predators downstrean capturing more prey per predator than those upstream, even though the number of prey may be greatly depleted by the time the prey patch reaches the downstream predators. Individual-based models may be necessary for complex spatial situations, such as salmonid migration, where processes such as schooling occur at fine scales and affect system predictions. We compare some results to predictions from other salmonid models. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

  19. Prey-predator model with a nonlocal consumption of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, M; Volpert, V

    2016-08-01

    The prey-predator model with nonlocal consumption of prey introduced in this work extends previous studies of local reaction-diffusion models. Linear stability analysis of the homogeneous in space stationary solution and numerical simulations of nonhomogeneous solutions allow us to analyze bifurcations and dynamics of stationary solutions and of travelling waves. These solutions present some new properties in comparison with the local models. They correspond to different feeding strategies of predators observed in ecology.

  20. Prey-predator model with a nonlocal consumption of prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, M.; Volpert, V.

    2016-08-01

    The prey-predator model with nonlocal consumption of prey introduced in this work extends previous studies of local reaction-diffusion models. Linear stability analysis of the homogeneous in space stationary solution and numerical simulations of nonhomogeneous solutions allow us to analyze bifurcations and dynamics of stationary solutions and of travelling waves. These solutions present some new properties in comparison with the local models. They correspond to different feeding strategies of predators observed in ecology.

  1. The Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with foraging-predation risk trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivan, Vlastimil

    2007-11-01

    This article studies the effects of adaptive changes in predator and/or prey activities on the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey population dynamics. The model assumes the classical foraging-predation risk trade-offs: increased activity increases population growth rate, but it also increases mortality rate. The model considers three scenarios: prey only are adaptive, predators only are adaptive, and both species are adaptive. Under all these scenarios, the neutral stability of the classical Lotka-Volterra model is partially lost because the amplitude of maximum oscillation in species numbers is bounded, and the bound is independent of the initial population numbers. Moreover, if both prey and predators behave adaptively, the neutral stability can be completely lost, and a globally stable equilibrium would appear. This is because prey and/or predator switching leads to a piecewise constant prey (predator) isocline with a vertical (horizontal) part that limits the amplitude of oscillations in prey and predator numbers, exactly as suggested by Rosenzweig and MacArthur in their seminal work on graphical stability analysis of predator-prey systems. Prey and predator activities in a long-term run are calculated explicitly. This article shows that predictions based on short-term behavioral experiments may not correspond to long-term predictions when population dynamics are considered.

  2. Larval density dependence in Anopheles gambiae s.s., the major African vector of malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriu, Simon M.; Coulson, Tim; Mbogo, Charles M.; Godfray, H. Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto is the most important vector of malaria in Africa although relatively little is known about the density-dependent processes determining its population size.Mosquito larval density was manipulated under semi-natural conditions using artificial larval breeding sites placed in the field in coastal Kenya; two experiments were conducted: one manipulating the density of a single cohort of larvae across a range of densities and the other employing fewer densities but with the treatments crossed with four treatments manipulating predator access.In the first experiment, larval survival, development rate and the size of the adult mosquito all decreased with larval density (controlling for block effects between 23% and 31% of the variance in the data could be explained by density).In the second experiment, the effects of predator manipulation were not significant, but again we observed strong density dependence in larval survival (explaining 30% of the variance).The results are compared with laboratory studies of A. gambiae larval competition and the few other studies conducted in the field, and the consequences for malaria control are discussed PMID:23163565

  3. Density-dependent coral recruitment displays divergent responses during distinct early life-history stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doropoulos, Christopher; Evensen, Nicolas R; Gómez-Lemos, Luis A; Babcock, Russell C

    2017-05-01

    Population growth involves demographic bottlenecks that regulate recruitment success during various early life-history stages. The success of each early life-history stage can vary in response to population density, interacting with intrinsic (e.g. behavioural) and environmental (e.g. competition, predation) factors. Here, we used the common reef-building coral Acropora millepora to investigate how density-dependence influences larval survival and settlement in laboratory experiments that isolated intrinsic effects, and post-settlement survival in a field experiment that examined interactions with environmental factors. Larval survival was exceptionally high (greater than 80%) and density-independent from 2.5 to 12 days following spawning. By contrast, there was a weak positive effect of larval density on settlement, driven by gregarious behaviour at the highest density. When larval supply was saturated, settlement was three times higher in crevices compared with exposed microhabitats, but a negative relationship between settler density and post-settlement survival in crevices and density-independent survival on exposed surfaces resulted in similar recruit densities just one month following settlement. Moreover, a negative relationship was found between turf algae and settler survival in crevices, whereas gregarious settlement improved settler survival on exposed surfaces. Overall, our findings reveal divergent responses by coral larvae and newly settled recruits to density-dependent regulation, mediated by intrinsic and environmental interactions.

  4. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  5. Memoirs of a locust: density-dependent behavioral change as a model for learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, N; Guershon, M; Orlova, M; Ayali, A

    2010-02-01

    A locust outbreak is a stupendous natural phenomenon that remains in the memory of whoever has been lucky (or unlucky) enough to witness it. Recent years have provided novel and important insights into the neurobiology of locust swarming. However, the central nervous system processes that accompany and perhaps even lie at the basis of locust phase transformation are still far from being fully understood. Our current work deals with the memory of a locust outbreak from a new perspective: that of the individual locust. We take locust density-dependent phase transformation - a unique example of extreme behavioral plasticity, and place it within the context of the accepted scheme of learning and memory. We confirm that a short time period of exposure to a small crowd of locusts is sufficient to induce a significant behavioral change in a previously solitary locust. Our results suggest that part of the behavioral change is due to long-term habituation of evasive and escape responses. We further demonstrate that the memory of a crowding event lasts for at least 24h, and that this memory is sensitive to a protein synthesis blocker. These findings add much to our understanding of locust density-dependent phase polyphenism. Furthermore, they offer a novel and tractable model for the study of learning and memory-related processes in a very distinctive behavioral context. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Density-dependent population dynamics in larvae of the dragonfly Pachydiplax longipennis: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buskirk, J

    1987-05-01

    Several features of dragonfly population biology suggest that population regulation occurs in the larval stage. This study was designed to determine if density-dependent interactions among larval odonates can affect survival, growth and emergence. First-instar larvae of the dragonfly Pachydiplax longipennis were raised in outdoor experimental ponds at initial densities of 38, 152, and 608 larvae · m(-2), under two levels of food availability. Food availability was supplemented in half the pools by volumetric addition of zooplankton every other day. Pools in the low food treatment did not receive the zooplankton supplement.There was a strong negative effect of density on the mean growth rate of survivors, which included both emerging tenerals and individuals overwintering in the larval stage. A higher proportion emerged from low density than high density pools. Metamorphs from high density populations were smaller and emerged slightly later than those from low density, but the absolute number of metamorphs did not differ significantly among density treatments. Food supplementation significantly increased the proportion of overwintering larvae. There were no significant food-by-density interactions, indicating that food and density acted independently on larval population dynamics. Density-dependent mechanisms can clearly contribute to odonate population regulation, especially by controlling the number of larvae which emerge and the average age at reproduction. Population-level responses to density may be a result of interference among larvae.

  7. Prey capture by harbour porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verfuss, Ursula; Miller, Lee; Pilz, Peter

    their ultrasonic clicks as biosonar for orientation and detection of prey (mostly smaller pelagic and bottom dwelling fish), and for communication.  For studying wild animals, hydrophone arrays [Villadsgaard et al. J.Exp.Biol. 210 (2007)] and acoustic (time/depth) tags [Akamatsu et al. Deep Sea Research II 54...... (2007)] have been used.  For studying captive animals, arrays and video techniques [Verfuß et al. J.Exp.Biol. 208 (2005)] as well as miniature acoustic-behavioral tags [Deruiter et al. JASA 123 (2008)] have been used.  While searching for prey, harbor porpoises use clicks at long intervals (>50 ms......) that progressively decrease when closing on a landmark.  The source levels of captive animals reduce by about half for each halving of the distance to the target.  After detecting the prey, the click interval first stabilizes at about 50 ms and then becomes progressively shorter while approaching the prey...

  8. Prey detection in a cruising copepod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Sanne; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Small cruising zooplankton depend on remote prey detection and active prey capture for efficient feeding. Direct, passive interception of prey is inherently very inefficient at low Reynolds numbers because the viscous boundary layer surrounding the approaching predator will push away potential prey....... Yet, direct interception has been proposed to explain how rapidly cruising, blind copepods feed on non-motile phytoplankton prey. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for prey detection in a cruising copepod, and describe how motile and non-motile prey are discovered by hydromechanical and tactile...

  9. Prey detection in a cruising copepod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Sanne; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Small cruising zooplankton depend on remote prey detection and active prey capture for efficient feeding. Direct, passive interception of prey is inherently very inefficient at low Reynolds numbers because the viscous boundary layer surrounding the approaching predator will push away potential prey....... Yet, direct interception has been proposed to explain how rapidly cruising, blind copepods feed on non-motile phytoplankton prey. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for prey detection in a cruising copepod, and describe how motile and non-motile prey are discovered by hydromechanical and tactile...

  10. Non-swarming grasshoppers exhibit density-dependent phenotypic plasticity reminiscent of swarming locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotham, Steven; Song, Hojun

    2013-11-01

    Locusts are well known for exhibiting an extreme form of density-dependent phenotypic plasticity known as locust phase polyphenism. At low density, locust nymphs are cryptically colored and shy, but at high density they transform into conspicuously colored and gregarious individuals. Most of what we know about locust phase polyphenism come from the study of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål), which is a devastating pest species affecting many countries in North Africa and the Middle East. The desert locust belongs to the grasshopper genus Schistocerca Stål, which includes mostly non-swarming, sedentary species. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest that the desert locust is the earliest branching lineage within Schistocerca, which raises a possibility that the presence of density-dependent phenotypic plasticity may be a plesiomorphic trait for the whole genus. In order to test this idea, we have quantified the effect of rearing density in terms of the resulting behavior, color, and morphology in two non-swarming Schistocerca species native to Florida. When reared in both isolated and crowded conditions, the two non-swarming species, Schistocerca americana (Drury) and Schistocerca serialis cubense (Saussure) clearly exhibited plastic reaction norms in all traits measured, which were reminiscent of the desert locust. Specifically, we found that both species were more active and more attracted to each other when reared in a crowded condition than in isolation. They were mainly bright green in color when isolated, but developed strong black patterns and conspicuous background colors when crowded. We found a strong effect of rearing density in terms of size. There were also more mechanoreceptor hairs on the outer face of the hind femora in the crowded nymphs in both species. Although both species responded similarly, there were some clear species-specific differences in terms of color and behavior. Furthermore, we compare and contrast our findings with

  11. Spatial patterns of coral survivorship: impacts of adult proximity versus other drivers of localized mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Gibbs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Species-specific enemies may promote prey coexistence through negative distance- and density-dependent survival of juveniles near conspecific adults. We tested this mechanism by transplanting juvenile-sized fragments of the brooding corals Pocillopora damicornis and Seriatopora hystrix 3, 12, 24 and 182 cm up- and down-current of conspecific adults and monitoring their survival and condition over time. We also characterized the spatial distribution of P. damicornis and S. hystrix within replicate plots on three Fijian reef flats and measured the distribution of small colonies within 2 m of larger colonies of each species. Juvenile-sized transplants exhibited no differences in survivorship as a function of distance from adult P. damicornis or S. hystrix. Additionally, both P. damicornis and S. hystrix were aggregated rather than overdispersed on natural reefs. However, a pattern of juveniles being aggregated near adults while larger (and probably older colonies were not suggests that greater mortality near large adults could occur over longer periods of time or that size-dependent mortality was occurring. While we found minimal evidence of greater mortality of small colonies near adult conspecifics in our transplant experiments, we did document hot-spots of species-specific corallivory. We detected spatially localized and temporally persistent predation on P. damicornis by the territorial triggerfish Balistapus undulatus. This patchy predation did not occur for S. hystrix. This variable selective regime in an otherwise more uniform environment could be one mechanism maintaining diversity of corals on Indo-Pacific reefs.

  12. Asymmetry energy of nuclear matter: Temperature and density dependence, and validity of semi-empirical formula

    CERN Document Server

    Bordbar, G H; Taghizade, M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have done a completely microscopic calculation using a many-body variational method based on the cluster expansion of energy to compute the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. In our calculations, we have employed the $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. We have also investigated the temperature and density dependence of asymmetry energy. Our results show that the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter depends on both density and temperature. We have also studied the effects of different terms in the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. These investigations indicate that at different densities and temperatures, the contribution of parabolic term is very substantial with respect to the other terms. Therefore, we can conclude that the parabolic approximation is a relatively good estimation, and our calculated binding energy of asymmetric nuclear matter is in a relatively good agreement with that of semi-empirical mass formula. However, for the accurate calculations, it is better to consider the effects of o...

  13. Turing bifurcation in a reaction-diffusion system with density-dependent dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Horsthemke, Werner

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by the recent finding [N. Kumar, G.M. Viswanathan, V.M. Kenkre, Physica A 388 (2009) 3687] that the dynamics of particles undergoing density-dependent nonlinear diffusion shows sub-diffusive behaviour, we study the Turing bifurcation in a two-variable system with this kind of dispersal. We perform a linear stability analysis of the uniform steady state to find the conditions for the Turing bifurcation and compare it with the standard Turing condition in a reaction-diffusion system, where dispersal is described by simple Fickian diffusion. While activator-inhibitor kinetics are a necessary condition for the Turing instability as in standard two-variable systems, the instability can occur even if the diffusion constant of the inhibitor is equal to or smaller than that of the activator. We apply these results to two model systems, the Brusselator and the Gierer-Meinhardt model.

  14. Warm unstable asymmetric nuclear matter: Critical properties and the density dependence of the symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Agrawal, B. K.

    2017-05-01

    The spinodal instabilities in hot asymmetric nuclear matter and some important critical parameters derived thereof are studied by using six different families of relativistic mean-field models. The slopes of the symmetry energy coefficient vary over a wide range within each family. The critical densities and proton fractions are more sensitive to the symmetry energy slope parameter at temperatures much below its critical value (Tc˜14 -16 MeV ). The spread in the critical proton fraction at a given symmetry energy slope parameter is noticeably larger near Tc, indicating that the equation of state of warm asymmetric nuclear matter at subsaturation densities is not sufficiently constrained. The distillation effects are sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at low temperatures which tend to wash out with increasing temperature.

  15. Isospin effects and the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, S R; Carlson, B V; Donangelo, R; Lynch, W G; Steiner, A W

    2009-01-01

    The density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is inspected using the Statistical Multifragmentation Model with Skyrme effective interactions. The model consistently considers the expansion of the fragments' volumes at finite temperature at the freeze-out stage. By selecting parameterizations of the Skyrme force that lead to very different equations of state for the symmetry energy, we investigate the sensitivity of different observables to the properties of the effective forces. Our results suggest that, in spite of being sensitive to the thermal dilation of the fragments' volumes, it is difficult to distinguish among the Skyrme forces from the isoscaling analysis. On the other hand, the isotopic distribution of the emitted fragments turns out to be very sensitive to the force employed in the calculation.

  16. Half-Lives of Proton Emitters With a Deformed Density-Dependent Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yi-Bin; REN Zhong-Zhou; NI Dong-Dong; SHENG Zong-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Half-lives of proton radioactivity are investigated with a deformed density-dependent model. The single folding potential which is dependent on deformation and orientation is employed to calculate the proton decay width through the deformed potential barrier. In addition, the spectroscopic factor is taken into account in the calcu-lation, which is obtained in the relativistic mean field theory with NL3. The calculated results of semi-spherical nuclei are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, and the results of well-deformed nuclei are also satisfactory. Moreover, a formula for the spherical proton emission half-life based on the Gamow quantum tunneling theory is presented.

  17. On the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature and its thermodynamical consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, S S; Chiapparini, M; Peres-Menezes, D

    2004-01-01

    In this work we study in a formal way the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature for nuclear matter. The thermodynamical potential and related quantities, as energy density and pressure are derived in two different ways. We first obtain the thermodynamical potential from the grand partition function, where the Hamiltonian depends on the density operator and is truncated at first order. We then reobtain the thermodynamical potential by calculating explicitly the energy density in a Thomas-Fermi approximation and considering the entropy of a fermi gas. The distribution functions for particles and antiparticles are the output of the minimization of the thermodynamical potential. It is shown that in the mean field theory the thermodynamical consistency is achieved. The connection with effective chiral lagrangians with Brown-Rho scaling is discussed.

  18. Density dependent exchange contribution to partial differential mu/ partial differential n and compressibility in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, E H; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Das Sarma, S

    2007-11-30

    We calculate partial differentialmu/ partial differentialn (where mu=chemical potential and n=electron density), which is associated with the compressibility, in graphene as a function of n, within the Hartree-Fock approximation. The exchange-driven Dirac-point logarithmic singularity in the quasiparticle velocity of intrinsic graphene disappears in the extrinsic case. The calculated renormalized partial differentialmu/ partial differentialn in extrinsic graphene on SiO2 has the same n;{-(1/2)} density dependence but is 20% larger than the inverse bare density of states, a relatively weak effect compared to the corresponding parabolic-band case. We predict that the renormalization effect can be enhanced to about 50% by changing the graphene substrate.

  19. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    CERN Document Server

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fern\\'andez & Reisenegger (2005) for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger (2010) for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our prediction...

  20. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a neotropical palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Patrick A; Visser, Marco D; Joseph Wright, S; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C

    2014-09-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a wide range of population density on Barro Colorado Island in Panama and assessed its consequences for seed distributions. We found that frugivore visitation, seed removal and dispersal distance all declined with population density of A. butyracea, demonstrating NDD of seed dispersal due to competition for dispersers. Furthermore, as population density increased, the distances of seeds from the nearest adult decreased, conspecific seed crowding increased and seedling recruitment success decreased, all patterns expected under poorer dispersal. Unexpectedly, however, our analyses showed that NDD of dispersal did not contribute substantially to these changes in the quality of the seed distribution; patterns with population density were dominated by effects due solely to increasing adult and seed density.

  1. Density-dependent changes in effective area occupied for sea-bottom-associated marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Rindorf, Anna; Gao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of marine fishes can change for many reasons, including density-dependent distributional shifts. Previous studies show mixed support for either the proportional-density model (PDM; no relationship between abundance and area occupied, supported by ideal-free distribution...... marine regions, to determine whether the BM or PDM provides a better description for sea-bottom-associated fishes. We fit a spatio-temporal model and estimate changes in effective area occupied and abundance, and combine results to estimate the average abundance–area relationship as well as variability...... for every 10% abundance increase) followed by Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes, and the Eastern Bering Sea shows a strong relationship between abundance and area occupied relative to other regions. We conclude that the BM explains a small but important portion of spatial dynamics for sea...

  2. Density-dependent changes in effective area occupied for sea-bottom-associated marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, James T; Rindorf, Anna; Gao, Jin; Hanselman, Dana H; Winker, Henning

    2016-10-12

    The spatial distribution of marine fishes can change for many reasons, including density-dependent distributional shifts. Previous studies show mixed support for either the proportional-density model (PDM; no relationship between abundance and area occupied, supported by ideal-free distribution theory) or the basin model (BM; positive abundance-area relationship, supported by density-dependent habitat selection theory). The BM implies that fishes move towards preferred habitat as the population declines. We estimate the average relationship using bottom trawl data for 92 fish species from six marine regions, to determine whether the BM or PDM provides a better description for sea-bottom-associated fishes. We fit a spatio-temporal model and estimate changes in effective area occupied and abundance, and combine results to estimate the average abundance-area relationship as well as variability among taxa and regions. The average relationship is weak but significant (0.6% increase in area for a 10% increase in abundance), whereas only a small proportion of species-region combinations show a negative relationship (i.e. shrinking area when abundance increases). Approximately one-third of combinations (34.6%) are predicted to increase in area more than 1% for every 10% increase in abundance. We therefore infer that population density generally changes faster than effective area occupied during abundance changes. Gadiformes have the strongest estimated relationship (average 1.0% area increase for every 10% abundance increase) followed by Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes, and the Eastern Bering Sea shows a strong relationship between abundance and area occupied relative to other regions. We conclude that the BM explains a small but important portion of spatial dynamics for sea-bottom-associated fishes, and that many individual populations merit cautious management during population declines, because a compressed range may increase the efficiency of harvest.

  3. Resampling method for applying density-dependent habitat selection theory to wildlife surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Tardy

    Full Text Available Isodar theory can be used to evaluate fitness consequences of density-dependent habitat selection by animals. A typical habitat isodar is a regression curve plotting competitor densities in two adjacent habitats when individual fitness is equal. Despite the increasing use of habitat isodars, their application remains largely limited to areas composed of pairs of adjacent habitats that are defined a priori. We developed a resampling method that uses data from wildlife surveys to build isodars in heterogeneous landscapes without having to predefine habitat types. The method consists in randomly placing blocks over the survey area and dividing those blocks in two adjacent sub-blocks of the same size. Animal abundance is then estimated within the two sub-blocks. This process is done 100 times. Different functional forms of isodars can be investigated by relating animal abundance and differences in habitat features between sub-blocks. We applied this method to abundance data of raccoons and striped skunks, two of the main hosts of rabies virus in North America. Habitat selection by raccoons and striped skunks depended on both conspecific abundance and the difference in landscape composition and structure between sub-blocks. When conspecific abundance was low, raccoons and striped skunks favored areas with relatively high proportions of forests and anthropogenic features, respectively. Under high conspecific abundance, however, both species preferred areas with rather large corn-forest edge densities and corn field proportions. Based on random sampling techniques, we provide a robust method that is applicable to a broad range of species, including medium- to large-sized mammals with high mobility. The method is sufficiently flexible to incorporate multiple environmental covariates that can reflect key requirements of the focal species. We thus illustrate how isodar theory can be used with wildlife surveys to assess density-dependent habitat selection

  4. Survival kinetics of starving bacteria is biphasic and density-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Phaiboun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the lifecycle of microorganisms, prolonged starvation is prevalent and sustaining life during starvation periods is a vital task. In the literature, it is commonly assumed that survival kinetics of starving microbes follows exponential decay. This assumption, however, has not been rigorously tested. Currently, it is not clear under what circumstances this assumption is true. Also, it is not known when such survival kinetics deviates from exponential decay and if it deviates, what underlying mechanisms for the deviation are. Here, to address these issues, we quantitatively characterized dynamics of survival and death of starving E. coli cells. The results show that the assumption--starving cells die exponentially--is true only at high cell density. At low density, starving cells persevere for extended periods of time, before dying rapidly exponentially. Detailed analyses show intriguing quantitative characteristics of the density-dependent and biphasic survival kinetics, including that the period of the perseverance is inversely proportional to cell density. These characteristics further lead us to identification of key underlying processes relevant for the perseverance of starving cells. Then, using mathematical modeling, we show how these processes contribute to the density-dependent and biphasic survival kinetics observed. Importantly, our model reveals a thrifty strategy employed by bacteria, by which upon sensing impending depletion of a substrate, the limiting substrate is conserved and utilized later during starvation to delay cell death. These findings advance quantitative understanding of survival of microbes in oligotrophic environments and facilitate quantitative analysis and prediction of microbial dynamics in nature. Furthermore, they prompt revision of previous models used to analyze and predict population dynamics of microbes.

  5. Energetic conditions promoting top-down control of prey by predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N Marshall

    Full Text Available Humans remove large amounts of biomass from natural ecosystems, and large bodied high trophic level animals are especially sensitive and vulnerable to exploitation. The effects of removing top-predators on food webs are often difficult to predict because of limited information on species interaction strengths. Here we used a three species predator-prey model to explore relationships between energetic properties of trophodynamic linkages and interaction strengths to provide heuristic rules that indicate observable energetic conditions that are most likely to lead to stable and strong top-down control of prey by predator species. We found that strong top-down interaction strengths resulted from low levels of energy flow from prey to predators. Strong interactions are more stable when they are a consequence of low per capita predation and when predators are subsidized by recruitment. Diet composition also affects stability, but the relationship depends on the form of the functional response. Our results imply that for generalist satiating predators, strong top-down control on prey is most likely for prey items that occupy a small portion of the diet and when density dependent recruitment is moderately high.

  6. Testing predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis: a meta-analysis of experimental evidence for distance- and density-dependent seed and seedling survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comita, Liza S; Queenborough, Simon A; Murphy, Stephen J; Eck, Jenalle L; Xu, Kaiyang; Krishnadas, Meghna; Beckman, Noelle; Zhu, Yan; Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena

    2014-07-01

    The Janzen-Connell hypothesis proposes that specialist natural enemies, such as herbivores and pathogens, maintain diversity in plant communities by reducing survival rates of conspecific seeds and seedlings located close to reproductive adults or in areas of high conspecific density. Variation in the strength of distance- and density-dependent effects is hypothesized to explain variation in plant species richness along climatic gradients, with effects predicted to be stronger in the tropics than the temperate zone and in wetter habitats compared to drier habitats.We conducted a comprehensive literature search to identify peer-reviewed experimental studies published in the 40+ years since the hypothesis was first proposed. Using data from these studies, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the current weight of evidence for the distance and density predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis.Overall, we found significant support for both the distance- and density-dependent predictions. For all studies combined, survival rates were significantly reduced near conspecifics compared to far from conspecifics, and in areas with high densities of conspecifics compared to areas with low conspecific densities. There was no indication that these results were due to publication bias.The strength of distance and density effects varied widely among studies. Contrary to expectations, this variation was unrelated to latitude, and there was no significant effect of study region. However, we did find a trend for stronger distance and density dependence in wetter sites compared to sites with lower annual precipitation. In addition, effects were significantly stronger at the seedling stage compared to the seed stage.Synthesis. Our study provides support for the idea that distance- and density-dependent mortality occurs in plant communities world-wide. Available evidence suggests that natural enemies are frequently the cause of such patterns, consistent with the Janzen

  7. Relationship of Course Woody Debris to Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Prey Diversity and Abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, G.S.

    1999-09-03

    The abundance of diversity of prey commonly used by the red-cockaded woodpecker were monitored in experimental plots in which course woody debris was manipulated. In one treatment, all the woody debris over four inches was removed. In the second treatment, the natural amount of mortality remained intact. The overall diversity of prey was unaffected; however, wood roaches were significantly reduced by removal of woody debris. The latter suggests that intensive utilizations or harvesting practices may reduce foraging.

  8. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the epidemic transmission in a predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Hui, Cang; Zhang, Yanyu; Li, Zizhen

    2008-11-01

    Epidemic transmission is one of the critical density-dependent mechanisms that affect species viability and dynamics. In a predator-prey system, epidemic transmission can strongly affect the success probability of hunting, especially for social animals. Predators, therefore, will suffer from the positive density-dependence, i.e., Allee effect, due to epidemic transmission in the population. The rate of species contacting the epidemic, especially for those endangered or invasive, has largely increased due to the habitat destruction caused by anthropogenic disturbance. Using ordinary differential equations and cellular automata, we here explored the epidemic transmission in a predator-prey system. Results show that a moderate Allee effect will destabilize the dynamics, but it is not true for the extreme Allee effect (weak or strong). The predator-prey dynamics amazingly stabilize by the extreme Allee effect. Predators suffer the most from the epidemic disease at moderate transmission probability. Counter-intuitively, habitat destruction will benefit the control of the epidemic disease. The demographic stochasticity dramatically influences the spatial distribution of the system. The spatial distribution changes from oil-bubble-like (due to local interaction) to aggregated spatially scattered points (due to local interaction and demographic stochasticity). It indicates the possibility of using human disturbance in habitat as a potential epidemic-control method in conservation.

  9. Predator-prey system with strong Allee effect in prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Shi, Junping; Wei, Junjie

    2011-03-01

    Global bifurcation analysis of a class of general predator-prey models with a strong Allee effect in prey population is given in details. We show the existence of a point-to-point heteroclinic orbit loop, consider the Hopf bifurcation, and prove the existence/uniqueness and the nonexistence of limit cycle for appropriate range of parameters. For a unique parameter value, a threshold curve separates the overexploitation and coexistence (successful invasion of predator) regions of initial conditions. Our rigorous results justify some recent ecological observations, and practical ecological examples are used to demonstrate our theoretical work.

  10. Natural recruitment, density-dependent juvenile survival, and the potential for additive effects of stock enhancement: an experimental evaluation of stocking northern pike (Esox lucius) fry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hühn, Daniel; Lübke, Kay; Skov, Christian

    2014-01-01

    in self-sustaining stocks. However, limited data based on replicated and controlled experiments are available to support this prediction. We performed a pond experiment (N = 4 per treatment) to compare the stock enhancing outcome of stocking hatchery-reared northern pike (Esox lucius) fry and the natural...... production of young in self-recruiting pike populations. We also added a treatment where pike fry were stocked into ponds that otherwise did not have pike to mimic the absence of natural recruitment. Fry stocking into self-reproducing stocks did not elevate year class strength over unstocked controls......Density-dependent mortality in young life stages should strongly limit the potential for additive effects caused by stocking of fish sizes that are smaller than size at recruitment into the fishery. Indeed, stocking models have suggested that stocking of fry should not elevate year class strength...

  11. Ocean acidification affects prey detection by a predatory reef fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L Cripps

    Full Text Available Changes in olfactory-mediated behaviour caused by elevated CO(2 levels in the ocean could affect recruitment to reef fish populations because larval fish become more vulnerable to predation. However, it is currently unclear how elevated CO(2 will impact the other key part of the predator-prey interaction--the predators. We investigated the effects of elevated CO(2 and reduced pH on olfactory preferences, activity levels and feeding behaviour of a common coral reef meso-predator, the brown dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus. Predators were exposed to either current-day CO(2 levels or one of two elevated CO(2 levels (∼600 µatm or ∼950 µatm that may occur by 2100 according to climate change predictions. Exposure to elevated CO(2 and reduced pH caused a shift from preference to avoidance of the smell of injured prey, with CO(2 treated predators spending approximately 20% less time in a water stream containing prey odour compared with controls. Furthermore, activity levels of fish was higher in the high CO(2 treatment and feeding activity was lower for fish in the mid CO(2 treatment; indicating that future conditions may potentially reduce the ability of the fish to respond rapidly to fluctuations in food availability. Elevated activity levels of predators in the high CO(2 treatment, however, may compensate for reduced olfactory ability, as greater movement facilitated visual detection of food. Our findings show that, at least for the species tested to date, both parties in the predator-prey relationship may be affected by ocean acidification. Although impairment of olfactory-mediated behaviour of predators might reduce the risk of predation for larval fishes, the magnitude of the observed effects of elevated CO(2 acidification appear to be more dramatic for prey compared to predators. Thus, it is unlikely that the altered behaviour of predators is sufficient to fully compensate for the effects of ocean acidification on prey mortality.

  12. Modelling landscape-level numerical responses of predators to prey: the case of cats and rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyffer Cruz

    Full Text Available Predator-prey systems can extend over large geographical areas but empirical modelling of predator-prey dynamics has been largely limited to localised scales. This is due partly to difficulties in estimating predator and prey abundances over large areas. Collection of data at suitably large scales has been a major problem in previous studies of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus and their predators. This applies in Western Europe, where conserving rabbits and predators such as Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus is important, and in other parts of the world where rabbits are an invasive species supporting populations of introduced, and sometimes native, predators. In pastoral regions of New Zealand, rabbits are the primary prey of feral cats (Felis catus that threaten native fauna. We estimate the seasonal numerical response of cats to fluctuations in rabbit numbers in grassland-shrubland habitat across the Otago and Mackenzie regions of the South Island of New Zealand. We use spotlight counts over 1645 km of transects to estimate rabbit and cat abundances with a novel modelling approach that accounts simultaneously for environmental stochasticity, density dependence and varying detection probability. Our model suggests that cat abundance is related consistently to rabbit abundance in spring and summer, possibly through increased rabbit numbers improving the fecundity and juvenile survival of cats. Maintaining rabbits at low abundance should therefore suppress cat numbers, relieving predation pressure on native prey. Our approach provided estimates of the abundance of cats and rabbits over a large geographical area. This was made possible by repeated sampling within each season, which allows estimation of detection probabilities. A similar approach could be applied to predator-prey systems elsewhere, and could be adapted to any method of direct observation in which there is no double-counting of individuals. Reliable estimates of numerical

  13. Experimental examination of intraspecific density-dependent competition during the breeding period in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D T Tyler Flockhart

    Full Text Available A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism.

  14. Experimental Examination of Intraspecific Density-Dependent Competition during the Breeding Period in Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Martin, Tara G.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism. PMID:22984614

  15. Density-dependent selection on mate search and evolution of Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berec, Luděk; Kramer, Andrew M; Bernhauerová, Veronika; Drake, John M

    2017-02-27

    Sexually reproducing organisms require males and females to find each other. Increased difficulty of females finding mates as male density declines is the most frequently reported mechanism of Allee effects in animals. Evolving more effective mate search may alleviate Allee effects, but may depend on density regimes a population experiences. In particular, high-density populations may evolve mechanisms that induce Allee effects which become detrimental when populations are reduced and maintained at a low density. We develop an individual-based, eco-genetic model to study how mating systems and fitness trade-offs interact with changes in population density to drive evolution of the rate at which males or females search for mates. Finite mate search rate triggers Allee effects in our model and we explore how these Allee effects respond to such evolution. We allow a population to adapt to several population density regimes and examine whether high-density populations are likely to reverse adaptations attained at low densities. We find density-dependent selection in most of scenarios, leading to search rates that result in lower Allee thresholds in populations kept at lower densities. This mainly occurs when fecundity costs are imposed on mate search, and provides an explanation for why Allee effects are often observed in anthropogenically rare species. Optimizing selection, where the attained trait value minimizes the Allee threshold independent of population density, depended on the trade-off between search and survival, combined with monogamy when females were searching. Other scenarios led to runaway selection on the mate search rate, including evolutionary suicide. Trade-offs involved in mate search may thus be crucial to determining how density influences the evolution of Allee effects. Previous studies did not examine evolution of a trait related to the strength of Allee effects under density variation. We emphasize the crucial role that mating systems, fitness

  16. Density-dependent role of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on ecosystem service provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Brandon J.; Theuerkauf, Kathrynlynn W.; Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Eggleston, David B.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can positively, neutrally, or negatively affect the provision of ecosystem services. The direction and magnitude of this effect can be a function of the invaders’ density and the service(s) of interest. We assessed the density-dependent effect of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on three ecosystem services (plant diversity and community structure, shoreline stabilization, and carbon storage) in two oligohaline marshes within the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NCNERR), USA. Plant species richness was equivalent among low, medium and high Phragmites density plots, and overall plant community composition did not vary significantly by Phragmites density. Shoreline change was most negative (landward retreat) where Phragmites density was highest (-0.40 ± 0.19 m yr-1 vs. -0.31 ± 0.10 for low density Phragmites) in the high energy marsh of Kitty Hawk Woods Reserve and most positive (soundward advance) where Phragmites density was highest (0.19 ± 0.05 m yr-1 vs. 0.12 ± 0.07 for low density Phragmites) in the lower energy marsh of Currituck Banks Reserve, although there was no significant effect of Phragmites density on shoreline change. In Currituck Banks, mean soil carbon content was approximately equivalent in cores extracted from low and high Phragmites density plots (23.23 ± 2.0 kg C m-3 vs. 22.81 ± 3.8). In Kitty Hawk Woods, mean soil carbon content was greater in low Phragmites density plots (36.63 ± 10.22 kg C m-3) than those with medium (13.99 ± 1.23 kg C m-3) or high density (21.61 ± 4.53 kg C m-3), but differences were not significant. These findings suggest an overall neutral density-dependent effect of Phragmites on three ecosystem services within two oligohaline marshes in different environmental settings within a protected reserve system. Moreover, the conceptual framework of this study can broadly inform an ecosystem services-based approach to invasive species management

  17. Density-dependent role of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on ecosystem service provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuerkauf, Seth J; Puckett, Brandon J; Theuerkauf, Kathrynlynn W; Theuerkauf, Ethan J; Eggleston, David B

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can positively, neutrally, or negatively affect the provision of ecosystem services. The direction and magnitude of this effect can be a function of the invaders' density and the service(s) of interest. We assessed the density-dependent effect of an invasive marsh grass, Phragmites australis, on three ecosystem services (plant diversity and community structure, shoreline stabilization, and carbon storage) in two oligohaline marshes within the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NCNERR), USA. Plant species richness was equivalent among low, medium and high Phragmites density plots, and overall plant community composition did not vary significantly by Phragmites density. Shoreline change was most negative (landward retreat) where Phragmites density was highest (-0.40 ± 0.19 m yr-1 vs. -0.31 ± 0.10 for low density Phragmites) in the high energy marsh of Kitty Hawk Woods Reserve and most positive (soundward advance) where Phragmites density was highest (0.19 ± 0.05 m yr-1 vs. 0.12 ± 0.07 for low density Phragmites) in the lower energy marsh of Currituck Banks Reserve, although there was no significant effect of Phragmites density on shoreline change. In Currituck Banks, mean soil carbon content was approximately equivalent in cores extracted from low and high Phragmites density plots (23.23 ± 2.0 kg C m-3 vs. 22.81 ± 3.8). In Kitty Hawk Woods, mean soil carbon content was greater in low Phragmites density plots (36.63 ± 10.22 kg C m-3) than those with medium (13.99 ± 1.23 kg C m-3) or high density (21.61 ± 4.53 kg C m-3), but differences were not significant. These findings suggest an overall neutral density-dependent effect of Phragmites on three ecosystem services within two oligohaline marshes in different environmental settings within a protected reserve system. Moreover, the conceptual framework of this study can broadly inform an ecosystem services-based approach to invasive species management.

  18. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    CERN Document Server

    Petschauer, Stefan; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the Lambda-nucleon in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the ...

  19. Kinetic modeling of rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including cell density-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Marius; Schmidberger, Anke; Vogelbacher, Markus; Kühnert, Christian; Beuker, Janina; Bernard, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is under complex control of a quorum sensing-dependent regulatory network. Due to a lack of understanding of the kinetics applicable to the process and relevant interrelations of variables, current processes for rhamnolipid production are based on heuristic approaches. To systematically establish a knowledge-based process for rhamnolipid production, a deeper understanding of the time-course and coupling of process variables is required. By combining reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and experimental data, a process model for rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa PAO1 on sunflower oil was developed as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In addition, cell density-based quorum sensing dynamics were included in the model. The model comprises a total of 36 parameters, 14 of which are yield coefficients and 7 of which are substrate affinity and inhibition constants. Of all 36 parameters, 30 were derived from dedicated experimental results, literature, and databases and 6 of them were used as fitting parameters. The model is able to describe data on biomass growth, substrates, and products obtained from a reference batch process and other validation scenarios. The model presented describes the time-course and interrelation of biomass, relevant substrates, and products on a process level while including a kinetic representation of cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschauer, Stefan; Haidenbauer, Johann; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  1. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Bierkens, Marc; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2015-04-01

    The prospect of sea level rise and increase in extreme weather conditions has led to a new focus on coastal defense in the Netherlands. As an innovative solution for coastal erosion a mega-nourishment named the Sand Motor (or Sand Engine) has been constructed at the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents; keeping the coastal defense structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. The large size and position of the Sand Motor might lead to a substantial increase of fresh ground water resources. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied. The preliminary model calculations show that in a period of 20 years volume of fresh water gradually increases to ca. 12 Mm3. In the nearby dune area 7-8 Mm3 is abstracted yearly, therefore the first results are promising in increasing fresh groundwater resources. More model calculations will be performed to investigate the sensitivity of the change in the fresh, brackish and salt water distribution.

  2. Δ (1232 ) effects in density-dependent relativistic Hartree-Fock theory and neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen-Yu; Li, Ang; Hu, Jin-Niu; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The density-dependent relativistic Hartree-Fock (DDRHF) theory is extended to include Δ isobars for the study of dense nuclear matter and neutron stars. To this end, we solve the Rarita-Schwinger equation for spin-3/2 particle. Both the direct and exchange terms of the Δ isobars' self-energies are evaluated in detail. In comparison with the relativistic mean field theory (Hartree approximation), a weaker parameter dependence is found for DDRHF. An early appearance of Δ isobars is recognized at ρB˜0.28 fm-3, comparable with that of hyperons. Also, we find that the Δ isobars' softening of the equation of state is mainly due to the reduced Fock contributions from the coupling of the isoscalar mesons, while the pion contributions are negligibly small. We finally conclude that with typical parameter sets, neutron stars with Δ isobars in their interiors could be as heavy as the two massive pulsars whose masses are precisely measured, with slightly smaller radii than normal neutron stars.

  3. $\\Delta$ (1232) effects in density-dependent relativistic Hartree-Fock theory and neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Jin-Niu; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The density-dependent relativistic Hartree-Fock (DDRHF) theory is extended to include $\\Delta$-isobars for the study of dense nuclear matter and neutron stars. To this end, we solve the Rarita-Schwinger equation for spin-3/2 particle. Both the direct and exchange terms of the $\\Delta$-isobars' self-energies are evaluated in details. In comparison with the relativistic mean field theory (Hartree approximation), a weaker parameter dependence is found for DDRHF. An early appearance of $\\Delta$-isobars is recognized at $\\rho_B\\sim0.27$fm$^{-3}$, comparable with that of hyperons. Also, we find that the $\\Delta$-isobars' softening of the equation of state is found to be mainly due to the reduced Fock contributions from the coupling of the isoscalar mesons, while the pion contributions are found negligibly small. We finally conclude that with typical parameter sets, neutron stars with $\\Delta$-isobars in their interiors could be as heavy as the two massive pulsars whose masses are precisely measured, with slightly s...

  4. Delineating effects of tensor force on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Chang; Li, Bao-An

    2012-01-01

    In this talk, we report results of our recent studies to delineate effects of the tensor force on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy within phenomenological models. The tensor force active in the isosinglet neutron-proton interaction channel leads to appreciable depletion/population of nucleons below/above the Fermi surface in the single-nucleon momentum distribution in cold symmetric nuclear matter (SNM). We found that as a consequence of the high momentum tail in SNM the kinetic part of the symmetry energy $E^{kin}_{sym}(\\rho)$ is significantly below the well-known Fermi gas model prediction of approximately $12.5 (\\rho/\\rho_0)^{2/3}$. With about 15% nucleons in the high momentum tail as indicated by the recent experiments at J-Lab by the CLAS Collaboration, the $E^{kin}_{sym}(\\rho)$ is negligibly small. It even becomes negative when more nucleons are in the high momentum tail in SNM. These features have recently been confirmed by three independent studies based on the state-of-the-art micros...

  5. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, S.; Bierkens, M. F.; Oude Essink, G.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal regions around the world climate change will lead to a sea level rise and an increase in extreme weather conditions. This prospect has resulted in a new focus on coastal protection in the Netherlands, resulting in the initiation of an innovative coastal defence project called the Sand Motor. In this project a large body of sand or so-called mega-nourishment has been constructed along the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents. Keeping the coastal defence structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. Because of the large size of the body of sand (21.5 million m3) and the position at the coastline and near coastal dunes, the Sand Motor might cause a substantial increase of the fresh water availability by increasing the volume fresh water lens underneath the dunes. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied.

  6. A density-dependent matrix model and its applications in optimizing harvest schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofan Shao; WANG Fei; DAI Limin; BAI Jianwei; LI Yingshan

    2006-01-01

    Based on temporal data collected from 36 re-measured plots, transition probabilities of trees from a diameter class to a higher class were analyzed for the broadleaved-Korean pine forest in the Changbai Mountains. It was found that the transition probabilities were related not only to diameter size but also to the total basal area of trees with the diameter class. This paper demonstrates the development of a density-dependent matrix model, DM2, and a series of simulations with it for forest stands with different conditions under different harvest schemes. After validations with independent field data, this model proved a suitable tool for optimization analysis of harvest schemes on computers. The optimum harvest scheme(s) can be determined by referring to stand growth, total timbers harvested, and size diversity changes over time. Three user-friendly interfaces were built with a forest management decision support system FORESTAR(R) for easy operations of DM2 by forest managers. This paper also summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of DM2.

  7. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefeng Piao

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  8. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Tiefeng; Chun, Jung Hwa; Yang, Hee Moon; Cheon, Kwangil

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD) and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height) ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r) function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata) species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  9. Hippo signaling regulates microprocessor and links cell-density-dependent miRNA biogenesis to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masaki; Triboulet, Robinson; Mohseni, Morvarid; Schlegelmilch, Karin; Shrestha, Kriti; Camargo, Fernando D; Gregory, Richard I

    2014-02-27

    Global downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in human cancers and can have a causative role in tumorigenesis. The mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we show that YAP, the downstream target of the tumor-suppressive Hippo-signaling pathway regulates miRNA biogenesis in a cell-density-dependent manner. At low cell density, nuclear YAP binds and sequesters p72 (DDX17), a regulatory component of the miRNA-processing machinery. At high cell density, Hippo-mediated cytoplasmic retention of YAP facilitates p72 association with Microprocessor and binding to a specific sequence motif in pri-miRNAs. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or expression of constitutively active YAP causes widespread miRNA suppression in cells and tumors and a corresponding posttranscriptional induction of MYC expression. Thus, the Hippo pathway links contact-inhibition regulation to miRNA biogenesis and may be responsible for the widespread miRNA repression observed in cancer.

  10. Inflammation triggers emergency granulopoiesis through a density-dependent feedback mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek W Cain

    Full Text Available Normally, neutrophil pools are maintained by homeostatic mechanisms that require the transcription factor C/EBPα. Inflammation, however, induces neutrophilia through a distinct pathway of "emergency" granulopoiesis that is dependent on C/EBPβ. Here, we show in mice that alum triggers emergency granulopoiesis through the IL-1RI-dependent induction of G-CSF. G-CSF/G-CSF-R neutralization impairs proliferative responses of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC to alum, but also abrogates the acute mobilization of BM neutrophils, raising the possibility that HSPC responses to inflammation are an indirect result of the exhaustion of BM neutrophil stores. The induction of neutropenia, via depletion with Gr-1 mAb or myeloid-specific ablation of Mcl-1, elicits G-CSF via an IL-1RI-independent pathway, stimulating granulopoietic responses indistinguishable from those induced by adjuvant. Notably, C/EBPβ, thought to be necessary for enhanced generative capacity of BM, is dispensable for increased proliferation of HSPC to alum or neutropenia, but plays a role in terminal neutrophil differentiation during granulopoietic recovery. We conclude that alum elicits a transient increase in G-CSF production via IL-1RI for the mobilization of BM neutrophils, but density-dependent feedback sustains G-CSF for accelerated granulopoiesis.

  11. Quorum sensing and density-dependent dispersal in an aquatic model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fellous

    Full Text Available Many organisms use cues to decide whether to disperse or not, especially those related to the composition of their environment. Dispersal hence sometimes depends on population density, which can be important for the dynamics and evolution of sub-divided populations. But very little is known about the factors that organisms use to inform their dispersal decision. We investigated the cues underlying density-dependent dispersal in inter-connected microcosms of the freshwater protozoan Paramecium caudatum. In two experiments, we manipulated (i the number of cells per microcosm and (ii the origin of their culture medium (supernatant from high- or low-density populations. We found a negative relationship between population density and rates of dispersal, suggesting the use of physical cues. There was no significant effect of culture medium origin on dispersal and thus no support for chemical cues usage. These results suggest that the perception of density - and as a result, the decision to disperse - in this organism can be based on physical factors. This type of quorum sensing may be an adaptation optimizing small scale monitoring of the environment and swarm formation in open water.

  12. Reversal of density dependence of juvenile Littorina littorea (Gastropoda) growth in response to periphyton nutrient status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ulrich

    2001-05-01

    Experimental periphyton communities were grown in aquaria receiving media of differently enriched seawater (fully enriched, without Si enrichment, without N and P enrichment) and supplied differently with medium (batch and weekly replacement). Periphyton was subject to grazing by 1-6 individuals of juvenile Littorina littorea. Periphyton biomass was higher in the replacement aquaria than in the batch aquaria and higher in the full and the -Si medium than in the -NP medium. The N:C ratio of the periphyton increased with Littorina number in the batch aquaria and was unaffected by Littorina number in the replacement aquaria. Diatoms were most dominant in the -NP treatments and rarest in the -Si treatments. Chlorophytes were dominant in the -Si and the fully enriched treatments, but also Cyanobacteria contributed significantly to periphyton biomass in those treatments under nutrient replacement. Somatic growth of Littorina was negatively correlated to Littorina density in the replacement aquaria and positively density dependent in the batch aquaria. The latter is explained by improved food quality under stronger grazing pressure.

  13. Strange matter equation of state in the quark mass-density-dependent model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)); Lugones, G. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina))

    1995-02-15

    We study the properties and stability of strange matter at [ital T]=0 in the quark mass-density-dependent model for noninteracting quarks. We found a wide stability window'' for the values of the parameters ([ital C],[ital M][sub [ital s]0]) and the resulting equation of state at low densities is stiffer than that of the MIT bag model. At high densities it tends to the ultrarelativistic behavior expected because of the asymptotic freedom of quarks. The density of zero pressure is near the one predicted by the bag model and [ital not] shifted away as stated before; nevertheless, at these densities the velocity of sound is [approx]50% larger in this model than in the bag model. We have integrated the equations of stellar structure for strange stars with the present equation of state. We found that the mass-radius relation is very much the same as in the bag model, although it extends to more massive objects, due to the stiffening of the equation of state at low densities.

  14. Tri-trophic interactions affect density dependence of seed fate in a tropical forest palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Marco D; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Wright, S Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Jansen, Patrick A

    2011-11-01

    Natural enemies, especially host-specific enemies, are hypothesised to facilitate the coexistence of plant species by disproportionately inflicting more damage at increasing host abundance. However, few studies have assessed such Janzen-Connell mechanisms on a scale relevant for coexistence and no study has evaluated potential top-down influences on the specialized pests. We quantified seed predation by specialist invertebrates and generalist vertebrates, as well as larval predation on these invertebrates, for the Neotropical palm Attalea butyracea across ten 4-ha plots spanning 20-fold variation in palm density. As palm density increased, seed attack by bruchid beetles increased, whereas seed predation by rodents held constant. But because rodent predation on bruchid larvae increased disproportionately with increasing palm density, bruchid emergence rates and total seed predation by rodents and bruchids combined were both density-independent. Our results demonstrate that top-down effects can limit the potential of host-specific insects to induce negative-density dependence in plant populations.

  15. Quark Matter at High Density based on Extended Confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass Model

    CERN Document Server

    Qauli, A I

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the inclusion of relativistic Coulomb terms in a confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model of strange quark matter (SQM). We found that if we include Coulomb term in scalar density form, SQM equation of state (EOS) at high densities is stiffer but if we include Coulomb term in vector density form is softer than that of standard CIDDM model. We also investigate systematically the role of each term of the extended CIDDM model. Compared with what was reported in Ref.~\\cite {ref:isospin}, we found the stiffness of SQM EOS is controlled by the interplay among the the oscillator harmonic, isospin asymmetry and Coulomb contributions depending on the parameter's range of these terms. We have found that the absolute stable condition of SQM and the mass of 2 $M_\\odot$ pulsars can constrain the parameter of oscillator harmonic $\\kappa_1$ $\\approx 0.53$ in the case Coulomb term excluded. If the Coulomb term is included, for the models with their parameters are consistent with SQM ...

  16. Lower within-community variance of negative density dependence increases forest diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Miranda

    Full Text Available Local abundance of adult trees impedes growth of conspecific seedlings through host-specific enemies, a mechanism first proposed by Janzen and Connell to explain plant diversity in forests. While several studies suggest the importance of this mechanism, there is still little information of how the variance of negative density dependence (NDD affects diversity of forest communities. With computer simulations, we analyzed the impact of strength and variance of NDD within tree communities on species diversity. We show that stronger NDD leads to higher species diversity. Furthermore, lower range of strengths of NDD within a community increases species richness and decreases variance of species abundances. Our results show that, beyond the average strength of NDD, the variance of NDD is also crucially important to explain species diversity. This can explain the dissimilarity of biodiversity between tropical and temperate forest: highly diverse forests could have lower NDD variance. This report suggests that natural enemies and the variety of the magnitude of their effects can contribute to the maintenance of biodiversity.

  17. Lower within-community variance of negative density dependence increases forest diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, António; Carvalho, Luís M; Dionisio, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Local abundance of adult trees impedes growth of conspecific seedlings through host-specific enemies, a mechanism first proposed by Janzen and Connell to explain plant diversity in forests. While several studies suggest the importance of this mechanism, there is still little information of how the variance of negative density dependence (NDD) affects diversity of forest communities. With computer simulations, we analyzed the impact of strength and variance of NDD within tree communities on species diversity. We show that stronger NDD leads to higher species diversity. Furthermore, lower range of strengths of NDD within a community increases species richness and decreases variance of species abundances. Our results show that, beyond the average strength of NDD, the variance of NDD is also crucially important to explain species diversity. This can explain the dissimilarity of biodiversity between tropical and temperate forest: highly diverse forests could have lower NDD variance. This report suggests that natural enemies and the variety of the magnitude of their effects can contribute to the maintenance of biodiversity.

  18. Roles of density-dependent growth and life history evolution in accounting for fisheries-induced trait changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeset, Anne Maria; Dunlop, Erin S; Heino, Mikko; Storvik, Geir; Stenseth, Nils C; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2016-12-27

    The relative roles of density dependence and life history evolution in contributing to rapid fisheries-induced trait changes remain debated. In the 1930s, northeast Arctic cod (Gadus morhua), currently the world's largest cod stock, experienced a shift from a traditional spawning-ground fishery to an industrial trawl fishery with elevated exploitation in the stock's feeding grounds. Since then, age and length at maturation have declined dramatically, a trend paralleled in other exploited stocks worldwide. These trends can be explained by demographic truncation of the population's age structure, phenotypic plasticity in maturation arising through density-dependent growth, fisheries-induced evolution favoring faster-growing or earlier-maturing fish, or a combination of these processes. Here, we use a multitrait eco-evolutionary model to assess the capacity of these processes to reproduce 74 y of historical data on age and length at maturation in northeast Arctic cod, while mimicking the stock's historical harvesting regime. Our results show that model predictions critically depend on the assumed density dependence of growth: when this is weak, life history evolution might be necessary to prevent stock collapse, whereas when a stronger density dependence estimated from recent data is used, the role of evolution in explaining fisheries-induced trait changes is diminished. Our integrative analysis of density-dependent growth, multitrait evolution, and stock-specific time series data underscores the importance of jointly considering evolutionary and ecological processes, enabling a more comprehensive perspective on empirically observed stock dynamics than previous studies could provide.

  19. Diet and density dependent competition affect larval performance and oviposition site selection in the mosquito species Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshioka Miho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oviposition-site choice is an essential component of the life history of all mosquito species. According to the oviposition-preference offspring-performance (P-P hypothesis, if optimizing offspring performance and fitness ensures high overall reproductive fitness for a given species, the female should accurately assess details of the heterogeneous environment and lay her eggs preferentially in sites with conditions more suitable to offspring. Methods We empirically tested the P-P hypothesis using the mosquito species Aedes albopictus by artificially manipulating two habitat conditions: diet (measured as mg of food added to a container and conspecific density (CD; number of pre-existing larvae of the same species. Immature development (larval mortality, development time to pupation and time to emergence and fitness (measured as wing length were monitored from first instar through adult emergence using a factorial experimental design over two ascending gradients of diet (2.0, 3.6, 7.2 and 20 mg food/300 ml water and CD (0, 20, 40 and 80 larvae/300 ml water. Treatments that exerted the most contrasting values of larval performance were recreated in a second experiment consisting of single-female oviposition site selection assay. Results Development time decreased as food concentration increased, except from 7.2 mg to 20.0 mg (Two-Way CR ANOVA Post-Hoc test, P > 0.1. Development time decreased also as conspecific density increased from zero to 80 larvae (Two-Way CR ANOVA Post-Hoc test, P . Combined, these results support the role of density-dependent competition for resources as a limiting factor for mosquito larval performance. Oviposition assays indicated that female mosquitoes select for larval habitats with conspecifics and that larval density was more important than diet in driving selection for oviposition sites. Conclusions This study supports predictions of the P-P hypothesis and provides a mechanistic understanding

  20. Time-dep endent Calculations for Two-proton Decay Width with Schematic Density-dependent Contact Pairing Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oishi Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the two-proton decay width of the 6 Be nucleus employing the schematic density-dependent contact potential for the proton-proton pairing interaction. The decay width is calculated with a time-dependent method, in which the two-proton emission is described as a time-evolution of a three-body meta-stable state. Model-dependence of the two-proton decay width has been shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different pairing models, schematic density-dependent contact and Minnesota interactions, which have zero and finite ranges, respectively.

  1. Parents benefit from eating offspring: density-dependent egg survivorship compensates for filial cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Hope; Lindström, Kai; St Mary, Colette M

    2006-10-01

    Why should animals knowingly consume their own young? It is difficult to imagine many circumstances in which eating one's own young (i.e., filial cannibalism) actually increases an individual's fitness; however, filial cannibalism commonly co-occurs with parental care in fishes. The evolutionary significance of filial cannibalism remains unclear. The most commonly accepted explanation is that filial cannibalism is a mechanism by which caring males gain energy or nutrients that they reinvest into future reproduction, thereby increasing net reproductive success. There is mixed support for this hypothesis and, at best, it can only explain filial cannibalism in some species. A recent alternative hypothesis suggests that filial cannibalism improves the survivorship of remaining eggs by increasing oxygen availability, and thus increases current reproductive success. This theory has received little attention as of yet. We evaluated the hypothesis of oxygen-mediated filial cannibalism in the sand goby by examining the effect of oxygen and egg density on the occurrence of filial cannibalism, evaluating the effects of partial clutch cannibalism on the survivorship of remaining eggs, and comparing potential costs and benefits of filial cannibalism related to the net number of eggs surviving. Indeed, we found that oxygen level and egg density affected the occurrence of cannibalism and that simulated partial clutch cannibalism improved survivorship of the remaining eggs. Additionally, because increased egg survivorship, stemming from partial egg removal, compensated for the cost of cannibalism (i.e., number of eggs removed) at a range of cannibalism levels, filial cannibalism potentially results in no net losses in reproductive success. However, oxygen did not affect egg survivorship. Thus, we suggest a more general hypothesis of filial cannibalism mediated by density-dependent egg survivorship.

  2. Density-Dependent Spacing Behaviour and Activity Budget in Pregnant, Domestic Goats (Capra hircus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Vas

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the spacing behaviour in social groups of domestic goats (Capra hircus in the farm environment. In this experiment, we studied interindividual distances, movement patterns and activity budgets in pregnant goats housed at three different densities. Norwegian dairy goats were kept in stable social groups of six animals throughout pregnancy at 1, 2 or 3 m2 per individual and their spacing behaviours (i.e., distance travelled, nearest and furthest neighbour distance and activity budgets (e.g., resting, feeding, social activities were monitored. Observations were made in the first, second and last thirds of pregnancy in the mornings, at noon and in the afternoons of each of these phases (4.5 hours per observation period. The findings show that goats held at animal densities of 2 and 3 m2 moved longer distances when they had more space per animal and kept larger nearest and furthest neighbour distances when compared to the 1 m2 per animal density. Less feeding activity was observed at the high animal density compared to the medium and low density treatments. The phase of gestation also had an impact on almost all behavioural variables. Closer to parturition, animals moved further distances and the increase in nearest and furthest neighbour distance was more pronounced at the lower animal densities. During the last period of gestation, goats spent less time feeding and more on resting, social behaviours and engaging in other various activities. Our data suggest that more space per goat is needed for goats closer to parturition than in the early gestation phase. We concluded that in goats spacing behaviour is density-dependent and changes with stages of pregnancy and activities. Finally, the lower density allowed animals to express individual preferences regarding spacing behaviour which is important in ensuring good welfare in a farming situation.

  3. Density-Dependent Spacing Behaviour and Activity Budget in Pregnant, Domestic Goats (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Judit; Andersen, Inger Lise

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the spacing behaviour in social groups of domestic goats (Capra hircus) in the farm environment. In this experiment, we studied interindividual distances, movement patterns and activity budgets in pregnant goats housed at three different densities. Norwegian dairy goats were kept in stable social groups of six animals throughout pregnancy at 1, 2 or 3 m2 per individual and their spacing behaviours (i.e., distance travelled, nearest and furthest neighbour distance) and activity budgets (e.g., resting, feeding, social activities) were monitored. Observations were made in the first, second and last thirds of pregnancy in the mornings, at noon and in the afternoons of each of these phases (4.5 hours per observation period). The findings show that goats held at animal densities of 2 and 3 m2 moved longer distances when they had more space per animal and kept larger nearest and furthest neighbour distances when compared to the 1 m2 per animal density. Less feeding activity was observed at the high animal density compared to the medium and low density treatments. The phase of gestation also had an impact on almost all behavioural variables. Closer to parturition, animals moved further distances and the increase in nearest and furthest neighbour distance was more pronounced at the lower animal densities. During the last period of gestation, goats spent less time feeding and more on resting, social behaviours and engaging in other various activities. Our data suggest that more space per goat is needed for goats closer to parturition than in the early gestation phase. We concluded that in goats spacing behaviour is density-dependent and changes with stages of pregnancy and activities. Finally, the lower density allowed animals to express individual preferences regarding spacing behaviour which is important in ensuring good welfare in a farming situation.

  4. Density-dependent reduction and induction of milkweed cardenolides by a sucking insect herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, John W; Malcolm, Stephen B

    2004-03-01

    The effect of aphid population size on host-plant chemical defense expression and the effect of plant defense on aphid population dynamics were investigated in a milkweed-specialist herbivore system. Density effects of the aposematic oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, on cardenolide expression were measured in two milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica and A. incarnata. These plants vary in constitutive chemical investment with high mean cardenolide concentration in A. curassavica and low to zero in A. incarnata. The second objective was to determine whether cardenolide expression in these two host plants impacts mean A. nerii colony biomass (mg) and density. Cardenolide concentration (microgram/g) of A. curassavica in both aphid-treated leaves and opposite, herbivore-free leaves decreased initially in comparison with aphid-free controls, and then increased significantly with A. nerii density. Thus, A. curassavica responds to aphid herbivory initially with density-dependent phytochemical reduction, followed by induction of cardenolides to concentrations above aphid-free controls. In addition, mean cardenolide concentration of aphid-treated leaves was significantly higher than that of opposite, herbivore-free leaves. Therefore, A. curassavica induction is strongest in herbivore-damage tissue. Conversely, A. incarnata exhibited no such chemical response to aphid herbivory. Furthermore, neither host plant responded chemically to herbivore feeding duration time (days) or to the interaction between herbivore initial density and feeding duration time. There were also no significant differences in mean colony biomass or population density of A. nerii reared on high cardenolide (A. curassavica) and low cardenolide (A. incarnata) hosts.

  5. Quark matter at high density based on an extended confined isospin-density-dependent mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qauli, A. I.; Sulaksono, A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the inclusion of relativistic Coulomb terms in a confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model of strange quark matter (SQM). We found that if we include the Coulomb term in scalar density form, the SQM equation of state (EOS) at high densities is stiffer but if we include the Coulomb term in vector density form it is softer than that of the standard CIDDM model. We also investigate systematically the role of each term of the extended CIDDM model. Compared with what was reported by Chu and Chen [Astrophys. J. 780, 135 (2014)], we found the stiffness of SQM EOS is controlled by the interplay among the oscillator harmonic, isospin asymmetry and Coulomb contributions depending on the parameter's range of these terms. We have found that the absolute stable condition of SQM and the mass of 2 M⊙ pulsars can constrain the parameter of oscillator harmonic κ1≈0.53 in the case the Coulomb term is excluded. If the Coulomb term is included, for the models with their parameters are consistent with SQM absolute stability condition, the 2.0 M⊙ constraint more prefers the maximum mass prediction of the model with the scalar Coulomb term than that of the model with the vector Coulomb term. On the contrary, the high densities EOS predicted by the model with the vector Coulomb is more compatible with the recent perturbative quantum chromodynamics result [1] than that predicted by the model with the scalar Coulomb. Furthermore, we also observed the quark composition in a very high density region depends quite sensitively on the kind of Coulomb term used.

  6. A phase transition induces chaos in a predator-prey ecosystem with a dynamic fitness landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Gilpin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In many ecosystems, natural selection can occur quickly enough to influence the population dynamics and thus future selection. This suggests the importance of extending classical population dynamics models to include such eco-evolutionary processes. Here, we describe a predator-prey model in which the prey population growth depends on a prey density-dependent fitness landscape. We show that this two-species ecosystem is capable of exhibiting chaos even in the absence of external environmental variation or noise, and that the onset of chaotic dynamics is the result of the fitness landscape reversibly alternating between epochs of stabilizing and disruptive selection. We draw an analogy between the fitness function and the free energy in statistical mechanics, allowing us to use the physical theory of first-order phase transitions to understand the onset of rapid cycling in the chaotic predator-prey dynamics. We use quantitative techniques to study the relevance of our model to observational studies of complex ecosystems, finding that the evolution-driven chaotic dynamics confer community stability at the "edge of chaos" while creating a wide distribution of opportunities for speciation during epochs of disruptive selection-a potential observable signature of chaotic eco-evolutionary dynamics in experimental studies.

  7. When attempts at robbing prey turn fatal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Carpenter, James M

    2012-07-01

    Because group-hunting arboreal ants spread-eagle insect prey for a long time before retrieving them, these prey can be coveted by predatory flying insects. Yet, attempting to rob these prey is risky if the ant species is also an effective predator. Here, we show that trying to rob prey from Azteca andreae workers is a fatal error as 268 out of 276 potential cleptobionts (97.1 %) were captured in turn. The ant workers hunt in a group and use the "Velcro®" principle to cling firmly to the leaves of their host tree, permitting them to capture very large prey. Exceptions were one social wasp, plus some Trigona spp. workers and flies that landed directly on the prey and were able to take off immediately when attacked. We conclude that in this situation, previously captured prey attract potential cleptobionts that are captured in turn in most of the cases.

  8. Global stability of prey-taxis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai-Yang; Wang, Zhi-An

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we prove the global boundedness and stability of the predator-prey system with prey-taxis in a two-dimensional bounded domain with Neumann boundary conditions. By deriving an entropy-like equality and a boundedness criterion, we show that the intrinsic interaction between predators and preys is sufficient to prevent the population overcrowding even the prey-taxis is included and strong. Furthermore, by constructing appropriate Lyapunov functionals, we show that prey-only steady state is globally asymptotically stable if the predation is weak, and the co-existence steady state is globally asymptotically stable under some conditions (like the prey-taxis is weak or the prey diffuses fast) if the predation is strong. The convergence rates of solutions to the steady states are derived in the paper.

  9. Prey pursuit and interception in dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olberg, R M; Worthington, A H; Venator, K R

    2000-02-01

    Perching dragonflies (Libellulidae; Odonata) are sit-and-wait predators, which take off and pursue small flying insects. To investigate their prey pursuit strategy, we videotaped 36 prey-capture flights of male dragonflies, Erythemis simplicicollis and Leucorrhinia intacta, for frame-by-frame analysis. We found that dragonflies fly directly toward the point of prey interception by steering to minimize the movement of the prey's image on the retina. This behavior could be guided by target-selective descending interneurons which show directionally selective visual responses to small-object movement. We investigated how dragonflies discriminate distance of potential prey. We found a peak in angular velocity of the prey shortly before take-off which might cue the dragonfly to nearby flying targets. Parallax information from head movements was not required for successful prey pursuit.

  10. Global existence of strong solutions to the micro-polar, compressible flow with density-dependent viscosities

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    Chen Mingtao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is concerned with global strong solutions of the micro-polar, compressible flow with density-dependent viscosity coefficients in one-dimensional bounded intervals. The important point in this article is that the initial density may vanish in an open subset.

  11. Behavioral signature of intraspecific competition and density dependence in colony-breeding marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A; Don Bowen, W; Leonard, Marty L

    2013-10-01

    In populations of colony-breeding marine animals, foraging around colonies can lead to intraspecific competition. This competition affects individual foraging behavior and can cause density-dependent population growth. Where behavioral data are available, it may be possible to infer the mechanism of intraspecific competition. If these mechanics are understood, they can be used to predict the population-level functional response resulting from the competition. Using satellite relocation and dive data, we studied the use of space and foraging behavior of juvenile and adult gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) from a large (over 200,000) and growing population breeding at Sable Island, Nova Scotia (44.0 (o)N 60.0 (o)W). These data were first analyzed using a behaviorally switching state-space model to infer foraging areas followed by randomization analysis of foraging region overlap of competing age classes. Patterns of habitat use and behavioral time budgets indicate that young-of-year juveniles (YOY) were likely displaced from foraging areas near (less capable divers than adults and this limits the habitat available to them. However, other segregating mechanisms cannot be ruled out, and we discuss several alternate hypotheses. Mark-resight data indicate juveniles born between 1998 and 2002 have much reduced survivorship compared with cohorts born in the late 1980s, while adult survivorship has remained steady. Combined with behavioral observations, our data suggest YOY are losing an intraspecific competition between adults and juveniles, resulting in the currently observed decelerating logistic population growth. Competition theory predicts that intraspecific competition resulting in a clear losing competitor should cause compensatory population regulation. This functional response produces a smooth logistic growth curve as carrying capacity is approached, and is consistent with census data collected from this population over the past 50 years. The competitive mechanism

  12. Cell-density dependent effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on E. coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipov, E D; Shcheglov, V S; Sarimov, R M; Belyaev, I Ya

    2003-01-01

    The changes in genome conformational state (GCS) induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in E. coli cells were measured by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) in cellular lysates. Effects of X-rays at doses 0.1 cGy--1 Gy depended on post-irradiation time. Significant relaxation of DNA loops followed by a decrease in AVTD. The time of maximum relaxation was between 5-80 min depending on the dose of irradiation. U-shaped dose response was observed with increase of AVTD in the range of 0.1-4 Gy and decrease in AVTD at higher doses. No such increase in AVTD was seen upon irradiation of cells at the beginning of cell lysis while the AVTD decrease was the same. Significant differences in the effects of X-rays and gamma-rays at the same doses were observed suggesting a strong dependence of low-dose effects on LET. Effects of 0.01 cGy gamma-rays were studied at different cell densities during irradiation. We show that the radiation-induced changes in GCS lasted longer at higher cell density as compared to lower cell density. Only small amount of cells were hit at this dose and the data suggest cell-to-cell communication in response to low-dose ionizing radiation. This prolonged effect was also observed when cells were irradiated at high cell density and diluted to low cell density immediately after irradiation. These data suggest that cell-to-cell communication occur during irradiation or within 3 min post-irradiation. The cell-density dependent response to low-dose ionizing radiation was compared with previously reported data on exposure of E. coli cells to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency and extremely high frequency (millimeter waves). The body of our data show that cells can communicate in response to electromagnetic fields and ionizing radiation, presumably by reemission of secondary photons in infrared-submillimeter frequency range.

  13. Anatomy of a population cycle: the role of density dependence and demographic variability on numerical instability and periodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Paul J; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-07-01

    Determining the causes of cyclic fluctuations in population size is a central tenet in population ecology and provides insights into population regulatory mechanisms. We have a firm understanding of how direct and delayed density dependence affects population stability and cyclic dynamics, but there remains considerable uncertainty in the specific processes contributing to demographic variability and consequent change in cyclic propensity. Spatiotemporal variability in cyclic propensity, including recent attenuation or loss of cyclicity among several temperate populations and the implications of habitat fragmentation and climate change on this pattern, highlights the heightened need to understand processes underlying cyclic variation. Because these stressors can differentially impact survival and productivity and thereby impose variable time delays in density dependence, there is a specific need to elucidate how demographic vital rates interact with the type and action of density dependence to contribute to population stability and cyclic variation. Here, we address this knowledge gap by comparing the stability of time series derived from general and species-specific (Canada lynx: Lynx canadensis; small rodents: Microtus, Lemmus and Clethrionomys spp.) matrix population models, which vary in their demographic rates and the direct action of density dependence. Our results reveal that density dependence acting exclusively on survival as opposed to productivity is destabilizing, suggesting that a shift in the action of population regulation toward reproductive output may decrease cyclic propensity and cycle amplitude. This result was the same whether delayed density dependence was pulsatile and acted on a single time period (e.g. t-1, t-2 or t-3) vs. more constant by affecting a successive range of years (e.g. t-1,…, t-3). Consistent with our general models, reductions in reproductive potential in both the lynx and small rodent systems led to notably large drops in

  14. Density dependence drives habitat production and survivorship of Acropora cervicornis used for restoration on a Caribbean coral reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Ladd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCoral restoration is gaining traction as a viable strategy to help restore degraded reefs. While the nascent field of coral restoration has rapidly progressed in the past decade, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the drivers of restoration success that may impede our ability to effectively restore coral reef communities. Here, we conducted a field experiment to investigate the influence of coral density on the growth, habitat production, and survival of corals outplanted for restoration. We used nursery-raised colonies of Acropora cervicornis to experimentally establish populations of corals with either 3, 6, 12, or 24 corals within 4m2 plots, generating a gradient of coral densities ranging from 0.75 corals m-2 to 12 corals m-2. After 13 months we found that density had a significant effect on the growth, habitat production, and survivorship of restored corals. We found that coral survivorship increased as colony density decreased. Importantly, the signal of density dependent effects was context dependent. Our data suggest that positive density dependent effects influenced habitat production at densities of 3 corals m-2, but further increases in density resulted in negative density dependent effects with decreasing growth and survivorship of corals. These findings highlight the importance of density dependence for coral restoration planning and demonstrate the need to evaluate the influence of density for other coral species used for restoration. Further work focused on the mechanisms causing density dependence such as increased herbivory, rapid disease transmission, or altered predation rates are important next steps to advance our ability to effectively restore coral reefs.

  15. Prey selection and foraging period of the predaceous rocky intertidal snail, Acanthina punctulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, Jane Lubchenco

    1974-12-01

    The diet and foraging period of the neogastropod Acanthina punctulata were investigated in order to test various aspects of recent optimal foraging strategy models. This intertidal snail is an actively searching predator which preys on snails and barnacles by boring a hole in the shell and rasping out the flesh. Unlike many gastropod predators, Acanthina drill its gastropod prey at a very specific location on the columella, the thickest portion of the shell. Acanthina's foraging period can be interpreted as a compromise between maximizing the energy obtained by feeding and minimizing risk of mortality from exposure to wave action. That foraging period minimizing risk of being dislodged by waves appears to be during low tide when the predators can be in shallow pools. However, prey cannot be captured and consumed during one low tide. Thus Acanthina must be exposed during some high tides, and its strategy appears to be to restrict movement while exposed. Thus search is not initiated during high tide, but drilling and prey consumption are continued during that time. A snail not drilling or consuming prey seeks the protection of crevices or large anemones during high tide. A model is presented to indicate the relative amounts of risk and net energy for Acanthina at successive low and high tides. Predictions from the model, e.g., minimizing search time to avoid being exposed for an additional high tide and no movement during high tide are supported by field data. Acanthina commences foraging at the beginning of low tide, searches initially for preferred prey, but if unsuccessful, settles for a less preferred prey and begins drilling this prey before the end of low tide. Drilling and ingestion of prey occur during the following high and sometimes low tides. These "handling times" take 95% of the total foraging time in the field, while search time takes only 5% (pursuit time is negligible). Drilling alone accounts for 48-70% of the total drilling and eating time. In the

  16. The effect of prey refuge in a patchy predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhihui; Wang, Shufan; Li, Weide; Li, Zizhen

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we proposed a patchy predator-prey model with one patch as refuge and the other as open habitat, and incorporated prey refuge in the considered model explicitly. We applied an analytical approach to study the dynamic consequences of the simplest forms of refuge used by prey and the migration efficiency. The results have shown that the refuge used by prey and the migration efficiency play an important role in the dynamic consequences of the interacting populations and the equilibrium density of two interacting populations. This work also proposed a new approach which can incorporate prey refuge in predator-prey system explicitly.

  17. Optimal forager against ideal free distributed prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, József; Cressman, Ross; Xu, Fei; Varga, Zoltan; Cabello, Tomás

    2015-07-01

    The introduced dispersal-foraging game is a combination of prey habitat selection between two patch types and optimal-foraging approaches. Prey's patch preference and forager behavior determine the prey's survival rate. The forager's energy gain depends on local prey density in both types of exhaustible patches and on leaving time. We introduce two game-solution concepts. The static solution combines the ideal free distribution of the prey with optimal-foraging theory. The dynamical solution is given by a game dynamics describing the behavioral changes of prey and forager. We show (1) that each stable equilibrium dynamical solution is always a static solution, but not conversely; (2) that at an equilibrium dynamical solution, the forager can stabilize prey mixed patch use strategy in cases where ideal free distribution theory predicts that prey will use only one patch type; and (3) that when the equilibrium dynamical solution is unstable at fixed prey density, stable behavior cycles occur where neither forager nor prey keep a fixed behavior.

  18. Temperature and electron density dependence of spin relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lifen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Temperature and carrier density-dependent spin dynamics for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs with different structural symmetries have been studied by using time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. The spin relaxation time is measured to be much longer for the symmetrically designed GaAs QW comparing with the asymmetrical one, indicating the strong influence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on spin relaxation. D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism has been revealed to be the dominant contribution for spin relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. The spin relaxation time exhibits non-monotonic-dependent behavior on both temperature and photo-excited carrier density, revealing the important role of non-monotonic temperature and density dependence of electron-electron Coulomb scattering. Our experimental observations demonstrate good agreement with recently developed spin relaxation theory based on microscopic kinetic spin Bloch equation approach.

  19. Competing effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of the Λ N interaction in BΛ values of hypernuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Rijken, Th. A.

    2016-10-01

    Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of Λ N interaction in Λ binding energies BΛ of hypernuclei are studied systematically on the basis of the baryon-baryon interaction model ESC (extended soft core) including many-body effects. By using the Λ N G -matrix interaction derived from ESC, we perform microscopic calculations of BΛ in Λ hypernuclei within the framework of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics under the averaged-density approximation. The calculated values of BΛ reproduce experimental data within a few hundred keV in the wide mass regions from 9 to 51. It is found that competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of Λ N interaction work decisively for fine-tuning of BΛ values.

  20. Traveling wave solutions of density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Emmanuel; Saydé, Michel; Ben Hamouda, Fathi; Lakhssassi, Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Analytical entire traveling wave solutions to the 1+1 density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method are presented in this paper. This equation can be regarded as an extension case of the Fisher-Kolmogoroff equation, which is used for studying insect and animal dispersal with growth dynamics. The analytical solutions are then used to investigate the effect of equation parameters on the population distribution.

  1. Approximate particle number projection with density dependent forces Superdeformed bands in the A=150 and A=190 regions

    CERN Document Server

    Valor, A; Robledo, L M

    2000-01-01

    We derive the equations for approximate particle number projection based on mean field wave functions with finite range density dependent forces. As an application ground bands of even-A superdeformed nuclei in the A=150 and A=190 regions are calculated with the Gogny force. We discuss nuclear properties such as quadrupole moments, moments of inertia and quasiparticle spectra, among others, as a function of the angular momentum. We obtain a good overall description.

  2. Effects of density dependent larval competition on the life history traits of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sampa Banerjee; Soujita Pramanik; Soumyajit Banerjee; Goutam K Saha; Gautam Aditya

    2017-01-01

    Consequences of larval competition at the population level provide explanation for the differences in relative abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in different geographical regions. The outcome of competition is assessed through the estimates of the life history traits as a response to varying density and resource available for larval development. In the present study, variations in the life history traits due to density-dependent intra- and inter- specific competition involving A...

  3. Global strong solution to compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ran; Guo, Ai; Zhu, Changjiang

    2017-04-01

    We obtain existence and uniqueness of global strong solution to one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for ideal polytropic gas flow, with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity under stress-free and thermally insulated boundary conditions. Here we assume viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) = 1 +ρα and heat conductivity coefficient κ (θ) =θβ for all α ∈ [ 0 , ∞) and β ∈ (0 , + ∞).

  4. Global well-posedness for the incompressible MHD equations with density-dependent viscosity and resistivity coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xin; Ye, Xia

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns an initial-boundary value problem of the inhomogeneous incompressible MHD equations in a smooth bounded domain. The viscosity and resistivity coefficients are density-dependent. The global well-posedness of strong solutions is established, provided the initial norms of velocity and magnetic field are suitably small in some sense, or the lower bound of the transport coefficients are large enough. More importantly, there is not any smallness condition on the density and its gradient.

  5. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics.

  6. Role of seasonality on predator-prey-subsidy population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dorian; Harrington, Heather A; Van Gorder, Robert A

    2016-05-07

    The role of seasonality on predator-prey interactions in the presence of a resource subsidy is examined using a system of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The problem is motivated by the Arctic, inhabited by the ecological system of arctic foxes (predator), lemmings (prey), and seal carrion (subsidy). We construct two nonlinear, nonautonomous systems of ODEs named the Primary Model, and the n-Patch Model. The Primary Model considers spatial factors implicitly, and the n-Patch Model considers space explicitly as a "Stepping Stone" system. We establish the boundedness of the dynamics, as well as the necessity of sufficiently nutritional food for the survival of the predator. We investigate the importance of including the resource subsidy explicitly in the model, and the importance of accounting for predator mortality during migration. We find a variety of non-equilibrium dynamics for both systems, obtaining both limit cycles and chaotic oscillations. We were then able to discuss relevant implications for biologically interesting predator-prey systems including subsidy under seasonal effects. Notably, we can observe the extinction or persistence of a species when the corresponding autonomous system might predict the opposite.

  7. Demographic models reveal the shape of density dependence for a specialist insect herbivore on variable host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom E X

    2007-07-01

    1. It is widely accepted that density-dependent processes play an important role in most natural populations. However, persistent challenges in our understanding of density-dependent population dynamics include evaluating the shape of the relationship between density and demographic rates (linear, concave, convex), and identifying extrinsic factors that can mediate this relationship. 2. I studied the population dynamics of the cactus bug Narnia pallidicornis on host plants (Opuntia imbricata) that varied naturally in relative reproductive effort (RRE, the proportion of meristems allocated to reproduction), an important plant quality trait. I manipulated per-plant cactus bug densities, quantified subsequent dynamics, and fit stage-structured models to the experimental data to ask if and how density influences demographic parameters. 3. In the field experiment, I found that populations with variable starting densities quickly converged upon similar growth trajectories. In the model-fitting analyses, the data strongly supported a model that defined the juvenile cactus bug retention parameter (joint probability of surviving and not dispersing) as a nonlinear decreasing function of density. The estimated shape of this relationship shifted from concave to convex with increasing host-plant RRE. 4. The results demonstrate that host-plant traits are critical sources of variation in the strength and shape of density dependence in insects, and highlight the utility of integrated experimental-theoretical approaches for identifying processes underlying patterns of change in natural populations.

  8. Predators marked with chemical cues from one prey have increased attack success on another prey species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, R.; Broufas, G.; de Jong, P.; Aguilar-Fenollosa, E.; Revynthi, A.; Sabelis, M.W.; Janssen, A.

    2015-01-01

    1. To reduce the risk of being eaten by predators, prey alter their morphology or behaviour. This response can be tuned to the current danger if chemical or other cues associated with predators inform the prey about the risks involved. 2. It is well known that various prey species discriminate

  9. Optimal foraging on perilous prey : risk of bill damage reduces optimal prey size in oystercatchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, AL; Oosterbeek, K; Ens, Bruno J.; Verhulst, S

    2006-01-01

    Intake rate maximization alone is not. always sufficient in explaining prey size selection in predators. For example, bivalve-feeding oystercatchers regularly select. smaller prey than expected if they aimed to maximize their intake rat-C. It has been proposed that. to these birds large prey are

  10. An evaluation of density-dependent and density-independent influences on population growth rates in Weddell seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, J.J.; Link, W.A.; Nichols, J.D.; Hadley, G.L.; Garrott, R.A.; Proffitt, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Much of the existing literature that evaluates the roles of density-dependent and density-independent factors on population dynamics has been called into question in recent years because measurement errors were not properly dealt with in analyses. Using state-space models to account for measurement errors, we evaluated a set of competing models for a 22-year time series of mark-resight estimates of abundance for a breeding population of female Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) studied in Erebus Bay, Antarctica. We tested for evidence of direct density dependence in growth rates and evaluated whether equilibrium population size was related to seasonal sea-ice extent and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). We found strong evidence of negative density dependence in annual growth rates for a population whose estimated size ranged from 438 to 623 females during the study. Based on Bayes factors, a density-dependence-only model was favored over models that also included en! vironmental covariates. According to the favored model, the population had a stationary distribution with a mean of 497 females (SD = 60.5), an expected growth rate of 1.10 (95% credible interval 1.08-1.15) when population size was 441 females, and a rate of 0.90 (95% credible interval 0.87-0.93) for a population of 553 females. A model including effects of SOI did receive some support and indicated a positive relationship between SOI and population size. However, effects of SOI were not large, and including the effect did not greatly reduce our estimate of process variation. We speculate that direct density dependence occurred because rates of adult survival, breeding, and temporary emigration were affected by limitations on per capita food resources and space for parturition and pup-rearing. To improve understanding of the relative roles of various demographic components and their associated vital rates to population growth rate, mark-recapture methods can be applied that incorporate both

  11. Prey selection of lions Panthera leo in a small, enclosed reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Power

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Annual trends in numbers of ungulate species on a 15 km² reserve from 1993 to 1998, were evaluated in the context of lion Panthera leo reintroduction during 1996, and subsequent predation by them. The ungulate prey base was enumerated annually by aerial counts and a road count that took place during 1998. The lion prey record was obtained from direct observations of a radio-located pride of eight lions and daily reserve management records. All ungulate species that underwent precipituous declines were also the most important prey to lions, comprising over 80 % of their prey, and they were preyed upon according to their availability. Lion predation was causal for the declines in wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus, Blesbok Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi and Warthog Phacochoerus africana, while the decline in Kudu Tragelaphus strepsiceros was only partly ascribed to lions, as other non-lion related mortality sources were identified. The only ungulate species to increase subsequent to lion reintroduction was the Impala Aepyceros melampus, which was furthermore under-selected by lions. The uncontrolled population growth of Impala could have elicited ecological degradation, and it was advised to either not stock Impala, or otherwise control their numbers if lions are unable to do so. Lion hunting success and kill rate, were 21 % (n = 63 and 1 kill/4.4 days, respectively. Three bushpigs Potamochoerus larvatus were killed but not utilised,and this finding is corroborated by an intensive study in Kwazulu-Natal, and this aversion is discussed. Predators can cause unprecedented declines of their prey where the prey are confined to small reserves that have no refuge from predation. On an annual basis, prey may need to be augmented to sustain predators on small reserves

  12. Prey size spectra and prey availability of larval and small juvenile cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1997-01-01

    stage when viewed on a relative predator/prey size scale. The study is based on stomach analysis of larval/juvenile cod in the size range 10-35 mm from nursery grounds in the North Sea. Stomach contents (species, size) were compared to environmental composition and preference indices were calculated...... prey biomass was highest in the areas of a hydrographic front, where larvae have been shown to concentrate. Changes in prey availability with larval growth depend strongly on specific prey biomass spectra at a given location. Both increasing and decreasing prey availability al increasing larval size...

  13. Density dependence of avian clutch size in resident and migrant species: is there a constraint on the predictability of competitor density?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of density dependence of clutch size is tested in 57 long-term population studies of 10 passerine bird species. In about half of the studies of tit species Parus spp. density dependence of clutch size was found, while none was found in studies of two flycatcher species Ficedula spp. One

  14. Predator-Prey Interactions in Communities with prey dispersal and Allee effects

    CERN Document Server

    Berezovskaya, F; Castillo-Chavez, C

    2009-01-01

    The population dynamics of predator-prey systems in the presence of patch-specific predators are explored in a setting where the prey population has access to both habitats. The emphasis is in situations where patch-prey abundance drives prey-dispersal between patches, with the fragile prey populations, that is, populations subject to the Allee effect. The resulting four-dimensional model's mathematical analysis is carried out via sub-models that focus in lower dimensional settings. The outcomes depend on, and in fact they are quite sensitive to, the structure of the system, the range of parameter values, and initial conditions. We show that the system can support multi-stability and a diverse set of predator-prey life-history dynamics that includes rather complex dynamical system outcomes. It is argued that in general evolution should favor heterogeneous settings including Allee effects, prey-refuges, and patch-specific predators.

  15. Permanence of Periodic Predator-Prey System with General Nonlinear Functional Response and Stage Structure for Both Predator and Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Huang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the permanence of periodic predator-prey system with general nonlinear functional responses and stage structure for both predator and prey and obtain that the predator and the prey species are permanent.

  16. Negative density dependence is stronger in resource-rich environments and diversifies communities when stronger for common but not rare species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManna, Joseph A; Walton, Maranda L; Turner, Benjamin L; Myers, Jonathan A

    2016-06-01

    Conspecific negative density dependence is thought to maintain diversity by limiting abundances of common species. Yet the extent to which this mechanism can explain patterns of species diversity across environmental gradients is largely unknown. We examined density-dependent recruitment of seedlings and saplings and changes in local species diversity across a soil-resource gradient for 38 woody-plant species in a temperate forest. At both life stages, the strength of negative density dependence increased with resource availability, becoming relatively stronger for rare species during seedling recruitment, but stronger for common species during sapling recruitment. Moreover, negative density dependence appeared to reduce diversity when stronger for rare than common species, but increase diversity when stronger for common species. Our results suggest that negative density dependence is stronger in resource-rich environments and can either decrease or maintain diversity depending on its relative strength among common and rare species.

  17. Effect of measurement error on tests of density dependence of catchability for walleyes in northern Wisconsin angling and spearing fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M.J.; Beard, T.D.; Hewett, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine how much measurement errors affected tests of density dependence of spearing and angling catchability for walleye Sander vitreus by quantifying relationships between spearing and angling catch rates (catch/h) and walleye population density (number/acre) in northern Wisconsin lakes. The mean measurement error of spearing catch rates was 43.5 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities, whereas the mean measurement error of angling catch rates was only 5.6 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities. The bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between spearing catch rate and adult walleye population density was similar to the ordinary-least-squares regression estimate but differed significantly from the geometric mean (GM) functional regression estimate. In contrast, the bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between angling catch rate and total walleye population density was intermediate between ordinary-least-squares and GM functional regression estimates. Catch rates of walleyes in both spearing and angling fisheries were not linearly related to walleye population density, which indicated that catch rates in both fisheries were hyperstable in relation to walleye population density. For both fisheries, GM functional regression overestimated the degree of hyperdepletion in catch rates and ordinary-least-squares regression overestimated the degree of hyperstability in catch rates. However, ordinary-least-squares regression induced significantly less bias in tests of density dependence than GM functional regression, so it may be suitable for testing the degree of density dependence in fisheries for which fish population density is estimated with mark-recapture methods similar to those used in our study. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  18. The effects of density-dependent form factors for (e, e'p) reaction in quasi-elastic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S. [Korea Aerospace University, School of Liberal Arts and Science, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Soongsil University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hungchong [Kookmin University, Department of General Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); So, W.Y. [Kangwon National University at Dogye, Department of Radiological Science, Samcheok (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the framework of a relativistic single particle model, the effects of density-dependent electromagnetic form factors on the exclusive (e, e'p) reaction are investigated in the quasi-elastic region. The density-dependent electromagnetic form factors are generated from a quark-meson coupling model and used to calculate the cross sections in two different densities, either at the normal density of ρ{sub 0} ∝ 0.15 fm{sup -3} or at the lower density, 0.5ρ{sub 0}. Then these cross sections are analyzed in the two different kinematics: One is that the momentum of the outgoing nucleon is along the momentum transfer. The other is that the angle between the momentum of the outgoing nucleon and the momentum transfer is varied at fixed magnitude of the momentum of the outgoing nucleon. Our theoretical differential reduced cross sections are compared with the NIKHEF data for the {sup 208}Pb(e, e'p) reaction, which is related to the probability that a bound nucleon from a given orbit can be knocked-out of the nucleus. The effects of the density-dependent form factors increase the differential cross sections for both knocked-out proton and neutron by an amount of a few percent. Moreover they are shown to be almost the same within only a few percent, i.e., nearly independent of the shell location of knockout nucleons. These results are quite consistent with the characteristics of double magic nuclei which have relatively sharp smearing in the density distribution. (orig.)

  19. On the density-dependence of seed predation in Dipteryx micrantha, a bat-dispersed rain forest tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Mónica; Tuomisto, Hanna; Loiselle, Bette A

    2004-06-01

    We studied the effect of seed density on seed predation by following the fate of bat-dispersed Dipteryx micrantha (Leguminosae) seeds deposited under bat feeding roosts. The study was conducted in Cocha Cashu biological station, Amazonian Peru, during the fruiting period of Dipteryx. Predation of Dipteryx seeds in the area is mainly by large to medium-sized rodents. Seed deposits beneath bat feeding roosts were monitored for a 13-week period in an 18-ha study area. A total of 210 seed deposits were found, and on average, seed predators encountered 22% of them during any one week. About one-third of the seed deposits escaped predation, and those deposits that had relatively few seeds were more likely to go unnoticed by rodents than were deposits with many seeds. The mean seed destruction rate was 8% per week; deposits with many seeds tended to lose a smaller proportion of their seeds to seed predators than did deposits with few seeds. Regression tests for the weekly data showed that, at the beginning of the observation period, seed predation was not density-dependent. Later, when the total seed crop beneath roosts was high, the number of seeds predated per deposit was positively density-dependent, while the proportion of seeds predated was negatively density-dependent, indicating predator satiation. Seed deposits that had been visited by seed predators once had a higher probability of being revisited the week after, especially if they contained many seeds when first encountered. This indicates that the foraging behavior of rodents may be affected by their remembering the location of seed-rich patches.

  20. The role of landscape features and density dependence in growth and fledging rates of Piping Plovers in North Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Pearse, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    For species with precocial young, survival from hatching to fledging is a key factor influencing recruitment. Furthermore, growth rates of precocial chicks are an indicator of forage quality and habitat suitability of brood-rearing areas. We examined how growth and fledging rates of Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) chicks were influenced by landscape features, such as hatchling density (hatchlings per hectare of remotely sensed habitat [H ha-1]), island vs. mainland, and wind fetch (exposure to waves) at 2-km segments (n ¼ 15) of Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota, during 2007–2008. Hatchling growth was comparable with published estimates for other habitats. Models for fledging rate (fledged young per segment) assuming density dependence had more support (wi ¼ 96%) than those assuming density independence (wi ¼ 4%). Density-dependent processes appeared to influence fledging rate only at densities .5 H ha-1, which occurred in 19% of the segments we sampled. When areas with densities .5 H ha-1 were excluded, density-dependence and density-independence models were equally supported (wi ¼ 52% and 48%, respectively). Fledging rate declined as the wind fetch of a segment increased. Fledging rate on mainland shorelines was 4.3 times greater than that on islands. Previous work has indicated that plovers prefer islands for nesting, but our results suggest that this preference is not optimal and could lead to an ecological trap for chicks. While other researchers have found nesting-habitat requirements to be gravelly areas on exposed beaches without fine-grain substrates, our results suggest that chicks fledge at lower rates in these habitats. Thus, breeding plovers likely require complexes of these nesting habitats along with protected areas with fine, nutrient-rich substrate for foraging by hatchlings.

  1. On the global and local nuclear stopping in mass asymmetric nuclear collisions using density-dependent symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amandeep, K.; Suneel, K.

    2017-09-01

    The present theoretical calculations have been performed within the framework of IQMD model to study a particular set of mass symmetric and asymmetric reactions (keeping total mass fixed) over a wide range of incident energies and colliding geometries. It has been observed that global as well as local nuclear stopping is influenced by the mass asymmetry of the reaction strongly. Influence of density-dependent symmetry energy has been observed in local nuclear stopping. Global stopping decreases with the increase in colliding geometry. Effect of colliding geometry on nuclear stopping is more at higher energies.

  2. A Room to Grow: The Residential Density-Dependence of Childbearing in Europe and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael Lauster

    2010-12-01

    produce new density-dependent fertility dynamics. In particular, childbearing becomes dependent upon residential roominess. This relationship is culturally specific, and that the cultural nature of this relationship means that professional and managerial classes are likely to be particularly influenced by residential roominess, while immigrants are less likely to be influenced. Hypotheses are tested linking residential roominess to the presence of an “own infant” in the household using census data from the Austria, Greece, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Roominess predicts fertility in all countries, but to differing degrees.

  3. A Room to Grow: The Residential Density-dependence of Childbearing in Europe and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael Lauster

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available I argue that cultural processes linked to the demographic transition produce new density-dependent fertility dynamics. In particular, childbearing becomes dependent upon residential roominess. This relationship is culturally specific, and I argue that the cultural nature of this relationship means that professional and managerial classes are likely to be particularly influenced by residential roominess, while immigrants are less likely to be influenced. I test hypotheses linking residential roominess to the presence of an “own infant” in the household using census data from the Austria, Greece, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Roominess predicts fertility in all countries, but to differing degrees.

  4. Remarks on the use of projected densities in the density-dependent part of Skyrme or Gogny functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, L. M.

    2010-06-01

    I discuss the inadequacy of the 'projected density' prescription to be used in density-dependent forces/functionals when calculations beyond mean field are pursued. The case of calculations aimed at the symmetry restoration of mean fields obtained with effective realistic forces of the Skyrme or Gogny type is considered in detail. It is shown that, at least for the restoration of spatial symmetries like rotations, translations or parity, the above prescription yields catastrophic results for the energy that drive the intrinsic wave-function to configurations with infinite deformation, thereby preventing its use both in projection after and before variation.

  5. Remarks on the use of projected densities in the density dependent part of Skyrme or Gogny functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Robledo, L M

    2010-01-01

    I discuss the inadequacy of the "projected density" prescription to be used in density dependent forces/functionals when calculations beyond mean field are pursued. The case of calculations aimed at the symmetry restoration of mean fields obtained with effective realistic forces of the Skyrme or Gogny type is considered in detail. It is shown that at least for the restoration of spatial symmetries like rotations, translations or parity the above prescription yields catastrophic results for the energy that drive the intrinsic wave function to configurations with infinite deformation, preventing thereby its use both in projection after and before variation.

  6. Vacuum states on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with general density-dependent viscosity and general pressure law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we study the one-dimensional motion of viscous gas with a general pres- sure law and a general density-dependent viscosity coefficient when the initial density connects to the vacuum state with a jump.We prove the global existence and the uniqueness of weak solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations by using the line method.For this,some new a priori estimates are obtained to take care of the general viscosity coefficientμ(ρ)instead ofρ~θ.

  7. Vacuum states on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with general density-dependent viscosity and general pressure law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-man SUN; Chang-jiang ZHU

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study the one-dimensional motion of viscous gas with a general pressure law and a general density-dependent viscosity coefficient when the initial density connects to the vacuum state with a jump. We prove the global existence and the uniqueness of weak solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations by using the line method. For this, some new a priori estimates are obtained to take care of the general viscosity coefficient μ(ρ) instead of ρθ.

  8. Impact of density-dependent symmetry energy and Coulomb interactions on the evolution of intermediate mass fragments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karan Singh Vinayak; Suneel Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Within the framework of isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model, we demonstrate the evolution of intermediate mass fragments in heavy-ion collisions. In this paper, we study the time evolution, impact parameter, and excitation energy dependence of IMF production for the different forms of density-dependent symmetry energy. The IMF production and charge distribution show a minor but considerable sensitivity towards various forms of densitydependent symmetry energy. The Coulomb interactions affect the IMF production significantly at peripheral collisions. The IMF production increases with the stiffness of symmetry energy.

  9. Carrier-Density-Dependent Electron Spin Relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs Multi Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOU Qian; WU Yu; LIU Lu-Ning; WEN Jin-Hui; LAI Tian-Shu; LIN Wei-Zhu

    2005-01-01

    @@ The carrier-density-dependent electron spin relaxation processes in GaAs/AlGaAs multi quantum wells are investigated by a femtosecond pump probe experiment. The spin relaxation time presents two distinguishable trends with the increasing excitation density. It increases from 60ps to 70ps with carrier densities from 1 × 1017 cm-3to 5 × 1017 cm-3 and gradually saturates up to ~80ps at 4 × 1018 cm-3. The experimental results are attributed to the combined competition between collision intensification and scattering potential screening and provide a good experimental confirmation for the theoretical D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism descriptions.

  10. Amplified spontaneous emission of phonons as a likely mechanism for density-dependent velocity saturation in GaN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurgin, Jacob B.; Bajaj, Sanyam; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-09-01

    We show that density-dependent velocity saturation in a GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) can be related to the stimulated emission of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons. As the drift velocity of electrons increases, the drift of the Fermi distribution in reciprocal space results in population inversion and gain for the LO phonons. Once this gain reaches a threshold value, the avalanche-like increase in LO phonon emission causes a rapid loss of electron energy and momentum and leads to drift velocity saturation. Our simple model correctly predicts both the general trend of decreasing saturation velocity with increasing electron density, and the measured experimental values of saturation.

  11. Metabolic and physiological changes in Prymnesium parvum when grown under, and grazing on prey of, variable nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Veronica M; Glibert, Patricia M.; Graneli, Edna;

    2016-01-01

    the realization that mixotrophy is important ecologically. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine changes in growth rates and physiological states of the toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum when fed Rhodomonas salina of varying nutritional status. Haemolytic activity of P. parvum and prey mortality of R....... Mortality rates were, however, directly related to the initial prey:predator cell ratios. On the other hand, growth of the predator was a function of nutritional status and a significant positive correlation was observed between growth rates of P. parvum and cell-specific depletion rates of N, whereas...

  12. Prey preferences of the jaguar Panthera onca reflect the post-Pleistocene demise of large prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt W Hayward

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Documenting the impacts of the Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions on predator-prey interactions is a challenge because of the incomplete fossil record and depauperate extant community structure. We used a comparative ecological approach to investigate whether the existing prey preference patterns of jaguars Panthera onca were potentially affected by the Pleistocene extinctions in the Americas compared with large felids in Africa and Asia. We reviewed the literature and found 25 studies reporting 3214 jaguar kills recorded throughout the species’ distribution. We found that jaguars significantly preferred capybara Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris and giant anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla, and avoided agoutis, carnivorans, primates, black-eared opossum Didelphis marsupialis and tapirs. Generalised linear models showed that jaguars select prey primarily based on socio-ecological and behavioural traits (abundance and herd size, rather than morphological characteristics (body size. Nonetheless, their accessible prey weight range was 6-60 kg, preferred prey weight range was 45-85 kg, and mean mass of significantly preferred prey was 32 ± 13 kg leading to a predator to prey body mass ratio of 1:0.53, which is much less than that of other solitary felids. Compared with other large, solitary felids, jaguars have an unusual predator to prey body mass ratio, show limited effect of prey morphology as a driver of prey selection, lack evidence of optimal foraging beyond their preferred prey, and an absence of preferentially hunting on Cetartiodactyla herbivores. These features, coupled with the reduction in jaguar body mass since the Pleistocene, suggest that the loss of larger potential prey items within the preferred and accessible weight ranges at the end-Pleistocene still affects jaguar predatory behaviour. It may be that jaguars survived this mass extinction event by preferentially preying on relatively small species.

  13. Fluorescent prey traps in carnivorous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, R; Johnson, A J; Sankar, S; Hussain, A A; Sathish Kumar, C; Sabulal, B

    2013-05-01

    Carnivorous plants acquire most of their nutrients by capturing ants, insects and other arthropods through their leaf-evolved biological traps. So far, the best-known attractants in carnivorous prey traps are nectar, colour and olfactory cues. Here, fresh prey traps of 14 Nepenthes, five Sarracenia, five Drosera, two Pinguicula species/hybrids, Dionaea muscipula and Utricularia stellaris were scanned at UV 366 nm. Fluorescence emissions of major isolates of fresh Nepenthes khasiana pitcher peristomes were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 366 nm. N. khasiana field pitcher peristomes were masked by its slippery zone extract, and prey capture rates were compared with control pitchers. We found the existence of distinct blue fluorescence emissions at the capture spots of Nepenthes, Sarracenia and Dionaea prey traps at UV 366 nm. These alluring blue emissions gradually developed with the growth of the prey traps and diminished towards their death. On excitation at 366 nm, N. khasiana peristome 3:1 CHCl3–MeOH extract and its two major blue bands showed strong fluorescence emissions at 430–480 nm. Masking of blue emissions on peristomes drastically reduced prey capture in N. khasiana pitchers. We propose these molecular emissions as a critical factor attracting arthropods and other visitors to these carnivorous traps. Drosera, Pinguicula and Utricularia prey traps showed only red chlorophyll emissions at 366 nm.

  14. Effects of density dependent larval competition on the life history traits of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Banerjee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Consequences of larval competition at the population level provide explanation for the differences in relative abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in different geographical regions. The outcome of competition is assessed through the estimates of the life history traits as a response to varying density and resource available for larval development. In the present study, variations in the life history traits due to density-dependent intra- and inter- specific competition involving A. aegypti and A. albopictus were assessed following the minimalist model. The instar-I larvae (0-day old F2 generation of both Aedes species were reared to the adult stages using the initial rearing density of 1, 2, 4 and 6 (individuals/10ml in multiple replicates. The age at pupation, pupal weight, adult weight and adult wing length of the individuals were considered as the response variables and surrogates of estimating the competitive interactions. Density dependent variations in the competitive interactions were evident for both the mosquitoes with reference to the selected life history traits. In A. aegypti, the life history traits varied with the levels of competition, which was not observed for A. albopictus. Although the density levels considered in the present instance were lower than in earlier studies, the observations were similar, with A. albopictus being competitively superior. It appears that irrespective of the density levels, interspecific competition affects A. aegypti and thus may bear population level consequences and overall abundance in the areas where both species are present.

  15. Quantifying Correlations Between Isovector Observables and the Density Dependence of Nuclear Symmetry Energy away from Saturation Density

    CERN Document Server

    Fattoyev, F J; Li, Bao-An

    2014-01-01

    According to the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, the nuclear symmetry energy $S(\\rho)$ and its slope $L(\\rho)$ at arbitrary densities can be decomposed in terms of the density and momentum dependence of the single-nucleon potentials in isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter which are potentially accessible to experiment. We quantify the correlations between several well-known isovector observables and $L(\\rho)$ to locate the density range in which each isovector observable is most sensitive to the density dependence of the $S(\\rho)$. We then study the correlation coefficients between those isovector observables and all the components of the $L(\\rho)$. The neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb is found to be strongly correlated with the $L(\\rho)$ at a subsaturation density of $\\rho = 0.59 \\rho_0$ through the density dependence of the first-order symmetry potential. Neutron star radii are found to be strongly correlated with the $L(\\rho)$ over a wide range of supra-saturation densities mainly through both the density an...

  16. Impulsive Control on Seasonally Perturbed General Holling Type Two-Prey One-Predator Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrima Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamical behaviors of two-prey one-predator model with general Holling type functional responses. The effect of seasonal perturbation on the model has been discussed analytically as well as numerically. The periodic fluctuation is considered in prey growth rate and the predator mortality rate of the model. The impulsive effects involving biological and chemical control strategy, periodic releasing of natural enemies, and spraying pesticide at different fixed times are introduced in the model with seasonal perturbation. We derive the conditions of stability for impulsive system using Floquet theory, small amplitude perturbation skills. A local asymptotically stable prey (pest eradicated periodic solution is obtained when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Numerical simulations of the model with and without seasonal disturbances exhibit different dynamics. Also we simulate numerically the model involving seasonal perturbations without impulse and with impulse. Finally, concluding remarks are given.

  17. Predator-prey coevolution driven by size selective predation can cause anti-synchronized and cryptic population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougi, Akihiko

    2012-03-01

    Population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics can occur on similar time scales, and a coupling of these two processes can lead to novel population dynamics. Recent theoretical studies of coevolving predator-prey systems have concentrated more on the stability of such systems than on the characteristics of cycles when they are unstable. Here I explore the characteristics of the cycles that arise due to coevolution in a system in which prey can increase their ability to escape from predators by becoming either significantly larger or significantly smaller in trait value (i.e., a bidirectional trait axis). This is a reasonable model of body size evolution in some systems. The results show that antiphase population cycles and cryptic cycles (large population fluctuation in one species but almost no change in another species) can occur in the coevolutionary system but not systems where only a single species evolves. Previously, those dynamical patterns have only been theoretically shown to occur in single species evolutionary models and the coevolutionary model which do not involve a bi-directional axis of adaptation. These unusual dynamics may be observed in predator-prey interactions when the density dependence in the prey species is strong.

  18. Gluttonous predators: how to estimate prey size when there are too many prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS. Araújo

    Full Text Available Prey size is an important factor in food consumption. In studies of feeding ecology, prey items are usually measured individually using calipers or ocular micrometers. Among amphibians and reptiles, there are species that feed on large numbers of small prey items (e.g. ants, termites. This high intake makes it difficult to estimate prey size consumed by these animals. We addressed this problem by developing and evaluating a procedure for subsampling the stomach contents of such predators in order to estimate prey size. Specifically, we developed a protocol based on a bootstrap procedure to obtain a subsample with a precision error of at the most 5%, with a confidence level of at least 95%. This guideline should reduce the sampling effort and facilitate future studies on the feeding habits of amphibians and reptiles, and also provide a means of obtaining precise estimates of prey size.

  19. The Dynamics of a Nonautonomous Predator-Prey Model with Infertility Control in the Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonautonomous predator-prey model with infertility control in the prey is formulated and investigated. Threshold conditions for the permanence and extinction of fertility prey and infertility prey are established. Some new threshold values of integral form are obtained. For the periodic cases, these threshold conditions act as sharp threshold values for the permanence and extinction of fertility prey and infertility prey. There are also mounting concerns that the quantity of biological sterile drug is obtained in the process of the prevention and control of pest in the grasslands and farmland. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the main results of this paper. The numerical simulations shown that, when the pest population is permanet, different dynamic behaviors may be found in this model, such as the global attractivity and the chaotic attractor.

  20. Predation on exotic zebra mussels by native fishes: Effects on predator and prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulick, D.D.; Lewis, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    1. Exotic zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, occur in southern U.S. waterways in high densities, but little is known about the interaction between native fish predators and zebra mussels. Previous studies have suggested that exotic zebra mussels are low profitability prey items and native vertebrate predators are unlikely to reduce zebra mussel densities. We tested these hypotheses by observing prey use of fishes, determining energy content of primary prey species of fishes, and conducting predator exclusion experiments in Lake Dardanelle, Arkansas. 2. Zebra mussels were the primary prey eaten by 52.9% of blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus; 48.2% of freshwater drum, Aplodinotus grunniens; and 100% of adult redear sunfish, Lepomis microlophus. Blue catfish showed distinct seasonal prey shifts, feeding on zebra mussels in summer and shad, Dorosoma spp., during winter. Energy content (joules g-1) of blue catfish prey (threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense; gizzard shad, D. cepedianum; zebra mussels; and asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea) showed a significant species by season interaction, but shad were always significantly greater in energy content than bivalves examined as either ash-free dry mass or whole organism dry mass. Fish predators significantly reduced densities of large zebra mussels (>5 mm length) colonising clay tiles in the summers of 1997 and 1998, but predation effects on small zebra mussels (???5 mm length) were less clear. 3. Freshwater drum and redear sunfish process bivalve prey by crushing shells and obtain low amounts of higher-energy food (only the flesh), whereas blue catfish lack a shell-crushing apparatus and ingest large amounts of low-energy food per unit time (bivalves with their shells). Blue catfish appeared to select the abundant zebra mussel over the more energetically rich shad during summer, then shifted to shad during winter when shad experienced temperature-dependent stress and mortality. Native fish predators can suppress adult zebra

  1. Nonlinearities lead to qualitative differences in population dynamics of predator-prey systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M C C Ameixa

    Full Text Available Since typically there are many predators feeding on most herbivores in natural communities, understanding multiple predator effects is critical for both community and applied ecology. Experiments of multiple predator effects on prey populations are extremely demanding, as the number of treatments and the amount of labour associated with these experiments increases exponentially with the number of species in question. Therefore, researchers tend to vary only presence/absence of the species and use only one (supposedly realistic combination of their numbers in experiments. However, nonlinearities in density dependence, functional responses, interactions between natural enemies etc. are typical for such systems, and nonlinear models of population dynamics generally predict qualitatively different results, if initial absolute densities of the species studied differ, even if their relative densities are maintained. Therefore, testing combinations of natural enemies without varying their densities may not be sufficient. Here we test this prediction experimentally. We show that the population dynamics of a system consisting of 2 natural enemies (aphid predator Adalia bipunctata (L., and aphid parasitoid, Aphidius colemani Viereck and their shared prey (peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer are strongly affected by the absolute initial densities of the species in question. Even if their relative densities are kept constant, the natural enemy species or combination thereof that most effectively suppresses the prey may depend on the absolute initial densities used in the experiment. Future empirical studies of multiple predator - one prey interactions should therefore use a two-dimensional array of initial densities of the studied species. Varying only combinations of natural enemies without varying their densities is not sufficient and can lead to misleading results.

  2. Prey-mediated avoidance of an intraguild predator by its intraguild prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan R; Blankenship, Terry L; Hooten, Mevin B; Shivik, John A

    2010-12-01

    Intraguild (IG) predation is an important factor influencing community structure, yet factors allowing coexistence of IG predator and IG prey are not well understood. The existence of spatial refuges for IG prey has recently been noted for their importance in allowing coexistence. However, reduction in basal prey availability might lead IG prey to leave spatial refuges for greater access to prey, leading to increased IG predation and fewer opportunities for coexistence. We determined how the availability of prey affected space-use patterns of bobcats (Lynx rufus, IG prey) in relation to coyote space-use patterns (Canis latrans, IG predators). We located animals from fall 2007 to spring 2009 and estimated bobcat home ranges and core areas seasonally. For each bobcat relocation, we determined intensity of coyote use, distance to water, small mammal biomass, and mean small mammal biomass of the home range during the season the location was collected. We built generalized linear mixed models and used Akaike Information Criteria to determine which factors best predicted bobcat space use. Coyote intensity was a primary determinant of bobcat core area location. In bobcat home ranges with abundant prey, core areas occurred where coyote use was low, but shifted to areas intensively used by coyotes when prey declined. High spatial variability in basal prey abundance allowed some bobcats to avoid coyotes while at the same time others were forced into more risky areas. Our results suggest that multiple behavioral strategies associated with spatial variation in basal prey abundance likely allow IG prey and IG predators to coexist.

  3. Coupled predator-prey oscillations in a chaotic food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beninca, E.; Jöhnk, K.; Heerkloss, R.; Huisman, J.

    2009-01-01

    Coupling of several predator-prey oscillations can generate intriguing patterns of synchronization and chaos. Theory predicts that prey species will fluctuate in phase if predator-prey cycles are coupled through generalist predators, whereas they will fluctuate in anti-phase if predator-prey cycles

  4. Coupled predator-prey oscillations in a chaotic food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benincà, E.; Johnk, K.D.; Heerkloss, R.; Huisman, J.

    2009-01-01

    Coupling of several predator-prey oscillations can generate intriguing patterns of synchronization and chaos. Theory predicts that prey species will fluctuate in phase if predator-prey cycles are coupled through generalist predators, whereas they will fluctuate in anti-phase if predator-prey cycles

  5. Effects of a disease affecting a predator on the dynamics of a predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Pierre; McHich, Rachid; Chowdhury, Tanmay; Sallet, Gauthier; Tchuente, Maurice; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2009-06-07

    We study the effects of a disease affecting a predator on the dynamics of a predator-prey system. We couple an SIRS model applied to the predator population, to a Lotka-Volterra model. The SIRS model describes the spread of the disease in a predator population subdivided into susceptible, infected and removed individuals. The Lotka-Volterra model describes the predator-prey interactions. We consider two time scales, a fast one for the disease and a comparatively slow one for predator-prey interactions and for predator mortality. We use the classical "aggregation method" in order to obtain a reduced equivalent model. We show that there are two possible asymptotic behaviors: either the predator population dies out and the prey tends to its carrying capacity, or the predator and prey coexist. In this latter case, the predator population tends either to a "disease-free" or to a "disease-endemic" state. Moreover, the total predator density in the disease-endemic state is greater than the predator density in the "disease-free" equilibrium (DFE).

  6. Predator-Prey-Subsidy Population Dynamics on Stepping-Stone Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lulan; Van Gorder, Robert A

    2017-03-16

    Predator-prey-subsidy dynamics on stepping-stone domains are examined using a variety of network configurations. Our problem is motivated by the interactions between arctic foxes (predator) and lemmings (prey) in the presence of seal carrion (subsidy) provided by polar bears. We use the n-Patch Model, which considers space explicitly as a "Stepping Stone" system. We consider the role that the carrying capacity, predator migration rate, input subsidy rate, predator mortality rate, and proportion of predators surviving migration play in the predator-prey-subsidy population dynamics. We find that for certain types of networks, added mobility will help predator populations, allowing them to survive or coexist when they would otherwise go extinct if confined to one location, while in other situations (such as when sparsely distributed nodes in the network have few resources available) the added mobility will hurt the predator population. We also find that a combination of favorable conditions for the prey and subsidy can lead to the formation of limit cycles (boom and bust dynamic) from stable equilibrium states. These modifications to the dynamics vary depending on the specific network structure employed, highlighting the fact that network structure can strongly influence the predator-prey-subsidy dynamics in stepping-stone domains.

  7. Evolution in predator-prey systems

    CERN Document Server

    Durrett, Rick

    2009-01-01

    We study the adaptive dynamics of predator prey systems modeled by a dynamical system in which the characteristics are allowed to evolve by small mutations. When only the prey are allowed to evolve, and the size of the mutational change tends to 0, the system does not exhibit long term prey coexistence and the parameters of the resident prey type converges to the solution of an ODE. When only the predators are allowed to evolve, coexistence of predators occurs. In this case, depending on the parameters being varied we see (i) the number of coexisting predators remains tight and the differences of the parameters from a reference species converge in distribution to a limit, or (ii) the number of coexisting predators tends to infinity, and we conjecture that the differences converge to a deterministic limit.

  8. Effects of the prey refuge distribution on a predator-prey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Ohsung; Song, Hark-Soo

    2016-03-01

    The existence of prey refuges in a predator-prey system is known to be strongly related to the ecosystem's stability. In this study, we explored how the prey refuge distribution affects the predator-prey system. To do so, we constructed a spatial lattice model to simulate an integrative predator (wolf) - prey (rabbit) - plant (grass) relationship. When a wolf (rabbit) encountered a rabbit (grass), the wolf (rabbit) tended to move to the rabbit (grass) for foraging while the rabbit tended to escape from the wolf. These behaviors were mathematically described by the degrees of willingness for hunting ( H) and escaping ( E). Initially, n refuges for prey were heterogeneously distributed in the lattice space. The heterogeneity was characterized as variable A. Higher values of A equate to higher aggregation in the refuge. We investigated the mean population density for different values of H, E, and A. To simply characterize the refuge distribution effect, we built an H-E grid map containing the population density for each species. Then, we counted the number of grids, N, with a population density ≥ 0.25. Simulation results showed that an appropriate value of A positively affected prey survival while values of A were too high had a negative effect on prey survival. The results were explained by using the trade-off between the staying time of the prey in the refuge and the cluster size of the refuge.

  9. Influence of predator mutual interference and prey refuge on Lotka-Volterra predator-prey dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liujuan; Chen, Fengde; Wang, Yiqin

    2013-11-01

    A Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model incorporating a constant number of prey using refuges and mutual interference for predator species is presented. By applying the divergency criterion and theories on exceptional directions and normal sectors, we show that the interior equilibrium is always globally asymptotically stable and two boundary equilibria are both saddle points. Our results indicate that prey refuge has no influence on the coexistence of predator and prey species of the considered model under the effects of mutual interference for predator species, which differently from the conclusion without predator mutual interference, thus improving some known ones. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the validity of our results.

  10. Predicting population survival under future climate change: density dependence, drought and extraction in an insular bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colchero, Fernando; Medellin, Rodrigo A; Clark, James S; Lee, Raymond; Katul, Gabriel G

    2009-05-01

    1. Our understanding of the interplay between density dependence, climatic perturbations, and conservation practices on the dynamics of small populations is still limited. This can result in uninformed strategies that put endangered populations at risk. Moreover, the data available for a large number of populations in such circumstances are sparse and mined with missing data. Under the current climate change scenarios, it is essential to develop appropriate inferential methods that can make use of such data sets. 2. We studied a population of desert bighorn sheep introduced to Tiburon Island, Mexico in 1975 and subjected to irregular extractions for the last 10 years. The unique attributes of this population are absence of predation and disease, thereby permitting us to explore the combined effect of density dependence, environmental variability and extraction in a 'controlled setting.' Using a combination of nonlinear discrete models with long-term field data, we constructed three basic Bayesian state space models with increasing density dependence (DD), and the same three models with the addition of summer drought effects. 3. We subsequently used Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the combined effect of drought, DD, and increasing extractions on the probability of population survival under two climate change scenarios (based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predictions): (i) increase in drought variability; and (ii) increase in mean drought severity. 4. The population grew from 16 individuals introduced in 1975 to close to 700 by 1993. Our results show that the population's growth was dominated by DD, with drought having a secondary but still relevant effect on its dynamics. 5. Our predictions suggest that under climate change scenario (i), extraction dominates the fate of the population, while for scenario (ii), an increase in mean drought affects the population's probability of survival in an equivalent magnitude as extractions. Thus, for the

  11. Beaked whales echolocate on prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Madsen, Peter T; Zimmer, Walter M X; de Soto, Natacha Aguilar; Tyack, Peter L

    2004-12-01

    Beaked whales (Cetacea: Ziphiidea) of the genera Ziphius and Mesoplodon are so difficult to study that they are mostly known from strandings. How these elusive toothed whales use and react to sound is of concern because they mass strand during naval sonar exercises. A new non-invasive acoustic ording tag was attached to four beaked whales(two Mesoplodon densirostris and two Ziphius cavirostris) and recorded high-frequency clicks during deep dives. The tagged whales only clicked at depths below 200 m, down to a maximum depth of 1267 m. Both species produced a large number of short, directional, ultrasonic clicks with significant energy below 20 kHz. The tags recorded echoes from prey items; to our knowledge, a first for any animal echolocating in the wild. As far as we are aware, these echoes provide the first direct evidence on how free-ranging toothed whales use echolocation in foraging. The strength of these echoes suggests that the source level of Mesoplodon clicks is in the range of 200-220 dB re 1 microPa at 1 m. This paper presents conclusive data on the normal vocalizations of these beaked whale species, which may enable acoustic monitoring to mitigate exposure to sounds intense enough to harm them.

  12. Predator-prey molecular ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

    2013-01-22

    Biological organisms use intricate networks of chemical reactions to control molecular processes and spatiotemporal organization. In turn, these living systems are embedded in self-organized structures of larger scales, for example, ecosystems. Synthetic in vitro efforts have reproduced the architectures and behaviors of simple cellular circuits. However, because all these systems share the same dynamic foundations, a generalized molecular programming strategy should also support complex collective behaviors, as seen, for example, in animal populations. We report here the bottom-up assembly of chemical systems that reproduce in vitro the specific dynamics of ecological communities. We experimentally observed unprecedented molecular behaviors, including predator-prey oscillations, competition-induced chaos, and symbiotic synchronization. These synthetic systems are tailored through a novel, compact, and versatile design strategy, leveraging the programmability of DNA interactions under the precise control of enzymatic catalysis. Such self-organizing assemblies will foster a better appreciation of the molecular origins of biological complexity and may also serve to orchestrate complex collective operations of molecular agents in technological applications.

  13. Beaked whales echolocate on prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Madsen, Peter T; Zimmer, Walter M X; de Soto, Natacha Aguilar; Tyack, Peter L

    2004-01-01

    Beaked whales (Cetacea: Ziphiidea) of the genera Ziphius and Mesoplodon are so difficult to study that they are mostly known from strandings. How these elusive toothed whales use and react to sound is of concern because they mass strand during naval sonar exercises. A new non-invasive acoustic ording tag was attached to four beaked whales(two Mesoplodon densirostris and two Ziphius cavirostris) and recorded high-frequency clicks during deep dives. The tagged whales only clicked at depths below 200 m, down to a maximum depth of 1267 m. Both species produced a large number of short, directional, ultrasonic clicks with significant energy below 20 kHz. The tags recorded echoes from prey items; to our knowledge, a first for any animal echolocating in the wild. As far as we are aware, these echoes provide the first direct evidence on how free-ranging toothed whales use echolocation in foraging. The strength of these echoes suggests that the source level of Mesoplodon clicks is in the range of 200-220 dB re 1 microPa at 1 m.This paper presents conclusive data on the normal vocalizations of these beaked whale species, which may enable acoustic monitoring to mitigate exposure to sounds intense enough to harm them. PMID:15801582

  14. Size- and density-dependent elution of normal and pathological red blood cells by gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardot, P J; Elgéa, C; Guernet, M; Godet, D; Andreux, J P

    1994-04-01

    Elution of normal and pathological human red blood cells (RBCs) was performed by gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF). The reproducibility of the retention factor was lower than 10% and elution at high and low flow-rates confirmed the existence of "lifting forces". No direct correlation between size and retention was observed for normal RBCs in the absence of density information. Elution of pathological human RBCs, known to be modified in shape, density and rigidity, was performed. The elution parameters confirmed that the retention mechanism of RBCs is at least density dependent but that other factors can be involved, such as shape or deformity. Moreover, peak profile description parameters (standard deviation and asymmetry) can be qualitatively related to some biophysical parameters. Numerous elution characteristics can be linked to cell properties described in the literature and although GFFF appeared to have limited capabilities in terms of size analysis it appeared to be a versatile tool for studying cell biophysical characteristics.

  15. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  16. Effects of Density-Dependent Quark Mass on Phase Diagram of Color-Flavor-Locked Quark Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Considering the density dependence of quark mass, we investigate the phase transition between the (unpaired) strange quark matter and the color-flavor-locked matter, which are supposed to be two candidates for the ground state of strongly interacting matter. We find that if the current mass of strange quark ms is small, the strange quark matter remains stable unless the baryon density is very high. If ms is large, the phase transition from the strange quark matter to the color-flavor-locked matter in particular to its gapless phase is found to be different from the results predicted by previous works. A complicated phase diagram of three-flavor quark matter is presented, in which the color-flavor-locked phase region is suppressed for moderate densities.

  17. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H. [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  18. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  19. Density-dependent interference of aphids with caterpillar-induced defenses in Arabidopsis: involvement of phytohormones and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Anneke; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to attacks by multiple herbivore species at the same time. To cope with these attacks, plants regulate defenses with the production of hormones such as salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). Because herbivore densities are dynamic in time, this may affect plant-mediated interactions between different herbivores attacking at the same time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, feeding by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids interferes with induced defenses against Plutella xylostella caterpillars. This is density dependent: at a low aphid density, the growth rate of P. xylostella was increased, whereas caterpillars feeding on plants colonized by aphids at a high density have a reduced growth rate. Growth of P. xylostella larvae was unaffected on sid2-1 or on dde2-2 mutant plants when feeding simultaneously with a low or high aphid density. This shows that aphid interference with caterpillar-induced defenses requires both SA and JA signal transduction pathways. Transcriptional analysis revealed that simultaneous feeding by caterpillars and aphids at a low density induced the expression of the SA transcription factor gene WRKY70 whereas expression of WRKY70 was lower in plants induced with both caterpillars and a high aphid density. Interestingly, the expression of the JA transcription factor gene MYC2 was significantly higher in plants simultaneously attacked by aphids at a high density and caterpillars. These results indicate that a lower expression level of WRKY70 leads to significantly higher MYC2 expression through SA-JA cross-talk. Thus, plant-mediated interactions between aphids and caterpillars are density dependent and involve phytohormonal cross-talk and differential activation of transcription factors.

  20. Cell density-dependent stimulation of PAI-1 and hyaluronan synthesis by TGF-β in orbital fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgoczi, Erika; Jeney, Florence; Gazdag, Annamaria; Erdei, Annamaria; Katko, Monika; Nagy, Domonkos M; Ujhelyi, Bernadett; Steiber, Zita; Gyory, Ferenc; Berta, Eszter; Nagy, Endre V

    2016-05-01

    During the course of Graves' orbitopathy (GO), orbital fibroblasts are exposed to factors that lead to proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) overproduction. Increased levels of tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 (SERPINE1)) might promote the accumulation of ECM components. PAI-1 expression is regulated by cell density and various cytokines and growth factors including transforming growth factorβ(TGF-β). We examined the effects of increasing cell densities and TGF-β on orbital fibroblasts obtained from GO patients and controls. Responses were evaluated by the measurement of proliferation, PAI-1 expression, and ECM production. There was an inverse correlation between cell density and the per cell production of PAI-1. GO orbital, normal orbital, and dermal fibroblasts behaved similarly in this respect. Proliferation rate also declined with increasing cell densities. Hyaluronan (HA) production was constant throughout the cell densities tested in all cell lines. In both GO and normal orbital fibroblasts, but not in dermal fibroblasts, TGF-β stimulated PAI-1 production in a cell density-dependent manner, reaching up to a five-fold increase above baseline. This has been accompanied by increased HA secretion and pericellular HA levels at high cell densities. Increasing cell density is a negative regulator of proliferation and PAI-1 secretion both in normal and GO orbital fibroblasts; these negative regulatory effects are partially reversed in the presence of TGF-β. Cell density-dependent regulation of PAI-1 expression in the orbit, together with the local cytokine environment, may have a regulatory role in the turnover of the orbital ECM and may contribute to the expansion of orbital soft tissue in GO.

  1. How the Magnitude of Prey Genetic Variation Alters Predator-Prey Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    Evolution can alter the stability and dynamics of ecological communities; for example, prey evolution can drive cyclic dynamics in predator-prey systems that are not possible in the absence of evolution. However, it is unclear how the magnitude of additive genetic variation in the evolving species mediates those effects. In this study, I explore how the magnitude of prey additive genetic variation determines what effects prey evolution has on the dynamics and stability of predator-prey systems. I use linear stability analysis to decompose the stability of a general eco-evolutionary predator-prey model into components representing the stabilities of the ecological and evolutionary subsystems as well as the interactions between those subsystems. My results show that with low genetic variation, the cyclic dynamics and stability of the system are determined by the ecological subsystem. With increased genetic variation, disruptive selection always destabilizes stable communities, stabilizing selection can stabilize or destabilize communities, and prey evolution can alter predator-prey phase lags. Stability changes occur approximately when the magnitude of genetic variation balances the (in)stabilities of the ecological and evolutionary subsystems. I discuss the connections between my stability results and prior results from the theory of adaptive dynamics.

  2. Periodic Solutions of a Delayed Predator-Prey Model with Stage Structure for Prey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Xu; Lan-sun Chen; Fei-long Hao

    2004-01-01

    A periodic predator-prey model with stage structure for prey and time delays due to negative feedbackand gestation of predator is proposed. By using Gaines and Mawhin's continuation theorem of coincidencedegree theory, su.cient conditions are derived for the existence of positive periodic solutions to the proposedmodel. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the feasibility of our main result.

  3. Prey-Predator Model with Two-Stage Infection in Prey: Concerning Pest Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan Kumar Nandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A prey-predator model system is developed; specifically the disease is considered into the prey population. Here the prey population is taken as pest and the predators consume the selected pest. Moreover, we assume that the prey species is infected with a viral disease forming into susceptible and two-stage infected classes, and the early stage of infected prey is more vulnerable to predation by the predator. Also, it is assumed that the later stage of infected pests is not eaten by the predator. Different equilibria of the system are investigated and their stability analysis and Hopf bifurcation of the system around the interior equilibriums are discussed. A modified model has been constructed by considering some alternative source of food for the predator population and the dynamical behavior of the modified model has been investigated. We have demonstrated the analytical results by numerical analysis by taking some simulated set of parameter values.

  4. Prey size spectra and prey availability of larval and small juvenile cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the prey preference characteristics of cod larvae and assess preference variability in relation to species and size composition of copepod prey. A further aim is to examine the hypothesis that dietary prey size spectra remain the same during the larval...... stage when viewed on a relative predator/prey size scale. The study is based on stomach analysis of larval/juvenile cod in the size range 10-35 mm from nursery grounds in the North Sea. Stomach contents (species, size) were compared to environmental composition and preference indices were calculated....... Prey size spectra had the expected relationship to larval cod size, and preference for given copepod species could be ascribed to their relative size; Additional species-specific preferences were evident, for example the larger Pseudocalanus and the larger Calanus spp. were highly preferred. Available...

  5. An impulsive predator-prey model with disease in the prey for integrated pest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruiqing; Chen, Lansun

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, an impulsive predator-prey model with disease in the prey is investigated for the purpose of integrated pest management. In the first part of the main results, we get the sufficient condition for the global stability of the susceptible pest-eradication periodic solution. This means if the release amount of infective prey and predator satisfy the condition, then the pest will be doomed. In the second part of the main results, we also get the sufficient condition for the permanence of the system. This means if the release amount of infective prey and predator satisfy the condition, then the prey and the predator will coexist. In the last section, we interpret our mathematical results. We also point out some possible future work.

  6. A systematic overview of harvesting-induced maturation evolution in predator-prey systems with three different life-history tradeoffs

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that anthropogenic harvesting may cause phenotypic adaptive changes in exploited wild populations, in particular maturation at smaller size and younger age. In this paper, we study the evolutionarily stable size-at- maturation of prey subjected to size-selective harvesting in a simple predator-prey model, taking into account three recognized life-history costs of early maturation, namely reduced fecundity, reduced growth, and increased mortality. Our analysis sh...

  7. Emergent impacts of cannibalism and size refuges in prey on intraguild predation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Armstrong, Joanna

    2008-10-01

    Many organisms undergo ontogenetic niche shifts due to considerable changes in size during their development. These ontogenetic shifts can alter the trophic position of individuals, the type and strength of ecological interactions across species, and allow for cannibalism within species. In this study we ask if and how the interaction of a size refuge and cannibalism in the prey alters the dynamics of intraguild predation (IGP) systems. By manipulating the composition of large cannibalistic (Aeshna umbrosa) and predatory (Anax junius) dragonfly larvae in mesocosms we show that the interaction of cannibals and predators was non-linear and increased the survival of prey. The structure of the final resource community shared by prey and predator differed between small and large dragonfly treatments but not within size classes across species. In general, the small prey stage showed similar shifts in microhabitat use and refuge use when exposed to either conspecific cannibals or predators, while large cannibals showed no clear anti-predator response. However, further behavioral experiments revealed that specific behavioral components, such as distances between individuals or number of movements, differed when individuals were exposed to either cannibals or predators. This indicates that individuals discriminated between conspecific or heterospecific predators. Furthermore, in similar experiments large cannibals and predators showed different behaviors when exposed to conspecifics rather than to each other. These changes in behavior are consistent with the observed increase in prey survival. In general, the results indicate that cannibalism and ontogenetic niche shifts can result in behavior-mediated indirect interactions that reduce the impact of the predator on the mortality of its prey and alter the interactions of IGP systems. However, they also indicate that size is not the sole determinant and that we also need to account for the species identity when predicting the

  8. A non-autonomous stochastic predator-prey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Aniello; Caputo, Luigia; Pirozzi, Enrica; Nobile, Amelia G

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider a non-autonomous predator-prey-like system, with a Gompertz growth law for the prey. By introducing random variations in both prey birth and predator death rates, a stochastic model for the predator-prey-like system in a random environment is proposed and investigated. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is solved to obtain the joint probability density for the prey and predator populations and the marginal probability densities. The asymptotic behavior of the predator-prey stochastic model is also analyzed.

  9. Assessing the impact on birds of prey of nine established wind farms in Thrace, NE Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kret, Elzbieta; Carcamo, Beatriz; Zografou, Christina; Vasilakis, Dimitris

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In this study, we evaluate the impact on birds of prey of nine already established wind farms in Thrace, where a large scale wind farm development project of at least 930 MW is under development. Moreover, the area is acknowledged as of high ornithological interest, used for nesting, wintering and passage by rare territorial birds of prey, including the Near Threatened black vultures that use it for foraging. Finally, ca 50% of the wind farm development project area is covered by Natura 2000 sites. During the monitoring (2008-2010), carcass surveys were carried out in order to estimate mortality. In addition, avian space use surveys were carried out, in order to calculate indexes and to establish comparisons with a previous monitoring study run in 2004-05. In total, 14 birds of prey were found dead (one black vulture, four griffon vultures, one booted eagle, two short-toed eagles, one western marsh harrier, one Eurasian sparrow hawk, three common buzzards, one hawk species). The estimated mortality rate was 0.152 birds of prey (including vultures/turbine/year). Griffon vultures, black vultures and common buzzards comprised more than 50% of observations in the study area. Crossing densities between wind turbines were positively correlated with east exposition and the inclination of the slope, and the length of the wind turbines. gaps, while it was negatively correlated with north exposition. The use of the area was more intensive four years after the initial monitoring, but numbers of common buzzard observations drastically decreased. We suggest that during the planning phase of wind farms it is important to avoid steep slopes, east expositions and to take into account the distance between consecutive wind turbines. Our findings indicate that running a post-construction monitoring during only one year may not be enough to properly assess the impact of wind farms on birds of prey. (Author)

  10. Occupational mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper aims to present the methods and main results from the Danish occupational mortality studies, and to set the Danish studies into the international context of occupational mortality studies. RESEARCH TOPICS: The first Danish occupational mortality study from 1970...

  11. Nonlinear Asymptotic Stability of the Lane-Emden Solutions for the Viscous Gaseous Star Problem with Degenerate Density Dependent Viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Xin, Zhouping; Zeng, Huihui

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear asymptotic stability of Lane-Emden solutions is proved in this paper for spherically symmetric motions of viscous gaseous stars with the density dependent shear and bulk viscosities which vanish at the vacuum, when the adiabatic exponent {γ} lies in the stability regime {(4/3, 2)}, by establishing the global-in-time regularity uniformly up to the vacuum boundary for the vacuum free boundary problem of the compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson systems with spherical symmetry, which ensures the global existence of strong solutions capturing the precise physical behavior that the sound speed is {C^{{1}/{2}}}-Hölder continuous across the vacuum boundary, the large time asymptotic uniform convergence of the evolving vacuum boundary, density and velocity to those of Lane-Emden solutions with detailed convergence rates, and the detailed large time behavior of solutions near the vacuum boundary. Those uniform convergence are of fundamental importance in the study of vacuum free boundary problems which are missing in the previous results for global weak solutions. Moreover, the results obtained in this paper apply to much broader cases of viscosities than those in Fang and Zhang (Arch Ration Mech Anal 191:195-243, 2009) for the theory of weak solutions when the adiabatic exponent {γ} lies in the most physically relevant range. Finally, this paper extends the previous local-in-time theory for strong solutions to a global-in-time one.

  12. Impact of numerical artifact of the forward model in the inverse solution of density-dependent flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohamed K.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the effect of computational error on the inversion of a density-dependent flow and transport model, using SEAWAT and UCODE-2005 in an inverse identification of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity using head and concentration data from a 2-D laboratory experiment. We investigated inversions using three different solution schemes including variation of number of particles and time step length, in terms of the three aspects: the shape and smoothness of the objective function surface, the consequent impacts to the optimization, and the resulting Pareto analyses. This study demonstrates that the inversion is very sensitive to the choice of the forward model solution scheme. In particular, standard finite difference methods provide the smoothest objective function surface; however, this is obtained at the cost of numerical artifacts that can lead to erroneous warping of the objective function surface. Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes limit these impacts at the cost of more computation time, while the hybrid method of characteristics (HMOC) approach with increased particle numbers and/or reduced time step gives both smoothed and accurate objective function surface. Use of the most accurate methods (TVD and HMOC) did lead to successful inversion of the two parameters; however, with distinct results for Pareto analyses. These results illuminate the sensitivity of the inversion to a number of aspects of the forward solution of the density-driven flow problem and reveal that parameter values may result that are erroneous but that counteract numerical errors in the solution.

  13. Density-dependence and within-host competition in a semelparous parasite of leaf-cutting ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Lene

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasite heterogeneity and within-host competition are thought to be important factors influencing the dynamics of host-parasite relationships. Yet, while there have been many theoretical investigations of how these factors may act, empirical data is more limited. We investigated the effects of parasite density and heterogeneity on parasite virulence and fitness using four strains of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae, and its leaf-cutting ant host Acromyrmex echinatior as the model system. Results The relationship between parasite density and infection was sigmoidal, with there being an invasion threshold for an infection to occur (an Allee effect. Although spore production was positively density-dependent, parasite fitness decreased with increasing parasite density, indicating within-host scramble competition. The dynamics differed little between the four strains tested. In mixed infections of three strains the infection-growth dynamics were unaffected by parasite heterogeneity. Conclusions The strength of within-host competition makes dispersal the best strategy for the parasite. Parasite heterogeneity may not have effected virulence or the infection dynamics either because the most virulent strain outcompeted the others, or because the interaction involved scramble competition that was impervious to parasite heterogeneity. The dynamics observed may be common for virulent parasites, such as Metarhizium, that produce aggregated transmission stages. Such parasites make useful models for investigating infection dynamics and the impact of parasite competition.

  14. Cell Density-Dependent Upregulation of PDCD4 in Keratinocytes and Its Implications for Epidermal Homeostasis and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4 is one multi-functional tumor suppressor inhibiting neoplastic transformation and tumor invasion. The role of PDCD4 in tumorigenesis has attracted more attention and has been systematically elucidated in cutaneous tumors. However, the normal biological function of PDCD4 in skin is still unclear. In this study, for the first time, we find that tumor suppressor PDCD4 is uniquely induced in a cell density-dependent manner in keratinocytes. To determine the potential role of PDCD4 in keratinocyte cell biology, we show that knockdown of PDCD4 by siRNAs can promote cell proliferation in lower cell density and partially impair contact inhibition in confluent HaCaT cells, indicating that PDCD4 serves as an important regulator of keratinocytes proliferation and contact inhibition in vitro. Further, knockdown of PDCD4 can induce upregulation of cyclin D1, one key regulator of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the expression patterns of PDCD4 in normal skin, different hair cycles and the process of wound healing are described in detail in vivo, which suggest a steady-state regulatory role of PDCD4 in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. These findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for keratinocytes’ biology and indicate that PDCD4 plays a role in epidermal homeostasis.

  15. Coulomb correlation effects and density dependence of radiative recombination rates in polar AlGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Greg; Rudin, Sergey; Bertazzi, Francesco; Garrett, Gregory; Wraback, Michael

    2013-03-01

    AlGaN narrow quantum wells are important elements of deep-ultraviolet light emitting devices. The electron-hole radiative recombination rates are important characteristics of these nanostructures. In this work we evaluated their dependence on carrier density and lattice temperature and compared our theoretical results with the experimentally determined radiative lifetimes in the c-plane grown AlGaN quantum wells. The bands were determined in the k .p approximation for a strained c-plane wurtzite quantum well and polarization fields were included in the model. In order to account for Coulomb correlations at relatively high densities of photo-excited electron-hole plasma and arbitrary temperature, we employed real-time Green's function formalism with self-energies evaluated in the self-consistent T-matrix approximation. The luminescence spectrum was obtained from the susceptibility by summing over scattering in-plane directions and polarization states. The recombination coefficient was obtained from the integrated photo-luminescence. The density dependence of the radiative recombination rate shows effects of strong screening of the polarization electric field at high photo-excitation density.

  16. Linear-In-The-Parameters Oblique Least Squares (LOLS) Provides More Accurate Estimates of Density-Dependent Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Vasco M. N. C. S.; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Huanel, Oscar R.; Guillemin, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Survival is a fundamental demographic component and the importance of its accurate estimation goes beyond the traditional estimation of life expectancy. The evolutionary stability of isomorphic biphasic life-cycles and the occurrence of its different ploidy phases at uneven abundances are hypothesized to be driven by differences in survival rates between haploids and diploids. We monitored Gracilaria chilensis, a commercially exploited red alga with an isomorphic biphasic life-cycle, having found density-dependent survival with competition and Allee effects. While estimating the linear-in-the-parameters survival function, all model I regression methods (i.e, vertical least squares) provided biased line-fits rendering them inappropriate for studies about ecology, evolution or population management. Hence, we developed an iterative two-step non-linear model II regression (i.e, oblique least squares), which provided improved line-fits and estimates of survival function parameters, while robust to the data aspects that usually turn the regression methods numerically unstable. PMID:27936048

  17. Constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the multiplicity and average $p_T$ ratios of charged pions

    CERN Document Server

    Cozma, M D

    2016-01-01

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions, a probe of the density dependence of symmetry energy above the saturation point, has been proven in a previous study to be extremely sensitive to the strength of the isovector $\\Delta$(1232) potential in nuclear matter. As there is no current knowledge, either from theory or experiment, about the magnitude of this quantity, the extraction of constraints for the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation by using exclusively the mentioned observable is hindered at present. It is shown that, by including the ratio of average $p_T$ of charged pions $\\langle p_T^{(\\pi^+)}\\rangle/\\langle p_T^{(\\pi^-)}\\rangle$ in the list of fitted observables, the noted problem can be circumvented. A realistic description of this observable requires the accounting for the interaction of pions with the dense nuclear matter environment by the incorporation of the so called S-wave and P-wave pion optical potentials. This is performed within the framework...

  18. Wild North Island Robins (Petroica longipes respond to Prey Animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Garland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available North Island robins of New Zealand are a food hoarding species, which is unique in that they almost exclusively cache highly perishable hunted insects for later retrieval. In order to do so, they either kill and dismember or paralyze their prey for caching, depending on the prey size and kind. The present study comprises two experiments, using a Violation of Expectancy (VoE paradigm to examine variation in search behavior response to different prey conditions. The first experiment presents three different types of prey (mealworms, earthworms and locusts in expected (present and unexpected (absent conditions. The second experiment presents prey in varying states of animacy (alive and whole, dead and whole, dead and halved, and an inanimate stick and reveals prey in expected (same state or unexpected (differing state conditions. While robins did not respond with differential search times to different types of unexpectedly missing prey in Experiment 1, in Experiment 2 robins searched longer in conditions where prey was found in a differing state of animacy than initially shown. Robins also searched longer for prey when immediately consuming retrieved prey than when caching retrieved prey. Results indicate that North Island robins may be sensitive to prey animacy upon storage and retrieval of insect prey; such information could play a role in storage, pilfering and retrieval strategies of such a perishable food source.

  19. Predator-prey encounters in turbulent waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Ott, Søren; Pécseli, H.L.;

    2002-01-01

    With reference to studies of predator-prey encounters in turbulent waters, we demonstrate the feasibility of an experimental method for investigations of particle fluxes to an absorbing surface in turbulent flows. A laboratory experiment is carried out, where an approximately homogeneous and isot......With reference to studies of predator-prey encounters in turbulent waters, we demonstrate the feasibility of an experimental method for investigations of particle fluxes to an absorbing surface in turbulent flows. A laboratory experiment is carried out, where an approximately homogeneous...

  20. Human activity helps prey win the predator-prey space race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhly, Tyler B; Semeniuk, Christina; Massolo, Alessandro; Hickman, Laura; Musiani, Marco

    2011-03-02

    Predator-prey interactions, including between large mammalian wildlife species, can be represented as a "space race", where prey try to minimize and predators maximize spatial overlap. Human activity can also influence the distribution of wildlife species. In particular, high-human disturbance can displace large carnivore predators, a trait-mediated direct effect. Predator displacement by humans could then indirectly benefit prey species by reducing predation risk, a trait-mediated indirect effect of humans that spatially decouples predators from prey. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that high-human activity was displacing predators and thus indirectly creating spatial refuge for prey species, helping prey win the "space race". We measured the occurrence of eleven large mammal species (including humans and cattle) at 43 camera traps deployed on roads and trails in southwest Alberta, Canada. We tested species co-occurrence at camera sites using hierarchical cluster and nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) analyses; and tested whether human activity, food and/or habitat influenced predator and prey species counts at camera sites using regression tree analysis. Cluster and NMS analysis indicated that at camera sites humans co-occurred with prey species more than predator species and predator species had relatively low co-occurrence with prey species. Regression tree analysis indicated that prey species were three times more abundant on roads and trails with >32 humans/day. However, predators were less abundant on roads and trails that exceeded 18 humans/day. Our results support the hypothesis that high-human activity displaced predators but not prey species, creating spatial refuge from predation. High-human activity on roads and trails (i.e., >18 humans/day) has the potential to interfere with predator-prey interactions via trait-mediated direct and indirect effects. We urge scientist and managers to carefully consider and quantify the

  1. Feeding, prey selection and prey encounter mechanisms in the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Titelman, J.

    1998-01-01

    by modeling N.scintillans both as a spherical and as a cylindrical collector. The latter model assumes that prey particles are collected on the string of mucus that may form at the tip of the tentacle. Feeding, growth and prey selection experiments all demonstrated that diatoms are cleared at substantially...... and that the high ascent velocity accounts for encounters with prey. However, the flow field around the cell-mucus complex is too complicated to be described accurately by simple geometric models. Fluid shear (0.7-1.8 s(-1)) had a negative impact on feeding rates, which were much less than predicted by models...

  2. Stability and Hopf bifurcation in a diffusive predator-prey system incorporating a prey refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaoyuan; Wei, Junjie

    2013-08-01

    A diffusive predator-prey model with Holling type II functional response and the no-flux boundary condition incorporating a constant prey refuge is considered. Globally asymptotically stability of the positive equilibrium is obtained. Regarding the constant number of prey refuge m as a bifurcation parameter, by analyzing the distribution of the eigenvalues, the existence of Hopf bifurcation is given. Employing the center manifold theory and normal form method, an algorithm for determining the properties of the Hopf bifurcation is derived. Some numerical simulations for illustrating the analysis results are carried out.

  3. Human activity helps prey win the predator-prey space race.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler B Muhly

    Full Text Available Predator-prey interactions, including between large mammalian wildlife species, can be represented as a "space race", where prey try to minimize and predators maximize spatial overlap. Human activity can also influence the distribution of wildlife species. In particular, high-human disturbance can displace large carnivore predators, a trait-mediated direct effect. Predator displacement by humans could then indirectly benefit prey species by reducing predation risk, a trait-mediated indirect effect of humans that spatially decouples predators from prey. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that high-human activity was displacing predators and thus indirectly creating spatial refuge for prey species, helping prey win the "space race". We measured the occurrence of eleven large mammal species (including humans and cattle at 43 camera traps deployed on roads and trails in southwest Alberta, Canada. We tested species co-occurrence at camera sites using hierarchical cluster and nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS analyses; and tested whether human activity, food and/or habitat influenced predator and prey species counts at camera sites using regression tree analysis. Cluster and NMS analysis indicated that at camera sites humans co-occurred with prey species more than predator species and predator species had relatively low co-occurrence with prey species. Regression tree analysis indicated that prey species were three times more abundant on roads and trails with >32 humans/day. However, predators were less abundant on roads and trails that exceeded 18 humans/day. Our results support the hypothesis that high-human activity displaced predators but not prey species, creating spatial refuge from predation. High-human activity on roads and trails (i.e., >18 humans/day has the potential to interfere with predator-prey interactions via trait-mediated direct and indirect effects. We urge scientist and managers to carefully consider and

  4. Plant density-dependent variations in bioactive markers and root yield in Australian-grown Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Guang; Sheng, Shu Jun; Pang, Edwin C K; May, Brian; Xue, Charlie Chang Li

    2011-04-01

    The plant density-dependent variations in the root yield and content, and the yield of biomarkers in Australian grown Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, a commonly used Chinese medicinal herb for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, were investigated in a field trial involving six different plant densities. The key biomarker compounds cryptotanshinone, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, and salvianolic acid B were quantified by a validated RP-HPLC method, and the root yields were determined per plant pair or unit area. There were significant variations (pplant densities. Positive linear correlations were observed between the contents of the three tanshinones, whereas negative linear correlations were revealed between the contents of the tanshinones and salvianolic acid B. The highest root yield per plant pair was achieved when the plants were grown at 45×30 cm or 45×40 cm, whereas the highest root production par unit area was obtained for a plant density of 30×30 cm. The highest contents of the three tanshinones and the most abundant production of these tanshinones per unit area were achieved when the plants were grown at 30×30 cm. However, the highest content of salvianolic acid B was found for a density of 45×40 cm, while its highest yield per unit area was obtained for densities of 30×40 cm or 45×30 cm. The findings suggest that the plant density distinctly affects the root yield and content and the yield of tanshinones and salvianolic acid B in Australian grown S. miltiorrhiza, which may be used as a guide for developing optimal agricultural procedures for cultivating this herb.

  5. Constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the multiplicity and average pT ratios of charged pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozma, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, a probe of the density dependence of symmetry energy above the saturation point, has been proven in a previous study to be extremely sensitive to the strength of the isovector Δ (1232 ) potential in nuclear matter. As there is no knowledge, either from theory or experiment, about the magnitude of this quantity, the extraction of constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation by using exclusively the mentioned observable is hindered at present. It is shown that, by including the ratio of average pT of charged pions / in the list of fitted observables, the noted problem can be circumvented. A realistic description of this observable requires accounting for the interaction of pions with the dense nuclear matter environment by the incorporation of the so-called S -wave and P -wave pion optical potentials. This is performed within the framework of a quantum molecular dynamics transport model that enforces the conservation of the total energy of the system. It is shown that constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density and the strength of the Δ (1232) potential can be simultaneously extracted. A symmetry energy with a value of the slope parameter L >50 MeV is favored, at 1 σ confidence level, from a comparison with published FOPI experimental data. A precise constraint will require experimental data more accurate than presently available, particularly for the charged pion multiplicity ratio, and better knowledge of the density and momentum dependence of the pion potential for the whole range of these two variables probed in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Impact of the aspects of forward model solution schemes in the inverse solution of density dependent flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, M.; Ginn, T.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the computational error on the solution of the inverse problem connecting with density-dependent flow problem. This effect will be addressed by evaluating the uniqueness of the inverse via monitoring objective function surface behavior in two dimensions parameter space, hydraulic conductivity and longitudinal dispersivity. In addition, the Pareto surface will be generated to evaluate the trade-offs between two calibration objectives based on head and concentration measurement errors. This is conducted by changing the aspects of forward model solution scheme, Eulerian and Lagrangian methods with associated variables. The data used for this study is based on the lab study of Nassar et al (2008). The seepage tank is essentially 2D (in an x-z vertical plane) with relatively homogenous coarse sand media with assigned flux in the upstream and constant head or assigned flux boundary condition at the downstream. The forward model solution is conducted with SEAWAT and it is utilized jointly with the inverse code UCODE-2005. This study demonstrates that the choice of the different numerical scheme with associated aspects of the forward problem is a vital step in the solution of the inverse problem in indirect manner. The method of characteristics gives good results by increasing the initial particles numbers and/ or reducing the time step. The advantage of using more particles concept over decreasing the time step is in smoothing the objective function surface that enable the gradient based search technique works in efficient way. Also, the selected points on the Pareto surface is collapsed to two points on the objective function space. Most likely they are not collapsed to a single point in objective function space with one best parameter set because the problem is advection dominating problem.

  7. Density dependence of hydrogen bonding and the translational-orientational structural order in supercritical water: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo; Ma, Jing

    2011-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulation have been performed with a wide range of densities along a near critical isotherm of supercritical water (SCW) in order to study the density dependence of the structure order and hydrogen bonding (HB). It is revealed that the translational structure order is nearly invariant while the orientational tetrahedral structure order is very sensitive to the bulk density under supercritical conditions. Meanwhile, some energetically unfavorable intermediate water dimer structures are found to appear under supercritical conditions due to the reduced energy difference and the enhanced energy fluctuation. As a consequence, a general geometrical criterion or the inclusion of a energy-based criterion instead of currently widely adopted pure r(OH)-based geometric criterion is suggested to be used in the HB statistics under supercritical conditions. It is found that the average HB number per H(2)O molecule (n(HB)) reduces with the decreasing SCW bulk density although a given pair of H(2)O molecules are shown to have a stronger ability to form a hydrogen bond under lower SCW bulk densities. Accordingly, the orientational tetrahedral structure order q decreases with the reducing bulk density under supercritical conditions. However, when the fluid is dilute with ρ ≤ 0.19ρ(c) (ρ(c) = 0.322 g/cm(3)), the energy fluctuation increases sharply and the short-range order is destroyed, signifying the supercritical fluid (SCF)-gas state transition. Accordingly, the orientational tetrahedral structure order q gets reversal around ρ = 0.19ρ(c) and approaches zero under very dilute conditions. The sensitivity of the orientational order to the density implies the microscopic origin of the significant dependence of SCF's physicochemical properties on the pressure.

  8. Optimum prey capture techniques in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.L.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis hydrodynamic principles are used to quantify relations between form and function in the prey capture mechanism of actinopterygian fish. This work is closely related to the papers on the hydrodynamics of fish feeding by Muller et al. (1982) and Muller & Osse (in press).

  9. Predators, prey, and natural disasters attract ecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlot, C

    1993-08-27

    Some 2200 ecologists turned out for the 78th annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America (ESA), held in Madison, Wisconsin, 31 July to 4 August. Among the offerings: reports on the effect of dams and levees on large river ecology, predator-prey interactions, how parasites might control evolution, and the impact of clearcutting on soil organisms.

  10. Motor control: how dragonflies catch their prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Michael H

    2015-03-16

    Detailed measurements of head and body motion have revealed previously unknown complexity in the predatory behavior of dragonflies. The new evidence suggests that the brains of these agile predators compute internal models of their own actions and those of their prey.

  11. SRKW summer prey - Prey species and stock specific consumption estimates for SRKW in their summer range

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) are listed as a Distinct Population Segment under the Endangered Species Act. Data concerning their prey species and stock...

  12. Killer whale prey - Determining prey selection by southern resident killer whales (SRKW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prey selectivity by southern resident killer whales is being determined by analyses of fish scales and tissue from predation events and feces. Information on killer...

  13. Prey perception in feeding-current feeding copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Goncalves, Rodrigo J.; Florian Couespel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    We reply to the comments of Paffenhöfer and Jiang () who argues that remote chemical prey perception is necessary for feeding-current feeding copepods to fulfill their nutritional requirements in a dilute ocean, that remote chemical prey detection may only be observed at very low prey concentrati...

  14. Coexistence Steady States in a Predator-Prey Model

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    An age-structured predator-prey system with diffusion and Holling-Tanner-type nonlinearities is considered. Regarding the intensity of the fertility of the predator as bifurcation parameter, we prove that a branch of positive coexistence steady states bifurcates from the marginal steady state with no prey. A similar result is obtained when the fertility of the prey varies.

  15. Harvesting and Conversation in a Predator-Prey System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jeljer; Bergh, van den Jeroen C.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Optimal harvesting of prey in a predator-prey ecosystem is studiedunder the condition that the existence of the predator has value. Predators (birds) and humans (fishers) compete for prey (shellfish). The behavior of the system is studied and conditions for optimal control are deduced. Various optim

  16. The functional response to prey density in an acarine system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, H.G.

    1974-01-01

    Predacious mites are considered to be important natural enemies of phytophagous mites. Their efficiency in the natural control of prey populations depends on the relationships of the number of prey killed per predator per time unit and the oviposition rate on the one hand and prey density on the

  17. Analysis of a Periodic Impulsive Predator-Prey System with Disease in the Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianwen Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a periodic predator-prey system subject to impulsive perturbations, in which a disease can be transmitted among the prey species only, in this paper. With the help of the theory of impulsive differential equations and Lyapunov functional method, sufficient conditions for the permanence, global attractivity, and partial extinction of system are established, respectively. It is shown that impulsive perturbations contribute to the above dynamics of the system. Numerical simulations are presented to substantiate the analytical results.

  18. The influence of intraguild predation on prey suppression and prey release: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance-Chalcraft, Heather D; Rosenheim, Jay A; Vonesh, James R; Osenberg, Craig W; Sih, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    Intraguild predation (IGP) occurs when one predator species consumes another predator species with whom it also competes for shared prey. One question of interest to ecologists is whether multiple predator species suppress prey populations more than a single predator species, and whether this result varies with the presence of IGP. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine this question, and others, regarding the effects of IGP on prey suppression. When predators can potentially consume one another (mutual IGP), prey suppression is greater in the presence of one predator species than in the presence of multiple predator species; however, this result was not found for assemblages with unidirectional or no IGP. With unidirectional IGP, intermediate predators were generally more effective than the top predator at suppressing the shared prey, in agreement with IGP theory. Adding a top predator to an assemblage generally caused prey to be released from predation, while adding an intermediate predator caused prey populations to be suppressed. However, the effects of adding a top or intermediate predator depended on the effectiveness of these predators when they were alone. Effects of IGP varied across different ecosystems (e.g., lentic, lotic, marine, terrestrial invertebrate, and terrestrial vertebrate), with the strongest patterns being driven by terrestrial invertebrates. Finally, although IGP theory is based on equilibrium conditions, data from short-term experiments can inform us about systems that are dominated by transient dynamics. Moreover, short-term experiments may be connected in some way to equilibrium models if the predator and prey densities used in experiments approximate the equilibrium densities in nature.

  19. Alterations in prey capture and induction of metallothioneins in grass shrimp fed cadmium-contaminated prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.G.; Hoexum Brouwer, T.M.; Brouwer, M.; Lopez, G.R.

    2000-04-01

    The aquatic oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri from a Cd-contaminated cove on the Hudson River, Foundry Cove, New York, USA, has evolved Cd resistance. Past studies have focused on how the mode of detoxification of Cd by these Cd-resistant worms influences Cd trophic transfer to the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. In the present study, the authors investigate reductions in prey capture in grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated prey. They also investigate the induction of metal-binding proteins, metallothioneins, in these Cd-exposed shrimp. Grass shrimp were fed field-exposed Cd-contaminated Foundry Cove oligochaetes or laboratory-exposed Cd-contaminated Artemia salina. Following these exposures, the ability of Cd- dosed and control shrimp to capture live A. salina was compared. Results show that shrimp fed laboratory-exposed Cd-contaminated A. salina for 2 weeks exhibit significant reductions in their ability to successfully capture prey (live A. salina). Reductions in prey capture were also apparent, though not as dramatic in shrimp fed for 1 week on field-exposed Cd-contained Foundry Cove oligochaetes. Shrimp were further investigated for their subcellular distribution of Cd to examine if alterations in prey capture could be linked to saturation of Cd-metallothionein. Cd-dosed shrimp produced a low molecular weight CD-binding metallothionein protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Most importantly, successful prey capture decreased with increased Cd body burdens and increased Cd concentration bound to high molecular weight proteins.

  20. Prey carriage varies with prey size in Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Nalepa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Exploitation of the hunting behavior of the solitary wasp Cerceris fumipennis is proving to be a useful method for detecting pest Buprestidae as well as for documenting buprestid diversity in eastern North America. Here we review prey carriage mechanisms in the species, and conclude that variation in prey carriage is correlated with the spectacular size range of their buprestid prey (4.9–22.3 mm length. Small prey items, including Agrilus species, are transported with the aid of a specialized morphological structure on the fifth metasomal sternite (“buprestid clamp”, resulting in a distinct curved posture during flight. Analysis of prey items from C. fumipennis in North Carolina in 2014 indicates that 30% of collected Agrilus spp. were not paralyzed prior to wasp arrival at the nest, and suggests that the buprestid clamp may function to prevent the escape of active small prey. Recognition that the curved flight posture of a female approaching her nest is a signal that she may be carrying a beetle in the genus Agrilus can improve efficiency of biosurveillance for pest Buprestidae.

  1. PERMANENCE OF A NONLINEAR PERIODIC PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM WITH PREY DISPERSAL AND PREDATOR DENSITY-INDEPENDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Chen; Junyan Xu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,a set of sufficient conditions which ensure the permanence of a nonlinear periodic predator-prey system with prey dispersal and predator density-independence are obtained,where the prey species can disperse among n patches,while the density-independent predator is confined to one of the patches and cannot disperse. Our results generalize some known results.

  2. Bifurcation and Limit Cycle of a Ratio-dependent Predator-prey System with Refuge on Prey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-wei; LIU Xia

    2013-01-01

    Influences of prey refuge on the dynamics of a predator-prey model with ratiodependent functional response are investigated.The local and global stability of positive equilibrium of the system are considered.Theoretical analysis indicates that constant refuge leads to the system undergo supercritical Hopf bifurcation twice with the birth rate of prey species changing continuously.

  3. PERMANENCE OF A NONLINEAR PERIODIC PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM WITH PREY DISPERSAL AND PREDATOR DENSITY-INDEPENDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,a set of suffcient conditions which ensure the permanence of a nonlinear periodic predator-prey system with prey dispersal and predator density-independence are obtained,where the prey species can disperse among n patches,while the density-independent predator is confined to one of the patches and cannot disperse. Our results generalize some known results.

  4. Population dynamics models based on cumulative density dependent feedback: A link to the logistic growth curve and a test for symmetry using aphid data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matis, J.H.; Kiffe, T.R.; Werf, van der W.; Costamagna, A.C.; Matis, T.I.; Grant, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Density dependent feedback, based on cumulative population size, has been advocated to explain and mathematically characterize “boom and bust” population dynamics. Such feedback results in a bell-shaped population trajectory of the population density. Here, we note that this trajectory is mathematic

  5. Analytic form for a nonlocal kinetic energy functional with a density-dependent kernel for orbital-free density functional theory under periodic and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gregory S.; Lignères, Vincent L.; Carter, Emily A.

    2008-07-01

    We derive an analytic form of the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC) [Wang , Phys. Rev. B 60, 16350 (1999)] kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) with the density-dependent response kernel. A real-space aperiodic implementation of the WGC KEDF is then described and used in linear scaling orbital-free density functional theory (OF-DFT) calculations.

  6. A Peak in Density Dependence of Electron Spin Relaxation Time in n-Type Bulk GaAs in the Metallic Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ka

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the peak in the density dependence of electron spin relaxation time in n-type bulk GaAs in the metallic regime predicted by Jiang and Wu[Phys.Rev.B 79 (2009) 125206]has been realized experimentally in the latest work[arXiv:0902.0270]by Krauβ et al.

  7. Predator personality and prey behavioural predictability jointly determine foraging performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-chen; Teo, Huey Yee; Norma-Rashid, Y.; Li, Daiqin

    2017-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions play important roles in ecological communities. Personality, consistent inter-individual differences in behaviour, of predators, prey or both are known to influence inter-specific interactions. An individual may also behave differently under the same situation and the level of such variability may differ between individuals. Such intra-individual variability (IIV) or predictability may be a trait on which selection can also act. A few studies have revealed the joint effect of personality types of both predators and prey on predator foraging performance. However, how personality type and IIV of both predators and prey jointly influence predator foraging performance remains untested empirically. Here, we addressed this using a specialized spider-eating jumping spider, Portia labiata (Salticidae), as the predator, and a jumping spider, Cosmophasis umbratica, as the prey. We examined personality types and IIVs of both P. labiata and C. umbratica and used their inter- and intra-individual behavioural variation as predictors of foraging performance (i.e., number of attempts to capture prey). Personality type and predictability had a joint effect on predator foraging performance. Aggressive predators performed better in capturing unpredictable (high IIV) prey than predictable (low IIV) prey, while docile predators demonstrated better performance when encountering predictable prey. This study highlights the importance of the joint effect of both predator and prey personality types and IIVs on predator-prey interactions. PMID:28094288

  8. Effects of uniform rotational flow on predator-prey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2012-12-01

    Rotational flow is often observed in lotic ecosystems, such as streams and rivers. For example, when an obstacle interrupts water flowing in a stream, energy dissipation and momentum transfer can result in the formation of rotational flow, or a vortex. In this study, I examined how rotational flow affects a predator-prey system by constructing a spatially explicit lattice model consisting of predators, prey, and plants. A predation relationship existed between the species. The species densities in the model were given as S (for predator), P (for prey), and G (for plant). A predator (prey) had a probability of giving birth to an offspring when it ate prey (plant). When a predator or prey was first introduced, or born, its health state was assigned an initial value of 20 that subsequently decreased by one with every time step. The predator (prey) was removed from the system when the health state decreased to less than zero. The degree of flow rotation was characterized by the variable, R. A higher R indicates a higher tendency that predators and prey move along circular paths. Plants were not affected by the flow because they were assumed to be attached to the streambed. Results showed that R positively affected both predator and prey survival, while its effect on plants was negligible. Flow rotation facilitated disturbances in individuals’ movements, which consequently strengthens the predator and prey relationship and prevents death from starvation. An increase in S accelerated the extinction of predators and prey.

  9. Antipredator responses by native mosquitofish to non-native cichlids: An examination of the role of prey naiveté

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehage, Jennifer S.; Dunlop, Katherine L.; Loftus, William F.

    2009-01-01

    The strong impact of non-native predators in aquatic systems is thought to relate to the evolutionary naiveté of prey. Due to isolation and limited dispersal, this naiveté may be relatively high in freshwater systems. In this study, we tested this notion by examining the antipredator response of native mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, to two non-native predators found in the Everglades, the African jewelfish,Hemichromis letourneuxi, and the Mayan cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus. We manipulated prey naiveté by using two mosquitofish populations that varied in their experience with the recent invader, the African jewelfish, but had similar levels of experience with the longer-established Mayan cichlid. Specifically, we tested these predictions: (1) predator hunting modes differed between the two predators, (2) predation rates would be higher by the novel jewelfish predator, (3) particularly on the naive population living where jewelfish have not invaded yet, (4) antipredator responses would be stronger to Mayan cichlids due to greater experience and weaker and/or ineffective to jewelfish, and (5) especially weakest by the naive population. We assayed prey and predator behavior, and prey mortality in lab aquaria where both predators and prey were free-ranging. Predator hunting modes and habitat domains differed, with jewelfish being more active search predators that used slightly higher parts of the water column and less of the habitat structure relative to Mayan cichlids. In disagreement with our predictions, predation rates were similar between the two predators, antipredator responses were stronger to African jewelfish (except for predator inspections), and there was no difference in response between jewelfish-savvy and jewelfish-naive populations. These results suggest that despite the novelty of introduced predators, prey may be able to respond appropriately if non-native predator archetypes are similar enough to those of native predators, if prey rely

  10. A focus on long-run sustainability of a harvested prey predator system in the presence of alternative prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, T K; Chattopadhyay, S K

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of a general equilibrium model we study the long-run dynamics of a prey-predator model in the presence of an alternative prey. Our results show that sustainability, i.e. a positive value of the population in the long run, essentially depends on individual harvesting efforts and digesting factors relative to alternative prey. A detailed bifurcation analysis evidences the richness of possible long-run dynamics. Our model clearly shows that the role of an alternative prey must be taken into consideration when studying prey-predator dynamics.

  11. Modeling prey consumption by native and non-native piscivorous fishes: implications for competition and impacts on shared prey in an ultraoligotrophic lake in Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncos, Romina; Beauchamp, David A.; Viglianoc, Pablo H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined trophic interactions of the nonnative salmonids Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalisand the main native predator Creole Perch Percichthys trucha in Lake Nahuel Huapi (Patagonia, Argentina) to determine the relative impact of each predator on their forage base and to evaluate the potential vulnerability of each predator to competitive impacts by the others. Using bioenergetics simulations, we demonstrated the overall importance of galaxiids and decapods to the energy budgets of nonnative salmonids and Creole Perch. Introduced salmonids, especially Rainbow Trout, exerted considerably heavier predatory demands on shared resources than did the native Creole Perch on both a per capita basis and in terms of relative population impacts. Rainbow Trout consumed higher quantities and a wider size range of Small Puyen (also known as Inanga) Galaxias maculatus than the other predators, including early pelagic life stages of that prey; as such, this represents an additional source of mortality for the vulnerable early life stages of Small Puyen before and during their transition from pelagic to benthic habitats. All predators were generally feeding at high feeding rates (above 40% of their maximum physiological rates), suggesting that competition for prey does not currently limit either Creole Perch or the salmonids in this lake. This study highlights the importance of keystone prey for the coexistence of native species with nonnative top predators. It provides new quantitative and qualitative evidence of the high predation pressure exerted on Small Puyen, the keystone prey species, during the larval to juvenile transition from pelagic to littoral-benthic habitat in Patagonian lakes. This study also emphasizes the importance of monitoring salmonid and Creole Perch population dynamics in order to detect signs of potential impacts through competition and shows the need to carefully consider the rationale

  12. Diet of Chinese skink, Eumeces chinensis: is prey size important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Jiang, Yong

    2006-06-01

    The diet of the skink, Eumeces chinensis (Lacertilia: Scincidae), in Xiamen (Amoy), China was examined using stomach analysis during April and May, and its selection of prey size was tested by feeding trials. Insects (primarily Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera), gastropods and arachnids constituted most of the E. chinensis diet, but earthworms, leeches, crustaceans and fish were also consumed. In the field, male skinks ate more prey items that were 11-20 mm in length than other size classes. When presented with a choice of different-sized prey in the laboratory, male E. chinensis exhibited a strong preference for prey items 11-20 mm in length over other size classes. The relationship between prey size and handling time was exponential, indicating that there is an upper limit to the ability of E. chinensis to process prey. Mean energy intake for handling different-sized prey showed that selection of midsizeclass prey items would provide male E. chinensis with the most energy-efficient prey option. These results indicate that prey size selection in E. chinensis favors maximization of rates of energy intake, which is in agreement with optimal foraging theory.

  13. Dynamics of a Delayed Predator-prey System with Stage Structure for Predator and Prey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Juan; Zhang Zi-zhen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a predator-prey system with two discrete delays and stage structure for both the predator and the prey is investigated. The dynamical be-haviors such as local stability and local Hopf bifurcation are analyzed by regarding the possible combinations of the two delays as bifurcating parameter. Some explicit formulae determining the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions are derived by using the normal form method and the center manifold theory. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to support the theoretical analysis.

  14. Patterns of prey capture and prey availability among populations of the carnivorous plant Pinguicula moranensis (Lentibulariaceae) along an environmental gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, Raúl E; Domínguez, César A

    2003-09-01

    In this study we explored the effect of the physical environment and the availability of prey (biomass and taxonomic composition) on the patterns of prey capture and reproduction on five populations of Pinguicula moranensis (Lentibulariaceae) in areas ranging from pine-oak forests to desert scrublands. Environmental variation was summarized using principal factor analysis. Prey availability and prey capture increased toward the shadiest, most humid, and fertile population. The probability of reproduction and average bud production per population did not follow the same tendency because both fitness components peaked at the middle of the environmental gradient. These results suggest that the benefits derived from carnivory are maximized at sites fulfilling a trade-off between light, moisture, and prey availability. We also found that the taxonomic composition of both the available prey and that of the prey captured by plants varied among populations. The results also indicated that the prey captured by plants are not a random sample of prey available within populations. Overall, the results from this study revealed a marked amount of heterogeneity in the physical and biotic environment among the populations of P. moranensis, which has the potential to affect the outcome of the interaction between this carnivorous species and its prey.

  15. A single predator charging a herd of prey: effects of self volume and predator-prey decision-making

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarzl, M; Oshanin, G; Metzler, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the degree of success of a single predator hunting a herd of prey on a two dimensional square lattice landscape. We explicitly consider the self volume of the prey restraining their dynamics on the lattice. The movement of both predator and prey is chosen to include an intelligent, decision making step based on their respective sighting ranges, the radius in which they can detect the other species (prey cannot recognise each other besides the self volume interaction): after spotting each other the motion of prey and predator turns from a nearest neighbour random walk into direct escape or chase, respectively. We consider a large range of prey densities and sighting ranges and compute the mean first passage time for a predator to catch a prey as well as characterise the effective dynamics of the hunted prey. We find that the prey's sighting range dominates their life expectancy and the predator profits more from a bad eyesight of the prey than from his own good eye sight. We characterise the dynamics ...

  16. Spatial aspects of tree mortality strongly differ between young and old-growth forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Andrew J; Lutz, James A; Donato, Daniel C; Freund, James A; Swanson, Mark E; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Sprugel, Douglas G; Franklin, Jerry F

    2015-11-01

    Rates and spatial patterns of tree mortality are predicted to change during forest structural development. In young forests, mortality should be primarily density dependent due to competition for light, leading to an increasingly spatially uniform pattern of surviving trees. In contrast, mortality in old-growth forests should be primarily caused by contagious and spatially autocorrelated agents (e.g., insects, wind), causing spatial aggregation of surviving trees to increase through time. We tested these predictions by contrasting a three-decade record of tree mortality from replicated mapped permanent plots located in young ( 300-year-old) Abies amabilis forests. Trees in young forests died at a rate of 4.42% per year, whereas trees in old-growth forests died at 0.60% per year. Tree mortality in young forests was significantly aggregated, strongly density dependent, and caused live tree patterns to become more uniform through time. Mortality in old-growth forests was spatially aggregated, but was density independent and did not change the spatial pattern of surviving trees. These results extend current theory by demonstrating that density-dependent competitive mortality leading to increasingly uniform tree spacing in young forests ultimately transitions late in succession to a more diverse tree mortality regime that maintains spatial heterogeneity through time.

  17. Density Dependence of the Mass and Decay Constant of Pion in Nuclear Matter in the Dyson-Schwinger Equation Approach of QCD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu-Xin; CHAO Jing-Yi; CHANG Lei; YUAN Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ With the Dyson-Schwinger equation formalism at finite chemical potential, we study the density dependence of the mass and decay constant of pion in nuclear matter. The calculated results indicate that both the mass and the decay constant remain almost constant at small chemical potential. As the chemical potential gets quite large, the decay constant increases and the mass decreases with the increasing of the chemical potential, and both of them vanish suddenly as a critical value is reached.

  18. Density-dependent sex ratio adjustment and the allee effect: a model and a test using a sex-changing fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stefan P W; Thibaut, Loïc; McCormick, Mark I

    2010-09-01

    Positive density dependence (i.e., the Allee effect; AE) often has important implications for the dynamics and conservation of populations. Here, we show that density-dependent sex ratio adjustment in response to sexual selection may be a common AE mechanism. Specifically, using an analytical model we show that an AE is expected whenever one sex is more fecund than the other and sex ratio bias toward the less fecund sex increases with density. We illustrate the robustness of this pattern, using Monte Carlo simulations, against a range of body size-fecundity relationships and sex-allocation strategies. Finally, we test the model using the sex-changing polygynous reef fish Parapercis cylindrica; positive density dependence in the strength of sexual selection for male size is evidenced as the causal mechanism driving local sex ratio adjustment, hence the AE. Model application may extend to invertebrates, reptiles, birds, and mammals, in addition to over 70 reef fishes. We suggest that protected areas may often outperform harvest quotas as a conservation tool since the latter promotes population fragmentation, reduced polygyny, a balancing of the sex ratio, and hence up to a 50% decline in per capita fecundity, while the former maximizes polygyny and source-sink potential.

  19. Prey selectivity affects reproductive success of a corallivorous reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rohan M; Jones, Geoffrey P; Munday, Philip L

    2013-06-01

    Most animals consume a narrower range of food resources than is potentially available in the environment, but the underlying basis for these preferences is often poorly understood. Foraging theory predicts that prey selection should represent a trade-off between prey preferences based on nutritional value and prey availability. That is, species should consume preferred prey when available, but select less preferred prey when preferred prey is rare. We employed both field observation and laboratory experiments to examine the relationship between prey selection and preferences in the obligate coral-feeding filefish, Oxymonacanthus longirostris. To determine the drivers of prey selection, we experimentally established prey preferences in choice arenas and tested the consequences of prey preferences for key fitness-related parameters. Field studies showed that individuals fed almost exclusively on live corals from the genus Acropora. While diet was dominated by the most abundant species, Acropora nobilis, fish appeared to preferentially select rarer acroporids, such as A. millepora and A. hyacinthus. Prey choice experiments confirmed strong preferences for these corals, suggesting that field consumption is constrained by availability. In a longer-term feeding experiment, reproductive pairs fed on non-preferred corals exhibited dramatic reductions to body weight, and in hepatic and gonad condition, compared with those fed preferred corals. The majority of pairs fed preferred corals spawned frequently, while no spawning was observed for any pairs fed a non-preferred species of coral. These experiments suggest that fish distinguish between available corals based on their intrinsic value as prey, that reproductive success is dependent on the presence of particular coral species, and that differential loss of preferred corals could have serious consequences for the population success of these dietary specialists.

  20. Prey Selection of Scandinavian Wolves: Single Large or Several Small?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Håkan; Eklund, Ann; Zimmermann, Barbara; Wikenros, Camilla; Wabakken, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Research on large predator-prey interactions are often limited to the predators' primary prey, with the potential for prey switching in systems with multiple ungulate species rarely investigated. We evaluated wolf (Canis lupus) prey selection at two different spatial scales, i.e., inter- and intra-territorial, using data from 409 ungulate wolf-kills in an expanding wolf population in Scandinavia. This expansion includes a change from a one-prey into a two-prey system with variable densities of one large-sized ungulate; moose (Alces alces) and one small-sized ungulate; roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Among wolf territories, the proportion of roe deer in wolf kills was related to both pack size and roe deer density, but not to moose density. Pairs of wolves killed a higher proportion of roe deer than did packs, and wolves switched to kill more roe deer as their density increased above a 1:1 ratio in relation to the availability of the two species. At the intra-territorial level, wolves again responded to changes in roe deer density in their prey selection whereas we found no effect of snow depth, time during winter, or other predator-related factors on the wolves' choice to kill moose or roe deer. Moose population density was only weakly related to intra-territorial prey selection. Our results show that the functional response of wolves on moose, the species hitherto considered as the main prey, was strongly dependent on the density of a smaller, alternative, ungulate prey. The impact of wolf predation on the prey species community is therefore likely to change with the composition of the multi-prey species community along with the geographical expansion of the wolf population.

  1. Birds of Prey: Training Solutions to Human Factors Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) 2007 2007 Paper No. 7133 Page 1 of 12 Birds of Prey: Training...2007 2. REPORT TYPE Conference Proceedings 3. DATES COVERED 01-01-2006 to 30-11-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Birds of Prey: Training Solutions...ITSEC) 2007 2007 Paper No. 7133 Page 3 of 12 Birds of Prey: Training Solutions to Human Factors Issues Robert T. Nullmeyer Air Force Research

  2. Venus Flytrap Seedlings Show Growth-Related Prey Size Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Hatcher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula has had a conservation status of vulnerable since the 1970s. Little research has focussed on the ecology and even less has examined its juvenile stages. For the first time, reliance on invertebrate prey for growth was assessed in seedling Venus flytrap by systematic elimination of invertebrates from the growing environment. Prey were experimentally removed from a subset of Venus flytrap seedlings within a laboratory environment. The amount of growth was measured by measuring trap midrib length as a function of overall growth as well as prey spectrum. There was significantly lower growth in prey-eliminated plants than those utilising prey. This finding, although initially unsurprising, is actually contrary to the consensus that seedlings (traps < 5 mm do not catch prey. Furthermore, flytrap was shown to have prey specificity at its different growth stages; the dominant prey size for seedlings did not trigger mature traps. Seedlings are capturing and utilising prey for nutrients to increase their overall trap size. These novel findings show Venus flytrap to have a much more complex evolutionary ecology than previously thought.

  3. Behavior of prey links midwater and demersal piscivorous reef fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Auster

    Full Text Available Pelagic and demersal guilds of piscivorous fishes are linked by a variety of biological and physical processes that mediate interactions with common prey species. Understanding the behaviors of predators and prey can provide insight into the conditions that make such linkages possible. Here we report on the behaviors of mid-water piscivorous fishes and the responses of prey that produce feeding opportunities for demersal piscivorous fishes associated with "live bottom" ledge habitats off the coast of Georgia (northwest Atlantic Ocean. Prey taxa reduced nearest neighbor distances and retreated towards the seafloor during predatory attacks by mid-water fishes. Demersal fishes subsequently attacked and consumed prey in these ephemeral high density patches. No predation by demersal fishes was observed when prey species were at background densities. If the predator-prey interactions of demersal piscivorous fishes are commonly mediated by the predatory behavior of midwater piscivorous fishes and their prey, such indirect facilitative behaviors may be important in terms of the population processes (e.g., prey consumption and growth rates of these demersal fishes.

  4. Prey processing in the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Nicolai; Krijestorac, Belma; Sanford, Christopher P J; Boistel, Renauld; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-07-01

    We studied prey processing in the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), involving slow, easily observed head-bobbing movements, which were compared with prey processing in other aquatic feeding vertebrates. We hypothesized that head-bobbing is a unique prey-processing behaviour, which alternatively could be structurally and functionally analogous with raking in basal teleosts, or with pharyngognathy in neoteleosts. Modulation of head-bobbing was elicited by prey with different motility and toughness. Head-bobbing involved sustained mouth occlusion and pronounced cranial elevation, similar to raking. However, the hyoid and pectoral girdle were protracted, and not retracted as in both raking and pharyngognathy. High-speed videofluoroscopy of hyoid movements confirmed that head-bobbing differs from other known aquatic prey-processing behaviours. Nevertheless, head-bobbing and other prey-processing behaviours converge on a recurrent functional theme in the trophic ecology of aquatic feeding vertebrates; the use of intraoral and oropharyngeal dentition surfaces to immobilize, reduce and process relatively large, tough or motile prey. Prey processing outside the pharyngeal region has not been described for neoteleosts previously, but morphological evidence suggests that relatives of Betta might use similar processing behaviours. Thus, our results suggest that pharyngognathy did not out-compete ancestral prey-processing mechanisms completely during the evolution of neoteleosts.

  5. Prey switching behaviour in the planktonic copepod Acartia tonsa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Saiz, E.; Viitasalo, M.

    1996-01-01

    . Based on earlier observations, we also hypothesized that turbulence changes food selection towards motile prey. We tested these hypotheses by examining feeding rates and behaviour in adult females of A. tonsa feeding in mixtures of 2 prey organisms, a diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii) and a ciliate...... (Strombidium sulcatum). Our data demonstrate prey switching in A. tonsa, both in terms of behaviour and in terms of feeding rates on the alternative prey. The time allocated to ambush and suspension feeding changed with the composition of the food, and clearance of diatoms was, accordingly, negatively related...

  6. The Coevolution of "Tyrannosaurus" & Its Prey: Could "Tyrannosaurus" Chase down & Kill a "Triceratops" for Lunch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, S. Randolph

    2014-01-01

    Students will analyze the coevolution of the predator-prey relationships between "Tyrannosaurus rex" and its prey species using analyses of animal speeds from fossilized trackways, prey-animal armaments, adaptive behaviors, bite marks on prey-animal fossils, predator-prey ratios, and scavenger competition. The students will be asked to…

  7. Two Generalized Predator-Prey Models for Integrated Pest Management with Stage Structure and Disease in the Prey Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqing Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stage-structured predator-prey models with disease in the prey are constructed. For the purpose of integrated pest management, two types of impulsive control strategies (impulsive release of infective prey and impulsive release of predator are used. For Case  1, infective prey applications are more frequent than releases of predator (natural enemies. For Case  2, predator (natural enemies releases are more frequent than infective prey applications. In both cases, we get the sufficient conditions for the global attractivity of the susceptible prey-eradication periodic solution. In addition, the persistence of the systems is also discussed. At last, the results are discussed and some possible future work is put forward.

  8. Feeding rates in the chaetognath Sagitta elegans : effects of prey size, prey swimming behaviour and small-scale turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito, H.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    distances. We develop a simple prey encounter rate model by describing the swimming prey as a 'force dipole' and assuming that a critical signal strength is required to elicit an attack. By fitting the model to the observations, a critical signal strength of 10(-2) cm s(-1) is estimated; this is very......The gut contents of Sagitta elegans were sampled twice daily (noon and midnight) during 9 days in October at an anchor station in the northern North Sea. Observations of the ambient prey field and of turbulent dissipation rates were collected simultaneously. The average number of prey per...... chaetognath was among the highest ever recorded, 0.57 +/- 0.10. Total gut content was independent of ambient prey concentration, suggesting that feeding rate was saturated. Clearance rates were estimated from gut contents and ambient prey concentrations and a literature-based estimate of digestion time...

  9. Rapid prey evolution can alter the structure of predator-prey communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friman, V. -P.; Jousset, A.; Buckling, A.

    2014-01-01

    Although microevolution has been shown to play an important role in pairwise antagonistic species interactions, its importance in more complex communities has received little attention. Here, we used two Pseudomonas fluorescens prey bacterial strains (SBW25 and F113) and Tetrahymena thermophila prot

  10. Mortality investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife mortality events usually occur unannounced and may find management agencies unaware. These events can become highly visible and politically charged affairs, depending upon the scale or species involved. The public, media, and (or) politicians may pressure managers, field investigators, and diagnosticians to quickly identify the cause or to comment on potential causes, the significance of the event, what is being done about it, and a resolution. It may be common during such events for speculation to rage, and for conflicting theories to be advanced to explain either the environmental conditions that led to the mortality or the actual cause of death.

  11. Global existence of solutions and uniform persistence of a diffusive predator-prey model with prey-taxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sainan; Shi, Junping; Wu, Boying

    2016-04-01

    This paper proves the global existence and boundedness of solutions to a general reaction-diffusion predator-prey system with prey-taxis defined on a smooth bounded domain with no-flux boundary condition. The result holds for domains in arbitrary spatial dimension and small prey-taxis sensitivity coefficient. This paper also proves the existence of a global attractor and the uniform persistence of the system under some additional conditions. Applications to models from ecology and chemotaxis are discussed.

  12. Linking biomechanics and ecology through predator-prey interactions: flight performance of dragonflies and their prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, S A; Rundle, D E; Iwasaki, J M; Crall, J D

    2012-03-15

    Aerial predation is a highly complex, three-dimensional flight behavior that affects the individual fitness and population dynamics of both predator and prey. Most studies of predation adopt either an ecological approach in which capture or survival rates are quantified, or a biomechanical approach in which the physical interaction is studied in detail. In the present study, we show that combining these two approaches provides insight into the interaction between hunting dragonflies (Libellula cyanea) and their prey (Drosophila melanogaster) that neither type of study can provide on its own. We performed >2500 predation trials on nine dragonflies housed in an outdoor artificial habitat to identify sources of variability in capture success, and analyzed simultaneous predator-prey flight kinematics from 50 high-speed videos. The ecological approach revealed that capture success is affected by light intensity in some individuals but that prey density explains most of the variability in success rate. The biomechanical approach revealed that fruit flies rarely respond to approaching dragonflies with evasive maneuvers, and are rarely successful when they do. However, flies perform random turns during flight, whose characteristics differ between individuals, and these routine, erratic turns are responsible for more failed predation attempts than evasive maneuvers. By combining the two approaches, we were able to determine that the flies pursued by dragonflies when prey density is low fly more erratically, and that dragonflies are less successful at capturing them. This highlights the importance of considering the behavior of both participants, as well as their biomechanics and ecology, in developing a more integrative understanding of organismal interactions.

  13. Social and demographic effects of anthropogenic mortality: a test of the compensatory mortality hypothesis in the red wolf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M Sparkman

    Full Text Available Whether anthropogenic mortality is additive or compensatory to natural mortality in animal populations has long been a question of theoretical and practical importance. Theoretically, under density-dependent conditions populations compensate for anthropogenic mortality through decreases in natural mortality and/or increases in productivity, but recent studies of large carnivores suggest that anthropogenic mortality can be fully additive to natural mortality and thereby constrain annual survival and population growth rate. Nevertheless, mechanisms underlying either compensatory or additive effects continue to be poorly understood. Using long-term data on a reintroduced population of the red wolf, we tested for evidence of additive vs. compensatory effects of anthropogenic mortality on annual survival and population growth rates, and the preservation and reproductive success of breeding pairs. We found that anthropogenic mortality had a strong additive effect on annual survival and population growth rate at low population density, though there was evidence for compensation in population growth at high density. When involving the death of a breeder, anthropogenic mortality was also additive to natural rates of breeding pair dissolution, resulting in a net decrease in the annual preservation of existing breeding pairs. However, though the disbanding of a pack following death of a breeder resulted in fewer recruits per litter relative to stable packs, there was no relationship between natural rates of pair dissolution and population growth rate at either high or low density. Thus we propose that short-term additive effects of anthropogenic mortality on population growth in the red wolf population at low density were primarily a result of direct mortality of adults rather than indirect socially-mediated effects resulting in reduced recruitment. Finally, we also demonstrate that per capita recruitment and the proportion of adults that became

  14. Insect prey foraging strategies in Callicebus oenanthe in northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluycker, Anneke M

    2012-05-01

    Titi monkeys (genus Callicebus) are small-bodied platyrrhines that supplement their predominantly frugivorous diet with variable amounts of leaves, seeds, and/or arthropod prey. Notable interspecific variation in the amount of insect prey in the diet has been observed in Callicebus, ranging from 0% to 20%. In this study, I investigate the degree and type of prey foraging in a little-known species, Callicebus oenanthe inhabiting a fragmented, secondary forest on the foothills of the Andes in northern Peru. I present data on prey type, prey search and capture techniques, substrate/vegetation use, foraging height, prey capture efficiency, and seasonal variation of insect prey foraging in one group of C. oenanthe observed from January to August 2005. Insect prey accounted for 22% of the diet, the highest amount reported for any Callicebus species to date, and insects from at least six different orders were included. C. oenanthe was mainly an investigative forager of hidden prey, manipulating easy-to-open substrates such as rolled up leaves, and hunted ant swarms and larger insects opportunistically. Insect foraging was predominant during the dry season (26%) and decreased during the wet season (13%). The study group foraged mostly in the understory (2-6 m) within vine-laden shrubs and trees, which may conform to an anti-predator strategy of crypticity. Overall the group had an 83% insect capture success rate. These data suggest that insect prey is an important part of the diet of C. oenanthe and may be especially notable during periods of resource scarcity. This study adds to the knowledge concerning insect prey foraging in Callicebus, which can have an important role in defining ecological strategies in the selection of secondary protein food resources within a given ecosystem.

  15. Invasive prey indirectly increase predation on their native competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorani, Max C N; Hovel, Kevin A

    2015-07-01

    Ecological theory predicts that invasive prey can interact with native prey directly by competing for shared resources or indirectly by changing the abundance or behavior of shared native predators. However, both the study and management of invasive prey have historically overlooked indirect effects. In southern California estuaries, introduction of the Asian nest mussel Arcuatula senhousia has been linked to profound changes in native bivalve assemblages, but the mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. We performed three field experiments to assess the mechanisms of competition between Arcuatula and native bivalves, and evaluated the potential for Arcuatula to indirectly mediate native predator-prey dynamics. We found that Arcuatula reduces the diversity, abundance, and size of native bivalve recruits by preemptively exploiting space in surface sediments. When paired with native shallow-dwelling clams (Chione undatella and Laevicardium substriatum), Arcuatula reduces adult survival through overgrowth competition. However, Arcuatula also attracts native predators, causing apparent competition by indirectly increasing predation of native clams, especially for poorly defended species. Therefore, invasive prey can indirectly increase predation rates on native competitors by changing the behavior of shared native predators, but the magnitude of apparent competition strongly depends on the vulnerability of natives to predation. Interestingly, our results indicate that the vulnerability of invasive prey to predation can greatly exacerbate impacts on their native competitors. Our findings suggest that consideration of both direct and indirect effects of invasive prey, as well as native predator-prey relationships, should lead to more effective invasive species management.

  16. Influence of stochastic perturbation on prey-predator systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Ryszard; Pichór, Katarzyna

    2007-03-01

    We analyse the influence of various stochastic perturbations on prey-predator systems. The prey-predator model is described by stochastic versions of a deterministic Lotka-Volterra system. We study long-time behaviour of both trajectories and distributions of the solutions. We indicate the differences between the deterministic and stochastic models.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of prey exploitation in a metapopulation of predators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pels, S.H.; de Roos, A.M.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    In well-mixed populations of predators and prey, natural selection favors predators with high rates of prey consumption and population growth. When spatial structure prevents the populations from being well mixed, such predators may have a selective disadvantage because they do not make full use of

  18. Top predators negate the effect of mesopredators on prey physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Maria M; Killen, Shaun S; Nadler, Lauren E; White, James R; McCormick, Mark I

    2016-07-01

    Predation theory and empirical evidence suggest that top predators benefit the survival of resource prey through the suppression of mesopredators. However, whether such behavioural suppression can also affect the physiology of resource prey has yet to be examined. Using a three-tier reef fish food web and intermittent-flow respirometry, our study examined changes in the metabolic rate of resource prey exposed to combinations of mesopredator and top predator cues. Under experimental conditions, the mesopredator (dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus) continuously foraged and attacked resource prey (juveniles of the damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis) triggering an increase in prey O2 uptake by 38 ± 12·9% (mean ± SE). The visual stimulus of a top predator (coral trout, Plectropomus leopardus) restricted the foraging activity of the mesopredator, indirectly allowing resource prey to minimize stress and maintain routine O2 uptake. Although not as strong as the effect of the top predator, the sight of a large non-predator species (thicklip wrasse, Hemigymnus melapterus) also reduced the impact of the mesopredator on prey metabolic rate. We conclude that lower trophic-level species can benefit physiologically from the presence of top predators through the behavioural suppression that top predators impose on mesopredators. By minimizing the energy spent on mesopredator avoidance and the associated stress response to mesopredator attacks, prey may be able to invest more energy in foraging and growth, highlighting the importance of the indirect, non-consumptive effects of top predators in marine food webs.

  19. Curvature facilitates prey fixation in predatory insect claws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petie, R.; Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Insects show a large variety in prey capture strategies, with a correspondingly large diversity in predatory adaptations. We studied a specific type of predatory claws, these can for example be found in praying mantis species. The claw is closeable over its entire length and the prey is fixed betwee

  20. EXTINCTION OF A DISCRETE NONLINEAR PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a discrete nonlinear predator-prey model with nonnegative coefficients bounded above and below by positive constants. We show that under some suitable assumptions the predator species is driven to extinction and the prey species x is globally attractive with any positive solution to a discrete Logistic equation.

  1. Periodic Solutions of a Discrete Time Predator-Prey System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-li Song; Mao-an Han

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a discrete predator-prey system with a non-monotonic functional response,which models the dynamics of the prey and the predator having non-overlapping generations. By using the coincidence degree theory, sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of positive periodic solutions.

  2. Stationary Patterns in One-Predator Two-Prey Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael; Zhigui, Lin

    1999-01-01

    Weakly-coupled elliptic system decribing models of simple three-species food webs such as the one-predator, two-prey modelis discussed. We show thatthere is no non-constant solution if diffusions or inter-specific competitions are strong, or if the intrinsic growths of the prey are slow...

  3. Stationary Patterns in One-Predator Two-Prey Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael; Zhigui, Lin

    1999-01-01

    Weakly-coupled elliptic system decribing models of simple three-species food webs such as the one-predator, two-prey model is discussed. We show that there is no non-constant solution if diffusions or inter-specific competitions are strong, or if the intrinsic growths of the prey are slow...

  4. Mortality Implications of Mortality Plateaus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missov, T. I.; Vaupel, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe in a unified framework all plateau-generating random effects models in terms of (i) plausible distributions for the hazard (baseline mortality) and the random effect (unobserved heterogeneity, frailty) as well as (ii) the impact of frailty on the baseline hazard. Mor...

  5. Density-dependence in space and time: opposite synchronous variations in population distribution and body condition in the Baltic Sea sprat (Sprattus sprattus over three decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Casini

    Full Text Available Spatio-temporal density-dependent processes are crucial regulatory factors for natural populations. However, there is a lack of studies addressing spatial density-dependence in fish growth. A previous investigation has suggested spatio-temporal density-dependence in body condition of Baltic sprat. Here, we used different techniques, such as centre of gravity, distance, and homogeneity indices, to better characterize the spatial and temporal variations in sprat density and body condition in the Baltic Proper. Our results evidenced a negative spatio-temporal co-variation between the centres of gravity of density and maximum condition. In the 1980s-early 1990s both centres were located in the middle of the Baltic Proper. From the mid 1990s the centres progressively separated in space, as the sprat population moved towards the north-eastern Baltic Proper, and the centre of maximum condition towards the south-western areas. Moreover, at low abundances, sprat density and condition were homogeneously distributed in space, whereas at high abundances both density and condition showed pronounced geographical gradients. The ecological processes potentially explaining the observed patterns were discussed in the light of the Ideal Free Distribution theory. We provide evidence that the shift in the spatial distribution of cod, the main predator of sprat, has been the main factor triggering the overall spatial changes in sprat density, and thus condition, during the past thirty years. The spatial indices shown here, synthesizing the spatio-temporal patterns of fish distribution, can support the implementation of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

  6. Density-dependence in space and time: opposite synchronous variations in population distribution and body condition in the Baltic Sea sprat (Sprattus sprattus) over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Michele; Rouyer, Tristan; Bartolino, Valerio; Larson, Niklas; Grygiel, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Spatio-temporal density-dependent processes are crucial regulatory factors for natural populations. However, there is a lack of studies addressing spatial density-dependence in fish growth. A previous investigation has suggested spatio-temporal density-dependence in body condition of Baltic sprat. Here, we used different techniques, such as centre of gravity, distance, and homogeneity indices, to better characterize the spatial and temporal variations in sprat density and body condition in the Baltic Proper. Our results evidenced a negative spatio-temporal co-variation between the centres of gravity of density and maximum condition. In the 1980s-early 1990s both centres were located in the middle of the Baltic Proper. From the mid 1990s the centres progressively separated in space, as the sprat population moved towards the north-eastern Baltic Proper, and the centre of maximum condition towards the south-western areas. Moreover, at low abundances, sprat density and condition were homogeneously distributed in space, whereas at high abundances both density and condition showed pronounced geographical gradients. The ecological processes potentially explaining the observed patterns were discussed in the light of the Ideal Free Distribution theory. We provide evidence that the shift in the spatial distribution of cod, the main predator of sprat, has been the main factor triggering the overall spatial changes in sprat density, and thus condition, during the past thirty years. The spatial indices shown here, synthesizing the spatio-temporal patterns of fish distribution, can support the implementation of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

  7. Dry Dog Food Integrity and Mite Strain Influence the Density-Dependent Growth of the Stored-Product Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybanska, Dagmar; Hubert, Jan; Markovic, Martin; Erban, Tomas

    2016-02-01

    The infestation of foodstuffs by mites is connected to health risks and economic losses. The cosmopolitan stored-product mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging and predominant pest of dry dog food. In this study, the influences on mite population growth of 1) the different dry dog food kernels present in the package; 2) the integrity of the dry dog food kernel, whether intact or crushed; 3) the initial population density of 10 or 100 specimens; and 4) the four mite strains used were investigated under laboratory conditions. The population growth tests were performed for 28 d at 85% relative humidity and 25°C. The intrinsic growth rates of the mites were compared. The population growth was higher on the brown and green kernels than on the red and white kernels. The kernel integrity affected the population growth, and the integrity effect was highly influenced by the initial mite population density. The mites showed density-dependent growth in three of the four mite strains tested. The initial population density changed the population growth ranking among the mite strains, thereby indicating strain-specific density-dependent growth. The results of this study have important implications for predictive models of stored-product mite populations in dry dog food. One practical recommendation is that the growth of mites should be considered with regard to the mite strains and according to the strain-specific density dependent growth. Next, the integrity of the kernels should be maintained because disrupted or crushed kernels promote increases in mite populations.

  8. Integrated Pest Management with Stochastic Birth Rate for Prey Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay eAkman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available X. Song and Z. Xiang [5] developed an impulsive differential equations model for a two-prey one-predator model with stage structure for the predator. They demonstrate the conditions on the impulsiveperiod for which a globally asymptotically stable pest-eradication periodic solution exists, as well asconditions on the impulsive period for which the prey species is permanently maintained under aneconomically acceptable threshold. We extend their model by including stage structure for both predatorand prey as well as by adding stochastic elements in the birth rate of the prey. As in [5], we find theconditions under which a globally asymptotically stable pest eradication periodic solution exists. Inaddition, we numerically show the relationship between the stochastically varying birth rate of the preyand the necessary efficacy of the pesticide for which the probability of eradication of the prey speciesis above 90%. This is significant because the model recognizes varying environmental and climaticconditions which affect the resources needed for pest eradication.

  9. COMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS WITH DENSITY-DEPENDENT VISCOSITY,VACUUM AND GRAVITATIONAL FORCE IN THE CASE OF GENERAL PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Lei; Wang Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    This is a continuation of the article (Comm. Partial Differential Equations 26 (2001) 965). In this article, the authors consider the one-dimensional compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes equations with gravitational force, fixed boundary condition, a general pressure and the density-dependent viscosity coefficient when the viscous gas con-nects to vacuum state with a jump in density. Precisely, the viscosity coefficient u is proportional to pθ and 0 < θ < 1/2, where p is the density, and the pressure P =P(p) is a general pressure. The global existence and the uniqueness of weak solution are proved.

  10. Density-dependent regulation of brook trout population dynamics along a core-periphery distribution gradient in a central Appalachian watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock M Huntsman

    Full Text Available Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution gradient within a central Appalachian watershed. We sampled seven sub-populations with study sites ranging in drainage area from 1.3-60 km(2 and long-term average densities ranging from 0.335-0.006 trout/m. Modeled response variables included per capita population growth rate of young-of-the-year, adult, and total brook trout. We also quantified a stock-recruitment relationship for the headwater population and coefficients of variability in mean trout density for all sub-populations over time. Density-dependent regulation was prevalent throughout the study area regardless of stream size. However, density-independent temperature models carried substantial weight and likely reflect the effect of year-to-year variability in water temperature on trout dispersal between cold tributaries and warm main stems. Estimated adult carrying capacities decreased exponentially with increasing stream size from 0.24 trout/m in headwaters to 0.005 trout/m in the main stem. Finally, temporal variance in brook trout population size was lowest in the high-density headwater population, tended to peak in mid-sized streams and declined slightly in the largest streams with the lowest densities. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that local density-dependent processes have a strong control on brook trout dynamics across the entire distribution gradient. However, the mechanisms of regulation likely shift from competition for limited food and space in headwater streams to

  11. The potential impact of density dependent fecundity on the use of the faecal egg count reduction test for detecting drug resistance in human hookworms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Kotze

    Full Text Available Current efforts to control human soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections involve the periodic mass treatment of people, particularly children, in all endemic areas, using benzimidazole and imidothiazole drugs. Given the fact that high levels of resistance have developed to these same drugs in roundworms of livestock, there is a need to monitor drug efficacy in human STHs. The faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT, in which faecal egg output is measured pre- and post-drug treatment, is presently under examination by WHO as a means of detecting the emergence of resistance. We have examined the potential impact of density dependent fecundity on FECRT data. Recent evidence with the canine hookworm indicates that the density dependent egg production phenomenon shows dynamic properties in response to drug treatment. This will impact on measurements of drug efficacy, and hence drug resistance. It is likely that the female worms that survive a FECRT drug treatment in some human cases will respond to the relaxation of density dependent constraints on egg production by increasing their egg output significantly compared to their pre-treatment levels. These cases will therefore underestimate drug efficacy in the FECRT. The degree of underestimation will depend on the ability of the worms within particular hosts to increase their egg output, which will in turn depend on the extent to which their egg output is constrained prior to the drug treatment. As worms within different human cases will likely be present at quite different densities prior to a proposed FECRT, there is potential for the effects of this phenomenon on drug efficacy measurements to vary considerably within any group of potential FECRT candidates. Measurement of relative drug efficacy may be improved by attempting to ensure a consistent degree of underestimation in groups of people involved in separate FECRTs. This may be partly achieved by omission of cases with the heaviest infections

  12. Modelling the fear effect in predator-prey interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Zanette, Liana; Zou, Xingfu

    2016-11-01

    A recent field manipulation on a terrestrial vertebrate showed that the fear of predators alone altered anti-predator defences to such an extent that it greatly reduced the reproduction of prey. Because fear can evidently affect the populations of terrestrial vertebrates, we proposed a predator-prey model incorporating the cost of fear into prey reproduction. Our mathematical analyses show that high levels of fear (or equivalently strong anti-predator responses) can stabilize the predator-prey system by excluding the existence of periodic solutions. However, relatively low levels of fear can induce multiple limit cycles via subcritical Hopf bifurcations, leading to a bi-stability phenomenon. Compared to classic predator-prey models which ignore the cost of fear where Hopf bifurcations are typically supercritical, Hopf bifurcations in our model can be both supercritical and subcritical by choosing different sets of parameters. We conducted numerical simulations to explore the relationships between fear effects and other biologically related parameters (e.g. birth/death rate of adult prey), which further demonstrate the impact that fear can have in predator-prey interactions. For example, we found that under the conditions of a Hopf bifurcation, an increase in the level of fear may alter the direction of Hopf bifurcation from supercritical to subcritical when the birth rate of prey increases accordingly. Our simulations also show that the prey is less sensitive in perceiving predation risk with increasing birth rate of prey or increasing death rate of predators, but demonstrate that animals will mount stronger anti-predator defences as the attack rate of predators increases.

  13. Heuristic Rules Underlying Dragonfly Prey Selection and Interception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huai-Ti; Leonardo, Anthony

    2017-03-28

    Animals use rules to initiate behaviors. Such rules are often described as triggers that determine when behavior begins. However, although less explored, these selection rules are also an opportunity to establish sensorimotor constraints that influence how the behavior ends. These constraints may be particularly significant in influencing success in prey capture. Here we explore this in dragonfly prey interception. We found that in the moments leading up to takeoff, perched dragonflies employ a series of sensorimotor rules that determine the time of takeoff and increase the probability of successful capture. First, the dragonfly makes a head saccade followed by smooth pursuit movements to orient its direction-of-gaze at potential prey. Second, the dragonfly assesses whether the prey's angular size and speed co-vary within a privileged range. Finally, the dragonfly times the moment of its takeoff to a prediction of when the prey will cross the zenith. Each of these processes serves a purpose. The angular size-speed criteria biases interception flights to catchable prey, while the head movements and the predictive takeoff ensure flights begin with the prey visually fixated and directly overhead-the key parameters that underlie interception steering. Prey that do not elicit takeoff generally fail at least one of the criterion, and the loss of prey fixation or overhead positioning during flight is strongly correlated with terminated flights. Thus from an abundance of potential targets, the dragonfly selects a stereotyped set of takeoff conditions based on the prey and body states most likely to end in successful capture.

  14. The Effects of Ocean Acidification on Predator-Prey Interactions between Mya arenaria and Callinectes sapidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, K.; Glaspie, C.; Seitz, R.

    2016-02-01

    The study examined the implications of ocean acidification for Mya arenaria and the predator-prey dynamics between M. arenaria and Callinectes sapidus. Clams were subjected to either ambient conditions or acidified conditions and grown over four weeks. Mortality, shell lengths, and biomass (ash-free dry weights) were recorded for clams destructively sampled each week. Clams were subjected to behavioral experiments to determine their response to an approaching physical disturbance. Crabs were exposed to acidified or ambient conditions for 48 hours, and placed in 48 hour mesocosm trials with clams. Shell lengths, mortality and biomass between the ambient and acidified clams were not significantly different between acidified and ambient treatments. Shell ash weights were lower for acidified clams, evidence of shell dissolution. In the behavioral experiment, ocean acidification reduced the ability of clams to respond to a predator stimulus. Lastly, in predator-prey mesocosm trials, in ambient conditions, crabs ate all or none of the available clams, whereas acidified crabs ate all available clams in many trials and ate at least one acidified clam per trial. The early effects of ocean acidification on M. arenaria will manifest in trophic interactions with other species, rather than impacting M. arenaria alone.

  15. Periodic solutions of multispecies-competition predator-prey system with Holling's type III functional response and prey supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwei He

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a nonautonomous multispecies competition predator-prey system with Holling's type III functional response and prey supplement. It is proved that the system is uniformly persistent under some conditions. Furthermore, we show that the system has a unique positive periodic solution which is globally asymptotically stable.

  16. Global Existence of Classical Solutions to a Three-Species Predator-Prey Model with Two Prey-Taxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are concerned with three-species predator-prey model including two prey-taxes and Holling type II functional response under no flux boundary condition. By applying the contraction mapping principle, the parabolic Schauder estimates, and parabolic Lp estimates, we prove that there exists a unique global classical solution of this system.

  17. Singular perturbation method for global stability of ratio-dependent predator-prey models with stage structure for the prey

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    Linfei Nie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a singular perturbation is introduced to analyze the global asymptotic stability of positive equilibria of ratio-dependent predator-prey models with stage structure for the prey. We prove theoretical results and show numerically that the proposed approach is feasible and efficient.

  18. Modelling the effects of prey size and distribution on prey capture rates of two sympatric marine predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris B Thaxter

    Full Text Available Understanding how prey capture rates are influenced by feeding ecology and environmental conditions is fundamental to assessing anthropogenic impacts on marine higher predators. We compared how prey capture rates varied in relation to prey size, prey patch distribution and prey density for two species of alcid, common guillemot (Uria aalge and razorbill (Alca torda during the chick-rearing period. We developed a Monte Carlo approach parameterised with foraging behaviour from bird-borne data loggers, observations of prey fed to chicks, and adult diet from water-offloading, to construct a bio-energetics model. Our primary goal was to estimate prey capture rates, and a secondary aim was to test responses to a set of biologically plausible environmental scenarios. Estimated prey capture rates were 1.5 ± 0.8 items per dive (0.8 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.6 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively for guillemots and 3.7 ± 2.4 items per dive (4.9 ± 3.1 and 7.3 ± 4.0 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively for razorbills. Based on species' ecology, diet and flight costs, we predicted that razorbills would be more sensitive to decreases in 0-group sandeel (Ammodytes marinus length (prediction 1, but guillemots would be more sensitive to prey patches that were more widely spaced (prediction 2, and lower in prey density (prediction 3. Estimated prey capture rates increased non-linearly as 0-group sandeel length declined, with the slope being steeper in razorbills, supporting prediction 1. When prey patches were more dispersed, estimated daily energy expenditure increased by a factor of 3.0 for guillemots and 2.3 for razorbills, suggesting guillemots were more sensitive to patchier prey, supporting prediction 2. However, both species responded similarly to reduced prey density (guillemot expenditure increased by 1.7; razorbill by 1.6, thus not supporting prediction 3. This bio-energetics approach complements other foraging models

  19. Modelling the effects of prey size and distribution on prey capture rates of two sympatric marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxter, Chris B; Daunt, Francis; Grémillet, David; Harris, Mike P; Benvenuti, Silvano; Watanuki, Yutaka; Hamer, Keith C; Wanless, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how prey capture rates are influenced by feeding ecology and environmental conditions is fundamental to assessing anthropogenic impacts on marine higher predators. We compared how prey capture rates varied in relation to prey size, prey patch distribution and prey density for two species of alcid, common guillemot (Uria aalge) and razorbill (Alca torda) during the chick-rearing period. We developed a Monte Carlo approach parameterised with foraging behaviour from bird-borne data loggers, observations of prey fed to chicks, and adult diet from water-offloading, to construct a bio-energetics model. Our primary goal was to estimate prey capture rates, and a secondary aim was to test responses to a set of biologically plausible environmental scenarios. Estimated prey capture rates were 1.5 ± 0.8 items per dive (0.8 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.6 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for guillemots and 3.7 ± 2.4 items per dive (4.9 ± 3.1 and 7.3 ± 4.0 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for razorbills. Based on species' ecology, diet and flight costs, we predicted that razorbills would be more sensitive to decreases in 0-group sandeel (Ammodytes marinus) length (prediction 1), but guillemots would be more sensitive to prey patches that were more widely spaced (prediction 2), and lower in prey density (prediction 3). Estimated prey capture rates increased non-linearly as 0-group sandeel length declined, with the slope being steeper in razorbills, supporting prediction 1. When prey patches were more dispersed, estimated daily energy expenditure increased by a factor of 3.0 for guillemots and 2.3 for razorbills, suggesting guillemots were more sensitive to patchier prey, supporting prediction 2. However, both species responded similarly to reduced prey density (guillemot expenditure increased by 1.7; razorbill by 1.6), thus not supporting prediction 3. This bio-energetics approach complements other foraging models in

  20. Modelling the Effects of Prey Size and Distribution on Prey Capture Rates of Two Sympatric Marine Predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxter, Chris B.; Daunt, Francis; Grémillet, David; Harris, Mike P.; Benvenuti, Silvano; Watanuki, Yutaka; Hamer, Keith C.; Wanless, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how prey capture rates are influenced by feeding ecology and environmental conditions is fundamental to assessing anthropogenic impacts on marine higher predators. We compared how prey capture rates varied in relation to prey size, prey patch distribution and prey density for two species of alcid, common guillemot (Uria aalge) and razorbill (Alca torda) during the chick-rearing period. We developed a Monte Carlo approach parameterised with foraging behaviour from bird-borne data loggers, observations of prey fed to chicks, and adult diet from water-offloading, to construct a bio-energetics model. Our primary goal was to estimate prey capture rates, and a secondary aim was to test responses to a set of biologically plausible environmental scenarios. Estimated prey capture rates were 1.5±0.8 items per dive (0.8±0.4 and 1.1±0.6 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for guillemots and 3.7±2.4 items per dive (4.9±3.1 and 7.3±4.0 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for razorbills. Based on species' ecology, diet and flight costs, we predicted that razorbills would be more sensitive to decreases in 0-group sandeel (Ammodytes marinus) length (prediction 1), but guillemots would be more sensitive to prey patches that were more widely spaced (prediction 2), and lower in prey density (prediction 3). Estimated prey capture rates increased non-linearly as 0-group sandeel length declined, with the slope being steeper in razorbills, supporting prediction 1. When prey patches were more dispersed, estimated daily energy expenditure increased by a factor of 3.0 for guillemots and 2.3 for razorbills, suggesting guillemots were more sensitive to patchier prey, supporting prediction 2. However, both species responded similarly to reduced prey density (guillemot expenditure increased by 1.7; razorbill by 1.6), thus not supporting prediction 3. This bio-energetics approach complements other foraging models in predicting likely

  1. Veterinary Aspects of Bird of Prey Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tom A; Lierz, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Captive breeding has contributed to successful restoration of many species of birds of prey. Avicultural techniques pioneered by raptor breeders include double clutching, direct fostering, cross-fostering, hatch and switch, hacking, imprinting male and female falcons for semen collection, and artificial insemination techniques. However, reproductive failure occurs related to management problems, including hygiene measures, food quality issues, breeding flock structure, or individual health issues of breeding birds. These may result in non-egg laying females, low-quality eggs, or infertile eggs caused by male infertility. Veterinary care of breeding collections is extremely important. This article provides an overview of veterinary involvement in raptor breeding projects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Predator-Prey Gompertz Model with Time Delay and Impulsive Perturbations on the Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Jia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and study a Gompertz model with time delay and impulsive perturbations on the prey. By using the discrete dynamical system determined by the stroboscopic map, we obtain the sufficient conditions for the existence and global attractivity of the “predator-extinction” periodic solution. With the theory on the delay functional and impulsive differential equation, we obtain the appropriate condition for the permanence of the system.

  3. Competing conservation objectives for predators and prey: estimating killer whale prey requirements for Chinook salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Williams

    Full Text Available Ecosystem-based management (EBM of marine resources attempts to conserve interacting species. In contrast to single-species fisheries management, EBM aims to identify and resolve conflicting objectives for different species. Such a conflict may be emerging in the northeastern Pacific for southern resident killer whales (Orcinus orca and their primary prey, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Both species have at-risk conservation status and transboundary (Canada-US ranges. We modeled individual killer whale prey requirements from feeding and growth records of captive killer whales and morphometric data from historic live-capture fishery and whaling records worldwide. The models, combined with caloric value of salmon, and demographic and diet data for wild killer whales, allow us to predict salmon quantities needed to maintain and recover this killer whale population, which numbered 87 individuals in 2009. Our analyses provide new information on cost of lactation and new parameter estimates for other killer whale populations globally. Prey requirements of southern resident killer whales are difficult to reconcile with fisheries and conservation objectives for Chinook salmon, because the number of fish required is large relative to annual returns and fishery catches. For instance, a U.S. recovery goal (2.3% annual population growth of killer whales over 28 years implies a 75% increase in energetic requirements. Reducing salmon fisheries may serve as a temporary mitigation measure to allow time for management actions to improve salmon productivity to take effect. As ecosystem-based fishery management becomes more prevalent, trade-offs between conservation objectives for predators and prey will become increasingly necessary. Our approach offers scenarios to compare relative influence of various sources of uncertainty on the resulting consumption estimates to prioritise future research efforts, and a general approach for assessing the extent of

  4. Consequences of a refuge for the predator-prey dynamics of a wolf-elk system in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joshua F; Hebblewhite, Mark; Bardsley, John

    2014-01-01

    Refugia can affect predator-prey dynamics via movements between refuge and non-refuge areas. We examine the influence of a refuge on population dynamics in a large mammal predator-prey system. Wolves (Canis lupus) have recolonized much of their former range in North America, and as a result, ungulate prey have exploited refugia to reduce predation risk with unknown impacts on wolf-prey dynamics. We examined the influence of a refuge on elk (Cervus elaphus) and wolf population dynamics in Banff National Park. Elk occupy the Banff townsite with little predation, whereas elk in the adjoining Bow Valley experience higher wolf predation. The Banff refuge may influence Bow Valley predator-prey dynamics through source-sink movements. To test this hypothesis, we used 26 years of wolf and elk population counts and the Delayed Rejection Adaptive Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo method to fit five predator-prey models: 1) with no source-sink movements, 2) with elk density-dependent dispersal from the refuge to the non-refuge, 3) with elk predation risk avoidance movements from the non-refuge to the refuge, 4) with differential movement rates between refuge and non-refuge, and 5) with short-term, source-sink wolf movements. Model 1 provided the best fit of the data, as measured by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). In the top model, Banff and Bow Valley elk had median growth rates of 0.08 and 0.03 (95% credibility intervals [CIs]: 0.027-0.186 and 0.001-0.143), respectively, Banff had a median carrying capacity of 630 elk (95% CI: 471.9-2676.9), Bow Valley elk had a median wolf encounter rate of 0.02 (95% CI: 0.013-0.030), and wolves had a median death rate of 0.23 (95% CI: 0.146-0.335) and a median conversion efficiency of 0.07 (95% CI: 0.031-0.124). We found little evidence for potential source-sink movements influencing the predator-prey dynamics of this system. This result suggests that the refuge was isolated from the non-refuge.

  5. Consequences of a refuge for the predator-prey dynamics of a wolf-elk system in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua F Goldberg

    Full Text Available Refugia can affect predator-prey dynamics via movements between refuge and non-refuge areas. We examine the influence of a refuge on population dynamics in a large mammal predator-prey system. Wolves (Canis lupus have recolonized much of their former range in North America, and as a result, ungulate prey have exploited refugia to reduce predation risk with unknown impacts on wolf-prey dynamics. We examined the influence of a refuge on elk (Cervus elaphus and wolf population dynamics in Banff National Park. Elk occupy the Banff townsite with little predation, whereas elk in the adjoining Bow Valley experience higher wolf predation. The Banff refuge may influence Bow Valley predator-prey dynamics through source-sink movements. To test this hypothesis, we used 26 years of wolf and elk population counts and the Delayed Rejection Adaptive Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo method to fit five predator-prey models: 1 with no source-sink movements, 2 with elk density-dependent dispersal from the refuge to the non-refuge, 3 with elk predation risk avoidance movements from the non-refuge to the refuge, 4 with differential movement rates between refuge and non-refuge, and 5 with short-term, source-sink wolf movements. Model 1 provided the best fit of the data, as measured by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC. In the top model, Banff and Bow Valley elk had median growth rates of 0.08 and 0.03 (95% credibility intervals [CIs]: 0.027-0.186 and 0.001-0.143, respectively, Banff had a median carrying capacity of 630 elk (95% CI: 471.9-2676.9, Bow Valley elk had a median wolf encounter rate of 0.02 (95% CI: 0.013-0.030, and wolves had a median death rate of 0.23 (95% CI: 0.146-0.335 and a median conversion efficiency of 0.07 (95% CI: 0.031-0.124. We found little evidence for potential source-sink movements influencing the predator-prey dynamics of this system. This result suggests that the refuge was isolated from the non-refuge.

  6. CRCP-Prey choice of corallivorous snails

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The snail, Coralliophila abbreviata, is a common generalist corallivore and can be a major contributor to Caribbean acroporid tissue mortality. Considering the...

  7. Wave propagation in predator-prey systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sheng-Chen; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a class of predator-prey systems of reaction-diffusion type. Specifically, we are interested in the dynamical behaviour for the solution with the initial distribution where the prey species is at the level of the carrying capacity, and the density of the predator species has compact support, or exponentially small tails near x=+/- ∞ . Numerical evidence suggests that this will lead to the formation of a pair of diverging waves propagating outwards from the initial zone. Motivated by this phenomenon, we establish the existence of a family of travelling waves with the minimum speed. Unlike the previous studies, we do not use the shooting argument to show this. Instead, we apply an iteration process based on Berestycki et al 2005 (Math Comput. Modelling 50 1385-93) to construct a set of super/sub-solutions. Since the underlying system does not enjoy the comparison principle, such a set of super/sub-solutions is not based on travelling waves, and in fact the super/sub-solutions depend on each other. With the aid of the set of super/sub-solutions, we can construct the solution of the truncated problem on the finite interval, which, via the limiting argument, can in turn generate the wave solution. There are several advantages to this approach. First, it can remove the technical assumptions on the diffusivities of the species in the existing literature. Second, this approach is of PDE type, and hence it can shed some light on the spreading phenomenon indicated by numerical simulation. In fact, we can compute the spreading speed of the predator species for a class of biologically acceptable initial distributions. Third, this approach might be applied to the study of waves in non-cooperative systems (i.e. a system without a comparison principle).

  8. Air density dependence of the response of the PTW SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber for (125)I brachytherapy seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Del Río, J; Tornero-López, A M; Guirado, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the air density dependence of the response of the new SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber, manufactured by PTW. The air density dependence of three different SourceCheck 4pi chambers was studied by measuring (125)I sources. Measurements were taken by varying the pressure from 746.6 to 986.6hPa in a pressure chamber. Three different HDR 1000 Plus ionization chambers were also analyzed under similar conditions. A linear and a potential-like function of the air density were fitted to experimental data and their achievement in describing them was analyzed. SourceCheck 4pi chamber response showed a residual dependence on the air density once the standard pressure and temperature factor was applied. The chamber response was overestimated when the air density was below that under normal atmospheric conditions. A similar dependence was found for the HDR 1000 Plus chambers analyzed. A linear function of the air density permitted a very good description of this residual dependence, better than with a potential function. No significant variability between the different specimens of the same chamber model studied was found. The effect of overestimation observed in the chamber responses once they are corrected for the standard pressure and temperature may represent a non-negligible ∼4% overestimation in high altitude cities as ours (700m AMSL). This overestimation behaves linearly with the air density in all cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tactile Experience Shapes Prey-Capture Behavior in Etruscan Shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eBrecht

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A crucial role of tactile experience for the maturation of neural response properties in the somatosensory system is well established, but little is known about the role of tactile experience in the development of tactile behaviors. Here we study how tactile experience affects prey capture behavior in Etruscan shrews, Suncus etruscus. Prey capture in adult shrews is a high-speed behavior that relies on precise attacks guided by tactile Gestalt cues. We studied the role of tactile experience by three different approaches. First, we analyzed the hunting skills of young shrews right after weaning. We found that prey capture in young animals is most but not all aspects similar to that of adults. Second we performed whisker trimming for three to four weeks after birth. Such deprivation resulted in a lasting disruption of prey capture even after whisker re-growth: attacks lacked precise targeting and had a lower success rate. Third, we presented adult shrews with an entirely novel prey species, the giant cockroach. The shape of this roach is very different from the shrew’s normal (cricket prey and the thorax – the preferred point of attack in crickets – is protected a heavy cuticle. Initially shrews attacked giant roaches the same way they attack crickets and targeted the thoracic region. With progressive experience, however, shrews adopted a new attack strategy targeting legs and underside of the roaches while avoiding other body parts. Speed and efficiency of attacks improved. These data suggest that tactile experience shapes prey capture behavior.

  10. Disentangling mite predator-prey relationships by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayas, Consuelo; Pina, Tatiana; Gómez-Martínez, María A; Camañes, Gemma; Ibáñez-Gual, María V; Jaques, Josep A; Hurtado, Mónica A

    2015-11-01

    Gut content analysis using molecular techniques can help elucidate predator-prey relationships in situations in which other methodologies are not feasible, such as in the case of trophic interactions between minute species such as mites. We designed species-specific primers for a mite community occurring in Spanish citrus orchards comprising two herbivores, the Tetranychidae Tetranychus urticae and Panonychus citri, and six predatory mites belonging to the Phytoseiidae family; these predatory mites are considered to be these herbivores' main biological control agents. These primers were successfully multiplexed in a single PCR to test the range of predators feeding on each of the two prey species. We estimated prey DNA detectability success over time (DS50), which depended on the predator-prey combination and ranged from 0.2 to 18 h. These values were further used to weight prey detection in field samples to disentangle the predatory role played by the most abundant predators (i.e. Euseius stipulatus and Phytoseiulus persimilis). The corrected predation value for E. stipulatus was significantly higher than for P. persimilis. However, because this 1.5-fold difference was less than that observed regarding their sevenfold difference in abundance, we conclude that P. persimilis is the most effective predator in the system; it preyed on tetranychids almost five times more frequently than E. stipulatus did. The present results demonstrate that molecular tools are appropriate to unravel predator-prey interactions in tiny species such as mites, which include important agricultural pests and their predators.

  11. Prey detection by vomeronasal chemoreception in a plethodontid salamander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placyk, John S; Graves, Brent M

    2002-05-01

    While chemoreception is involved in a wide variety of salamander behaviors, the chemosensory system that mediates specific behaviors is rarely known. We investigated the role of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in foraging behavior of the red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) by manipulating salamanders' abilities to detect nonvolatile chemical cues emitted by potential prey. Subjects received one of three treatments: (1) impaired vomeronasal system, (2) sham manipulation, and (3) no manipulation. The role of the VNS in mediating foraging on motile prey (Drosophila melanogaster) was investigated under three light conditions (bright, dim, dark). Salamanders with impaired VNSs foraged less efficiently than either of the other experimental groups by displaying the longest latency to attack and the lowest rate of prey capture, especially in the absence of visual cues. A second experiment utilized freshly killed prey to determine whether the VNS takes on added importance in the absence of visual or tactile cues associated with moving prey. Animals with impaired VNSs showed a decreased foraging efficiency on stationary prey under both dark and light conditions. In addition, a mark-recapture study of VNS-impaired and sham salamanders in the field also indicated that salamanders with impaired VNSs consumed fewer stationary prey compared to shams. The study indicates that the VNS plays a substantial role in the foraging behavior of the plethodontid salamander, P. cinereus.

  12. Predicting prey population dynamics from kill rate, predation rate and predator-prey ratios in three wolf-ungulate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetich, John A; Hebblewhite, Mark; Smith, Douglas W; Peterson, Rolf O

    2011-11-01

    1. Predation rate (PR) and kill rate are both fundamental statistics for understanding predation. However, relatively little is known about how these statistics relate to one another and how they relate to prey population dynamics. We assess these relationships across three systems where wolf-prey dynamics have been observed for 41 years (Isle Royale), 19 years (Banff) and 12 years (Yellowstone). 2. To provide context for this empirical assessment, we developed theoretical predictions of the relationship between kill rate and PR under a broad range of predator-prey models including predator-dependent, ratio-dependent and Lotka-Volterra dynamics. 3. The theoretical predictions indicate that kill rate can be related to PR in a variety of diverse ways (e.g. positive, negative, unrelated) that depend on the nature of predator-prey dynamics (e.g. structure of the functional response). These simulations also suggested that the ratio of predator-to-prey is a good predictor of prey growth rate. That result motivated us to assess the empirical relationship between the ratio and prey growth rate for each of the three study sites. 4. The empirical relationships indicate that PR is not well predicted by kill rate, but is better predicted by the ratio of predator-to-prey. Kill rate is also a poor predictor of prey growth rate. However, PR and ratio of predator-to-prey each explained significant portions of variation in prey growth rate for two of the three study sites. 5. Our analyses offer two general insights. First, Isle Royale, Banff and Yellowstone are similar insomuch as they all include wolves preying on large ungulates. However, they also differ in species diversity of predator and prey communities, exploitation by humans and the role of dispersal. Even with the benefit of our analysis, it remains difficult to judge whether to be more impressed by the similarities or differences. This difficulty nicely illustrates a fundamental property of ecological

  13. Predator cannibalism can intensify negative impacts on heterospecific prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Kunio; Kishida, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    Although natural populations consist of individuals with different traits, and the degree of phenotypic variation varies among populations, the impact of phenotypic variation on ecological interactions has received little attention, because traditional approaches to community ecology assume homogeneity of individuals within a population. Stage structure, which is a common way of generating size and developmental variation within predator populations, can drive cannibalistic interactions, which can affect the strength of predatory effects on the predator's heterospecific prey. Studies have shown that predator cannibalism weakens predatory effects on heterospecific prey by reducing the size of the predator population and by inducing less feeding activity of noncannibal predators. We predict, however, that predator cannibalism, by promoting rapid growth of the cannibals, can also intensify predation pressure on heterospecific prey, because large predators have large resource requirements and may utilize a wider variety of prey species. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an experiment in which we created carnivorous salamander (Hynobius retardatus) populations with different stage structures by manipulating the salamander's hatch timing (i.e., populations with large or small variation in the timing of hatching), and explored the resultant impacts on the abundance, behavior, morphology, and life history of the salamander's large heterospecific prey, Rana pirica frog tadpoles. Cannibalism was rare in salamander populations having small hatch-timing variation, but was frequent in those having large hatch-timing variation. Thus, giant salamander cannibals occurred only in the latter. We clearly showed that salamander giants exerted strong predation pressure on frog tadpoles, which induced large behavioral and morphological defenses in the tadpoles and caused them to metamorphose late at large size. Hence, predator cannibalism arising from large variation in the timing

  14. Alternative prey use affects helminth parasite infections in grey wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Olwyn C; Roth, James D

    2016-09-01

    Predators affect prey populations not only through direct predation, but also by acting as definitive hosts for their parasites and completing parasite life cycles. Understanding the affects of parasitism on prey population dynamics requires knowing how their predators' parasite community is affected by diet and prey availability. Ungulates, such as moose (Alces americanus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), are often important prey for wolves (Canis lupus), but wolves also consume a variety of alternative prey, including beaver (Castor canadensis) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus). The use of alternative prey, which may host different or fewer parasites than ungulates, could potentially reduce overall abundance of ungulate parasites within the ecosystem, benefiting both wolves and ungulate hosts. We examined parasites in wolf carcasses from eastern Manitoba and estimated wolf diet using stable isotope analysis. Taeniidae cestodes were present in most wolves (75%), reflecting a diet primarily comprised of ungulates, but nematodes were unexpectedly rare. Cestode abundance was negatively related to the wolf's δ(13) C value, indicating diet affects parasite abundance. Wolves that consumed a higher proportion of beaver and caribou (Rangifer tarandus), estimated using Bayesian mixing models, had lower cestode abundance, suggesting the use of these alternative prey can reduce parasite loads. Long-term consumption of beavers may lower the abundance of adult parasites in wolves, eventually lowering parasite density in the region and ultimately benefiting ungulates that serve as intermediate hosts. Thus, alternative prey can affect both predator-prey and host-parasite interactions and potentially affect food web dynamics. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  15. Individual prey choices of octopuses: Are they generalist or specialist?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer A. MATHER; Tatiana S. LEITE; Allan T. BATISTA

    2012-01-01

    Prey choice is often evaluated at the species or population level.Here,we analyzed the diet of octopuses of different populations with the aim to assess the importance of individual feeding habits as a factor affecting prey choice.Two methods were used,an assessment of the extent to which an individual octopus made choices of species representative of those population (PSi and IS) and 25% cutoff values for number of choices and percentage intake of individual on their prey.In one population of Octopus cf vulgaris in Bermuda individuals were generaiist by IS=0.77,but most chose many prey of the same species,and were specialists on it by >75% intake.Another population had a wider prey selection,still generalist with PSi=0.66,but two individuals specialized by choices.In Bonaire,there was a wide range of prey species chosen,and the population was specialists by IS=0.42.Individual choices revealed seven specialists and four generalists.A population of Octopus cyanea in Hawaii all had similar choices of crustaceans,so the population was generalist by IS with 0.74.But by individual choices,three were considered a specialist.A population of Enteroctopus dofleini from Puget Sound had a wide range of preferences,in which seven were also specialists,IS=0.53.By individual choices,thirteen were also specialists.Given the octopus specialty of learning during foraging,we hypothesize that both localized prey availability and individual personality differences could influence the exploration for prey and this translates into different prey choices across individuals and populations showed in this study.

  16. Individual prey choices of octopuses: Are they generalist or specialist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. MATHER, Tatiana S. LEITE, Allan T. BATISTA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prey choice is often evaluated at the species or population level. Here, we analyzed the diet of octopuses of different populations with the aim to assess the importance of individual feeding habits as a factor affecting prey choice. Two methods were used, an assessment of the extent to which an individual octopus made choices of species representative of those population (PSi and IS and 25% cutoff values for number of choices and percentage intake of individual on their prey. In one population of Octopus cf vulgaris in Bermuda individuals were generalist by IS=0.77, but most chose many prey of the same species, and were specialists on it by >75% intake. Another population had a wider prey selection, still generalist with PSi=0.66, but two individuals specialized by choices. In Bonaire, there was a wide range of prey species chosen, and the population was specialists by IS= 0.42. Individual choices revealed seven specialists and four generalists. A population of Octopus cyanea in Hawaii all had similar choices of crustaceans, so the population was generalist by IS with 0.74. But by individual choices, three were considered a specialist. A population of Enteroctopus dofleini from Puget Sound had a wide range of preferences, in which seven were also specialists, IS=0.53. By individual choices, thirteen were also specialists. Given the octopus specialty of learning during foraging, we hypothesize that both localized prey availability and individual personality differences could influence the exploration for prey and this translates into different prey choices across individuals and populations showed in this study [Current Zoology 58 (4: 597-603, 2012].

  17. A self-organized system of smart preys and predators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenfeld, Alejandro F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, CONICET, Suc. 4, C.C. 16 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Albano, Ezequiel V. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, CONICET, Suc. 4, C.C. 16 (1900) La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: ealbano@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

    2004-11-22

    Based on the fact that, a standard prey-predator model (SPPM), exhibits irreversible phase transitions, belonging to the universality class of directed percolation (DP), between prey-predator coexistence and predator extinction [Phys. Lett. A 280 (2001) 45], a self-organized prey-predator model (SOPPM) is formulated and studied by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The SOPPM is achieved defining the parameters of the SPPM as functions of the density of species. It is shown that the SOPPM self-organizes into an active state close the absorbing phase of the SPPM, and consequently their avalanche exponents also belong to the universality class of DP.

  18. Cannibalism in discrete-time predator-prey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Yunshyong; Jang, Sophia R-J

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we propose and investigate a two-stage population model with cannibalism. It is shown that cannibalism can destabilize and lower the magnitude of the interior steady state. However, it is proved that cannibalism has no effect on the persistence of the population. Based on this model, we study two systems of predator-prey interactions where the prey population is cannibalistic. A sufficient condition based on the nontrivial boundary steady state for which both populations can coexist is derived. It is found via numerical simulations that introduction of the predator population may either stabilize or destabilize the prey dynamics, depending on cannibalism coefficients and other vital parameters.

  19. The Neuronal Control of Flying Prey Interception in Dragonflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-19

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0193 THE NEURONAL CONTROL OF FLYING PREY INTERCEPTION IN DRAGONFLIES Robert Olberg TRUSTEES OF UNION COLLEGE IN THE TOWN OF...OMB control number. 12-08-2014 Final 15-05-2010 to 14-05-2014 The neuronal control of flying prey interception in dragonflies FA9550-10-1-0472 Olberg...AFOSR/PKR1 DUNS143574726 Distribution A. Approved for public release Eight pairs of large descending visual neurons (TSDNs) control dragonfly prey

  20. Toxoplasmosis in prey species and consequences for prevalence in feral cats: not all prey species are equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, E; Thulliez, P; Pontier, D; Gilot-Fromont, E

    2007-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is largely transmitted to definitive felid hosts through predation. Not all prey species represent identical risks of infection for cats because of differences in prey susceptibility, exposure and/or lifespan. Previously published studies have shown that prevalence in rodent and lagomorph species is positively correlated with body mass. We tested the hypothesis that different prey species have different infection risks by comparing infection dynamics of feral cats at 4 sites in the sub-Antarctic Kerguelen archipelago which differed in prey availability. Cats were trapped from 1994 to 2004 and anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were detected using the modified agglutination test (> or =1:40). Overall seroprevalence was 51.09%. Antibody prevalence differed between sites, depending on diet and also on sex, after taking into account the effect of age. Males were more often infected than females and the difference between the sexes tended to be more pronounced in the site where more prey species were available. A difference in predation efficiency between male and female cats may explain this result. Overall, our results suggest that the composition of prey items in cat diet influences the risk of T. gondii infection. Prey compositon should therefore be considered important in any understanding of infection dynamics of T. gondii.

  1. Nodulation gene regulation and quorum sensing control density-dependent suppression and restriction of nodulation in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum-soybean symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitacksorn, Siriluck; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    The nodulation of Glycine max cv. Lambert and the nodulation-restricting plant introduction (PI) genotype PI 417566 by wild-type Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 is regulated in a population-density-dependent manner. Nodulation on both plant genotypes was suppressed (inhibited) when plants received a high-density inoculum (10(9) cells/ml) of strain USDA110 grown in complex medium, and more nodules were produced on plants receiving a low-cell-density inoculum (10(5) cells/ml). Since cell-free supernatants from strain USDA110 grown to high cell density in complex medium decreased the expression of an nodY-lacZ fusion, this phenomenon was attributed to bradyoxetin-induced repression of nod gene expression. Inoculation of either the permissive soybean genotype (cv. Lambert) or PI 417566 with 10(9) cells/ml of the nodD2, nolA, nodW, and nwsB mutants of USDA110 enhanced nodulation (up to 24%) relative to that seen with inoculations done with 10(5) cells/ml of the mutants or the wild-type strain, indicating that these genes are involved in population-density-dependent nodulation of soybeans. In contrast, the number of nodules produced by an nodD1 mutant on either soybean genotype was less than those seen with the wild-type strain inoculated at a low inoculum density. The nodD2 mutant outcompeted B. japonicum strain USDA123 for nodulation of G. max cv. Lambert at a high or low inoculum density, and the results of root-tip-marking and time-to-nodulate studies indicated that the nolA and nodD2 mutants nodulated this soybean genotype faster than wild-type USDA110. Taken together, the results from these studies indicate that the nodD2 mutant of B. japonicum may be useful to enhance soybean nodulation at high inoculum densities and that NodD2 is a key repressor influencing host-controlled restriction of nodulation, density-dependent suppression of nodulation, perception of bradyoxetin, and competitiveness in the soybean-B. japonicum symbiosis.

  2. Mortal assets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  3. Trophic relay and prey switching - A stomach contents and calorimetric investigation of an ambassid fish and their saltmarsh prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Jack J.; Platell, Margaret E.; Schreider, Maria J.

    2015-12-01

    Trophic relay is an ecological model that involves the movement of biomass and energy from vegetation, such as saltmarshes, within estuaries to the open sea via a series of predator-prey relationships. Any potential for trophic relay is therefore affected by water movements within an estuary and by the ability of a predator to "switch" prey in response to fluctuating abundances of those prey. Saltmarsh-dwelling grapsid crabs, which feed on saltmarsh-derived detritus and microphytobenthos, release zoeae into ebbing tides that inundate saltmarshes during spring-tide cycles within tidally-dominated estuaries, such as Brisbane Water Estuary, therefore providing an opportunity to examine whether prey-switching and/or trophic relay may occur in fish that feed on those zoeae (such as the highly abundant estuarine ambassid, Ambassis jacksoniensis). This model was examined by sampling A. jacksoniensis near saltmarshes in a large, temperate south-eastern Australian estuary during flood and ebb tides on days of saltmarsh inundation and non-inundation over four spring-tide events in 2012. Stomach fullnesses of A. jacksoniensis were generally highest during ebb tides on days of saltmarsh inundation, implying that feeding was most marked at these times. Caridean decapods dominated diets during flood tides and on days of no saltmarsh inundation, while crab zoeae dominated diets during ebb tides and on days of inundation, suggesting that, when saltmarsh-derived zoeae became abundant, A. jacksoniensis switched to feeding on those prey. Three potential zooplankton prey (calanoid copepods, caridean decapods and crab zoeae) did not differ calorimetrically, indicating that switching of prey by A. jacksoniensis is not directly related to their preying on energetically greater prey, but reflects opportunistic feeding on more abundant and/or less elusive prey. As A. jacksoniensis is able to switch prey from estuarine caridean decapods to saltmarsh-derived crab zoeae, this very abundant

  4. Harvesting Control for a Stage-Structured Predator-Prey Model with Ivlev's Functional Response and Impulsive Stocking on Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyuan Liu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a delayed stage-structured Ivlev's functional response predator-prey model with impulsive stocking on prey and continuous harvesting on predator. Sufficient conditions of the global attractivity of predator-extinction periodic solution and the permanence of the system are obtained. These results show that the behavior of impulsive stocking on prey plays an important role for the permanence of the system. We also prove that all solutions of the system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Our results provide reliable tactical basis for the biological resource management and enrich the theory of impulsive delay differential equations.

  5. Perceiving the algae: How feeding-current feeding copepods detect their nonmotile prey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goncalves, Rodrigo J.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Feeding-current feeding copepods detect and capture prey individually, but the mechanism by which nonmotile prey is detected has been unclear. Early reports that copepods detect phytoplankton prey at distances of one body length or more led to the hypothesis that solutes leaking from the prey wou...

  6. Foraging behavior of larval cod ( Gadus morhua ) influenced by prey density and hunger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1995-01-01

    to 7 mm long) was observed visually, and prey attacks, swimming activity and gut contents were registered across a range of 1 to 120 copepod nauplii l(-1). When prey density decreased, larvae increased their swimming activity, increased their responsiveness to prey (distance of reaction) and decreased...... in the lower range of (mean) prey densities measured at sea....

  7. Predation and prey selectivity by Argyrosomus h%/epidotus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ly show that larger prey are preferred by larger predators. S. Afr. J. Zoot. 1985 ... found in estuaries in Natal and the Cape (Wallace & van der. Elst 1975 .... Trawling depths and times ...... plankton picker, A. hololepidotus is probably an active.

  8. NONLINEAR SINGULARLY PERTURBED PREDATOR-PREY REACTION DIFFUSION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MoJiaqi; TangRongrong

    2004-01-01

    A class of nonlinear predator-prey reaction diffusion systems for singularly perturbedproblems are considered. Under suitable conditions, by using theory of differential inequalitiesthe existence and asymptotic behavior of solution for initial boundary value problems arestudied.

  9. Coexistence of structured populations with size-based prey selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Species with a large adult-offspring size ratio and a preferred predator–prey mass ratio undergo ontogenetic trophic niche shift(s) throughout life. Trophic interactions between such species vary throughout life, resulting in different species-level interaction motifs depending on the ma......Abstract Species with a large adult-offspring size ratio and a preferred predator–prey mass ratio undergo ontogenetic trophic niche shift(s) throughout life. Trophic interactions between such species vary throughout life, resulting in different species-level interaction motifs depending...... coexistence’ state when the ratio between sizes at maturation of the two species is less than a predator–prey mass ratio and the resource level is low to intermediate, or in a ‘trophic ladder’ state if the ratio of sizes at maturation is larger than the predator–prey mass ratio at all resource levels. While...

  10. Scaling up predator–prey dynamics using spatial moment equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barraquand, Frédéric; Murrell, David J; Spencer, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Classical models of predator–prey dynamics, commonly used in community and evolutionary ecology to explain population cycles, species coexistence, the effects of enrichment, or predict the evolution of behavioural traits...

  11. Analyses of stomach contents provide information on prey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    However, this difficulty has been overcome for some localities .... Changes in prey choice with growth were investigated, ..... hunting behaviour and habitat use by the different sharks. ... doubt partly because of the resistance of the chitinous.

  12. Density-dependent dynamical coexistence of excitons and free carriers in the organolead perovskite C H3N H3Pb I3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Yu; Wang, Xiangyuan; Lv, Yanping; Wang, Shufeng; Wang, Kai; Shi, Yantao; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-10-01

    The high efficiency of perovskite solar cells benefits from the high density of photoinduced free carriers. We studied how exciton and free carriers, as the two major photoproducts, coexist inside the C H3N H3Pb I3 perovskite. A new density-resolved spectroscopic method was developed for this purpose. The density-dependent coexistence of excitons and free carriers over a wide density range was experimentally observed. The quantitative analysis on the density-resolved spectra revealed a moderate exciton binding energy of 24 ± 2 meV. The results effectively proved that the strong ionic polarization inside the perovskite has a negligible contribution to exciton formation. The spectra also efficiently uncovered the effective mass of electron-hole pairs. Our spectroscopic method and the results profoundly enrich the understanding of the photophysics in perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications.

  13. Carrier-density dependence of photoluminescence from localized states in InGaN/GaN quantum wells in nanocolumns and a thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimosako, N., E-mail: n-shimosako@sophia.jp; Inose, Y.; Satoh, H.; Kinjo, K.; Nakaoka, T.; Oto, T. [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kishino, K.; Ema, K. [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sophia Nanotechnology Research Center, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-11-07

    We have measured and analyzed the carrier-density dependence of photoluminescence (PL) spectra and the PL efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells in nanocolumns and in a thin film over a wide excitation range. The localized states parameters, such as the tailing parameter, density and size of the localized states, and the mobility edge density are estimated. The spectral change and reduction of PL efficiency are explained by filling of the localized states and population into the extended states around the mobility edge density. We have also found that the nanocolumns have a narrower distribution of the localized states and a higher PL efficiency than those of the film sample although the In composition of the nanocolumns is higher than that of the film.

  14. Density-dependent benefits in ant-hemipteran mutualism? The case of the ghost ant Tapinoma melanocephalum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aiming; Kuang, Beiqing; Gao, Yingrui; Liang, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Although density-dependent benefits to hemipterans from ant tending have been measured many times, few studies have focused on integrated effects such as interactions between ant tending, natural enemy density, and hemipteran density. In this study, we tested whether the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis is affected by tending by ghost ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum), the presence of parasitoids, mealybug density, parasitoid density and interactions among these factors. Our results showed that mealybug colony growth rate and percentage parasitism were significantly affected by ant tending, parasitoid presence, and initial mealybug density separately. However, there were no interactions among the independent factors. There were also no significant interactions between ant tending and parasitoid density on either mealybug colony growth rate or percentage parasitism. Mealybug colony growth rate showed a negative linear relationship with initial mealybug density but a positive linear relationship with the level of ant tending. These results suggest that benefits to mealybugs are density-independent and are affected by ant tending level.

  15. Molecular basis for prey relocation in viperid snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebrate predators use a broad arsenal of behaviors and weaponry for overcoming fractious and potentially dangerous prey. A unique array of predatory strategies occur among snakes, ranging from mechanical modes of constriction and jaw-holding in non-venomous snakes, to a chemical means, venom, for quickly dispatching prey. However, even among venomous snakes, different prey handling strategies are utilized, varying from the strike-and-hold behaviors exhibited by highly toxic elapid snakes to the rapid strike-and-release envenomation seen in viperid snakes. For vipers, this mode of envenomation represents a minimal risk predatory strategy by permitting little contact with or retaliation from prey, but it adds the additional task of relocating envenomated prey which has wandered from the attack site. This task is further confounded by trails of other unstruck conspecific or heterospecific prey. Despite decades of behavioral study, researchers still do not know the molecular mechanism which allows for prey relocation. Results During behavioral discrimination trials (vomeronasal responsiveness) to euthanized mice injected with size-fractionated venom, Crotalus atrox responded significantly to only one protein peak. Assays for enzymes common in rattlesnake venoms, such as exonuclease, L-amino acid oxidase, metalloproteinase, thrombin-like and kallikrein-like serine proteases and phospholipase A2, showed that vomeronasal responsiveness was not dependent on enzymatic activity. Using mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing, we identified the proteins responsible for envenomated prey discrimination as the non-enzymatic disintegrins crotatroxin 1 and 2. Our results demonstrate a novel and critical biological role for venom disintegrins far beyond their well-established role in disruption of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Conclusions These findings reveal the evolutionary significance of free disintegrins in venoms as the molecular

  16. Red queen dynamics in specific predator-prey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Terence; Cai, Anna Q

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of a predator-prey system are studied, with a comparison of discrete and continuous strategy spaces. For a [Formula: see text] system, the average strategies used in the discrete and continuous case are shown to be the same. It is further shown that the inclusion of constant prey switching in the discrete case can have a stabilising effect and reduce the number of available predator types through extinction.

  17. Recognition of inconspicuous prey: importance of additional visual cues

    OpenAIRE

    KARLÍKOVÁ, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    The ability of wild caught great tits (Parus major) to discriminate between equally coloured edible (roach - Blaptica dubia) and inedible prey (firebug - Pyrrhocoris apterus) was tested with respect to other visual traits (shape of legs, antennae,means of locomotion). To simulate more natural conditions, three different experiment types were carried out. Prey was presented either alternately (first roach or firebug) or simultaneously. Additionally, the effect of learning and memory was tested...

  18. Feeding, prey selection and prey encounter mechanisms in the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Titelman, J.

    1998-01-01

    (similar to 1 m h(- 1)). In stagnant water, clearance rates of latex spheres (5-80 mu m) increased approximately with prey particle size squared. This scaling is consistent with N.scintillans being an interception feeder. However, absolute clearance rates were substantially lower than those predicted...... higher rates than latex beads and other phytoplankters, particularly dinoflagellates. We propose that diatoms stick more efficiently than latex beads to the mucus of N.scintillans and that dinoflagellates reduce fatal contact behaviorally. We conclude that N.scintillans is an interception feeder...

  19. Local Bifurcations and Optimal Theory in a Delayed Predator-Prey Model with Threshold Prey Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankam, Israel; Tchinda Mouofo, Plaire; Mendy, Abdoulaye; Lam, Mountaga; Tewa, Jean Jules; Bowong, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effects of time delay and piecewise-linear threshold policy harvesting for a delayed predator-prey model. It is the first time that Holling response function of type III and the present threshold policy harvesting are associated with time delay. The trajectories of our delayed system are bounded; the stability of each equilibrium is analyzed with and without delay; there are local bifurcations as saddle-node bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation; optimal harvesting is also investigated. Numerical simulations are provided in order to illustrate each result.

  20. Integrated pest management with stochastic birth rate for prey species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Olcay; Comar, Timothy D; Hrozencik, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Song and Xiang (2006) developed an impulsive differential equations model for a two-prey one-predator model with stage structure for the predator. They demonstrate the conditions on the impulsive period for which a globally asymptotically stable pest-eradication periodic solution exists, as well as conditions on the impulsive period for which the prey species is permanently maintained under an economically acceptable threshold. We extend their model by including stage structure for both predator and prey as well as by adding stochastic elements in the birth rate of the prey. As in Song and Xiang (2006), we find the conditions under which a globally asymptotically stable pest eradication periodic solution exists. In addition, we numerically show the relationship between the stochastically varying birth rate of the prey and the necessary efficacy of the pesticide for which the probability of eradication of the prey species is above 90%. This is significant because the model recognizes varying environmental and climatic conditions which affect the resources needed for pest eradication.

  1. Predator-prey interactions and changing environments: who benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Mark V; Mangel, Marc; Hedges, Kevin

    2007-11-29

    While aquatic environments have long been thought to be more moderate environments than their terrestrial cousins, environmental data demonstrate that for some systems this is not so. Numerous important environmental parameters can fluctuate dramatically, notably dissolved oxygen, turbidity and temperature. The roles of dissolved oxygen and turbidity on predator-prey interactions have been discussed in detail elsewhere within this issue and will be considered only briefly here. Here, we will focus primarily on the role of temperature and its potential impact upon predator-prey interactions. Two key properties are of particular note. For temperate aquatic ecosystems, all piscine and invertebrate piscivores and their prey are ectothermic. They will therefore be subject to energetic demands that are significantly affected by environmental temperature. Furthermore, the physical properties of water, particularly its high thermal conductivity, mean that thermal microenvironments will not exist so that fine-scale habitat movements will not be an option for dealing with changing water temperature in lentic environments. Unfortunately, there has been little experimental analysis of the role of temperature on such predator-prey interactions, so we will instead focus on theoretical work, indicating that potential implications associated with thermal change are unlikely to be straightforward and may present a greater threat to predators than to their prey. Specifically, we demonstrate that changes in the thermal environment can result in a net benefit to cold-adapted species through the mechanism of predator-prey interactions.

  2. Predator interference and stability of predator-prey dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přibylová, Lenka; Berec, Luděk

    2015-08-01

    Predator interference, that is, a decline in the per predator consumption rate as predator density increases, is generally thought to promote predator-prey stability. Indeed, this has been demonstrated in many theoretical studies on predator-prey dynamics. In virtually all of these studies, the stabilization role is demonstrated as a weakening of the paradox of enrichment. With predator interference, stable limit cycles that appear as a result of environmental enrichment occur for higher values of the environmental carrying capacity of prey, and even a complete absence of the limit cycles can happen. Here we study predator-prey dynamics using the Rosenzweig-MacArthur-like model in which the Holling type II functional response has been replaced by a predator-dependent family which generalizes many of the commonly used descriptions of predator interference. By means of a bifurcation analysis we show that sufficiently strong predator interference may bring about another stabilizing mechanism. In particular, hysteresis combined with (dis)appearance of stable limit cycles imply abrupt increases in both the prey and predator densities and enhanced persistence and resilience of the predator-prey system. We encourage refitting the previously collected data on predator consumption rates as well as for conducting further predation experiments to see what functional response from the explored family is the most appropriate.

  3. Indirect evolutionary rescue: prey adapts, predator avoids extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamichi, Masato; Miner, Brooks E

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have increasingly recognized evolutionary rescue (adaptive evolution that prevents extinction following environmental change) as an important process in evolutionary biology and conservation science. Researchers have concentrated on single species living in isolation, but populations in nature exist within communities of interacting species, so evolutionary rescue should also be investigated in a multispecies context. We argue that the persistence or extinction of a focal species can be determined solely by evolutionary change in an interacting species. We demonstrate that prey adaptive evolution can prevent predator extinction in two-species predator-prey models, and we derive the conditions under which this indirect evolutionary interaction is essential to prevent extinction following environmental change. A nonevolving predator can be rescued from extinction by adaptive evolution of its prey due to a trade-off for the prey between defense against predation and population growth rate. As prey typically have larger populations and shorter generations than their predators, prey evolution can be rapid and have profound effects on predator population dynamics. We suggest that this process, which we term 'indirect evolutionary rescue', has the potential to be critically important to the ecological and evolutionary responses of populations and communities to dramatic environmental change.

  4. Revealing the role of predator interference in a predator-prey system with disease in prey population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Kooi, B.W.; Biswas, B.

    2015-01-01

    on infected populations can have both positive and negative influences on disease in prey populations. Here, we present a predator-prey system where the prey population is subjected to an infectious disease to explore the impact of predator on disease dynamics. Specifically, we investigate how...... the interference among predators affects the dynamics and structure of the predator-prey community. We perform a detailed numerical bifurcation analysis and find an unusually large variety of complex dynamics, such as, bistability, torus and chaos, in the presence of predators. We show that, depending...... on the strength of interference among predators, predators enhance or control disease outbreaks and population persistence. Moreover, the presence of multistable regimes makes the system very sensitive to perturbations and facilitates a number of regime shifts. Since, the habitat structure and the choice...

  5. The Dynamical Analysis of a Prey-Predator Model with a Refuge-Stage Structure Prey Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raid Kamel Naji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed and analyzed a mathematical model dealing with two species of prey-predator system. It is assumed that the prey is a stage structure population consisting of two compartments known as immature prey and mature prey. It has a refuge capability as a defensive property against the predation. The existence, uniqueness, and boundedness of the solution of the proposed model are discussed. All the feasible equilibrium points are determined. The local and global stability analysis of them are investigated. The occurrence of local bifurcation (such as saddle node, transcritical, and pitchfork near each of the equilibrium points is studied. Finally, numerical simulations are given to support the analytic results.

  6. Dynamic Analysis of a Predator-Prey (Pest Model with Disease in Prey and Involving an Impulsive Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviors of a predator-prey (pest model with disease in prey and involving an impulsive control strategy to release infected prey at fixed times are investigated for the purpose of integrated pest management. Mathematical theoretical works have been pursuing the investigation of the local asymptotical stability and global attractivity for the semitrivial periodic solution and population persistent, which depicts the threshold expression of some critical parameters for carrying out integrated pest management. Numerical analysis indicates that the impulsive control strategy has a strong effect on the dynamical complexity and population persistent using bifurcation diagrams and power spectra diagrams. These results show that if the release amount of infective prey can satisfy some critical conditions, then all biological populations will coexist. All these results are expected to be of use in the study of the dynamic complexity of ecosystems.

  7. Prey utilization by wolves and a preliminary assessment of wolf and prey densities in three drainages within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the prey utilization by wolves and an assessment of wolf and prey densities in 3 drainages within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  8. A specialized araneophagic predator's short-term nutrient utilization depends on the macronutrient content of prey rather than on prey taxonomic affiliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Søren; Li, Daiqin; Mayntz, David

    2010-01-01

    A specialist predator that has a specialized diet, prey-specific prey-capture behaviour and a preference for a particular type of prey may or may not be specialized metabolically. Previous studies have shown that jumping spiders of the genus Portia prey on other spiders using prey-specific prey......-capture behaviour, prefer spiders as prey to insects and gain long-term benefits in terms of higher survival and growth rates on spider diets than on insect diets. However, it is unclear whether there are substances uniquely present in spiders on which Portia depends, or, alternatively, spiders and insects all...... contain more or less the same nutrients but the relative amounts of these substances are such that Portia perform better on a spider diet. These questions are addressed by testing the hypothesis that prey specialization includes metabolic adaptations that allow Portia an enhanced nutrient extraction...

  9. Dynamics and patterns of a diffusive Leslie-Gower prey-predator model with strong Allee effect in prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wenjie; Wang, Mingxin

    2016-10-01

    This paper is devoted to study the dynamical properties and stationary patterns of a diffusive Leslie-Gower prey-predator model with strong Allee effect in the prey population. We first analyze the nonnegative constant equilibrium solutions and their stabilities, and then study the dynamical properties of time-dependent solutions. Moreover, we investigate the stationary patterns induced by diffusions (Turing pattern). Our results show that the impact of the strong Allee effect essentially increases the system spatiotemporal complexity.

  10. Dynamic Behaviors of a Nonautonomous Discrete Predator-Prey System Incorporating a Prey Refuge and Holling Type II Functional Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonautonomous discrete predator-prey system incorporating a prey refuge and Holling type II functional response is studied in this paper. A set of sufficient conditions which guarantee the persistence and global stability of the system are obtained, respectively. Our results show that if refuge is large enough then predator species will be driven to extinction due to the lack of enough food. Two examples together with their numerical simulations show the feasibility of the main results.

  11. Comparing nearshore benthic and pelagic prey as mercury sources to lake fish: the importance of prey quality and mercury content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Roxanne; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L

    2016-09-15

    Mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation in fish poses well-known health risks to wildlife and humans through fish consumption. Yet fish Hg concentrations are highly variable, and key factors driving this variability remain unclear. One little studied source of variation is the influence of habitat-specific feeding on Hg accumulation in lake fish. However, this is likely important because most lake fish feed in multiple habitats during their lives, and the Hg and caloric content of prey from different habitats can differ. This study used a three-pronged approach to investigate the extent to which habitat-specific prey determine differences in Hg bioaccumulation in fish. This study first compared Hg concentrations in common nearshore benthic invertebrates and pelagic zooplankton across five lakes and over the summer season in one lake, and found that pelagic zooplankton generally had higher Hg concentrations than most benthic taxa across lakes, and over a season in one lake. Second, using a bioenergetics model, the effects of prey caloric content from habitat-specific diets on fish growth and Hg accumulation were calculated. This model predicted that the consumption of benthic prey results in lower fish Hg concentrations due to higher prey caloric content and growth dilution (high weight gain relative to Hg from food), in addition to lower prey Hg levels. Third, using data from the literature, links between fish Hg content and the degree of benthivory, were examined, and showed that benthivory was associated with reduced Hg concentrations in lake fish. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that higher Hg content and lower caloric content make pelagic zooplankton prey greater sources of Hg for fish than nearshore benthic prey in lakes. Hence, habitat-specific foraging is likely to be a strong driver of variation in Hg levels within and between fish species.

  12. Delayed stage-structured predator-prey model with impulsive perturbations on predator and chemical control on prey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We consider a delayed stage-structured pest management predator-prey system with impulsive transmitting on predator and chemical control on prey. Sufficient conditions of the global attractiveness of the pest-extinction boundary periodic solution and permanence of the system are obtained. We also prove that all solutions of the system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Our results provide reliable tactical basis for practical pest management.

  13. STABILITY OF A PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM WITH PREY TAXIS IN A GENERAL CLASS OF FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.YOUSEFNEZHAD; S.A. MOHAMMADI

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a diffusive predator-prey system with general functional responses and prey-tactic sensitivities is studied. Providing such generality, we construct a Lyapunov function and we show that the positive constant steady state is locally and globally asymp-totically stable. With an eye on the biological interpretations, a numerical simulation is performed to illustrate the feasibility of the analytical findings.

  14. Variable prey development time suppresses predator-prey cycles and enhances stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, James T; Reeve, John D; Xu, Dashun; Xiao, Mingqing; Stevens, Heidi N

    2016-03-01

    Although theoretical models have demonstrated that predator-prey population dynamics can depend critically on age (stage) structure and the duration and variability in development times of different life stages, experimental support for this theory is non-existent. We conducted an experiment with a host-parasitoid system to test the prediction that increased variability in the development time of the vulnerable host stage can promote interaction stability. Host-parasitoid microcosms were subjected to two treatments: Normal and High variance in the duration of the vulnerable host stage. In control and Normal-variance microcosms, hosts and parasitoids exhibited distinct population cycles. In contrast, insect abundances were 18-24% less variable in High- than Normal-variance microcosms. More significantly, periodicity in host-parasitoid population dynamics disappeared in the High-variance microcosms. Simulation models confirmed that stability in High-variance microcosms was sufficient to prevent extinction. We conclude that developmental variability is critical to predator-prey population dynamics and could be exploited in pest-management programs.

  15. Do lions Panthera leo actively select prey or do prey preferences simply reflect chance responses via evolutionary adaptations to optimal foraging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Matt W; Hayward, Gina J; Tambling, Craig J; Kerley, Graham I H

    2011-01-01

    Research on coursing predators has revealed that actions throughout the predatory behavioral sequence (using encounter rate, hunting rate, and kill rate as proxy measures of decisions) drive observed prey preferences. We tested whether similar actions drive the observed prey preferences of a stalking predator, the African lion Panthera leo. We conducted two 96 hour, continuous follows of lions in Addo Elephant National Park seasonally from December 2003 until November 2005 (16 follows), and compared prey encounter rate with prey abundance, hunt rate with prey encounter rate, and kill rate with prey hunt rate for the major prey species in Addo using Jacobs' electivity index. We found that lions encountered preferred prey species far more frequently than expected based on their abundance, and they hunted these species more frequently than expected based on this higher encounter rate. Lions responded variably to non-preferred and avoided prey species throughout the predatory sequence, although they hunted avoided prey far less frequently than expected based on the number of encounters of them. We conclude that actions of lions throughout the predatory behavioural sequence, but particularly early on, drive the prey preferences that have been documented for this species. Once a hunt is initiated, evolutionary adaptations to the predator-prey interactions drive hunting success.

  16. Influence of salinity and prey presence on the survival of aquatic macroinvertebrates of a freshwater marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Ryong; King, Sammy L.

    2012-01-01

    Salinization of coastal freshwater environments is a global issue. Increased salinity from sea level rise, storm surges, or other mechanisms is common in coastal freshwater marshes of Louisiana, USA. The effects of salinity increases on aquatic macroinvertebrates in these systems have received little attention, despite the importance of aquatic macroinvertebrates for nutrient cycling, biodiversity, and as a food source for vertebrate species. We used microcosm experiments to evaluate the effects of salinity, duration of exposure, and prey availability on the relative survival of dominant aquatic macroinvertebrates (i.e., Procambarus clarkii Girard, Cambarellus puer Hobbs, Libellulidae, Dytiscidae cybister) in a freshwater marsh of southwestern Louisiana. We hypothesized that increased salinity, absence of prey, and increased duration of exposure would decrease survival of aquatic macroinvertebrates and that crustaceans would have higher survival than aquatic insect taxon. Our first hypothesis was only partially supported as only salinity increases combined with prolonged exposure duration affected aquatic macroinvertebrate survival. Furthermore, crustaceans had higher survival than aquatic insects. Salinity stress may cause mortality when acting together with other stressful conditions.

  17. Local extinction of a coral reef fish explained by inflexible prey choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, R. M.; Munday, P. L.; Brandl, S. J.; Jones, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    While global extinctions of marine species are infrequent, local extinctions are becoming common. However, the role of habitat degradation and resource specialisation in explaining local extinction is unknown. On coral reefs, coral bleaching is an increasingly frequent cause of coral mortality that can result in dramatic changes to coral community composition. Coral-associated fishes are often specialised on a limited suite of coral species and are therefore sensitive to these changes. This study documents the local extinction of a corallivorous reef fish, Oxymonacanthus longirostris, following a mass bleaching event that altered the species composition of associated coral communities. Local extinction only occurred on reefs that also completely lost a key prey species, Acropora millepora, even though coral cover remained high. In an experimental test, fish continued to select bleached A. millepora over the healthy, but less-preferred prey species that resisted bleaching. These results suggest that behavioural inflexibility may limit the ability of specialists to cope with even subtle changes to resource availability.

  18. Prey type, vibrations and handling interactively influence spider silk expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamires, S J; Chao, I-C; Tso, I-M

    2010-11-15

    The chemical and mechanical properties of spider major ampullate (MA) silks vary in response to different prey, mostly via differential expression of two genes - MaSp1 and MaSp2 - although the spinning process exerts additional influence over the mechanical properties of silk. The prey cues that initiate differential gene expression are unknown. Prey nutrients, vibratory stimuli and handling have been suggested to be influential. We performed experiments to decouple the vibratory stimuli and handling associated with high and low kinetic energy prey (crickets vs flies) from their prey nutrients to test the relative influence of each as inducers of silk protein expression in the orb web spider Nephila pilipes. We found that the MA silks from spiders feeding on live crickets had greater percentages of glutamine, serine, alanine and glycine than those from spiders feeding on live flies. Proline composition of the silks was unaffected by feeding treatment. Increases in alanine and glycine in the MA silks of the live-cricket-feeding spiders indicate a probable increase in MaSp1 gene expression. The amino acid compositions of N. pilipes feeding on crickets with fly stimuli and N. pilipes feeding on flies with cricket stimuli did not differ from each other or from pre-treatment responses, so these feeding treatments did not induce differential MaSp expression. Our results indicate that cricket vibratory stimuli and handling interact with nutrients to induce N. pilipes to adjust their gene expression to produce webs with mechanical properties appropriate for the retention of this prey. This shows that spiders can genetically alter their silk chemical compositions and, presumably, mechanical properties upon exposure to different prey types. The lack of any change in proline composition with feeding treatment in N. pilipes suggests that the MaSp model determined for Nephila clavipes is not universally applicable to all Nephila.

  19. Patterns and causes of demographic variation in a harvested moose population: evidence for the effects of climate and density-dependent drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Glen S

    2011-11-01

    1. Better understanding of the mechanisms affecting demographic variation in ungulate populations is needed to support sustainable management of harvested populations. While studies of moose Alces alces L. populations have previously explored temporal variation in demographic processes, managers responsible for populations that span large heterogeneous landscapes would benefit from an understanding of how demography varies across biogeographical gradients in climate and other population drivers. Evidence of thresholds in population response to manageable and un-manageable drivers could aid resource managers in identifying limits to the magnitude of sustainable change. 2. Generalized additive models (GAMs) were used to evaluate the relative importance of population density, habitat abundance, summer and winter climatic conditions, primary production, and harvest intensity in explaining spatial variation in moose vital rates in Ontario, Canada. Tree regression was used to test for thresholds in the magnitudes of environmental predictor variables that significantly affected population vital rates. 3. Moose population growth rate was negatively related to moose density and positively related to the abundance of mixed deciduous habitat abundant in forage. Calf recruitment was negatively related to a later start of the growing season and calf harvest. The ratio of bulls to cows was related to male harvest and hunter access, and thresholds were evident in predictor variables for all vital rate models. 4. Findings indicate that the contributions of density-dependent and independent factors can vary depending on the scale of population process. The importance of density dependence and habitat supply to low-density ungulate populations was evident, and management strategies for ungulates may be improved by explicitly linking forest management and harvest. Findings emphasize the importance of considering summer climatic influences to ungulate populations, as

  20. Comparative growth and development of spiders reared on live and dead prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu; Zhang, Fan; Gui, Shaolan; Qiao, Huping; Hose, Grant C

    2013-01-01

    Scavenging (feeding on dead prey) has been demonstrated across a number of spider families, yet the implications of feeding on dead prey for the growth and development of individuals and population is unknown. In this study we compare the growth, development, and predatory activity of two species of spiders that were fed on live and dead prey. Pardosa astrigera (Lycosidae) and Hylyphantes graminicola (Lyniphiidae) were fed live or dead fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster. The survival of P. astrigera and H. graminicola was not affected by prey type. The duration of late instars of P. astrigera fed dead prey were longer and mature spiders had less protein content than those fed live prey, whereas there were no differences in the rate of H. graminicola development, but the mass of mature spiders fed dead prey was greater than those fed live prey. Predation rates by P. astrigera did not differ between the two prey types, but H. graminicola had a higher rate of predation on dead than alive prey, presumably because the dead flies were easier to catch and handle. Overall, the growth, development and reproduction of H. graminicola reared with dead flies was better than those reared on live flies, yet for the larger P. astrigera, dead prey may suit smaller instars but mature spiders may be best maintained with live prey. We have clearly demonstrated that dead prey may be suitable for rearing spiders, although the success of the spiders fed such prey appears size- and species specific.

  1. A shift in bloater consumption in Lake Michigan between 1993 and 2011 and its effects on Diporeia and Mysis prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoven, Steven A.; Bunnell, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Bioenergetics modeling was used to determine individual and population consumption by Bloater Coregonus hoyi in Lake Michigan during three time periods with variable Bloater density: 1993–1996 (high), 1998–2002 (intermediate), and 2009–2011 (low). Despite declines in Bloater abundance between 1993 and 2011, our results did not show any density-dependent compensatory response in annual individual consumption, specific consumption, or proportion of maximum consumption consumed. Diporeia spp. accounted for a steadily decreasing fraction of annual consumption, and Bloater were apparently unable to eat enough Mysis diluviana or other prey to account for the loss of Diporeia in the environment. The fraction of production of both Diporeia and Mysis that was consumed by the Bloater population decreased over time so that the consumption-to-production ratio for Diporeia + Mysis was 0.74, 0.26, and 0.14 in 1993–1996, 1998–2002, and 2009–2011, respectively. Although high Bloater numbers in the 1980s to 1990s may have had an influence on populations of Diporeia, Bloater were not the main factor driving Diporeia to a nearly complete disappearance because Diporeia continued to decline when Bloater predation demands were lessening. Thus, there appears to be a decoupling in the inverse relationship between predator and prey abundance in Lake Michigan. Compared with Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, the other dominant planktivore in the lake, Bloater have a lower specific consumption and higher gross conversion efficiency (GCE), indicating that the lake can support a higher biomass of Bloater than Alewife. However, declines in Bloater GCE since the 1970s and the absence of positive responses in consumption variables following declines in abundance suggest that productivity in Lake Michigan might not be able to support the same biomass of Bloater as in the past.

  2. Avian trichomonosis in spotted owls (Strix occidentalis): Indication of opportunistic spillover from prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Krysta H; Girard, Yvette A; Woods, Leslie; Johnson, Christine K

    2016-12-01

    Avian trichomonosis, caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae, has variable pathogenicity among bird species ranging from asymptomatic infections to severe disease periodically manifesting in epidemic mortality. Traditionally, columbids are identified as highly susceptible to infection with occasional spillover into raptors that prey on infected birds. We identified avian trichomonosis in two dead California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) and three dead northern spotted owls (S. o. caurina) in California during 2011-2015; infection was confirmed in four owls by PCR. Pathologic lesions associated with trichomonosis in the owls included caseonecrotic lesions of the upper palate accompanied by oropharyngitis, cellulitis, myositis, and/or sinusitis. Spotted owls are known to mainly feed on small mammals; therefore, the source of infection as well as the significance of the disease in spotted owls is unclear. These owl trichomonosis cases coincided temporally and spatially with three trichomonosis epidemics in band-tailed pigeons (Patagioenas fasciata monilis). The same parasite, T. gallinae subtype A2, was isolated from the spotted owls and band-tailed pigeons, suggesting the owls became infected when opportunistically feeding on pigeons during mortality events. Avian trichomonosis is an important factor in the decline of the Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeon population with near-annual mortality events during the last 10 years and could have conservation implications for raptor species at risk, particularly those that are facing multiple threats.

  3. Avian trichomonosis in spotted owls (Strix occidentalis: Indication of opportunistic spillover from prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysta H. Rogers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian trichomonosis, caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae, has variable pathogenicity among bird species ranging from asymptomatic infections to severe disease periodically manifesting in epidemic mortality. Traditionally, columbids are identified as highly susceptible to infection with occasional spillover into raptors that prey on infected birds. We identified avian trichomonosis in two dead California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis and three dead northern spotted owls (S. o. caurina in California during 2011–2015; infection was confirmed in four owls by PCR. Pathologic lesions associated with trichomonosis in the owls included caseonecrotic lesions of the upper palate accompanied by oropharyngitis, cellulitis, myositis, and/or sinusitis. Spotted owls are known to mainly feed on small mammals; therefore, the source of infection as well as the significance of the disease in spotted owls is unclear. These owl trichomonosis cases coincided temporally and spatially with three trichomonosis epidemics in band-tailed pigeons (Patagioenas fasciata monilis. The same parasite, T. gallinae subtype A2, was isolated from the spotted owls and band-tailed pigeons, suggesting the owls became infected when opportunistically feeding on pigeons during mortality events. Avian trichomonosis is an important factor in the decline of the Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeon population with near-annual mortality events during the last 10 years and could have conservation implications for raptor species at risk, particularly those that are facing multiple threats.

  4. Effects of industrial development on the predator-prey relationship between wolves and caribou in northeastern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, A. R. C. [Alberta Univ., Dept. of Biological Sciences, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-09-30

    The influence of timber harvesting, combined with development of the oil and natural gas industry and the resulting environmental changes on predator-prey relationship between wolves and caribou in northeastern Alberta are investigated. To establish the level of influence, two ways of predator-prey relationship were studied: (1) spatial distribution of caribou in relation to alternative prey, commonly moose, which is assumed to reduce the level of wolf predation experienced by caribou populations, and (2) the development of linear corridors which has been hypothesized to increase predation pressure on caribou. With respect to spatial separation it was found that the selection of fen/bog complexes by caribou and the selection of well-drained habitats by moose and wolves resulted in spatial separation, reducing, but not totally eliminating predation pressure on caribou from wolves. Regarding the effect of linear corridors, radio monitoring established that caribou mortalities attribued to wolf predation were higher among caribou that were closer to linear corridors than among caribou that were farther from corridors than random points. These and other related observations led to the conclusion that timber harvesting and increased industrial activity in and near caribou ranges could have significant effect on caribou population dynamics by increasing predation. Managaement implications of these results and various remedial options are discussed. refs. figs.

  5. Perceptual advertisement by the prey of stalking or ambushing predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2012-12-21

    There has been previous theoretical explorations of the stability of signals by prey that they have detected a stalking or ambush predator, where such perceptual advertisement dissuades the predator from attacking. Here we use a game theoretical model to extend the theory to consider some empirically-motivated complexities: (i) many perceptual advertisement signals appear to have the potential to vary in intensity, (ii) higher intensity signals are likely to be most costly to produce, and (iii) some high-cost signals (such as staring directly at the predator) can only be utilised if the prey is very confident of the existence of a nearby predator (that is, there are reserved or unfakable signals). We demonstrate that these complexities still allow for stable signalling. However, we do not find solutions where prey use a range of signal intensities to signal different degrees of confidence in the proximity of a predator; with prey simply adopting a binary response of not signalling or always signalling at the same fixed level. However this fixed level will not always be the cheapest possible signal, and we predict that prey that require more certainty about proximity of a predator will use higher-cost signals. The availability of reserved signals does not prohibit the stability of signalling based on lower-cost signals, but we also find circumstances where only the reserved signal is used. We discuss the potential to empirically test our model predictions, and to develop theory further to allow perceptual advertisement to be combined with other signalling functions.

  6. It takes guts to locate elusive crustacean prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasley-Rasher, R. S.; Brady, D. C.; Smith, B. E.; Jumars, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Mobile crustacean prey, i.e., crangonid, euphausiid, mysid, and pandalid shrimp, are vital links in marine food webs. Their intermediate sizes and characteristic caridoid escape responses lead to chronic underestimation when sampling at large spatial scales with either plankton nets or large trawl nets. Here, as discrete sampling units, we utilize individual fish diets (i.e., fish biosamplers) collected by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service and Northeast Fisheries Science Center to examine abundance and location of these prey families over large spatial and temporal scales in the northeastern U.S. shelf large ecosystem. Fish biosamplers revealed significant spatial shifts in prey in early spring. Distributions of mysids and crangonids in fish diets shoaled significantly from February to March. Distributions of euphausiids and pandalids in fish diets shifted northward during March. Of multiple hypotheses for these shifts, prey migration is most strongly supported. Future efforts can apply this method to address questions regarding temporal patterns or shifts in prey distribution and abundance that may be driven by large-scale stressors such as food-web shifts or climate change

  7. Prey-dependent retention of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by mixotrophic dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunwoo; Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Kitack; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the retention of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in phototrophic dinoflagellates arising from mixotrophy by estimating the cellular content of DMSP in Karlodinium veneficum (mixotrophic growth) fed for 7-10 days on either DMSP-rich Amphidinium carterae (phototrophic growth only) or DMSP-poor Teleaulax sp. (phototrophic growth only). In K. veneficum fed on DMSP-poor prey, the cellular content of DMSP remained almost unchanged regardless of the rate of feeding, whereas the cellular content of DMSP in cells of K. veneficum fed on DMSP-rich prey increased by as much as 21 times the cellular concentration derived exclusively from phototrophic growth. In both cases, significant fractions (10-32% in the former case and 55-65% in the latter) of the total DMSP ingested by K. veneficum were transformed into dimethylsulfide and other biochemical compounds. The results may indicate that the DMSP content of prey species affects temporal variations in the cellular DMSP content of mixotrophic dinoflagellates, and that mixotrophic dinoflagellates produce DMS through grazing on DMSP-rich preys. Additional studies should be performed to examine the universality of our finding in other mixotrophic dinoflagellates feeding on diverse prey species.

  8. Potential impact of low-concentration silver nanoparticles on predator-prey interactions between predatory dragonfly nymphs and Daphnia magna as a prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Dubey, Brajesh

    2012-07-17

    This study investigated the potential impacts of low-concentration citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (citrate-nAg; 2 μg L(-1) as total Ag) on the interactions of Daphnia magna Straus (as a prey) with the predatory dragonfly ( Anax junius : Odonata) nymph using the behavioral, survival, and reproductive end points. Four different toxicity bioassays were evaluated: (i) horizontal migration; (ii) vertical migration; (iii) 48 h survival; and (iv) 21 day reproduction; using four different treatment combinations: (i) Daphnia + citrate-nAg; (ii) Daphnia + predator; (iii) Daphnia + citrate-nAg + predator; and (iv) Daphnia only (control). Daphnia avoided the predators using the horizontal and vertical movements, indicating that Daphnia might have perceived a significant risk of predation. However, with citrate-nAg + predator treatment, Daphnia response did not differ from control in the vertical migration test, suggesting that Daphnia were unable to detect the presence of predator with citrate-nAg treatment and this may have potential implication on daphnids population structure owing to predation risk. The 48 h survival test showed a significant mortality of Daphnia individuals in the presence of predators, with or without citrate-nAg, in the test environment. Average reproduction of daphnids increased by 185% with low-concentration citrate-nAg treatment alone but was severely compromised in the presence of predators (decreased by 91.3%). Daphnia reproduction was slightly enhanced by approximately 128% with citrate-nAg + predator treatment. Potential mechanisms of these differential effects of low-concentration citrate-nAg, with or without predators, are discussed. Because silver dissolution was minimal, the observed toxicity could not be explained by dissolved Ag alone. These findings offer novel insights into how exposure to low-concentration silver nanoparticles could influence predator-prey interactions in the fresh water systems.

  9. Non-density dependent pollen dispersal of Shorea maxwelliana (Dipterocarpaceae revealed by a Bayesian mating model based on paternity analysis in two synchronized flowering seasons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Masuda

    Full Text Available Pollinator syndrome is one of the most important determinants regulating pollen dispersal in tropical tree species. It has been widely accepted that the reproduction of tropical forest species, especially dipterocarps that rely on insects with weak flight for their pollination, is positively density-dependent. However differences in pollinator syndrome should affect pollen dispersal patterns and, consequently, influence genetic diversity via the mating process. We examined the pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of Shorea maxwelliana, the flowers of which are larger than those of Shorea species belonging to section Mutica which are thought to be pollinated by thrips (weak flyers. A Bayesian mating model based on the paternity of seeds collected from mother trees during sporadic and mass flowering events revealed that the estimated pollen dispersal kernel and average pollen dispersal distance were similar for both flowering events. This evidence suggests that the putative pollinators - small beetles and weevils - effectively contribute to pollen dispersal and help to maintain a high outcrossing rate even during sporadic flowering events. However, the reduction in pollen donors during a sporadic event results in a reduction in effective pollen donors, which should lead to lower genetic diversity in the next generation derived from seeds produced during such an event. Although sporadic flowering has been considered less effective for outcrossing in Shorea species that depend on thrips for their pollination, effective pollen dispersal by the small beetles and weevils ensures outcrossing during periods of low flowering tree density, as occurs in a sporadic flowering event.

  10. Density dependence of relaxation dynamics in glass formers, and the dependence of their fragility on the softness of inter-particle interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANSHUL D S PARMAR; PALLABI KUNDU; SRIKANTH SASTRY

    2017-07-01

    Fragility, quantifying the rapidity of variation of relaxation times, is analysed for a series of model glass formers, which differ in the softness of their interparticle interactions. In an attempt to rationalize experimental observations in colloidal suspensions that softer interactions lead to stronger (less fragile) glassformers, we study the variation of relaxation dynamics with density, rather than temperature, as a control parameter.We employ density-temperature scaling, analyzed in recent studies, to address the question.We find that while employing inverse density in place of temperature leads to the conclusion that softer interactions lead to stronger behaviour, the use of scaled variables involving temperature and density lead to the opposite conclusion, similarly to earlier investigations where temperature variation of relaxation dynamics was analysed for the same systems. We rationalize our results by considering the Adam-Gibbs (AG) fragility, which incorporates the density dependence of the configurational entropy and an activation energy that may arise from other propertiesof a glass former.Within the framework of the Adam-Gibbs relation, by employing density temperature scaling for the analysis, we find that softer particles make more fragile glasses, as deduced from dynamical quantities, which is found to be consistent with the Adam-Gibbs fragility.

  11. Density-Dependent Benefits in Ant-Hemipteran Mutualism? The Case of the Ghost Ant Tapinoma melanocephalum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the Invasive Mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aiming; Kuang, Beiqing; Gao, Yingrui; Liang, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Although density-dependent benefits to hemipterans from ant tending have been measured many times, few studies have focused on integrated effects such as interactions between ant tending, natural enemy density, and hemipteran density. In this study, we tested whether the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis is affected by tending by ghost ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum), the presence of parasitoids, mealybug density, parasitoid density and interactions among these factors. Our results showed that mealybug colony growth rate and percentage parasitism were significantly affected by ant tending, parasitoid presence, and initial mealybug density separately. However, there were no interactions among the independent factors. There were also no significant interactions between ant tending and parasitoid density on either mealybug colony growth rate or percentage parasitism. Mealybug colony growth rate showed a negative linear relationship with initial mealybug density but a positive linear relationship with the level of ant tending. These results suggest that benefits to mealybugs are density-independent and are affected by ant tending level. PMID:25886510

  12. Loss of animal seed dispersal increases extinction risk in a tropical tree species due to pervasive negative density dependence across life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughlin, T Trevor; Ferguson, Jake M; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Zuidema, Pieter A; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Levey, Douglas J

    2015-01-07

    Overhunting in tropical forests reduces populations of vertebrate seed dispersers. If reduced seed dispersal has a negative impact on tree population viability, overhunting could lead to altered forest structure and dynamics, including decreased biodiversity. However, empirical data showing decreased animal-dispersed tree abundance in overhunted forests contradict demographic models which predict minimal sensitivity of tree population growth rate to early life stages. One resolution to this discrepancy is that seed dispersal determines spatial aggregation, which could have demographic consequences for all life stages. We tested the impact of dispersal loss on population viability of a tropical tree species, Miliusa horsfieldii, currently dispersed by an intact community of large mammals in a Thai forest. We evaluated the effect of spatial aggregation for all tree life stages, from seeds to adult trees, and constructed simulation models to compare population viability with and without animal-mediated seed dispersal. In simulated populations, disperser loss increased spatial aggregation by fourfold, leading to increased negative density dependence across the life cycle and a 10-fold increase in the probability of extinction. Given that the majority of tree species in tropical forests are animal-dispersed, overhunting will potentially result in forests that are fundamentally different from those existing now.

  13. Density-dependent quiescence in glioma invasion: instability in a simple reaction–diffusion model for the migration/proliferation dichotomy

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are very aggressive brain tumours, in which tumour cells gain the ability to penetrate the surrounding normal tissue. The invasion mechanisms of this type of tumour remain to be elucidated. Our work is motivated by the migration/proliferation dichotomy (go-or-grow) hypothesis, i.e. the antagonistic migratory and proliferating cellular behaviours in a cell population, which may play a central role in these tumours. In this paper, we formulate a simple go-or-grow model to investigate the dynamics of a population of glioma cells for which the switch from a migratory to a proliferating phenotype (and vice versa) depends on the local cell density. The model consists of two reaction-diffusion equations describing cell migration, proliferation and a phenotypic switch. We use a combination of numerical and analytical techniques to characterize the development of spatio-temporal instabilities and travelling wave solutions generated by our model. We demonstrate that the density-dependent go-or-grow mechanism can produce complex dynamics similar to those associated with tumour heterogeneity and invasion.

  14. Density-dependent benefits in ant-hemipteran mutualism? The case of the ghost ant Tapinoma melanocephalum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae and the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiming Zhou

    Full Text Available Although density-dependent benefits to hemipterans from ant tending have been measured many times, few studies have focused on integrated effects such as interactions between ant tending, natural enemy density, and hemipteran density. In this study, we tested whether the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis is affected by tending by ghost ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum, the presence of parasitoids, mealybug density, parasitoid density and interactions among these factors. Our results showed that mealybug colony growth rate and percentage parasitism were significantly affected by ant tending, parasitoid presence, and initial mealybug density separately. However, there were no interactions among the independent factors. There were also no significant interactions between ant tending and parasitoid density on either mealybug colony growth rate or percentage parasitism. Mealybug colony growth rate showed a negative linear relationship with initial mealybug density but a positive linear relationship with the level of ant tending. These results suggest that benefits to mealybugs are density-independent and are affected by ant tending level.

  15. Non-density dependent pollen dispersal of Shorea maxwelliana (Dipterocarpaceae) revealed by a Bayesian mating model based on paternity analysis in two synchronized flowering seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinsuke; Tani, Naoki; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Lee, Soon Leong; Muhammad, Norwati; Kondo, Toshiaki; Numata, Shinya; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Pollinator syndrome is one of the most important determinants regulating pollen dispersal in tropical tree species. It has been widely accepted that the reproduction of tropical forest species, especially dipterocarps that rely on insects with weak flight for their pollination, is positively density-dependent. However differences in pollinator syndrome should affect pollen dispersal patterns and, consequently, influence genetic diversity via the mating process. We examined the pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of Shorea maxwelliana, the flowers of which are larger than those of Shorea species belonging to section Mutica which are thought to be pollinated by thrips (weak flyers). A Bayesian mating model based on the paternity of seeds collected from mother trees during sporadic and mass flowering events revealed that the estimated pollen dispersal kernel and average pollen dispersal distance were similar for both flowering events. This evidence suggests that the putative pollinators - small beetles and weevils - effectively contribute to pollen dispersal and help to maintain a high outcrossing rate even during sporadic flowering events. However, the reduction in pollen donors during a sporadic event results in a reduction in effective pollen donors, which should lead to lower genetic diversity in the next generation derived from seeds produced during such an event. Although sporadic flowering has been considered less effective for outcrossing in Shorea species that depend on thrips for their pollination, effective pollen dispersal by the small beetles and weevils ensures outcrossing during periods of low flowering tree density, as occurs in a sporadic flowering event.

  16. Modeling and analysis of a density-dependent stochastic integral projection model for a disturbance specialist plant and its seed bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eager, Eric Alan; Rebarber, Richard; Tenhumberg, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    In many plant species dormant seeds can persist in the soil for one to several years. The formation of these seed banks is especially important for disturbance specialist plants, as seeds of these species germinate only in disturbed soil. Seed movement caused by disturbances affects the survival and germination probability of seeds in the seed bank, which subsequently affect population dynamics. In this paper, we develop a stochastic integral projection model for a general disturbance specialist plant-seed bank population that takes into account both the frequency and intensity of random disturbances, as well as vertical seed movement and density-dependent seedling establishment. We show that the probability measures associated with the plant-seed bank population converge weakly to a unique measure, independent of initial population. We also show that the population either persists with probability one or goes extinct with probability one, and provides a sharp criteria for this dichotomy. We apply our results to an example motivated by wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) populations, and explore how the presence or absence of a "storage effect" impacts how a population responds to different disturbance scenarios.

  17. Colominic acid inhibits the proliferation of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and injures their monolayers: cell density-dependent effects prevented by sulfation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Chika; Morita, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-18

    Colominic acid (CA), produced by Escherichia coli K1, is a polymer of sialic acid linked through alpha (2-->8) glycosidic linkages. Although there are several studies on the biological activities of chemically sulfated CA, the activity of CA has been incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of CA, prepared as an alpha2,8-linked homopolymer of N-acetylneuraminic acid, on the proliferation and monolayer maintenance of bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture. The results indicate that CA potently inhibits the proliferation of sparse endothelial cells without nonspecific cell damage. The inhibitory effect of CA was markedly stronger than those of sodium spirulan and calcium spirulan, known polysaccharides that inhibit endothelial cell proliferation. On the other hand, in dense endothelial cells, CA induced nonspecific cell damage and markedly injured the monolayer. These results indicate that CA has two distinct effects on vascular endothelial cells: one is the inhibition of proliferation when the cell density is low, and the other is the nonspecific cytotoxicity when the cell density is high. Interestingly, these cell density-dependent effects of CA could be prevented by sulfation of the CA chains. Therefore, it is concluded that CA not only inhibits the proliferation of sparse endothelial cells without nonspecific cell damage but also injures dense cells in a monolayer by nonspecific cytotoxicity, which can be prevented by sulfation of the polysaccharide.

  18. Capture success and efficiency of dragonflies pursuing different types of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, S A; Salcedo, M K; Pandit, M M; Iwasaki, J M

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of predator-prey interactions vary enormously, due both to the heterogeneity of natural environments and to wide variability in the sensorimotor systems of predator and prey. In addition, most predators pursue a range of different types of prey, and most organisms are preyed upon by a variety of predators. We do not yet know whether predators employ a general kinematic and behavioral strategy, or whether they tailor their pursuits to each type of prey; nor do we know how widely prey differ in their survival strategies and sensorimotor capabilities. To gain insight into these questions, we compared aerial predation in 4 species of libelluid dragonflies pursuing 4 types of dipteran prey, spanning a range of sizes. We quantified the proportion of predation attempts that were successful (capture success), as well as the total time spent and the distance flown in pursuit of prey (capture efficiency). Our results show that dragonfly prey-capture success and efficiency both decrease with increasing size of prey, and that average prey velocity generally increases with size. However, it is not clear that the greater distances and times required for capturing larger prey are due solely to the flight performance (e.g., speed or evasiveness) of the prey, as predicted. Dragonflies initiated pursuits of large prey when they were located farther away, on average, as compared to small prey, and the total distance flown in pursuit was correlated with initial distance to the prey. The greater initial distances observed during pursuits of larger prey may arise from constraints on dragonflies' visual perception; dragonflies typically pursued prey subtending a visual angle of 1°, and rarely pursued prey at visual angles greater than 3°. Thus, dragonflies may be unable to perceive large prey flying very close to their perch (subtending a visual angle greater than 3-4°) as a distinct target. In comparing the performance of different dragonfly species that co-occur in the

  19. Biomechanics (Communication arising): prey attack by a large theropod dinosaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzetta, T H; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2002-03-28

    Prey-capture strategies in carnivorous dinosaurs have been inferred from the biomechanical features of their tooth structure, the estimated bite force produced, and their diet. Rayfield et al. have used finite-element analysis (FEA) to investigate such structure-function relationships in Allosaurus fragilis, and have found that the skull was designed to bear more stress than could be generated by simple biting. They conclude that this large theropod dinosaur delivered a chop-and-slash 'hatchet' blow to its prey, which it approached with its mouth wide open before driving its upper tooth row downwards. We argue that this mode of predation is unlikely, and that the FEA results, which relate to an 'overengineered' skull, are better explained by the biomechanical demands of prey capture. Understanding the mechanics of predation is important to our knowledge of the feeding habits of carnivorous dinosaurs and for accurate reconstruction their lifestyles.

  20. Influence of poisoned prey on foraging behavior of ferruginous hawks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Kuncir, Frank; Clinton, Criss C.

    2017-01-01

    We recorded 19 visits by ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis) over 6 d at two black–tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) subcolonies poisoned with the rodenticide Rozol® Prairie Dog Bait (0.005% chlorophacinone active ingredient) and at an adjacent untreated subcolony. Before Rozol® application ferruginous hawks foraged in the untreated and treated subcolonies but after Rozol® application predation by ferruginous hawks was only observed in the treated subcolonies. We suggest that ferruginous hawks' preference for hunting in the treated subcolonies after Rozol® application was influenced by the availability of easy-to-capture prey, presumably due to Rozol® poisoning. The energetically beneficial behavior of favoring substandard prey may increase raptor encounters with rodenticide exposed animals if prey vulnerability has resulted from poisoning.