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Sample records for density-density response function

  1. Space race functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats.

  2. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  3. Which impulse response function?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares standard and local projection techniques in the production of impulse response functions both theoretically and empirically. Through careful selection of a structural decomposition, the comparison continues to an application of US data to the textbook ISLM model. It is argued that local projection techniques offer a remedy to the bias of the conventional method especially at horizons longer than the vector autoregression's lag length. The application highlights that the te...

  4. Recharge Response Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Calver

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the establishment of transfer functions for describing the annual oscillation of unconfined aquifer water levels in response to effective precipitation. A simple saturated zone representation is developed to accompany the unsaturated zone mechanism. Practical examples are drawn from a sample of sites from the chalk and the Permo-Triassic sandstones of England and Wales. Modelled water levels are in many cases good. The technique is most appropriate within the usual range of fluctuation of aquifer water level, with no great change in influence of abstractions, and when it is acceptable to approximate the complexity of unsaturated zone processes in practical analysis.

  5. Optimally focused cold atom systems obtained using density-density correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Andika; Campbell, Daniel L; Price, Ryan M; De, Subhadeep; Spielman, I B

    2014-01-01

    Resonant absorption imaging is a common technique for detecting the two-dimensional column density of ultracold atom systems. In many cases, the system's thickness along the imaging direction greatly exceeds the imaging system's depth of field, making the identification of the optimally focused configuration difficult. Here we describe a systematic technique for bringing Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) and other cold-atom systems into an optimal focus even when the ratio of the thickness to the depth of field is large: a factor of 8 in this demonstration with a BEC. This technique relies on defocus-induced artifacts in the Fourier-transformed density-density correlation function (the power spectral density, PSD). The spatial frequency at which these artifacts first appear in the PSD is maximized on focus; the focusing process therefore both identifies and maximizes the range of spatial frequencies over which the PSD is uncontaminated by finite-thickness effects.

  6. The Kepler Pixel Response Function

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, Stephen T; Jenkins, Jon M; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Klaus, Todd; Caldwell, Douglas A; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Dotson, Jessie L; Koch, David G; Borucki, William J

    2010-01-01

    Kepler seeks to detect sequences of transits of Earth-size exoplanets orbiting Solar-like stars. Such transit signals are on the order of 100 ppm. The high photometric precision demanded by Kepler requires detailed knowledge of how the Kepler pixels respond to starlight during a nominal observation. This information is provided by the Kepler pixel response function (PRF), defined as the composite of Kepler's optical point spread function, integrated spacecraft pointing jitter during a nominal cadence and other systematic effects. To provide sub-pixel resolution, the PRF is represented as a piecewise-continuous polynomial on a sub-pixel mesh. This continuous representation allows the prediction of a star's flux value on any pixel given the star's pixel position. The advantages and difficulties of this polynomial representation are discussed, including characterization of spatial variation in the PRF and the smoothing of discontinuities between sub-pixel polynomial patches. On-orbit super-resolution measurement...

  7. On the phase diagram of the extended Hubbard model with intersite density-density interactions in the atomic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapcia, Konrad Jerzy; Robaszkiewicz, Stanisław

    2016-11-01

    The charge ordering is a phenomenon associated with inhomogeneous distribution of electron density occurring mostly in strongly correlated materials such as transition metal oxides or organic conductors. The extended Hubbard model (EHM) is one of the simplest model for description of this phenomenon. The full phase diagram of the EHM with intersite density-density interactions W1 and W2 (nearest- and next-nearest-neighbour, respectively) in the atomic limit as a function of the chemical potential has been derived in the variational approach, which treats the on-site interaction exactly and the intersite interactions within mean-field approximation. The results for arbitrary values of model parameters (in the two-sublattice assumption) reveal that the diagram has very complex structure including various (multi-)critical points. A variety of the transitions between different phases, in particular with long-range charge-order, has been found to occur on the diagram. The results presented are rigorous ones in the high-dimension limit for any W1 and W2 ≤ 0.

  8. Functional responses modified by predator density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratina, P.; Vos, M.; Bateman, A.W.; Anholt, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    Realistic functional responses are required for accurate model predictions at the community level. However, controversy remains regarding which types of dependencies need to be included in functional response models. Several studies have shown an effect of very high predator densities on per capita

  9. Response functions of atom gravimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Nagornyi, V D

    2012-01-01

    Atom gravimeters are equivalent to non-multi-level corner-cube gravimeters in translating the gravity signal into the measurement result. This enables description of atom gravimeters as LTI systems. The system's impulse responses by acceleration, velocity, and displacement are found to have the shape of triangle, meander, and the Dirac comb resp. The effects of inhomogeneous gravity field are studied for constant and linear vertical gradients and self-attraction of the instrument. For the constant gradient the effective measurement height is below the top of the trajectory at 1/6 and 7/24 of its length for the fountain and the release types of the instruments resp. The analysis is expanded to the gravimeters implementing the Bloch oscillations at the apex of the trajectory. In filtering the vibrations these instruments are equivalent to the first-order low-pass filters, while other atom gravimeters are equivalent to the second-order low-pass filters.

  10. Female sexual function and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Although female sexual dysfunction is a problem with low priority, it can have a profound impact on quality of life. In women, the cycle of sexual response begins in the brain, where a memory, an image, a scent, music, or a fantasy acts as a trigger to prompt sexual arousal. Thus, the brain is really the key and starting place for treatment of sexual dysfunction. Decreased libido, altered arousal, inability to achieve orgasm, and dyspareunia are the four broad types of sexual dysfunction in women. Decreased libido, thought to be related to androgenic hormones, results in delayed or altered arousal, decreased vaginal lubrication and dilation, delayed or absent orgasm, and pain or dyspareunia, which can lead to an aversion to sexual experiences.

  11. Response functions after a quantum quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Matteo; Gambassi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    The response of physical systems to external perturbations can be used to probe both their equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics. While response and correlation functions are related in equilibrium by fluctuation-dissipation theorems, out of equilibrium they provide complementary information on the dynamics. In the past years, a method has been devised to map the quantum dynamics of an isolated extended system after a quench onto a static theory with boundaries in imaginary time; up to now, however, the focus was entirely on symmetrized correlation functions. Here we provide a prescription which, in principle, allows one to retrieve the whole set of relevant dynamical quantities characterizing the evolution, including linear response functions. We illustrate this construction with some relevant examples, showing in the process the emergence of light-cone effects similar to those observed in correlation functions.

  12. Dynamic Responsive Systems for Catalytic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlatković, Matea; Collins, Beatrice S L; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-11-21

    Responsive systems have recently gained much interest in the scientific community in attempts to mimic dynamic functions in biological systems. One of the fascinating potential applications of responsive systems lies in catalysis. Inspired by nature, novel responsive catalytic systems have been built that show analogy with allosteric regulation of enzymes. The design of responsive catalytic systems allows control of catalytic activity and selectivity. In this Review, advances in the field over the last four decades are discussed and a comparison is made amongst the dynamic responsive systems based on the principles underlying their catalytic mechanisms. The catalyst systems are sorted according to the triggers used to achieve control of the catalytic activity and the distinct catalytic reactions illustrated. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Generalized functional responses for species distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthiopoulos, J.; Hebblewhite, M.; Aarts, G.M; Fieberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers employing resource selection functions (RSFs) and other related methods aim to detect correlates of space-use and mitigate against detrimental environmental change. However, an empirical model fit to data from one place or time is unlikely to capture species responses under different con

  14. A Functional Model of the Aesthetic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Conrad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a process of somatic evolution, the brain semi-randomly generates initially-unstable neural circuits that are selectively stabilized if they succeed in making sense out of raw sensory input. The human aesthetic response serves the function of stabilizing the circuits that successfully mediate perception and interpretation, making those faculties more agile, conferring selective advantage. It is triggered by structures in art and nature that provoke the making of sense. Art is deliberate human action aimed at triggering the aesthetic response in others; thus, if successful, it serves the same function of making perception and interpretation more agile. These few principles initiate a cascade of emergent phenomena which account for many observed qualities of aesthetics, including universality and idiosyncrasy of taste, the relevance of artists’ intentions, the virtues of openness and resonance, the dysfunction of formulaic art, and the fact that methods of art correspond to modes of perceptual transformation.

  15. NaI(Tl) response functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Ortiz R, J. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Calz. de la Cruz 118 Sur, Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); De Leon M, H. A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1801 Ote., 20155 Aguascalientes, Ags. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The response functions of a NaI(Tl) detector have been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Response functions were calculated for monoenergetic photon sources (0.05 to 3 MeV). Responses were calculated for point-like sources and for sources distributed in Portland cement cylinders. The responses were used to calculate the efficiency functions in term of photon energy. Commonly, sources used for calibration are point-like, and eventually sources to be measured have different features. In order to use the calibrated sources corrections due to solid angle, self-absorption and scattering, must be carried out. However, some of these corrections are not easy to perform. In this work, the calculated responses were used to estimate the detector efficiency of point-like sources, and sources distributed in Portland type cement. Samples of Portland paste were prepared and were exposed to photoneutrons produced by a 15 MV linac. Some of the elements in the cement were activated producing γ-emitting radionuclides that were measured with a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer, that was calibrated with point-like sources. In order to determine the specific activity in the induced radioisotopes calculated efficiencies were used to make corrections due to the differences between the solid angle, photon absorption and photon scattering in the point-like calibration sources and the sources distributed in cement. During the interaction between photoneutrons and the cement samples three radioisotopes were induced: {sup 56}Mn, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 28}Al. (Author)

  16. Ant functional responses along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnan, Xavier; Cerdá, Xim; Retana, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Understanding species distributions and diversity gradients is a central challenge in ecology and requires prior knowledge of the functional traits mediating species' survival under particular environmental conditions. While the functional ecology of plants has been reasonably well explored, much less is known about that of animals. Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth, and they perform a great variety of ecological functions. In this study, we analyse how the functional species traits present in ant communities vary along broad gradients in climate, productivity and vegetation type in the south-western Mediterranean. To this end, we compiled one of the largest animal databases to date: it contains information on 211 local ant communities (including eight climate variables, productivity, and vegetation type) and 124 ant species, for which 10 functional traits are described. We used traits that characterize different dimensions of the ant functional niche with respect to morphology, life history and behaviour at both individual and colony level. We calculated two complementary functional trait community indices ('trait average' and 'trait dissimilarity') for each trait, and we analysed how they varied along the three different gradients using generalized least squares models that accounted for spatial autocorrelation. Our results show that productivity, vegetation type and, to a lesser extent, each climate variable per se might play an important role in shaping the occurrence of functional species traits in ant communities. Among the climate variables, temperature and precipitation seasonality had a much higher influence on functional responses than their mean values, whose effects were almost lacking. Our results suggest that strong relationships might exist between the abiotic environment and the distribution of functional traits among south-western Mediterranean ant communities. This finding indicates that

  17. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-10-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.

  18. Bayesian estimation of the hemodynamic response function in functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelec, G.; Benali, H.; Ciuciu, P.; Poline, J.-B.

    2002-05-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a recent, non-invasive technique allowing for the evolution of brain processes to be dynamically followed in various cognitive or behavioral tasks. In BOLD fMRI, what is actually measured is only indirectly related to neuronal activity through a process that is still under investigation. A convenient way to analyze BOLD fMRI data consists of considering the whole brain as a system characterized by a transfer response function, called the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). Precise and robust estimation of the HRF has not been achieved yet: parametric methods tend to be robust but require too strong constraints on the shape of the HRF, whereas non-parametric models are not reliable since the problem is badly conditioned. We therefore propose a full Bayesian, non-parametric method that makes use of basic but relevant a priori knowledge about the underlying physiological process to make robust inference about the HRF. We show that this model is very robust to decreasing signal-to-noise ratio and to the actual noise sampling distribution. We finally apply the method to real data, revealing a wide variety of HRF shapes.

  19. Experimental model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu; Liu, Xi; Dong, Xinjun; Wang, Yang; Pu, Qianhui

    2016-04-01

    In order to obtain a finite element (FE) model that can more accurately describe structural behaviors, experimental data measured from the actual structure can be used to update the FE model. The process is known as FE model updating. In this paper, a frequency response function (FRF)-based model updating approach is presented. The approach attempts to minimize the difference between analytical and experimental FRFs, while the experimental FRFs are calculated using simultaneously measured dynamic excitation and corresponding structural responses. In this study, the FRF-based model updating method is validated through laboratory experiments on a four-story shear-frame structure. To obtain the experimental FRFs, shake table tests and impact hammer tests are performed. The FRF-based model updating method is shown to successfully update the stiffness, mass and damping parameters of the four-story structure, so that the analytical and experimental FRFs match well with each other.

  20. Response predictions using the observed autocorrelation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; H. Brodtkorb, Astrid; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2017-01-01

    This article studies a procedure that facilitates short-time, deterministic predictions of the wave-induced motion of a marine vessel, where it is understood that the future motion of the vessel is calculated ahead of time. Such predictions are valuable to assist in the execution of many marine......-induced response in study. Thus, predicted (future) values ahead of time for a given time history recording are computed through a mathematical combination of the sample autocorrelation function and previous measurements recorded just prior to the moment of action. Importantly, the procedure does not need input...

  1. Functional, Responsive Materials Assembled from Recombinant Oleosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel

    Biological cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane made primarily of phospholipids that form a bilayer. This membrane is permselective and compartmentalizes the cell. A simple form of artificial cell is the vesicle, in which a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounds an aqueous solution. However, there is no a priori reason why a membrane needs to be made of phospholipids. It could be made of any surfactant that forms a bilayer. We have assembled membranes and other structures from the recombinant plant protein oleosin. The ability to assemble from a recombinant protein means that every molecule is identical, we have complete control over the sequence, and hence can build in designer functionality with high fidelity, including adhesion and enzymatic activity. Such incorporation is trivial using the tools of molecular biology. We find that while many variants of oleosin make membranes, others make micelles and sheets. We show how the type of supramolecular structure can be altered by the conditions of solvent, such as ionic strength, and the architecture of the surfactant itself. We show that protease cleavable domains can be incorporated within oleosin, and be engineered to protect other functional domains such as adhesive motifs, to make responsive materials whose activity and shape depend on the action of proteases. We will also present the idea of making ``Franken''-oleosins, where large domains of native oleosin are replaced with domains from other functional proteins, to make hybrids conferred by the donor protein. Thus, we can view oleosin as a template upon which a vast array of designer functionalities can be imparted..

  2. Analytical response function for planar Ge detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alvarez, Juan A.; Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2016-04-01

    We model the response function (RF) of planar HPGe x-ray spectrometers for photon energies between around 10 keV and 100 keV. The RF is based on the proposal of Seltzer [1981. Nucl. Instrum. Methods 188, 133-151] and takes into account the full-energy absorption in the Ge active volume, the escape of Ge Kα and Kβ x-rays and the escape of photons after one Compton interaction. The relativistic impulse approximation is employed instead of the Klein-Nishina formula to describe incoherent photon scattering in the Ge crystal. We also incorporate a simple model for the continuous component of the spectrum produced by the escape of photo-electrons from the active volume. In our calculations we include external interaction contributions to the RF: (i) the incoherent scattering effects caused by the detector's Be window and (ii) the spectrum produced by photo-electrons emitted in the Ge dead layer that reach the active volume. The analytical RF model is compared with pulse-height spectra simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code.

  3. Response functions of semiconducting lithium indium diselenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukosi, Eric; Chvala, Ondrej [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-21

    This paper presents the results of a computational investigation that determined the gamma-ray and neutron response functions of a new semiconducting material, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2}, which is very sensitive to thermal neutrons. Both MCNP6 simulations and custom post-processing/simulation techniques were used to determine various detection properties of LISe. The computational study included consideration of energetic electron escape, the contribution from the activation of {sup 115}In and subsequent decay of {sup 116}In, triton and alpha particle escape from the {sup 6}Li reaction pathway, and the effect of incomplete charge collection when detecting neutrons via the {sup 6}Li reaction pathway. The result of neutron detection with incomplete charge collection was compared to experimental results and showed general agreement, where holes exhibit a lower mobility-lifetime product than electrons, as expected for compound semiconductors. - Highlights: • Charged particle escape does not significantly affect measured neutron spectra. • Energetic electron escape affects gamma-induced spectra. • LISe has a small photoelectric cross section for high energy gamma-rays. • Excellent gamma/neutron discrimination capability. • Activated {sup 116}In does not readily interfere with {sup 6}Li-based neutron signal.

  4. 32 CFR 352a.4 - Responsibilities and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities and functions. 352a.4 Section...) ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTERS DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE (DFAS) § 352a.4 Responsibilities and functions. (a... finance and accounting requirements, systems, and functions identified in DoD Directive 5118.3, 1 and...

  5. Impact of nutrition on immune function and the inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The review utilizes data on three micronutrients (vitamin A, zinc and iron), anthropometrically defined undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and obesity to evaluate the effect on immune function, recovery of immune function in response to nutritional interventions, related health outco...

  6. Estimation of Frequency Response Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    A method for estimating frequency response functions by the Random Decrement technique is investigated in this paper. The method is based on the auto and cross Random Decrement functions of the input process and the output process of a linear system. The Fourier transformation of these functions...... is used to calculate the frequency response functions. The Random Decrement functions are obtained by averaging time segments of the processes under given initial conditions. The method will reduce the leakage problem, because of the natural decay of the Random Decrement functions. Also, the influence...

  7. Autoimmune Response Confers Decreased Cardiac Function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... interleukin-6 (IL-6), high –sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and echocardiographic indices of heart function in the two .... patients were classified as NYHA class II, fifteen as class III, and ... group were excluded if they had a history of.

  8. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only...

  9. 32 CFR 344.4 - Responsibilities and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities and functions. 344.4 Section... functions. The Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs is the principal staff assistant and... functions as the USD(P&R) and the Secretary of Defense may prescribe. ...

  10. Estimation of Frequency Response Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Asmussen, J. C.

    A method for estimating frequency response functions by the random decrement technique is investigated in this paper. The method is based on the auto and cross Random Decrement functions of the input process and the output process of a linear system. The Fourier transformation of these functions...

  11. Linear and quadratic static response functions and structure functions in Yukawa liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Péter; Donkó, Zoltán; Kalman, Gabor J; Golden, Kenneth I

    2014-08-01

    We compute linear and quadratic static density response functions of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids by applying an external perturbation potential in molecular dynamics simulations. The response functions are also obtained from the equilibrium fluctuations (static structure factors) in the system via the fluctuation-dissipation theorems. The good agreement of the quadratic response functions, obtained in the two different ways, confirms the quadratic fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also find that the three-point structure function may be factorizable into two-point structure functions, leading to a cluster representation of the equilibrium triplet correlation function.

  12. Functional Roles of Syk in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Su Yi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a series of complex biological responses to protect the host from pathogen invasion. Chronic inflammation is considered a major cause of diseases, such as various types of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases and cancers. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk was initially found to be highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and has been known to play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses. However, recent studies have reported that Syk is also involved in other biological functions, especially in innate immune responses. Although Syk has been extensively studied in adaptive immune responses, numerous studies have recently presented evidence that Syk has critical functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and is closely related to innate immune response. This review describes the characteristics of Syk-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes the recent findings supporting the crucial roles of Syk in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and diseases, and discusses Syk-targeted drug development for the therapy of inflammatory diseases.

  13. The response of electrostatic probes via the λ-function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rerup, T.O.; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1994-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to a planar spacer. The study involves the numerical calculation of the probe λ-function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity and spatial...

  14. An optimized semiclassical approximation for vibrational response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-03-01

    The observables of multidimensional infrared spectroscopy may be calculated from nonlinear vibrational response functions. Fully quantum dynamical calculations of vibrational response functions are generally impractical, while completely classical calculations are qualitatively incorrect at long times. These challenges motivate the development of semiclassical approximations to quantum mechanics, which use classical mechanical information to reconstruct quantum effects. The mean-trajectory (MT) approximation is a semiclassical approach to quantum vibrational response functions employing classical trajectories linked by deterministic transitions representing the effects of the radiation-matter interaction. Previous application of the MT approximation to the third-order response function R(3)(t3, t2, t1) demonstrated that the method quantitatively describes the coherence dynamics of the t3 and t1 evolution times, but is qualitatively incorrect for the waiting-time t2 period. Here we develop an optimized version of the MT approximation by elucidating the connection between this semiclassical approach and the double-sided Feynman diagrams (2FD) that represent the quantum response. Establishing the direct connection between 2FD and semiclassical paths motivates a systematic derivation of an optimized MT approximation (OMT). The OMT uses classical mechanical inputs to accurately reproduce quantum dynamics associated with all three propagation times of the third-order vibrational response function.

  15. Nuclear response functions for the N-N*(1440) transition

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Donnelly, T W; Molinari, A

    2003-01-01

    Parity-conserving and -violating response functions are computed for the inclusive electroexcitation of the N*(1440)(Roper) resonance in nuclear matter modeled as a relativistic Fermi gas. Using various empirical parameterizations and theoretical models of the N-N*(1440) transition form factors, the sensitivity of the response functions to details of the structure of the Roper resonance is investigated. The possibility of disentangling this resonance from the contribution of Delta electroproduction in nuclei is addressed. Finally, the contributions of the Roper resonance to the longitudinal scaling function and to the Coulomb sum rule are also explored.

  16. Newton algorithm for fitting transfer functions to frequency response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, J. T.; Mingori, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing transfer functions from frequency response measurements is considered. Given a complex vector representing the measured frequency response of a physical system, a transfer function of specified order is determined that minimizes the sum of the magnitude-squared of the frequency response errors. This nonlinear least squares minimization problem is solved by an iterative global descent algorithm of the Newton type that converges quadratically near the minimum. The unknown transfer function is expressed as a sum of second-order rational polynomials, a parameterization that facilitates a numerically robust computer implementation. The algorithm is developed for single-input, single-output, causal, stable transfer functions. Two numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  17. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, A. [Institut d’Astronomie et d’Astrophysique, CP 226, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Davesne, D., E-mail: davesne@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Navarro, J. [IFIC (CSIC University of Valencia), Apdo. Postal 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin–orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe–Salpeter equation for the particle–hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin–isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  18. The Synthesis of Structural Responses Using Experimentally Measured Frequency Response Functions and Field Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAP,JEROME S.; NELSON,CURTIS F.

    2000-11-17

    This paper presents an analysis technique used to generate the structural response at locations not measured during the ejection of a captive-carried store. The ejection shock event is complicated by the fact that forces may be imparted to the store at eight distinct locations. The technique derives forcing functions by combining the initial field test data for a limited number of measurement locations with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured using a traditional modal-type impact (tap) test at the same locations. The derived forcing functions were then used with tap test FRFs measured at additional locations of interest to produce the desired response data.

  19. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  20. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  1. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  2. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  3. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  4. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  5. Functionally unidimensional item response models for multivariate binary data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ip, Edward; Molenberghs, Geert; Chen, Shyh-Huei;

    2013-01-01

    The problem of fitting unidimensional item response models to potentially multidimensional data has been extensively studied. The focus of this article is on response data that have a strong dimension but also contain minor nuisance dimensions. Fitting a unidimensional model to such multidimensio......The problem of fitting unidimensional item response models to potentially multidimensional data has been extensively studied. The focus of this article is on response data that have a strong dimension but also contain minor nuisance dimensions. Fitting a unidimensional model...... to such multidimensional data is believed to result in ability estimates that represent a combination of the major and minor dimensions. We conjecture that the underlying dimension for the fitted unidimensional model, which we call the functional dimension, represents a nonlinear projection. In this article we investigate...... tool. An example regarding a construct of desire for physical competency is used to illustrate the functional unidimensional approach....

  6. Stability analysis of Reynolds stress response functional candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafinger, M.; Hallatschek, K. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-IPP Association, Garching (Germany); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    Complete information on the behavior of zonal flows in turbulence systems is coded in the turbulent stress response to the respective flow pattern. We show that turbulence stress response functionals containing only the linear first order wavenumber dependence on the flow pattern result in unstable structures up to the system size. A minimal augmentation to reproduce the flow patterns observed in turbulence simulations is discussed.

  7. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications.

  8. Functionally Unidimensional Item Response Models for Multivariate Binary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Molenberghs, Geert; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Goegebeur, Yuri; De Boeck, Paul

    2013-07-01

    The problem of fitting unidimensional item response models to potentially multidimensional data has been extensively studied. The focus of this article is on response data that have a strong dimension but also contain minor nuisance dimensions. Fitting a unidimensional model to such multidimensional data is believed to result in ability estimates that represent a combination of the major and minor dimensions. We conjecture that the underlying dimension for the fitted unidimensional model, which we call the functional dimension, represents a nonlinear projection. In this article we investigate 2 issues: (a) can a proposed nonlinear projection track the functional dimension well, and (b) what are the biases in the ability estimate and the associated standard error when estimating the functional dimension? To investigate the second issue, the nonlinear projection is used as an evaluative tool. An example regarding a construct of desire for physical competency is used to illustrate the functional unidimensional approach.

  9. Linear density response function in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jun; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel;

    2011-01-01

    We present an implementation of the linear density response function within the projector-augmented wave method with applications to the linear optical and dielectric properties of both solids, surfaces, and interfaces. The response function is represented in plane waves while the single......-particle eigenstates can be expanded on a real space grid or in atomic-orbital basis for increased efficiency. The exchange-correlation kernel is treated at the level of the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) and crystal local field effects are included. The calculated static and dynamical dielectric...... functions of Si, C, SiC, AlP, and GaAs compare well with previous calculations. While optical properties of semiconductors, in particular excitonic effects, are generally not well described by ALDA, we obtain excellent agreement with experiments for the surface loss function of graphene and the Mg(0001...

  10. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  11. Role of the density, density effect and mean excitation energy in solid-state detectors for small photon fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Pedro; Benmakhlouf, Hamza

    2017-02-01

    A number of recent publications on small photon beam dosimetry aim at contributing to the understanding of the response of solid-state detectors in small fields. Some of them assign the difference in response to the mass density, or to the electron density, of the sensitive detector material relative to that of water. This work analyses the role of the mass and electron density (ρ,{{n}\\text{e}} ), density effect (δ) and mean excitation energy (I-value) of some detector materials in a 6 MV photon beam of 0.5 cm radius, its rationale being that the response of a detector depends critically on the stopping-power ratio detector-to-water. The influence on the detector response of volume scaling by electron density, and of electron single and multiple scattering, is also investigated. Detector materials are water, diamond and silicon, and additional materials are included for consistency in the analysis. A detailed analysis on the (ρ,I,δ ) dependence of stopping-power ratios shows that the density effect δ depends both on the electron density and on the I-value of the medium, but not on the mass density ρ alone as is usually assumed. This leads to a double dependence of stopping-power ratios on the I-value and questions the adequacy of a ‘density perturbation factor’ or of common interpretations of detector response in terms of ρ alone. Differences in response can be described in terms of the variation of stopping power ratios detector-to-water, mainly due to different I-values and to a lesser extent to different values of electron density. It is found that at low energies the trend of Monte Carlo-calculated electron fluence spectra inside the detector materials depends solely on their I-values. No dependence on mass density or density effect alone is observed at any energy. The trend of restricted-cema ratios to water (as a substitute of absorbed dose ratios) follows that of stopping-power ratios at 1 MeV, the most probable energy of differential

  12. Semiparametric Item Response Functions in the Context of Guessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Carl F.; Cai, Li

    2016-01-01

    We present a logistic function of a monotonic polynomial with a lower asymptote, allowing additional flexibility beyond the three-parameter logistic model. We develop a maximum marginal likelihood-based approach to estimate the item parameters. The new item response model is demonstrated on math assessment data from a state, and a computationally…

  13. Helping as a Function of Empathic Responses and Sociopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Edward L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Investigated helping as a function of empathic anxiety (anxiety in response to modeled distress) and individual differences in sociopathic tendencies. Results indicated modeled distress produces increases in anxiety which are positively associated with helping and sociopathic individuals are less likely to help than are nonsociopathic individuals.…

  14. Cortisol stress responses and children's behavioral functioning at school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, S.S.H.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Weerth, C. de

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated whether cortisol stress responses of 6-year-olds were associated with their behavioral functioning at school. Additionally, the moderating role of stress in the family environment was examined. To this end, 149 healthy children (Magen=n6.09 years; 70 girls) participate

  15. Functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for stimuli-responsive and targeted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, Nikola [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Construction of functional supramolecular nanoassemblies has attracted great deal of attention in recent years for their wide spectrum of practical applications. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) in particular were shown to be effective scaffolds for the construction of drug carriers, sensors and catalysts. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of stimuli-responsive, controlled release MSN-based assemblies for drug delivery.

  16. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional

  17. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional M

  18. Fcγ Receptor Heterogeneity in Leukocyte Functional Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies participate in defense of the organism from all types of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. IgG antibodies recognize their associated antigen via their two Fab portions and are in turn recognized though their Fc portion by specific Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on the membrane of immune cells. Multiple types and polymorphic variants of FcγR exist. These receptors are expressed in many cells types and are also redundant in inducing cell responses. Crosslinking of FcγR on the surface of leukocytes activates several effector functions aimed toward the destruction of pathogens and the induction of an inflammatory response. In the past few years, new evidence on how the particular IgG subclass and the glycosylation pattern of the antibody modulate the IgG–FcγR interaction has been presented. Despite these advances, our knowledge of what particular effector function is activated in a certain cell and in response to a specific type of FcγR remains very limited today. On one hand, each immune cell could be programmed to perform a particular cell function after FcγR crosslinking. On the other, each FcγR could activate a particular signaling pathway leading to a unique cell response. In this review, I describe the main types of FcγRs and our current view of how particular FcγRs activate various signaling pathways to promote unique leukocyte functions. PMID:28373871

  19. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional M

  20. Finite element estimation of acoustical response functions in HID lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Bernd; Wolff, Marcus [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Production, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Berliner Tor 21, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Hirsch, John; Antonis, Piet [Philips Lighting BV, Lightlabs, Mathildelaan 1, 5600 JM Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bhosle, Sounil [Universite de Toulouse (United States); Barrientos, Ricardo Valdivia, E-mail: bernd.baumann@haw-hamburg.d [National Nuclear Research Institute, Highway Mexico-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, CP 52750 (Mexico)

    2009-11-21

    High intensity discharge lamps can experience flickering and even destruction when operated at high frequency alternating current. The cause of these problems has been identified as acoustic resonances inside the lamp's arc tube. Here, a finite element approach for the calculation of the acoustic response function is described. The developed model does not include the plasma dynamics.

  1. Transverse response functions in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Rost, E; Shepard, J R

    1992-01-01

    We calculate transverse response functions for quasi-elastic electron scattering at high momentum transfers in a relativistic Hartree approximation in configuration space. We treat the excitation of the $\\Delta$ resonance using its free mass and width. Good agreement with experiment is found in the dip region.

  2. Conceptual DFT: chemistry from the linear response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, Paul; Fias, Stijn; Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank

    2014-07-21

    Within the context of reactivity descriptors known in conceptual DFT, the linear response function (χ(r,r')) remained nearly unexploited. Although well known, in its time dependent form, in the solid state physics and time-dependent DFT communities the study of the "chemistry" present in the kernel was, until recently, relatively unexplored. The evaluation of the linear response function as such and its study in the time independent form are highlighted in the present review. On the fundamental side, the focus is on the approaches of increasing complexity to compute and represent χ(r,r'), its visualisation going from plots of the unintegrated χ(r,r') to an atom condensed matrix. The study on atoms reveals its physical significance, retrieving atomic shell structure, while the results on molecules illustrate that a variety of chemical concepts are retrieved: inductive and mesomeric effects, electron delocalisation, aromaticity and anti-aromaticity, σ and π aromaticity,…. The applications show that the chemistry of aliphatic (saturated and unsaturated) chains, saturated and aromatic/anti-aromatic rings, organic, inorganic or metallic in nature, can be retrieved via the linear response function, including the variation of the electronic structure of the reagents along a reaction path. The connection of the linear response function with the concept of nearsightedness and the alchemical derivatives is also highlighted.

  3. Linear-response thermal time-dependent density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    The van Leeuwen proof of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is generalized to thermal ensembles. This allows generalization to finite temperatures of the Gross-Kohn relation, the exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT, and fluctuation dissipation theorem for DFT. This produces a natural method for generating new thermal exchange-correlation (XC) approximations.

  4. Allometric functional response model: body masses constrain interaction strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic-Pestic, Olivera; Rall, Björn C; Kalinkat, Gregor; Brose, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    1. Functional responses quantify the per capita consumption rates of predators depending on prey density. The parameters of these nonlinear interaction strength models were recently used as successful proxies for predicting population dynamics, food-web topology and stability. 2. This study addressed systematic effects of predator and prey body masses on the functional response parameters handling time, instantaneous search coefficient (attack coefficient) and a scaling exponent converting type II into type III functional responses. To fully explore the possible combinations of predator and prey body masses, we studied the functional responses of 13 predator species (ground beetles and wolf spiders) on one small and one large prey resulting in 26 functional responses. 3. We found (i) a power-law decrease of handling time with predator mass with an exponent of -0.94; (ii) an increase of handling time with prey mass (power-law with an exponent of 0.83, but only three prey sizes were included); (iii) a hump-shaped relationship between instantaneous search coefficients and predator-prey body-mass ratios; and (iv) low scaling exponents for low predator-prey body mass ratios in contrast to high scaling exponents for high predator-prey body-mass ratios. 4. These scaling relationships suggest that nonlinear interaction strengths can be predicted by knowledge of predator and prey body masses. Our results imply that predators of intermediate size impose stronger per capita top-down interaction strengths on a prey than smaller or larger predators. Moreover, the stability of population and food-web dynamics should increase with increasing body-mass ratios in consequence of increases in the scaling exponents. 5. Integrating these scaling relationships into population models will allow predicting energy fluxes, food-web structures and the distribution of interaction strengths across food web links based on knowledge of the species' body masses.

  5. Assessing the Neuroendocrine Stress Response in the Functional Neuroimaging Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony P.; Liberzon, Israel

    2009-01-01

    Neural regulation of stress responses, and the feedback of stress hormones to the brain, reflect complex brain-body interactions that may underlie the effects of psychological stress on health. Elucidating the brain circuitry involved in the cortical control of limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the cortical “targets” of cortisol that in turn modulates brain function, requires careful assessment of glucocorticoid hormones, in the context of the neuroimaging paradigms. Here we discuss approaches for assessment of endocrine function in the context of neuroimaging, including methods of blood and saliva specimen collection, and methods for drug/hormone administration. We also briefly discuss important temporal considerations, including appropriate timing of sample collections for hormones with different time-courses of activation (e.g. ACTH vs. cortisol), the pharmacokinetics of both endogenous hormones and administered agents, and circadian considerations. These are crucial to experimental designs of rhythmic hormonal systems and multiple feedback loops. We briefly address psychological/behavioral ‘activation’ paradigms used for inducing endogenous LHPA axis responses within or in proximity to scanner, as well as strategies for administration of exogenous hormones or secretagogues. Finally, we discuss some of the analyses issues in terms of hormone responses (e.g. response and area under curve, diurnal variability) and strategies for linking measured levels of peripheral humoral factor to brain activity (e.g. hormone responses as between subject regressors of BOLD activations, hormone levels as within subject regressors in analyses of covariance of brain activity over time, etc.). PMID:19481160

  6. Retrieving impulse response function amplitudes from the ambient seismic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Loïc; Denolle, Marine; Miyake, Hiroe; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2017-07-01

    Seismic interferometry is now widely used to retrieve the impulse response function of the Earth between two distant seismometers. The phase information has been the focus of most passive imaging studies, as conventional seismic tomography uses traveltime measurements. The amplitude information, however, is harder to interpret because it strongly depends on the distribution of ambient seismic field sources and on the multitude of processing methods. Our study focuses on the latter by comparing the amplitudes of the impulse response functions calculated between seismic stations in the Kanto sedimentary basin, Japan, using several processing techniques. This region provides a unique natural laboratory to test the reliability of the amplitudes with complex wave propagation through the basin, and dense observations from the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network. We compute the impulse response functions using the cross correlation, coherency and deconvolution techniques of the raw ambient seismic field and the cross correlation of 1-bit normalized data. To validate the amplitudes of the impulse response functions, we use a shallow Mw 5.8 earthquake that occurred on the eastern edge of Kanto Basin and close to a station that is used as the virtual source. Both S and surface waves are retrieved in the causal part of the impulse response functions computed with all the different techniques. However, the amplitudes obtained from the deconvolution method agree better with those of the earthquake. Despite the expected wave attenuation due to the soft sediments of the Kanto Basin, seismic amplification caused by the basin geometry dominates the amplitudes of S and surface waves and is captured by the ambient seismic field. To test whether or not the anticausal part of the impulse response functions from deconvolution also contains reliable amplitude information, we use another virtual source located on the western edge of the basin. We show that the surface wave amplitudes

  7. Reinterpreting space, time lags, and functional responses in ecological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, M J; Wilson, H B; Pacala, S W

    2000-12-01

    Natural enemy-victim interactions are of major applied importance and of fundamental interest to ecologists. A key question is what stabilizes these interactions, allowing the long-term coexistence of the two species. Three main theoretical explanations have been proposed: behavioral responses, time-dependent factors such as delayed density dependence, and spatial heterogeneity. Here, using the powerful moment-closure technique, we show a fundamental equivalence between these three elements. Limited movement by organisms is a ubiquitous feature of ecological systems, allowing spatial structure to develop; we show that the effects of this can be naturally described in terms of time lags or within-generation functional responses.

  8. [Cerebral vasoreactivity and functional response in stroke: a study with functional MR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, R; Matthews, P M

    Lacunar infarcts are usually associated with anatomical and possibly functional changes in the walls of small blood vessels (penetrating arteries). The functional effect varies and is accompanied by cerebral adaptive/reorganizational changes. BOLD contrast, originated in the microvasculature (especially with ultra high magnetic fields) depends, in the end, on haemodynamic changes and is useful for exploring patterns of cerebral activation using fMR. To compare the temporal behaviour of the BOLD signal and the distribution of activation between a group of patients with no functional sequelae following a stroke and a control group, by using fMR at 3T. The stroke group showed a smaller number of voxels activated, but this was not statistically significant. The patterns of activation, size of the sensor motor area (SM or ASM) and index of laterality were similar in both groups. In SM the BOLD response was 85% slower (pstroke group, which were insufficient to produce reorganizational/adaptive changes or by the great variety of responses. The temporal response of the BOLD response was different in the stroke group, probably as a result of the alteration in the haemodynamic response in relation to the underlying processes which damage the functional properties of the vascular wall. This difference in the BOLD response should be interpreted with caution, and borne in mind when interpreting activation in persons with vascular pathology. Further studies are necessary for better understanding of its significance.

  9. Executing application function calls in response to an interrupt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Gheorghe; Archer, Charles J.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Heidelberger, Philip; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-05-11

    Executing application function calls in response to an interrupt including creating a thread; receiving an interrupt having an interrupt type; determining whether a value of a semaphore represents that interrupts are disabled; if the value of the semaphore represents that interrupts are not disabled: calling, by the thread, one or more preconfigured functions in dependence upon the interrupt type of the interrupt; yielding the thread; and if the value of the semaphore represents that interrupts are disabled: setting the value of the semaphore to represent to a kernel that interrupts are hard-disabled; and hard-disabling interrupts at the kernel.

  10. Exact response functions within the time-dependent Gutzwiller approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünemann, J.; Wasner, S.; Oelsen, E. v.; Seibold, G.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the applicability of the two existing versions of a time-dependent Gutzwiller approach (TDGA) beyond the frequently used limit of infinite spatial dimensions. To this end, we study the two-particle response functions of a two-site Hubbard model where we can compare the exact results and those derived from the TDGA. It turns out that only the more recently introduced version of the TDGA can be combined with a diagrammatic approach which allows for the evaluation of Gutzwiller wave functions in finite dimensions. For this TDGA method, we derive the time-dependent Lagrangian for general single-band Hubbard models.

  11. Neutron response function characterization of {sup 4}He scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Rolison, Lucas M.; Lewis, Jason M. [University of Florida, Nuclear Engineering Program, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Murer, David [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., Räffelstrasse 11, 8045 Zürich (Switzerland); Massey, Thomas N. [Ohio University, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A. [University of Florida, Nuclear Engineering Program, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Time-of-flight measurements were conducted to characterize the neutron energy response of pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron scintillation detectors for the first time, using the Van de Graaff generator at Ohio University. The time-of-flight spectra and pulse height distributions were measured. This data was used to determine the light output response function, which was found to be linear at energies below 3.5 MeV. The intrinsic efficiency of the detector as a function of incident energy was also calculated: the average efficiency up to 10 MeV was 3.1%, with a maximum efficiency of 6.6% at 1.05 MeV. These results will enable development of neutron spectrum unfolding algorithms for neutron spectroscopy applications with these detectors.

  12. Functional stimuli responsive hydrogel devices by self-folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, ChangKyu; Xiao, Rui; Park, JaeHyun; Cha, Jaepyeong; Nguyen, Thao D.; Gracias, David H.

    2014-09-01

    We describe a photolithographic approach to create functional stimuli responsive, self-folding, microscale hydrogel devices using thin, gradient cross-linked hinges and thick, fully cross-linked panels. The hydrogels are composed of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (pNIPAM-AAc) with reversible stimuli responsive properties just below physiological temperatures. We show that a variety of three-dimensional structures can be formed and reversibly actuated by temperature or pH. We experimentally characterized the swelling and mechanical properties of pNIPAM-AAc and developed a finite element model to rationalize self-folding and its variation with hinge thickness and swelling ratio. Finally, we highlight applications of this approach in the creation of functional devices such as self-folding polymeric micro-capsules, untethered micro-grippers and thermally steered micro-mirror systems.

  13. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found marked homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we were able to describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal.

  14. Time dependent density functional calculation of plasmon response in clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng(王锋); Zhang Feng-Shou(张丰收); Eric Suraud

    2003-01-01

    We have introduced a theoretical scheme for the efficient description of the optical response of a cluster based on the time-dependent density functional theory. The practical implementation is done by means of the fully fledged timedependent local density approximation scheme, which is solved directly in the time domain without any linearization.As an example we consider the simple Na2 cluster and compute its surface plasmon photoabsorption cross section, which is in good agreement with the experiments.

  15. Functional Development of the Octenol Response in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 07 March 2013 doi: 10.3389/fphys.2013.00039 Functional development of the octenol response in Aedes aegypti ...l’Insecte, Signalisation et Communication, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 1272, F-75252 Paris, France. Attraction of female Aedes aegypti ...mosquitoes. Keywords: odorant receptor, gustatory receptor, octenol, CO2, olfaction, Aedes aegypti , development INTRODUCTION Female Aedes aegypti

  16. Transcriptomic responses to functional feeds in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchi, Luca; Bickerdike, Ralph; Douglas, Alex; Secombes, Christopher J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2011-11-01

    Functional feeds are diets that have positive effects on both health and growth promoting performance of the animals ingesting them, by supplying additional compounds above and beyond the basic nutritional requirements for animal growth alone. The most common additives used in aquaculture diets are probiotics, prebiotics, immunostimulants, vitamins and nucleotides. Inclusion of these components to fish diets can increase feed conversion efficiency and growth, as well as having positive effects on the fish immune system. This review discusses the results from previous studies on fish nutrition and includes a novel genomic approach, using microarray analysis, to elucidate nutritional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed a newly developed functional feed health premix diet. The transcriptome analysis demonstrated that compared to the standard diet feeding with the functional feed had significant effects on biological processes in the liver. This resulted in a reduction of the expression of genes related to protein turnover, reduced circulating plasma proteins and a down regulation of genes involved in the immune response. These results suggest that the functional feed may infer a decrease in whole body metabolic demands, suppressing both protein turnover and whole body oxygen demand, as well as down regulating several genes involved in the innate immune system. Together these changes appear to result in less energy wastage in fish and an enhanced growth and performance.

  17. Chemosensory function and response in idiopathic environmental intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, P; Hummel, T

    2000-01-01

    This chapter reviews the current literature on the possible role of olfactory and trigeminal chemosensory function in idiopathic environmental intolerances (IEI). Two general points emerge from the review. First, studies of chemosensory function in IEI patients indicate that, despite their self-reported "heightened sensitivity" and enhanced responsivity to environmental odors, when compared to healthy controls they generally are found to be equally or even less sensitive to odors as measured by objective psychophysical and electrophysiological measures of olfactory function. These studies point towards alterations in the cognitive processing of olfactory information as the major characteristic of IEI. Second, studies of the role of sensitivity and bias in olfactory and trigeminal chemosensory functioning indicate that nonsensory factors (e.g., attention, bias, personality) can dramatically alter the self-reported impact of exposure to volatile chemicals. Together, these general points suggest a perspective on IEI that views many symptoms of the disorder to primarily reflect the influence of nonsensory, cognitive processes on responses to environmental odors.

  18. Renal Function and Cardiovascular Response to Mental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Stephen L.; Katzel, Leslie I.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Weir, Matthew R.; Waldstein, Shari R.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims Cardiovascular reactivity (CVR), defined as an exaggerated hemodynamic response to mental stress, is a putative vascular risk factor and may reflect sympathetic hyperactivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and vascular risk, but its relationship with CVR is unknown. Methods CVR was assessed in 107 individuals without overt cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Blood pressure and heart rate responses were elicited by three experimental tasks designed to evoke mental stress. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated using the MDRD formula. General linear models estimated the association between renal function and CVR, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Mean age was 66 years and 11% had eGFR of <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. After multivariate adjustment, a low eGFR was associated with a greater stress response of systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse pressure. Associations were only partially attenuated after adjustment for lipids and glucose tolerance. When considered as a continuous variable, lower eGFR was associated with a greater blood pressure response after adjustment for glycemia. Conclusion Although there were relatively few participants with CKD, these results suggest a relationship between CKD and greater CVR. Further investigation is warranted into factors that mediate this relationship and potential clinical consequences of this exaggerated response to stress in CKD. PMID:18025779

  19. Functional trait responses to grazing are mediated by soil moisture and plant functional group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuxia; Li, Wenhuai; Lan, Zhichun; Ren, Haiyan; Wang, Kaibo

    2015-12-11

    Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, community structure and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have tested how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and plant functional group identity. We examined the effects of grazing on functional traits across a broad range of species along a soil moisture gradient in Inner Mongolia grassland. Our results showed that trait syndromes of plant size (individual biomass) and shoot growth (leaf N content and leaf density) distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The effects of grazing on functional traits were mediated by soil moisture and dependent on functional group identity. For most species, grazing decreased plant height but increased leaf N and specific leaf area (SLA) along the moisture gradient. Grazing enhanced the community-weighted attributes (leaf NCWM and SLACWM), which were triggered mainly by the positive trait responses of annuals and biennials and perennial grasses, and increased relative abundance of perennial forbs. Our results suggest that grazing-induced species turnover and increased intraspecific trait variability are two drivers for the observed changes in community weighted attributes. The dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance-resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive-conservative strategies in resource utilization.

  20. Resistance to change of forgetting functions and response rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Amy L; Shahan, Timothy A; Nevin, John A

    2005-07-01

    This experiment examined the effects of reinforcement probability on resistance to change of remembering and response rate. Pigeons responded on a two-component multiple schedule in which completion of a variable-interval 20-s schedule produced delayed matching-to-sample trials in both components. Each session included four delays (0.1 s, 2 s, 4 s, and 8 s) between sample termination and presentation of comparison stimuli in both components. The two components differed in the probability of reinforcement arranged for correct matches (i.e., rich, p = .9; lean, p = .1). Response rates during the variable-interval portion of the procedure were higher in the rich component during baseline and more resistant to the disruptive effects of intercomponent food and extinction. Forgetting functions were constructed by examining matching accuracy as a function of delay duration. Baseline accuracy was higher in the rich component than in the lean component as measured by differences in the gamma-intercept of the forgetting functions (i.e., initial discrimination), rather than from differences in the slope of the forgetting function (i.e., rate of forgetting). Intercomponent food increased the rate of forgetting relatively more in the lean component than in the rich component, but initial discrimination was not systematically affected. Extinction reduced initial discrimination relatively more in the lean component than in the rich component, but did not systematically affect rate of forgetting. These results are consistent with our previous data suggesting that, as for response rate, accuracy and resistance to change of discriminating are positively related to rate of reinforcement. These data also suggest that the disruptability of remembering depends on the conditions of reinforcement, but the way in which remembering is disrupted depends on the nature of the disruptor.

  1. How linear features alter predator movement and the functional response.

    KAUST Repository

    McKenzie, Hannah W

    2012-01-18

    In areas of oil and gas exploration, seismic lines have been reported to alter the movement patterns of wolves (Canis lupus). We developed a mechanistic first passage time model, based on an anisotropic elliptic partial differential equation, and used this to explore how wolf movement responses to seismic lines influence the encounter rate of the wolves with their prey. The model was parametrized using 5 min GPS location data. These data showed that wolves travelled faster on seismic lines and had a higher probability of staying on a seismic line once they were on it. We simulated wolf movement on a range of seismic line densities and drew implications for the rate of predator-prey interactions as described by the functional response. The functional response exhibited a more than linear increase with respect to prey density (type III) as well as interactions with seismic line density. Encounter rates were significantly higher in landscapes with high seismic line density and were most pronounced at low prey densities. This suggests that prey at low population densities are at higher risk in environments with a high seismic line density unless they learn to avoid them.

  2. The Pathogenesis of ACLF: The Inflammatory Response and Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although systemic inflammation is a hallmark of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), its role in the development of this syndrome is poorly understood. Here the author first summarizes the general principles of the inflammatory response. Inflammation can be triggered by exogenous or endogenous inducers. Important exogenous inducers include bacterial products such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and virulence factors. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns elicit inflammation through structural feature recognition (using innate pattern-recognition receptors [PRRs]), whereas virulence factors generally trigger inflammation via functional feature recognition. Endogenous inducers are called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and include molecules released by necrotic cells and products of extracellular matrix breakdown. Danger-associated molecular patterns use different PRRs. The purpose of the inflammatory response may differ according to the type of stimulus: The aim of infection-induced inflammation is to decrease pathogen burden, whereas the DAMP-induced inflammation aims to promote tissue repair. An excessive inflammatory response can induce collateral tissue damage (a process called immunopathology). However immunopathology may not be the only mechanism of tissue damage; for example, organ failure can develop because of failed disease tolerance. In this review, the author also discusses how general principles of the inflammatory response can help us to understand the development of ACLF in different contexts: bacterial infection, severe alcoholic hepatitis, and cases in which there is no identifiable trigger.

  3. Material reconstruction for spectral computed tomography with detector response function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiulong; Gao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Different from conventional computed tomography (CT), spectral CT using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is able to provide the unprecedented material compositions. However accurate spectral CT needs to account for the detector response function (DRF), which is often distorted by factors such as pulse pileup and charge-sharing. In this work, we propose material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF. The simulation results suggest that the proposed methods reconstructed more accurate material compositions than the conventional method without DRF. Moreover, the proposed linearized method with linear data fidelity from spectral resampling had improved reconstruction quality from the nonlinear method directly based on nonlinear data fidelity.

  4. Integrating comparative functional response experiments into global change research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Eoin J

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the importance of non-consumptive effects in predator-prey interaction research, which can often outweigh the importance of direct feeding. Barrios-O'Neill et al. (2014) report a novel method to characterize such effects by comparing the functional response of native and introduced intermediate consumers in the presence and absence of a higher predator. The invader exhibited stronger direct feeding and was also more resistant to intimidation by the higher predator. This experimental framework may be incorporated into mainstream global change research, for example, to quantify the importance of non-consumptive effects for the success or failure of biological invasions.

  5. Predictive functional control of integrating process based on impulse response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZHANG; Ping LI; Weidong ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    The predictive model is built according to the characteristics of the impulse response of integrating process. In order to eliminate the permanent offset between the setpoint and the process output in the presence of the load disturbance, a novel error compensation method is proposed. Then predictive functional control of integrating process is designed. The method given generates a simple control structure, which can significantly reduce online computation. Furthermore, the tuning of the controller is fairly straightforward. Simulation results indicate that the designed control system is relatively robust to the parameters variation of the process.

  6. Exactly solvable model for the time response function of RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it; Fonte, P. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Gobbi, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The fluctuation theory for the growth of several avalanches is briefly summarized and extended to include the case of electronegative gas mixtures. Based on such physical picture, the intrinsic time response function of an RPC can be calculated in a closed form and its average and rms extracted from series representations. The corresponding timing resolution, expressed in units of 1/(({alpha}-{eta})vd), is a universal function of the mean number of 'effective' clusters n0 reduced by electron attachment: n0(1-{eta}/{alpha}). A comparison to a few selected good-quality experimental data is attempted for the timing resolution of both 1-gap and 4-gaps RPCs, finding a reasonable agreement.

  7. Mitochondrial Composition,Function and Stress Response in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard P.Jacoby; Lei Li; Shaobai Huang; Chun Pong Lee; A.Harvey Millar; Nicolas L.Taylor

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of mitochondria is respiration,where catabolism of substrates is coupled to ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation.In plants,mitochondrial composition is relatively complex and flexible and has specific pathways to support photosynthetic processes in illuminated leaves.This review begins with outlining current models of mitochondrial composition in plant cells,with an emphasis upon the assembly of the complexes of the classical electron transport chain (ETC).Next,we focus upon the comparative analysis of mitochondrial function from different tissue types.A prominent theme in the plant mitochondrial literature involves linking mitochondrial composition to environmental stress responses,and this review then gives a detailed outline of how oxidative stress impacts upon the plant mitochondrial proteome with particular attention to the role of transition metals.This is followed by an analysis of the signaling capacity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species,which studies the transcriptional changes of stress responsive genes as a framework to define specific signals emanating from the mitochondrion.Finally,specific mitochondrial roles during exposure to harsh environments are outlined,with attention paid to mitochondrial delivery of energy and intermediates,mitochondrial support for photosynthesis,and mitochondrial processes operating within root cells that mediate tolerance to anoxia and unfavorable soil chemistries.

  8. Identification of damage based on frequency response function (FRF data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman M. S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical joints, particularly fasteners such as bolted joints have a complex non-linear behaviour. The non-linearity might emerge from the material, geometry or by the contacts in the joints. However, damage to a structure can be happened either their connections or the material of components. The effect of damage can change the dynamic properties of the structure such as natural frequencies and mode shapes and structural performance and can cause premature failure to structure. This paper presents a damage detection method using a vibration based damage detection method based on the frequency response function (FRF data. A combination of numerical model and physical bolted jointed structure of damaged and undamaged structure will be investigated. The validation is employed to detect the presence of damage in the structure based on the frequency response function (FRF data from the parameter values used in the benchmark model and damaged model. The comparisons of the undamaged and damaged structure of the FRF have revealed the damaged structure was shifted from the undamaged structure. The effect of the FRF between undamaged and damaged structure is clearly affected by the reduction of stiffness for the damaged structure.

  9. Response Function of the Crayfish Caudal Photoreceptor to Hydrodynamic Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breite, Sally; Bahar, Sonya; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2002-03-01

    In its abdominal 6th ganglion the crayfish houses 2 light-sensitive neurons (caudal photoreceptors, or CPRs). It is known that these neurons work in tandem with a mechanosensory system of tiny hairs spread across the tailfan, which make synaptic contact with the photoreceptors. A stochastic resonance effect has been shown in this system in which light enhances the transduction of a weak, periodic mechanosensory (hydrodynamic) stimulus. It is not known, however, whether an optimal response from the CPR is induced by a single sine wave cycle or some other waveform. We have experimentally investigated this favorable waveform by driving a tailfan preparation with mechanical 10 Hz correlated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise and calculating the response function from the spike-triggered average of the applied noise waveform. We will discuss differences in the shape of the optimal waveform under dark and light conditions, as well as what seems to be a noticeable difference in the magnitude of the animals' response to a noisy stimulus in comparison with a periodic stimulus.

  10. Cognitive function, treatment response to lithium, and social functioning in Japanese patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satoshi; Fujii, Kumiko; Ozeki, Yuji; Ohmori, Kenichi; Honda, Gyo; Mori, Harunobu; Kato, Kazuko; Kuroda, Jinichi; Aoki, Akiko; Asahi, Haruhiko; Sato, Hayato; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Akiyama, Kazufumi

    2017-07-10

    Patients with bipolar disorder often suffer from cognitive impairment that significantly influences their functional outcome. However, it remains unknown whether lithium has a central role in cognition and functional outcome. We examined whether cognition and functional outcome were predicted by demographic and clinical variables, including the response to lithium, in lithium-treated patients with bipolar disorder. We evaluated 96 lithium-treated euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and 196 age- and-gender-matched healthy controls, using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). The patients were also assessed using the Social Functioning Scale (SFS) and "The Retrospective Criteria of Long-Term Treatment Response in Research Subjects with Bipolar Disorder" (Alda) scale, which was evaluated as either a continuous measure of the total scale or a dichotomous criterion. Multiple regression analysis revealed two key findings: first, that the premorbid intelligence quotient, age, and number of mood episodes were predictors of the BACS composite score; and, second, that the BACS composite score, negative symptoms, and continuous measure on the total Alda scale (but not its dichotomy) predicted the total SFS score. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to confirm these findings, and additionally revealed that the Alda scale was significantly associated with negative symptoms and also the number of mood episodes, regardless of how it was evaluated. SEM delineated how demographic and clinical variables, cognitive performance, and response to lithium treatment were causally associated with, and converged on, social function. The putative role of the Alda scale for social function warrants further study. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Is the functional stretch response servo controlled or preprogrammed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C W; Kearney, R E

    1982-03-01

    Recent findings in humans and primates suggest that the long latency electromyographic (EMG) responses, evoked by opposing sudden limb displacements, might be mediated via a transcortical pathway. However, it is not clear whether these "late" responses are servo controlled or preprogrammed. We have addressed these questions in two interrelated experimental series. Firstly, the late EMG responses (termed the FSR) evoked in the ankle muscles of 8-12 normal human subjects were mapped as a function of displacement amplitude and velocity. Secondly, the FSR evoked by sustained ramp displacements (lasting 500 msec) were compared with those elicited by transient pulse displacements (lasting 60 msec) having entirely different amplitude and velocity profiles. The findings demonstrated a general lack of a systematic relationship between the characteristics of the initial component of the FSR and displacement parameters, although exceptions were noted in individual subjects. Furthermore, no marked difference was found in either the latency or the rise time of the FSRs evoked by ramp and pulse displacements. The similarity of the FSRs in spite of widely different input patterns is not consistent with the behaviour of a servo response. However, such a finding is in agreement with the concept of a preprogrammed pattern of activity which, once triggered, has to run its full course without the possibility of modification. It is therefore concluded that, at least the initial part of the FSR is generated by the triggered release of a preformulated pattern of intended movement relatively independent of the specific pattern of limb displacement, rather than acting in the manner of a servo mechanism.

  12. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  13. Relativistic Spin-Isospin Dependent Response Function of Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang-Gang; CHEN Wei; AI Bao-Quan; ZHENG Xiao-Ping; Masahiro Nakano

    2000-01-01

    A full relativistic formalism is employed to derive the relativistic particle-hole and delta-hole excitation polariza tion insertion of pion propagator in nuclear matter. The spin-isospin-dependent response function of nucleus at high energy-momentum transfer is calculated with the nuclear matter approximation. The short range correlation effect, two-nucleon absorption and nucleus form factor effects are included in the calculation. The position and width of the resonance peak of the spin-isospin mode are reproduced and found to be coincident with experiment data. The position of the peak and its width is sensitive to Landau-Migdal parameter g' which is about 0.6.

  14. The adaptive response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünheid, Thorsten; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; van Eijden, Theo M G J

    2009-12-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function while minimizing energy use. Changes in these anatomical parameters are associated with changes in neuromuscular activity as the pattern of muscle activation by the central nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of muscle properties. This review summarizes the adaptive response of jaw muscles to various stimuli or perturbations in the orofacial system and addresses general changes in muscles as they adapt, specific adaptive changes in jaw muscles under various physiologic and pathologic conditions, and their adaptive response to non-surgical and surgical therapeutic interventions. Although the jaw muscles are used concertedly in the masticatory system, their adaptive changes are not always uniform and vary with the nature, intensity, and duration of the stimulus. In general, stretch, increases neuromuscular activity, and resistance training result in hypertrophy, elicits increases in mitochondrial content and cross-sectional area of the fibres, and may change the fibre-type composition of the muscle towards a larger percentage of slow-type fibres. In contrast, changes in the opposite direction occur when neuromuscular activity is reduced, the muscle is immobilized in a shortened position, or paralysed. The broad range of stimuli that affect the properties of jaw muscles might help explain the large variability in the anatomical and physiological characteristics found among individuals, muscles, and muscle portions.

  15. Frequency response function-based model updating using Kriging model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. T.; Wang, C. J.; Zhao, J. P.

    2017-03-01

    An acceleration frequency response function (FRF) based model updating method is presented in this paper, which introduces Kriging model as metamodel into the optimization process instead of iterating the finite element analysis directly. The Kriging model is taken as a fast running model that can reduce solving time and facilitate the application of intelligent algorithms in model updating. The training samples for Kriging model are generated by the design of experiment (DOE), whose response corresponds to the difference between experimental acceleration FRFs and its counterpart of finite element model (FEM) at selected frequency points. The boundary condition is taken into account, and a two-step DOE method is proposed for reducing the number of training samples. The first step is to select the design variables from the boundary condition, and the selected variables will be passed to the second step for generating the training samples. The optimization results of the design variables are taken as the updated values of the design variables to calibrate the FEM, and then the analytical FRFs tend to coincide with the experimental FRFs. The proposed method is performed successfully on a composite structure of honeycomb sandwich beam, after model updating, the analytical acceleration FRFs have a significant improvement to match the experimental data especially when the damping ratios are adjusted.

  16. The function of small RNAs in plant biotic stress response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Huang; Meiling Yang; Xiaoming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) play essential roles in plants upon biotic stress. Plants utilize RNA silencing machinery to facilitate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity to defend against pathogen attack or to facilitate defense against insect herbivores. Pathogens, on the other hand, are also able to generate effectors and sRNAs to counter the host immune response. The arms race between plants and pathogens/insect herbivores has triggered the evolution of sRNAs, RNA silencing machinery and pathogen effectors. A great number of studies have been performed to investigate the roles of sRNAs in plant defense, bringing in the opportunity to utilize sRNAs in plant protection. Transgenic plants with pathogen-derived resistance ability or trans-generational defense have been generated, which show promising potential as solutions for pathogen/insect herbi-vore problems in the field. Here we summarize the recent progress on the function of sRNAs in response to biotic stress, mainly in plant-pathogen/insect herbivore interaction, and the application of sRNAs in disease and insect herbivore control.

  17. Automated calculation of anharmonic vibrational contributions to first hyperpolarizabilities: quadratic response functions from vibrational configuration interaction wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Christiansen, Ove; Hättig, Christof

    2009-10-21

    Quadratic response functions are derived and implemented for a vibrational configuration interaction state. Combined electronic and vibrational quadratic response functions are derived using Born-Oppenheimer vibronic product wave functions. Computational tractable expressions are derived for determining the total quadratic response contribution as a sum of contributions involving both electronic and vibrational linear and quadratic response functions. In the general frequency-dependent case this includes a new and more troublesome type of electronic linear response function. Pilot calculations for the FH, H(2)O, CH(2)O, and pyrrole molecules demonstrate the importance of vibrational contributions for accurate comparison to experiment and that the vibrational contributions in some cases can be very large. The calculation of transition properties between vibrational states is combined with sum-over-states expressions for analysis purposes. On the basis of this some simple analysis methods are suggested. Also, a preliminary study of the effect of finite lifetimes on quadratic response functions is presented.

  18. Motor response complications and the function of striatal efferent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, T N; Mouradian, M M; Engber, T M

    1993-12-01

    Motor response complications eventually appear in most patients with advanced Parkinson's disease being treated with levodopa. The interval between onset of parkinsonism and emergence of these adverse events appears independent of the dose or the duration of therapy. Current evidence suggests that "wearing-off" fluctuations largely reflect the loss of normally functioning dopaminergic terminals, although postsynaptic alterations contribute somewhat to the underlying decline in the duration of levodopa's antiparkinsonian action. "On-off" fluctuations and peak-dose dyskinesias, on the other hand, appear to arise mainly as a consequence of postjunctional alterations that follow exposure to nonphysiologic intrasynaptic dopamine fluctuations in patients who have lost the buffering afforded by dopaminergic terminals. Studies in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions indicate that striking functional alterations occur in striatal dopaminoceptive systems as a result of dopaminergic denervation and that levodopa replacement, particularly when given intermittently, fails to normalize these changes. To the extent that similar alterations contribute to the appearance of motor complications, the successful symptomatic therapy of Parkinson's disease may require continuous dopaminergic stimulation, as well as direct pharmacologic targeting of striatal dopaminoceptive systems.

  19. The light responsive transcriptome of the zebrafish: function and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Weger

    Full Text Available Most organisms possess circadian clocks that are able to anticipate the day/night cycle and are reset or "entrained" by the ambient light. In the zebrafish, many organs and even cultured cell lines are directly light responsive, allowing for direct entrainment of the clock by light. Here, we have characterized light induced gene transcription in the zebrafish at several organizational levels. Larvae, heart organ cultures and cell cultures were exposed to 1- or 3-hour light pulses, and changes in gene expression were compared with controls kept in the dark. We identified 117 light regulated genes, with the majority being induced and some repressed by light. Cluster analysis groups the genes into five major classes that show regulation at all levels of organization or in different subset combinations. The regulated genes cover a variety of functions, and the analysis of gene ontology categories reveals an enrichment of genes involved in circadian rhythms, stress response and DNA repair, consistent with the exposure to visible wavelengths of light priming cells for UV-induced damage repair. Promoter analysis of the induced genes shows an enrichment of various short sequence motifs, including E- and D-box enhancers that have previously been implicated in light regulation of the zebrafish period2 gene. Heterologous reporter constructs with sequences matching these motifs reveal light regulation of D-box elements in both cells and larvae. Morpholino-mediated knock-down studies of two homologues of the D-box binding factor Tef indicate that these are differentially involved in the cell autonomous light induction in a gene-specific manner. These findings suggest that the mechanisms involved in period2 regulation might represent a more general pathway leading to light induced gene expression.

  20. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental factors...... including treatments, mutations and pathogen infections. Similarly, drugs may be discovered by the relationship between the transcript profiles effectuated or impacted by a candidate drug and by the target disease. The integration of such data enables systems biology to predict the interplay between...

  1. Functional response models to estimate feeding rates of wading birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, J.A.; Gilliam, J.F.; Miranda-Castro, L.

    2010-01-01

    Forager (predator) abundance may mediate feeding rates in wading birds. Yet, when modeled, feeding rates are typically derived from the purely prey-dependent Holling Type II (HoII) functional response model. Estimates of feeding rates are necessary to evaluate wading bird foraging strategies and their role in food webs; thus, models that incorporate predator dependence warrant consideration. Here, data collected in a mangrove swamp in Puerto Rico in 1994 were reanalyzed, reporting feeding rates for mixed-species flocks after comparing fits of the HoII model, as used in the original work, to the Beddington-DeAngelis (BD) and Crowley-Martin (CM) predator-dependent models. Model CM received most support (AIC c wi = 0.44), but models BD and HoII were plausible alternatives (AIC c ??? 2). Results suggested that feeding rates were constrained by predator abundance. Reductions in rates were attributed to interference, which was consistent with the independently observed increase in aggression as flock size increased (P rates. However, inferences derived from the HoII model, as used in the original work, were sound. While Holling's Type II and other purely prey-dependent models have fostered advances in wading bird foraging ecology, evaluating models that incorporate predator dependence could lead to a more adequate description of data and processes of interest. The mechanistic bases used to derive models used here lead to biologically interpretable results and advance understanding of wading bird foraging ecology.

  2. Using remotely sensed temperature to estimate climate response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heft-Neal, Sam; Lobell, David B.; Burke, Marshall

    2017-01-01

    Temperature data are commonly used to estimate the sensitivity of many societally relevant outcomes, including crop yields, mortality, and economic output, to ongoing climate changes. In many tropical regions, however, temperature measures are often very sparse and unreliable, limiting our ability to understand climate change impacts. Here we evaluate satellite measures of near-surface temperature (Ts) as an alternative to traditional air temperatures (Ta) from weather stations, and in particular their ability to replace Ta in econometric estimation of climate response functions. We show that for maize yields in Africa and the United States, and for economic output in the United States, regressions that use Ts produce very similar results to those using Ta, despite the fact that daily correlation between the two temperature measures is often low. Moreover, for regions such as Africa with poor station coverage, we find that models with Ts outperform models with Ta, as measured by both R 2 values and out-of-sample prediction error. The results indicate that Ts can be used to study climate impacts in areas with limited station data, and should enable faster progress in assessing risks and adaptation needs in these regions.

  3. Dual Functions of Phospholipase in Plant Response to Drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueyun Hong; Suqin Zheng; Xuemin Wang

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipase Dα1 (PLDα1) has been shown to mediate the abscisic acid regulation of stomatal movements.Arabidopsis plants deficient in PLDα1 increased,whereas PLDoLl-overexpressing tobacco decreased,transpirational water loss.In the early stage of drought,the decrease in water loss was associated with a rapid stomatal closure caused by a high level of PLD in PLDα1-overexpressing plants.However,in the late stage of drought,the overexpressing plants displayed more susceptibility to drought than control plants.PLDα1 activity in the overexpressing plants was much higher than that of control plants in which drought also induced an increase in PLDα1 activity.The high level of PLDα1 activity was correlated to membrane degradation in late stages of drought,as demonstrated by ionic leakage and lipid peroxidation.These findings indicate that a high level of PLDα1 expression has different effects on plant response to water deficits.It promotes stomatal closure at earlier stages,but disrupts membranes in prolonged drought stress.These findings are discussed in relation to the understanding of PLD functions and potential applications.

  4. Engineering structure and function using thermo-responsive biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszka, Martha K.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly enables exquisite control at the smallest scale and generates order amongst macromolecular building blocks that remain too small to be manipulated individually. Environmental cues, such as heating, can trigger the organization of these materials from individual molecules to multiparticle assemblies with a variety of compositions and functions. Synthetic as well as biological polymers have been engineered for these purposes; however, biological strategies can offer unparalleled control over the composition of these macromolecular building blocks. Biologic polymers are macromolecules, themselves composed of monomeric units that can be precisely tailored at the genetic level; furthermore, they can often utilize endogenous biodegradation pathways, which may enhance their potential clinical applications. DNA (nucleotides), polysaccharides (carbohydrates), and proteins (amino acids) have all been engineered to self-assemble into nanostructures in response to a change in temperature. This focus article reviews the growing body of literature exploring temperature-dependent nano-assembly of these biological macromolecules, summarizes some of their physical properties, and discusses future directions. PMID:26112277

  5. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  6. Nonlinearity of dose-response functions for carcinogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoel, D G; Portier, C J

    1994-01-01

    Carcinogenesis data for 315 chemicals were obtained from the National Cancer Institute-National Toxicology Program (NCI-NTP) bioassay programs and were analyzed to examine the shape of carcinogenesis dose-response curves. Tumor site data were more often consistent with a quadratic response than with a linear response, suggesting that the routine use of linear dose-response models will often overestimate risk. Information from in vivo short-term mutagenicity and genotoxicity assays was also ob...

  7. Polyester textile functionalization through incorporation of pH/thermo-responsive microgels. Part II: polyester functionalization and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glampedaki, P.; Calvimontes, A.; Dutschk, V.; Warmoeskerken, M.M.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to functionalize the surface of polyester textiles is described in this study. Functionalization was achieved by incorporating pH/temperature-responsive polyelectrolyte microgels into the textile surface layer using UV irradiation. The aim of functionalization was to regulate polyeste

  8. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowei Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors.

  9. Function-weighted frequency response function sensitivity method for analytical model updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. M.

    2017-09-01

    Since the frequency response function (FRF) sensitivity method was first proposed [26], it has since become a most powerful and practical method for analytical model updating. Nevertheless, the original formulation of the FRF sensitivity method does suffer the limitation that the initial analytical model to be updated should be reasonably close to the final updated model to be sought, due the assumed mathematical first order approximation implicit to most sensitivity based methods. Convergence to correct model is not guaranteed when large modelling errors exist and blind application often leads to optimal solutions which are truly sought. This paper seeks to examine all the important numerical characteristics of the original FRF sensitivity method including frequency data selection, numerical balance and convergence performance. To further improve the applicability of the method to cases of large modelling errors, a new novel function-weighted sensitivity method is developed. The new method has shown much superior performance on convergence even in the presence of large modelling errors. Extensive numerical case studies based on a mass-spring system and a GARTEUR structure have been conducted and very encouraging results have been achieved. Effect of measurement noise has been examined and the method works reasonably well in the presence of measurement uncertainties. The new method removes the restriction of modelling error magnitude being of second order in Euclidean norm as compared with that of system matrices, thereby making it a truly general method applicable to most practical model updating problems.

  10. Optimal function explains forest responses to global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick Dewar; Oskar Franklin; Annikki Makela; Ross E. McMurtrie; Harry T. Valentine

    2009-01-01

    Plant responses to global changes in carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen, and water availability are critical to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations, hydrology, and hence climate. Our understanding of those responses is incomplete, however. Multiple-resource manipulation experiments and empirical observations have revealed a...

  11. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility: Differences Across Industries and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John W.; And Others

    The concept of social responsibility as applied to business suggests that the corporation no longer has a responsibility only to the stockholder but must make decisions aimed toward balancing the interests of all clientele groups affected by actions of the corporation. These groups include managers, administrators, employees, and the general…

  12. Electroencephalography of response inhibition tasks : functional networks and cognitive contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huster, René J; Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Lavallee, Christina F; Falkenstein, Michael; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2013-01-01

    Response inhibition paradigms, as for example stop signal and go/no-go tasks, are often used to study cognitive control processes. Because of the apparent demand to stop a motor reaction, the electrophysiological responses evoked by stop and no-go trials have sometimes likewise been interpreted as i

  13. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility: Differences Across Industries and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John W.; And Others

    The concept of social responsibility as applied to business suggests that the corporation no longer has a responsibility only to the stockholder but must make decisions aimed toward balancing the interests of all clientele groups affected by actions of the corporation. These groups include managers, administrators, employees, and the general…

  14. Listeners' Response to Music as a Function of Personality Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara E.; Schmidt, Charles P.

    1991-01-01

    Presents findings of research concerning the relationship between listener response to music and personality variables. Reports that correlations were found among undergraduate music appreciation students between the Music Listener Response Scale and sensing intuition for the entire group and between judgment perception and the scale among…

  15. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  16. Functional characterization of Foxp3-specific spontaneous immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne Købke; Munir, S; Andersen, Anders Woetmann;

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are associated with an impaired prognosis in several cancers. The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) is generally expressed in Tregs. Here, we identify and characterize spontaneous cytotoxic immune responses to Foxp3-expressing cells...... in peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cancer patients. These immune responses were directed against a HLA-A2-restricted peptide epitope derived from Foxp3. Foxp3-reactive T cells were characterized as cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. These cells recognized dendritic cells incubated with recombinant Foxp3 protein...... readily killed by the Foxp3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The spontaneous presence of Foxp3-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses suggest a general role of such T cells in the complex network of immune regulation as such responses may eliminate Tregs, that is, suppression of the suppressors...

  17. The adaptative response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünheid, T.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Korfage, J.A.M.; Zentner, A.; van Eijden, T.M.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function

  18. A few observations on linking VEP responses to the magno- and parvocellular systems by way of contrast-response functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottun, Bernt C

    2014-03-01

    It has been proposed that magno- and parvocellular contributions to Visually Evoked Potentials (VEPs) can be isolated, or differentiated, by noting the contrast-response relationships of the responses. This suggestion is examined quantitatively by determining the similarity between various sets of VEP data that have been attributed to the magno- and parvocellular systems and previously reported contrast-response functions for different kinds of neurons (magno- and parvocellular neurons and V1, V4, and MT cells) and combinations of the contrast-response functions for these neurons. It is found that other neurons, or combinations of other neurons, typically give better fits to the data than do magno- and parvocellular cells. Thus, to attribute VEP responses to the magno- or parvocellular systems based on contrast-responses properties faces difficulties.

  19. Responsiveness of the OARSI-OMERACT osteoarthritis pain and function measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, M; Davis, A; Lohmander, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of the Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain (ICOAP) measure, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Physical Function Short Form (HOOS-PS), and the Knee Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Physical Function Short Form (KOOS...

  20. Defensive functions and responsible metabolites of microbial endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing evidence indicates that plant microbiomes are influence by ecological successes of plant hosts. Further, endophytic microbes such as bacteria and fungi greatly affect plant stress tolerance and are responsible for defensive reaction to several forms of herbivory. What is not yet clear i...

  1. Circuit architecture explains functional similarity of bacterial heat shock responses

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Masayo; Trusina, Ala

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock response is a stress response to temperature changes and a consecutive increase in amounts of unfolded proteins. To restore homeostasis, cells upregulate chaperones facilitating protein folding by means of transcription factors (TF). We here investigate two heat shock systems: one characteristic to gram negative bacteria, mediated by transcriptional activator sigma32 in E. coli, and another characteristic to gram positive bacteria, mediated by transcriptional repressor HrcA in L. lactis. We construct simple mathematical model of the two systems focusing on the negative feedbacks, where free chaperons suppress sigma32 activation in the former, while they activate HrcA repression in the latter. We demonstrate that both systems, in spite of the difference at the TF regulation level, are capable of showing very similar heat shock dynamics. We find that differences in regulation impose distinct constrains on chaperone-TF binding affinities: the binding constant of free sigma32 to chaperon DnaK, known to...

  2. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stud

  3. Diuretic response and renal function in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, Jozine Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure fluid overload is a frequently occurring problem, which is among others caused by an impaired function of the heart. This fluid overload may lead to severe dyspnea warranting an acute hospitalization. The first choice treatment of this fluid overload is administration

  4. [Functional imaging of pain: from the somatic response to emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain imaging in subjects experiencing pain (real, observed or imagined) has led to considerable progress in our understanding of the role of the brain andpsyche in pain integration and control, as well as some forms of somatoform pain with no anatomical basis. This research is challenging not only the dichotomy between the soma and psyche, but also the concept of psychosomatic pain.

  5. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the metallic response of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, PL

    2005-01-01

    We extend the formulation of time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response properties of dielectric and semi-metallic solids [Kootstra , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6517 (2000)] to treat metals as well. To achieve this, the Kohn-Sham response functions have to include both interba

  6. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the metallic response of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, PL

    We extend the formulation of time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response properties of dielectric and semi-metallic solids [Kootstra , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6517 (2000)] to treat metals as well. To achieve this, the Kohn-Sham response functions have to include both

  7. Food supply and demand, a simulation model of the functional response of grazing ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallegange, I.M.; Brunsting, A.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic model of the functional response is a first prerequisite to be able to bridge the gap between local feeding ecology and grazing rules that pertain to larger scales. A mechanistic model is presented that simulates the functional response, growth and grazing time of ruminants. It is based on

  8. Analytical solutions for spin response functions in model storage rings with Siberian Snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, S.R. [Convergent Computing Inc., P.O. Box 561, Shoreham, NY 11786 (United States)], E-mail: srmane@optonline.net

    2009-03-01

    I present analytical solutions for the spin response functions for radial field rf dipole spin flippers in models of storage rings with one Siberian Snake or two diametrically opposed orthogonal Siberian Snakes. The solutions can serve as benchmarks tests for computer programs. The spin response functions can be used to calculate the resonance strengths for radial field rf dipole spin flippers in storage rings.

  9. Food supply and demand, a simulation model of the functional response of grazing ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallegange, I.M.; Brunsting, A.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic model of the functional response is a first prerequisite to be able to bridge the gap between local feeding ecology and grazing rules that pertain to larger scales. A mechanistic model is presented that simulates the functional response, growth and grazing time of ruminants. It is based on

  10. Impulse-response functions of several detectors used in flow-injection analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugteren-Osinga, van I.C.; Hoogendam, E.; Bos, M.; Linden, van der W.E.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of the impulse-response function of a detector is given. Its application to photometers, ion-sensitive field effect transistors, a potentiometric detector at constant current and a voltammetric detector shows that the impulse-response function can be used to obtain

  11. Functional responses of North Atlantic fish eggs to increasing temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsoukali, Stavroula; Visser, Andre; MacKenzie, Brian

    2016-01-01

    -days and survival of fish eggs from 32 populations of 17 species in the North Atlantic to different temperatures in order to determine potential consequences of global warming for these species. The response of development time exhibited a similar decreasing trend with respect to temperature across species....... The similar slopes of regression lines relating lntransformed development time and temperature indicate similar sensitivity to temperature changes. Across-species differences were mainly driven by intercept values, indicating up to 8- fold differences in development time at given temperature...

  12. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

    2013-01-08

    Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

  13. Covalent bonding from alchemical linear response density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-01-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of linear response based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated single bonds to hydrogen, as well as single, double, and triple bonds between main-group elements, occurring in small iso-electronic molecular spaces with atomic elements drawn from rows 2-3 in the $p$-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order estimates of bonding potentials can achieve chemical accuracy if the alchemical interpolation connects molecules containing late elements in the periodic table (3$^{rd}$ and 4$^{th}$ row) and identical number of atoms and molecular geometries. For these interpolations, changes in bonding potential are near-linear in the coupling parameter, resulting in accurate Hellmann-Feynman predictions. Second order estimates for such interpolations yield worse predictions. The predictions become substantially worse if initial and final molecules differ not only in composition...

  14. Monitoring asthma in childhood: lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Moeller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the methods available for measuring reversible airways obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR and inflammation as hallmarks of asthma, and their role in monitoring children with asthma. Persistent bronchial obstruction may occur in asymptomatic children and is considered a risk factor for severe asthma episodes and is associated with poor asthma outcome. Annual measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s using office based spirometry is considered useful. Other lung function measurements including the assessment of BHR may be reserved for children with possible exercise limitations, poor symptom perception and those not responding to their current treatment or with atypical asthma symptoms, and performed on a higher specialty level. To date, for most methods of measuring lung function there are no proper randomised controlled or large longitudinal studies available to establish their role in asthma management in children. Noninvasive biomarkers for monitoring inflammation in children are available, for example the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide fraction, and the assessment of induced sputum cytology or inflammatory mediators in the exhaled breath condensate. However, their role and usefulness in routine clinical practice to monitor and guide therapy remains unclear, and therefore, their use should be reserved for selected cases.

  15. Separated Response Function Ratios in Exclusive, Forward pi^{+/-} Electroproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, G M; Butuceanu, C; Gaskell, D; Horn, T; Mack, D J; Abbott, D; Aniol, K; Anklin, H; Armstrong, C; Arrington, J; Assamagan, K; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Barrett, B; Beise, E J; Bochna, C; Boeglin, W; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Chang, C C; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Dunne, J; Eden, T; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gibson, E F; Gilman, R; Gustafsson, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Jackson, H; Jin, S; Jones, M K; Keppel, C E; Kim, P H; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Koltenuk, D; Kovaltchouk, V; Liang, M; Liu, J; Lolos, G J; Lung, A; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Matsumura, A; McKee, D; Meekins, D; Mitchell, J; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Mueller, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Okayasu, Y; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C; Pitz, D; Potterveld, D; Punjabi, V; Qin, L M; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Roos, P G; Sarty, A; Shin, I K; Smith, G R; Stepanyan, S; Tang, L G; Tadevosyan, V; Tvaskis, V; van der Meer, R L J; Vansyoc, K; Van Westrum, D; Vidakovic, S; Volmer, J; Vulcan, W; Warren, G; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Zhao, W -X; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B

    2014-01-01

    The study of exclusive $\\pi^{\\pm}$ electroproduction on the nucleon, including separation of the various structure functions, is of interest for a number of reasons. The ratio $R_L=\\sigma_L^{\\pi^-}/\\sigma_L^{\\pi^+}$ is sensitive to isoscalar contamination to the dominant isovector pion exchange amplitude, which is the basis for the determination of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data. A change in the value of $R_T=\\sigma_T^{\\pi^-}/\\sigma_T^{\\pi^+}$ from unity at small $-t$, to 1/4 at large $-t$, would suggest a transition from coupling to a (virtual) pion to coupling to individual quarks. Furthermore, the mentioned ratios may show an earlier approach to pQCD than the individual cross sections. We have performed the first complete separation of the four unpolarized electromagnetic structure functions above the dominant resonances in forward, exclusive $\\pi^{\\pm}$ electroproduction on the deuteron at central $Q^2$ values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV$^2$ at $W$=1.95 GeV, and $Q^2=2.45$ GeV$^2$ at $W...

  16. Invertibility of retarded response functions for Laplace transformable potentials: Application to one-body reduced density matrix functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2015-08-07

    A theorem for the invertibility of arbitrary response functions is presented under the following conditions: the time dependence of the potentials should be Laplace transformable and the initial state should be a ground state, though it might be degenerate. This theorem provides a rigorous foundation for all density-functional-like theories in the time-dependent linear response regime. Especially for time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) functional theory, this is an important step forward, since a solid foundation has currently been lacking. The theorem is equally valid for static response functions in the non-degenerate case, so can be used to characterize the uniqueness of the potential in the ground state version of the corresponding density-functional-like theory. Such a classification of the uniqueness of the non-local potential in ground state 1RDM functional theory has been lacking for decades. With the aid of presented invertibility theorem presented here, a complete classification of the non-uniqueness of the non-local potential in 1RDM functional theory can be given for the first time.

  17. Executive function and endocrinological responses to acute resistance exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Liang eTsai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study had the following two aims: First, to explore the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE, i.e., using exercise machines to contract and stretch muscles on behavioral and electrophysiological performance when performing a cognitive task involving executive functioning in young male adults; Second, to investigate the potential biochemical mechanisms of such facilitative effects using two neurotrophic factors [i.e., growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1] and the cortisol levels elicited by such an exercise intervention mode with two different exercise intensities. Sixty young male adults were recruited and randomly assigned to a high-intensity (HI exercise group, moderate-intensity (MI exercise group, and non-exercise-intervention (NEI group. Blood samples were taken, and the behavioral and electrophysiological indices were simultaneously measured when individuals performed a Go/No-Go task combined with the Erikson Flanker paradigm at baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 minutes of moderate- or high-intensity RE or a control period. The results showed that the acute RE could not only benefit the subjects’ behavioral (i.e., RTs and accuracy performance, as found in previous studies, but also increase the P3 amplitude. Although the serum GH and IGF-1 levels were significantly increased via moderate or high intensity RE in both the MI and HI groups, the increased serum levels of neurotrophic factors were significantly decreased about 20 minutes after exercise. In addition, such changes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive (i.e., behavioral and electrophysiological performance. In contrast, the serum levels of cortisol in the HI and MI groups were significantly lower after acute RE, and the changes in cortisol levels were significantly associated with the changes in electrophysiological (i.e., P3 amplitude performance. The findings suggest the beneficial effects of acute RE on executive

  18. Stochastic analysis of response functions in environmental modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumeo, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Development of a new mathematical technique to include stochasticity in environmental models used of resource management and public health risk analysis is reported. The technique is based on the expansion of basic governing equations to include stochastic terms. The stochastic terms are then separated from the non-fluctuating terms, and the resulting set of equations solved simultaneously. The solutions of this set of equations are used to calculate the moments of the output variables. In addition, the moments are used in conjunction with the Fokker-Planck Equation to produce an analytical solution for the probability density functions of the dependent variables. The technique is applied in two examples. The first example is an application to the Streeter-Phelps BOD-OD Equations. Results of the analysis are compared to field data as well as to results of a Monte Carlo model and to moments derived using a Stochastic Differential Equations approach. The second application involves analysis of health risks associated with waterborne diseases. Results are compared to the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of a similar system of equations.

  19. Traveling wavefronts in nonlocal diffusive predator-prey system with Holling type II functional response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the existence of traveling wavefronts for a nonlocal diffusive predator-prey system with functional response of Holling type II. We first establish the existence principle for the system with a general functional response by using a fixed point theorem and upper-lower solution technique. We apply this result to a predator-prey model with Holling type II functional response. We deduce the existence of traveling wavefronts that connect the zero equilibrium and the positive equilibrium.

  20. Testing functional trait-based mechanisms underpinning plant responses to grazing and linkages to ecosystem functioning in grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. X. Zheng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, ecological strategies, community structure, and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have examined how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and functional group identity. We test functional trait-based mechanisms underlying the responses of different life forms to grazing and linkages to ecosystem functioning along a soil moisture gradient in the Inner Mongolia grassland. A principal component analysis (PCA based on 9 traits × 276 species matrix showed that the plant size spectrum (i.e., individual biomass, leaf economics spectrum (leaf N content and leaf density, and light competition spectrum (height and stem-leaf biomass ratio distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The three life forms exhibited differential strategies as indicated by trait responses to grazing. The annuals and biennials adopted grazing-tolerant strategies associated with high growth rate, reflected by high leaf N content and specific leaf area. The perennial grasses exhibited grazing-tolerant strategies associated with great regrowth capacity and high palatability scores, whereas perennial forbs showed grazing-avoidant strategies with short stature and low palatability scores. In addition, the dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance–resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive–conservative strategies in resource utilization. Grazing increased the relative abundance of perennial forbs with low palatability in the wet and fertile meadow, but it promoted perennial grasses with high palatability in the dry and infertile typical steppe. Our findings suggest that the effects of grazing on plant functional traits are dependent on both the abiotic (e.g., soil moisture and biotic (e.g., plant functional group identity and composition factors. Grazing-induced shifts in functional group composition are largely dependent

  1. Testing functional trait-based mechanisms underpinning plant responses to grazing and linkages to ecosystem functioning in grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S. X.; Li, W. H.; Lan, Z. C.; Ren, H. Y.; Wang, K. B.; Bai, Y. F.

    2014-09-01

    Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, ecological strategies, community structure, and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have examined how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and functional group identity. We test functional trait-based mechanisms underlying the responses of different life forms to grazing and linkages to ecosystem functioning along a soil moisture gradient in the Inner Mongolia grassland. A principal component analysis (PCA) based on 9 traits × 276 species matrix showed that the plant size spectrum (i.e., individual biomass), leaf economics spectrum (leaf N content and leaf density), and light competition spectrum (height and stem-leaf biomass ratio) distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The three life forms exhibited differential strategies as indicated by trait responses to grazing. The annuals and biennials adopted grazing-tolerant strategies associated with high growth rate, reflected by high leaf N content and specific leaf area. The perennial grasses exhibited grazing-tolerant strategies associated with great regrowth capacity and high palatability scores, whereas perennial forbs showed grazing-avoidant strategies with short stature and low palatability scores. In addition, the dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance-resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive-conservative strategies in resource utilization. Grazing increased the relative abundance of perennial forbs with low palatability in the wet and fertile meadow, but it promoted perennial grasses with high palatability in the dry and infertile typical steppe. Our findings suggest that the effects of grazing on plant functional traits are dependent on both the abiotic (e.g., soil moisture) and biotic (e.g., plant functional group identity and composition) factors. Grazing-induced shifts in functional group composition are largely dependent on resource

  2. The numerical and functional responses of a granivorous rodent and the fate of Neotropical tree seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, R.; Rejmanek, M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite their potential to provide mechanistic explanations of rates of seed dispersal and seed fate, the functional and numerical responses of seed predators have never been explicitly examined within this context. Therefore, we investigated the numerical response of a small-mammal seed predator, Heteromys desmarestianus, to disturbance-induced changes in food availability and evaluated the degree to which removal and fate of seeds of eight tree species in a lowland tropical forest in Belize were related to the functional response of H. desmarestianus to varying seed densities. Mark-recapture trapping was used to estimate abundance of H. desmarestianus in six 0.5-ha grids from July 2000 to September 2002. Fruit availability and seed fate were estimated in each grid, and two experiments nested within the grids were used to determine (1) the form of the functional response for nine levels of fruit density (2-32 fruits/m 2), (2) the removal rate and handling times, and (3) the total proportion of fruits removed. The total proportion of fruits removed was determined primarily by the numerical response of H. desmarestianus to fruit availability, while removal rates and the proportion of seeds eaten or cached were related primarily to the form of the functional response. However, the numerical and functional responses interacted; H. desmarestianus showed strong spatial and temporal numerical responses to total fruit availability, and their density relative to fruit availability resulted in variation in the form of the functional response. Types I, II, and III functional responses were observed, as were density-independent responses, and these responses varied both among and within fruit species. The highest proportions of fruits were eaten when the Type III functional response was detected, which was when fruit availability was high relative to H. desmarestianus population density. Numerous idiosyncratic influences on seed fate have been documented, but our results

  3. The numerical and functional responses of a granivorous rodent and the fate of Neotropical tree seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Rob; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2009-06-01

    Despite their potential to provide mechanistic explanations of rates of seed dispersal and seed fate, the functional and numerical responses of seed predators have never been explicitly examined within this context. Therefore, we investigated the numerical response of a small-mammal seed predator, Heteromys desmarestianus, to disturbance-induced changes in food availability and evaluated the degree to which removal and fate of seeds of eight tree species in a lowland tropical forest in Belize were related to the functional response of H. desmarestianus to varying seed densities. Mark-recapture trapping was used to estimate abundance of H. desmarestianus in six 0.5-ha grids from July 2000 to September 2002. Fruit availability and seed fate were estimated in each grid, and two experiments nested within the grids were used to determine (1) the form of the functional response for nine levels of fruit density (2-32 fruits/m2), (2) the removal rate and handling times, and (3) the total proportion of fruits removed. The total proportion of fruits removed was determined primarily by the numerical response of H. desmarestianus to fruit availability, while removal rates and the proportion of seeds eaten or cached were related primarily to the form of the functional response. However, the numerical and functional responses interacted; H. desmarestianus showed strong spatial and temporal numerical responses to total fruit availability, and their density relative to fruit availability resulted in variation in the form of the functional response. Types I, II, and III functional responses were observed, as were density-independent responses, and these responses varied both among and within fruit species. The highest proportions of fruits were eaten when the Type III functional response was detected, which was when fruit availability was high relative to H. desmarestianus population density. Numerous idiosyncratic influences on seed fate have been documented, but our results

  4. Assessing item fit for unidimensional item response theory models using residuals from estimated item response functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Shelby J; Sinharay, Sandip; Chon, Kyong Hee

    2013-07-01

    Residual analysis (e.g. Hambleton & Swaminathan, Item response theory: principles and applications, Kluwer Academic, Boston, 1985; Hambleton, Swaminathan, & Rogers, Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) is a popular method to assess fit of item response theory (IRT) models. We suggest a form of residual analysis that may be applied to assess item fit for unidimensional IRT models. The residual analysis consists of a comparison of the maximum-likelihood estimate of the item characteristic curve with an alternative ratio estimate of the item characteristic curve. The large sample distribution of the residual is proved to be standardized normal when the IRT model fits the data. We compare the performance of our suggested residual to the standardized residual of Hambleton et al. (Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) in a detailed simulation study. We then calculate our suggested residuals using data from an operational test. The residuals appear to be useful in assessing the item fit for unidimensional IRT models.

  5. Response to Martini and Habeck: Semiochemical dose-response curves fit by kinetic formation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini and Habeck (2014) correctly describe the conceptual simulation model of Byers (2013) where molecules in an odor filament pass by an antenna causing an electrophysiological antennographic (EAG) response that is proportional to how many of the receptors are hit at least once by a molecule. Inc...

  6. Cerebral vasoreactivity and functional response in stroke: a study with functional MR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piñeiro, R; Matthews, P M

    2001-01-01

    .... To compare the temporal behaviour of the BOLD signal and the distribution of activation between a group of patients with no functional sequelae following a stroke and a control group, by using fMR at 3T...

  7. Herbicide and fertilizers promote analogous phylogenetic responses but opposite functional responses in plant communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Wisz, Mary S.; Strandberg, Beate

    2014-01-01

    on long-term experiment we show that fertilizer and herbicides (glyphosate) have contrasting effects on functional structure, but can increase phylogenetic diversity in semi-natural plant communities. We found that an increase in nitrogen promoted an increase in the average specific leaf area and canopy...... height at the community level, but an increase in glyphosate promoted a decrease in those traits. Phylogenetic diversity of plant communities increased when herbicide and fertilizer were applied together, likely because functional traits facilitating plant success in those conditions were......Throughout the world, herbicides and fertilizers change species composition in agricultural communities, but how do the cumulative effects of these chemicals impact the functional and phylogenetic structure of non-targeted communities when they drift into adjacent semi-natural habitats? Based...

  8. Game-Theoretic Methods for Functional Response and Optimal Foraging Behavior: e88773

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ross Cressman; Vlastimil Krivan; Joel S Brown; József Garay

    2014-01-01

    ... the corresponding functional response. It is shown that the optimal foraging behavior that maximizes predator energy intake per unit time is a Nash equilibrium of the underlying optimal foraging game...

  9. PERMANENCE OF A PERIODIC PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM WITH DISPERSAL AND GENERAL HOLLING TYPE FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a set of sufficient conditions which ensure the permanence of a periodic predator-prey system with dispersal and general Holling type functional response are obtained. Our results generalize some known results.

  10. Periodic Solutions of Periodic Delay Predator-Prey System with Nonmonotonic Functional Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋永利; 韩茂安

    2003-01-01

    By using the continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, sufficient conditions are obtained for theexistence of positive periodic solutions of a delayed predator-prey system with nonmonotonic functional response ina periodic environment.

  11. The impact of nonlinear functional responses on the long-term evolution of food web structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossel, Barbara; McKane, Alan J; Quince, Christopher

    2004-08-21

    We investigate the long-term web structure emerging in evolutionary food web models when different types of functional responses are used. We find that large and complex webs with several trophic layers arise only if the population dynamics is such that it allows predators to focus on their best prey species. This can be achieved using modified Lotka-Volterra or Holling/Beddington functional responses with effective couplings that depend on the predator's efficiency at exploiting the prey, or a ratio-dependent functional response with adaptive foraging. In contrast, if standard Lotka-Volterra or Holling/Beddington functional responses are used, long-term evolution generates webs with almost all species being basal, and with additionally many links between these species. Interestingly, in all cases studied, a large proportion of weak links result naturally from the evolution of the food webs.

  12. Understanding the Function of Emotional Eating: Does it Buffer the Stress Response and Help Us Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-09

    Stress, Appraisal and Coping. New York: Springer. Levenson, R. W., & Ekman , P. (2002). Difficulty does not account for emotion -specific heart rate...Function of Emotional Eating: Does it Buffer the Stress Response and Help Us Cope?" Name of Candidate: Robyn Osborn Doctor of Philosophy Degree 9...Member Date Date S-/Q/08 Date Date Understanding the function of emotional eating: Does it buffer the stress response and help us cope

  13. Exposure-response functions for (or versus?) the prediction of annoyance in specific situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.A.; Vos, H.

    2012-01-01

    Based on data from many surveys, exposure-response functions have been derived to describe the average expected annoyance response at a certain noise level. These have been used to define acceptable levels of environmental noise for separate noise sources. However, the prediction of the annoyance re

  14. The Role of Expectancy in Eliciting Hypnotic Responses as a Function of Type of Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Irving; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship between expectancy and suggestibility in hypnosis as a function of type of induction (N=100). Results showed subjects were able to predict their responses to a cognitive skill induction with great accuracy but were not very accurate in predicting responses to a hypnotic trance induction. (JAC)

  15. Quantifying the functional responses of vegetation to drought and oxygen stress in temperate ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, J.C.; Bardin, V.; Bartholomeus, R.P.; Bodegom, van P.M.

    2012-01-01

    1. Our understanding of the generality of plant functional responses to water availability is limited; current field studies use either very rough approximations of water and oxygen availability or only focus on water-stressed ecosystems. Studies that relate species' responses to a surplus of water

  16. Automated postural responses are modified in a functional manner by instruction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Laing, A.C.; Robinovitch, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    The restoration of upright balance after a perturbation relies on highly automated and, to a large extent, stereotyped postural responses. Although these responses occur before voluntary control comes into play, previous research has shown that they can be functionally modulated on the basis of cogn

  17. Sensory Responsiveness as a Predictor of Social Severity in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Claudia L.; Harper, Jacquelyn D.; Kueker, Rachel Holmes; Lang, Andrea Runzi; Abbacchi, Anna M.; Todorov, Alexandre; LaVesser, Patricia D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between sensory responsiveness and social severity in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD; N = 36) and age-matched controls (N = 26) between 6 and 10 years old. Significant relationships were found between social responsiveness scale scores and each of the six sensory profile sensory…

  18. Sensory Responsiveness as a Predictor of Social Severity in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Claudia L.; Harper, Jacquelyn D.; Kueker, Rachel Holmes; Lang, Andrea Runzi; Abbacchi, Anna M.; Todorov, Alexandre; LaVesser, Patricia D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between sensory responsiveness and social severity in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD; N = 36) and age-matched controls (N = 26) between 6 and 10 years old. Significant relationships were found between social responsiveness scale scores and each of the six sensory profile sensory…

  19. Data Equivalency of an Interactive Voice Response System for Home Assessment of Back Pain and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S Shaw

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interactive voice response (IVR systems that collect survey data using automated, push-button telephone responses may be useful to monitor patients’ pain and function at home; however, its equivalency to other data collection methods has not been studied.

  20. Person Response Functions and the Definition of Units in the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Perkins, Aminah F.

    2011-01-01

    Humphry (this issue) has written a thought-provoking piece on the interpretation of item discrimination parameters as scale units in item response theory. One of the key features of his work is the description of an item response theory (IRT) model that he calls the logistic measurement function that combines aspects of two traditions in IRT that…

  1. Response prediction for modified mechanical systems based on in-situ frequency response functions: Theoretical and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengwei; Zhu, Ping

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a general method using in-situ frequency response functions (FRFs) is proposed for predicting operational responses of modified mechanical systems. In the method responses of modified mechanical systems can be calculated by using the delta dynamic stiffness matrix, the subsystem FRF matrix and responses of the original system, even though operational forces are unknown. The proposed method is derived theoretically in a general form as well as for six specific scenarios. The six scenarios correspond respectively to: (a) modifications made on the mass; (b) changes made on the stiffness values of the link between a degree-of-freedom (DOF) and the ground; (c) the fully rigid link between a DOF and the ground; (d) changes made on the stiffness values of the link between two DOFs; (e) the null link between two DOFs and (f) the fully rigid link between two DOFs. It is found that for scenarios (a), (b) and (d) the delta dynamic stiffness matrix is required when predicting responses of the modified mechanical system. But for scenarios (c), (e) and (f), no delta dynamic stiffness matrix is required and the new system responses can be calculated solely using the subsystem FRF matrix and responses of the original system. The proposed method is illustrated by a numerical example and validated using data generated by finite element simulations. The work in this paper will be beneficial to solving vibration and noise engineering problems.

  2. Bronchodilator response of advanced lung function parameters depending on COPD severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarenbäck, Linnea; Eriksson, Göran; Peterson, Stefan; Ankerst, Jaro; Bjermer, Leif; Tufvesson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is defined as partly irreversible airflow obstruction. The response pattern of bronchodilators has not been followed in advanced lung function parameters. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate bronchodilator response pattern in advanced lung function parameters in a continuous fashion along forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) percent predicted (%p) in COPD patients and controls. Patients and methods Eighty-one smokers/ex-smokers (41 controls and 40 COPD) performed spirometry, body plethysmography, impulse oscillometry and single-breath helium dilution carbon monoxide diffusion at baseline, after salbutamol inhalation and then after an additional inhalation of ipratropium. Results Most pulmonary function parameters showed a linear increase in response to decreased FEV1%p. The subjects were divided into groups of FEV1%p 65, and the findings from continuous analysis were verified. The exceptions to this linear response were inspiratory capacity (IC), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC and expiratory resistance (Rex), which showed a segmented response relationship to FEV1%p. IC and FVC, with break points (BP) of 57 and 58 FEV1%p respectively, showed no response above, but an incresed slope below the BP. In addition, in patients with FEV1%p 65, response of FEV1%p did not correlate to response of volume parameters. Conclusion Response of several advanced lung function parameters differs depending on patients’ baseline FEV1%p, and specifically response of volume parameters is most pronounced in COPD patients with FEV1%p <65. Volume and resistance responses do not follow the flow response measured with FEV1 and may thus be used as a complement to FEV1 reversibility to identify flow, volume and resistance responders. PMID:27932874

  3. Functional response to cholinesterase inhibitor therapy in a naturalistic Alzheimer’s disease cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattmo Carina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activities of daily living (ADL are an essential part of the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A decline in ADL affects independent living and has a strong negative impact on caregiver burden. Functional response to cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI treatment and factors that might influence this response in naturalistic AD patients need investigating. The aim of this study was to identify the socio-demographic and clinical factors that affect the functional response after 6 months of ChEI therapy. Methods This prospective, non-randomised, multicentre study in a routine clinical setting included 784 AD patients treated with donepezil, rivastigmine or galantamine. At baseline and after 6 months of treatment, patients were assessed using several rating scales, including the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL scale, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Demographic and clinical characteristics were investigated at baseline. The functional response and the relationships of potential predictors were analysed using general linear models. Results After 6 months of ChEI treatment, 49% and 74% of patients showed improvement/no change in IADL and in PSMS score, respectively. The improved/unchanged patients exhibited better cognitive status at baseline; regarding improved/unchanged PSMS, patients were younger and used fewer anti-depressants. A more positive functional response to ChEI was observed in younger individuals or among those having the interaction effect of better preserved cognition and lower ADL ability. Patients with fewer concomitant medications or those using NSAIDs/acetylsalicylic acid showed a better PSMS response. Conclusions Critical characteristics that may influence the functional response to ChEI in AD were identified. Some predictors differed from those previously shown to affect cognitive response, e.g., lower cognitive ability and older age

  4. 76 FR 78716 - Delegation of Duties, Functions, and Responsibilities Vested in the Director General of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... Delegation of Duties, Functions, and Responsibilities Vested in the Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources By virtue of the authority vested in me as Director General of the... the duties, functions, and authorities vested in me as Director General of the Foreign Service...

  5. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allievi, Alessandro G; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level-dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults.

  6. Response-Time Variability Is Related to Parent Ratings of Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Martin, Cristina Dominguez; Mairena, Maria Angeles; Di Martino, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Isquith, Peter K.; Gioia, Gerard; Petkova, Eva; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD are often characterized as inconsistent across many contexts. ADHD is also associated with deficits in executive function. We examined the relationships between response time (RT) variability on five brief computer tasks to parents' ratings of ADHD-related features and executive function in a group of children with…

  7. Intake rates and the functional response in shorebirds (Charadriiformes) eating macro-invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goss-Custard, John D.; West, Andrew D.; Yates, Michael G.; Caldow, Richard W. G.; Stillman, Richard A.; Bardsley, Louise; Castilla, Juan; Castro, Macarena; Dierschke, Volker; Durell, Sarah E. A. Le V. Dit; Eichhorn, Goetz; Ens, Bruno J.; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Udayangani-Fernando, P. U.; Ferns, Peter N.; Hockey, Philip A. R.; Gill, Jennifer A.; Johnstone, Ian; Kalejta-Summers, Bozena; Masero, Jose A.; Moreira, Francisco; Nagarajan, Rajarathina Velu; Owens, Ian P. F.; Pacheco, Cristian; Perez-Hurtado, Alejandro; Rogers, Danny; Scheiffarth, Gregor; Sitters, Humphrey; Sutherland, William J.; Triplet, Patrick; Worrall, Dave H.; Zharikov, Yuri; Zwarts, Leo; Pettifor, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    As field determinations take much effort, it would be useful to be able to predict easily the coefficients describing the functional response of free-living predators, the function relating food intake rate to the abundance of food organisms in the environment. As a means easily to parameterise an i

  8. CHRONOTROPIC RESPONSE TO EXERCISE IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL-FIBRILLATION - RELATION TO FUNCTIONAL-STATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBERG, MP; CRIJNS, HJGM; GOSSELINK, ATM; VANDENBROEK, SAJ; HILLEGE, HJ; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; LIE, KI

    Objective-To determine the relation between functional capacity and heart rate response to exercise in patients with atrial fibrillation. Subjects-73 consecutive patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. Main outcome measures-Relation between functional capacity, measured as peak oxygen consumption

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex in humans: response to increased functional demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushu, S; Kumaran, S S; Tripathi, R P; Gupta, A; Jain, P C; Jain, V

    2001-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed in six different sessions of a volunteer over a period of one month. Increased tapping rate resulted in increase in the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal intensity as well as the volume/area of activation (pixels) in the contralateral primary motor area up to tapping rate of 120 taps/min (2 Hz), beyond which it saturates. Activation in supplementary motor area was also observed. The obtained results are correlated to increased functional demands.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex in humans: response to increased functional demands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Khushu; S S Kumaran; R P Tripathi; A Gupta; P C Jain; V Jain

    2001-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed in six different sessions of a volunteer over a period of one month. Increased tapping rate resulted in increase in the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal intensity as well as the volume/area of activation (pixels) in the contralateral primary motor area up to tapping rate of 120 taps/min (2 Hz), beyond which it saturates. Activation in supplementary motor area was also observed. The obtained results are correlated to increased functional demands.

  11. Multivariate identification of plant functional response and effect traits in an agricultural landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakeman, Robin J

    2011-06-01

    Plant functional traits have been proposed as a linkage between the environmental control of vegetation and ecosystem function. Identification of traits that mediate the response of plant species to the environment is well established, but the identification of effect traits and the linkage between the two sets is less developed. This was attempted for a study of eight contrasting land uses in a marginal agricultural landscape where data on vegetation, management controls of the disturbance regime, and soil characteristics, including nitrogen release, were measured simultaneously with measures of ecosystem function such as litter decomposition rates and primary productivity on 30 sites. Trait data were assembled from databases, and an iterative multivariate approach using the three table (species, trait, environment) method RLQ was employed to identify a parsimonious set of traits that predict plant species responses to the environment and a parsimonious set of traits that link vegetation to ecosystem function. The lists of response and effect traits were similar, and where differences were observed, traits were usually highly correlated with at least one trait in the other list. This approach identified a small number of traits (canopy height, leaf dry matter content, leaf size, and specific leaf area) that provide a means of linking vegetation responses to environmental change with changes in ecosystem function. Other response traits included vegetative spread strategy, start of flowering, and seed terminal velocity, but within the system studied these traits were all significantly correlated to the traits shared between the response and effect lists.

  12. A Study on Ionospheric HF Channel with Bitemporal Response and Scattering Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    At first the bitemporal response method is introduced to solve the scattering function of the ionospheric channel. We can get the scattering function as a function of the group path time delay and Doppler frequency. Thus Doppler effect resulting from the continuous movement of the ionosphere is analyzed to study the characteristics of the various ionospheric irregularities and disturbance. many possible problems and correction are researched lastly.

  13. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and their pH-responsive hydrogels with amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-07-10

    New biocompatible, pH-responsive, and fully fibrous hydrogels have been prepared based on amyloid fibrils hybridized and gelled by functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) far below the gelling concentration of amyloid fibrils. Sulfonic functional groups were introduced on the surfaces of MWNTs either by a covalent diazonium reaction or by physical π-π interactions. The presence of the isoelectric point of amyloid fibrils allows a reversible gelling behavior through ionic interactions with functionalized MWNTs.

  14. Nuclear response functions for the N-N{sup *}(1440) transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L. E-mail: luis.alvarez-ruso@theo.physik.uni-giessen.de; Barbaro, M.B.; Donnelly, T.W.; Molinari, A

    2003-08-25

    Parity-conserving and -violating response functions are computed for the inclusive electroexcitation of the N{sup *}(1440) (Roper) resonance in nuclear matter modeled as a relativistic Fermi gas. Using various empirical parameterizations and theoretical models of the N-N{sup *}(1440) transition form factors, the sensitivity of the response functions to details of the structure of the Roper resonance is investigated. The possibility of disentangling this resonance from the contribution of {delta} electroproduction in nuclei is addressed. Finally, the contributions of the Roper resonance to the longitudinal scaling function and to the Coulomb sum rule are also explored.

  15. Response functions of imaging plates to photons, electrons and 4He particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aléonard, M M

    2013-10-01

    Imaging plates from Fuji (BAS-SR, MS, and TR types) are phosphor films routinely used in ultra high intensity laser experiments. However, few data are available on the absolute IP response functions to ionizing particles. We have previously measured and modeled the IP response functions to protons. We focus here on the determination of the responses to photons, electrons, and (4)He particles. The response functions are obtained on an energy range going from a few tens of keV to a few tens of MeV and are compared to available data. The IP sensitivities to the different ionizing particles demonstrate a quenching effect depending on the particle stopping power.

  16. Exercise training modulates functional sympatholysis and alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in hypertensive and normotensive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is linked to an increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity and reduced tissue perfusion. We investigated the role of exercise training on functional sympatholysis and postjunctional α-adrenergic responsiveness in individuals with essential hypertension. Leg haemodynamics.......05). There was no difference in the vasodilatory response to infused ATP or in muscle P2Y2 receptor content between the groups before and after training. However, training lowered the vasodilatory response to ATP and increased skeletal muscle P2Y2 receptor content in both groups (P ... that exercise training improves functional sympatholysis and reduces postjunctional α-adrenergic responsiveness in both normo- and hypertensive individuals. The ability for functional sympatholysis and the vasodilator and sympatholytic effect of intravascular ATP appears not to be altered in essential...

  17. Are Commonly Measured Functional Traits Involved in Tropical Tree Responses to Climate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate models predict significant rainfall reduction in Amazonia, reducing water availability for trees. We present how functional traits modulate the tree growth response to climate. We used data from 3 years of bimestrial growth measurements for 204 trees of 53 species in the forest of Paracou, French Guiana. We integrated climate variables from an eddy covariance tower and functional trait values describing life history, leaf, and stem economics. Our results indicated that the measured functional traits are to some extent linked to the response of trees to climate but they are poor predictors of the tree climate-induced growth variation. Tree growth was affected by water availability for most of the species with different species growth strategies in drought conditions. These strategies were linked to some functional traits, especially maximum height and wood density. These results suggest that (i trees seem adapted to the dry season at Paracou but they show different growth responses to drought, (ii drought response is linked to growth strategy and is partly explained by functional traits, and (iii the limited part of the variation of tree growth explained by functional traits may be a strong limiting factor for the prediction of tree growth response to climate.

  18. Functional evolution of the p53 regulatory network through its target response elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegga, Anil G.; Inga, Alberto; Menendez, Daniel; Aronow, Bruce J.; Resnick, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional network evolution is central to the development of complex biological systems. Networks can evolve through variation of master regulators and/or by changes in regulation of genes within networks. To gain insight into meaningful evolutionary differences in large networks, it is essential to address the functional consequences of sequence differences in response elements (REs) targeted by transcription factors. Using a combination of custom bioinformatics and multispecies alignment of promoter regions, we investigated the functional evolution of REs in terms of responsiveness to the sequence-specific transcription factor p53, a tumor suppressor and master regulator of stress responses. We identified REs orthologous to known p53 targets in human and rodent cells or alternatively REs related to the established p53 consensus. The orthologous REs were assigned p53 transactivation capabilities based on rules determined from model systems, and a functional heat map was developed to visually summarize conservation of sequence and relative level of responsiveness to p53 for 47 REs in 14 species. Individual REs exhibited marked differences in transactivation potentials and widespread evolutionary turnover. Functional differences were often not predicted from consensus sequence evaluations. Of the established human p53 REs analyzed, 91% had sequence conservation in at least one nonprimate species compared with 67.5% for functional conservation. Surprisingly, there was almost no conservation of functional REs for genes involved in DNA metabolism or repair between humans and rodents, suggesting important differences in p53 stress responses and cancer development. PMID:18187580

  19. Addressing the Photometric Calibration Challenge: Explicit Determination of the Instrumental Response and Atmospheric Response Functions, and Tying it All Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the dominant source of systematic uncertainty in exploiting type Ia supernovae to determine the nature of the dark energy. We review our ongoing program to address this calibration challenge by performing measurements of both the instrumental response function and the optical transmission function of the atmosphere. A key aspect of this approach is to complement standard star observations by using NIST-calibrated photodiodes as a metrology foundation for optical flux measurements. We present our first attempt to assess photometric consistency between synthetic photometry and observations, by comparing predictions based on a NIST-diode-based determination of the PanSTARRS-1 instrumental response and empirical atmospheric transmission measurements, with fluxes we obtained from observing spectrophotometric standards.

  20. Addressing the Photometric Calibration Challenge: Explicit Determination of the Instrumental Response and Atmospheric Response Functions, and Tying it All Together

    CERN Document Server

    Stubbs, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the dominant source of systematic uncertainty in exploiting type Ia supernovae to determine the nature of the dark energy. We review our ongoing program to address this calibration challenge by performing measurements of both the instrumental response function and the optical transmission function of the atmosphere. A key aspect of this approach is to complement standard star observations by using NIST-calibrated photodiodes as a metrology foundation for optical flux measurements. We present our first attempt to assess photometric consistency between synthetic photometry and observations, by comparing predictions based on a NIST-diode-based determination of the PanSTARRS-1 instrumental response and empirical atmospheric transmission measurements, with fluxes we obtained from observing spectrophotometric standards.

  1. Functional diversity response to hardwood forest management varies across taxa and spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bryan D; Holland, Jeffrey D; Summerville, Keith S; Dunning, John B; Saunders, Michael R; Jenkins, Michael A

    2017-03-15

    Contemporary forest management offers a trade-off between the potential positive effects of habitat heterogeneity on biodiversity, and the potential harm to mature-forest communities caused by habitat loss and perforation of the forest canopy. While the response of taxonomic diversity to forest management has received a great deal of scrutiny, the response of functional diversity is largely unexplored. However, functional diversity may represent a more direct link between biodiversity and ecosystem function. To examine how forest management affects diversity at multiple spatial scales, we analyzed a long-term dataset that captured changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of moths (Lepidoptera), longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and breeding birds in response to contemporary silvicultural systems in oak-hickory hardwood forests. We used these datasets to address the following questions: how do even- and uneven-aged silvicultural systems affect taxonomic and functional diversity at the scale of managed landscapes compared to the individual harvested and unharvested forest patches that comprise the landscapes, and how do these silvicultural systems affect the functional similarity of assemblages at the scale of managed landscapes and patches? Due to increased heterogeneity within landscapes, we expected even-aged silviculture to increase and uneven-aged silviculture to decrease functional diversity at the landscape level regardless of impacts at the patch level. Functional diversity responses were taxon-specific with respect to the direction of change and time since harvest. Responses were also consistent across patch and landscape levels within each taxon. Moth assemblage species richness, functional richness, and functional divergence were negatively affected by harvesting, with stronger effects resulting from uneven-aged than even-aged management. Longhorned beetle assemblages exhibited a peak in species richness two years after harvesting, while

  2. Smart gating membranes with in situ self-assembled responsive nanogels as functional gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Zhuang; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei; Lin, Shuo; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-10-01

    Smart gating membranes, inspired by the gating function of ion channels across cell membranes, are artificial membranes composed of non-responsive porous membrane substrates and responsive gates in the membrane pores that are able to dramatically regulate the trans-membrane transport of substances in response to environmental stimuli. Easy fabrication, high flux, significant response and strong mechanical strength are critical for the versatility of such smart gating membranes. Here we show a novel and simple strategy for one-step fabrication of smart gating membranes with three-dimensionally interconnected networks of functional gates, by self-assembling responsive nanogels on membrane pore surfaces in situ during a vapor-induced phase separation process for membrane formation. The smart gating membranes with in situ self-assembled responsive nanogels as functional gates show large flux, significant response and excellent mechanical property simultaneously. Because of the easy fabrication method as well as the concurrent enhancement of flux, response and mechanical property, the proposed smart gating membranes will expand the scope of membrane applications, and provide ever better performances in their applications.

  3. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  4. The plant heat stress transcription factors (HSFs: structure, regulation and function in response to abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eGuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity and drought adversely affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs, including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs. HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps. In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  5. Association between social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hideaki; Adachi, Akiko; Kaneko, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Social functioning has received widespread attention as one of the most important outcomes in psychiatric disorders and has been related to cognitive functioning and the underlying brain activity. Cognitive decline, however, appears not only in the psychiatric population but also in aged individuals. In our previous study, we demonstrated a significant relationship between social functioning and prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in patients with depression. However, it has not been shown whether the above relationship could be extended to healthy populations. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a possible association between social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses in healthy elderly adults by using a non-invasive and low-constraint functional neuroimaging technique, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Study subjects included 55 healthy, elderly volunteers. We measured hemodynamic responses over prefrontal cortical (PFC) areas during the verbal fluency task by using multi-channel NIRS and analyzed the relationship between task-associated hemodynamic responses and social functioning as measured by the social adaptation self-evaluation scale (SASS). A significant positive relationship was observed between the SASS total score and PFC activation. Our findings suggest that PFC activation is associated with social functioning in healthy elderly adults. Furthermore, hemodynamic responses assessed using non-invasive NIRS could be a useful biological marker of these characteristics.

  6. Development of mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds using functionalized silica nano-fillers for the control of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michelle; Nayyer, Leila; Butler, Peter E; Palgrave, Robert G; Seifalian, Alexander M; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to produce mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds which can alter cellular functions using two different functionalized (OH and NH2) silica nano-fillers. Fumed silica-hydroxyl and fumed silica-amine nano-fillers were mixed with a biocompatible polymer (POSS-PCU) at various wt% to produce scaffolds. XPS and mechanical testing demonstrate that bulk mechanical properties are modified without changing the scaffold's surface chemistry. Mechanical testing showed significant change in bulk properties of POSS-PCU scaffolds with an addition of silica nanofillers as low as 1% (PScaffolds modified with NH2 silica showed significantly higher bulk mechanical properties compared to the one modified with the OH group. Enhanced cell adhesion, proliferation and collagen production over 14days were observed on scaffolds with higher bulk mechanical properties (NH2) compared to those with lower ones (unmodified and OH modified) (Ppolymeric scaffolds, which can help to customize cellular responses for biomaterial applications.

  7. Invertibility of the retarded response functions for initial mixed states: application to one-body reduced density matrix functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giesbertz, Klaas J H

    2016-01-01

    In [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 054102 (2015)] I have derived conditions to characterize the kernel of the retarded response function, under the assumption that the initial state is a ground state. In this article I demonstrate its generalization to mixed states (ensembles). To make the proof work, the weights in the ensemble need to be decreasing for increasing energies of the pure states from which the mixed state is constructed. The resulting conditions are not easy to verify, but under the additional assumptions that the ensemble weights are directly related to the energies and that the full spectrum of the Hamiltonian participates in the ensemble, it is shown that potentials only belong to the kernel of the retarded response function if they commute with the initial Hamiltonian. These additional assumptions are valid for thermodynamic ensembles, which makes this result also physically relevant. The conditions on the potentials for the thermodynamic ensembles are much stronger than in the pure state (zero tempera...

  8. Determination of continuous system transfer functions from sampled pulse response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jay B.; Watkins, Wendell R.; Palacios, Fernando R.; Billingsley, Daniel R.

    1994-12-01

    A method for determining the transfer function of a continuous system from sampled responses to single- and multiple-pulse excitation is presented. The method is an extension of the sampled-edge-response method pioneered by the theoretical work of A. Papoulis in 1962 and the application of the theory to optical systems by B. Tatian in 1965. Occasions arise when pulse rather than step-function stimuli are available for system excitations. In such cases, the method presented is useful for determining the system transfer function. The use of antialiasing filters and estimation of non-bandwidth-limited transfer functions are discussed. Practical application of the method to characterizing the system transfer function of a commercial 8- to 12-micrometers infrared imager is also presented.

  9. The evolution of the phage shock protein response system: interplay between protein function, genomic organization, and system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvet, M; Toni, T; Sheng, X; Thorne, T; Jovanovic, G; Engl, C; Buck, M; Pinney, J W; Stumpf, M P H

    2011-03-01

    Sensing the environment and responding appropriately to it are key capabilities for the survival of an organism. All extant organisms must have evolved suitable sensors, signaling systems, and response mechanisms allowing them to survive under the conditions they are likely to encounter. Here, we investigate in detail the evolutionary history of one such system: The phage shock protein (Psp) stress response system is an important part of the stress response machinery in many bacteria, including Escherichia coli K12. Here, we use a systematic analysis of the genes that make up and regulate the Psp system in E. coli in order to elucidate the evolutionary history of the system. We compare gene sharing, sequence evolution, and conservation of protein-coding as well as noncoding DNA sequences and link these to comparative analyses of genome/operon organization across 698 bacterial genomes. Finally, we evaluate experimentally the biological advantage/disadvantage of a simplified version of the Psp system under different oxygen-related environments. Our results suggest that the Psp system evolved around a core response mechanism by gradually co-opting genes into the system to provide more nuanced sensory, signaling, and effector functionalities. We find that recruitment of new genes into the response machinery is closely linked to incorporation of these genes into a psp operon as is seen in E. coli, which contains the bulk of genes involved in the response. The organization of this operon allows for surprising levels of additional transcriptional control and flexibility. The results discussed here suggest that the components of such signaling systems will only be evolutionarily conserved if the overall functionality of the system can be maintained.

  10. Comparison of the electromagnetic responses of $^{12}$C obtained from the Green's function Monte Carlo and spectral function approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Noemi; Benhar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic responses of carbon obtained from the Green's function Monte Carlo and spectral function approaches using the same dynamical input are compared in the kinematical region corresponding to momentum transfer in the range 300-570 MeV. The results of our analysis, aimed at pinning down the limits of applicability of the approximations involved in the two schemes, indicate that the factorization ansatz underlying the spectral function formalism provides remarkably accurate results down to momentum transfer as low as 300 MeV. On the other hand, it appears that at 570 MeV relativistic corrections to the electromagnetic current not included in the Monte Carlo calculations may play a significant role in the transverse channel.

  11. Functional response of osteoblasts in functionally gradient titanium alloy mesh arrays processed by 3D additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, K C; Kumar, A; Misra, R D K; Li, S J; Hao, Y L; Yang, R

    2017-02-01

    We elucidate here the osteoblasts functions and cellular activity in 3D printed interconnected porous architecture of functionally gradient Ti-6Al-4V alloy mesh structures in terms of cell proliferation and growth, distribution of cell nuclei, synthesis of proteins (actin, vinculin, and fibronectin), and calcium deposition. Cell culture studies with pre-osteoblasts indicated that the interconnected porous architecture of functionally gradient mesh arrays was conducive to osteoblast functions. However, there were statistically significant differences in the cellular response depending on the pore size in the functionally gradient structure. The interconnected porous architecture contributed to the distribution of cells from the large pore size (G1) to the small pore size (G3), with consequent synthesis of extracellular matrix and calcium precipitation. The gradient mesh structure significantly impacted cell adhesion and influenced the proliferation stage, such that there was high distribution of cells on struts of the gradient mesh structure. Actin and vinculin showed a significant difference in normalized expression level of protein per cell, which was absent in the case of fibronectin. Osteoblasts present on mesh struts formed a confluent sheet, bridging the pores through numerous cytoplasmic extensions. The gradient mesh structure fabricated by electron beam melting was explored to obtain fundamental insights on cellular activity with respect to osteoblast functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cochlear Responses and Auditory Brainstem Response Functions in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy/ Dys-Synchrony and Individuals with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Physiologic measures of cochlear and auditory nerve function may be of assis¬tance in distinguishing between hearing disorders due primarily to auditory nerve impairment from those due primarily to cochlear hair cells dysfunction. The goal of present study was to measure of co-chlear responses (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response in some adults with auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony and subjects with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: Patients were 16 adults (32 ears in age range of 14-30 years with auditory neu¬ropathy/ dys-synchrony and 16 individuals in age range of 16-30 years from both sexes. The results of transient otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response measures were compared in both groups and the effects of age, sex, ear and degree of hearing loss were studied. Results: The pure-tone average was 48.1 dB HL in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony group and the fre¬quency of low tone loss and flat audiograms were higher among other audiogram's shapes. Transient oto¬acoustic emissions were shown in all auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony people except two cases and its average was near in both studied groups. The latency and amplitude of the biggest reversed co-chlear microphonics response were higher in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients than control peo¬ple significantly. The correlation between cochlear microphonics amplitude and degree of hearing loss was not significant, and age had significant effect in some cochlear microphonics measures. Audi-tory brainstem response had no response in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients even with low stim¬uli rates. Conclusion: In adults with speech understanding worsen than predicted from the degree of hearing loss that suspect to auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony, the frequency of low tone loss and flat audiograms are higher. Usually auditory brainstem response is absent in

  13. Bronchodilator response of advanced lung function parameters depending on COPD severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarenbäck L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Linnea Jarenbäck,1 Göran Eriksson,1 Stefan Peterson,2 Jaro Ankerst,1 Leif Bjermer,1 Ellen Tufvesson1 1Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, 2Regional Cancer Center South, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden Background: COPD is defined as partly irreversible airflow obstruction. The response pattern of bronchodilators has not been followed in advanced lung function parameters. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate bronchodilator response pattern in advanced lung function parameters in a continuous fashion along forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 percent predicted (%p in COPD patients and controls. Patients and methods: Eighty-one smokers/ex-smokers (41 controls and 40 COPD performed spirometry, body plethysmography, impulse oscillometry and single-breath helium dilution carbon monoxide diffusion at baseline, after salbutamol inhalation and then after an additional inhalation of ipratropium. Results: Most pulmonary function parameters showed a linear increase in response to decreased FEV1%p. The subjects were divided into groups of FEV1%p <65 and >65, and the findings from continuous analysis were verified. The exceptions to this linear response were inspiratory capacity (IC, forced vital capacity (FVC, FEV1/FVC and expiratory resistance (Rex, which showed a segmented response relationship to FEV1%p. IC and FVC, with break points (BP of 57 and 58 FEV1%p respectively, showed no response above, but an incresed slope below the BP. In addition, in patients with FEV1%p <65 and >65, response of FEV1%p did not correlate to response of volume parameters. Conclusion: Response of several advanced lung function parameters differs depending on patients’ baseline FEV1%p, and specifically response of volume parameters is most pronounced in COPD patients with FEV1%p <65. Volume and resistance responses do not follow the flow response measured with FEV1 and may thus be used as a

  14. Microbial response to simulated global change is phylogenetically conserved and linked with functional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Anthony S; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D; Berlemont, Renaud; Goulden, Michael L; Lu, Ying; Treseder, Kathleen K; Weihe, Claudia; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of microbial communities hampers predictions about their responses to global change. Here we investigate the potential for using a phylogenetic, trait-based framework to capture the response of bacteria and fungi to global change manipulations. Replicated grassland plots were subjected to 3+ years of drought and nitrogen fertilization. The responses of leaf litter bacteria and fungi to these simulated changes were significantly phylogenetically conserved. Proportional changes in abundance were highly correlated among related organisms, such that relatives with approximately 5% ribosomal DNA genetic distance showed similar responses to the treatments. A microbe's change in relative abundance was significantly correlated between the treatments, suggesting a compromise between numerical abundance in undisturbed environments and resistance to change in general, independent of disturbance type. Lineages in which at least 90% of the microbes shared the same response were circumscribed at a modest phylogenetic depth (τD 0.014-0.021), but significantly larger than randomized simulations predict. In several clades, phylogenetic depth of trait consensus was higher. Fungal response to drought was more conserved than was response to nitrogen fertilization, whereas bacteria responded equally to both treatments. Finally, we show that a bacterium's response to the manipulations is correlated with its potential functional traits (measured here as the number of glycoside hydrolase genes encoding the capacity to degrade different types of carbohydrates). Together, these results suggest that a phylogenetic, trait-based framework may be useful for predicting shifts in microbial composition and functioning in the face of global change.

  15. Functional response of predatory thrips to two-spotted spider mite - influence of pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    depending on the types and doses of the pesticides used. A type II functional response was found in all pesticide-dose combinations except for females exposed to a half-labelled dose of fenpropathrin, in which a type III functional response was observed. For type II functional responses, the search rates...... were similar to those found in the control treatments irrespective of predator sex, pesticide and pesticide dose. No differences in handling times across treatments were observed for males but handling times were longer for females, irrespective of pesticide and dose, compared to the control treatment....... The theoretical maximum number of prey attacked by the thrips was 49.67 and 23.67 eggs per day for females and males, respectively; both maxima were attained in the control treatment. These values were reduced for males exposed to full doses of either pesticide and for females exposed to both half and full doses...

  16. Constrained Ordination Analysis with Enrichment of Bell-Shaped Response Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Thas, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Constrained ordination methods aims at finding an environmental gradient along which the species abundances are maximally separated. The species response functions, which describe the expected abundance as a function of the environmental score, are according to the ecological fundamental niche theory only meaningful if they are bell-shaped. Many classical model-based ordination methods, however, use quadratic regression models without imposing the bell-shape and thus allowing for meaningless U-shaped response functions. The analysis output (e.g. a biplot) may therefore be potentially misleading and the conclusions are prone to errors. In this paper we present a log-likelihood ratio criterion with a penalisation term to enforce more bell-shaped response shapes. We report the results of a simulation study and apply our method to metagenomics data from microbial ecology.

  17. Microwave measurement of the solid propellant pressure-coupled response function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.; Magiawala, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an investigation are presented on the applicability of a microwave Doppler shift technique for directly determining propellant response functions over the desired frequency range. The investigation consisted of three phases. In Phase 1 the validity of the technique was established by comparing measured pressure-coupled response function data to existing data from T-burners and rotating valve tests. In Phase 2 a new microwave burner-pressure modulation system capable of achieving frequencies and mean chamber pressures of at least 1500 Hz and 10.5 MPa (1500 psia), respectively, was developed. During Phase 3 test firings are being carried out to define the frequency limit, response function resolution, and precision of the new design.

  18. Novel response function resolves by image deconvolution more details of surface nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2010-01-01

    A novel method of image processing is presented which relies on deconvolution of data using the response function of the apparatus. It is revealed that all the surface structures observed by digital imaging are generated by a convolution of the response function of the apparatus with the surfaces......’ nanomorphology, which provided images of convoluted physical structures rather than images of real physical structures. In order to restore the genuine physical information on surface structures, a deconvolution using a novel response function of the feedback circuitry is required. At the highest resolution......, that is, atomic resolution, the effect of deconvolution is at its maximum, whereas images at lower resolution are sharpened by eliminating smoothing effects and shadow effects. The method is applied to measurements of imaging by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM) at atomic resolution...

  19. Reduced Density Matrix Functional Theory (RDMFT) and Linear Response Time-Dependent RDMFT (TD-RDMFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernal, Katarzyna; Giesbertz, Klaas J H

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT) and linear response time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory (TD-RDMFT) are reviewed. In particular, we present various approaches to develop approximate density matrix functionals which have been employed in RDMFT. We discuss the properties and performance of most available density matrix functionals. Progress in the development of functionals has been paralleled by formulation of novel RDMFT-based methods for predicting properties of molecular systems and solids. We give an overview of these methods. The time-dependent extension, TD-RDMFT, is a relatively new theory still awaiting practical and generally useful functionals which would work within the adiabatic approximation. In this chapter we concentrate on the formulation of TD-RDMFT response equations and various adiabatic approximations. None of the adiabatic approximations is fully satisfactory, so we also discuss a phase-dependent extension to TD-RDMFT employing the concept of phase-including-natural-spinorbitals (PINOs). We focus on applications of the linear response formulations to two-electron systems, for which the (almost) exact functional is known.

  20. Generation of the neutron response function of an NE213 scintillator for fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present a method to evaluate the neutron response function of an NE213 liquid scintillator. This method is particularly useful when the proton light yield function of the detector has not been measured, since it is based on a proton light yield function taken from literature, MCNPX simulations, measurements of gamma-rays from a calibration source and measurements of neutrons from fusion experiments with ohmic plasmas. The inclusion of the latter improves the description of the proton light yield function in the energy range of interest (around 2.46 MeV). We apply this method to an NE213 detector installed at JET, inside the radiation shielding of the magnetic proton recoil (MPRu) spectrometer, and present the results from the calibration along with some examples of application of the response function to perform neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) of fusion plasmas. We also investigate how the choice of the proton light yield function affects the NES analysis, finding that the result does not change significantly. This points to the fact that the method for the evaluation of the neutron response function is robust and gives reliable results.

  1. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  2. Nuclear response functions with finite range Gogny force: tensor terms and instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    De Pace, A

    2016-01-01

    A fully-antisymmetrized random phase approximation calculation employing the continued fraction technique is performed to study nuclear matter response functions with the finite range Gogny force. The most commonly used parameter sets of this force, as well as some recent generalizations that include the tensor terms are considered and the corresponding response functions are shown. The calculations are performed at the first and second order in the continued fraction expansion and the explicit expressions for the second order tensor contributions are given. Comparison between first and second order continued fraction expansion results are provided. The differences between the responses obtained at the two orders turn to be more pronounced for the forces including tensor terms than for the standard Gogny ones. In the vector channels the responses calculated with Gogny forces including tensor terms are characterized by a large heterogeneity, reflecting the different choices for the tensor part of the interacti...

  3. Mixed-effects Gaussian process functional regression models with application to dose-response curve prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J Q; Wang, B; Will, E J; West, R M

    2012-11-20

    We propose a new semiparametric model for functional regression analysis, combining a parametric mixed-effects model with a nonparametric Gaussian process regression model, namely a mixed-effects Gaussian process functional regression model. The parametric component can provide explanatory information between the response and the covariates, whereas the nonparametric component can add nonlinearity. We can model the mean and covariance structures simultaneously, combining the information borrowed from other subjects with the information collected from each individual subject. We apply the model to dose-response curves that describe changes in the responses of subjects for differing levels of the dose of a drug or agent and have a wide application in many areas. We illustrate the method for the management of renal anaemia. An individual dose-response curve is improved when more information is included by this mechanism from the subject/patient over time, enabling a patient-specific treatment regime.

  4. The neural and genetic basis of executive function: attention, cognitive flexibility, and response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Sheree F; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Executive function is a collection of cognitive processes essential for higher order mental function. Processes involved in executive function include, but are not limited to, working memory, attention, cognitive flexibility, and impulse control. These complex behaviors are largely mediated by prefrontal cortical function but are modulated by dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic input. The ability of these neurotransmitter systems to modulate executive function allows for adaptation in cognitive behavior in response to changes in the environment. Because of the important role these neurotransmitter systems play in regulating executive function, changes in these systems can also have a grave impact on executive function. In addition, polymorphisms in genes associated with these neurotransmitters are associated with phenotypic differences in executive function. Understanding how these naturally occurring polymorphisms contribute to different executive function phenotypes will advance basic knowledge of cognition and potentially further understanding and treatment of mental illness that involve changes in executive function. In this review, we will examine the influence of dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and acetylcholine on the following measures of executive function: attention, cognitive flexibility, and impulse control. We will also review the effects of polymorphisms in genes associated with these neurotransmitter systems on these measures of executive function. © 2013.

  5. Predator-dependent functional response in wolves: from food limitation to surplus killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Barbara; Sand, Håkan; Wabakken, Petter; Liberg, Olof; Andreassen, Harry Peter

    2015-01-01

    The functional response of a predator describes the change in per capita kill rate to changes in prey density. This response can be influenced by predator densities, giving a predator-dependent functional response. In social carnivores which defend a territory, kill rates also depend on the individual energetic requirements of group members and their contribution to the kill rate. This study aims to provide empirical data for the functional response of wolves Canis lupus to the highly managed moose Alces alces population in Scandinavia. We explored prey and predator dependence, and how the functional response relates to the energetic requirements of wolf packs. Winter kill rates of GPS-collared wolves and densities of cervids were estimated for a total of 22 study periods in 15 wolf territories. The adult wolves were identified as the individuals responsible for providing kills to the wolf pack, while pups could be described as inept hunters. The predator-dependent, asymptotic functional response models (i.e. Hassell-Varley type II and Crowley-Martin) performed best among a set of 23 competing linear, asymptotic and sigmoid models. Small wolf packs acquired >3 times as much moose biomass as required to sustain their field metabolic rate (FMR), even at relatively low moose abundances. Large packs (6-9 wolves) acquired less biomass than required in territories with low moose abundance. We suggest the surplus killing by small packs is a result of an optimal foraging strategy to consume only the most nutritious parts of easy accessible prey while avoiding the risk of being detected by humans. Food limitation may have a stabilizing effect on pack size in wolves, as supported by the observed negative relationship between body weight of pups and pack size. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  6. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-03-01

    Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator-prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator-prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  7. Subject specific BOLD fMRI respiratory and cardiac response functions obtained from global signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahpour, Maryam; Refai, Hazem; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2013-05-15

    Subtle changes in either breathing pattern or cardiac pulse rate alter blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal (BOLD fMRI). This is problematic because such fluctuations could possibly not be related to underlying neuronal activations of interest but instead the source of physiological noise. Several methods have been proposed to eliminate physiological noise in BOLD fMRI data. One such method is to derive a template based on average multi-subject data for respiratory response function (RRF) and cardiac response function (CRF) by simultaneously utilizing an external recording of cardiac and respiratory waveforms with the fMRI. Standard templates can then be used to model, map, and remove respiration and cardiac fluctuations from fMRI data. Utilizing these does not, however, account for intra-subject variations in physiological response. Thus, performing a more individualized approach for single subject physiological noise correction becomes more desirable, especially for clinical purposes. Here we propose a novel approach that employs subject-specific RRF and CRF response functions obtained from the whole brain or brain tissue-specific global signals (GS). Averaging multiple voxels in global signal computation ensures physiological noise dominance over thermal and system noise in even high-spatial-resolution fMRI data, making the GS suitable for deriving robust estimations of both RRF and CRF for individual subjects. Using these individualized response functions instead of standard templates based on multi-subject averages judiciously removes physiological noise from the data, assuming that there is minimal neuronal contribution in the derived individualized filters. Subject-specific physiological response functions obtained from the GS better maps individuals' physiological characteristics.

  8. Analysis of the Dynamic Response in the Railway Vehicles to the Track Vertical Irregularities. Part I: The Theoretical Model and the Vehicle Response Functions

    OpenAIRE

    M. Dumitriu

    2015-01-01

    The paper herein focuses on the dynamic response of a two-bogie vehicle to the excitations derived from the track vertical irregularities. The symmetrical and antisymmetrical modes due from the bounce and pitch motions of the axles’ planes in the two bogies are being considered. The analysis of the dynamic response in the vehicle relies on the response functions in three reference points of the carbody, composed by means of these response functions to the symmetrical and antisymme...

  9. Functional CD8+ T Cell Responses in Lethal Ebola Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-15

    2003. Cutting edge: impairment of dendritic cells and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses . J. Immunol. 170: 2797–2801. 20. Bosio, C. M., B...Functional CD8 T Cell Responses in Lethal Ebola Virus Infection1 Steven B. Bradfute, Kelly L. Warfield, and Sina Bavari2 Ebola virus (EBOV) causes...the development of an effective adap- tive immune response, leading to overwhelming infection and death. Ebola virus (EBOV)3 is a single-stranded

  10. Muscle twitch responses for shaping the multi-pad electrode for functional electrical stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malešević Nebojša; Popović Lana; Bijelić Goran; Kvaščev Goran

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for optimization of multi-pad electrode spatial selectivity during transcutaneous Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of hand. The presented method is based on measurement of individual muscle twitch responses during low frequency electrical stimulation via pads within multi-pad electrode. Twitch responses are recorded by Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers. The aim of this methodology is to substitute bulky sensors, torque sensor...

  11. Intraspecific trait variation drives functional responses of old-field plant communities to nutrient enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Andrew; Ritchie, Mark E

    2016-05-01

    Environmental changes are expected to shift the distribution of functional trait values in plant communities through a combination of species turnover and intraspecific variation. The strength of these shifts may depend on the availability of individuals with trait values adapted to new environmental conditions, represented by the functional diversity (FD) of existing community residents or dispersal from the regional species pool. We conducted a 3-year nutrient- and seed-addition experiment in old-field plant communities to examine the contributions of species turnover and intraspecific variation to community trait shifts, focusing on four key plant functional traits: vegetative height, leaf area, specific leaf area (SLA), and leaf dry matter content (LDMC). We further examined the influence of initial FD and seed availability on the strength of these shifts. Community mean height, leaf area, and SLA increased in response to fertilization, and these shifts were driven almost entirely by intraspecific variation. The strength of intraspecific shifts in height and leaf area was positively related to initial intraspecific FD in these traits. Intraspecific trait responses to fertilization varied among species, with species of short stature displaying stronger shifts in SLA and LDMC but weaker shifts in leaf area. Trait shifts due to species turnover were generally weak and opposed intraspecific responses. Seed addition altered community taxonomic composition but had little effect on community trait shifts. These results highlight the importance of intraspecific variation for short-term community functional responses and demonstrate that the strength of these responses may be mediated by community FD.

  12. Functional Responses of Retaliatory Killing versus Recreational Sport Hunting of Leopards in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, Lourens H; Somers, Michael J; Dalerum, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Predation strategies in response to altering prey abundances can dramatically influence the demographic effects of predation. Despite this, predation strategies of humans are rarely incorporated into quantitative assessments of the demographic impacts of humans killing carnivores. This scarcity largely seems to be caused by a lack of data. In this study, we contrasted predation strategies exhibited by people involved in retaliatory killing and recreational sport hunting of leopards (Panthera pardus) in the Waterberg District Municipality, South Africa. We predicted a specialist predation strategy exemplified by a type II functional response for retaliatory killing, and a generalist strategy exemplified by a type III functional response for recreational sport hunting. We could not distinguish between a type I, a type II, or a type III functional response for retaliatory killing, but the most parsimonious model for recreational sport hunting corresponded to a type I functional response. Kill rates were consistently higher for retaliatory killing than for recreational sport hunting. Our results indicate that retaliatory killing of leopards may have severe demographic consequences for leopard populations, whereas the demographic consequences of recreational sport hunting likely are less dramatic.

  13. Functioning of peripheral Ia pathways in infants with typical development: responses in antagonist muscle pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Caroline; Ulrich, Beverly D; Martin, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    In muscle responses of proprioceptive origin, including the stretch/tendon reflex (T-reflex), the corresponding reciprocal excitation and irradiation to distant muscles have been described from newborn infants to older adults. However, the functioning of other responses mediated primarily by Ia-afferents has not been investigated in infants. Understanding the typical development of these multiple pathways is critical to determining potential problems in their development in populations affected by neurological disease, such as spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Hence, the goal of the present study was to quantify the excitability of Ia-mediated responses in lower limb muscles of infants with typical development. These responses were elicited by mechanical stimulation applied to the distal tendons of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (QAD) muscles of both legs in twelve 2- to 10-month-old infants and recorded simultaneously in antagonist muscle pairs by surface EMG. Tendon taps alone elicited responses in either, both or neither muscle. The homonymous response (T-reflex) was less frequent in the TA than the GS or QAD muscle. An 80 Hz vibration superimposed on tendon taps induced primarily an inhibition of monosynaptic responses; however, facilitation also occurred in either muscle of the recorded pair. These responses were not influenced significantly by age or gender. Vibration alone produced a tonic reflex response in the vibrated muscle (TVR) and/or the antagonist muscle (AVR). However, for the TA muscle the TVR was more frequently elicited in older than younger infants. High variability was common to all responses. Overall, the random distribution and inconsistency of muscle responses suggests that the gain of Ia-mediated feedback is unstable. We propose that during infancy the central nervous system needs to learn to set stable feedback gain, or destination of proprioceptive assistance, based on their use during functional

  14. Status of development of gamma-ray detector response function code or GAMDRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fusheng; Han, Xiaogang

    2012-07-01

    The need for an accurate representation of the detector response functions (DRFs) for sodium iodide (NaI), bismuth germinate (BGO), etc., arises in the oilwell logging business, especially important for spectral logging tools such as a geochemical logging tool. While Monte Carlo models predict the photon spectra incidents on these detectors, the DRFs are used to generate the pulse-height spectra. A Monte Carlo-based γ-ray detector response function code (GAMDRF) was developed to meet the requirements based on complete photon physics.

  15. Molecular response functions for the polarizable continuum model physical basis and quantum mechanical formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Cammi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This Brief presents the main aspects of the response functions theory (RFT) for molecular solutes described within the framework of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM). PCM is a solvation model for a Quantum Mechanical molecular system in which the solvent is represented as a continuum distribution of matter. Particular attention is devoted to the description of the basic features of the PCM model, and to the problems characterizing the study of the response function theory for molecules in solution with respect to the analogous theory on isolated molecules.

  16. Transfer function analysis of the autonomic response to respiratory activity during random interval breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. H.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Stevenson, K.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We report a new method for the noninvasive characterization of the frequency response of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in mediating fluctuations in heart rate (HR). The approach entails computation of the transfer function magnitude and phase between instantaneous lung volume and HR. Broad band fluctuations in lung volume were initiated when subjects breathed on cue to a sequence of beeps spaced randomly in time. We studied 10 subjects in both supine and standing positions. The transfer function, averaged among all the subjects, showed systematic differences between the two postures, reflecting the differing frequency responses of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS.

  17. Transfer function analysis of the autonomic response to respiratory activity during random interval breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. H.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Stevenson, K.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We report a new method for the noninvasive characterization of the frequency response of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in mediating fluctuations in heart rate (HR). The approach entails computation of the transfer function magnitude and phase between instantaneous lung volume and HR. Broad band fluctuations in lung volume were initiated when subjects breathed on cue to a sequence of beeps spaced randomly in time. We studied 10 subjects in both supine and standing positions. The transfer function, averaged among all the subjects, showed systematic differences between the two postures, reflecting the differing frequency responses of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS.

  18. Functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris reflex response during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) reflex response following ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations during the late stance phase of the gait cycle [1]. Stevenson et al. [1] proposed that the cBF reflex acts to slow the forward progression...... the treadmill velocity was altered concurrently or 50 ms after knee perturbation onset. These results, together with the finding that the cBF reflex response is under some cortical control [1], strongly suggest a functional role for the cBF reflex during walking that is adaptable to the environmental situation....

  19. Plant Functional Variability in Response to Late-Quaternary Climate Change Recorded in Ancient Packrat Middens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, C. A.; Potts, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Responses of plant functional traits to environmental variability are of enduring interest because they constrain organism performance and ecosystem function. However, most inferences regarding plant functional trait response to climatic variability have been limited to the modern period. To better understand plant functional response to long-term climate variability and how adjustments in leaf morphology may contribute to patterns of species establishment, persistence, or extirpation, we measured specific leaf area (SLA) from macrofossils preserved in ancient packrat middens collected along the Arizona/New Mexico border, USA. Our record spanned more than 32,000 years and included six woodland and Chihuahuan Desert species: Berberis cf. haematocarpa, Juniperus cf. coahuilensis, Juniperus osteosperma, Larrea tridentata, Prosopis glandulosa and Parthenium incanum. We predicted that regional climatic warming and drying since the late Pleistocene would result in intraspecific decreases in SLA. As predicted, SLA was positively correlated with midden age for three of the six species (L. tridentata, J. osteosperma, B. cf. haematocarpa). SLA was also negatively correlated with December (L. tridentata, J. cf. coahuilensis) or June (B. cf. haematocarpa, J. osteosperma) insolation. A unique record of vegetation community dynamics, plant macrofossils preserved in packrat middens also represent a rich and largely untapped source of information on long-term trends in species functional response to environmental change.

  20. Bias Errors due to Leakage Effects When Estimating Frequency Response Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Josefsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency response functions are often utilized to characterize a system's dynamic response. For a wide range of engineering applications, it is desirable to determine frequency response functions for a system under stochastic excitation. In practice, the measurement data is contaminated by noise and some form of averaging is needed in order to obtain a consistent estimator. With Welch's method, the discrete Fourier transform is used and the data is segmented into smaller blocks so that averaging can be performed when estimating the spectrum. However, this segmentation introduces leakage effects. As a result, the estimated frequency response function suffers from both systematic (bias and random errors due to leakage. In this paper the bias error in the H1 and H2-estimate is studied and a new method is proposed to derive an approximate expression for the relative bias error at the resonance frequency with different window functions. The method is based on using a sum of real exponentials to describe the window's deterministic autocorrelation function. Simple expressions are derived for a rectangular window and a Hanning window. The theoretical expressions are verified with numerical simulations and a very good agreement is found between the results from the proposed bias expressions and the empirical results.

  1. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, Mary A; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J G; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H; Atkin, Owen K

    2016-04-05

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration-temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates.

  2. Electromagnetic and neutral-weak response functions of 4He and 12C

    CERN Document Server

    Lovato, A; Carlson, J; Pieper, Steven C; Schiavilla, R

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of the quasi-elastic electromagnetic and neutral-weak response functions of 4He and 12C are carried out for the first time. They are based on a realistic approach to nuclear dynamics, in which the strong interactions are described by two- and three-nucleon potentials and the electroweak interactions with external fields include one- and two-body terms. The Green's function Monte Carlo method is used to calculate directly the Laplace transforms of the response functions, and maximum-entropy techniques are employed to invert the resulting imaginary-time correlation functions with associated statistical errors. The theoretical results, confirmed by experiment in the electromagnetic case, show that two-body currents generate excess transverse strength from threshold to the quasi-elastic to the dip region and beyond. These findings challenge the conventional picture of quasi-elastic inclusive scattering as being largely dominated by single-nucleon knockout processes.

  3. Global Analysis of a Delayed Impulsive Lotka-Volterra Model with Holling III Type Functional Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A delayed impulsive Lotka-Volterra model with Holing III type functional response was established. With the help of Mawhin’s Continuation Theorem in coincidence degree theory, a sufficient condition is found for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the system under consideration. By applying the comparison theorem and constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the permanence and global attractivity of the model are proved. Two numerical simulations are also given to illustrate our main results.

  4. Functional response analysis of Anisops sardea (Hemiptera: Notonectidae) against Culex quinquefasciatus in laboratory condition

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendra Prasad Mondal; Anupam Ghosh; Subhasis Bandyopadhyay; Goutam Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Culex quinquefasciatus is the principal vector of lymphatic filariasis (LF). Application of alternative vector control methodologies are aimed at reduction of mosquito breeding sites and biting activity through the use of biological control methods. In the present study, functional response of aquatic Hemipteran backswimmer, Anisops sardea was assessed against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae in laboratory bioassay. Methods: The functional respons of A. sardea was ass...

  5. Stability in a Simple Food Chain System with Michaelis-Menten Functional Response and Nonlocal Delays

    OpenAIRE

    Wenzhen Gan; Canrong Tian; Qunying Zhang; Zhigui Lin

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the asymptotical behavior of solutions to the reaction-diffusion system under homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. By taking food ingestion and species' moving into account, the model is further coupled with Michaelis-Menten type functional response and nonlocal delay. Sufficient conditions are derived for the global stability of the positive steady state and the semitrivial steady state of the proposed problem by using the Lyapunov functional. Our results show...

  6. The solutions of the strongly nonlocal spatial solitons with several types of nonlocal response functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Shi-Gen; Guo Qi; Lan Sheng; Wu Li-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The fundamental and second order strongly nonlocal solitons of the nonlocal nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equation for several types of nonlocal responses are calculated by Ritz's variational method.For a specific type of nonlocal response, the solutions of the strongly nonlocal solitons with the same beam width but difierent degrees of nonlocality are identical except for an amplitude factor.For a nonlocal case where the nonlocal response function decays in direct proportion to the ruth power of the distance near the source point,the power and the phase constant of the strongly nonlocal soliton are in inverse proportion to the(m+2)th power of its beam width.

  7. A database of neutron spectra, instrument response functions, and dosimetric conversion factors for radiation protection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, O.F. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Siebert, B.R.L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    One of the major problems encountered in dose assessment for neutron radiation protection derives from the imperfect dose equivalent response of the devices used for monitoring. To investigate the performance of such devices in realistic neutron fields and to optimise calibration procedures, knowledge of both the prevalent spectral fluences and the energy response of the dosemeters is required. To facilitate this and similar studies, a database has been developed comprising a catalogue of neutron spectra and energy-dependent response functions together with a software package to manipulate the data in the catalogue. The range of data, features of the programs, and examples for radiation protection applications are described. (author).

  8. Regularization for Continuously Observed Ordinal Response Variables with Piecewise-Constant Functional Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    response variable taking on ordinal values 1 to C and a 1x vector of explanatory variables , , the proportional odds model is given by...I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S Regularization for Continuously Observed Ordinal Response Variables with Piecewise...response variable , quality of video provided by the Shadow to friendly ground units, was measured on an ordinal scale continuously over time. Functional

  9. Experimental design and multiple response optimization. Using the desirability function in analytical methods development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candioti, Luciana Vera; De Zan, María M; Cámara, María S; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2014-06-01

    A review about the application of response surface methodology (RSM) when several responses have to be simultaneously optimized in the field of analytical methods development is presented. Several critical issues like response transformation, multiple response optimization and modeling with least squares and artificial neural networks are discussed. Most recent analytical applications are presented in the context of analytLaboratorio de Control de Calidad de Medicamentos (LCCM), Facultad de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, C.C. 242, S3000ZAA Santa Fe, ArgentinaLaboratorio de Control de Calidad de Medicamentos (LCCM), Facultad de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, C.C. 242, S3000ZAA Santa Fe, Argentinaical methods development, especially in multiple response optimization procedures using the desirability function.

  10. Green's function surface-integral method for nonlocal response of plasmonic nanowires in arbitrary dielectric environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N. Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    We develop a nonlocal-response generalization to the Green's function surface-integral method (GSIM), also known as the boundary-element method. This numerically efficient method can accurately describe the linear hydrodynamic nonlocal response of arbitrarily shaped plasmonic nanowires in arbitrary...... dielectric backgrounds. All previous general-purpose methods for nonlocal response are bulk methods. We also expand the possible geometries to which the usual local-response GSIM can be applied, by showing how to regularize singularities that occur in the surface integrals when the nanoparticles touch...... close to and on top of planar dielectric substrates. Especially for the latter geometry, considerable differences in extinction cross sections are found for local as compared to nonlocal response, similar to what is found for plasmonic dimer structures....

  11. Optimal representation of the bath response function & fast calculation of influence functional coefficients in open quantum systems with BATHFIT 1

    CERN Document Server

    Dattani, Nikesh S; Pollock, Felix A

    2012-01-01

    Today's most popular techniques for accurately calculating the dynamics of the reduced density operator in an open quantum system, either require, or gain great computational benefits, from representing the bath response function a(t) in the form a(t)={\\Sigma}_k^K p_k e^{O_k t} . For some of these techniques, the number of terms in the series K plays the lead role in the computational cost of the calculation, and is therefore often a limiting factor in simulating open quantum system dynamics. We present an open source MATLAB program called BATHFIT 1, whose input is any spectral distribution functions J(w) or bath response function, and whose output attempts to be the set of parameters {p_k,w_k}_k=1^K such that for a given value of K, the series {\\Sigma}_k^k p_k e^{O_k t} is as close as possible to a(t). This should allow the user to represent a(t) as accurately as possible with as few parameters as possible. The program executes non-linear least squares fitting, and for a very wide variety of spectral distrib...

  12. Dynamic response of AFM cantilevers to dissimilar functionalized silica surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Misra, Sambit; Karacor, M Basar; Prakash, Shaurya; Shannon, Mark A

    2010-11-16

    The dynamic response of an oscillating microcantilever with a gold-coated tip interacting with dissimilar functionalized silica surfaces was studied in electrolyte solutions with pH ranging from 4 to 9. Silica surfaces were chemically modified, yielding dissimilar surfaces with -Br, -NH(2), and -CH(3) functional group terminations. The relative hydrophobicity of the surfaces was characterized by contact angle measurements. The surface charge of the functionalized surfaces was first probed with commonly used static AFM measurements and serves as a reference to the dynamic response data. The amplitude and phase of the cantilever oscillation were monitored and used to calculate the effective interaction stiffness and damping coefficient, which relate to the electrical double layer interactions and also to distance-dependent hydrodynamic damping at the solid/water interface. The data for the dynamic response of the AFM over silica surfaces as a function of chemical functionalization and electrolyte pH show that the effective stiffness has a distinctive dependence on the surface charge of functionalized silica surfaces. The hydrodynamic damping also correlates strongly with the relative hydrophobicity of the surface. The data reported here indicate that interfacial properties can be strongly affected by changing the chemical composition of surfaces.

  13. Fuzzy controllers based on some fuzzy implication operators and their response functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hongxing; YOU Fei; PENG Jiayin

    2004-01-01

    The fuzzy controllers constructed by 23 fuzzy implication operators based on CRI algorithm and their response functions are discussed.The conclusions show that the fuzzy controllers constructed by 9 fuzzy implication operators are universal approximators to continuous functions and can be used in practical fuzzy control systems.And these 9 fuzzy implication operators except for Einstein operator intersection are all the adjoint pairs of some fuzzy implication operators.Besides, there are 3 other fuzzy controllers formed by fuzzy implication operators being regarded approximately as fitted functions.

  14. Silicon Damage Response Function Derivation and Verification: Assessment of Impact on ASTM Standard E722

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depriest, Kendall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Unsuccessful attempts by members of the radiation effects community to independently derive the Norgett-Robinson-Torrens (NRT) damage energy factors for silicon in ASTM standard E722-14 led to an investigation of the software coding and data that produced those damage energy factors. The ad hoc collaboration to discover the reason for lack of agreement revealed a coding error and resulted in a report documenting the methodology to produce the response function for the standard. The recommended changes in the NRT damage energy factors for silicon are shown to have significant impact for a narrow energy region of the 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence response function. However, when evaluating integral metrics over all neutrons energies in various spectra important to the SNL electronics testing community, the change in the response results in a small decrease in the total 1- MeV(Si) equivalent fluence of ~0.6% compared to the E722-14 response. Response functions based on the newly recommended NRT damage energy factors have been produced and are available for users of both the NuGET and MCNP codes.

  15. Nuclear response functions with finite-range Gogny force: Tensor terms and instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pace, A.; Martini, M.

    2016-08-01

    A fully antisymmetrized random phase approximation calculation employing the continued fraction technique is performed to study nuclear matter response functions with the finite-range Gogny force. The most commonly used parameter sets of this force, as well as some recent generalizations that include the tensor terms, are considered and the corresponding response functions are shown. The calculations are performed at first and second order in the continued fraction expansion and the explicit expressions for the second-order tensor contributions are given. Comparisons between first- and second-order continued fraction expansion results are provided. The differences between the responses obtained at the two orders turn out to be more pronounced for the forces including tensor terms than for the standard Gogny ones. In the vector channels the responses calculated with Gogny forces including tensor terms are characterized by a large heterogeneity, reflecting the different choices for the tensor part of the interaction. For the sake of comparison the response functions obtained considering a G -matrix-based nuclear interaction are also shown. As a first application of the present calculation, the possible existence of spurious finite-size instabilities of the Gogny forces with or without tensor terms has been investigated. The positive conclusion is that all the Gogny forces but the GT2 one are free of spurious finite-size instabilities. In perspective, the tool developed in the present paper can be inserted in the fitting procedure to construct new Gogny-type forces.

  16. Electromagnetic and neutral-weak response functions of 4He and 12C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, A.; Gandolfi, S.; Carlson, J.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.

    2015-06-01

    Background: A major goal of nuclear theory is to understand the strong interaction in nuclei as it manifests itself in terms of two- and many-body forces among the nuclear constituents, the protons and neutrons, and the interactions of these constituents with external electroweak probes via one- and many-body currents. Purpose: The objective of the present work is to calculate the quasielastic electroweak response functions in light nuclei within the realistic dynamical framework outlined above. These response functions determine the inclusive cross section as function of the lepton momentum and energy transfers. Methods: Their ab initio calculation is a very challenging quantum many-body problem, since it requires summation over the entire excitation spectrum of the nucleus and inclusion in the electroweak currents of one- and many-body terms. Green's functions Monte Carlo methods allow one to circumvent both difficulties by computing the response in imaginary time (the so-called Euclidean response) and hence summing implicitly over the bound and continuum states of the nucleus, and by implementing specific algorithms designed to deal with the complicated spin-isospin structure of nuclear many-body operators. Results: Theoretical predictions for 4He and 12C, confirmed by experiment in the electromagnetic case, show that two-body currents generate excess transverse strength from threshold to the quasielastic to the dip region and beyond. Conclusions: These results challenge the conventional picture of quasielastic inclusive scattering as being largely dominated by single-nucleon knockout processes.

  17. Keitel Functional Test for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: translation, reliability, validity, and responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Skjodt, H.; Klarlund, M.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to translate the German Keitel Functional Test (KFT) into Danish and test it for reliability, concurrent and predictive validity, and responsiveness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Translation of the KFT was performed acco...

  18. IL-13 receptor alpha-2 regulates the immune and functional response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    IL-13 has a prominent role in host defense against the gastrointestinal nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis; however, the role of IL-13 alpha2 in the immune and functional response to enteric infection is not known. In the current study, we investigated changes in smooth muscle and epithelial ce...

  19. Functional response of Cosmoclopius nigroannulatus (Hem.: Reduviidae to different densities of Spartocera dentiventris (Hem.: Coreidae nymphae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. da Rocha

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the functional response of the predator Cosmoclopius nigroannulatus on first instar nymphae of Spartocera dentiventris, both species associated with Nicotina tabacum. The experiment was carried out in laboratory conditions: 27 ± 1ºC; 80 ± 5%, RH; 12 h, photophase. Ten newly emerged adults of each sex of C. nigroannulatus were used in each of five densities (5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 individuals of S. dentiventris nymphae. The predators were observed every 24 h for five days, when the number of dead and/or consumed nymphae was recorded. The results showed a positive correlation between the number of ingested nymphae and the increase in prey density. Females ingested more nymphae than the males. The estimated handling time per prey (Th was higher in males (3.07 h than in females (1.93 h, with total handling time (Th x Na increased with density. Other components of the functional response, such as attack rate (a', searching time (Ts, and search efficiency (E showed, in neither males nor females, a negative correlation regarding density. The results indicated a higher predatory efficiency in the females. The components of the functional response fitted significantly the randomic model of the Holling discs equation (Na = N {1 - exp[- a'(T - ThNa]}, evidencing a functional response of type II.

  20. Scaling of ac susceptibility and the nonlinear response function of high-temperature superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Kaixuan; NING; Zhenhua; XU; Hengyi; QI; Zhi; LU; Guo

    2005-01-01

    The amplitude-dependent ac susceptibility of high-temperature superconductors is shown to obey some empirical scaling relations. We try to analyze this behavior by extending a dc nonlinear response function of mixed state to the ac cases. The derived equations for critical current and ac susceptibility x(T) agree with the scaling relations of experimental data.

  1. Measurements of response functions of EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator for fast neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J.; Barzilov, A.; Peters, E. E.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron response functions were measured for an EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. The 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory was used to produce proton and deuteron beams for reactions with gaseous tritium and deuterium targets, yielding monoenergetic neutrons by means of the 3H(p,n)3He, 2H(d,n)3He, and 3H(d,n)4He reactions. The neutron energy was selected by tuning the charged-particle's energy and using the angular dependence of the neutron emission. The resulting response functions were measured for 0.1-MeV steps in neutron energy from 0.1 MeV to 8.2 MeV and from 12.2 MeV to 20.2 MeV. Experimental data were processed using a procedure for digital pulse-shape discrimination, which allowed characterization of the response functions of the plastic scintillator to neutrons only. The response functions are intended for use in neutron spectrum unfolding methods.

  2. Glial cell response after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage - Functional consequences and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, B.J.; Vergouwen, M.D.I.; Kelfkens, M.M.; Rinkel, G.J.E.; Hol, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, both astrocytes and microglia, respond to neurodegenerative processes and to brain damage by a process called reactive gliosis. This response is highly context dependent, varies from mild to severe, and can be protective or detrimental for neural functioning. In patients with a

  3. Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O.

    2015-01-01

    1.Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates.2.U

  4. Moving on with foraging theory : Incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Jan A; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O

    2015-01-01

    Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Usin

  5. Identification of Disulphide Stress-responsive Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factors in Rothia mucilaginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Discussion Sigma factors are crucial for prokaryotic transcription initia- tion where different sigma factors are activated in response to various...Mycobacterium tuberculosis extracytoplasmic-function sigma factor SigL regulates polyketide synthases and secreted or membrane proteins and is required for

  6. A derivation of Holling's type I, II and III functional responses in predator-prey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, J H P; Souza, M O

    2013-06-21

    Predator-prey dynamics is most simply and commonly described by Lotka-Volterra-type ordinary differential equations (ODEs) for continuous population density variables in the limit of large population sizes. One popular extension of these ODEs is the so-called Rosenzweig-MacArthur model in which various interaction rates between the populations have a nonlinear dependence on the prey concentration. Nonlinear 'functional responses' of this type were originally proposed by Holling on the basis of a general argument concerning the allocation of a predator's time between two activities: 'prey searching' and 'prey handling'. Although these functional responses are constructed in terms of the behaviour of an individual predator, they are routinely incorporated at the population level in models that include reproduction and death. In this paper we derive a novel three variable model for the simplest possible mathematical formulation of predator-prey dynamics that allows the interplay between these various processes to take place, on their different characteristic timescales. We study its properties in detail and show how it reduces to Holling's functional responses in special limits. As a result we are able to establish direct links between individual-level and population-level behaviour in the context of these well-known functional responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Testing Hypotheses About the Person-Response Function in Person-Fit Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, Wilco H.M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Meijer, R.R.

    The person-response function (PRF) relates the probability of an individual's correct answer to the difficulty of items measuring the same latent trait. Local deviations of the observed PRF from the expected PRF indicate person misfit. We discuss two new approaches to investigate person fit. The

  8. Bifurcations of a predator-prey model with non-monotonic response function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.W.; Naudot, Vincent; Roussarie, Robert; Saleh, Khairul

    2005-01-01

    A 2-dimensional predator-prey model with five parameters is investigated, adapted from the Volterra-Lotka system by a non-monotonic response function. A description of the various domains of structural stability and their bifurcations is given. The bifurcation structure is reduced to four organising

  9. Comparative responsiveness of measures of pain and function after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, A K; Roos, Ewa M.; Westerlund, J P

    2001-01-01

    To compare the responsiveness of the Functional Assessment System (FAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (SF-36) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) scheduled for total hip replacement....

  10. Predation of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) by Norops serranoi (Reptilia: Polychrotidae): functional response and evasion ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, Ariane; Valle-Mora, Javier; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Susana Eva; Liedo, Pablo

    2014-06-01

    The Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), is one of the 10 worldwide more important fruit crop pests. Orchards of southeastern Chiapas also shelter the tree-dwelling lizard Norops serranoi (Köhler), which likely prey upon these flies. In standard laboratory conditions, we determined the functional response of four male and four female lizards on mass-reared fruit flies. We used a general logistic analysis of proportion of killed prey versus available prey to determine the shape of the functional response. Male lizards showed a type II functional response, while females showed a type III functional response. For the highest fruit fly densities, female lizards caught significantly more fruit flies than males did. The predator evasion ability and the survival of mass-reared and wild fruit flies were compared. Wild fruit flies evaded more male lizard attacks than mass-reared flies. However, when female lizards attacked, there was no significant difference between strains. Fruit flies survival was higher with male than with female lizards, but it did not depend on fruit fly strains. This is the first report of a vertebrate preying on the Mexican fruit fly, demonstrating that female lizards impose a higher predation pressure and are more efficient at capturing wild fruit flies than males. We discuss the implications of our results on mass-rearing and quality control of sterile flies.

  11. Effects of Sublethal Concentrations of Insecticides on the Functional Response of Two Mirid Generalist Predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki F Martinou

    Full Text Available The use of agrochemicals particularly pesticides, can hamper the effectiveness of natural enemies, causing disruption in the ecosystem service of biological control. In the current study, the effects of the insecticides thiacloprid and chlorantraniliprole on the functional response curves were assessed for two mirid predator nymphs, Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur and Nesidiocoris tenuis Reuter. In the absence of insecticides, both predators exhibited a type II functional response when feeding on eggs of the moth Ephestia kuehniella. N. tenuis seems to be a more efficient predator than M. pygmaeus, as model estimated handling time was significantly lower for the former than for the latter. Residual exposure of M. pygmaeus to sublethal concentrations of either insecticide was associated with a change in the asymptote but not the type of the functional response curve. Thiacloprid seems to be the least compatible with M. pygmaeus, as it led to both a significant reduction of the attack rate and an increase in handling time. In contrast, chlorantraniliprole exposure significantly increased the handling time, but not the attack rate of the predator. Residual exposure of N. tenuis to sublethal concentrations of either insecticide did not have a significant effect on the type nor the parameters of the functional response model. The results show that pesticide residues that do not have lethal effects on beneficial arthropods can reduce prey consumption depending on predator species and on likely risks associated with toxicity.

  12. Response inhibition and immediate arousal in children with high-functioning autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymaekers, Ruth; van der Meere, Jaap; Roeyers, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    The current study compared high-functioning children with autism (HFA) and a peer control group on an immediate arousal task measuring response inhibition. In one condition go stimuli were presented whereas in another condition a tone preceded the go stimulus. The tone caused an immediate arousal ef

  13. On the Predator-Prey System with Holling-(n + 1) Functional Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Jian Hua SUN

    2007-01-01

    The qualitative properties of a predatorprey system with Holling-(n + 1) functional response and a fairly general growth rate are completely investigated. The necessary and sufficient condition to guarantee the uniqueness of limit cycles is given. Our work extends the previous relevant results in the reference.

  14. Permanence of a stage-structured predator-prey system with a class of functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhihui; Wang, Shufan; Wang, Wenting; Li, Zizhen

    2011-12-01

    A stage-structured predator-prey system incorporating a class of functional responses is presented in this article. By analyzing the system and using the standard comparison theorem, the sufficient conditions are derived for permanence of the system and non-permanence of predators.

  15. Assessment of the biological control capability of Hippodamia variegata (Col.: Coccinellidae) using functional response experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madadi, Hossein; Parizi, Emad Mohajeri; Allahyari, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Lady beetles are among the most successful predators of aphids in different environments. The functional responses of different life stages of Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) towards cotton aphidswere examined in two different set-ups, a two-dimensional Petri dish set-up with detached leaves and a t...

  16. The impact of executive function on response to cognitive behavioral therapy in late-life depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Madeleine S; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Thompson, Larry W; Kesler, Shelli R; Anker, Lauren; Flournoy, John; Berman, Mika P; Holland, Jason M; O'Hara, Ruth M

    2016-04-01

    Late-life depression (LLD) is a common and debilitating condition among older adults. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has strong empirical support for the treatment of depression in all ages, including in LLD. In teaching patients to identify, monitor, and challenge negative patterns in their thinking, CBT for LLD relies heavily on cognitive processes and, in particular, executive functioning, such as planning, sequencing, organizing, and selectively inhibiting information. It may be that the effectiveness of CBT lies in its ability to train these cognitive areas. Participants with LLD completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery before enrolling in CBT. The current study examined the relationship between neuropsychological function prior to treatment and response to CBT. When using three baseline measures of executive functioning that quantify set shifting, cognitive flexibility, and response inhibition to predict treatment response, only baseline Wisconsin Card Sort Task performance was associated with a significant drop in depression symptoms after CBT. Specifically, worse performance on the Wisconsin Card Sort Task was associated with better treatment response. These results suggest that CBT, which teaches cognitive techniques for improving psychiatric symptoms, may be especially beneficial in LLD if relative weaknesses in specific areas of executive functioning are present. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Organization of Functional Postural Responses Following Perturbations in Multiple Directions in Elderly Fallers Standing Quietly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Sok, David; Jakovljevic, Miroljub; Cikajlo, Imre

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess functional postural responses by analyzing the center-of-pressure trajectories resulting from perturbations delivered in multiple directions to elderly fallers. Ten elderly individuals were standing quietly on two force platforms while an apparatus delivered controlled perturbations at the level of pelvis…

  18. Dysfunction of stress responsive systems as a risk factor for functional somatic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, Lineke M.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of functional somatic syndromes or disorders (FSDs) is generally considered to be a multifactorial interplay between psychological, biological, and social factors. One of the most investigated biological factors is stress responsive system dysfunction Despite more than twenty years of r

  19. Periodic solutions of delayed predator-prey model with the Beddington-DeAngelis functional response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo Haifeng [Institute of Applied Mathematics, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou, Gansu 730050 (China)]. E-mail: hfhuo@lut.cn; Li Wantong [Department of Mathematics, Lanzhou University Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)]. E-mail: wtli@lzu.edu.cn; Nieto, Juan J. [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Facultad de Matematicas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)]. E-mail: amnieto@usc.es

    2007-07-15

    By using the continuation theorem based on Gaines and Mawhin's coincidence degree, sufficient and realistic conditions are obtained for the global existence of positive periodic solutions for a delayed predator-prey model with the Beddington-DeAngelis functional response. Our results are applicable to state dependent and distributed delays.

  20. Functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris reflex response during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend S.; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) reflex response following ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations during the late stance phase of the gait cycle [1]. Stevenson et al. [1] proposed that the cBF reflex acts to slow the forward progression...

  1. Measuring individuals' response quality in self-administered psychological tests: an introduction to Gendre's functional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Marc; Meier, Emanuele; Capel, Roland; Gendre, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The functional method is a new test theory using a new scoring method that assumes complexity in test structure, and thus takes into account every correlation between factors and items. The main specificity of the functional method is to model test scores by multiple regression instead of estimating them by using simplistic sums of points. In order to proceed, the functional method requires the creation of hyperspherical measurement space, in which item responses are expressed by their correlation with orthogonal factors. This method has three main qualities. First, measures are expressed in the absolute metric of correlations; therefore, items, scales and persons are expressed in the same measurement space using the same single metric. Second, factors are systematically orthogonal and without errors, which is optimal in order to predict other outcomes. Such predictions can be performed to estimate how one would answer to other tests, or even to model one's response strategy if it was perfectly coherent. Third, the functional method provides measures of individuals' response validity (i.e., control indices). Herein, we propose a standard procedure in order to identify whether test results are interpretable and to exclude invalid results caused by various response biases based on control indices.

  2. Response function for the characterization of photo-induced anisotropy in azobenzene containing polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajti, S.; Kerekes, Á.; Ramanujam, P.S.;

    2002-01-01

    A response function is derived for the description of photo-induced birefringence and dichroism in case of materials where the underlying process is photo-isomerization. Our result explains the usefulness of the theoretical formulae derived earlier by Kakichashvili for photo-anisotropic materials...

  3. A transfer function approach to the small-signal response of saturated semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Blumenthal, D. J.; Mørk, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the small-signal frequency response (SSFR) of a wavelength converter based on cross-gain modulation in a semiconductor optical amplifier with a finite waveguide loss is presented. We use a transfer function formalism to explain the resonant behavior of the frequency...

  4. Testing Hypotheses About the Person-Response Function in Person-Fit Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, Wilco H.M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Meijer, Rob R.

    2004-01-01

    The person-response function (PRF) relates the probability of an individual's correct answer to the difficulty of items measuring the same latent trait. Local deviations of the observed PRF from the expected PRF indicate person misfit. We discuss two new approaches to investigate person fit. The fir

  5. Uniform persistence of multispecies ecological competition predator-pray system with Holling Ⅲ type functional response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to study the persistence of the general multispecies competition predator-pray system with Holling Ⅲ type functional response.In this system,the competition among predator species and among prey species are simultaneously considered.By using the comparison theory and qualitative analysis,the sufficient conditions for uniform strong persistence are obtained.

  6. Field measurements give biased estimates of functional response parameters, but help explain foraging distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijns, S.; Knot, I.E.; Piersma, T.; van Gils, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    1.Mechanistic insights and predictive understanding of the spatial distributions of foragers are typically derived by fitting either field measurements on intake rates and food abundance, or observations from controlled experiments, to functional response models. It has remained unclear, however, wh

  7. Foliar temperature-respiration response functions for broad-leaved tree species in the southern Appalachians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolstad; Mitchell; Vose

    1999-11-01

    We measured leaf respiration in 18 eastern deciduous forest tree species to determine if there were differences in temperature-respiration response functions among species or among canopy positions. Leaf respiration rates were measured in situ and on detached branches for Acer pensylvanicum L., A. rubrum L., Betula spp. (B. alleghaniensis Britt. and B. lenta L.), Carya glabra (Mill.) Sweet, Cornus florida L., Fraxinus spp. (primarily F. americana L.), Liriodendron tulipifera L., Magnolia fraseri Walt., Nyssa sylvatica Marsh., Oxydendrum arboreum L., Platanus occidentalis L., Quercus alba L., Q. coccinea Muenchh., Q. prinus L., Q. rubra L., Rhododendron maximum L., Robinia psuedoacacia L., and Tilia americana L. in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. Dark respiration was measured on fully expanded leaves at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees C with an infrared gas analyzer equipped with a temperature-controlled cuvette. Temperature-respiration response functions were fit for each leaf. There were significant differences in response functions among species and by canopy position within species. These differences were observed when respiration was expressed on a mass, nitrogen, or area basis. Cumulative nighttime leaf respiration was calculated and averaged over ten randomly selected nights for each leaf. Differences in mean cumulative nighttime respiration were statistically significant among canopy positions and species. We conclude that effects of canopy position and species on temperature-respiration response functions may need to be considered when making estimates of whole-tree or canopy respiration.

  8. Manual of functions, assignments, and responsibilities for nuclear safety: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-15

    The FAR Manual is a convenient easy-to-use collection of the functions, assignments, and responsibilities (FARs) of DOE nuclear safety personnel. Current DOE directives, including Orders, Secretary of Energy Notices, and other assorted policy memoranda, are the source of this information and form the basis of the FAR Manual. Today, the majority of FARs for DOE personnel are contained in DOE`s nuclear safety Orders. As these Orders are converted to rules in the Code of Federal Regulations, the FAR Manual will become the sole source for information relating to the functions, assignments, responsibilities of DOE nuclear safety personnel. The FAR Manual identifies DOE directives that relate to nuclear safety and the specific DOE personnel who are responsible for implementing them. The manual includes only FARs that have been extracted from active directives that have been approved in accordance with the procedures contained in DOE Order 1321.1B.

  9. Construction of DNA damage response gene pprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Guanjun; LU Huiming; HUANG Lifen; HUA Yuejin

    2005-01-01

    PprI, a DNA damage response factor from the extraordinary radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, plays a central regulatory role in multiple DNA damage repair. In this study, a fusion DNA fragment carrying kanamycin resistance gene with the D. Radiodurans groEL promoter was cloned by PCR amplification and reversely inserted into the pprI locus in the genome of the wild-type strain R1. The resulting pprI-deficient strain, designated YR1, was very sensitive to ionizing radiation. Meanwhile, the re- combinant DNA fragment was cloned into the shuttle vector pRADZ3, and resulted in plasmid pRADK with kanamycin resistance in D. Radiodurans. The fragments containing complete pprI gene and 3'-terminal deletion pprI△ were cloned into plasmid pRADK. The resulted plasmids designated pRADKpprI and pRADKpprI△ were then transformed to YR1. Results show that YR1 carrying pRADKpprI was able to fully restore the extreme radioresistance to the same level as the wild-type D. Raiodurans R1, whereas YR1 pRADKpprI△ failed to do so. Construction of DNA repair switch PprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in D. Radiodurans is not only useful to elucidating the relationship between domains and functions of PprI protein, but also opens the door to the further studies of the biological functions of PprI protein in vivo.

  10. Functional modeling of vitamin responsiveness in yeast: a common pyridoxine-responsive cystathionine beta-synthase mutation in homocystinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C E; Gallagher, P M; Guttormsen, A B; Refsum, H; Ueland, P M; Ose, L; Folling, I; Whitehead, A S; Tsai, M Y; Kruger, W D

    1997-12-01

    Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in extremely elevated levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) and high risk of thromboembolic events. About half of all patients diagnosed with CBS deficiency respond to pyridoxine treatment with a significant lowering of tHcy levels. We examined 12 CBS-deficient patients from 10 Norwegian families for mutations in the CBS gene and identified mutations in 18 of the 20 CBS alleles. Five of the seven patients classified as pyridoxine-responsive contain the newly identified point mutation, G797A (R266K). This point mutation is tightly linked with a previously identified 'benign' 68 bp duplication of the intron 7-exon 8 boundary within the CBS gene. We tested the effect of all of the mutations identified on human CBS function utilizing a yeast system. Five of the six mutations had a distinguishable phenotype in yeast, indicating that they were in fact pathogenic. Interestingly, the G797A allele had no phenotype when the yeast were grown in high concentrations of pyridoxine, but a severe phenotype when grown in low concentrations, thus mirroring the behavior in humans. These studies show that the G797A mutation is an important cause of pyridoxine-responsive CBS deficiency and demonstrate the utility of yeast functional assays in the analysis of human mutations.

  11. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness after Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Birgitte Kjær; Jensen, Jørgen S; Nielsen, Kim G

    2008-01-01

    follow-up examination including lung function testing (28 PCR-positive and 37 PCR-negative). In addition to the PCR-test for M. pneumoniae all respiratory tract specimens were additionally tested for other atypical bacteria and for viruses by PCR. Lung function was measured as specific airway resistance...... by whole-body plethysmography and bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed by cold, dry air hyperventilation. Neither baseline lung function nor bronchial response to cold dry air hyperventilation differed between M. pneumoniae-positive and -negative children: mean baseline lung function were 1.17 versus...... 1.21 (kPa sec), P = 0.45; and mean change in specific resistance was 13% versus 9%, P = 0.42. In conclusion, M. pneumoniae infection in early childhood was not associated with long-term effects on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness 2 years after infection....

  12. CO2-response function of radiation use efficiency in rice for climate change scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereu Augusto Streck

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate a generalized response function to the atmospheric CO2 concentration [f(CO2] by the radiation use efficiency (RUE in rice. Experimental data on RUE at different CO2 concentrations were collected from rice trials performed in several locations around the world. RUE data were then normalized, so that all RUE at current CO2 concentration were equal to 1. The response function was obtained by fitting normalized RUE versus CO2 concentration to a Morgan-Mercer-Flodin (MMF function, and by using Marquardt's method to estimate the model coefficients. Goodness of fit was measured by the standard deviation of the estimated coefficients, the coefficient of determination (R², and the root mean square error (RMSE. The f(CO2 describes a nonlinear sigmoidal response of RUE in rice, in function of the atmospheric CO2 concentration, which has an ecophysiological background, and, therefore, renders a robust function that can be easily coupled to rice simulation models, besides covering the range of CO2 emissions for the next generation of climate scenarios for the 21st century.

  13. Differentiating functions of the lateral and medial prefrontal cortex in motor response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H Rodrigo, Achala; Domenico, Stefano I Di; Ayaz, Hasan; Gulrajani, Sean; Lam, Jaeger; Ruocco, Anthony C

    2014-01-15

    The right inferior frontal gyrus is generally considered a critical region for motor response inhibition. Recent studies, however, suggest that the role of this cortical area in response inhibition may be overstated and that the contributions of other aspects of the prefrontal cortex are often overlooked. The current study used optical imaging to identify regions of the prefrontal cortex beyond the right inferior frontal gyrus which may serve to support motor response inhibition. Forty-three right-handed healthy adults completed a manual Go/No-Go task while evoked oxygenation of the prefrontal cortex was measured using 16-channel functional near-infrared spectroscopy. During motor response inhibition, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and to a lesser extent the homologous contralateral region, showed increased activation relative to a baseline task. Conversely, the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly deactivated, and the extent of reduced activity in this region was associated with fewer errors on the response inhibition task. These findings suggest a more substantial role of the left inferior frontal gyrus in response inhibition and possibly a distinct function of the middle frontal gyrus subserving error detection on manual motor control tasks.

  14. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  15. Emotional susceptibility trait modulates insula responses and functional connectivity in flavor processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd JH Ebisch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between Emotional Susceptibility (ES, an aspect of the personality trait Neuroticism, and individual differences in the neural responses in anterior insula to primary sensory stimuli colored by affective valence, i.e. distasting or pleasantly tasting oral stimuli. In addition, it was studied whether intrinsic functional connectivity patterns of brain regions characterized by such differential responses could be related to ES. To this purpose 25 female participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, while being involved in a flavor experiment. During the experiment, flavor stimuli were administered consisting of small amounts of liquid with a different affective valence: neutral, pleasant, unpleasant. The results showed that individual differences in ES trait predicted distinct neural activity patterns to the different stimulus conditions in a region of left anterior insula that a previous meta-analysis revealed to be linked with olfacto-gustatory processing. Specifically, low ES was associated with enhanced neural responses to both pleasant and unpleasant stimuli, compared to neutral stimuli. By contrast, high ES participants showed equally strong neural responses to all types of stimuli without differentiating between the neutral and affective stimuli. Finally, during a task-free state, high ES trait appeared also to be related to decreased intrinsic functional connectivity between left anterior insula and left cerebellum. Our findings show that individual differences in ES are associated with differential anterior insula responses to primary sensory (flavor stimuli as well as to intrinsic functional cortico-cerebellar connectivity, the latter suggesting a basis in the brain intrinsic functional architecture of the regulation of emotional experiences.

  16. Stability in a Simple Food Chain System with Michaelis-Menten Functional Response and Nonlocal Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Gan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the asymptotical behavior of solutions to the reaction-diffusion system under homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. By taking food ingestion and species' moving into account, the model is further coupled with Michaelis-Menten type functional response and nonlocal delay. Sufficient conditions are derived for the global stability of the positive steady state and the semitrivial steady state of the proposed problem by using the Lyapunov functional. Our results show that intraspecific competition benefits the coexistence of prey and predator. Furthermore, the introduction of Michaelis-Menten type functional response positively affects the coexistence of prey and predator, and the nonlocal delay is harmless for stabilities of all nonnegative steady states of the system. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the main results.

  17. Response Functions for the Two-Dimensional Ultracold Fermi Gas: Dynamical BCS Theory and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Ettore; Shi, Hao; Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-08-01

    Response functions are central objects in physics. They provide crucial information about the behavior of physical systems, and they can be directly compared with scattering experiments involving particles such as neutrons or photons. Calculations of such functions starting from the many-body Hamiltonian of a physical system are challenging and extremely valuable. In this paper, we focus on the two-dimensional (2D) ultracold Fermi atomic gas which has been realized experimentally. We present an application of the dynamical BCS theory to obtain response functions for different regimes of interaction strengths in the 2D gas with zero-range attractive interaction. We also discuss auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods for the calculation of imaginary time correlations in these dilute Fermi gas systems. Illustrative results are given and comparisons are made between AFQMC and dynamical BCS theory results to assess the accuracy of the latter.

  18. Optimizing health system response to patient's needs: an argument for the importance of functioning information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfe, Maren; Prodinger, Birgit; Bickenbach, Jerome E; Stucki, Gerold

    2017-06-06

    Current health systems are increasingly challenged to meet the needs of a growing number of patients living with chronic and often multiple health conditions. The primary outcome of care, it is argued, is not merely curing disease but also optimizing functioning over a person's life span. According to the World Health Organization, functioning can serve as foundation for a comprehensive picture of health and augment the biomedical perspective with a broader and more comprehensive picture of health as it plays out in people's lives. The crucial importance of information about patient's functioning for a well-performing health system, however, has yet to be sufficiently appreciated. This paper argues that functioning information is fundamental in all components of health systems and enhances the capacity of health systems to optimize patients' health and health-related needs. Beyond making sense of biomedical disease patterns, health systems can profit from using functioning information to improve interprofessional collaboration and achieve cross-cutting disease treatment outcomes. Implications for rehabilitation Functioning is a key health outcome for rehabilitation within health systems. Information on restoring, maintaining, and optimizing human functioning can strengthen health system response to patients' health and rehabilitative needs. Functioning information guides health systems to achieve cross-cutting health outcomes that respond to the needs of the growing number of individuals living with chronic and multiple health conditions. Accounting for individuals functioning helps to overcome fragmentation of care and to improve interprofessional collaboration across settings.

  19. Single Cell Functional Proteomics for Monitoring Immune Response in Cancer Therapy: Technology, Methods and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eMa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, significant progresses have taken place in the field of cancer immunotherapeutics, which are being developed for most human cancers. New immunotherapeutics, such as Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4, have been approved for clinical treatment; cell-based immunotherapies such as adoptive cell transfer (ACT have either passed the final stage of human studies (i.e., sipuleucel-T for the treatment of selected neoplastic malignancies or reached the stage of phase II/III clinical trials. Immunotherapetics has become a sophisticated field. Multimodal therapeutic regimens comprising several functional modules (up to 5 in the case of ACT have been developed to provide focused therapeutic responses with improved efficacy and reduced side-effects. However, a major challenge remains: the lack of effective and clinically-applicable immune assessment methods. Due to the complexity of antitumor immune responses within patients, it is difficult to provide comprehensive assessment of therapeutic efficacy and mechanism. To address this challenge, new technologies have been developed to directly profile the cellular immune functions and the functional heterogeneity. With the goal to measure the functional proteomics of single immune cells, these technologies are informative, sensitive, high-throughput and highly-multiplex. They have been used to uncover new knowledge of cellular immune functions and have be utilized for rapid, informative, and longitudinal monitoring of immune response in clinical anti-cancer treatment. In addition, new computational tools are required to integrate high dimensional data sets generated from the comprehensive, single-cell level measurements of patient’s immune responses to guide accurate and definitive diagnostic decision. These single-cell immune function assessment tools will likely contribute to new understanding of therapy mechanism, pre-treatment stratification of patients and ongoing therapeutic monitoring and

  20. A Response Function Approach for Rapid Far-Field Tsunami Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkova, Elena; Nicolsky, Dmitry; Wang, Dailin

    2017-08-01

    Predicting tsunami impacts at remote coasts largely relies on tsunami en-route measurements in an open ocean. In this work, these measurements are used to generate instant tsunami predictions in deep water and near the coast. The predictions are generated as a response or a combination of responses to one or more tsunameters, with each response obtained as a convolution of real-time tsunameter measurements and a pre-computed pulse response function (PRF). Practical implementation of this method requires tables of PRFs in a 3D parameter space: earthquake location-tsunameter-forecasted site. Examples of hindcasting the 2010 Chilean and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunamis along the US West Coast and beyond demonstrated high accuracy of the suggested technology in application to trans-Pacific seismically generated tsunamis.

  1. A predator-prey model with a holling type I functional response including a predator mutual interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, G.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. A Predator-Prey Model with a Holling Type I Functional Response Including a Predator Mutual Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gunog; Deangelis, Donald L.

    2011-12-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses.

  3. Conserving approximations for response functions of the Fermi gas in a random potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiš, Václav; Kolorenč, Jindřich

    2016-07-01

    One- and two-electron Green functions are simultaneously needed to determine the response functions of the electron gas in a random potential. Reliable approximations must retain consistency between the two types of Green functions expressed via Ward identities so that their output is compliant with macroscopic symmetries and conservation laws. Such a consistency is not directly guaranteed when summing nonlocal corrections to the local (dynamical) mean field. We analyze the reasons for this failure and show how the full Ward identity can generically be implemented in the diagrammatic approach to the vertex functions without breaking the analytic properties of the self-energy. We use the low-energy asymptotics of the conserving two-particle vertex determining the singular part of response and correlation functions to derive an exact representation of the diffusion constant in terms of Green functions of the perturbation theory. We then calculate explicitly the leading vertex corrections to the mean-field diffusion constant due to maximally-crossed diagrams.

  4. Community functional responses to soil and climate at multiple spatial scales: when does intraspecific variation matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Siefert

    Full Text Available Despite increasing evidence of the importance of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities, its role in community trait responses to environmental variation, particularly along broad-scale climatic gradients, is poorly understood. We analyzed functional trait variation among early-successional herbaceous plant communities (old fields across a 1200-km latitudinal extent in eastern North America, focusing on four traits: vegetative height, leaf area, specific leaf area (SLA, and leaf dry matter content (LDMC. We determined the contributions of species turnover and intraspecific variation to between-site functional dissimilarity at multiple spatial scales and community trait responses to edaphic and climatic factors. Among-site variation in community mean trait values and community trait responses to the environment were generated by a combination of species turnover and intraspecific variation, with species turnover making a greater contribution for all traits. The relative importance of intraspecific variation decreased with increasing geographic and environmental distance between sites for SLA and leaf area. Intraspecific variation was most important for responses of vegetative height and responses to edaphic compared to climatic factors. Individual species displayed strong trait responses to environmental factors in many cases, but these responses were highly variable among species and did not usually scale up to the community level. These findings provide new insights into the role of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities and the factors controlling its relative importance. The contribution of intraspecific variation to community trait responses was greatest at fine spatial scales and along edaphic gradients, while species turnover dominated at broad spatial scales and along climatic gradients.

  5. Community functional responses to soil and climate at multiple spatial scales: when does intraspecific variation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Andrew; Fridley, Jason D; Ritchie, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence of the importance of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities, its role in community trait responses to environmental variation, particularly along broad-scale climatic gradients, is poorly understood. We analyzed functional trait variation among early-successional herbaceous plant communities (old fields) across a 1200-km latitudinal extent in eastern North America, focusing on four traits: vegetative height, leaf area, specific leaf area (SLA), and leaf dry matter content (LDMC). We determined the contributions of species turnover and intraspecific variation to between-site functional dissimilarity at multiple spatial scales and community trait responses to edaphic and climatic factors. Among-site variation in community mean trait values and community trait responses to the environment were generated by a combination of species turnover and intraspecific variation, with species turnover making a greater contribution for all traits. The relative importance of intraspecific variation decreased with increasing geographic and environmental distance between sites for SLA and leaf area. Intraspecific variation was most important for responses of vegetative height and responses to edaphic compared to climatic factors. Individual species displayed strong trait responses to environmental factors in many cases, but these responses were highly variable among species and did not usually scale up to the community level. These findings provide new insights into the role of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities and the factors controlling its relative importance. The contribution of intraspecific variation to community trait responses was greatest at fine spatial scales and along edaphic gradients, while species turnover dominated at broad spatial scales and along climatic gradients.

  6. Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory with pairing fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Degao; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Recent development in particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) broadens the perspective on ground state correlation energies [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013), Y. Yang, H. van Aggelen, S. N. Steinmann, D. Peng, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174110 (2013); D. Peng, S. N. Steinmann, H. van Aggelen, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104112 (2013)] and N ± 2 excitation energies [Y. Yang, H. van Aggelen, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 224105 (2013)]. So far Hartree-Fock and approximated density-functional orbitals have been utilized to evaluate the pp-RPA equation. In this paper, to further explore the fundamentals and the potential use of pairing matrix dependent functionals, we present the linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory with pairing fields with both adiabatic and frequency-dependent kernels. This theory is related to the density-functional theory and time-dependent density-functional theory for superconductors, but is applied to normal non-superconducting systems for our purpose. Due to the lack of the proof of the one-to-one mapping between the pairing matrix and the pairing field for time-dependent systems, the linear-response theory is established based on the representability assumption of the pairing matrix. The linear response theory justifies the use of approximated density-functionals in the pp-RPA equation. This work sets the fundamentals for future density-functional development to enhance the description of ground state correlation energies and N ± 2 excitation energies.

  7. Intermittency in processing explains the diversity and shape of functional grazing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Kai W

    2012-08-01

    Central to theoretical studies of trophic interactions is the formulation of the consumer response to varying food availability. Response functions, however, are only rarely derived in mechanistic ways. As a consequence, the uncertainty in the functional representation of feeding remains large, as, e.g., evident from the ongoing debate on the usage of Ivlev, or Holling type I, II, and III functions in aquatic ecosystem models. Here, I refer to the work of Sjöberg in Ecol Model 10:215-225 (1980) who proposed to apply elements of the queuing theory developed in operational research to plankton-plankton interactions. Within this frame, food item processing is subdivided into two major stages which may operate with variable synchronicity. Asynchronous phasing of the two stages enhances the probability of long total processing times. This phenomenon is here termed feeding intermittency. Intermittency is assumed to determine the functional form of grazing kinetics, for which a novel grazing function containing a "shape" parameter is derived. Using this function, I evaluate the hypotheses that intermittency is influenced by (1) patchiness in the prey field (e.g., related to turbulence), and (2) the ratio of actual prey size to optimal prey size. Evidence for the first hypothesis arises from explaining reported variations in clearance rates of Acartia tonsa under different turbulence regimes. Further model applications to ingestion data for rotifers, copepods, and ciliates support the view that an increasing food size enhances intermittency and, this way, affects functional grazing responses. In the application to ciliate grazing, a possible prey density effect appears, possibly due to an intermittent activation of a feeding sub-stage. Queueing theory offers mechanistic explanations for transitions between Holling I-, II-, and Ivlev-type grazing. In doing so for variable prey size ratios, it may also refine size-based ecosystem models which are increasingly emerging in

  8. Diffusion of responsibility attenuates altruistic punishment: A functional magnetic resonance imaging effective connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunliang; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Liu, Chao; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Krueger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Humans altruistically punish violators of social norms to enforce cooperation and pro-social behaviors. However, such altruistic behaviors diminish when others are present, due to a diffusion of responsibility. We investigated the neural signatures underlying the modulations of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment, conjoining a third-party punishment task with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate Granger causality mapping. In our study, participants acted as impartial third-party decision-makers and decided how to punish norm violations under two different social contexts: alone (i.e., full responsibility) or in the presence of putative other third-party decision makers (i.e., diffused responsibility). Our behavioral results demonstrated that the diffusion of responsibility served as a mediator of context-dependent punishment. In the presence of putative others, participants who felt less responsible also punished less severely in response to norm violations. Our neural results revealed that underlying this behavioral effect was a network of interconnected brain regions. For unfair relative to fair splits, the presence of others led to attenuated responses in brain regions implicated in signaling norm violations (e.g., AI) and to increased responses in brain regions implicated in calculating values of norm violations (e.g., vmPFC, precuneus) and mentalizing about others (dmPFC). The dmPFC acted as the driver of the punishment network, modulating target regions, such as AI, vmPFC, and precuneus, to adjust altruistic punishment behavior. Our results uncovered the neural basis of the influence of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment and highlighted the role of the mentalizing network in this important phenomenon. Hum Brain Mapp 37:663-677, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations....... The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations...... in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made...

  10. Bidirectional Associations Between Parental Responsiveness and Executive Function During Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Emily C; Landry, Susan H; Montroy, Janelle J; Williams, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we examined bidirectional associations between parental responsiveness and executive function (EF) processes in socioeconomically disadvantaged preschoolers. Participants were 534 3- to 5-year-old children (71% Hispanic/Latino; 28% African American; 1% European American) attending Head Start programs. At Time 1 (T1) and 6.5 months later at Time 2 (T2), parents and children participated in a videotaped free play session and children completed delay inhibition (gift delay-wrap, gift delay-bow) and conflict EF (bear/dragon, dimensional change card sort) tasks. Parental warm acceptance, contingent responsiveness, and verbal scaffolding were coded from the free play videos and aggregated to create a parental responsiveness latent variable. A cross-lagged panel structural equation model indicated that higher T1 parental responsiveness significantly predicted more positive gain in delay inhibition and conflict EF from T1 to T2. Higher T1 delay inhibition, but not T1 conflict EF, significantly predicted more positive change in parental responsiveness from T1 to T2. These associations were not explained by several possible confounding variables, including children's age, gender, race/ethnicity, and verbal ability. Findings suggest that parental responsiveness may support EF development in disadvantaged children, with reciprocal effects of delay inhibition on parental responsiveness.

  11. Calculation of Coupled Vibroacoustics Response Estimates from a Library of Available Uncoupled Transfer Function Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Hunt, Ron; Fulcher, Clay; Towner, Robert; McDonald, Emmett

    2012-01-01

    The design and theoretical basis of a new database tool that quickly generates vibroacoustic response estimates using a library of transfer functions (TFs) is discussed. During the early stages of a launch vehicle development program, these response estimates can be used to provide vibration environment specification to hardware vendors. The tool accesses TFs from a database, combines the TFs, and multiplies these by input excitations to estimate vibration responses. The database is populated with two sets of uncoupled TFs; the first set representing vibration response of a bare panel, designated as H(sup s), and the second set representing the response of the free-free component equipment by itself, designated as H(sup c). For a particular configuration undergoing analysis, the appropriate H(sup s) and H(sup c) are selected and coupled to generate an integrated TF, designated as H(sup s +c). This integrated TF is then used with the appropriate input excitations to estimate vibration responses. This simple yet powerful tool enables a user to estimate vibration responses without directly using finite element models, so long as suitable H(sup s) and H(sup c) sets are defined in the database libraries. The paper discusses the preparation of the database tool and provides the assumptions and methodologies necessary to combine H(sup s) and H(sup c) sets into an integrated H(sup s + c). An experimental validation of the approach is also presented.

  12. SNPs in stress-responsive rice genes: validation, genotyping, functional relevance and population structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parida Swarup K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP validation and large-scale genotyping are required to maximize the use of DNA sequence variation and determine the functional relevance of candidate genes for complex stress tolerance traits through genetic association in rice. We used the bead array platform-based Illumina GoldenGate assay to validate and genotype SNPs in a select set of stress-responsive genes to understand their functional relevance and study the population structure in rice. Results Of the 384 putative SNPs assayed, we successfully validated and genotyped 362 (94.3%. Of these 325 (84.6% showed polymorphism among the 91 rice genotypes examined. Physical distribution, degree of allele sharing, admixtures and introgression, and amino acid replacement of SNPs in 263 abiotic and 62 biotic stress-responsive genes provided clues for identification and targeted mapping of trait-associated genomic regions. We assessed the functional and adaptive significance of validated SNPs in a set of contrasting drought tolerant upland and sensitive lowland rice genotypes by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence alterations in catalytic domains and three-dimensional secondary protein structure encoded by stress-responsive genes. We found a strong genetic association among SNPs in the nine stress-responsive genes with upland and lowland ecological adaptation. Higher nucleotide diversity was observed in indica accessions compared with other rice sub-populations based on different population genetic parameters. The inferred ancestry of 16% among rice genotypes was derived from admixed populations with the maximum between upland aus and wild Oryza species. Conclusions SNPs validated in biotic and abiotic stress-responsive rice genes can be used in association analyses to identify candidate genes and develop functional markers for stress tolerance in rice.

  13. Responsiveness and validity of three dexterous function measures in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-wei Hsieh, MS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared the responsiveness and validity of the Box and Block Test (BBT, the Nine-Hole Peg Test (NHPT, and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT. We randomized 59 patients with stroke into one of three rehabilitation treatments for 3 weeks. We administered six outcome measures (BBT, NHPT, ARAT, Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA], Motor Activity Log [MAL], and Stroke Impact Scale [SIS] hand function domain pretreatment and posttreatment. We used the standardized response mean (SRM to examine responsiveness and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rho to examine concurrent validity. The BBT, NHPT, and ARAT were moderately responsive to change and not significantly different (SRM = 0.64-0.79. The correlations within the BBT, NHPT, and ARAT were moderate to good at pretreatment (rho = -0.55 to -0.80 and posttreatment (rho = -0.57 to -0.71. The BBT and ARAT showed fair to moderate correlations with the FMA, MAL, and SIS hand function domain at pretreatment and posttreatment (rho = 0.31-0.59, whereas the NHPT demonstrated low to fair correlations with the FMA and MAL (rho = -0.16 to -0.33 and moderate correlations with the SIS hand function domain (rho = -0.58 to -0.66. Our results indicate that the BBT, NHPT, and ARAT are suitable to detect changes over time. While simultaneously considering the responsiveness and validity attributes, the BBT and ARAT can be considered more appropriate for evaluating dexterous function than the NHPT. Further studies with larger samples are needed to validate these findings.

  14. Precise response functions in all-electron methods: Application to the optimized-effective-potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The optimized-effective-potential method is a special technique to construct local Kohn-Sham potentials from general orbital-dependent energy functionals. In a recent publication [M. Betzinger, C. Friedrich, S. Blügel, A. Görling, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.83.045105 83, 045105 (2011)] we showed that uneconomically large basis sets were required to obtain a smooth local potential without spurious oscillations within the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. This could be attributed to the slow convergence behavior of the density response function. In this paper, we derive an incomplete-basis-set correction for the response, which consists of two terms: (1) a correction that is formally similar to the Pulay correction in atomic-force calculations and (2) a numerically more important basis response term originating from the potential dependence of the basis functions. The basis response term is constructed from the solutions of radial Sternheimer equations in the muffin-tin spheres. With these corrections the local potential converges at much smaller basis sets, at much fewer states, and its construction becomes numerically very stable. We analyze the improvements for rock-salt ScN and report results for BN, AlN, and GaN, as well as the perovskites CaTiO3, SrTiO3, and BaTiO3. The incomplete-basis-set correction can be applied to other electronic-structure methods with potential-dependent basis sets and opens the perspective to investigate a broad spectrum of problems in theoretical solid-state physics that involve response functions.

  15. Real-time Kadanoff-Baym approach to nuclear response functions

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, H S

    2016-01-01

    Linear density response functions are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter of normal density by time-evolving two-time Green's functions in real time. Of particular interest is the effect of correlations. The system is therefore initially time-evolved with a collision term calculated in a direct Born approximation as well as with full (RPA) ring-summation until fully correlated. An external time-dependent potential is then applied. The ensuing density fluctuations are recorded to calculate the density response. This method was previously used by Kwong and Bonitz for studying plasma oscillations in a correlated electron gas. The energy-weighted sum-rule for the response function is guaranteed by using conserving self-energy insertions as the method then generates the full vertex-functions. These can alternatively be calculated by solving a Bethe -Salpeter equation as done in some previous works. The (first order) mean field is derived from a momentum-dependent (non-local) interaction while $2^{nd}$ order se...

  16. Fibroblast growth factor 8 deficiency compromises the functional response of the serotonergic system to stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Brooks

    Full Text Available Functionally heterogeneous populations of serotonergic neurons, located within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR, play a role in stress-related behaviors and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as anxiety and depression. Abnormal development of these neurons may permanently alter their structure and connections, making the organism more susceptible to anxiety-related disorders. A factor that critically regulates the development of serotonergic neurons is fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8. In this study, we used acute restraint stress followed by behavioral testing to examine whether Fgf8 signaling during development is important for establishing functional stress- and anxiety-related DR neurocircuits in adulthood. Wild-type and heterozygous male mice globally hypomorphic for Fgf8 were exposed to acute restraint stress and then tested for anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze. Further, we measured c-Fos immunostaining as a marker of serotonergic neuronal activation and tissue 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations as a marker of serotonin functional output. Results showed that Fgf8 hypomorphs exhibited 1 an exaggerated response of DR anxiety-promoting circuits and 2 a blunted response of a DR panic-inhibiting circuit to stress, effects that together were associated with increased baseline anxiety-like behavior. Overall, our results provide a neural substrate upon which Fgf8 deficiency could affect stress response and support the hypothesis that developmental disruptions of serotonergic neurons affect their postnatal functional integrity.

  17. Optimization of correlated multi-response quality engineering by the upside-down normal loss function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, Melis; Köksoy, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Most of the published literature on robust design is basically concerned with a single response. However, the reality is that common industrial problems usually involve several quality characteristics, which are often correlated. Traditional approaches to multidimensional quality do not offer much information on how much better or worse a process is when finding optimal settings. Köksoy and Fan [Engineering Optimization 44 (8): 935-945] pointed out that the upside-down normal loss function provides a more reasonable risk assessment to the losses of being off-target in product engineering research. However, they only consider the single-response case. This article generalizes their idea to more than one response under possible correlations and co-movement effects of responses on the process loss. The response surface methodology has been adapted, estimating the expected multivariate upside-down normal loss function of a multidimensional system to find the optimal control factor settings of a given problem. The procedure and its merits are illustrated through an example.

  18. Emotional intelligence correlates with functional responses to dynamic changes in facial trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Schwab, Zachary J; Tkachenko, Olga; Webb, Christian A; DelDonno, Sophie R; Kipman, Maia; Rauch, Scott L; Weber, Mareen

    2013-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to a constellation of traits, competencies, or abilities that allow individuals to understand emotional information and successfully navigate and solve social/emotional problems. While little is known about the neurobiological substrates that underlie EI, some evidence suggests that these capacities may involve a core neurocircuitry involved in emotional decision-making that includes the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insula, and amygdala. In a sample of 39 healthy volunteers (22 men; 17 women), scores on the Bar-On EQ-i (a trait/mixed model of EI) and Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT; an ability model of EI) were correlated with functional magnetic resonance imaging responses during brief presentations of moving facial expressions that changed in the level of perceived trustworthiness. Core emotion neurocircuitry was responsive to dynamic changes in facial features, regardless of whether they reflected increases or decreases in apparent trustworthiness. In response to facial movements indicating decreasing trustworthiness, MSCEIT correlated positively with functional responses of the vmPFC and rostral ACC, whereas the EQ-i was unrelated to regional activation. Systematic differences in EI ability appear to be significantly related to the responsiveness of the vmPFC and rostral ACC to facial movements suggesting potential trustworthiness.

  19. Single passive leg movement-induced hyperemia: a simple vascular function assessment without a chronotropic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Massimo; Layec, Gwenael; Trinity, Joel; Hart, Corey R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-01-01

    Passive leg movement (PLM)-induced hyperemia is a novel approach to assess vascular function, with a potential clinical role. However, in some instances, the varying chronotropic response induced by PLM has been proposed to be a potentially confounding factor. Therefore, we simplified and modified the PLM model to require just a single PLM (sPLM), an approach that may evoke a peripheral hemodynamic response, allowing a vascular function assessment, but at the same time minimizing central responses. To both characterize and assess the utility of sPLM, in 12 healthy subjects, we measured heart rate (HR), stroke volume, cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP), leg blood flow (LBF), and calculated leg vascular conductance (LVC) during both standard PLM, consisting of passive knee flexion and extension performed at 1 Hz for 60 s, and sPLM, consisting of only a single passive knee flexion and extension over 1 s. During PLM, MAP transiently decreased (5 ± 1 mmHg), whereas both HR and CO increased from baseline (6.0 ± 1.1 beats/min, and 0.8 ± 0.01 l/min, respectively). Following sPLM, MAP fell similarly (5 ± 2 mmHg; P = 0.8), but neither HR nor CO responses were identifiable. The peak LBF and LVC response was similar for PLM (993 ± 189 ml/min; 11.9 ± 1.5 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively) and sPLM (878 ± 119 ml/min; 10.9 ± 1.6 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively). Thus sPLM represents a variant of the PLM approach to assess vascular function that is more easily performed and evokes a peripheral stimulus that induces a significant hyperemia, but does not generate a potentially confounding, chronotropic response, which may make sPLM more useful clinically.

  20. A Sigmoid Functional Response Emerges When Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Start Killing Fresh Target Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2017-03-28

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing involves the formation of a synapse with a target cell, followed by delivery of perforin and granzymes. Previously, we derived a general functional response for CTL killing while considering that CTLs form stable synapses (i.e., single-stage) and that the number of conjugates remains at steady state. However, the killing of target cells sometimes requires multiple engagements (i.e., multistage). To study how multistage killing and a lack of steady state influence the functional response, we here analyze a set of differential equations as well as simulations employing the cellular Potts model, in both cases describing CTLs that kill target cells. We find that at steady state the total killing rate (i.e., the number of target cells killed by all CTLs) is well described by the previously derived double saturation function. Compared to single-stage killing, the total killing rate during multistage killing saturates at higher CTL and target cell densities. Importantly, when the killing is measured before the steady state is approached, a qualitatively different functional response emerges for two reasons: First, the killing signal of each CTL gets diluted over several targets and because this dilution effect is strongest at high target cell densities; this can result in a peak in the dependence of the total killing rate on the target cell density. Second, the total killing rate exhibits a sigmoid dependence on the CTL density when killing is a multistage process, because it takes typically more than one CTL to kill a target. In conclusion, a sigmoid dependence of the killing rate on the CTLs during initial phases of killing may be indicative of a multistage killing process. Observation of a sigmoid functional response may thus arise from a dilution effect and is not necessarily due to cooperative behavior of the CTLs. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct measurement and calibration of the Kepler CCD Pixel Response Function for improved photometry and astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkov, Zoran

    Stellar images taken with telescopes and detectors in space are usually undersampled, and to correct for this, an accurate pixel response function is required. The standard approach for HST and KEPLER has been to measure the telescope PSF combined ("convolved") with the actual pixel response function, super-sampled by taking into account dithered or offset observed images of many stars (Lauer [1999]). This combined response function has been called the "PRF" (Bryson et al. [2011]). However, using such results has not allowed astrometry from KEPLER to reach its full potential (Monet et al. [2010], [2014]). Given the precision of KEPLER photometry, it should be feasible to use a pre-determined detector pixel response function (PRF) and an optical point spread function (PSF) as separable quantities to more accurately correct photometry and astrometry for undersampling. Wavelength (i.e. stellar color) and instrumental temperature should be affecting each of these differently. Discussion of the PRF in the "KEPLER Instrument Handbook" is limited to an ad-hoc extension of earlier measurements on a quite different CCD. It is known that the KEPLER PSF typically has a sharp spike in the middle, and the main bulk of the PSF is still small enough to be undersampled, so that any substructure in the pixel may interact significantly with the optical PSF. Both the PSF and PRF are probably asymmetric. We propose to measure the PRF for an example of the CCD sensors used on KEPLER at sufficient sampling resolution to allow significant improvement of KEPLER photometry and astrometry, in particular allowing PSF fitting techniques to be used on the data archive.

  2. Real-time Kadanoff-Baym approach to nuclear response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, H. S.; Kwong, N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Linear density response functions are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter of normal density by time-evolving two-time Green's functions in real time. Of particular interest is the effect of correlations. The system is therefore initially time-evolved with a collision term calculated in a direct Born approximation until fully correlated. An external time-dependent potential is then applied. The ensuing density fluctuations are recorded to calculate the density response. This method was previously used by Kwong and Bonitz for studying plasma oscillations in a correlated electron gas. The energy-weighted sum-rule for the response function is guaranteed by using conserving self-energy insertions as the method then generates the full vertex-functions. These can alternatively be calculated by solving a Bethe -Salpeter equation as done in works by Bozek et al. The (first order) mean field is derived from a momentum-dependent (non-local) interaction while 2nd order self-energies are calculated using a particle-hole two-body effective (or residual) interaction given by a gaussian local potential. We show results of calculations of the response function S(ɷ,q0 ) for q0 = 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8fm -1. Comparison is made with the nucleons being un-correlated i.e. with only the first order mean field included. We discuss the relation of our work with the Landau quasi-particle theory as applied to nuclear systems by Babu and Brown and followers.

  3. Genomic, genetic and functional dissection of bitter taste responses to artificial sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudnitzky, Natacha; Bufe, Bernd; Thalmann, Sophie; Kuhn, Christina; Gunn, Howard C; Xing, Chao; Crider, Bill P; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Wooding, Stephen P

    2011-09-01

    Bitter taste perception is initiated by TAS2R receptors, which respond to agonists by triggering depolarization of taste bud cells. Mutations in TAS2Rs are known to affect taste phenotypes by altering receptor function. Evidence that TAS2Rs overlap in ligand specificity suggests that they may also contribute joint effects. To explore this aspect of gustation, we examined bitter perception of saccharin and acesulfame K, widely used artificial sweeteners with aversive aftertastes. Both substances are agonists of TAS2R31 and -43, which belong to a five-member subfamily (TAS2R30-46) responsive to a diverse constellation of compounds. We analyzed sequence variation and linkage structure in the ∼140 kb genomic region encoding TAS2R30-46, taste responses to the two sweeteners in subjects, and functional characteristics of receptor alleles. Whole-gene sequences from TAS2R30-46 in 60 Caucasian subjects revealed extensive diversity including 34 missense mutations, two nonsense mutations and high-frequency copy-number variants. Thirty markers, including non-synonymous variants in all five genes, were associated (P 0.95). Haplotype analyses revealed that most associations were spurious, arising from LD with variants in TAS2R31. In vitro assays confirmed the functional importance of four TAS2R31 mutations, which had independent effects on receptor response. The existence of high LD spanning functionally distinct TAS2R loci predicts that bitter taste responses to many compounds will be strongly correlated even when they are mediated by different genes. Integrative approaches combining phenotypic, genetic and functional analysis will be essential in dissecting these complex relationships.

  4. Functions of FUS/TLS From DNA Repair to Stress Response: Implications for ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ranjith Kumar Sama

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS or FUS is a multifunctional DNA-/RNA-binding protein that is involved in a variety of cellular functions including transcription, protein translation, RNA splicing, and transport. FUS was initially identified as a fusion oncoprotein, and thus, the early literature focused on the role of FUS in cancer. With the recent discoveries revealing the role of FUS in neurodegenerative diseases, namely amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, there has been a renewed interest in elucidating the normal functions of FUS. It is not clear which, if any, endogenous functions of FUS are involved in disease pathogenesis. Here, we review what is currently known regarding the normal functions of FUS with an emphasis on DNA damage repair, RNA processing, and cellular stress response. Further, we discuss how ALS-causing mutations can potentially alter the role of FUS in these pathways, thereby contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  5. Characteristic Functions Describing the Power Absorption Response of Periodic Structures to Partially Coherent Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Craeye, Christophe; Thomas, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Many new types of sensing or imaging surfaces are based on periodic thin films. It is explained how the response of those surfaces to partially coherent fields can be fully characterized by a set of functions in the wavenumber spectrum domain. The theory is developed here for the case of 2D absorbers with TE illumination and arbitrary material properties in the plane of the problem, except for the resistivity which is assumed isotropic. Sum and difference coordinates in both spatial and spectral domains are conveniently used to represent the characteristic functions, which are specialized here to the case of periodic structures. Those functions can be either computed or obtained experimentally. Simulations rely on solvers based on periodic-boundary conditions, while experiments correspond to Energy Absorption Interferometry (EAI), already described in the literature. We derive rules for the convergence of the representation versus the number of characteristic functions used, as well as for the sampling to be ...

  6. IS SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CONSIDERS A FUNCTION OF LATIN AMERICAN CENTRAL BANKS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Elena Carrera Pedroza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose was to research whether social responsibility is considered a function of Latin American Central Banks. It focused on a qualitative and quantitative model, with epistemological base centered on phenomenology, a type of methodological approach that uses a feasible project and design field. From a statistical probabilistic procedure, a sample of nine Latin American Central banks was selected. For data collection, a questionnaire was applied, which revealed that 78% have education programs designed to train and disseminate economic knowledge, 56% takes social responsibility activities, while 44% makes grants to third parties.

  7. The social welfare function and individual responsibility: some theoretical issues and empirical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Paul; Tsuchiya, Aki

    2009-01-01

    The literature on income distribution has attempted to evaluate different degrees of inequality using a social welfare function (SWF) approach. However, it has largely ignored the source of such inequalities, and has thus failed to consider different degrees of inequity. The literature on egalitarianism has addressed issues of equity, largely in relation to individual responsibility. This paper builds upon these two literatures, and introduces individual responsibility into the SWF. Results from a small-scale study of people's preferences in relation to the distribution of health benefits are presented to illustrate how the parameter values of a SWF might be determined.

  8. Deuteron spin-flip resonance widths and the spin response function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Mane

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The spin response function is used to analyze the spin-flip resonance widths of stored polarized deuteron beams. It is found, using simple model assumptions, that the contribution of the vertical betatron oscillations (for an rf radial dipole field spin-flipper reduces the resonance width by an amount in good agreement with recent measurements. It is also noted that, for spin-flip measurements with an rf-solenoid spin flipper, the spin response formalism also yields an answer consistent with experimental data.

  9. Rapid estimation of frequency response functions by close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of a rapid method which estimates the frequency response function from stereoscopic dynamic data is computed. It is shown that reversal of the order of the operations of coordinate transformation and Fourier transformation, which provides a significant increase in computational speed, introduces error. A portion of the error, proportional to the perturbation components normal to the camera focal planes, cannot be eliminated. The remaining error may be eliminated by proper scaling of frequency data prior to coordinate transformation. Methods are developed for least squares estimation of the full 3x3 frequency response matrix for a three dimensional structure.

  10. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations...... with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene...

  11. Temperature response functions introduce high uncertainty in modelled carbon stocks in cold temperature regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Portner

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems contain formulations for the dependence of respiration on temperature, but the sensitivity of predicted carbon pools and fluxes to these formulations and their parameterization is not understood. Thus, we made an uncertainty analysis of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to its temperature dependency using the ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS.

    We used five temperature response functions (Exponential, Arrhenius, Lloyd-Taylor, Gaussian, Van't Hoff. We determined the parameter uncertainty ranges of the functions by nonlinear regression analysis based on eight experimental datasets from northern hemisphere ecosystems. We sampled over the uncertainty bounds of the parameters and run simulations for each pair of temperature response function and calibration site. The uncertainty in both long-term and short-term soil carbon dynamics was analyzed over an elevation gradient in southern Switzerland.

    The function of Lloyd-Taylor turned out to be adequate for modelling the temperature dependency of soil organic matter decomposition, whereas the other functions either resulted in poor fits (Exponential, Arrhenius or were not applicable for all datasets (Gaussian, Van't Hoff. There were two main sources of uncertainty for model simulations: (1 the uncertainty in the parameter estimates of the response functions, which increased with increasing temperature and (2 the uncertainty in the simulated size of carbon pools, which increased with elevation, as slower turn-over times lead to higher carbon stocks and higher associated uncertainties. The higher uncertainty in carbon pools with slow turn-over rates has important implications for the uncertainty in the projection of the change of soil carbon stocks driven by climate change, which turned out to be more uncertain for higher elevations and hence higher latitudes, which are of key importance for the global terrestrial carbon

  12. An estimation of the yield and response functions for the mini neutron monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Lopez, R. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present study estimates the yield and response functions of the mini neutron monitor (miniNM). This relatively new cosmic ray detector is the mobile version of the standard NM64. It can be use not only to calibrate the NM64 but also to study the modulation processes. Due to its portability, the miniNM can be easily placed in a suitable location to measure secondary particles, which give information about the intensity variations of galactic and solar cosmic rays. In order to perform these modulation studies with miniNMs, it is crucial to know their sensitivity to detect secondary cosmic ray flux, i.e., we must know their yield function. A previous study found that miniNM and NM64 have slightly different response functions. This work analyzes the observed counting rate ratio (miniNM to NM64) and gives for the first time an useful expression for the yield function of the miniNM. The results found here will allow to interpret the new measurements with this mobile neutron monitor. For comparison, a brief summary of the NM64 yield functions reported by other authors is presented.

  13. The interplay between genotype, metabolic state and cofactor treatment governs phenylalanine hydroxylase function and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigl, Michael; Gersting, Søren W; Danecka, Marta K; Messing, Dunja D; Woidy, Mathias; Pinkas, Daniel; Kemter, Kristina F; Blau, Nenad; Muntau, Ania C

    2011-07-01

    The discovery of a pharmacological treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU) raised new questions about function and dysfunction of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), the enzyme deficient in this disease. To investigate the interdependence of the genotype, the metabolic state (phenylalanine substrate) and treatment (BH(4) cofactor) in the context of enzyme function in vitro and in vivo, we (i) used a fluorescence-based method for fast enzyme kinetic analyses at an expanded range of phenylalanine and BH(4) concentrations, (ii) depicted PAH function as activity landscapes, (iii) retraced the analyses in eukaryotic cells, and (iv) translated this into the human system by analyzing the outcome of oral BH(4) loading tests. PAH activity landscapes uncovered the optimal working range of recombinant wild-type PAH and provided new insights into PAH kinetics. They demonstrated how mutations might alter enzyme function in the space of varying substrate and cofactor concentrations. Experiments in eukaryotic cells revealed that the availability of the active PAH enzyme depends on the phenylalanine-to-BH(4) ratio. Finally, evaluation of data from BH(4) loading tests indicated that the patient's genotype influences the impact of the metabolic state on drug response. The results allowed for visualization and a better understanding of PAH function in the physiological and pathological state as well as in the therapeutic context of cofactor treatment. Moreover, our data underscore the need for more personalized procedures to safely identify and treat patients with BH(4)-responsive PAH deficiency.

  14. Uncertainty analysis of signal deconvolution using a measured instrument response function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartouni, E. P.; Beeman, B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Moore, A. S.; Munro, D. H.; Phillips, T.; Sayre, D. B.

    2016-11-01

    A common analysis procedure minimizes the ln-likelihood that a set of experimental observables matches a parameterized model of the observation. The model includes a description of the underlying physical process as well as the instrument response function (IRF). In the case investigated here, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers, the IRF is constructed from measurements and models. IRF measurements have a finite precision that can make significant contributions to determine the uncertainty estimate of the physical model's parameters. We apply a Bayesian analysis to properly account for IRF uncertainties in calculating the ln-likelihood function used to find the optimum physical parameters.

  15. An Impulsive Three-Species Model with Square Root Functional Response and Mutual Interference of Predator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An impulsive two-prey and one-predator model with square root functional responses, mutual interference, and integrated pest management is constructed. By using techniques of impulsive perturbations, comparison theorem, and Floquet theory, the existence and global asymptotic stability of prey-eradication periodic solution are investigated. We use some methods and sufficient conditions to prove the permanence of the system which involve multiple Lyapunov functions and differential comparison theorem. Numerical simulations are given to portray the complex behaviors of this system. Finally, we analyze the biological meanings of these results and give some suggestions for feasible control strategies.

  16. Qualitative analysis on a diffusive prey-predator model with ratio-dependent functional response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a prey-predator model with diffusion and ratio-dependent functional response subject to the homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. Our main focuses are on the global behavior of the reaction-diffusion system and its corresponding steady-state problem. We first apply various Lyapunov functions to discuss the global stability of the unique positive constant steady-state. Then, for the steady-state system, we establish some a priori upper and lower estimates for positive steady-states, and derive several results for non-existence of positive non-constant steady-states if the diffusion rates are large or small.

  17. Trajectories of Microbial Community Function in Response to Accelerated Remediation of Subsurface Metal Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Mary [Regents of the Univ. of Callifornia, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Objectives of proposed research were to; Determine if the trajectories of microbial community composition and function following organic carbon amendment can be related to, and predicted by, key environmental determinants; Assess the relative importance of the characteristics of the indigenous microbial community, sediment, groundwater, and concentration of organic carbon amendment as the major determinants of microbial community functional response and bioremediation capacity; and Provide a fundamental understanding of the microbial community ecology underlying subsurface metal remediation requisite to successful application of accelerated remediation and long-term stewardship of DOE-IFC sites.

  18. White matter reorganization and functional response after focal cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystelle Po

    Full Text Available After stroke, the brain has shown to be able to achieve spontaneous functional recovery despite severe cerebral damage. This phenomenon is poorly understood. To address this issue, focal transient ischemia was induced by 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion in Wistar rats. The evolution of stroke was followed using two magnetic resonance imaging modalities: diffusion spectrum imaging (acquired before, one and four weeks after stroke and functional magnetic resonance imaging (acquired before and five weeks after stroke. To confirm the imaging observations, immunohistochemical staining for myelin, astrocytes and macrophages/microglia was added. At four weeks after stroke, a focal alteration of the diffusion anisotropy was observed between the ipsilesional ventricle and the lesion area. Using tractography this perturbation was identified as reorganization of the ipsilesional internal capsule. Functional imaging at five weeks after ischemia demonstrated activation of the primary sensorimotor cortex in both hemispheres in all rats except one animal lacking a functional response in the ipsilesional cortex. Furthermore, fiber tracking showed a transhemispheric fiber connection through the corpus callosum, which-in the rat without functional recovery-was lost. Our study shows the influence of the internal capsule reorganization, combined with inter-hemispheric connections though the corpus callosum, on the functional activation of the brain from stroke. In conclusion, tractography opens a new door to non-invasively investigate the structural correlates of lack of functional recovery after stroke.

  19. Global biodiversity, stoichiometry and ecosystem function responses to human-induced C-N-P imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Jofre; Sardans, Jordi; Stefanescu, Constantí; Ubach, Andreu; Bartrons, Mireia; Asensio, Dolores; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Global change analyses usually consider biodiversity as a global asset that needs to be preserved. Biodiversity is frequently analysed mainly as a response variable affected by diverse environmental drivers. However, recent studies highlight that gradients of biodiversity are associated with gradual changes in the distribution of key dominant functional groups characterized by distinctive traits and stoichiometry, which in turn often define the rates of ecosystem processes and nutrient cycling. Moreover, pervasive links have been reported between biodiversity, food web structure, ecosystem function and species stoichiometry. Here we review current global stoichiometric gradients and how future distributional shifts in key functional groups may in turn influence basic ecosystem functions (production, nutrient cycling, decomposition) and therefore could exert a feedback effect on stoichiometric gradients. The C-N-P stoichiometry of most primary producers (phytoplankton, algae, plants) has been linked to functional trait continua (i.e. to major axes of phenotypic variation observed in inter-specific analyses of multiple traits). In contrast, the C-N-P stoichiometry of higher-level consumers remains less precisely quantified in many taxonomic groups. We show that significant links are observed between trait continua across trophic levels. In spite of recent advances, the future reciprocal feedbacks between key functional groups, biodiversity and ecosystem functions remain largely uncertain. The reported evidence, however, highlights the key role of stoichiometric traits and suggests the need of a progressive shift towards an ecosystemic and stoichiometric perspective in global biodiversity analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Percolation line, response functions, and Voronoi polyhedra analysis in supercritical water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Škvor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a physical relevance (meaning of percolation in supercritical fluids is addressed considering a primitive model of water. Two different criteria, physical and configurational, are used for the cluster definition in Monte Carlo simulations over a range of pressures to determine the percolation line and skewness, and a theoretical analytic equation of state is used to evaluate response functions. It is found that both criteria yield practically the same percolation line. However, unlike the findings for simple fluids, the loci of the response function extrema exhibit density/pressure dependence quite different from that of the percolation line. The only potential coincidence between the loci of the extrema of a thermodynamic property and a detectable structural change is found for the coefficient of isothermal compressibility and Voronoi neighbors distribution skewness maximum.

  1. Stem cell function and stress response are controlled by protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Sandra; Bandiera, Roberto; Popis, Martyna; Hussain, Shobbir; Lombard, Patrick; Aleksic, Jelena; Sajini, Abdulrahim; Tanna, Hinal; Cortés-Garrido, Rosana; Gkatza, Nikoletta; Dietmann, Sabine; Frye, Michaela

    2016-06-15

    Whether protein synthesis and cellular stress response pathways interact to control stem cell function is currently unknown. Here we show that mouse skin stem cells synthesize less protein than their immediate progenitors in vivo, even when forced to proliferate. Our analyses reveal that activation of stress response pathways drives both a global reduction of protein synthesis and altered translational programmes that together promote stem cell functions and tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, we show that inhibition of post-transcriptional cytosine-5 methylation locks tumour-initiating cells in this distinct translational inhibition programme. Paradoxically, this inhibition renders stem cells hypersensitive to cytotoxic stress, as tumour regeneration after treatment with 5-fluorouracil is blocked. Thus, stem cells must revoke translation inhibition pathways to regenerate a tissue or tumour.

  2. Enhanced NLO response in BODIPY-coumarin hybrids: density functional theory approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YOGESH ERANDE; NAGAIYAN SEKAR

    2017-09-01

    We have thoroughly investigated the first, second and third polarizability characteristics of four hybrid chromophores by spectroscopic and computational methods. B3LYP, CAMB3LYP and BHandHLYP functionals in combination with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set were used to evaluate the polarizability and hyperpolarizability characteristics of these chromophores. Generalized Mulliken Hush analysis and frontier molecular orbital electronic distribution images of chromophores obtained from Density functional theory computation has established the charge transfer characteristics of these hybrid chromophores. On the basis of charge transfer characteristic, these red absorbing and NIR emissive chromophores possess high nonlinear optical response. Comparison of isolated units with their analogous hybrid chromophores shows that fusion ofcoumarin with BODIPY enhances the nonlinear optical response.

  3. Nonlinear functional response parameter estimation in a stochastic predator-prey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, Gianni; Pasquali, Sara; Ruggeri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Parameter estimation for the functional response of predator-prey systems is a critical methodological problem in population ecology. In this paper we consider a stochastic predator-prey system with non-linear Ivlev functional response and propose a method for model parameter estimation based on time series of field data. We tackle the problem of parameter estimation using a Bayesian approach relying on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. The efficiency of the method is tested on a set of simulated data. Then, the method is applied to a predator-prey system of importance for Integrated Pest Management and biological control, the pest mite Tetranychus urticae and the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. The model is estimated on a dataset obtained from a field survey. Finally, the estimated model is used to forecast predator-prey dynamics in similar fields, with slightly different initial conditions.

  4. Bayesian inference for functional response in a stochastic predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, Gianni; Pasquali, Sara; Ruggeri, Fabrizio

    2008-02-01

    We present a Bayesian method for functional response parameter estimation starting from time series of field data on predator-prey dynamics. Population dynamics is described by a system of stochastic differential equations in which behavioral stochasticities are represented by noise terms affecting each population as well as their interaction. We focus on the estimation of a behavioral parameter appearing in the functional response of predator to prey abundance when a small number of observations is available. To deal with small sample sizes, latent data are introduced between each pair of field observations and are considered as missing data. The method is applied to both simulated and observational data. The results obtained using different numbers of latent data are compared with those achieved following a frequentist approach. As a case study, we consider an acarine predator-prey system relevant to biological control problems.

  5. Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive performance. Sixty-eight participants were randomly assigned into control, 40%, 70%, or 100% of 10-repetition maximal resistance exercise groups. Participants were tested on Day 1 (baseline) and on Day 2 (measures were taken relative to performance of the treatment). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, self-reported arousal, and affect were assessed on both days. Cognitive performance was assessed on Day 1 and before and following treatment on Day 2. Results from regression analyses indicated that there is a significant linear effect of exercise intensity on information processing speed, and a significant quadratic trend for exercise intensity on executive function. Thus, there is a dose-response relationship between the intensity of resistance exercise and cognitive performance such that high-intensity exercise benefits speed of processing, but moderate intensity exercise is most beneficial for executive function.

  6. Calculation of Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer Response Functions in Energy Range up to 20 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Martinkovic, J

    2005-01-01

    Multisphere neutron spectrometer is a basic instrument of neutron measurements in the scattered radiation field at charged-particles accelerators for radiation protection and dosimetry purposes. The precise calculation of the spectrometer response functions is a necessary condition of the propriety of neutron spectra unfolding. The results of the response functions calculation for the JINR spectrometer with LiI(Eu) detector (a set of 6 homogeneous and 1 heterogeneous moderators, "bare" detector within cadmium cover and without it) at two geometries of the spectrometer irradiation - in uniform monodirectional and uniform isotropic neutron fields - are given. The calculation was carried out by the code MCNP in the neutron energy range 10$^{-8}$-20 MeV.

  7. Simulation of the response functions of an extended range neutron multisphere spectrometer using FLUKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan-Feng; Ding, Ya-Dong; Wang, Qing-Bin; Ma, Zhong-Jian; Guo, Si-Ming; Li, Guan-Jia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the distribution of radiation field in the CSNS spectrometer hall at Dongguan, China, was simulated by the FLUKA program. The results show that the radiation field of the high energy proton accelerator is dominated by neutron radiation, with a broad range of neutron energies, spanning about eleven orders of magnitude. Simulation and calculation of the response functions of four Bonner spheres with a simplified model is done with FLUKA and MCNPX codes respectively, proving the feasibility of the FLUKA program for this application and the correctness of the calculation method. Using the actual model, we simulate and calculate the energy response functions of Bonner sphere detectors with polyethylene layers of different diameters, including detectors with lead layers, using the FLUKA code. Based on the simulation results, we select eleven detectors as the basic structure for an Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometer (ERNMS).

  8. Simulation of the response functions of an extended range neutron multisphere spectrometer using FLUKA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pan-Feng; DING Ya-Dong; WANG Qing-Bin; MA Zhong-Jian; GUO Si-Ming; LI Guan-Jia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,the distribution of radiation field in the CSNS spectrometer hall at Dongguan,China,was simulated by the FLUKA program.The results show that the radiation field of the high energy proton accelerator is dominated by neutron radiation,with a broad range of neutron energies,spanning about eleven orders of magnitude.Simulation and calculation of the response functions of four Bonner spheres with a simplified model is done with FLUKA and MCNPX codes respectively,proving the feasibility of the FLUKA program for this application and the correctness of the calculation method.Using the actual model,we simulate and calculate the energy response functions of Bonner sphere detectors with polyethylene layers of different diameters,including detectors with lead layers,using the FLUKA code.Based on the simulation results,we select eleven detectors as the basic structure for an Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometer (ERNMS).

  9. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  10. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitters, Holly; York, Alan; Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Di Stefano, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD) provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape sampling approach to examine relationships between bird FD, vegetation diversity and time since fire. We surveyed birds and measured vegetation at 36 landscape sampling units in dry and wet forest in southeast Australia during 2010 and 2011. Four uncorrelated indices of bird FD (richness, evenness, divergence and dispersion) were derived from six bird traits, and we investigated responses of these indices and species richness to both vertical and horizontal vegetation diversity using linear mixed models. We also considered the extent to which the mean and diversity of time since fire were related to vegetation diversity. Results showed opposing responses of FD to vegetation diversity in dry and wet forest. In dry forest, where fire is frequent, species richness and two FD indices (richness and dispersion) were positively related to vertical vegetation diversity, consistent with theory relating to environmental variation and coexistence. However, in wet forest subject to infrequent fire, the same three response variables were negatively associated with vertical diversity. We suggest that competitive dominance by species results in lower FD as vegetation diversity increases in wet forest. The responses of functional evenness were opposite to those of species richness, functional richness and dispersion in both forest types, highlighting the value of examining multiple FD metrics at management-relevant scales. The mean and diversity of time since fire were uncorrelated with vegetation

  11. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  12. Stimuli-Responsive DNA-Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jason S; Freage, Lina; Enkin, Natalie; Garcia, Miguel Angel Aleman; Willner, Itamar

    2017-02-01

    The synthesis of nucleic acid-functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is described. The metal-organic frameworks are loaded with a dye being locked in the structures by means of stimuli-responsive nucleic acid caps. The pH and K(+) -ion-triggered release, and switchable release, are demonstrated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Dynamics of a three species food chain model with Crowley-Martin type functional response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar [Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826 004 (India)], E-mail: ranjit_ism@yahoo.com; Naji, Raid Kamel [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Baghdad (Iraq)], E-mail: rknaji@gmail.com

    2009-11-15

    In this paper, a three species food chain model, consisting of a hybrid type of prey-dependent and predator-dependent functional responses, is investigated analytically as well as numerically. The local and global stability analysis is carried out. The persistence conditions are established. Bifurcation diagrams are obtained for biologically feasible parameters. The results show that the system exhibits rich complexity features such as stable, periodic and chaotic dynamics.

  14. STABILIZATION OF A KIND OF PREY-PREDATOR MODEL WITH HOLLING FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi LIU; Qingling ZHANG; Lichun ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    The stabilization problem of a kind of prey-predator model with Holling functional response is investigated. By approximate linearization approach, a feedback control law stabilizing the closedloop system is obtained. On the other hand, by exact linearization approach, a suitable change of coordinates in the state space and a feedback control law render the complex nonlinear system to be a linear controllable one such that the positive equilibrium point of the closed-loop system is globally asymptotically stable.

  15. Dynamics of a Predator-Prey System with Mixed Functional Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunki Baek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A predator-prey system with two preys and one predator is considered. Especially, two different types of functional responses, Holling type and Beddington-DeAngelis type, are adopted. First, the boundedness of system is showed. Stabilities analysis of system is investigated via some properties about equilibrium points and stabilities of two subsystems without one of the preys of system. Also, persistence conditions of system are found out and some numerical examples are illustrated to substantiate our theoretical results.

  16. Loss of melanocortin-4 receptor function attenuates HPA responses to psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Karen K; Mul, Joram D; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Egan, Ann E; Begg, Denovan P; Halcomb, Kristen; Seeley, Randy J; Herman, James P; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2014-04-01

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), well-known for its role in the regulation of energy balance, is widely expressed in stress-regulatory brain regions, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the medial amygdala (MeA). In agreement with this, MC4R has been implicated in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA) regulation. The present work investigated the role of chronic Mc4r function to modulate basal HPA axis tone and to facilitate acute HPA responses to psychological stress, using a novel rat model with Mc4r loss-of-function. In this study, adult male rats were placed into 3 groups (n=15/group) according to genotype [wild-type (WT); heterozygous mutant (HET); and homozygous mutant (HOM)]. Basal (pre-stress) plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were measured in the AM and PM, and the HPA axis response to restraint was assessed in the AM. Rats were perfused at 2h after restraint to assess the effect of loss of MC4R on stress-induced c-Fos immunolabeling in stress-regulatory brain regions. We find that basal (non-stress) AM and PM plasma ACTH and corticosterone showed a normal diurnal rhythm that was not altered according to genotype. Consistent with this, adrenal and thymus weights were unaffected by genotype. However, the plasma ACTH and corticosterone responses to restraint were significantly reduced by loss of MC4R function. Likewise, stress-induced c-Fos immunolabeling in both PVH and MeA was significantly reduced by loss of Mc4r function. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous MC4R signaling contributes to the HPA axis response to stress. Because MC4R plays a critical role in the regulation of energy balance, the present work suggests that it may also serve as an important communication link between brain metabolic and stress systems.

  17. Precise all-electron dynamical response functions: Application to COHSEX and the RPA correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    We present a methodology to calculate frequency and momentum dependent all-electron response functions determined within Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It overcomes the main obstacle in calculating response functions in practice, which is the slow convergence with respect to the number of unoccupied states and the basis-set size. In this approach, the usual sum-over-states expression of perturbation theory is complemented by the response of the orbital basis functions, explicitly constructed by radial integrations of frequency-dependent Sternheimer equations. To an essential extent an infinite number of unoccupied states are included in this way. Furthermore, the response of the core electrons is treated virtually exactly, which is out of reach otherwise. The method is an extension of the recently introduced incomplete-basis-set correction (IBC) [Betzinger et al., Phys. Rev. B 85, 245124 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245124; Phys. Rev. B 88, 075130 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.075130] to the frequency and momentum domain. We have implemented the generalized IBC within the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method and demonstrate for rocksalt BaO the improved convergence of the dynamical Kohn-Sham polarizability. We apply this technique to compute (a) quasiparticle energies employing the COHSEX approximation for the self-energy of many-body perturbation theory and (b) all-electron RPA correlation energies. It is shown that the favorable convergence of the polarizability is passed over to the COHSEX and RPA calculation.

  18. Functional MRI and Response Inhibition in Children Exposed to Cocaine in utero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinkopf, Stephen J.; Lester, Barry M.; Sanes, Jerome N.; Eliassen, James C.; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Seifer, Ronald; LaGasse, Linda L.; Durston, Sarah; Casey, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the potential long-term effects of cocaine exposure on brain functioning using fMRI in school-aged children. The sample included 12 children with prenatal cocaine exposure and 12 non-exposed children (8–9 years old). Groups did not differ on IQ, socioeconomic status, or perinatal risk factors. A response inhibition task was administered during an fMRI scan using a 1.5-T MRI system. Task performance did not differentiate groups, but groups were differentiated by patterns of task-related brain activity. Cocaine-exposed children showed greater activation in the right inferior frontal cortex and caudate during response inhibition, whereas non-exposed children showed greater activations in temporal and occipital regions. These preliminary findings suggest that prenatal cocaine may affect the development of brain systems involved in the regulation of attention and response inhibition. PMID:19372696

  19. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  20. Unified Approach to Thermodynamic Optimization of Generic Objective Functions in the Linear Response Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While many efforts have been devoted to optimizing the power output for a finite-time thermodynamic process, thermodynamic optimization under realistic situations is not necessarily concerned with power alone; rather, it may be of great relevance to optimize generic objective functions that are combinations of power, entropy production, and/or efficiency. One can optimize the objective function for a given model; generally the obtained results are strongly model dependent. However, if the thermodynamic process in question is operated in the linear response regime, then we show in this work that it is possible to adopt a unified approach to optimizing the objective function, thanks to Onsager’s theory of linear irreversible thermodynamics. A dissipation bound is derived, and based on it, the efficiency associated with the optimization problem, which is universal in the linear response regime and irrespective of model details, can be obtained in a unified way. Our results are in good agreement with previous findings. Moreover, we unveil that the ratio between the stopping time of a finite-time process and the optimized duration time plays a pivotal role in determining the corresponding efficiency in the case of linear response.

  1. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Simon; Gössl, Dorothée; Schmidt, Alexandra; Niedermayer, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Endres, Stefan; Bein, Thomas; Bourquin, Carole

    2016-01-14

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1β. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications.

  2. Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry and Neural Recovery Function: a Comparative Study between Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Bettina; Hamerschmidt, Rogerio; Wiemes, Gislaine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neural response telemetry (NRT) is a method of capturing the action potential of the distal portion of the auditory nerve in cochlear implant (CI) users, using the CI itself to elicit and record the answers. In addition, it can also measure the recovery function of the auditory nerve (REC), that is, the refractory properties of the nerve. It is not clear in the literature whether the responses from adults are the same as those from children. Objective To compare the results of NRT and REC between adults and children undergoing CI surgery. Methods Cross-sectional, descriptive, and retrospective study of the results of NRT and REC for patients undergoing IC at our service. The NRT is assessed by the level of amplitude (microvolts) and REC as a function of three parameters: A (saturation level, in microvolts), t0 (absolute refractory period, in seconds), and tau (curve of the model function), measured in three electrodes (apical, medial, and basal). Results Fifty-two patients were evaluated with intraoperative NRT (26 adults and 26 children), and 24 with REC (12 adults and 12 children). No statistically significant difference was found between intraoperative responses of adults and children for NRT or for REC's three parameters, except for parameter A of the basal electrode. Conclusion The results of intraoperative NRT and REC were not different between adults and children, except for parameter A of the basal electrode. PMID:25992145

  3. Calculation of static and dynamic linear magnetic response in approximate time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-14

    We report implementations and results of time-dependent density functional calculations (i) of the frequency-dependent magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability, (ii) of the (observable) translationally invariant linear magnetic response, and (iii) of a linear intensity differential (LID) which includes the dynamic dipole magnetizability. The density functional calculations utilized density fitting. For achieving gauge-origin independence we have employed time-periodic magnetic-field-dependent basis functions as well as the dipole velocity gauge, and have included explicit density-fit related derivatives of the Coulomb potential. We present the results of calculations of static and dynamic magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizabilities for a set of small molecules, the LID for the SF6 molecule, and dispersion curves for M-hexahelicene of the origin invariant linear magnetic response as well as of three dynamic polarizabilities: magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole, electric dipole-electric dipole, and electric dipole-magnetic dipole. We have also performed comparison of the linear magnetic response and magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability over a wide range of frequencies for H2O and SF6.

  4. Functional response of Cosmoclopius nigroannulatus (Hem.: Reduviidae) to different densities of Spartocera dentiventris (Hem.: Coreidae) nymphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, L; Redaelli, L R

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated the functional response of the predator Cosmoclopius nigroannulatus on first instar nymphae of Spartocera dentiventris, both species associated with Nicotina tabacum. The experiment was carried out in laboratory conditions: 27 +/- 1 degree C; 80 +/- 5%, RH; 12 h, photophase. Ten newly emerged adults of each sex of C. nigroannulatus were used in each of five densities (5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 individuals) of S. dentiventris nymphae. The predators were observed every 24 h for five days, when the number of dead and/or consumed nymphae was recorded. The results showed a positive correlation between the number of ingested nymphae and the increase in prey density. Females ingested more nymphae than the males. The estimated handling time per prey (Th) was higher in males (3.07 h) than in females (1.93 h), with total handling time (Th x Na) increased with density. Other components of the functional response, such as attack rate (a'), searching time (Ts), and search efficiency (E) showed, in neither males nor females, a negative correlation regarding density. The results indicated a higher predatory efficiency in the females. The components of the functional response fitted significantly the randomic model of the Holling discs equation (Na = N [1 - exp[- a'(T - ThNa)

  5. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a "flat" 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL-target encounter rates.

  6. Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry and Neural Recovery Function: a Comparative Study between Adults and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho, Bettina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neural response telemetry (NRT is a method of capturing the action potential of the distal portion of the auditory nerve in cochlear implant (CI users, using the CI itself to elicit and record the answers. In addition, it can also measure the recovery function of the auditory nerve (REC, that is, the refractory properties of the nerve. It is not clear in the literature whether the responses from adults are the same as those from children. Objective To compare the results of NRT and REC between adults and children undergoing CI surgery. Methods Cross-sectional, descriptive, and retrospective study of the results of NRT and REC for patients undergoing IC at our service. The NRT is assessed by the level of amplitude (microvolts and REC as a function of three parameters: A (saturation level, in microvolts, t0 (absolute refractory period, in seconds, and tau (curve of the model function, measured in three electrodes (apical, medial, and basal. Results Fifty-two patients were evaluated with intraoperative NRT (26 adults and 26 children, and 24 with REC (12 adults and 12 children. No statistically significant difference was found between intraoperative responses of adults and children for NRT or for REC's three parameters, except for parameter A of the basal electrode. Conclusion The results of intraoperative NRT and REC were not different between adults and children, except for parameter A of the basal electrode.

  7. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  8. Research on the iterative method for model updating based on the frequency response function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ming Li; Jia-Zhen Hong

    2012-01-01

    Model reduction technique is usually employed in model updating process,In this paper,a new model updating method named as cross-model cross-frequency response function (CMCF) method is proposed and a new iterative method associating the model updating method with the model reduction technique is investigated.The new model updating method utilizes the frequency response function to avoid the modal analysis process and it does not need to pair or scale the measured and the analytical frequency response function,which could greatly increase the number of the equations and the updating parameters.Based on the traditional iterative method,a correction term related to the errors resulting from the replacement of the reduction matrix of the experimental model with that of the finite element model is added in the new iterative method.Comparisons between the traditional iterative method and the proposed iterative method are shown by model updating examples of solar panels,and both of these two iterative methods combine the CMCF method and the succession-level approximate reduction technique.Results show the effectiveness of the CMCF method and the proposed iterative method.

  9. Exposure-response functions for health effects of air pollutants based on epidemiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunan, K.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide exposure-response functions for health effects and air pollution, which can be used in cost-effectiveness analyses of abatement measures. When cost-effective abatement strategies for air pollution are analyzed, and when air quality standards are set, it is important to have quantitative knowledge about health damage. In spite of their shortcomings, epidemiological studies provide a sound basis for exposure-response functions because they involve a random cross section of the population. In this report the exposure-response functions apply to the relation between air pollutant concentrations and relative effect frequencies, and involve the following health effect end-points: acute and chronic respiratory symptoms in children and adults, asthma episodes in children and adults, eye irritations, headache, lung damage in children, excess mortality, lung cancer incidence. The effects are attributed to one indicator component, which in many cases is particles, but for some effects NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, or CO. A calculation procedure is suggested which makes it possible to estimate excess annual symptom-days for short-term effects using the annual average concentration. 103 refs., 1 table

  10. Exposure-response functions for health effects of air pollutants based on epidemiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunan, K.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide exposure-response functions for health effects and air pollution, which can be used in cost-effectiveness analyses of abatement measures. When cost-effective abatement strategies for air pollution are analyzed, and when air quality standards are set, it is important to have quantitative knowledge about health damage. In spite of their shortcomings, epidemiological studies provide a sound basis for exposure-response functions because they involve a random cross section of the population. In this report the exposure-response functions apply to the relation between air pollutant concentrations and relative effect frequencies, and involve the following health effect end-points: acute and chronic respiratory symptoms in children and adults, asthma episodes in children and adults, eye irritations, headache, lung damage in children, excess mortality, lung cancer incidence. The effects are attributed to one indicator component, which in many cases is particles, but for some effects NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, or CO. A calculation procedure is suggested which makes it possible to estimate excess annual symptom-days for short-term effects using the annual average concentration. 103 refs., 1 table

  11. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  12. Complementary function of two transketolase isoforms from Moniliella megachiliensis in relation to stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Mizushima, Daiki; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2017-12-01

    Two transketolase isogenes, MmTKL1 and MmTKL2, isolated from Moniliella megachiliensis were investigated for their roles in stress response and erythritol biosynthesis. The encoded proteins were highly homologous in amino acid sequence and domain structure. Two stress response elements (STREs) were found upstream of MmTKL1, while no STRE was found upstream of MmTKL2. In contrast, two Ap-1 elements were present upstream of MmTKL2, but none were detected upstream of MmTKL1. MmTKL2 partially complemented the aromatic amino acid auxotrophy of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tkl1 deletion mutant, suggesting that at least one of the MmTKLs functioned as a transketolase in vivo. In response to short-term osmotic stress (20% glucose or 1.2 M NaCl) in Moniliella cells, MmTKL1 expression increased rapidly through the first 40 min before subsequently decreasing gradually, while MmTKL2 expression showed no significant change. In contrast, short-term oxidative stress (0.15 mM menadione) induced considerable increases in MmTKL2, while MmTKL1 expression remained low under the same conditions. Long-term osmotic stress (20% glucose) yielded increased expression of both genes starting at 12 h and continuing through 72 h. During either osmotic or oxidative stress, intracellular erythritol accumulation could clearly be correlated with the pattern of expression of either MmTKL1 or MmTKL2. These results strongly suggested that MmTKL1 is responsible primarily for the response to osmotic stress, while MmTKL2 is responsible primarily for the response to oxidative stress. Thus, we postulate that the two transketolase isoforms of M. megachiliensis play distinct and complementary roles in coordinating erythritol production in response to distinct environmental stresses.

  13. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Zhu

    Full Text Available The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  14. Sexual responsiveness is condition-dependent in female guppies, but preference functions are not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks Robert

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in mate choice behaviour among females within a population may influence the strength and form of sexual selection, yet the basis for any such variation is still poorly understood. Condition-dependence may be an important source of variation in female sexual responsiveness and in the preference functions for male display traits that she expresses when choosing. We manipulated food intake of female guppies (Poecilia reticulata, and examined the effect on several measures of condition and various components of mate choice behaviour. Results Diet significantly influenced four measures of female condition: standard length, weight, reproductive status and somatic fat reserves. Diet also significantly affected female sexual responsiveness, but not preference functions: females in good and poor condition prefer the same males. Conclusions Variation in female condition within populations is therefore unlikely to influence the direction of sexual selection imposed by female choice. It may, however, influence the strength of sexual selection due to its effects on female responsiveness. The relative importance of female choice as a sexually selective force may also covary with female condition, however, because low responsiveness may result in sneak copulations being relatively more important as a determinant of the paternity of offspring. Differences among populations in mean condition may also influence geographic differences in the strength of sexual selection.

  15. Adiabatic approximation of time-dependent density matrix functional response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernal, Katarzyna; Giesbertz, Klaas; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2007-12-07

    Time-dependent density matrix functional theory can be formulated in terms of coupled-perturbed response equations, in which a coupling matrix K(omega) features, analogous to the well-known time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) case. An adiabatic approximation is needed to solve these equations, but the adiabatic approximation is much more critical since there is not a good "zero order" as in TDDFT, in which the virtual-occupied Kohn-Sham orbital energy differences serve this purpose. We discuss a simple approximation proposed earlier which uses only results from static calculations, called the static approximation (SA), and show that it is deficient, since it leads to zero response of the natural orbital occupation numbers. This leads to wrong behavior in the omega-->0 limit. An improved adiabatic approximation (AA) is formulated. The two-electron system affords a derivation of exact coupled-perturbed equations for the density matrix response, permitting analytical comparison of the adiabatic approximation with the exact equations. For the two-electron system also, the exact density matrix functional (2-matrix in terms of 1-matrix) is known, enabling testing of the static and adiabatic approximations unobscured by approximations in the functional. The two-electron HeH(+) molecule shows that at the equilibrium distance, SA consistently underestimates the frequency-dependent polarizability alpha(omega), the adiabatic TDDFT overestimates alpha(omega), while AA improves upon SA and, indeed, AA produces the correct alpha(0). For stretched HeH(+), adiabatic density matrix functional theory corrects the too low first excitation energy and overpolarization of adiabatic TDDFT methods and exhibits excellent agreement with high-quality CCSD ("exact") results over a large omega range.

  16. Maternal executive function, infant feeding responsiveness and infant growth during the first 3 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, A J; Demerath, E W; Finsaas, M C; Moore, C J; Georgieff, M K; Carlson, S M

    2017-08-01

    There is limited research in young infants, particularly executive function (cognitive control over one's own behaviour), maternal feeding decisions and infant weight and adiposity gains. We used a checklist to assess cues mothers use to decide when to initiate and terminate infant feedings at 2 weeks and 3 months of age (N = 69). Maternal executive function was assessed using the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery subtests for executive function and infant body composition using air displacement plethysmography. Mothers with higher executive function reported relying on fewer non-satiety cues at 2 weeks of age (β = -0.29, p = 0.037) and on more infant hunger cues at 3 months of age (β = 0.31, p = 0.018) in their decisions on initiating and terminating feedings. Responsive feeding decisions, specifically the use of infant-based hunger cues at 3 months, in turn were associated with lower gains in weight-for-length (β = -0.30, p = 0.028) and percent body fat (β = -0.2, p = 0.091; non-covariate adjusted β = -0.27, p = 0.029). These findings show both an association between maternal executive function and responsive feeding decisions and an association between responsive feeding decisions and infant weight and adiposity gains. The causal nature and direction of these associations require further investigation. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Profile: a preliminary look at responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Kristin E; Yang, Jaynie F

    2014-02-01

    The Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Profile (SCI-FAP) is a valid, reliable measure of walking skill (eg, walking while negotiating obstacles, doors, and stairs). The responsiveness of the SCI-FAP was assessed at least 7 months after spinal cord injury (SCI) and compared with that of the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) and the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). A secondary analysis of data collected during a randomized, single-blind, crossover trial was performed. Participants had incomplete SCI and could walk at least 5 m without manual assistance. After 3 or 4 baseline assessments, participants completed 2 months of precision training (stepping over obstacles and onto targets on the ground) and 2 months of endurance training (treadmill training with body weight support, if needed). Walking function was assessed with the SCI-FAP, 10MWT, and 6MWT. Internal responsiveness was evaluated through change scores and standardized response means (SRMs). External responsiveness was gauged by correlating change scores on the SCI-FAP, 10MWT, and 6MWT. The minimal detectable change was calculated from the standard error of measurement from the baseline assessments. The SCI-FAP scores improved with both interventions. The magnitude of change was greater for participants whose pretraining self-selected speed was less than 0.5 m/s. The SCI-FAP had moderate SRMs. The 10MWT (fastest speed) and 6MWT had the largest SRMs after precision training and endurance training, respectively. The minimal detectable change in the SCI-FAP was 96 points. The convenience sample was small and all participants could ambulate independently (with devices); therefore, the generalizability of the findings is limited. The SCI-FAP was responsive to changes in walking ability in participants who had incomplete SCI and walked at slow speeds, but overall the 10MWT and 6MWT were more responsive.

  18. Analysis of velocity-coupled response function data from the dual rotating valve. [combustion stability of solid rocket propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. S.; Waugh, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a re-evaluation of the propellant combustion data obtained using the dual valve approach for measuring velocity-coupling characteristics of solid propellants are presented. Data analysis and testing procedures are described. The velocity response is compared to pressure-coupled response data within the context of thermal wave response theory. This comparison shows important inconsistencies which cast doubt on inferring the velocity response from pressure-coupled response functions.

  19. Classical density-functional theory of inhomogeneous water including explicit molecular structure and nonlinear dielectric response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, Johannes; Arias, T A

    2010-02-11

    We present an accurate free-energy functional for liquid water written in terms of a set of effective potential fields in which fictitious noninteracting water molecules move. The functional contains an exact expression of the entropy of noninteracting molecules and thus provides an ideal starting point for the inclusion of complex intermolecular interactions which depend on the orientation of the interacting molecules. We show how an excess free-energy functional can be constructed to reproduce the following properties of water: the dielectric response; the experimental site-site correlation functions; the surface tension; the bulk modulus of the liquid and the variation of this modulus with pressure; the density of the liquid and the vapor phase; and liquid-vapor coexistence. As a demonstration, we present results for the application of this theory to the behavior of liquid water in a parallel plate capacitor. In particular, we make predictions for the dielectric response of water in the nonlinear regime, finding excellent agreement with known data.

  20. Static Response of Functionally Graded Material Plate under Transverse Load for Varying Aspect Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionally gradient materials (FGM are one of the most widely used materials in various applications because of their adaptability to different situations by changing the material constituents as per the requirement. Nowadays it is very easy to tailor the properties to serve specific purposes in functionally gradient material. Most structural components used in the field of engineering can be classified as beams, plates, or shells for analysis purposes. In the present study the power law, sigmoid law and exponential distribution, is considered for the volume fraction distributions of the functionally graded plates. The work includes parametric studies performed by varying volume fraction distributions and aspect ratio. The FGM plate is subjected to transverse UDL (uniformly distributed load and point load and the response is analysed.

  1. Functions of MDMX in the Modulation of the p53-Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiaan Lenos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The MDM family proteins MDM2 and MDMX are two critical regulators of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Expression of both proteins is necessary for allowing the embryonal development by keeping the activity of p53 in check. Upon stresses that need to activate p53 to perform its function as guardian of the genome, p53 has to be liberated from these two inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the various mechanisms by which MDMX protein levels are downregulated upon various types of stress, including posttranslational modifications of the MDMX protein and the regulation of mdmx mRNA expression, including alternative splicing. In addition, the putative function(s of the described MDMX splice variants, particularly in tumor development, will be discussed. Lastly, in contrast to common belief, we have recently shown the existence of a p53-MDMX feedback loop, which is important for dampening the p53-response at later phases after genotoxic stress.

  2. Green's functions for analysis of dynamic response of wheel/rail to vertical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazilu, Traian

    2007-09-01

    An analytical model to simulate wheel/rail interaction using the Green's functions method is proposed in this paper. The model consists of a moving wheel on a discretely supported rail. Particularly for this model of rail, the bending and the longitudinal displacement are coupled due to the rail pad and a complex model of the rail pad is adopted. An efficient method for solving a time-domain analysis for wheel/rail interaction is presented. The method is based on the properties of the rail's Green functions and starting to these functions, a track's Green matrix is assembled for the numerical simulations of wheel/rail response due to three kinds of vertical excitations: the steady-state interaction, the rail corrugation and the wheel flat. The study points to influence of the worn rail—rigid contact—on variation in the wheel/rail contact force. The concept of pinned-pinned inhibitive rail pad is also presented.

  3. Regarding the evaluation of the solid rocket propellant response function to pressure coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan ION

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available High frequency combustion instabilities imply a major risk for the solid rocket motor stableworking and they are directly linked to the propellant response to chamber pressure coupling. Thisarticle discusses a laboratory testing method for the measurement and evaluation of the pressurecoupled response for non-metalized propellants in a first stage. Experimental researches were donewith an adequate setup, built and improved in our lab, able to evaluate the propellant response byinterpreting the pressure oscillations damping in terms of propellant response. Our paper aims atdefining a linearized one-dimensional flow study model to analyze the disturbed operation of the solidpropellant rocket motors. Based on the applied model we can assert that the real part of propellantresponse is a function of the oscillations damping, acoustic energy in the motor chamber and variouslosses in the burning chamber. The imaginary part of propellant response mainly depends on thenormalized pulsation, on the burning chamber gas column and on the pressure oscillations frequency.Our research purpose was obviously to minimize the risk of the combustion instabilities effects on therocket motors working, by experimental investigations using jet modulating techniques and sustainedby an interesting study model based on the perturbation method.

  4. Osteopontin promotes dendritic cell maturation and function in response to HBV antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui GY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guangying Cui,1,2 Jianing Chen,1,2 Jianqin He,1,2 Chong Lu,1,2 Yingfeng Wei,1,2 Lin Wang,1,2 Xuejun Xu,3 Lanjuan Li,1,2 Toshimitsu Uede,4 Hongyan Diao1,2 1State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 2Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 3Department of Oral Orthodontics, Affiliated Stomatology Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 4Molecular Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Purpose: Dendritic cells (DCs play critical roles in promoting innate and adaptive immunity in microbial infection. Functional impairment of DCs may mediate the suppression of viral-specific T-cell immune response in chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients. Osteopontin (OPN is involved in several liver diseases and infectious diseases. However, whether OPN affects DC function in hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is unknown.Methods: Twenty CHB patients and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited. OPN secreted by DCs was compared. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with OPN antibody were examined to study the costimulatory molecular expression and interleukin (IL-12 production of DCs after HBV antigenic stimulation. OPN-deficient mice were used to investigate the influence of OPN on DC maturation and function after HBV antigenic stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous OPN was administrated to further verify the functioning of DCs from CHB patients upon HBV antigenic stimulation.Results: We found that OPN production of DCs from CHB patients was significantly lower than those from healthy volunteers. The absence of OPN impaired IL-12 production and costimulatory molecular expression of DCs upon stimulation with HBV antigens. Defective DC function led to reduced activation of Th1 response to

  5. A fractal climate response function can simulate global average temperature trends of the modern era and the past millennium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    2013-01-01

    A climate response function is introduced that consists of six exponential (low-pass) filters with weights depending as a power law on their e-folding times. The response of this two-parameter function to the combined forcings of solar irradiance, greenhouse gases, and SO2-related aerosols is fitted

  6. 41 CFR 102-3.115 - What are the responsibilities and functions of an agency Committee Management Officer (CMO)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the responsibilities and functions of an agency Committee Management Officer (CMO)? 102-3.115 Section 102-3.115 Public...? § 102-3.115 What are the responsibilities and functions of an agency Committee Management Officer (CMO...

  7. 25 CFR 12.1 - Who is responsible for the Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... enforcement function? 12.1 Section 12.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER INDIAN COUNTRY LAW ENFORCEMENT Responsibilities § 12.1 Who is responsible for the Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement function? The Commissioner of Indian Affairs, or in the absence of a Commissioner...

  8. Olive response to water availability: yield response functions, soil water content indicators and evaluation of adaptability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Maria; Alfieri, Silvia Maria; Basile, Angelo; Bonfante, Antonello; Menenti, Massimo; Monaco, Eugenia; De Lorenzi, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Climate evolution, with the foreseen increase of temperature and frequency of drought events during the summer, could cause significant changes in the availability of water resources specially in the Mediterranean region. European countries need to encourage sustainable agriculture practices, reducing inputs, especially of water, and minimizing any negative impact on crop quantity and quality. Olive is an important crop in the Mediterranean region that has traditionally been cultivated with no irrigation and is known to attain acceptable production under dry farming. Therefore this crop will not compete for foreseen reduced water resources. However, a good quantitative knowledge must be available about effects of reduced precipitation and water availability on yield. Yield response functions, coupled with indicators of soil water availability, provide a quantitative description of the cultivar- specific behavior in relation to hydrological conditions. Yield response functions of 11 olive cultivars, typical of Mediterranean environment, were determined using experimental data (unpublished or reported in scientific literature). The yield was expressed as relative yield (Yr); the soil water availability was described by means of different indicators: relative soil water deficit (RSWD), relative evapotranspiration (RED) and transpiration deficit (RTD). Crops can respond nonlinearly to changes in their growing conditions and exhibit threshold responses, so for the yield functions of each olive cultivar both linear regression and threshold-slope models were considered to evaluate the best fit. The level of relative yield attained in rain-fed conditions was identified and defined as the acceptable yield level (Yrrainfed). The value of the indicator (RSWD, RED and RTD) corresponding to Yrrainfed was determined for each cultivar and indicated as the critical value of water availability. The error in the determination of the critical value was estimated. By means of a

  9. Global functional analyses of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Kao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first global functional analysis of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins (PFTs. PFTs are uniquely important bacterial virulence factors, comprising the single largest class of bacterial protein toxins and being important for the pathogenesis in humans of many Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Their mode of action is deceptively simple, poking holes in the plasma membrane of cells. The scattered studies to date of PFT-host cell interactions indicate a handful of genes are involved in cellular defenses to PFTs. How many genes are involved in cellular defenses against PFTs and how cellular defenses are coordinated are unknown. To address these questions, we performed the first genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen for genes that, when knocked down, result in hypersensitivity to a PFT. This screen identifies 106 genes (∼0.5% of genome in seven functional groups that protect Caenorhabditis elegans from PFT attack. Interactome analyses of these 106 genes suggest that two previously identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, one (p38 studied in detail and the other (JNK not, form a core PFT defense network. Additional microarray, real-time PCR, and functional studies reveal that the JNK MAPK pathway, but not the p38 MAPK pathway, is a key central regulator of PFT-induced transcriptional and functional responses. We find C. elegans activator protein 1 (AP-1; c-jun, c-fos is a downstream target of the JNK-mediated PFT protection pathway, protects C. elegans against both small-pore and large-pore PFTs and protects human cells against a large-pore PFT. This in vivo RNAi genomic study of PFT responses proves that cellular commitment to PFT defenses is enormous, demonstrates the JNK MAPK pathway as a key regulator of transcriptionally-induced PFT defenses, and identifies AP-1 as the first cellular component broadly important for defense against large- and small-pore PFTs.

  10. TcNPR3 from Theobroma cacao functions as a repressor of the pathogen defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-06

    Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) NON-EXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) is a transcription coactivator that plays a central role in regulating the transcriptional response to plant pathogens. Developing flowers of homozygous npr3 mutants are dramatically more resistant to infection by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, suggesting a role of NPR3 as a repressor of NPR1-mediated defense response with a novel role in flower development. We report here the characterization of a putative NPR3 gene from the tropical tree species Theobroma cacao (TcNPR3). Like in Arabidopsis, TcNPR3 was constitutively expressed across a wide range of tissue types and developmental stages but with some differences in relative levels compared to Arabidopsis. To test the function of TcNPR3, we performed transgenic complementation analysis by introducing a constitutively expressing putative TcNPR3 transgene into an Arabidopsis npr3 mutant. TcNPR3 expressing Arabidopsis plants were partially restored to the WT pathogen phenotype (immature flowers susceptible to bacterial infection). To test TcNPR3 function directly in cacao tissues, a synthetic microRNA targeting TcNPR3 mRNA was transiently expressed in cacao leaves using an Agrobacterium-infiltration method. TcNPR3 knock down leaf tissues were dramatically more resistance to infection with Phytophthora capsici in a leaf bioassay, showing smaller lesion sizes and reduced pathogen replication. We conclude that TcNPR3 functions similar to the Arabidopsis NPR3 gene in the regulation of the cacao defense response. Since TcNPR3 did not show a perfect complementation of the Arabidopsis NPR3 mutation, the possibility remains that other functions of TcNPR3 remain to be found. This novel knowledge can contribute to the breeding of resistant cacao varieties against pathogens through molecular markers based approaches or biotechnological strategies.

  11. BDNF genotype interacts with motor-function to influence rehabilitation responsiveness post-stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine T Shiner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Persistent motor impairment is common but highly heterogeneous post-stroke. Genetic polymorphisms, including those identified on the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and apolipoprotein E (APOE genes, may contribute to this variability by limiting the capacity for use-dependent neuroplasticity, and hence rehabilitation responsiveness.Objective. To determine whether BDNF and APOE genotypes influence motor improvement facilitated by post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation. Methods. BDNF Val66Met and APOE isoform genotypes were determined using leukocyte DNA for 55 community-dwelling patients 2-123 months post-stroke. All patients completed a dose-matched upper-limb rehabilitation program of either Wii-based Movement Therapy or Constraint-induced Movement Therapy. Upper-limb motor-function was assessed pre- and post-therapy using a suite of functional measures. Results. Motor-function improved for all patients post-therapy, with no difference between therapy groups. In the pooled data, there was no significant effect of BDNF or APOE genotype on motor-function at baseline, or following the intervention. However, a significant interaction between the level of residual motor-function and BDNF genotype was identified (p=0.029, whereby post-therapy improvement was significantly less for Met allele carriers with moderate and high, but not low motor-function. There was no significant association between APOE genotype and therapy outcomes. Conclusions. This study identified a novel interaction between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, motor-function status and the magnitude of improvement with rehabilitation in chronic stroke. This polymorphism does not preclude, but may reduce, the magnitude of motor improvement with therapy, particularly for patients with higher but not lower residual motor-function. BDNF genotype should be considered in the design and interpretation of clinical trials.

  12. Response of rotifer functional groups to changing trophic state and crustacean community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina MANCA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Information based on taxon-based indices is species-specific while information gained from function-based research can give a comprehensive view of ecosystem processes. We applied the guild-ratio, an index based on the proportion of functional groups of rotifers (i.e. microphagous and raptorial species, on a long-term data set of Lago Maggiore. By applying seasonal trend decomposition based on smoothing techniques and non-metrical multidimensional scaling, we assessed the response of rotifer functional groups to changes in trophic state and climate. While the taxon-based indices showed smooth changes, the function-based index showed a dramatic shift from a raptorial to a microphagous dominance, with a back-shift to raptorial dominance starting in 2000. The seasonal peak of microphagous and raptorial dry weight was clearly separated in the pre-eutrophication period. When mesotrophic conditions prevailed both peaks overlapped, only to be separated again with re-oligotrophication. We attributed these alterations of rotifer functional groups to changes in competition with crustacean zooplankton and to decreased phytoplankton algal abundance and size while altered seasonality in functional groups could be related to inter-group competition for food. We hypothesise that the effects of trophic state (i.e. altered phytoplankton and climate (i.e. altered cladoceran community were transferred across trophic levels to rotifer functional groups. Our study highlights that functional groups are valid instruments for illustrating unifying principles in ecology through a better understanding of ecosystem processes and the interrelationship between trophic levels.

  13. Analyzing the Stability of Price Response Functions: Measuring the Influence of Different Parameters in a Monte Carlo Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusch, Michael; Baier, Daniel

    The usage and the estimation of price response function is very important for strategic marketing decisions. Typically price response functions with an empirical basis are used. However, such price response functions are subject to a lot of disturbing influence factors, e.g., the assumed profit maximum price and the assumed corresponding quantity of sales. In such cases, the question how stable the found price response function is was not answered sufficiently up to now. In this paper, the question will be pursued how much (and what kind of) errors in market research are pardonable for a stable price response function. For the comparisons, a factorial design with synthetically generated and disturbed data is used.

  14. Effects of head-down bed rest on the executive functions and emotional response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Liu

    Full Text Available Prolonged bed rest may cause changes in the autonomic nervous system that are related to cognition and emotion. This study adopted an emotional flanker task to evaluate the effect of 45 days -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR on executive functioning in 16 healthy young men at each of six time points: the second-to-last day before the bed rest period, the eleventh, twentieth, thirty-second and fortieth day during the bed rest period, and the eighth day after the bed rest period. In addition, self-report inventories (Beck Anxiety Inventory, BAI; Beck Depression Inventory, BDI; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, PANAS were conducted to record emotional changes, and the participants' galvanic skin response (GSR, heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV were assessed as measures of physiological activity. The results showed that the participants' reaction time on the flanker task increased significantly relative to their responses on the second-to-last day before the period of bed rest, their galvanic skin response weakened and their degrees of positive affect declined during the bed rest period. Our results provide some evidence for a detrimental effect of prolonged bed rest on executive functioning and positive affect. Whether this stems from a lack of aerobic physical activity and/or the effect of HDBR itself remains to be determined.

  15. Recent Advances in Stimuli-Responsive Release Function Drug Delivery Systems for Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chendi Ding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Benefiting from the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery systems (DDSs with stimuli-responsive controlled release function show great potential in clinical anti-tumor applications. By using a DDS, the harsh side effects of traditional anti-cancer drug treatments and damage to normal tissues and organs can be avoided to the greatest extent. An ideal DDS must firstly meet bio-safety standards and secondarily the efficiency-related demands of a large drug payload and controlled release function. This review highlights recent research progress on DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. The first section briefly reviews the nanoscale scaffolds of DDSs, including mesoporous nanoparticles, polymers, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The second section presents the main types of stimuli-responsive mechanisms and classifies these into two categories: intrinsic (pH, redox state, biomolecules and extrinsic (temperature, light irradiation, magnetic field and ultrasound ones. Clinical applications of DDS, future challenges and perspectives are also mentioned.

  16. Social support, threat, and coping responses and effectiveness in the functionally disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNett, S C

    1987-01-01

    A causal model based on Lazarus' (1966) cognitively oriented theory of psychological stress and coping was tested in a functionally disabled population to determine the effects of social support variables, threat appraisal, and coping responses on coping effectiveness. Social support variables (perceived availability of social support, perceived effectiveness of social support, and personal constraints to the use of social support) were hypothesized to effect coping responses both directly and through the variable of threat appraisal. Coping responses (use of social support, cognitive reappraisal, emotion-focused coping, and problem-focused coping) were hypothesized to directly effect coping effectiveness and to mediate the effect of all other variables. Data from 50 functionally disabled, wheel-chair-bound individuals discharged within 3 years from two rehabilitation facilities were analyzed using path analysis. The model fit the data and accounted for 61% of the variance in coping effectiveness. Findings indicated that perceived availability of social support, but not the use of social support, was significantly and positively related to coping effectiveness through the mediating variables of problem- and emotion-focused coping. In contrast to the relationship of marital status to coping effectiveness usually found in the literature, nonmarried subjects coped more effectively and perceived less threat.

  17. Functional response of the ladybird, Cydonia vicina nilotica to cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora in the laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NASSER SAID MANDOUR; NESREN ABDEL-SALLAM EL-BASHA; TONG-XIAN LIU

    2006-01-01

    The functional response of Cydonia vicina nilotica Muls. (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae) to six densities of Aphis craccivora Koch (Homoptera: Aphididae) nymphs on broad bean (Vicia faba Linn.) was investigated in the laboratory. A linear relationship between the rate of consumption and prey density was observed with r2 values between 0.58 and 0.97. Plotting prey density against prey killed by four larval instars, and adult males and females of C. vicina nilotica fit well with the type Ⅱ model of Holling' s disc equation.Adult females consumed the highest number of prey, followed by fourth instars and adult males. Based on the functional response data, the model predicts a maximum of 144.9, 116.3,86.2, 80.0, 72.5 and 20.0 nymphs to be consumed per day by an individual adult female,fourth instar, adult male, third, second and first instars, respectively. The differences in the responses of the predator to aphid densities are discussed.

  18. Coupling External Radiation Transport Code Results to the GADRAS Detector Response Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Thoreson, Gregory G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Horne, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection

    2014-01-01

    Simulating gamma spectra is useful for analyzing special nuclear materials. Gamma spectra are influenced not only by the source and the detector, but also by the external, and potentially complex, scattering environment. The scattering environment can make accurate representations of gamma spectra difficult to obtain. By coupling the Monte Carlo Nuclear Particle (MCNP) code with the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) detector response function, gamma spectrum simulations can be computed with a high degree of fidelity even in the presence of a complex scattering environment. Traditionally, GADRAS represents the external scattering environment with empirically derived scattering parameters. By modeling the external scattering environment in MCNP and using the results as input for the GADRAS detector response function, gamma spectra can be obtained with a high degree of fidelity. This method was verified with experimental data obtained in an environment with a significant amount of scattering material. The experiment used both gamma-emitting sources and moderated and bare neutron-emitting sources. The sources were modeled using GADRAS and MCNP in the presence of the external scattering environment, producing accurate representations of the experimental data.

  19. Structural and functional responses of benthic invertebrates to imidacloprid in outdoor stream mesocosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestana, J.L.T., E-mail: jpestana@ua.p [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Environment Canada at Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, 10 Bailey Drive, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Alexander, A.C., E-mail: alexa.alexander@unb.c [Environment Canada at Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, 10 Bailey Drive, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Culp, J.M., E-mail: jculp@unb.c [Environment Canada at Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, 10 Bailey Drive, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Baird, D.J., E-mail: djbaird@unb.c [Environment Canada at Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, 10 Bailey Drive, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Cessna, A.J., E-mail: asoares@ua.p [Environment Canada, National Hydrology Research Centre, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Soares, A.M.V.M., E-mail: asoares@ua.p [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2009-08-15

    Structural and functional responses of a benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage to pulses of the insecticide imidacloprid were assessed in outdoor stream mesocosms. Imidacloprid pulses reduced invertebrate abundance and community diversity in imidacloprid-dosed streams compared to control streams. These results correlated well with effects of imidacloprid on leaf litter decomposition and feeding rates of Pteronarcys comstocki, a stonefly, in artificial streams. Reductions in oxygen consumption of stoneflies exposed to imidacloprid were also observed in laboratory experiments. Our findings suggest that leaf litter degradation and single species responses can be sensitive ecotoxicological endpoints that can be used as early warning indicators and biomonitoring tools for pesticide contamination. The data generated illustrates the value of mesocosm experiments in environmental assessment and how the consideration of functional and structural endpoints of natural communities together with in situ single species bioassays can improve the evaluation and prediction of pesticide effects on stream ecosystems. - Combining organism-level responses with community-level processes for the evaluation and prediction of pesticide effects on stream ecosystems.

  20. The hidden function of photosynthesis: a sensing system for environmental conditions that regulates plant acclimation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Yang, Chunhong

    2012-06-01

    Plants convert light energy from the sun into chemical energy by photosynthesis. Since they are sessile, they have to deal with a wide range of conditions in their immediate environment. Many abiotic and biotic parameters exhibit considerable fluctuations which can have detrimental effects especially on the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting. During evolution, plants, therefore, evolved a number of acclimation processes which help them to adapt photosynthesis to such environmental changes. This includes protective mechanisms such as excess energy dissipation and processes supporting energy redistribution, e.g. state transitions or photosystem stoichiometry adjustment. Intriguingly, all these responses are triggered by photosynthesis itself via the interplay of its light reaction and the Calvin-Benson cycle with the residing environmental condition. Thus, besides its primary function in harnessing and converting light energy, photosynthesis acts as a sensing system for environmental changes that controls molecular acclimation responses which adapt the photosynthetic function to the environmental change. Important signalling parameters directly or indirectly affected by the environment are the pH gradient across the thylakoid membrane and the redox states of components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and/or electron end acceptors coupled to it. Recent advances demonstrate that these signals control post-translational modifications of the photosynthetic protein complexes and also affect plastid and nuclear gene expression machineries as well as metabolic pathways providing a regulatory framework for an integrated response of the plant to the environment at all cellular levels.

  1. Predicting therapeutic response to secondary treatment with bupropion: dichotic listening tests of functional brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Gerard E; Stewart, Jonathan W; Schaller, Jennifer D; McGrath, Patrick J

    2007-10-31

    Studies using neuroimaging, electrophysiologic and cognitive measures have raised hopes for developing predictors of therapeutic response to antidepressants. Pretreatment measures of functional brain asymmetry have been found to be related to response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. This report examines the extent to which dichotic listening tests also predict clinical response to an antidepressant with a different mechanism of action, i.e., bupropion. Dichotic listening data were obtained for 17 unmedicated depressed patients who were subsequently treated with bupropion. Right-handed outpatients were tested on dichotic fused-words and complex-tones tests. Seven patients who responded to bupropion and 10 nonresponders did not differ in gender, age or education. Bupropion responders had significantly larger left-hemisphere advantage for perceiving words when compared to nonresponders, but there was no difference in their right-hemisphere advantage for tones. All patients having a left-hemisphere advantage above the normal mean responded to bupropion, whereas only 9% of patients below the normal mean responded to treatment. These findings should encourage further study of the clinical value of dichotic listening and other measures of functional brain asymmetry for identifying depressed patients who most benefit from treatment with different classes of antidepressants.

  2. The impact of chromatin dynamics on plant light responses and circadian clock function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneche, Fredy; Malapeira, Jordi; Mas, Paloma

    2014-06-01

    Research on the functional properties of nucleosome structure and composition dynamics has revealed that chromatin-level regulation is an essential component of light signalling and clock function in plants, two processes that rely extensively on transcriptional controls. In particular, several types of histone post-translational modifications and chromatin-bound factors act sequentially or in combination to establish transcriptional patterns and to fine-tune the transcript abundance of a large repertoire of light-responsive genes and clock components. Cytogenetic approaches have also identified light-induced higher-order chromatin changes that dynamically organize the condensation of chromosomal domains into sub-nuclear foci containing silenced repeat elements. In this review, we report recently identified molecular actors that establish chromatin state dynamics in response to light signals such as photoperiod, intensity, and spectral quality. We also highlight the chromatin-dependent mechanisms that contribute to the 24-h circadian gene expression and its impact on plant physiology and development. The commonalities and contrasts of light- and clock-associated chromatin-based mechanisms are discussed, with particular emphasis on their impact on the selective regulation and rapid modulation of responsive genes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Functional response, host stage preference and interference of two whitefly parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Yun; Yang, Nian-Wan; Duan, Min; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2016-02-01

    The functional responses of two parasitoids, Eretmocerus hayati Zolnerowich & Rose and Encarsia sophia Girault & Dodd, of whitefly Bemisia tabaci Gennadius Middle East-Asia Minor 1 were studied under laboratory conditions. In addition, the influence of host density and host stage on the competitive interactions between the two parasitoids, and biological control effect on whitefly were evaluated. In the functional response study, adult parasitoids were tested individually, with a conspecific or heterospecific competitor. Both Er. hayati and En. sophia exhibited a type II response to increasing host density, whether a conspecific or heterospecific competitor was present or not. Difference of searching rates and handling times between treatments suggested interference interactions existed between two parasitoid species. In the host stage preference study, two parasitoid species were jointly tested. Er. hayati had a competitive advantage over En. sophia when provided young host instars (first and second instar), whereas no advantage was found on old host instars (third and fourth instar). The biological control effect of Er. hayati and En. sophia in different introductions varied with host density. However, the effect of host instar on host mortality was not significant. These findings provide information for the practice of biological control and give better insight into how parasitoid species may coexist in diverse environments.

  4. Diverse functional responses to drought in a Mediterranean-type shrubland in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A G; Dawson, T E; February, E C; Midgley, G F; Bond, W J; Aston, T L

    2012-07-01

    • Mediterranean-type ecosystems contain 20% of all vascular plant diversity on Earth and have been identified as being particularly threatened by future increases in drought. Of particular concern is the Cape Floral Region of South Africa, a global biodiversity hotspot, yet there are limited experimental data to validate predicted impacts on the flora. In a field rainout experiment, we tested whether rooting depth and degree of isohydry or anisohydry could aid in the functional classification of drought responses across diverse growth forms. • We imposed a 6-month summer drought, for 2 yr, in a mountain fynbos shrubland. We monitored a suite of parameters, from physiological traits to morphological outcomes, in seven species comprising the three dominant growth forms (deep-rooted proteoid shrubs, shallow-rooted ericoid shrubs and graminoid restioids). • There was considerable variation in drought response both between and within the growth forms. The shallow-rooted, anisohydric ericoid shrubs all suffered considerable reductions in growth and flowering and increased mortality. By contrast, the shallow-rooted, isohydric restioids and deep-rooted, isohydric proteoid shrubs were largely unaffected by the drought. • Rooting depth and degree of iso/anisohydry allow a first-order functional classification of drought response pathways in this flora. Consideration of additional traits would further refine this approach.

  5. Multi-response Optimization of Pectinase Processing Conditions on Blueberry Juice Extraction by Desirability Function Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Gao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Response Surface Methodology (RSM was employed to analyze the effect of pectinase processing on Juice Yield (JY, Total Anthocyanin content (TA, Total Phenol content (TP and Total Flavonoid content (TF of blueberry juice. The processing conditions included enzyme dosage, hydrolysis temperature and hydrolysis time. For resolving multi-response optimization, desirability function method was used to integrate JY, TA, TP and TF into a new target D (Desirability value. Predicted values of JY, TA, TP, TF and D were found to be in good agreement with experimental values as indicated by the high R2 values of 0.9963, 0.9217, 0.9586, 0.9901 and 0.9933, respectively. The optimum conditions were: enzyme dosage of 0.6 mg/g, hydrolysis temperature of 51.6°C and hydrolysis time of 2.36 h. At this optimum point, JY, TA, TP, TF and D were 71.406%, 420.367 mg/L, 2.784 g/L, 3.121 g/L and 0.9206, respectively. The study showed that RSM was an effective technique to model the effect of pectinase processing on blueberry juice parameters and desirability function method could be used for multi-response optimization of blueberry juice extraction.

  6. Coupling External Radiation Transport Code Results to the GADRAS Detector Response Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Thoreson, Gregory G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Horne, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection

    2014-01-01

    Simulating gamma spectra is useful for analyzing special nuclear materials. Gamma spectra are influenced not only by the source and the detector, but also by the external, and potentially complex scattering environment. The scattering environment can make accurate representations of gamma spectra difficult to obtain. By coupling the Monte Carlo Nuclear Particle (MCNP) code with the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) detector response function, gamma spectrum simulations can be computed with a high degree of fidelity even in the presence of a complex scattering environment. Traditionally, GADRAS represents the external scattering environment with empirically derived scattering parameters. By modeling the external scattering environment in MCNP and using the results as input for the GADRAS detector response function, gamma spectra can be obtained with a high degree of fidelity. This method was verified with experimental data obtained in an environment with a significant amount of scattering material. The experiment used both gamma-emitting sources and moderated and bare neutron-emitting sources. The sources were modeled using GADRAS and MCNP in the presence of the external scattering environment, producing accurate representations of the experimental data.

  7. Changes in tree functional composition amplify the response of forest biomass to climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichstein, Jeremy; Zhang, Tao; Niinemets, Ulo; Sheffield, Justin

    2017-04-01

    The response of forest carbon storage to climate change is highly uncertain, contributing substantially to the divergence among global climate model projections. Numerous studies have documented responses of forest ecosystems to climate change and variability, including drought-induced increases in tree mortality rates. However, the sensitivity of forests to climate variability - in terms of both biomass carbon storage and functional components of tree species composition - has yet to be quantified across a large region using systematically sampled data. Here, we combine systematic forest inventories across the eastern USA with a species-level drought-tolerance index, derived from a meta-analysis of published literature, to quantify changes in forest biomass and community-mean-drought-tolerance in one-degree grid cells from the 1980s to 2000s. We show that forest biomass responds to decadal-scale changes in water deficit and that this biomass response is amplified by concurrent changes in community-mean-drought-tolerance. The amplification of the direct effects of water stress on biomass occurs because water stress tends to induce a shift in tree species composition towards more drought-tolerant but lower-biomass species. Multiple plant functional traits are correlated with the above species-level drought-tolerance index, and likely contribute to the decrease in biomass with increasing drought-tolerance. These traits include wood density and P50 (the xylem water potential at which a plant loses 50% of its hydraulic conductivity). Simulations with a trait- and competition-based dynamic global vegetation model suggest that species differences in plant carbon allocation to wood, leaves, and fine roots also likely contribute to the observed decrease in biomass with increasing drought-tolerance, because competition drives plants to over-invest in fine roots when water is limiting. Thus, the most competitive species under dry conditions have greater root allocation but

  8. Form and function in hillslope hydrology: characterization of subsurface flow based on response observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Lisa; Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas; Sprenger, Matthias; Zehe, Erwin; Tronicke, Jens; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2017-07-01

    The phrase form and function was established in architecture and biology and refers to the idea that form and functionality are closely correlated, influence each other, and co-evolve. We suggest transferring this idea to hydrological systems to separate and analyze their two main characteristics: their form, which is equivalent to the spatial structure and static properties, and their function, equivalent to internal responses and hydrological behavior. While this approach is not particularly new to hydrological field research, we want to employ this concept to explicitly pursue the question of what information is most advantageous to understand a hydrological system. We applied this concept to subsurface flow within a hillslope, with a methodological focus on function: we conducted observations during a natural storm event and followed this with a hillslope-scale irrigation experiment. The results are used to infer hydrological processes of the monitored system. Based on these findings, the explanatory power and conclusiveness of the data are discussed. The measurements included basic hydrological monitoring methods, like piezometers, soil moisture, and discharge measurements. These were accompanied by isotope sampling and a novel application of 2-D time-lapse GPR (ground-penetrating radar). The main finding regarding the processes in the hillslope was that preferential flow paths were established quickly, despite unsaturated conditions. These flow paths also caused a detectable signal in the catchment response following a natural rainfall event, showing that these processes are relevant also at the catchment scale. Thus, we conclude that response observations (dynamics and patterns, i.e., indicators of function) were well suited to describing processes at the observational scale. Especially the use of 2-D time-lapse GPR measurements, providing detailed subsurface response patterns, as well as the combination of stream-centered and hillslope-centered approaches

  9. Dual functions of ASCIZ in the DNA base damage response and pulmonary organogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Jurado

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Zn²(+-finger proteins comprise one of the largest protein superfamilies with diverse biological functions. The ATM substrate Chk2-interacting Zn²(+-finger protein (ASCIZ; also known as ATMIN and ZNF822 was originally linked to functions in the DNA base damage response and has also been proposed to be an essential cofactor of the ATM kinase. Here we show that absence of ASCIZ leads to p53-independent late-embryonic lethality in mice. Asciz-deficient primary fibroblasts exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA base damaging agents MMS and H2O2, but Asciz deletion knock-down does not affect ATM levels and activation in mouse, chicken, or human cells. Unexpectedly, Asciz-deficient embryos also exhibit severe respiratory tract defects with complete pulmonary agenesis and severe tracheal atresia. Nkx2.1-expressing respiratory precursors are still specified in the absence of ASCIZ, but fail to segregate properly within the ventral foregut, and as a consequence lung buds never form and separation of the trachea from the oesophagus stalls early. Comparison of phenotypes suggests that ASCIZ functions between Wnt2-2b/ß-catenin and FGF10/FGF-receptor 2b signaling pathways in the mesodermal/endodermal crosstalk regulating early respiratory development. We also find that ASCIZ can activate expression of reporter genes via its SQ/TQ-cluster domain in vitro, suggesting that it may exert its developmental functions as a transcription factor. Altogether, the data indicate that, in addition to its role in the DNA base damage response, ASCIZ has separate developmental functions as an essential regulator of respiratory organogenesis.

  10. Depression alters maternal extended amygdala response and functional connectivity during distress signals in attachment relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, S Shaun; Swain, James E

    2017-05-15

    Maternal attachment-related parenting behaviors require mothers to regulate self-related and child-related distress. Emotion regulation is, in turn, influenced by maternal mood and personal developmental history. In the current study we examined how depressive mood may alter maternal limbic system function and functional connectivity underlying defensive and hedonic motivations. Twenty nine mothers were recruited to undergo a baby-cry task during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Based on self-reported depression symptoms and clinical interview, the participants were grouped as healthy controls (n=15) and currently depressed (n=14). In the baby-cry task, 30s-long auditory stimuli of baby-cry sounds were presented to simulate four conditions: generic baby-cry (Just-Listen), baby-cry as if it were their own child's cry (Your-Baby), baby-cry as if it were themselves (Self), and matched control sounds (Noise). Depressed mothers, as compared to healthy controls, showed greater Self versus Just-Listen responses in left extended amygdala and decreased functional coupling between this left extended amygdala as the seed and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in self-oriented (Self versus Just-Listen) and child-oriented (Your-Baby versus Just-Listen) distress signals. Moreover, the extended amygdala's differential functional connectivity with dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) during the Your-Baby versus Self was increased for depressed mothers and decreased for healthy controls. Thus, depression may affect mothers by increasing baby-cry threat responses and dysregulating associations between threat and heathy child-oriented parenting motivations. These results are discussed in the context of attachment and self-psychology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  12. Functional response of U.S. grasslands to the early 21st-century drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M Susan; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E; Huete, Alfredo; McClaran, Mitchel P; Zhang, Yongguang; Hamerlynck, Erik P; Augustine, David J; Gunter, Stacey A; Kitchen, Stanley G; Peters, Debra P C; Starks, Patrick J; Hernandez, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Grasslands across the United States play a key role in regional livelihood and national food security. Yet, it is still unclear how this important resource will respond to the prolonged warm droughts and more intense rainfall events predicted with climate change. The early 21st-century drought in the southwestern United States resulted in hydroclimatic conditions that are similar to those expected with future climate change. We investigated the impact of the early 21st-century drought on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of six desert and plains grasslands dominated by C4 (warm season) grasses in terms of significant deviations between observed and expected ANPP. In desert grasslands, drought-induced grass mortality led to shifts in the functional response to annual total precipitation (P(T)), and in some cases, new species assemblages occurred that included invasive species. In contrast, the ANPP in plains grasslands exhibited a strong linear function of the current-year P(T) and the previous-year ANPP, despite prolonged warm drought. We used these results to disentangle the impacts of interannual total precipitation, intra-annual precipitation patterns, and grassland abundance on ANPP, and thus generalize the functional response of C4 grasslands to predicted climate change. This will allow managers to plan for predictable shifts in resources associated with climate change related to fire risk, loss of forage, and ecosystem services.

  13. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented.

  14. Steady-State Contrast Response Functions Provide a Sensitive and Objective Index of Amblyopic Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel H.; Simard, Mathieu; Saint-Amour, Dave; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Visual deficits in amblyopia are neural in origin, yet are difficult to characterize with functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI). Our aim was to develop an objective electroencephalography (EEG) paradigm that can be used to provide a clinically useful index of amblyopic deficits. Methods. We used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) to measure full contrast response functions in both amblyopic (n = 10, strabismic or mixed amblyopia, mean age: 44 years) and control (n = 5, mean age: 31 years) observers, both with and without a dichoptic mask. Results. At the highest target contrast, the ratio of amplitudes across the weaker and stronger eyes was highly correlated (r = 0.76) with the acuity ratio between the eyes. We also found that the contrast response function in the amblyopic eye had both a greatly reduced amplitude and a shallower slope, but that surprisingly dichoptic masking was weaker than in controls. The results were compared with the predictions of a computational model of amblyopia and suggest a modification to the model whereby excitatory (but not suppressive) signals are attenuated in the amblyopic eye. Conclusions. We suggest that SSVEPs offer a sensitive and objective measure of the ocular imbalance in amblyopia and could be used to assess the efficacy of amblyopia therapies currently under development. PMID:25634977

  15. Bmi1 regulates mitochondrial function and the DNA damage response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jichun; Song, Shiwei; Lee, In Hye; Quijano, Celia; Liu, Hongjun; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Chen, Haoqian; Cao, Long-Yue; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Kumar, Neil G; Rovira, Ilsa I; Xu, Xiao-Ling; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Motoyama, Noboru; Deng, Chu-Xia; Finkel, Toren

    2009-05-21

    Mice deficient in the Polycomb repressor Bmi1 develop numerous abnormalities including a severe defect in stem cell self-renewal, alterations in thymocyte maturation and a shortened lifespan. Previous work has implicated de-repression of the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus as mediating many of the aspects of the Bmi1(-/-) phenotype. Here we demonstrate that cells derived from Bmi1(-/-) mice also have impaired mitochondrial function, a marked increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and subsequent engagement of the DNA damage response pathway. Furthermore, many of the deficiencies normally observed in Bmi1(-/-) mice improve after either pharmacological treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or genetic disruption of the DNA damage response pathway by Chk2 (also known as Chek2) deletion. These results demonstrate that Bmi1 has an unexpected role in maintaining mitochondrial function and redox homeostasis and indicate that the Polycomb family of proteins can coordinately regulate cellular metabolism with stem and progenitor cell function.

  16. Functional response analysis of Anisops sardea (Hemiptera: Notonectidae) against Culex quinquefasciatus in laboratory condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Rajendra Prasad; Ghosh, Anupam; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasis; Chandra, Goutam

    2014-10-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus is the principal vector of lymphatic filariasis (LF). Application of alternative vector control methodologies are aimed at reduction of mosquito breeding sites and biting activity through the use of biological control methods. In the present study, functional response of aquatic Hemipteran backswimmer, Anisops sardea was assessed against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae in laboratory bioassay. The functional respons of A. sardea was assessed against III(rd) instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Respective handling times and coefficient of attack rates were determined by a non linear polynomeal regression equation. The results of rates of predation in variable prey densities exhibited a 'linear rise to plateau curve', associated with 'Type -II' functional response. The logistic regression estimated a significant negative linear parameter (P(1) <0) which also supported the same observation. Associated 'attack rates' and 'handling times' were also calculated using the Holling Disc Equation. The results of present experiments indicate that A. sardea can be used as a biocontrol agent against the larval forms of Cx. quinquefasciatus in temporarily available breeding places of mosquito with relatively clear water. However, a detailed field study has to be done to confirm these findings.

  17. Switchable and responsive liquid crystal-functionalized microfibers produced via coaxial electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2012-03-01

    "Wearable technology" or "smart textiles" are concepts that are very rapidly gaining in attention around the world, as industry as well as academia are making major advances in integrating advanced devices with various textiles around our household. The technological challenges involved in this development are however considerable, calling for new solutions, new materials and truly original thinking. An attractive approach to realize certain classes of wearable devices may be to use textile fibers functionalized by responsive materials such as liquid crystals, normally not connected to textiles. We can produce non-woven textiles with such fibers by means of electrospinning, a technique for producing very thin polymer fibers that can be uniform or with core-sheath geometries. Since the core can be made out of traditionally non-spinnable materials we can use coaxial electrospinning (one fluid spun inside another) to produce composite fibers with a core of liquid crystal inside a polymer sheath. The resulting fibers constitute an entirely new configuration for applying liquid crystals, giving the fibers functionality and responsiveness. For instance, with a cholesteric core we can produce non-woven mats with iridescent color that can be tuned (or removed) e.g. by heating or cooling. In this paper I describe our method of producing these novel functionalized fibers and their characterization, and I will discuss the directions for future research and application possibilities, e.g. in clothing-integrated sensors and indicators.

  18. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulmonary function responses to ozone in smokers with a limited smoking history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Melissa L., E-mail: mlbates@pediatrics.wisc.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Critical Care Division, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Brenza, Timothy M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ben-Jebria, Abdellaziz [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bascom, Rebecca [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Eldridge, Marlowe W. [Department of Pediatrics, Critical Care Division, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Ultman, James S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In non-smokers, ozone (O{sub 3}) inhalation causes decreases in forced expiratory volume (FEV{sub 1}) and dead space (V{sub D}) and increases the slope of the alveolar plateau (S{sub N}). We previously described a population of smokers with a limited smoking history that had enhanced responsiveness to brief O{sub 3} boluses and aimed to determine if responsiveness to continuous exposure was also enhanced. Thirty smokers (19 M, 11 F, 24 ± 4 years, 6 ± 4 total years smoking,4 ± 2 packs/week) and 30 non-smokers (17 M, 13 F, 25 ± 6 years) exercised for 1 h on a cycle ergometer while breathing 0.30 ppm O{sub 3}. Smokers and non-smokers were equally responsive in terms of FEV{sub 1} (− 9.5 ± 1.8% vs − 8.7 ± 1.9%). Smokers alone were responsive in terms of V{sub D} (− 6.1 ± 1.2%) and S{sub N} (9.1 ± 3.4%). There was no difference in total delivered dose. Dead space ventilation (V{sub D}/V{sub T}) was not initially different between the two groups, but increased in the non-smokers (16.4 ± 2.8%) during the exposure, suggesting that the inhaled dose may be distributed more peripherally in smokers. We also conclude that these cigarette smokers retain their airway responsiveness to O{sub 3} and, uniquely, experience changes in V{sub D} that lead to heterogeneity in airway morphometry and an increase in S{sub N}. - Highlights: • We previously found lung function responses to O{sub 3} bolus exposure in smokers. • Here, we describe their responsiveness to continuous O{sub 3} exposure with exercise. • Spirometry and capnography were used to assess pulmonary function changes. • Enhanced bronchoconstriction in smokers increases parenchymal delivery of O{sub 3}.

  20. Functional analysis of the RNAi response in ovary-derived silkmoth Bm5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolliopoulou, Anna; Swevers, Luc

    2013-08-01

    Experiments of dsRNA-mediated gene silencing in lepidopteran insects in vivo are characterized by high variability although lepidopteran cell cultures have shown an efficient response to RNAi in transfection experiments. In order to identify the core RNAi factors that regulate the RNAi response of Lepidoptera, we employed the silkmoth ovary-derived Bm5 cells as a test system since this cell line is known to respond potently in silencing after dsRNA transfection. Two parallel approaches were used; involving knock-down of the core RNAi genes or over-expression of the main siRNA pathway factors, in order to study possible inhibition or stimulation of the RNAi silencing response, respectively. Components from all three main small RNA pathways (BmAgo-1 for miRNA, BmAgo-2/BmDcr-2 for siRNA, and BmAgo-3 for piRNA) were found to be involved in the RNAi response that is triggered by dsRNA. Since BmAgo-3, a factor in the piRNA pathway that functions independent of Dicer in Drosophila, was identified as a limiting factor in the RNAi response, sense and antisense ssRNA was also tested to induce gene silencing but proved to be ineffective, suggesting a dsRNA-dependent role for BmAgo-3 in Bombyx mori. After efficient over-expression of the main siRNA factors, immunofluorescence staining revealed a predominant cytoplasmic localization in Bm5 cells. This is the first study in Lepidoptera to provide evidence for possible overlapping of all three known small RNA pathways in the regulation of the dsRNA-mediated silencing response using transfected B. mori-derived Bm5 cells as experimental system.

  1. Predicting treatment response in social anxiety disorder from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrmann, Oliver; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Polli, Frida E; Reynolds, Gretchen O; Horn, Franziska; Keshavan, Anisha; Triantafyllou, Christina; Saygin, Zeynep M; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pollack, Mark; Gabrieli, John D

    2013-01-01

    Current behavioral measures poorly predict treatment outcome in social anxiety disorder (SAD). To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine neuroimaging-based treatment prediction in SAD. To measure brain activation in patients with SAD as a biomarker to predict subsequent response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected prior to CBT intervention. Changes in clinical status were regressed on brain responses and tested for selectivity for social stimuli. Patients were treated with protocol-based CBT at anxiety disorder programs at Boston University or Massachusetts General Hospital and underwent neuroimaging data collection at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Thirty-nine medication-free patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for the generalized subtype of SAD. Brain responses to angry vs neutral faces or emotional vs neutral scenes were examined with fMRI prior to initiation of CBT. Whole-brain regression analyses with differential fMRI responses for angry vs neutral faces and changes in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale score as the treatment outcome measure. Pretreatment responses significantly predicted subsequent treatment outcome of patients selectively for social stimuli and particularly in regions of higher-order visual cortex. Combining the brain measures with information on clinical severity accounted for more than 40% of the variance in treatment response and substantially exceeded predictions based on clinical measures at baseline. Prediction success was unaffected by testing for potential confounding factors such as depression severity at baseline. The results suggest that brain imaging can provide biomarkers that substantially improve predictions for the success of cognitive behavioral interventions and more generally suggest that such biomarkers may offer evidence-based, personalized medicine approaches for optimally selecting among treatment options for a patient.

  2. The rate of training response to aerobic exercise affects brain function of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika; Takeda, Masaki; Mimura, Tatsuya; Pajk, Melitta; Abraham, Dora; Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing volume of data connecting capacity to respond to exercise training with quality of life and aging. In this study, we used a rat model in which animals were selectively bred for low and high gain in running distance to test t whether genetic segregation for trainability is associated with brain function and signaling processes in the hippocampus. Rats selected for low response (LRT) and high response training (HRT) were randomly divided into control or exercise group that trained five times a week for 30 min per day for three months at 70% VO2max. All four groups had similar running distance before training. With training, HRT rats showed significantly greater increases in VO2max and running distance than LRT rats (p brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ratio of phospho and total cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), and apoptotic index, also showed significant differences between LRT and HRT groups. These findings suggest that aerobic training responses are not localized to skeletal muscle, but differently involve signaling processes in the brain of LRT and HRT rats.

  3. Spectrum response estimation for deep-water floating platforms via retardation function representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fushun; Liu, Chengcheng; Chen, Jiefeng; Wang, Bin

    2017-08-01

    The key concept of spectrum response estimation with commercial software, such as the SESAM software tool, typically includes two main steps: finding a suitable loading spectrum and computing the response amplitude operators (RAOs) subjected to a frequency-specified wave component. In this paper, we propose a nontraditional spectrum response estimation method that uses a numerical representation of the retardation functions. Based on estimated added mass and damping matrices of the structure, we decompose and replace the convolution terms with a series of poles and corresponding residues in the Laplace domain. Then, we estimate the power density corresponding to each frequency component using the improved periodogram method. The advantage of this approach is that the frequency-dependent motion equations in the time domain can be transformed into the Laplace domain without requiring Laplace-domain expressions for the added mass and damping. To validate the proposed method, we use a numerical semi-submerged pontoon from the SESAM. The numerical results show that the responses of the proposed method match well with those obtained from the traditional method. Furthermore, the estimated spectrum also matches well, which indicates its potential application to deep-water floating structures.

  4. Shadow response in the blind cavefish Astyanax reveals conservation of a functional pineal eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Jeffery, William R

    2008-02-01

    The blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus undergoes bilateral eye degeneration during embryonic development. Despite the absence of light in the cave environment, cavefish have retained a structurally intact pineal eye. We show here that contrary to visual degeneration in the bilateral eyes, the cavefish pineal eye has conserved the ability to detect light. Larvae of two different Astyanax cavefish populations and the con-specific sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) respond similarly to light dimming by shading the pineal eye. As a response to shading, cavefish larvae swim upward vertically. This behavior resembles that of amphibian tadpoles rather than other teleost larvae, which react to shadows by swimming downward. The shadow response is highest at 1.5-days post-fertilization (d.p.f.), gradually diminishes, and is virtually undetectable by 7.5 d.p.f. The shadow response was substantially reduced after surgical removal of the pineal gland from surface fish or cavefish larvae, indicating that it is based on pineal function. In contrast, removal of one or both bilateral eye primordia did not affect the shadow response. Consistent with its light detecting capacity, immunocytochemical studies indicate that surface fish and cavefish pineal eyes express a rhodopsin-like antigen, which is undetectable in the degenerating bilateral eyes of cavefish larvae. We conclude that light detection by the pineal eye has been conserved in cavefish despite a million or more years of evolution in complete darkness.

  5. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Simon; Gößl, Dorothée; Schmidt, Alexandra; Niedermayer, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Endres, Stefan; Bein, Thomas; Bourquin, Carole

    2015-12-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1β. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications.Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized

  6. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Visual Cortical Response by Means of Functional Transcranial Doppler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Roje-Bedekovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the visual evoked response and investigated side-to-side differences in mean blood flow velocities (MBFVs by means of functional transcranial Doppler (fTCD in 49 right-handed patients with severe internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis and 30 healthy volunteers, simultaneously in both posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs using 2 MHz probes, successively in the dark and during the white light stimulation. Statistically significant correlation (P=0.001 was shown in healthy and in patients (P0.05. The correlation between ipsilateral left PCA was significantly higher than the one with contralateral right PCA (P<0.05. There is a clear trend towards the lateralisation of the visual evoked response in the right PCA.

  7. Stimuli-responsive cellulose modified by epoxy-functionalized polymer nanoparticles with photochromic and solvatochromic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Amin; Rad, Jaber Keyvan; Mahdavian, Ali Reza

    2016-10-05

    Photoresponsive papers are among the fast and simple tools for detection of polarity by solvatochromic and photochromic behaviors upon UV irradiation. Here, a new, green and facile modification strategy was employed to prepare novel stimuli-responsive cellulose materials containing spiropyran by mixing microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), as a model compound, with epoxy-functionalized photochromic latex. FTIR analysis, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were used to confirm the microstructral properties. Crystallographic analysis revealed a decrease in crystallinity of cellulose matrix and approved the incorporation of photochromic copolymer. Then stimuli-responsive papers were prepared by using pulp paper as the cellulosic matrix and their smart characteristics were studied under UV irradiation while dried or immersed into some polar and non-polar solvents. Different color changes were observed and investigated by solid-state UV-vis spectroscopy. These significant results were attributed to the efficient chemical modification and confirmed by SEM, EDX and nitrogen mapping analyses.

  8. The uncertainty of crop yield projections is reduced by improved temperature response functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Enli; Martre, Pierre; Zhao, Zhigan

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the accuracy of crop productivity estimates is a key element in planning adaptation strategies to ensure global food security under climate change. Process-based crop models are effective means to project climate impact on crop yield, but have large uncertainty in yield simulations. Here...... response functions that when substituted in four wheat models reduced the error in grain yield simulations across seven global sites with different temperature regimes by 19% to 50% (42% average). We anticipate the improved temperature responses to be a key step to improve modelling of crops under rising...... temperature and climate change, leading to higher skill of crop yield projections. Process-based modelling of crop growth is an effective way of representing how crop genotype, environment and management interactions affect crop production to aid tactical and strategic decision making1. Process-based crop...

  9. Functional foods and urban agriculture: two responses to climate change-related food insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jane M; Donati, Kelly J; Pike, Lucy L; Hattersley, Libby

    2009-01-01

    Affluent diets have negative effects on the health of the population and the environment. Moreover, the ability of industrialised agricultural ecosystems to continue to supply these diets is threatened by the anticipated consequences of climate change. By challenging the ongoing supply the diets of affluent countries, climate change provides a population and environmental health opportunity. This paper contrasts two strategies for dealing with climate change-related food insecurity. Functional foods are being positioned as one response because they are considered a hyper-efficient mechanism for supplying essential micronutrients. An alternative response is civic and urban agriculture. Rather than emphasising increased economic or nutritional efficiencies, civic agriculture presents a holistic approach to food security that is more directly connected to the economic, environmental and social factors that affect diet and health.

  10. Normal response function method for mass and stiffness matrix updating using complex FRFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S.; Modak, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    Quite often a structural dynamic finite element model is required to be updated so as to accurately predict the dynamic characteristics like natural frequencies and the mode shapes. Since in many situations undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes need to be predicted, it has generally been the practice in these situations to seek updating of only mass and stiffness matrix so as to obtain a reliable prediction model. Updating using frequency response functions (FRFs) has been one of the widely used approaches for updating, including updating of mass and stiffness matrices. However, the problem with FRF based methods, for updating mass and stiffness matrices, is that these methods are based on use of complex FRFs. Use of complex FRFs to update mass and stiffness matrices is not theoretically correct as complex FRFs are not only affected by these two matrices but also by the damping matrix. Therefore, in situations where updating of only mass and stiffness matrices using FRFs is required, the use of complex FRFs based updating formulation is not fully justified and would lead to inaccurate updated models. This paper addresses this difficulty and proposes an improved FRF based finite element model updating procedure using the concept of normal FRFs. The proposed method is a modified version of the existing response function method that is based on the complex FRFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through a numerical study of a simple but representative beam structure. The effect of coordinate incompleteness and robustness of method under presence of noise is investigated. The results of updating obtained by the improved method are compared with the existing response function method. The performance of the two approaches is compared for cases of light, medium and heavily damped structures. It is found that the proposed improved method is effective in updating of mass and stiffness matrices in all the cases of complete and incomplete data and

  11. Impaired leukocyte trafficking and skin inflammatory responses in hamsters lacking a functional circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Cable, Erin J; Patel, Priyesh N; Pyter, Leah M; Onishi, Kenneth G; Stevenson, Tyler J; Ruby, Norman F; Bradley, Sean P

    2013-08-01

    The immune system is under strong circadian control, and circadian desynchrony is a risk factor for metabolic disorders, inflammatory responses and cancer. Signaling pathways that maintain circadian rhythms (CRs) in immune function in vivo, and the mechanisms by which circadian desynchrony impairs immune function, remain to be fully identified. These experiments tested the hypothesis that the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives CRs in the immune system, using a non-invasive model of SCN circadian arrhythmia. Robust CRs in blood leukocyte trafficking, with a peak during the early light phase (ZT4) and nadir in the early dark phase (ZT18), were absent in arrhythmic hamsters, as were CRs in spleen clock gene (per1, bmal1) expression, indicating that a functional pacemaker in the SCN is required for the generation of CRs in leukocyte trafficking and for driving peripheral clocks in secondary lymphoid organs. Pinealectomy was without effect on CRs in leukocyte trafficking, but abolished CRs in spleen clock gene expression, indicating that nocturnal melatonin secretion is necessary for communicating circadian time information to the spleen. CRs in trafficking of antigen presenting cells (CD11c(+) dendritic cells) in the skin were abolished, and antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity skin inflammatory responses were markedly impaired in arrhythmic hamsters. The SCN drives robust CRs in leukocyte trafficking and lymphoid clock gene expression; the latter of which is not expressed in the absence of melatonin. Robust entrainment of the circadian pacemaker provides a signal critical to diurnal rhythms in immunosurveilliance and optimal memory T-cell dependent immune responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of different esophageal carcinoma resection on the lung function, inflammatory factor production and stress response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Cai Zhang; Fu-Chun Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of thoracic minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and conventional thoracotomy on lung function, inflammatory factor and stress response for esophageal cancer patients.Methods:In this study, 288 cases of esophageal cancer patients were collected in our hospital from January 2011 to January 2016. Patients were randomly divided into observation group (n=144) and control group (n=144), the observation group received thoracic minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and control group underwent conventional open surgery. The levels of inflammatory cytokines indicators [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10] and stress response [white blood cell count (WBC), three free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), C-reactive protein (CRP), cortisol] were detected 1 d, 3 d and 5 d after surgery. Lung function [percent predicted vital capacity (VC%), percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume (FEV%), forced expiratory volume in 1 second percentage of predicted value (FEV1%), FVC% predicted percentage (FVC%), accounted for the maximum ventilation per minute, percentage of predicted value (MVV%)] of patients in two groups were measured 1 month after surgery.Results:Compared with the control group, VC and FVC in the observation group were significantly higher 1 month after surgery; the levels of TNF-α in patients of observation group were significantly lower than the control group 1 d, 3 d and 5 d after surgery; the levels IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in patients of observation group were significantly lower than the control group 1 d and 3 d after surgery but not on Day5. No significant difference was found in WBC, FT3, FT4, CRP and cortisol levels between the two groups.Conclusion:Compared with conventional thoracotomy, thoracic minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery can effectively reduce surgical trauma and inhibit the release of inflammatory factors, bring less effect on lung function and improve the

  13. rTMS neuromodulation improves electrocortical functional measures of information processing and behavioral responses in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estate M Sokhadze

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reports in autism spectrum disorders (ASD of a minicolumnopathy with consequent deficits of lateral inhibition help explain observed behavioral and executive dysfunctions. We propose that neuromodulation based on rTMS will enhance lateral inhibition through activation of inhibitory double bouquet interneurons and will be accompanied by improvements in the prefrontal executive functions. Methods: The current study used ERPs in a visual oddball task with illusory figures. We compared clinical, behavioral and electrocortical outcomes in 2 groups of children with autism (TMS, wait-list group [WTL]. We predicted that 18 session long course in autistic patients will have better behavioral and ERP outcomes as compared to age- and IQ-matched wait-list group. We used 18 sessions of 1Hz rTMS applied over the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex in 27 individuals with ASD diagnosis. The WTL group was comprised of 27 age-matched ASD subjects. Results: Post-TMS evaluations showed decreased irritability and hyperactivity and decreased stereotypic behaviors. Following rTMS we found decreased amplitude and prolonged latency in the fronto-central ERPs to non-targets in the TMS group. These ERP changes along with increased centro-parietal ERPs to targets are indicative of more efficient processing of information post-TMS. Another finding was increased magnitude of error-related negativity (ERN during commission errors. We calculated normative post-error reaction time (RT slowing response in both groups and found that rTMS was accompanied by post-error RT slowing and higher accuracy of responses, whereas the WTL group kept on showing typical for ASD post-error RT speeding and had higher error rate. Conclusion: Results from our study indicate that rTMS improves executive functioning in ASD as evidenced by normalization of ERP responses and behavioral reactions during executive function test, and also by improvements in clinical behavioral evaluations.

  14. Assessing Understanding of the Concept of Function: A Study Comparing Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Responses to Multiple-Choice and Constructed-Response Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Susan Jane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether multiple-choice and constructed-response items assessed prospective secondary mathematics teachers' understanding of the concept of function. The conceptual framework for the study was the Dreyfus and Eisenberg (1982) Function Block. The theoretical framework was Sierpinska's (1992, 1994)…

  15. A binaural advantage in the subjective modulation transfer function with simple impulse responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Eric Robert; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    into account that humans listen with two ears. There can be large interaural phase differences in the modulation transfer functions, which can create detectable interaural level difference fluctuations. Measurements were made to determine whether these interaural modulation phase differences can be used...... to enhance the detectability of sinusoidal intensity modulations imposed on a broadband noise carrier and then convolved with simple, dichotic impulse responses. The results show that there can be a significant advantage to listening with two ears over listening with just one. Some further investigations...... were made to determine whether this advantage in signal detection can also be used as an advantage for speech intelligibility....

  16. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, M P; Guo, S; Kalinin, S V; Jesse, S [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reukov, V V; Thompson, G L; Vertegel, A A, E-mail: sergei2@ornl.go [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  17. Thermodynamic response functions and Maxwell relations for a Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Escamilla, L

    2015-01-01

    Assuming the existence of a fundamental thermodynamic relation, the classical thermodynamics of a black hole with mass and angular momentum is given. New definitions of response functions and $TdS$ equations are introduced and mathematical analogous of the Euler equation and Gibbs-Duhem relation are founded. Thermodynamic stability is studied from concavity conditions, resulting in an unstable equilibrium at all the domain except for a region of local stable equilibrium. Maxwell relations are written, allowing to build the thermodynamic squares. Our results shown an interesting analogy between thermodynamics of gravitational and magnetic systems.

  18. Microeconomics of Deficit Irrigation and Subjective Water Response Function for Intensive Olive Groves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Expósito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper analyzes the economics of deficit irrigation based on the use of subjective estimates of the crop yield–water relationship to determine water supply in irrigated olive groves. Interviewed farmers were asked to give three estimates for the yield-water relationship as a function of water supply (full irrigation, usual deficit irrigation and extreme deficit irrigation. Those responses are contrasted with the actual irrigation dose and the results appear to support the hypothesis that a majority of farmers use deficit irrigation as a strategy that maximizes the value of limited water input rather than the conventional microeconomic behavior of maximizing the return to land.

  19. Correspondence between phasor transforms and frequency response function in RLC circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Hassan Mohamed Abdelalim

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of RLC circuits is usually made by considering phasor transforms of sinusoidal signals (characterized by constant amplitude, period and phase) that allow the calculation of the AC steady state of RLC circuits by solving simple algebraic equations. In this paper I try to show that phasor representation of RLC circuits is analogue to consider the frequency response function (commonly designated by FRF) of the total impedance of the circuit. In this way I derive accurate expressions for the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and their corresponding values of impedances of the parallel and series RLC circuits respectively, notwithstanding the presence of damping effects.

  20. A NRESPG Monte Carlo code for the calculation of neutron response functions for gas counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, K.; Takeda, N.; Fukuda, A. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Torii, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Sugita, T.; Yang, X.; Dietze, G.

    1996-07-01

    In this paper, we show the outline of the NRESPG and some typical results of the response functions and efficiencies of several kinds of gas counters. The cross section data for the several kinds of filled gases and the wall material of stainless steel or aluminum are taken mainly from ENDF/B-IV. The ENDF/B-V for stainless steel is also used to investigate the influence on pulse height spectra of gas counters due to the difference of nuclear data files. (J.P.N.)

  1. Dynamical behavior of a three species food chain model with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, Raid Kamel [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Baghdad (Iraq)]. E-mail: rknaji@yahoo.com; Balasim, Alla Tariq [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Baghdad (Iraq)]. E-mail: alkhazrejy@yahoo.com

    2007-06-15

    A three species food chain model with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response is investigated. The local stability analysis is carried out and global behavior is simulated numerically for a biologically feasible choice of parameters. The persistence conditions of a food chain model are established. The bifurcation diagrams are obtained for different parameters of the model after intensive numerical simulations. The results of simulations show that the model could exhibit chaotic dynamics for realistic and biologically feasible parametric values. Finally, the effect of immigration within prey species is investigated. It is observed that adding small amount of constant immigration to prey species stabilize the system.

  2. Brain Cholinergic Function and Response to Rivastigmine in Patients With Chronic Sequels of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östberg, Anna; Virta, Jere; Rinne, Juha O

    2017-01-01

    subjects for more than 1 year after at least moderate traumatic brain injury. Ten of the subjects were respondents and 7 nonrespondents to cholinergic medication. DESIGN:: Cholinergic function was assessed with [methyl-C] N-methylpiperidyl-4-acetate-PET (C-MP4A-PET), which reflects the activity...... was notably lower throughout the cortex in both respondents and nonrespondents, without significant differences between them. CONCLUSION:: Our study suggests that frontal cholinergic dysfunction is associated with the clinical response to cholinergic stimulation in patients with traumatic brain injury....

  3. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  4. Dynamical behaviors and chaos control in a discrete functional response model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yue [Institute of Systems Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)]. E-mail: zyueneu@sina.com; Zhang Qingling [Institute of Systems Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)]. E-mail: qlzhang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Zhao Lichun [Department of Mathematics, Anshan Teachers College, Anshan 114005 (China); Yang Chunyu [Institute of Systems Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2007-11-15

    In this paper, the dynamical behaviors and chaos control are investigated in a discrete functional response model. It is verified that there are phenomena of the transcritical bifurcation, flip bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation types and chaos in the sense of Marotto's definition. Specifically, a controller is designed to stabilize the chaotic orbits and enable them to be an ideal target one (i.e., an unstable fixed point of the chaotic system). Finally, numerical simulations not only show the consistency with theoretical analysis but also exhibit the complex dynamical behaviors.

  5. Impulse-response function of splanchnic circulation with model-independent constraints: theory and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    Modeling physiological processes using tracer kinetic methods requires knowledge of the time course of the tracer concentration in blood supplying the organ. For liver studies, however, inaccessibility of the portal vein makes direct measurement of the hepatic dual-input function impossible...... sampling in aorta and portal vein were made in 13 anesthetized pigs following inhalation of intravascular [15O]CO or injections of diffusible 3-O-[11C]methylglucose (MG). The parameters of the impulse-response function have a physiological interpretation in terms of the distribution of washout constants...... and are mathematically equivalent to the mean transit time (T) and standard deviation of transit times. The results include estimates of mean transit times from the aorta to the portal vein in pigs: T = 0.35 +/- 0.05 min for CO and 1.7 +/- 0.1 min for MG. The prediction of the portal venous time-activity curve benefits...

  6. Undersized annuloplasty for functional mitral regurgitation: is it responsible for clinically relevant mitral stenosis during exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Antonio; De Bonis, Michele; Pappalardo, Federico; Taramasso, Maurizio; Verzini, Alessandro; Calabrese, Maria Chiara; Maisano, Francesco; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2012-07-01

    The study aim was to assess if an undersized mitral annuloplasty for functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) in dilated cardiomyopathy can determine a clinically relevant mitral stenosis during exercise. Both, rest and stress echocardiography were performed in 12 patients submitted to an undersized ring annuloplasty for FMR in dilated cardiomyopathy. The mean ring size was 27 +/- 1.3 mm. All patients were in NYHA functional classes I-II, were in stable sinus rhythm, and without significant residual mitral regurgitation (grade stroke volume (63 +/- 15 versus 77 +/- 14 ml, p FMR. Stress echocardiography represents a valuable tool to assess an appropriate cardiac response to exercise and to detect a significant exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension after undersized annuloplasty ring surgery.

  7. Some Exact Properties of the Nonequilibrium Response Function for Transient Photoabsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Perfetto, E

    2015-01-01

    The physical interpretation of time-resolved photoabsorption experiments is not as straightforward as for the more conventional photoabsorption experiments conducted on equilibrium systems. In fact, the relation between the transient photoabsorption spectrum and the properties of the examined sample can be rather intricate since the former is a complicated functional of both the driving pump and the feeble probe fields. In this work we critically review the derivation of the time-resolved photoabsorption spectrum in terms of the nonequilibrium dipole response function $\\chi$ and assess its domain of validity. We then analyze $\\chi$ in detail and discuss a few exact properties useful to interpret the transient spectrum {\\em during} (overlapping regime) and {\\em after} (nonoverlapping regime) the action of the pump. The nonoverlapping regime is the simplest to address. The absorption energies are indeed independent of the delay between the pump and probe pulses and hence the transient spectrum can change only b...

  8. Functionally Graded Interfaces: Role and Origin of Internal Electric Field and Modulated Electrical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Bo; Kang, Min-Gyu; Nguyen, Peter; Hudait, Mantu K; Priya, Shashank

    2015-10-14

    We report the tunable electrical response in functionally graded interfaces in lead-free ferroelectric thin films. Multilayer thin film graded heterostructures were synthesized on platinized silicon substrate with oxide layers of varying thickness. Interestingly, the graded heterostructure thin films exhibited shift of the hysteresis loops on electric field and polarization axes depending upon the direction of an applied bias. A diode-like characteristics was observed in current-voltage behavior under forward and reverse bias. This modulated electrical behavior was attributed to the perturbed dynamics of charge carriers under internal bias (self-bias) generated due to the increased skewness of the potential wells. The cyclic sweeping of voltage further demonstrated memristor-like current-voltage behavior in functionally graded heterostructure devices. The presence of an internal bias assisted the generation of photocurrent by facilitating the separation of photogenerated charges. These novel findings provide opportunity to design new circuit components for the next generation of microelectronic device architectures.

  9. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  10. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness after Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B.B.; Jensen, J.S.; Nielsen, K.G.

    2008-01-01

    .17 versus 1.21 (kPa sec), P=0.45; and mean change in specific resistance was 13% versus 9%, P= 0.42. In conclusion, M. pneumoniae infection in early childhood was not associated with long-term effects on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness 2 years after infection Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6......Mycoplasma (M.) pneumoniae has been associated with exacerbation of symptoms in asthmatic school children and adults; and an etiological role in asthma has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether infection with M. pneumoniae in early childhood has a long-term influence...... on lung function and bronchial responsiveness. In a retrospective, clinical cohort-study children younger than 5 years-of-age when PCR-tested for M. pneumoniae were enrolled. Sixty-five children with clinical symptoms suggesting infection with M. pneumoniae during an epidemic season completed a clinical...

  11. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Heidegger, S; Schmidt, A; Gößl, D; Argyo, C; Endres, S; Bein, T; Bourquin, C

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-funct...

  12. TORSIONAL IMPACT RESPONSE OF A PENNY-SHAPED CRACK IN A FUNCTIONAL GRADED STRIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯文杰; 李向国; 王守东

    2004-01-01

    The torsional impact response of a penny-shaped crack in a nonhomogeneous strip is considered. The shear modulus is assumed to be functionally graded such that the reduce the problem to solving a Fredholm integral equation. The crack tip stress field is obtained by considering behavior of Bessel function. Explicit expressions of both the dynamic stress intensity factor and the energy density factor were derived. And it is shown that, as crack igated are the effects of material nonhomogeneity and strip's highness on the dynamic fracture behavior.at the peak of the dynamic stress intensity factor can be suppressed by increasing the nonhomogeneity parameter of the shear modulus, and that the ting of the strip' s highness.

  13. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH(-/-)) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  14. Simulation and Analysis of Spectral Response Function and Bandwidth of Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simulation method for acquiring spectrometer’s Spectral Response Function (SRF based on Huygens Point Spread Function (PSF is suggested. Taking into account the effects of optical aberrations and diffraction, the method can obtain the fine SRF curve and corresponding spectral bandwidth at any nominal wavelength as early as in the design phase. A prism monochromator is proposed for illustrating the simulation procedure. For comparison, a geometrical ray-tracing method is also provided, with bandwidth deviations varying from 5% at 250 nm to 25% at 2400 nm. Further comparison with reported experiments shows that the areas of the SRF profiles agree to about 1%. However, the weak scattered background light on the level of 10−4 to 10−5 observed by experiment could not be covered by this simulation. This simulation method is a useful tool for forecasting the performance of an underdesigned spectrometer.

  15. Functional responses and resilience of boreal forest ecosystem after reduction of deer density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachand, Marianne; Pellerin, Stéphanie; Moretti, Marco; Aubin, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D; Poulin, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The functional trait-based approach is increasingly used to predict responses of ecological communities to disturbances, but most studies target a single taxonomic group. Here, we assessed the resilience of a forest ecosystem to an overabundant herbivore population by assessing changes in 19 functional traits for plant, 13 traits for ground beetle and 16 traits for songbird communities after six years of controlled browsing on Anticosti Island (Quebec, Canada). Our results indicated that plants were more responsive to 6 years of reduced browsing pressure than ground beetles and songbirds. However, co-inertia analysis revealed that ground beetle communities responded in a similar way than plant communities with stronger relationships between plant and ground beetle traits at reduced deer density, a pattern not detected between plant and songbird. High deer density favored plants species that reproduce vegetatively and with abiotic pollination and seed dispersal, traits implying little interaction with animal. On the other hand, traits found at reduced deer density mostly involved trophic interaction. For example, plants in this treatment had fleshy fruits and large seeds dispersed by birds or other animals whereas ground beetle species were carnivorous. Overall, our results suggest that plant communities recovered some functional components to overabundant herbivore populations, since most traits associated with undisturbed forests were reestablished after six years of deer reduction. The re-establishment of functional plant communities with traits involving trophic interaction induces changes in the ground-beetle trait community, but forest structure remains likely insufficiently heterogeneous to shift the songbird trait community within six years.

  16. Functional responses and resilience of boreal forest ecosystem after reduction of deer density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Bachand

    Full Text Available The functional trait-based approach is increasingly used to predict responses of ecological communities to disturbances, but most studies target a single taxonomic group. Here, we assessed the resilience of a forest ecosystem to an overabundant herbivore population by assessing changes in 19 functional traits for plant, 13 traits for ground beetle and 16 traits for songbird communities after six years of controlled browsing on Anticosti Island (Quebec, Canada. Our results indicated that plants were more responsive to 6 years of reduced browsing pressure than ground beetles and songbirds. However, co-inertia analysis revealed that ground beetle communities responded in a similar way than plant communities with stronger relationships between plant and ground beetle traits at reduced deer density, a pattern not detected between plant and songbird. High deer density favored plants species that reproduce vegetatively and with abiotic pollination and seed dispersal, traits implying little interaction with animal. On the other hand, traits found at reduced deer density mostly involved trophic interaction. For example, plants in this treatment had fleshy fruits and large seeds dispersed by birds or other animals whereas ground beetle species were carnivorous. Overall, our results suggest that plant communities recovered some functional components to overabundant herbivore populations, since most traits associated with undisturbed forests were reestablished after six years of deer reduction. The re-establishment of functional plant communities with traits involving trophic interaction induces changes in the ground-beetle trait community, but forest structure remains likely insufficiently heterogeneous to shift the songbird trait community within six years.

  17. Early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chunlan Chen,* Wenhua Jian,* Yi Gao, Yanqing Xie, Yan Song, Jinping Zheng State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, China National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: It is unknown whether aggressive medication strategies should be used for early COPD with or without lung hyperinflation. We aimed to explore the characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness of early COPD patients (stages I and II with/without lung hyperinflation.Methods: Four hundred and six patients with COPD who performed both lung volume and bronchodilation tests were retrospectively analyzed. Residual volume to total lung capacity >120% of predicted values indicated lung hyperinflation. The characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness were compared between the patients with and without lung hyperinflation across all stages of COPD.Results: The percentages of patients with lung hyperinflation were 72.7% in the entire cohort, 19.4% in stage I, 68.5% in stage II, 95.3% in stage III, and 100.0% in stage IV. The patients with lung hyperinflation exhibited poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness of both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity than those without lung hyperinflation during early COPD (t=2.21–5.70, P=0.000–0.029, especially in stage I, while age, body mass index, smoking status, smoking history, and disease duration were similar between the two subgroups in the same stages. From stages I to IV of subgroups with lung hyperinflation, stage I patients had the best bronchodilator responsiveness. Use of bronchodilator responsiveness of forced vital capacity to detect the presence of lung hyperinflation in COPD patients showed relatively high sensitivities (69.5%–75.3% and specificities (70.3%

  18. Diet-Induced Weight Loss Alters Functional Brain Responses during an Episodic Memory Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan; Stomby, Andreas; Ryberg, Mats; Lindahl, Bernt; Larsson, Christel; Nyberg, Lars; Olsson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that overweight is negatively associated with cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a reduction in body weight by dietary interventions could improve episodic memory performance and alter associated functional brain responses in overweight and obese women. 20 overweight postmenopausal women were randomized to either a modified paleolithic diet or a standard diet adhering to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations for 6 months. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain function during an episodic memory task as well as anthropometric and biochemical data before and after the interventions. Episodic memory performance improved significantly (p = 0.010) after the dietary interventions. Concomitantly, brain activity increased in the anterior part of the right hippocampus during memory encoding, without differences between diets. This was associated with decreased levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFA). Brain activity increased in pre-frontal cortex and superior/middle temporal gyri. The magnitude of increase correlated with waist circumference reduction. During episodic retrieval, brain activity decreased in inferior and middle frontal gyri, and increased in middle/superior temporal gyri. Diet-induced weight loss, associated with decreased levels of plasma FFA, improves episodic memory linked to increased hippocampal activity. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  19. Do behavioral foraging responses of prey to predators function similarly in restored and pristine foodwebs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M P Madin

    Full Text Available Efforts to restore top predators in human-altered systems raise the question of whether rebounds in predator populations are sufficient to restore pristine foodweb dynamics. Ocean ecosystems provide an ideal system to test this question. Removal of fishing in marine reserves often reverses declines in predator densities and size. However, whether this leads to restoration of key functional characteristics of foodwebs, especially prey foraging behavior, is unclear. The question of whether restored and pristine foodwebs function similarly is nonetheless critically important for management and restoration efforts. We explored this question in light of one important determinant of ecosystem function and structure--herbivorous prey foraging behavior. We compared these responses for two functionally distinct herbivorous prey fishes (the damselfish Plectroglyphidodon dickii and the parrotfish Chlorurus sordidus within pairs of coral reefs in pristine and restored ecosystems in two regions of these species' biogeographic ranges, allowing us to quantify the magnitude and temporal scale of this key ecosystem variable's recovery. We demonstrate that restoration of top predator abundances also restored prey foraging excursion behaviors to a condition closely resembling those of a pristine ecosystem. Increased understanding of behavioral aspects of ecosystem change will greatly improve our ability to predict the cascading consequences of conservation tools aimed at ecological restoration, such as marine reserves.

  20. Conserved and Variable Functions of the sigma(E Stress Response in Related Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often cope with environmental stress by inducing alternative sigma (sigma factors, which direct RNA polymerase to specific promoters, thereby inducing a set of genes called a regulon to combat the stress. To understand the conserved and organism-specific functions of each sigma, it is necessary to be able to predict their promoters, so that their regulons can be followed across species. However, the variability of promoter sequences and motif spacing makes their prediction difficult. We developed and validated an accurate promoter prediction model for Escherichia coli sigma(E, which enabled us to predict a total of 89 unique sigma(E-controlled transcription units in E. coli K-12 and eight related genomes. sigma(E controls the envelope stress response in E. coli K-12. The portion of the regulon conserved across genomes is functionally coherent, ensuring the synthesis, assembly, and homeostasis of lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane porins, the key constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The larger variable portion is predicted to perform pathogenesis-associated functions, suggesting that sigma(E provides organism-specific functions necessary for optimal host interaction. The success of our promoter prediction model for sigma(E suggests that it will be applicable for the prediction of promoter elements for many alternative sigma factors.

  1. Micromechanics and Structural Response of Functionally Graded, Particulate-Matrix, Fiber-Reinforced Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Guy M; Birman, Victor

    2009-05-15

    Reinforcement of fibrous composites by stiff particles embedded in the matrix offers the potential for simple, economical functional grading, enhanced response to mechanical loads, and improved functioning at high temperatures. Here, we consider laminated plates made of such a material, with spherical reinforcement tailored by layer. The moduli for this material lie within relatively narrow bounds. Two separate moduli estimates are considered: a "two-step" approach in which fibers are embedded in a homogenized particulate matrix, and the Kanaun-Jeulin (2001) approach, which we re-derive in a simple way using the Benveniste (1988) method. Optimal tailoring of a plate is explored, and functional grading is shown to improve the performance of the structures considered. In the example of a square, simply supported, cross-ply laminated panel subjected to uniform transverse pressure, a modest functional grading offers significant improvement in performance. A second example suggests superior blast resistance of the panel achieved at the expense of only a small increase in weight.

  2. Diet-Induced Weight Loss Alters Functional Brain Responses during an Episodic Memory Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl-Johan Boraxbekk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been suggested that overweight is negatively associated with cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a reduction in body weight by dietary interventions could improve episodic memory performance and alter associated functional brain responses in overweight and obese women. Methods: 20 overweight postmenopausal women were randomized to either a modified paleolithic diet or a standard diet adhering to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations for 6 months. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain function during an episodic memory task as well as anthropometric and biochemical data before and after the interventions. Results: Episodic memory performance improved significantly (p = 0.010 after the dietary interventions. Concomitantly, brain activity increased in the anterior part of the right hippocampus during memory encoding, without differences between diets. This was associated with decreased levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFA. Brain activity increased in pre-frontal cortex and superior/middle temporal gyri. The magnitude of increase correlated with waist circumference reduction. During episodic retrieval, brain activity decreased in inferior and middle frontal gyri, and increased in middle/superior temporal gyri. Conclusions: Diet-induced weight loss, associated with decreased levels of plasma FFA, improves episodic memory linked to increased hippocampal activity.

  3. Characterization of the equine skeletal muscle transcriptome identifies novel functional responses to exercise training

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    MacHugh David E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital gene expression profiling was used to characterize the assembly of genes expressed in equine skeletal muscle and to identify the subset of genes that were differentially expressed following a ten-month period of exercise training. The study cohort comprised seven Thoroughbred racehorses from a single training yard. Skeletal muscle biopsies were collected at rest from the gluteus medius at two time points: T1 - untrained, (9 ± 0.5 months old and T2 - trained (20 ± 0.7 months old. Results The most abundant mRNA transcripts in the muscle transcriptome were those involved in muscle contraction, aerobic respiration and mitochondrial function. A previously unreported over-representation of genes related to RNA processing, the stress response and proteolysis was observed. Following training 92 tags were differentially expressed of which 74 were annotated. Sixteen genes showed increased expression, including the mitochondrial genes ACADVL, MRPS21 and SLC25A29 encoded by the nuclear genome. Among the 58 genes with decreased expression, MSTN, a negative regulator of muscle growth, had the greatest decrease. Functional analysis of all expressed genes using FatiScan revealed an asymmetric distribution of 482 Gene Ontology (GO groups and 18 KEGG pathways. Functional groups displaying highly significant (P Conclusion Exercise training in Thoroughbred racehorses results in coordinate changes in the gene expression of functional groups of genes related to metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and muscle structure.

  4. A temperature response function for modeling leaf growth and development of the African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Response functions used in crop simulation models are usually different for different physiological processes and cultivars, resulting in many unknown coefficients in the response functions. This is the case of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl., where a generalized temperature response for leaf growth and development has not been developed yet. The objective of this study was to develop a generalized nonlinear temperature response function for leaf appearance rate and leaf elongation rate in African violet. The nonlinear function has three coefficients, which are the cardinal temperatures (minimum, optimum, and maximum temperatures. These coefficients were defined as 10, 24, and 33ºC, based on the cardinal temperatures of other tropical species. Data of temperature response of leaf appearance rate and leaf elongation rate in African violet, cultivar Utah, at different light levels, which are from published research, were used as independent data for evaluating the performance of the nonlinear temperature response function. The results showed that a generalized nonlinear response function can be used to describe the temperature response of leaf growth and development in African violet. These results imply that a reduction in the number of input data required in African violet simulation models is possible.

  5. Autonomic Function Predicts Fitness Response to Short-Term High-Intensity Interval Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, A M; Tulppo, M P; Eskelinen, J J; Savolainen, A M; Kapanen, J; Heinonen, I H A; Hautala, A J; Hannukainen, J C; Kalliokoski, K K

    2015-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that baseline cardiac autonomic function and its acute response to all-out interval exercise explains individual fitness responses to high-intensity interval training (HIT). Healthy middle-aged sedentary men performed HIT (n=12, 4-6×30 s of all-out cycling efforts with 4-min recovery) or aerobic training (AET, n=9, 40-60 min at 60% of peak workload in exercise test [Loadpeak]), comprising 6 sessions within 2 weeks. Low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power of R-R interval oscillation were analyzed from data recorded at supine and standing position (5+5 min) every morning during the intervention. A significant training effect (ptraining*group interaction, was observed in Loadpeak and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Pre-training supine LF/HF ratio, an estimate of sympathovagal balance, correlated with training outcome in Loadpeak (Spearman's rho [rs]=-0.74, p=0.006) and VO2peak (rs=- 0.59, p=0.042) in the HIT but not the AET group. Also, the mean change in the standing LF/HF ratio in the morning after an acute HIT exercise during the 1(st) week of intervention correlated with training response in Loadpeak (rs=- 0.68, p=0.014) and VO2peak (rs=-0.60, p=0.039) with HIT but not with AET. In conclusion, pre-training cardiac sympathovagal balance and its initial alterations in response to acute HIT exercise were related to fitness responses to short-term HIT. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Glial response in the rat models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuronal denervations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataveljic, Danijela; Petrovic, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Saponjic, Jasna; Andjus, Pavle

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, particularly in the nucleus basalis (NB). Similarly, Parkinson's disease (PD) might involve the selective loss of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons. Therefore, lesions of these functionally distinct cholinergic centers in rats might serve as models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. Our previous articles described dissimilar sleep/wake-state disorders in rat models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. This study further examines astroglial and microglial responses as underlying pathologies in these distinct sleep disorders. Unilateral lesions of the NB or the PPT were induced with rats under ketamine/diazepam anesthesia (50 mg/kg i.p.) by using stereotaxically guided microinfusion of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). Twenty-one days after the lesion, loss of cholinergic neurons was quantified by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry, and the astroglial and microglial responses were quantified by glia fibrillary acidic protein/OX42 immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the anatomofunctionally related astroglial response following unilateral excitotoxic PPT cholinergic neuronal lesion. Whereas IBO NB and PPT lesions similarly enhanced local astroglial and microglial responses, astrogliosis in the PPT was followed by a remote astrogliosis within the ipslilateral NB. Conversely, there was no microglial response within the NB after PPT lesions. Our results reveal the rostrorostral PPT-NB astrogliosis after denervation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT. This hierarchically and anatomofunctionally guided PPT-NB astrogliosis emerged following cholinergic neuronal loss greater than 17% throughout the overall rostrocaudal PPT dimension.

  7. The response to sulpiride in social anxiety disorder: D2 receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caroline; Bhikha, Shamina; Colhoun, Helen; Carter, Frances; Frampton, Chris; Porter, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) have a hypoactive central dopaminergic system. Supporting this there have been reports from neuroimaging studies of reduced striatal D2 receptor binding in subjects with SAD. The aim of this study was to investigate D2 receptor sensitivity in patients with SAD compared with a group of matched, healthy controls using a neuroendocrine challenge with the selective D2 antagonist, sulpiride. D2 receptor function was assessed in 23 subjects with generalized SAD and 23 matched, healthy controls using a challenge with 400 mg of a selective D2 antagonist, sulpiride in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Response to sulpiride was measured by the change in prolactin level and changes in self-rated measures of social anxiety, mood and the ability to experience pleasure. There was no significant difference in prolactin response to sulpiride between the two groups. Sulpiride resulted in no effect in either the SAD or healthy control group on measures of social anxiety, mood or the ability to experience pleasure. Contrary to our hypothesis, in this study we found no evidence of reduced D2 receptor function in subjects with SAD compared with healthy controls.

  8. Simulation studies of the response function of a radioactive waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.gurau@ymail.com [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Sima, Octavian [Physics Department, Bucharest University, P.O.B. MG-11, RO-077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2012-01-15

    A simulation program based on GEANT 3.21 toolkit was developed to simulate the response function of ISOCART (Ortec) gamma-ray spectrometry system applied to radioactive waste drum assessment. In view of studying the effects of possible non-homogeneous radioactivity distribution in the drum, the volume of the drum was fictitiously divided into several spatial domains. The simulation program was applied repeatedly considering each time the source distributed in another domain. In this way the expected spectra in the energy range from 50 to 2000 keV as well as the full energy peak and the total efficiencies were obtained for the case when the source is distributed in each domain and also for the case when the source is uniformly distributed in the entire drum. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation technique for calibration of radioactive waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Monte Carlo simulation program was based on GEANT 3.21 toolkit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Response function of ISOCART gamma-ray spectrometry evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volume of the drum fictitiously divided into several spatial domains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full energy peak and total efficiencies evaluated.

  9. Functional changes of the reward system underlie blunted response to social gaze in cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, Katrin H; Herdener, Marcus; Schilbach, Leonhard; Stämpfli, Philipp; Hulka, Lea M; Vonmoos, Matthias; Ingold, Nina; Vogeley, Kai; Tobler, Philippe N; Seifritz, Erich; Quednow, Boris B

    2014-02-18

    Social interaction deficits in drug users likely impede treatment, increase the burden of the affected families, and consequently contribute to the high costs for society associated with addiction. Despite its significance, the neural basis of altered social interaction in drug users is currently unknown. Therefore, we investigated basal social gaze behavior in cocaine users by applying behavioral, psychophysiological, and functional brain-imaging methods. In study I, 80 regular cocaine users and 63 healthy controls completed an interactive paradigm in which the participants' gaze was recorded by an eye-tracking device that controlled the gaze of an anthropomorphic virtual character. Valence ratings of different eye-contact conditions revealed that cocaine users show diminished emotional engagement in social interaction, which was also supported by reduced pupil responses. Study II investigated the neural underpinnings of changes in social reward processing observed in study I. Sixteen cocaine users and 16 controls completed a similar interaction paradigm as used in study I while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. In response to social interaction, cocaine users displayed decreased activation of the medial orbitofrontal cortex, a key region of reward processing. Moreover, blunted activation of the medial orbitofrontal cortex was significantly correlated with a decreased social network size, reflecting problems in real-life social behavior because of reduced social reward. In conclusion, basic social interaction deficits in cocaine users as observed here may arise from altered social reward processing. Consequently, these results point to the importance of reinstatement of social reward in the treatment of stimulant addiction.

  10. Serum response factor controls transcriptional network regulating epidermal function and hair follicle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Congxing; Hindes, Anna; Burns, Carole J; Koppel, Aaron C; Kiss, Alexi; Yin, Yan; Ma, Liang; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Khnykin, Denis; Jahnsen, Frode L; Crosby, Seth D; Ramanan, Narendrakumar; Efimova, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of growth-related immediate-early, cytoskeletal, and muscle-specific genes to control growth, differentiation, and cytoskeletal integrity in different cell types. To investigate the role for SRF in epidermal development and homeostasis, we conditionally knocked out SRF in epidermal keratinocytes. We report that SRF deletion disrupted epidermal barrier function leading to early postnatal lethality. Mice lacking SRF in epidermis displayed morphogenetic defects, including an eye-open-at-birth phenotype and lack of whiskers. SRF-null skin exhibited abnormal morphology, hyperplasia, aberrant expression of differentiation markers and transcriptional regulators, anomalous actin organization, enhanced inflammation, and retarded hair follicle (HF) development. Transcriptional profiling experiments uncovered profound molecular changes in SRF-null E17.5 epidermis and revealed that many previously identified SRF target CArG box-containing genes were markedly upregulated in SRF-null epidermis, indicating that SRF may function to repress transcription of a subset of its target genes in epidermis. Remarkably, when transplanted onto nude mice, engrafted SRF-null skin lacked hair but displayed normal epidermal architecture with proper expression of differentiation markers, suggesting that although keratinocyte SRF is essential for HF development, a cross-talk between SRF-null keratinocytes and the surrounding microenvironment is likely responsible for the barrier-deficient mutant epidermal phenotype.

  11. Spatial heterogeneity and functional response: an experiment in microcosms with varying obstacle densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauzy, Céline; Tully, Thomas; Spataro, Thierry; Paul, Grégory; Arditi, Roger

    2010-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of the environment has long been recognized as a major factor in ecological dynamics. Its role in predator-prey systems has been of particular interest, where it can affect interactions in two qualitatively different ways: by providing (1) refuges for the prey or (2) obstacles that interfere with the movements of both prey and predators. There have been relatively fewer studies of obstacles than refuges, especially studies on their effect on functional responses. By analogy with reaction-diffusion models for chemical systems in heterogeneous environments, we predict that obstacles are likely to reduce the encounter rate between individuals, leading to a lower attack rate (predator-prey encounters) and a lower interference rate (predator-predator encounters). Here, we test these predictions under controlled conditions using collembolans (springtails) as prey and mites as predators in microcosms. The effect of obstacle density on the functional response was investigated at the scales of individual behavior and of the population. As expected, we found that increasing obstacle density reduces the attack rate and predator interference. Our results show that obstacles, like refuges, can reduce the predation rate because obstacles decrease the attack rate. However, while refuges can increase predator dependence, we suggest that obstacles can decrease it by reducing the rate of encounters between predators. Because of their opposite effect on predator dependence, obstacles and refuges could modify in different ways the stability of predator-prey communities.

  12. Intraperitoneal local anaesthetics after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: effects on postoperative pain, metabolic responses and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, B M; Kalkman, C J; Odoom, J A; de Wit, L; Ringers, J

    1994-03-01

    We have compared the efficacy of 0.9% NaCl 20 ml (n = 15), 0.25% bupivacaine 20 ml (n = 15) and 0.5% lignocaine 20 ml (n = 15), administered i.p., in reducing postoperative pain and opioid requirements, and modifying the metabolic response to surgery and postoperative lung function after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There were no differences in postoperative pain scores (visual analogue scale and verbal rating scale) between the three groups in the first 4 h after operation and in analgesic requirements during the first 24 h. In all groups, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow and forced expiratory volume in 1 s decreased 2 h after surgery (P < 0.001). Ventilatory values recovered only partially in the first 2 days after operation (P < 0.05), with no significant differences between groups. Plasma concentrations of glucose and cortisol increased after surgery (P < 0.05). Cortisol concentrations returned to baseline 48 h after operation. There were no significant differences between the groups in any measured variable. These data suggest that the administration of 20 ml of local anaesthetics i.p. is not effective in reducing postoperative pain, improving lung function, or attenuating the metabolic endocrine response after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  13. Functional Characterization of Bacterial Communities Responsible for Fermentation of Doenjang: A Traditional Korean Fermented Soybean Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo Yong; Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Hyo Jung; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-01-01

    Doenjang samples were prepared in triplicate and their microbial abundance, bacterial communities, and metabolites throughout fermentation were analyzed to investigate the functional properties of microorganisms in doenjang. Viable bacterial cells were approximately three orders of magnitude higher than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria are more responsible for doenjang fermentation. Pyrosequencing and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of bacterial communities and metabolites, respectively. Bacterial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that doenjang samples included Bacillus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Oceanobacillus, and Tetragenococcus. These genera were found either in doenjang-meju or solar salts, but not in both, suggesting two separate sources of bacteria. Bacillus and Enterococcus were dominant genera during the fermentation, but their abundances were not associated with metabolite changes, suggesting that they may not be major players in doenjang fermentation. Tetragenococcus was dominant in 108 day-doenjang samples, when lactate, acetate, putrescine, and tyramine increased quickly as glucose and fructose decreased, indicating that Tetragenococcus might be primarily responsible for organic acid and biogenic amine production. Lactobacillus was identified as a dominant group from the 179-day samples, associated with the increase of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the decrease of galactose, indicating a potential role for this genus as a major GABA producer during fermentation. The results of this study clarified the functional properties of major bacterial communities in the doenjang fermentation process, contributing to the production of safe and high-quality doenjang.

  14. Functional characterization of bacterial communities responsible for fermentation of doenjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Yong eJung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Doenjang samples were prepared in triplicate and their microbial abundance, bacterial communities, and metabolites throughout fermentation were analyzed to investigate the functional properties of microorganisms in doenjang. Viable bacterial cells were approximately three orders of magnitude higher than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria are more responsible for doenjang fermentation. Pyrosequencing and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of bacterial communities and metabolites, respectively. Bacterial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that doenjang samples included Bacillus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Oceanobacillus, and Tetragenococcus. These genera were found either in doenjang-meju or solar salts, but not in both, suggesting two separate sources of bacteria. Bacillus and Enterococcus were dominant genera during the fermentation, but their abundances were not associated with metabolite changes, suggesting that they may not be major players in doenjang fermentation. Tetragenococcus was dominant in 108 day-doenjang samples, when lactate, acetate, putrescine, and tyramine increased quickly as glucose and fructose decreased, indicating that Tetragenococcus might be primarily responsible for organic acid and biogenic amine production. Lactobacillus was identified as a dominant group from the 179-day samples, associated with the increase of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and the decrease of galactose, indicating a potential role for this genus as a major GABA producer during fermentation. The results of this study clarified the functional properties of major bacterial communities in the doenjang fermentation process, contributing to the production of safe and high-quality doenjang.

  15. Polarizable embedding with a multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory linear response method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan, E-mail: erik.hedegard@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratorium fur Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, Vladimir Prelog Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense (Denmark); Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard [Laboratory of Computational Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense (Denmark); Knecht, Stefan [Laboratorium fur Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, Vladimir Prelog Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Kongsted, Jacob, E-mail: kongsted@sdu.dk; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard, E-mail: hjj@sdu.dk [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense (Denmark)

    2015-03-21

    We present here the coupling of a polarizable embedding (PE) model to the recently developed multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory method (MC-srDFT), which can treat multiconfigurational systems with a simultaneous account for dynamical and static correlation effects. PE-MC-srDFT is designed to combine efficient treatment of complicated electronic structures with inclusion of effects from the surrounding environment. The environmental effects encompass classical electrostatic interactions as well as polarization of both the quantum region and the environment. Using response theory, molecular properties such as excitation energies and oscillator strengths can be obtained. The PE-MC-srDFT method and the additional terms required for linear response have been implemented in a development version of DALTON. To benchmark the PE-MC-srDFT approach against the literature data, we have investigated the low-lying electronic excitations of acetone and uracil, both immersed in water solution. The PE-MC-srDFT results are consistent and accurate, both in terms of the calculated solvent shift and, unlike regular PE-MCSCF, also with respect to the individual absolute excitation energies. To demonstrate the capabilities of PE-MC-srDFT, we also investigated the retinylidene Schiff base chromophore embedded in the channelrhodopsin protein. While using a much more compact reference wave function in terms of active space, our PE-MC-srDFT approach yields excitation energies comparable in quality to CASSCF/CASPT2 benchmarks.

  16. Functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets in regulating T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn E. Clausen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a heterogeneous family of professional antigen presenting cells (APC classically recognized as most potent inducers of adaptive immune responses. In this respect, Langerhans cells (LC have long been considered to be prototypic immunogenic DC in the skin. More recently this view has considerably changed. The generation of in vivo cell ablation and lineage tracing models revealed the complexity of the skin DC network and, in particular, established the existence of a number of phenotypically distinct Langerin+ and negative DC populations in the dermis. Moreover, by now we appreciate that DC also exert important regulatory functions and are required for the maintenance of tolerance towards harmless foreign and self-antigens. This review summarizes our current understanding of the skin-resident DC system in the mouse and discusses emerging concepts on the functional specialization of the different skin DC subsets in regulating T cell responses. Special consideration is given to antigen cross-presentation as well as immune reactions towards contact sensitizers, cutaneous pathogens and tumors. These studies form the basis for the manipulation of the human counterparts of the murine DC subsets to promote immunity or tolerance for the treatment of human disease.

  17. Analysis of an Impulsive One-Predator and Two-Prey System with Stage-Structure and Generalized Functional Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmin Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An impulsive one-predator and two-prey system with stage-structure and generalized functional response is proposed and analyzed. By reasonable assumption and theoretical analysis, we obtain conditions for the existence and global attractivity of the predator-extinction periodic solution. Sufficient conditions for the permanence of this system are established via impulsive differential comparison theorem. Furthermore, abundant results of numerical simulations are given by choosing two different and concrete functional responses, which indicate that impulsive effects, stage-structure, and functional responses are vital to the dynamical properties of this system. Finally, the biological meanings of the main results and some control strategies are given.

  18. Loss in Executive Functioning Best Explains Changes in Pain Responsiveness in Patients with Dementia-Related Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Miriam; Mylius, Veit; Schepelmann, Karsten; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    There is ample evidence that dementia changes the processing of pain. However, it is not known whether this change in pain processing is related to the general decline in cognitive functioning or whether it may be related to specific domains of cognitive functioning. With the present study we tried to answer this question. We assessed different cognitive domains (orientation, memory, abstract thinking/executive function, aphasia and apraxia, and information processing speed) in 70 older patients with cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment up to moderate degrees of dementia). Pain responsiveness was assessed by measuring the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) threshold and facial responses to noxious electrical stimulation. Using regression analyses, we assessed which domain of cognitive functioning best predicted variance in pain responsiveness. Variance in pain responsiveness (NFR and facial expressions) was best explained by those items assessing executive functioning even when controlling for overall cognitive performance and memory functioning. The close association between executive functioning and pain responsiveness suggests that dementia-related neurodegeneration in prefrontal areas might result not only in reduced executive functioning but also in a loss of pain inhibitory potency, rendering the patient more vulnerable to pain. Our findings also suggest that pain assessment in dementia should be regularly completed by tests of cognitive functions.

  19. Loss in Executive Functioning Best Explains Changes in Pain Responsiveness in Patients with Dementia-Related Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kunz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that dementia changes the processing of pain. However, it is not known whether this change in pain processing is related to the general decline in cognitive functioning or whether it may be related to specific domains of cognitive functioning. With the present study we tried to answer this question. We assessed different cognitive domains (orientation, memory, abstract thinking/executive function, aphasia and apraxia, and information processing speed in 70 older patients with cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment up to moderate degrees of dementia. Pain responsiveness was assessed by measuring the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR threshold and facial responses to noxious electrical stimulation. Using regression analyses, we assessed which domain of cognitive functioning best predicted variance in pain responsiveness. Variance in pain responsiveness (NFR and facial expressions was best explained by those items assessing executive functioning even when controlling for overall cognitive performance and memory functioning. The close association between executive functioning and pain responsiveness suggests that dementia-related neurodegeneration in prefrontal areas might result not only in reduced executive functioning but also in a loss of pain inhibitory potency, rendering the patient more vulnerable to pain. Our findings also suggest that pain assessment in dementia should be regularly completed by tests of cognitive functions.

  20. Observation-based Estimate of Climate Sensitivity with a Scaling Climate Response Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Raphael; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    To properly adress the anthropogenic impacts upon the earth system, an estimate of the climate sensitivity to radiative forcing is essential. Observation-based estimates of climate sensitivity are often limited by their ability to take into account the slower response of the climate system imparted mainly by the large thermal inertia of oceans, they are nevertheless essential to provide an alternative to estimates from global circulation models and increase our confidence in estimates of climate sensitivity by the multiplicity of approaches. It is straightforward to calculate the Effective Climate Sensitivity(EffCS) as the ratio of temperature change to the change in radiative forcing; the result is almost identical to the Transient Climate Response(TCR), but it underestimates the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity(ECS). A study of global mean temperature is thus presented assuming a Scaling Climate Response Function to deterministic radiative forcing. This general form is justified as there exists a scaling symmetry respected by the dynamics, and boundary conditions, over a wide range of scales and it allows for long-range dependencies while retaining only 3 parameter which are estimated empirically. The range of memory is modulated by the scaling exponent H. We can calculate, analytically, a one-to-one relation between the scaling exponent H and the ratio of EffCS to TCR and EffCS to ECS. The scaling exponent of the power law is estimated by a regression of temperature as a function of forcing. We consider for the analysis 4 different datasets of historical global mean temperature and 100 scenario runs of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 distributed among the 4 Representative Concentration Pathways(RCP) scenarios. We find that the error function for the estimate on historical temperature is very wide and thus, many scaling exponent can be used without meaningful changes in the fit residuals of historical temperatures; their response in the year 2100

  1. Development of NRESP98 Monte Carlo codes for the calculation of neutron response functions of neutron detectors. Calculation of the response function of spherical BF{sub 3} proportional counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, M.; Saito, K.; Ando, H. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-05-01

    The method to calculate the response function of spherical BF{sub 3} proportional counter, which is commonly used as neutron dose rate meter and neutron spectrometer with multi moderator system, is developed. As the calculation code for evaluating the response function, the existing code series NRESP, the Monte Carlo code for the calculation of response function of neutron detectors, is selected. However, the application scope of the existing NRESP is restricted, the NRESP98 is tuned as generally applicable code, with expansion of the geometrical condition, the applicable element, etc. The NRESP98 is tested with the response function of the spherical BF{sub 3} proportional counter. Including the effect of the distribution of amplification factor, the detailed evaluation of the charged particle transportation and the effect of the statistical distribution, the result of NRESP98 calculation fit the experience within {+-}10%. (author)

  2. A fast continuation scheme for accurate tracing of nonlinear oscillator frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Dunne, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A new algorithm is proposed to combine the split-frequency harmonic balance method (SF-HBM) with arc-length continuation (ALC) for accurate tracing of the frequency response of oscillators with non-expansible nonlinearities. ALC is incorporated into the SF-HBM in a two-stage procedure: Stage I involves finding a reasonably accurate response frequency and solution using a relatively large number of low-frequency harmonics. This step is achieved using the SF-HBM in conjunction with ALC. Stage II uses the SF-HBM to obtain a very accurate solution at the frequency obtained in Stage I. To guarantee rapid path tracing, the frequency axis is appropriately subdivided. This gives high chance of success in finding a globally optimum set of harmonic coefficients. When approaching a turning point however, arc-lengths are adaptively reduced to obtain a very accurate solution. The combined procedure is tested on three hardening stiffness examples: a Duffing model; an oscillator with non-expansible stiffness and single harmonic forcing; and an oscillator with non-expansible stiffness and multiple-harmonic forcing. The results show that for non-expansible nonlinearities and multiple-harmonic forcing, the proposed algorithm is capable of tracing-out frequency response functions with high accuracy and efficiency.

  3. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly Response Functions: Solving the Fe VIII Problems with Hinode EIS Bright Point Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelz, Joan T; Kimble, Jason A; 10.1007/s11207-012-0208-1

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is a state-of-the-art imager with the potential to do unprecedented time-dependent multi-thermal analysis at every pixel on scales short compared to the radiative and conductive cooling times. Recent results, however, have identified missing spectral lines in the CHIANTI atomic physics data base, which is used to construct the instrument response functions. We have done differential emission measure analysis using simultaneous AIA and Hinode/EIS observations of six X-ray bright points. Our results not only support the conclusion that CHIANTI is incomplete near 131 angstroms, but more importantly, suggest that the peak temperature of the Fe VIII emissivity/response is likely to be closer to log T = 5.8 than to the current value of log T = 5.7. Using a revised emissivity/response calculation for Fe VIII, we find that the observed AIA 131-angstrom flux can be underestimated by about 1.25, which is smaller than previous comparisons.

  4. Human medullary responses to cooling and rewarming the skin: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllen, Robin M; Farrell, Michael; Johnson, John M; Trevaks, David; Cole, Leonie; McKinley, Michael J; Jackson, Graeme; Denton, Derek A; Egan, Gary F

    2006-01-17

    A fall in skin temperature precipitates a repertoire of thermoregulatory responses that reduce the likelihood of a decrease in core temperature. Studies in animals suggest that medullary raphé neurons are essential for cold-defense, mediating both the cutaneous vasoconstrictor and thermogenic responses to ambient cooling; however, the involvement of raphé neurons in human thermoregulation has not been investigated. This study used functional MRI with an anatomically guided region of interest (ROI) approach to characterize changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal within the human medulla of nine normal subjects during non-noxious cooling and rewarming of the skin by a water-perfused body suit. An ROI covering 4.9 +/- 0.3 mm(2) in the ventral midline of the medulla immediately caudal to the pons (the rostral medullary raphé) showed an increase in BOLD signal of 3.9% (P medullary cross section at the same level (area, 126 +/- 15 mm(2)) showed no significant change in mean BOLD signal with cooling (+0.2%, P > 0.05). These findings demonstrate that human rostral medullary raphé neurons are selectively activated in response to a thermoregulatory challenge and point to the location of thermoregulatory neurons homologous to those of the raphé pallidus nucleus in rodents.

  5. Corazonin neurons function in sexually dimorphic circuitry that shape behavioral responses to stress in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available All organisms are confronted with dynamic environmental changes that challenge homeostasis, which is the operational definition of stress. Stress produces adaptive behavioral and physiological responses, which, in the Metazoa, are mediated through the actions of various hormones. Based on its associated phenotypes and its expression profiles, a candidate stress hormone in Drosophila is the corazonin neuropeptide. We evaluated the potential roles of corazonin in mediating stress-related changes in target behaviors and physiologies through genetic alteration of corazonin neuronal excitability. Ablation of corazonin neurons confers resistance to metabolic, osmotic, and oxidative stress, as measured by survival. Silencing and activation of corazonin neurons lead to differential lifespan under stress, and these effects showed a strong dependence on sex. Additionally, altered corazonin neuron physiology leads to fundamental differences in locomotor activity, and these effects were also sex-dependent. The dynamics of altered locomotor behavior accompanying stress was likewise altered in flies with altered corazonin neuronal function. We report that corazonin transcript expression is altered under starvation and osmotic stress, and that triglyceride and dopamine levels are equally impacted in corazonin neuronal alterations and these phenotypes similarly show significant sexual dimorphisms. Notably, these sexual dimorphisms map to corazonin neurons. These results underscore the importance of central peptidergic processing within the context of stress and place corazonin signaling as a critical feature of neuroendocrine events that shape stress responses and may underlie the inherent sexual dimorphic differences in stress responses.

  6. The Response Clamp: Functional characterization of neural systems using closed-loop control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner eWallach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The voltage clamp method, pioneered by Hodgkin, Huxley and Katz, laid the foundations to neurophysiological research. Its core rationale is the use of closed-loop control as a tool for system characterization. A recently introduced method, the response clamp, extends the voltage clamp rationale to the functional, phenomenological level. The method consists of on-line estimation of a response variable of interest (e.g. the probability of response or its latency and a simple feedback control mechanism designed to tightly converge this variable towards a desired trajectory. In the present contribution I offer a perspective on this novel method and its applications in the broader context of system identification and characterization. First, I demonstrate how internal state variables are exposed using the method, and how the use of several controllers may allow for a detailed, multi-variable characterization of the system. Second, I discuss three different categories of applications of the method: (i exploration of intrinsically generated dynamics, (ii exploration of extrinsically generated dynamics and (iii generation of input-output trajectories. The relation of these categories to similar uses in the voltage clamp and other techniques is also discussed. Finally, I discuss the method’s limitations, as well as its possible synthesis with existing complementary approaches.

  7. Structure, Function and Networks of Transcription Factors Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Skriver

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic disorder (ID, referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners such as E3 ubiquitin ligases and TF regions with ID represent future targets for engineering improved abiotic stress tolerance in crops.

  8. Modelling Geomechanical Impact of CO2 Injection Using Precomputed Response Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Odd; Gasda, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    When injecting CO2 or other fluids into a geological formation, pressure plays an important role both as a driver of flow and as a risk factor for mechanical integrity. The full effect of geomechanics on aquifer flow can only be captured using a coupled flow-geomechanics model. In order to solve this computationally expensive system, various strategies have been put forwards over the years, with some of the best current methods based on sequential splitting. In the present work, we seek to approximate the full geomechanical effect on flow without the need of coupling with a geomechanics solver during simulation, and at a computational cost comparable to that of an uncoupled model. We do this by means of precomputed pressure response functions. At grid model generation time, a geomechanics solver is used to compute the mechanical response of the aquifer for a set of pressure fields. The relevant information from these responses is then stored in a compact form and embedded with the grid model. We test the accu...

  9. Brain activity of adolescents with high functioning autism in response to emotional words and facial emoticons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Hyun Han

    Full Text Available Studies of social dysfunction in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD have generally focused on the perception of emotional words and facial affect. Brain imaging studies have suggested that the fusiform gyrus is associated with both the comprehension of language and face recognition. We hypothesized that patients with ASD would have decreased ability to recognize affect via emotional words and facial emoticons, relative to healthy comparison subjects. In addition, we expected that this decreased ability would be associated with altered activity of the fusiform gyrus in patients with ASD. Ten male adolescents with ASDs and ten age and sex matched healthy comparison subjects were enrolled in this case-control study. The diagnosis of autism was further evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Brain activity was assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in response to emotional words and facial emoticon presentation. Sixty emotional words (45 pleasant words +15 unpleasant words were extracted from a report on Korean emotional terms and their underlying dimensions. Sixty emoticon faces (45 pleasant faces +15 unpleasant faces were extracted and modified from on-line sites. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, patients with ASD have increased activation of fusiform gyrus in response to emotional aspects of words. In contrast, patients with ASD have decreased activation of fusiform gyrus in response to facial emoticons, relative to healthy comparison subjects. We suggest that patients with ASD are more familiar with word descriptions than facial expression as depictions of emotion.

  10. Brain activity of adolescents with high functioning autism in response to emotional words and facial emoticons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Doug Hyun; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Kim, Bung Nyun; McMahon, William; Renshaw, Perry F

    2014-01-01

    Studies of social dysfunction in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have generally focused on the perception of emotional words and facial affect. Brain imaging studies have suggested that the fusiform gyrus is associated with both the comprehension of language and face recognition. We hypothesized that patients with ASD would have decreased ability to recognize affect via emotional words and facial emoticons, relative to healthy comparison subjects. In addition, we expected that this decreased ability would be associated with altered activity of the fusiform gyrus in patients with ASD. Ten male adolescents with ASDs and ten age and sex matched healthy comparison subjects were enrolled in this case-control study. The diagnosis of autism was further evaluated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Brain activity was assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in response to emotional words and facial emoticon presentation. Sixty emotional words (45 pleasant words +15 unpleasant words) were extracted from a report on Korean emotional terms and their underlying dimensions. Sixty emoticon faces (45 pleasant faces +15 unpleasant faces) were extracted and modified from on-line sites. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, patients with ASD have increased activation of fusiform gyrus in response to emotional aspects of words. In contrast, patients with ASD have decreased activation of fusiform gyrus in response to facial emoticons, relative to healthy comparison subjects. We suggest that patients with ASD are more familiar with word descriptions than facial expression as depictions of emotion.

  11. Head-related transfer functions of the barn owl: measurement and neural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, C H; Hartung, K; Takahashi, T T

    1998-04-01

    Sounds arriving at the eardrum are filtered by the external ear and associated structures in a frequency and direction specific manner. When convolved with the appropriate filters and presented to human listeners through headphones, broadband noises can be precisely localized to the corresponding position outside of the head (reviewed in Blauert, 1997). Such a 'virtual auditory space' can be a potentially powerful tool for neurophysiological and behavioral work in other species as well. We are developing a virtual auditory space for the barn owl, Tyto alba, a highly successful auditory predator that has become a well-established model for hearing research. We recorded catalogues of head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) from the frontal hemisphere of 12 barn owls and compared virtual and free sound fields acoustically and by their evoked neuronal responses. The inner ca. 1 cm of the ear canal was found to contribute little to the directionality of the HRTFs. HRTFs were recorded by inserting probetube microphones to within about 1 or 2 mm of the eardrum. We recorded HRTFs at frequencies between 2 and 11 kHz, which includes the frequencies most useful to the owl for sound localization (3-9 kHz; Konishi, 1973). Spectra of virtual sounds were within +/- 1 dB of amplitude and +/- 10 degrees of phase of the spectra of free field sounds measured near to the eardrum. The spatial pattern of responses obtained from neurons in the inferior colliculus were almost indistinguishable in response to virtual and to free field stimulation.

  12. Implementation of angular response function modeling in SPECT simulations with GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descourt, P; Visvikis, D [INSERM, U650, LaTIM, IFR SclnBioS, Universite de Brest, CHU Brest, Brest, F-29200 (France); Carlier, T; Bardies, M [CRCNA INSERM U892, Nantes (France); Du, Y; Song, X; Frey, E C; Tsui, B M W [Department of Radiology, J Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Buvat, I, E-mail: dimitris@univ-brest.f [IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Orsay (France)

    2010-05-07

    Among Monte Carlo simulation codes in medical imaging, the GATE simulation platform is widely used today given its flexibility and accuracy, despite long run times, which in SPECT simulations are mostly spent in tracking photons through the collimators. In this work, a tabulated model of the collimator/detector response was implemented within the GATE framework to significantly reduce the simulation times in SPECT. This implementation uses the angular response function (ARF) model. The performance of the implemented ARF approach has been compared to standard SPECT GATE simulations in terms of the ARF tables' accuracy, overall SPECT system performance and run times. Considering the simulation of the Siemens Symbia T SPECT system using high-energy collimators, differences of less than 1% were measured between the ARF-based and the standard GATE-based simulations, while considering the same noise level in the projections, acceleration factors of up to 180 were obtained when simulating a planar 364 keV source seen with the same SPECT system. The ARF-based and the standard GATE simulation results also agreed very well when considering a four-head SPECT simulation of a realistic Jaszczak phantom filled with iodine-131, with a resulting acceleration factor of 100. In conclusion, the implementation of an ARF-based model of collimator/detector response for SPECT simulations within GATE significantly reduces the simulation run times without compromising accuracy. (note)

  13. NOTE: Implementation of angular response function modeling in SPECT simulations with GATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descourt, P.; Carlier, T.; Du, Y.; Song, X.; Buvat, I.; Frey, E. C.; Bardies, M.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Visvikis, D.

    2010-05-01

    Among Monte Carlo simulation codes in medical imaging, the GATE simulation platform is widely used today given its flexibility and accuracy, despite long run times, which in SPECT simulations are mostly spent in tracking photons through the collimators. In this work, a tabulated model of the collimator/detector response was implemented within the GATE framework to significantly reduce the simulation times in SPECT. This implementation uses the angular response function (ARF) model. The performance of the implemented ARF approach has been compared to standard SPECT GATE simulations in terms of the ARF tables' accuracy, overall SPECT system performance and run times. Considering the simulation of the Siemens Symbia T SPECT system using high-energy collimators, differences of less than 1% were measured between the ARF-based and the standard GATE-based simulations, while considering the same noise level in the projections, acceleration factors of up to 180 were obtained when simulating a planar 364 keV source seen with the same SPECT system. The ARF-based and the standard GATE simulation results also agreed very well when considering a four-head SPECT simulation of a realistic Jaszczak phantom filled with iodine-131, with a resulting acceleration factor of 100. In conclusion, the implementation of an ARF-based model of collimator/detector response for SPECT simulations within GATE significantly reduces the simulation run times without compromising accuracy.

  14. Obligate brood parasites show more functionally effective innate immune responses: an eco-immunological hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D. Caldwell; Summers, Scott G.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; He, Haiqi; Kogut, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Immune adaptations of obligate brood parasites attracted interest when three New World cowbird species (Passeriformes, Icteridae, genus Molothrus) proved unusually resistant to West Nile virus. We have used cowbirds as models to investigate the eco-immunological hypothesis that species in parasite-rich environments characteristically have enhanced immunity as a life history adaptation. As part of an ongoing program to understand the cowbird immune system, in this study we measured degranulation and oxidative burst, two fundamental responses of the innate immune system. Innate immunity provides non-specific, fast-acting defenses against a variety of invading pathogens, and we hypothesized that innate immunity experiences particularly strong selection in cowbirds, because their life history strategy exposes them to diverse novel and unpredictable parasites. We compared the relative effectiveness of degranulation and oxidative burst responses in two cowbird species and one related, non-parasitic species. Both innate immune defenses were significantly more functionally efficient in the two parasitic cowbird species than in the non-parasitic red-winged blackbird (Icteridae, Agelaius phoeniceus). Additionally, both immune defenses were more functionally efficient in the brown-headed cowbird (M. ater), an extreme host-generalist brood parasite, than in the bronzed cowbird (M. aeneus), a moderate host-specialist with lower exposure to other species and their parasites. Thus the relative effectiveness of these two innate immune responses corresponds to the diversity of parasites in the niche of each species and to their relative resistance to WNV. This study is the first use of these two specialized assays in a comparative immunology study of wild avian species.

  15. Can a Clinical Test of Reaction Time Predict a Functional Head-Protective Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECKNER, JAMES T.; LIPPS, DAVID B.; KIM, HOGENE; RICHARDSON, JAMES K.; ASHTON-MILLER, JAMES A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reaction time is commonly prolonged after a sport-related concussion. Besides being a marker for injury, a rapid reaction time is necessary for protective maneuvers that can reduce the frequency and severity of additional head impacts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a clinical test of simple visuomotor reaction time predicted the time taken to raise the hands to protect the head from a rapidly approaching ball. Methods Twenty-six healthy adult participants recruited from campus and community recreation and exercise facilities completed two experimental protocols during a single session: a manual visuomotor simple reaction time test (RTclin) and a sport-related head-protective response (RTsprt). RTclin measured the time required to catch a thin vertically oriented device on its release by the tester and was calculated from the distance the device fell before being arrested. RTsprt measured the time required to raise the hands from waist level to block a foam tennis ball fired toward the subject’s face from an air cannon and was determined using an optoelectronic camera system. A correlation coefficient was calculated between RTclin and RTsprt, with linear regression used to assess for effect modification by other covariates. Results A strong positive correlation was found between RTclin and RTsprt (r = 0.725, P < 0.001) independent of age, gender, height, or weight. Conclusions RTclin is predictive of a functional sport-related head-protective response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a clinical test predicting the ability to protect the head in a simulated sport environment. This correlation with a functional head-protective response is a relevant consideration for the potential use of RTclin as part of a multifaceted concussion assessment program. PMID:20689458

  16. The interaction of spatial scale and predator-prey functional response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, T.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    Predator-prey models with a prey-dependent functional response have the property that the prey equilibrium value is determined only by predator characteristics. However, in observed natural systems (for instance, snail-periphyton interactions in streams) the equilibrium periphyton biomass has been shown experimentally to be influenced by both snail numbers and levels of available limiting nutrient in the water. Hypothesizing that the observed patchiness in periphyton in streams may be part of the explanation for the departure of behavior of the equilibrium biomasses from predictions of the prey-dependent response of the snail-periphyton system, we developed and analyzed a spatially-explicit model of periphyton in which snails were modeled as individuals in their movement and feeding, and periphyton was modeled as patches or spatial cells. Three different assumptions on snail movement were used: (1) random movement between spatial cells, (2) tracking by snails of local abundances of periphyton, and (3) delayed departure of snails from cells to reduce costs associated with movement. Of these assumptions, only the third strategy, based on an herbivore strategy of staying in one patch until local periphyton biomass concentration falls below a certain threshold amount, produced results in which both periphyton and snail biomass increased with nutrient input. Thus, if data are averaged spatially over the whole system, we expect that a ratio-dependent functional response may be observed if the herbivore behaves according to the third assumption. Both random movement and delayed cell departure had the result that spatial heterogeneity of periphyton increased with nutrient input.

  17. Characterization of the equine skeletal muscle transcriptome identifies novel functional responses to exercise training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGivney, Beatrice A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Digital gene expression profiling was used to characterize the assembly of genes expressed in equine skeletal muscle and to identify the subset of genes that were differentially expressed following a ten-month period of exercise training. The study cohort comprised seven Thoroughbred racehorses from a single training yard. Skeletal muscle biopsies were collected at rest from the gluteus medius at two time points: T(1) - untrained, (9 +\\/- 0.5 months old) and T(2) - trained (20 +\\/- 0.7 months old). RESULTS: The most abundant mRNA transcripts in the muscle transcriptome were those involved in muscle contraction, aerobic respiration and mitochondrial function. A previously unreported over-representation of genes related to RNA processing, the stress response and proteolysis was observed. Following training 92 tags were differentially expressed of which 74 were annotated. Sixteen genes showed increased expression, including the mitochondrial genes ACADVL, MRPS21 and SLC25A29 encoded by the nuclear genome. Among the 58 genes with decreased expression, MSTN, a negative regulator of muscle growth, had the greatest decrease.Functional analysis of all expressed genes using FatiScan revealed an asymmetric distribution of 482 Gene Ontology (GO) groups and 18 KEGG pathways. Functional groups displaying highly significant (P < 0.0001) increased expression included mitochondrion, oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid metabolism while functional groups with decreased expression were mainly associated with structural genes and included the sarcoplasm, laminin complex and cytoskeleton. CONCLUSION: Exercise training in Thoroughbred racehorses results in coordinate changes in the gene expression of functional groups of genes related to metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and muscle structure.

  18. A meta-analysis of functional group responses to forest recovery outside of the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spake, Rebecca; Ezard, Thomas H G; Martin, Philip A; Newton, Adrian C; Doncaster, C Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Both active and passive forest restoration schemes are used in degraded landscapes across the world to enhance biodiversity and ecosystem service provision. Restoration is increasingly also being implemented in biodiversity offset schemes as compensation for loss of natural habitat to anthropogenic development. This has raised concerns about the value of replacing old-growth forest with plantations, motivating research on biodiversity recovery as forest stands age. Functional diversity is now advocated as a key metric for restoration success, yet it has received little analytical attention to date. We conducted a meta-analysis of 90 studies that measured differences in species richness for functional groups of fungi, lichens, and beetles between old-growth control and planted or secondary treatment forests in temperate, boreal, and Mediterranean regions. We identified functional-group-specific relationships in the response of species richness to stand age after forest disturbance. Ectomycorrhizal fungi averaged 90 years for recovery to old-growth values (between 45 years and unrecoverable at 95% prediction limits), and epiphytic lichens took 180 years to reach 90% of old-growth values (between 140 years and never for recovery to old-growth values at 95% prediction limits). Non-saproxylic beetle richness, in contrast, decreased as stand age of broadleaved forests increased. The slow recovery by some functional groups essential to ecosystem functioning makes old-growth forest an effectively irreplaceable biodiversity resource that should be exempt from biodiversity offsetting initiatives. © 2015 The Authors Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Acidosis downregulates platelet haemostatic functions and promotes neutrophil proinflammatory responses mediated by platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Carestia, Agostina; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Romaniuk, María Albertina; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Klement, Giannoula Lakka; Schattner, Mirta

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis is one of the hallmarks of tissue injury such as trauma, infection, inflammation, and tumour growth. Although platelets participate in the pathophysiology of all these processes, the impact of acidosis on platelet biology has not been studied outside of the quality control of laboratory aggregation assays or platelet transfusion optimization. Herein, we evaluate the effect of physiologically relevant changes in extracellular acidosis on the biological function of platelets, placing particular emphasis on haemostatic and secretory functions. Platelet haemostatic responses such as adhesion, spreading, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, ATP release, aggregation, thromboxane B2 generation, clot retraction and procoagulant activity including phosphatidilserine exposure and microparticle formation, showed a statistically significant inhibition of thrombin-induced changes at pH of 7.0 and 6.5 compared to the physiological pH (7.4). The release of alpha granule content was differentially regulated by acidosis. At low pH, thrombin or collagen-induced secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and endostatin were dramatically reduced. The release of von Willebrand factor and stromal derived factor-1α followed a similar, albeit less dramatic pattern. In contrast, the induction of CD40L was not changed by low pH, and P-selectin exposure was significantly increased. While the generation of mixed platelet-leukocyte aggregates and the increased chemotaxis of neutrophils mediated by platelets were further augmented under acidic conditions in a P-selectin dependent manner, the increased neutrophil survival was independent of P-selectin expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that extracellular acidosis downregulates most of the haemostatic platelet functions, and promotes those involved in amplifying the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory response.

  20. Cleavage of serum response factor mediated by enteroviral protease 2A contributes to impaired cardiac function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerry Wong; Jingchun Zhang; Bobby Yanagawa; Zongshu Luo; Xiangsheng Yang; Jiang Chang; Bruce McManus; Honglin Luo

    2012-01-01

    Enteroviral infection can lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM),which is a major cause of cardiovascular mortality worldwide.However,the pathogenetic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated.Serum response factor (SRF) is a cardiac-enriched transcription regulator controlling the expression of a variety of target genes,including those involved in the contractile apparatus and immediate early response,as well as microRNAs that silence the expression of cardiac regulatory factors.Knockout of SRF in the heart results in downregulation of cardiac contractile gene expression and development of DCM.The goal of this study is to understand the role of SRF in enterovirus-induced cardiac dysfunction and progression to DCM.Here we report that SRF is cleaved following enteroviral infection of mouse heart and cultured cardiomyocytes.This cleavage is accompanied by impaired cardiac function and downregulation of cardiac-specific contractile and regulatory genes.Further investigation by antibody epitope mapping and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that SRF cleavage occurs at the region of its transactivation domain through the action of virus-encoded protease 2A.Moreover,we demonstrate that cleavage of SRF dissociates its transactivation domain from DNA-binding domain,resulting in the disruption of SRF-mediated gene transactivation.In addition to loss of functional SRF,finally we report that the N-terminal fragment of SRF cleavage products can also act as a dominant-negative transcription factor,which likely competes with the native SRF for DNA binding.Our results suggest a mechanism by which virus infection impairs heart function and may offer a new therapeutic strategy to ameliorate myocardial damage and progression to DCM.

  1. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  2. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilina, Svetlana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albert, Victor [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Badaeva, Ekaterina [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Koposov, Alexey [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to

  3. Cardiorespiratory, metabolic, and biomechanical responses during functional electrical stimulation leg exercise: health and fitness benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Glen M; Hamzaid, Nur A; Fornusek, Ché

    2008-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES)-induced leg exercise offers the potential for individuals with lower-limb paralysis to otherwise gain some benefits conferred by leg exercise. Although its original intent is to reactivate the leg muscles to produce functional upright mobility, as a rehabilitation therapy, FES-evoked exercise increases the whole-body metabolism of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) so that they may gain general and localized health and fitness benefits. The physiological and psychosocial responses during FES-evoked cycling, standing, rowing, leg extension, or stepping have been extensively explored for over 20 years. Some of the advantages of such exercise include augmented cardiorespiratory fitness, promotion of leg blood circulation, increased activity of specific metabolic enzymes or hormones, greater muscle volume and fiber size, enhanced functional exercise capacity such as strength and endurance, and altered bone mineral density. Positive psychosocial adaptations have also been reported among SCI individuals who undergo FES exercise. This article presents a position review of the available literature on the effects of FES-evoked exercise since the earliest date until 2007, to warrant a conclusion about the current status and potential of FES-evoked exercise for paralyzed people.

  4. A general functional response of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated killing of target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2014-04-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data.

  5. Dynamics of confined water reconstructed from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of bulk response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coridan, Robert H.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Lai, Ghee Hwee; Abbamonte, Peter; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoconfined water and surface-structured water impacts a broad range of fields. For water confined between hydrophilic surfaces, measurements and simulations have shown conflicting results ranging from “liquidlike” to “solidlike” behavior, from bulklike water viscosity to viscosity orders of magnitude higher. Here, we investigate how a homogeneous fluid behaves under nanoconfinement using its bulk response function: The Green's function of water extracted from a library of S(q,ω) inelastic x-ray scattering data is used to make femtosecond movies of nanoconfined water. Between two confining surfaces, the structure undergoes drastic changes as a function of surface separation. For surface separations of ≈9 Å, although the surface-associated hydration layers are highly deformed, they are separated by a layer of bulklike water. For separations of ≈6 Å, the two surface-associated hydration layers are forced to reconstruct into a single layer that modulates between localized “frozen’ and delocalized “melted” structures due to interference of density fields. These results potentially reconcile recent conflicting experiments. Importantly, we find a different delocalized wetting regime for nanoconfined water between surfaces with high spatial frequency charge densities, where water is organized into delocalized hydration layers instead of localized hydration shells, and are strongly resistant to `freezing' down to molecular distances (<6 Å).

  6. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yume [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Tada, Shusuke [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Seki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 981-8558 (Japan); Enomoto, Takemi [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  7. Western red cedar dust exposure and lung function: a dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noertjojo, H K; Dimich-Ward, H; Peelen, S; Dittrick, M; Kennedy, S M; Chan-Yeung, M

    1996-10-01

    The relationship between levels of cumulative red cedar dust exposure and decline in lung function was explored in an 11-yr follow-up study of 243 sawmill workers who participated in at least two occasions. We also studied 140 office workers in a similar manner as control subjects. Workers with asthma were excluded from the analysis. During the period of the study, 916 personal and 216 area samples of dust were collected from the sawmill. Cumulative wood dust exposure was calculated for each sawmill worker according to the duration and exposure in each job, based on the geometric mean of all dust measurements for that job. Average daily dust exposure was calculated by dividing the total cumulative exposure by the number of days of work. Workers were divided into low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups with mean daily level of exposure of 0.4 mg/m3, respectively. Sawmill workers had significantly greater declines in FEV1 and FVC compared with office workers adjusted for age, smoking, and initial lung function. A dose-response relationship was observed between the level of exposure and the annual decline in FVC. We conclude that exposure to Western red cedar dust is associated with a greater decline in lung function which may lead to development of chronic airflow limitation.

  8. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, J Q; Klopfenstein, B A; Stevens, A A; Havel, P J; Adams, S H; Dunn, T N; Krisky, C; Rooney, W D

    2011-03-01

    In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during glucose ingestion or infusion have demonstrated suppression of hypothalamic signalling, but no studies have compared the effects of glucose and fructose. We therefore sought to determine if the brain response differed to glucose vs. fructose in humans independently of the ingestive process. Nine healthy, normal weight subjects underwent blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI measurements during either intravenous (IV) glucose (0.3 mg/kg), fructose (0.3 mg/kg) or saline, administered over 2 min in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Blood was sampled every 5 min during a baseline period and following infusion for 60 min in total for glucose, fructose, lactate and insulin levels. No significant brain BOLD signal changes were detected in response to IV saline. BOLD signal in the cortical control areas increased during glucose infusion (p = 0.002), corresponding with increased plasma glucose and insulin levels. In contrast, BOLD signal decreased in the cortical control areas during fructose infusion (p = 0.006), corresponding with increases of plasma fructose and lactate. Neither glucose nor fructose infusions significantly altered BOLD signal in the hypothalamus. In normal weight humans, cortical responses as assessed by BOLD fMRI to infused glucose are opposite to those of fructose. Differential brain responses to these sugars and their metabolites may provide insight into the neurologic basis for dysregulation of food intake during high dietary fructose intake. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Responsiveness of the motor function measure in patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerot, Carole; Payan, Christine; Iwaz, Jean; Ecochard, René; Bérard, Carole

    2013-08-01

    To assess the ability of the Motor Function Measure (MFM) to detect changes in the progression of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Observational, retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Seventeen departments of pediatric physical medicine. Volunteer patients with SMA (N=112) aged 5.7 to 59 years with no treatment other than physical therapy and nutritional or respiratory assistance. Not applicable. The distributions of the MFM scores (total score and 3 subscores) were analyzed per SMA subtype. The relationships between scores and age were studied. The slopes of score changes (reflecting MFM responsiveness) were estimated in patients with at least 6 months' follow-up and 2 MFMs. Hypothetical sample sizes for specific effect sizes in clinical trial scenarios are given. In 12 patients with SMA type 2 and 19 with SMA type 3 (mean ± SD follow-up, 25.8 ± 19mo), there was a moderate inverse relationship between age and the MFM total score. Patients with less than 6 months' follow-up showed little score changes. Patients with longer follow-ups showed a slow deterioration (-0.9 points/y for type 2 and -0.6 points/y for type 3). Substantial responsiveness was obtained with the MFM Dimension 2 subscore (proximal and axial motricity) in patients with SMA type 2 (standardized response mean [SRM]=1.29), and with the MFM Dimension 1 subscore (standing and transfers) in patients with SMA type 3 aged 10 to 15 years (SRM=.94). If further confirmed by larger studies, these preliminary results on the relative responsiveness of the MFM in SMA will foster its use in monitoring disease progression in patients who participate in clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exact out-of-time-ordered correlation functions for an interacting lattice fermion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Werner, Philipp; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Exact solutions for local equilibrium and nonequilibrium out-of-time-ordered correlation (OTOC) functions are obtained for a lattice fermion model with on-site interactions, namely, the Falicov-Kimball (FK) model, in the large dimensional and thermodynamic limit. Our approach is based on the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory generalized to an extended Kadanoff-Baym contour. We find that the density-density OTOC is most enhanced at intermediate coupling around the metal-insulator phase transition. In the high-temperature limit, the OTOC remains nontrivially finite and interaction dependent, even though dynamical charge correlations probed by an ordinary response function are completely suppressed. We propose an experiment to measure OTOCs of fermionic lattice systems including the FK and Hubbard models in ultracold atomic systems.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Combustion Instability in Solid Rocket Motor : Implementation of Pressure Coupled Response Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Combustion instability in solid propellant rocket motor is numerically simulated by implementing propellant response function with quasi steady homogeneous one dimensional formulation. The convolution integral of propellant response with pressure history is implemented through a user defined function in commercial computational fluid dynamics software. The methodology is validated against literature reported motor test and other simulation results. Computed amplitude of pressure fluctuations compare closely with the literarture data. The growth rate of pressure oscillations of a cylindrical grain solid rocket motor is determined for different response functions at the fundamental longitudinal frequency. It is observed that for response function more than a critical value, the motor exhibits exponential growth rate of pressure oscillations.

  12. Permanence of Periodic Predator-Prey System with General Nonlinear Functional Response and Stage Structure for Both Predator and Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Huang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the permanence of periodic predator-prey system with general nonlinear functional responses and stage structure for both predator and prey and obtain that the predator and the prey species are permanent.

  13. Time correlation function and finite field approaches to the calculation of the fifth order Raman response in liquid xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVane, Russell; Space, Brian; Jansen, Thomas L C; Keyes, T

    2006-12-21

    The fifth order, two-dimensional Raman response in liquid xenon is calculated via a time correlation function (TCF) theory and the numerically exact finite field method. Both employ classical molecular dynamics simulations. The results are shown to be in excellent agreement, suggesting the efficacy of the TCF approach, in which the response function is written approximately in terms of a single classical multitime TCF.

  14. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation-an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry B; Bahadori, Amir A [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Eckerman, Keith F [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Nuclear and Radiological/Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-04-21

    A comprehensive set of photon fluence-to-dose response functions (DRFs) is presented for two radiosensitive skeletal tissues-active and total shallow marrow-within 15 and 32 bone sites, respectively, of the ICRP reference adult male. The functions were developed using fractional skeletal masses and associated electron-absorbed fractions as reported for the UF hybrid adult male phantom, which in turn is based upon micro-CT images of trabecular spongiosa taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The new DRFs expand upon both the original set of seven functions produced in 1985, and a 2007 update calculated under the assumption of secondary electron escape from spongiosa. In this study, it is assumed that photon irradiation of the skeleton will yield charged particle equilibrium across all spongiosa regions at energies exceeding 200 keV. Kerma coefficients for active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone and spongiosa at higher energies are calculated using the DRF algorithm setting the electron-absorbed fraction for self-irradiation to unity. By comparing kerma coefficients and DRF functions, dose enhancement factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient (MEAC) ratios for active marrow to spongiosa were derived. These MEAC ratios compared well with those provided by the NIST Physical Reference Data Library (mean difference of 0.8%), and the dose enhancement factors for active marrow compared favorably with values calculated in the well-known study published by King and Spiers (1985 Br. J. Radiol. 58 345-56) (mean absolute difference of 1.9 percentage points). Additionally, dose enhancement factors for active marrow were shown to correlate well with the shallow marrow volume fraction (R{sup 2} = 0.91). Dose enhancement factors for the total shallow marrow were also calculated for 32 bone sites representing the first such derivation for this target tissue.

  15. Modeling of functional trunk muscle performance: interfacing ergonomics and spine rehabilitation in response to the ADA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, K A; Parnianpour, M; Sparto, P J; Simon, S R

    1997-10-01

    The combination of increasing costs of musculoskeletal injuries and the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has created the need for a more objective functional understanding of dynamic trunk performance. In this study, trunk extensor and flexor strengths were measured as a function of angular position and velocity for 20 subjects performing maximum isometric and isokinetic exertions. Results indicate that trunk strength is significantly influenced by trunk angular position, trunk angular velocity, gender, and direction, as well as by the interaction between trunk angular position and velocity. Three-dimensional surfaces of trunk strength in response to trunk angular position and velocity were constructed for each subject per direction. Such data presentation is more accurate and gives better insight about the strength profile of an individual than does the traditional use of a single strength value. The joint strength capacity profiles may be combined with joint torque requirements from a manual material handling task, such as a lifting task, to compute the dynamic utilization ratio for the trunk muscles. This ratio can be used as a unified measure of both task demand and functional capacity to guide job assignment, return to work, and prognosis during the rehabilitation processes. Furthermore, the strength regressions developed in this study would provide dynamic strength limits that can be used as functional constraints in the computer simulation of physical activities, such as lifting. In light of the ADA, this would be of great value in predicting the consequences of task modifications and/or workstation alterations without subjecting an injured worker or an individual with a disability to unnecessary testing.

  16. Functional changes in neutrophils and psychoneuroendocrine responses during 105 days of confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strewe, C; Muckenthaler, F; Feuerecker, M; Yi, B; Rykova, M; Kaufmann, I; Nichiporuk, I; Vassilieva, G; Hörl, M; Matzel, S; Schelling, G; Thiel, M; Morukov, B; Choukèr, A

    2015-05-01

    The innate immune system as one key element of immunity and a prerequisite for an adequate host defense is of emerging interest in space research to ensure crew health and thus mission success. In ground-based studies, spaceflight-associated specifics such as confinement caused altered immune functions paralleled by changes in stress hormone levels. In this study, six men were confined for 105 days to a space module of ~500 m(3) mimicking conditions of a long-term space mission. Psychic stress was surveyed by different questionnaires. Blood, saliva, and urine samples were taken before, during, and after confinement to determine quantitative and qualitative immune responses by analyzing enumerative assays and quantifying microbicide and phagocytic functions. Additionally, expression and shedding of L-selectin (CD62L) on granulocytes and different plasma cytokine levels were measured. Cortisol and catecholamine levels were analyzed in saliva and urine. Psychic stress or an activation of the psychoneuroendocrine system could not be testified. White blood cell counts were not significantly altered, but innate immune functions showed increased cytotoxic and reduced microbicide capabilities. Furthermore, a significantly enhanced shedding of CD62L might be a hint at increased migratory capabilities. However, this was observed in the absence of any acute inflammatory state, and no rise in plasma cytokine levels was detected. In summary, confinement for 105 days caused changes in innate immune functions. Whether these changes result from an alert immune state in preparation for further immune challenges or from a normal adaptive process during confinement remains to be clarified in future research.

  17. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E; Hresko, Richard C; Hruz, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 is of fundamental importance for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite intensive effort, the ability to express and purify sufficient quantities of structurally and functionally intact protein for biophysical analysis has previously been exceedingly difficult. We report here the development of novel methods to express, purify, and functionally reconstitute GLUT4 into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes. Rat GLUT4 containing FLAG and His tags at the amino and carboxy termini, respectively, was engineered and stably transfected into HEK-293 cells. Overexpression in suspension culture yielded over 1.5 mg of protein per liter of culture. Systematic screening of detergent solubilized GLUT4-GFP fusion protein via fluorescent-detection size exclusion chromatography identified lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) as highly effective for isolating monomeric GLUT4 micelles. Preservation of structural integrity and ligand binding was demonstrated via quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and competition of ATB-BMPA photolabeling by cytochalasin B. GLUT4 was reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs and proper folding was confirmed. Reconstitution of purified GLUT4 with amphipol A8-35 stabilized the transporter at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time. Functional activity of purified GLUT4 was confirmed by reconstitution of LMNG-purified GLUT4 into proteoliposomes and measurement of saturable uptake of D-glucose over L-glucose. Taken together, these data validate the development of an efficient means to generate milligram quantities of stable and functionally intact GLUT4 that is suitable for a wide array of biochemical and biophysical analyses.

  18. Predictors of functional response and remission with desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Claudio N; Endicott, Jean; Boucher, Matthieu; Fayyad, Rana S; Guico-Pabia, Christine J

    2014-12-01

    The predictive value of early functional improvement for treatment success at week 8 was assessed in a pooled analysis in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Data were pooled from 7 double-blind studies in adult patients with MDD randomly assigned to desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d or placebo. Four levels of treatment success were determined at week 8 for patients with baseline Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) score > 12 (N = 2156): functional response (SDS ≤12 and ≥50% improvement in SDS), functional/depression response (SDS ≤12 and ≥50% improvement in both SDS and 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HAM-D17] score), functional remission (SDS desvenlafaxine (40%, 32%, 23%, 15%, respectively) vs placebo (31%, 22%, 17%, 10%; all P ≤ 0.002). Early change in SDS was a highly significant predictor of functional response/remission (ORs, 0.958-0.970; all P desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d is predictive of treatment success.

  19. An error-related negativity potential investigation of response monitoring function in individuals with Internet addiction disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhe eZhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Internet addiction disorder (IAD is an impulse disorder or at least related to impulse control disorder. Deficits in executive functioning, including response monitoring, have been proposed as a hallmark feature of impulse control disorders. The error-related negativity (ERN reflects individual’s ability to monitor behavior. Since IAD belongs to a compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder, theoretically, it should present response monitoring functional deficit characteristics of some disorders, such as substance dependence, ADHD or alcohol abuse, testing with an Erikson flanker task. Up to now, no studies on response monitoring functional deficit in IAD were reported. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics in a modified Erikson flanker task.23 subjects were recruited as IAD group. 23 matched age, gender and education healthy persons were recruited as control group. All participants completed the modified Erikson flanker task while measured with event-related potentials (ERPs. IAD group made more total error rates than did controls (P < 0.01; Reactive times for total error responses in IAD group were shorter than did controls (P < 0.01. The mean ERN amplitudes of total error response conditions at frontal electrode sites and at central electrode sites of IAD group were reduced compared with control group (all P < 0.01. These results revealed that IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics and shares ERN characteristics of compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder.

  20. Emotional Responses to Odors in Children with High-Functioning Autism: Autonomic Arousal, Facial Behavior and Self-Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legisa, Jasna; Messinger, Daniel S.; Kermol, Enzo; Marlier, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Although emotional functioning is impaired in children with autism, it is unclear if this impairment is due to difficulties with facial expression, autonomic responsiveness, or the verbal description of emotional states. To shed light on this issue, we examined responses to pleasant and unpleasant odors in eight children (8-14 years) with…