WorldWideScience

Sample records for density soil water

  1. Measurement of density and water content of soil using photon multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertek, C.; Haselberger, N.

    1984-11-01

    A quantitative measure of density and of water content in soil was determined by photon multiple scattering following sample irradiation by a 0.7 mCi 137Cs source. Counting was effected using a stabilized single channel scintillation detector and counter system in the differential mode. Scattered photons of 80 keV energy were measured using a 20 keV window. The moving source method was applied to find the density of soil and count rate ratios of dry soil to wet soil. Independent calibrations were applied for the moisture measurements. Four curves were obtained for the soil density range of 0.5-1.5 g/cm 3 by using soil standards of 2.6, 7.0, 10.6 and 16.1 wt.% water content. Direct influence of photons was measured by blocking the direct path of photons to the detector by shielding both the Cs source and the detector.

  2. The Relations Between Soil Water Retention Characteristics, Particle Size Distributions, Bulk Densities and Calcium Carbonate Contents for Danish Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels H.; Balstrøm, Thomas; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    A database containing about 800 soil profiles located in a 7-km grid covering Denmark has been used to develop a set of regression equations of soil water content at pressure heads –1, -10, -100 and –1500 kPa versus particle size distribution, organic matter, CaCO3 and bulk density. One purpose...... was to elaborate equations based of soil parameters available in the Danish Soil Classification's texture database on particle size distribution and organic matter. It was also tested if inclusion of bulk density or CaCO3 content (in CaCO3-containing samples) as predictors or grouping in surface and subsurface...... horizons or textural classes improved the regression equations. Compared to existing Danish equations based on much fewer observations the accuracies of the new equations were better. The equations also predicted the soil water content at the measured pressure heads more accurate than the pedotransfer...

  3. [Spatial variation characteristics of surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on Karst slopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Chen, Hong-Song; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yun-Peng; Ye, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ke-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Surface soil water-physical properties play a decisive role in the dynamics of deep soil water. Knowledge of their spatial variation is helpful in understanding the processes of rainfall infiltration and runoff generation, which will contribute to the reasonable utilization of soil water resources in mountainous areas. Based on a grid sampling scheme (10 m x 10 m) and geostatistical methods, this paper aimed to study the spatial variability of surface (0-10 cm) soil water content, soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on a typical shrub slope (90 m x 120 m, projected length) in Karst area of northwest Guangxi, southwest China. The results showed that the surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity had different spatial dependence and spatial structure. Sample variogram of the soil water content was fitted well by Gaussian models with the nugget effect, while soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity were fitted well by exponential models with the nugget effect. Variability of soil water content showed strong spatial dependence, while the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity showed moderate spatial dependence. The spatial ranges of the soil water content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were small, while that of the soil bulk density was much bigger. In general, the soil water content increased with the increase of altitude while it was opposite for the soil bulk densi- ty. However, the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity had a random distribution of large amounts of small patches, showing high spatial heterogeneity. Soil water content negatively (P conductivity, while there was no significant correlation between the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  4. Rapid selection of a representative monitoring location of soil water content for irrigation scheduling using surface moisture-density gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Ibrahim; Janat, Mussadak; Makhlouf, Mohsen; Hamdan, Altayeb

    2016-10-01

    Establishing a representative monitoring location of soil water content is important for agricultural water management. One of the challenges is to develop a field protocol for determining such a location with minimum costs. In this paper, we use the concept of time stability in soil water content to examine whether using a short term monitoring period is sufficient to identify a representative site of soil water content and, therefore, irrigation scheduling. Surface moisture-density gauge was used as a means for measuring soil water content. Variations of soil water content in space and time were studied using geostatistical tools. Measuring soil water content was made at 30 locations as nodes of a 6×8 m grid, six times during the growing season. A representative location for average soil water content estimation was allocated at the beginning of a season, and thereafter it was validated. Results indicated that the spatial pattern of soil water content was strongly temporally stable, explained by the relationship between soil water content and fine soil texture. Two field surveys of soil water content, conducted before and after the 1st irrigation, could be sufficient to allocate a representative location of soil water content, and for adequate irrigation scheduling of the whole field. Surface moisture-density gauge was found to be efficient for characterising time stability of soil water content under irrigated field conditions.

  5. Appropriate density of water and soil conservation of Pinus tabulaeformis and Robinia pseudoacacia forests in loess area, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun ZHANG; Chengliang ZHANG; Wei HE; Lei NA

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, based on a long-term monitor-ing of water cycle in the water and soil conservation forest stands of Pinus tabulaeformis and Robinia pseu-doacacia, the soil moisture deficit is calculated. Following the principles of runoff-collecting forestry and applying the forest structure investigation results, the authors developed a formula to calculate appropriate density for forests on the basis of different diameters at breast height (DBH). Using this method to manage forests, the natural water requirement of forests can be met and soil drought can be avoided. In addition, with long-term monitoring of soil moisture in stands, the authors also give an appropriate managing density specifically for the water and soil conservation forests of P.tabulaeformis and R.pseudoacacia in the loess area which is according to soil moisture content,or with the lowest soil moisture content and invalid moisture frequency as the indexes.

  6. Controls on stand transpiration and soil water utilization along a tree density gradient in a Neotropical savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra J. Bucci; Fabian G. Scholz; Guillermo Goldstein; William A. Hoffmann; Frederick C. Meinzer; Augusto C. Franco; Thomas Giambelluca; Fernando Miralles-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Environmental controls of stand-level tree transpiration (E) and seasonal patterns of soil water utilization were studied in five central Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) sites differing in tree density. Tree density of Cerrado vegetation in the study area consistently changes along topographic gradients from ~1,000 trees ha-1 in open savannas (campo...

  7. BDEN: A timesaving computer program for calculating soil bulk density and water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn G. Starr; Michael J. Geist

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive computer program written in BASIC language that will calculate soil bulk density and moisture percentage by weight and volume. Coarse fragment weights are required. The program will also summarize the resulting data giving mean, standard deviation, and 95-percent confidence interval on one or more groupings of data.

  8. Sensitivity of in-situ gamma-ray spectra to soil density and water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, A.V.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Maucec, M.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of sediment water content and bulk density on measurements of in-situ environmental gamma-radiation were investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulations consider a large bismuth-germanate detector in a semi-infinite geometry. The volume contributing radiation to the detector

  9. Estimation of effective hydrologic properties of soils from observations of vegetation density. M.S. Thesis; [water balance of watersheds in Clinton, Maine and Santa Paula, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellers, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    An existing one-dimensional model of the annual water balance is reviewed. Slight improvements are made in the method of calculating the bare soil component of evaporation, and in the way surface retention is handled. A natural selection hypothesis, which specifies the equilibrium vegetation density for a given, water limited, climate-soil system, is verified through comparisons with observed data and is employed in the annual water balance of watersheds in Clinton, Ma., and Santa Paula, Ca., to estimate effective areal average soil properties. Comparison of CDF's of annual basin yield derived using these soil properties with observed CDF's provides excellent verification of the soil-selection procedure. This method of parameterization of the land surface should be useful with present global circulation models, enabling them to account for both the non-linearity in the relationship between soil moisture flux and soil moisture concentration, and the variability of soil properties from place to place over the Earth's surface.

  10. Predicting available water of soil from particle-size distribution and bulk density in an oasis-desert transect in northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danfeng; Gao, Guangyao; Shao, Ming'an; Fu, Bojie

    2016-07-01

    A detailed understanding of soil hydraulic properties, particularly the available water content of soil, (AW, cm3 cm-3), is required for optimal water management. Direct measurement of soil hydraulic properties is impractical for large scale application, but routinely available soil particle-size distribution (PSD) and bulk density can be used as proxies to develop various prediction functions. In this study, we compared the performance of the Arya and Paris (AP) model, Mohammadi and Vanclooster (MV) model, Arya and Heitman (AH) model, and Rosetta program in predicting the soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) at 34 points with experimental SWCC data in an oasis-desert transect (20 × 5 km) in the middle reaches of the Heihe River basin, northwestern China. The idea of the three models emerges from the similarity of the shapes of the PSD and SWCC. The AP model, MV model, and Rosetta program performed better in predicting the SWCC than the AH model. The AW determined from the SWCCs predicted by the MV model agreed better with the experimental values than those derived from the AP model and Rosetta program. The fine-textured soils were characterized by higher AW values, while the sandy soils had lower AW values. The MV model has the advantages of having robust physical basis, being independent of database-related parameters, and involving subclasses of texture data. These features make it promising in predicting soil water retention at regional scales, serving for the application of hydrological models and the optimization of soil water management.

  11. Critical soil bulk density for soybean growth in Oxisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisuke Sato, Michel; Veras de Lima, Herdjania; Oliveira, Pedro Daniel de; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the critical soil bulk density from the soil penetration resistance measurements for soybean root growth in Brazilian Amazon Oxisols. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using disturbed soil samples collected from the northwest of Para characterized by different texture. The treatments consisted of a range of soil bulk densities for each soil textural class. Three pots were used for soybean growth of and two for the soil penetration resistance curve. From the fitted model, the critical soil bulk density was determined considering the penetration resistance values of 2 and 3 MPa. After sixty days, plants were cut and root length, dry mass of root, and dry mass of shoots were determined. At higher bulk densities, the increase in soil water content decreased the penetration resistance, allowing unrestricted growth of soybean roots. Regardless of soil texture, the penetration resistance of 2 and 3 MPa had a slight effect on root growth in soil moisture at field capacity and a reduction of 50% in the soybean root growth was achieved at critical soil bulk density of 1.82, 1.75, 1.51, and 1.45 Mg m-3 for the sandy loam, sandy clay loam, clayey, and very clayey soil.

  12. Impact of water content and decomposition stage on the soil water repellency of peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Sokolowsky, Liv; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bachmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is widely reported for all kinds of soils and mainly caused by hydrophobic organic compounds. It has a substantial influence on soil hydraulic processes such as water infiltration, preferential flow paths and evaporation and therefore on hydrological processes in general. The severity of soil water repellency strongly depends on the soil water content and the amount of soil organic carbon. Although peat soils are characterized by high soil organic carbon contents, studies about peat soils are rare and mostly available for horticultural substrates. Here, we present soil water repellency measurements for peat soils with varying porosities, bulk densities and stages of decomposition. The peat soils were sampled at two different sites in a bog complex. The sites have been drained for 1 and 100 years. Samples were taken from each soil layer and, additionally, in a vertical resolution of 0.03 m. To determine the soil water contents at which the peat becomes water repellent, we applied the commonly used water drop penetration time test on progressively dewatered samples. In order to identify the influence of the decomposition stage as determined by the depth within the soil profile and duration of drainage, the potential soil water repellency was measured at air-dried sieved samples by the sessile drop method. First results show that the soil water repellency of peat soils is strongly dependent on the soil water content. For air-dried peat samples, the influence of different decomposition stages of the bog peat is negligible. All air-dried samples are extremely water repellent with contact angles > 130°. However, comparing the results with the soil organic matter content shows a slightly tendency of increasing soil water repellency with increasing soil organic matter contents.

  13. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil columns packed to different bulk densities and water uptake by plantroots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi-Pisa, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory metbod used to determine both the soil moisture retention curve and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in soil columns under transient flow conditions during evaporation.

  14. Soil Water Retention Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  15. Explaining Air and Water Transport in Undisturbed Soils By X-Ray CT Derived Macroporosity and CT- Number-Derived Matrix Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per

    The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important to predict the fluxes of air, water and solutes through soil and understand soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) -derived parameters were evaluated as predictors of water, air and solute transport through soil....... Forty five soil columns (20-cm × 20-cm) were collected at an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark. The soil columns were scanned in a medical CT-scanner. Subsequent to this, non-reactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory together with measurements of air permeability (Ka...... is considered a robust indicator of preferential flow. Meanwhile, CT-derived limiting macro-porosity was the best predictor for Ka and log10Ksat. A best subsets regression analysis was performed combining macroporosity, limiting macroporosity and CTmatrix. The predictions of water and air flow improved using...

  16. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in Soil Water Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Jacques, D.; Pan, F.; van Genuchten, M.; Cady, R. E.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil water flow modeling has multiple applications. This modeling is based on simplifications stemming from both conceptual uncertainty and lack of detailed knowledge about parameters. Modern soil moisture sensors can provide detailed information about changes in soil water content in time and with depth. This information can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. Earlier we demonstrated ensemble simulations of soil water flow by using sets of pedotransfer functions (empirical relationships between soil hydraulic properties and soil basic properties, such as particle size distribution, bulk density, organic carbon content, etc.). The objective of this work was to apply the data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter to soil water flow modeling, using soil water content monitoring with TDR probes and an ensemble of soil water flow models parameterized with different pedotransfer functions. Experiments were carried out at the Bekkevoort site, Belgium. Sixty time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes with two rods) were installed along the trench in loamy soil at 12 locations with 50-cm horizontal spacing at five depths (15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 cm). Water content and weather parameters were monitored for one year with 15 min frequency. Soil water flow was simulated using the HYDRUS6 software. Mean daily means of water contents at the observation depths were the measurements used in data assimilation. Eighteen pedotransfer functions for water retention and one for hydraulic conductivity were applied to generate ensembles to evaluate the uncertainty in simulation results, whereas the replicated measurements at each of measurement depths were used to characterize the uncertainty in data. Data assimilation appeared to be very efficient. Even assimilating measurements at a single depth provided substantial improvement in simulations at other observation depths. Results on

  17. Complexity Analysis of Peat Soil Density Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampurno, Joko; Diah Faryuni, Irfana; Dzar Eljabbar Latief, Fourier; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    The distributions of peat soil density have been identified using fractal analysis method. The study was conducted on 5 peat soil samples taken from a ground field in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, at the coordinates (0 ° 4 '2:27 "S, 109 ° 18' 48.59" E). In this study, we used micro computerized tomography (pCT Scanner) at 9.41 micro meter per pixel resolution under peat soil samples to provide 2-D high-resolution images L1-L5 (200 200 pixels) that were used to detect the distribution of peat soil density. The method for determining the fractal dimension and intercept was the 2-D Fourier analysis method. The method was used to obtain the log log-plot of magnitude with frequency. Fractal dimension was obtained from the straight regression line that interpolated the points in the interval with the largest coefficient determination. Intercept defined by the point of intersection on the -axis. The conclusion was that the distributions of peat soil density showing the fractal behaviour with the heterogeneity of the samples from the highest to the lowest were L5, L1, L4, L3 and L2. Meanwhile, the range of density values of the samples from the highest to the lowest was L3, L2, L4, L5 and L1. The study also concluded that the behaviour of the distribution of peat soil density was a weakly anisotropic.

  18. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-xian WANG; Xiao-jun LI; Xin-qiang LIANG; Qi-xiang LUO; Fang FAN; Ying-xu CHEN; Zu-zhang LI; Huo-xi SUN; Tian-fang DAI; Jun-nan WAN

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC)sequestration.We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China.The experiment included eight treatments:(1) check,(2) PK,(3) NP,(4) NK,(5) NPK,(6) 7F:3M (N,P,K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N),(7) 5F:5M (N,P,K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N),(8) 3F:7M (N,P,K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N).Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment.The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha.The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check.Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers.The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues.Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization.Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC.

  19. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-04-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC.

  20. Three Principles of Water Flow in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Lin, H.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of water flow in soils is crucial to understanding terrestrial hydrological cycle, surface energy balance, biogeochemical dynamics, ecosystem services, contaminant transport, and many other Critical Zone processes. However, due to the complex and dynamic nature of non-uniform flow, reconstruction and prediction of water flow in natural soils remain challenging. This study synthesizes three principles of water flow in soils that can improve modeling water flow in soils of various complexity. The first principle, known as the Darcy's law, came to light in the 19th century and suggested a linear relationship between water flux density and hydraulic gradient, which was modified by Buckingham for unsaturated soils. Combining mass balance and the Buckingham-Darcy's law, L.A. Richards quantitatively described soil water change with space and time, i.e., Richards equation. The second principle was proposed by L.A. Richards in the 20th century, which described the minimum pressure potential needed to overcome surface tension of fluid and initiate water flow through soil-air interface. This study extends this principle to encompass soil hydrologic phenomena related to varied interfaces and microscopic features and provides a more cohesive explanation of hysteresis, hydrophobicity, and threshold behavior when water moves through layered soils. The third principle is emerging in the 21st century, which highlights the complex and evolving flow networks embedded in heterogeneous soils. This principle is summarized as: Water moves non-uniformly in natural soils with a dual-flow regime, i.e., it follows the least-resistant or preferred paths when "pushed" (e.g., by storms) or "attracted" (e.g., by plants) or "restricted" (e.g., by bedrock), but moves diffusively into the matrix when "relaxed" (e.g., at rest) or "touched" (e.g., adsorption). The first principle is a macroscopic view of steady-state water flow, the second principle is a microscopic view of interface

  1. The Maximum Density of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses a series of experiments performed by Thomas Hope in 1805 which show the temperature at which water has its maximum density. Early data cast into a modern form as well as guidelines and recent data collected from the author provide background for duplicating Hope's experiments in the classroom. (JN)

  2. [Soil water and its karst effect in epikarst dynamic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Qin, Xing-Ming; Jiang, Zhong-Cheng; Luo, Wei-Qun; Qi, Xiao-Fan

    2009-07-01

    This paper studied the soil physical properties, soil CO2, soil water and spring water chemistry in a mature forest and a shrub in Nongla of Guangxi, China, as well as the relationships between the chemistry of soil water and spring water, aimed to understand the karst effect of the soil water in Nongla epikarst dynamic system. Significant differences were observed in the soil bulk density and non-capillary porosity under forest and shrub, which affected soil water content. The fixed CO2 in soil water had a significant negative correlation with soil CO2, and the free CO2 in soil water was 0 mg x m(-3) in the forest and 5.33 x 10(3) mg x m(-3) in the shrub. In soil water and spring water, there was a negative correlation between pH and Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl- concentrations, and a positive correlation between K+, Na+, and HCO3- concentrations and organic C content. After the eluviation of rain water, the ion concentrations in leached soil water increased greatly, and accordingly, its corrosion ability enhanced greatly. The karst process in forest environment was stable and intensive, while that in shrub environment was active but weak.

  3. Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kishne, Andrea Sz; Chang, Hung-Chih; Kish, Laszlo B

    2007-01-01

    Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified re...

  4. The impact of agriculture terraces on soil organic matter, aggregate stability, water repellency and bulk density. A study in abandoned and active farms in the Sierra de Enguera, Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Burguet, Maria; Keesstra, Saskia; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Di Prima, Simone; Brevik, Erik; Novara, Agata; Jordan, Antonio; Tarolli, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion, land degradation, lack of organic matter, erodible soils, rock outcrops… are a consequence of the human abuse and misuse of the soil resources. And this is a worldwide environmental issue (Novara et al., 2011; Vanlauwe et al., 2015; Musinguzi et al., 2015; Pereira et al., 2015; Mwagno et al., 2016). Agriculture terraces are a strategy to reduce the soil erosion, improve the soil fertility and allow the ploughing (Cerdà et al., 2010; Li et al., 2014). Although this idea is well accepted there are few scientific evidences that demonstrate that soils in the terraced areas are more stable, fertile and sustainable that the soil in non terraced areas. In fact, the ploughing in comparison to the abandoned or not ploughed land results in the soil degradation (Lieskovský and Kenderessy, 2014; Gao et al., 2015; Parras-Alcántara et al., 2014). This is mainly due to the lack of vegetation that increase the surface runoff (Cerdà et al., 1998; Keesstra et al., 2007). And why is necessary to develop also in terraced landscapes soil erosion control strategies (Mekonnen et al., 2015a; Mekonnen et al., 2015b; Prosdocimi et al., 2016). Our objective was to assess the soil organic matter content (Walkley and Black, 1934), the soil bulk density (ring method), the aggregate stabilility (drop impact) and the water repellency (Water Drop Penetration Time test) in four study sites in the Sierra de Enguera. Two sites were terraced: one abandoned 40 years before the measurements and the other still active with olive crops. And two control sites non-terraced. We used the paired plot strategy to compare the impact of terracing and abandonment. At each site we collected randomly 50 soil samples at 0-2 cm, 4-6 and 8-10 cm depth. At each sampling point 100 WDPT measurements where carried out, and one sample for the bulk density, and one for the organic matter, and one for the soil aggregate stability were collected. The soil surface samples shown the largest differences. The

  5. Humble View on Soil Water Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZHI-XIONG; ZHOULIU-ZONG

    1993-01-01

    Soil water is one of renewable water resources.Some properties of soil water concerning with its availability to plant are briefly described.An equation for estimating the amount of soil water resource is presented.Based on the evaporation demand of atmosphere,the evaluation coefficient for soil water resource is suggested.

  6. Soil-water characteristics of sandy soil and soil cement with and without vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The use of soil cement as a growth medium was examined in this study. During the monitoring, green soil cement revealed diverse ecological values. The survival rates of plants in each soil conditions were higher than 80%,which was very promising. Furthermore, the survival rates dropped when the soil density reached95%, which means soil density might influence the survival rate of plant. Plant growth rates in sandy soil were higher than that in soil cement. In particular, low soil density faci...

  7. Relationships between soil moisture-holding properties and soil texture, organic matter content, and bulk density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, H. C. F.

    1981-01-01

    Specimens from the surface horizon and the subsoil of 62 soil horizons in Hedmark and Oppland were investigated to study how the mechanical composition of the soil, the organic matter content and the bulk density affect their porosity and air capacity and their total and available water content. Most of the specimens belonged to the loam group, and a smaller number was from sandy and silty types of soil. Equations were established to make it possible to calculate the water retention curves and the amount of available water from the above mentioned parameters. As a rule, errors derived from the equations are no greater than those which are found in similar research in other countries.

  8. Impact of urban contamination of the La Paz River basin on thermotolerant coliform density and occurrence of multiple antibiotic resistant enteric pathogens in river water, irrigated soil and fresh vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Violeta; Mamani, Nataniel; Iñiguez, Volga

    2016-01-01

    La Paz River in Andean highlands is heavily polluted with urban run-off and further contaminates agricultural lowlands and downstream waters at the Amazon watershed. Agricultural produce at this region is the main source of vegetables for the major Andean cities of La Paz and El Alto. We conducted a 1 year study, to evaluate microbial quality parameters and occurrence of multiple enteropathogenic bacteria (Enterohemorrhagic E. coli-EHEC, Enteroinvasive E. coli or Shigella-EIEC/Shigella, Enteroaggregative E. coli-EAEC, Enteropathogenic E. coli-EPEC Enterotoxigenic E. coli-ETEC and Salmonella) and its resistance to 11 antibiotics. Four sampling locations were selected: a fresh mountain water reservoir (un-impacted, site 1) and downstream sites receiving wastewater discharges (impacted, sites 2-4). River water (sites 1-4, N = 48), and soil and vegetable samples (site 3, N = 24) were collected during dry (April-September) and rainy seasons (October-March). Throughout the study, thermotolerant coliform density values at impacted sites greatly exceeded the guidelines for recreational and agricultural water uses. Seasonal differences were found for thermotolerant coliform density during dry season in water samples nearby a populated and hospital compound area. In contrast to the un-impacted site, where none of the tested enteropathogens were found, 100 % of surface water, 83 % of soil and 67 % of vegetable samples at impacted sites, were contaminated with at least one enteropathogen, being ETEC and Salmonella the most frequently found. ETEC isolates displayed different patterns of toxin genes among sites. The occurrence of enteropathogens was associated with the thermotolerant coliform density. At impacted sites, multiple enteropathogens were frequently found during rainy season. Among isolated enteropathogens, 50 % were resistant to at least two antibiotics, with resistance to ampicillin, nalidixic acid, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline commonly

  9. Organic Carbon Influences on Soil Particle Density and Rheological Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    Soil particle density (rs) is not routinely measured and is assumed to range between 2.60 and 2.70 Mgm23 or to be a constant (2.65 Mgm23) when estimating essential properties such as porosity, and volumetric water and air relations. Values of rs for the same soil may, however, differ significantly from the standard range due to management induced changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations. We quantified the rs and Atterberg limits of a Rayne silt loam for five long-term (.22 yr) moldboard-plowed continuous corn (Zea mays L.; MP), no-till continuous corn (NT), no-till continuous corn with beef cattle manure (NTm), pasture, and forest systems.We also assessed the relationships of SOC concentration with rs and the Atterberg limits and the impact of rs on soil porosity. Mean rs across NT, NTm, and pasture (2.35 Mg m23) was |7% lower than that for MP in the 0- to 10-cm soil depth (2.52 Mg m23, P , 0.01). Forest had the lowest rs of all soils (1.79 Mg m23). The NTm caused a greater reduction in rs and a greater increase in SOC concentration, liquid limit (LL), plastic limit (PL), and plasticity index (PI) than NT. Surface soils under MP had the highest rs and rb and the lowest SOC concentration, LL, PL, and PI. The SOC concentration was correlated negatively with rs (r 2 5 0.75) and positively with Atterberg limits (r 2 . 0.64) at .20-cm depth. Estimates of soil porosity for NT, NTm, and pasture using the constant rs overestimated the ''true'' porosity by 12% relative to that using the measured rs.

  10. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Suk Young; Minasny, Budiman; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yihyun; Lee, Kyungdo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at -10 and -1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at -10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively). Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils.

  11. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Young Hong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at −10 and −1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at −10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively. Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils.

  12. Simulation of Soil Water Content Variability in a Heavy Clay Soil under Contrasting Soil Managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, A.; Vanderlinden, K.; Martínez, G.; Espejo, A. J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is a key variable for numerous physical, chemical and biological processes that take place at or near the soil surface. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of SWC at the field scale is of prime importance for implementing efficient measurement strategies in applications. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of gravimetric SWC in a heavy clay soil, in a wheat-sunflower-legume rotation under conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) using a simple water balance model. An experimental field in SW Spain, where conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) management of a heavy clay soil are being compared since 1983, was sampled for gravimetric SWC on 38 occasions during 2008 and 2009. Topsoil clay content across the six plots was on average 55%, with a standard deviation of 2.7%. The soil profile was sampled at 54 locations, evenly distributed over the three CT and NT plots, at depths of 0-10, 25-35, and 55-65 cm. Topsoil water retention curves (SWRC) were determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples from each of the 54 locations. A weather station recorded daily precipitation and evapotranspiration, as calculated by the Penman-Monteith FAO equation. The water balance was calculated using the Thornthwaite-Mather model with a daily time step. Three parameters, water holding capacity, and water evaporation corrector coefficients for each of the two years, were inversely estimated at the 54 SWC observation points and probability density functions were identified. Spatial variability of SWC was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, and simulated and observed variability were compared. This Monte Carlo scheme, using a simple water balance model with only three parameters, was found to be useful for evaluating the influence of soil management on the variability of SWC in heavy clay soils.

  13. Soil Water Balance Measurement in Field Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZHI-XIONG

    1992-01-01

    A 5-year experiment on water balance has been conducted in a flat rainfed wheat field with an area of 66×100m2 in Fengqiu,Henan Province in China.Based on the analysis of semi-variance functions conducted with soil moisture samples taken from 77 nodes of a 10×10m2 grid,the soil moisture distribution in the field was structural with a temporal stability.According to the autocorrelation range of the semi-variance function,6 sites were selected for the determination of soil water conditions.The characteristic of probability density function of the differences of water storage in two sets of measurements showed that the distribution of these variables in the field was a normal one.The error in the estimation of the average of 5 random samples was 14% (α=0.10),and the errors of water consumption by wheat during the experiments were estimated to be 6-13%.Sime the experimental field was large enough to avoid any edge effect,the results obtained should tally with the actual situation.Yet the soil system was heterogeneous,so we must follow the principles of statistics and geostatistics when describing the system's status with the average of the samples.

  14. Water repellent soils: the case for unsaturated soil mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckett Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water repellent (or “hydrophobic” or “non-wetting” soils have been studied by soil scientists for well over a century. These soils are typified by poor water infiltration, which leads to increased soil erosion and poor crop growth. However, the importance of water repellence on determining soil properties is now becoming recognised by geotechnical engineers. Water repellent soils may, for example, offer novel solutions for the design of cover systems overlying municipal or mine waste storage facilities. However, investigations into factors affecting their mechanical properties have only recently been initiated. This purpose of this paper is to introduce geotechnical engineers to the concept of water repellent soils and to discuss how their properties can be evaluated under an unsaturated soils framework. Scenarios in which water repellent properties might be relevant in geotechnical applications are presented and methods to quantify these properties in the laboratory and in the field examined.

  15. Soil warming affects soil organic matter chemistry of all density fractions of a mountain forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wanek, Wolfgang; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and increase thereby the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated microbial activity might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. We here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three different density fractions of forest soils from a long term warming experiment in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling the soils in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for 8 consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results which included organic C content, total N content, δ13C, δ 14C, δ 15N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. The differences in the three individual fractions (free particulate organic matter, occluded particulate organic matter and mineral associated organic matter) were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and sampling depth. We did however find statistically significant effects of warming in all density fractions from 0-10 cm depth, 10-20 cm depth or both. Our results also including significant changes in the supposedly more stable mineral associated organic matter fraction where δ 13C values decreased at both sampling depths and the relative proportion of N-bearing compounds decreased at a sampling depth of 10-20 cm. All the observed changes can be attributed to an interplay of enhanced microbial decomposition of SOM and increased root litter input. This study suggests that soil warming destabilizes all density fractions of

  16. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  17. On the use of surface neutron-gamma gauges to estimate soil water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, T.T.; Cassaro, F.A.M.; Reichardt, K. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Oliveira, J.C.M.; Timm, L.C

    2002-09-01

    Surface neutron-gamma gauges are handy instruments to measure soil water contents and bulk densities of surface layers. Although available for some decades, their optimal use is still not well established. This study is a contribution to improve their use, mainly in relation to calibration, and of the effect of soil dry bulk density on soil water content measurements.

  18. PEDO-TRANSFER FUNCTIONS FOR ESTIMATING SOIL BULK DENSITY IN CENTRAL AMAZONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Seixas Barros

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Under field conditions in the Amazon forest, soil bulk density is difficult to measure. Rigorous methodological criteria must be applied to obtain reliable inventories of C stocks and soil nutrients, making this process expensive and sometimes unfeasible. This study aimed to generate models to estimate soil bulk density based on parameters that can be easily and reliably measured in the field and that are available in many soil-related inventories. Stepwise regression models to predict bulk density were developed using data on soil C content, clay content and pH in water from 140 permanent plots in terra firme (upland forests near Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. The model results were interpreted according to the coefficient of determination (R2 and Akaike information criterion (AIC and were validated with a dataset consisting of 125 plots different from those used to generate the models. The model with best performance in estimating soil bulk density under the conditions of this study included clay content and pH in water as independent variables and had R2 = 0.73 and AIC = -250.29. The performance of this model for predicting soil density was compared with that of models from the literature. The results showed that the locally calibrated equation was the most accurate for estimating soil bulk density for upland forests in the Manaus region.

  19. Stomatal Density and Bio-water Saving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Bio-water saving is to increase water use efficiency of crops or crop yield per unit of water input. Plant water use efficiency is determined by photosynthesis and transpiration, for both of which stomata are crucial. Stomata are pores on leaf epidermis for both water and carbon dioxide fluxes that are controlled by two major factors: stomatal behavior and density. Stomatal behavior has been the focus of intensive research, while less attention has been paid to stomatal density. Recently, a number of genes controlling stomatal development have been identified. This review summarizes the recent progress on the genes regulating stomatal density, and discusses the role of stomatal density in plant water use efficiency and the possibility to increase plant water use efficiency, hence bio-water saving by genetically manipulating stomatal density.

  20. Effects of a waste paper product on soil phosphorus, carbon, and bulk density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, David; Aiken, Glen

    2006-01-01

    Applications of manures to agricultural fields have increased soil test values for P to high levels in parts of the USA and thus increased the likelihood that P will be transported to surface water and degrade its quality. Waste paper applications to soils with high STP (soil test P) may decrease the risk of P transport to surface water by decreasing DRP (dissolved reactive P) by the formation of insoluble Al-P complexes and providing organic matter to improve infiltration. A field experiment was conducted near Booneville, AR (USA) to assess the effects of different rates of a waste paper product addition on STP, soil bulk density, and total soil C with a soil with approximately 45 mg Bray1-P kg-1 soil (dry weight). A Leadvale silt loam soil (fine-silty, siliceous, thermic Typic Fragiudult) was amended with 0, 22, 44, or 88 Mg waste paper product ha-1 to supply approximately 90, 170, or 350 kg Al ha-1, respectively. One year after additions, there was a strong negative correlation between waste paper product application rates and soil bulk density, and a strong positive correlation between rates and total soil C content. Soil bulk density and total C 2 yr after additions, and soil DRP and Bray1-P were not affected by waste paper additions. These results support the hypothesis that decreases in DRP in runoff from soils receiving waste paper additions were probably due to changes in soil organic matter and bulk density, rather than changes in the chemical forms of soil P.

  1. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these highly productive soils are left bare under the prevailing land management and marly soils are vulnerable to soil water erosion when left bare. In this paper we study the impact of different agricultural land management strategies on soil properties (bulk density, soil organic matter, soil moisture), soil water erosion and runoff, by means of simulated rainfall experiments and soil analyses. Three representative land managements (tillage/herbicide/covered with vegetation) were selected, where 20 paired plots (60 plots) were established to determine soil losses and runoff. The simulated rainfall was carried out at 55mmh(-1) in the summer of 2013 (erosion were significantly higher in herbicide treated plots compared to the others. Runoff sediment concentration was significantly higher in tilled plots. The lowest values were identified in covered plots. Overall, tillage, but especially herbicide treatment, decreased vegetation cover, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and increased bulk density, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion. Soil erosion was extremely high in herbicide plots with 0.91Mgha(-1)h(-1) of soil lost; in the tilled fields erosion rates were lower with 0.51Mgha(-1)h(-1). Covered soil showed an erosion rate of 0.02Mgha(-1)h(-1). These results showed that agricultural management influenced water and sediment dynamics and that tillage and herbicide treatment should be avoided.

  2. Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, T.; Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Takeishi, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    A large amount of cooling water is used in a D-T fusion reactor. The cooling water will contain tritium with high concentration because tritium can permeate metal walls at high temperature easily. A development of tritium handling technology for confining tritiated water in the fusion facility is an important issue. In addition, it is also important to understand tritium behavior in environment assuming severe accidents. In this study, percolation experiments of tritiated water in soil packed bed were carried out and tritium behavior in soil was discussed. Six soil samples were collected in Hakozaki campus of Kyushu University. These particle densities were of the same degree as that of general soils and moisture contents were related to BET surface area. For two soil samples used in the percolation experiment of tritiated water, saturated hydraulic conductivity agreed well with the estimating value by Creager. Tritium retention ratio in the soil packed bed was larger than water retention. This is considered to be due to an effect of tritium sorption on the surface of soil particles. The isotope exchange capacity estimated by assuming that H/T ratio of supplied tritiated water and H/T ratio of surface water of soil particle was equal was comparable to that on cement paste and mortar which were obtained by exposure of tritiated water vapor. (authors)

  3. Dynamic investigation on the coupled changing process of moisture and density fields in freezing soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立新; 蒲毅彬; 廖全荣; 顾同欣

    1999-01-01

    The data reflecting the change in density are obtained, with computer tomograph scanning through the sample of freezing soil section by section at intervals without destruction. Combined with the changing characteristics of water content along the sample during test, the dynamic coupled process of moisture and density fields under the effect of temperature gradient on the freezing soil in closed system is discussed. The result reflects the internal process of frost heave improvement resulting from the transfer of mass and heat.

  4. Assessment and utilization of soil water resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analyses of water interactions and water balance, this paper discusses the issues on the assessment and regulation of soil water resources, which lays the scientific basis for limited irrigation and water-saving agriculture.

  5. Influence of stand density on soil CO2 efflux for a Pinus densiflora forest in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Nam Jin; Son, Yowhan; Lee, Sue Kyoung; Yoon, Tae Kyung; Seo, Kyung Won; Kim, Choonsig; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Bae, Sang Won; Hwang, Jaehong

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the influence of stand density [938 tree ha(-1) for high stand density (HD), 600 tree ha(-1) for medium stand density (MD), and 375 tree ha(-1) for low stand density (LD)] on soil CO(2) efflux (R (S)) in a 70-year-old natural Pinus densiflora S. et Z. forest in central Korea. Concurrent with R (S) measurements, we measured litterfall, total belowground carbon allocation (TBCA), leaf area index (LAI), soil temperature (ST), soil water content (SWC), and soil nitrogen (N) concentration over a 2-year period. The R (S) (t C ha(-1) year(-1)) and leaf litterfall (t C ha(-1) year(-1)) values varied with stand density: 6.21 and 2.03 for HD, 7.45 and 2.37 for MD, and 6.96 and 2.23 for LD, respectively. In addition, R (S) was correlated with ST (R (2) = 0.77-0.80, P densiflora.

  6. Linking Soil Physical Parameters Along a Density Gradient in a Loess-Soil Long-Term Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, Marie; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand the impact of texture and organic carbon (OC) on soil structure development. Only few studies investigated this for silt-dominated soils. In this study, soil physical properties were determined on samples from a controlled experiment (Static Fertilization Experiment...... coefficient data; the model pore-connectivity factor was fairly constant, whereas the water blockage factor was markedly different. Water and air parameters both implied that change in bulk density was the major driver for diffusive and convective parameters in the experiment....

  7. Spatial correlation between weed species densities and soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Mette; Christensen, Svend; Simmelsgaard, Svend Erik

    2002-01-01

    -correlated with the phosphorus content in the soil in all years. The density of Veronica spp. and Poa annua L. was negatively cross-correlated with pH in all three years. Other spatial cross-correlations that were found in this study were inconsistent over time or field site. The densities of some of the weed species were......The spatial cross-correlation between weed species densities and six soil properties within fields was analysed using cross-semivariograms. The survey was carried out in three successive years in two fields. The most consistent relationship between weed species density (numbers m−2) and soil...... spatially cross-correlated with more than one soil property. The results showed that the range of spatial dependence varied not only between fields, but also between weed species and soil properties, as well as between years. This study indicates that the weed pattern is field-specific and that the spatial...

  8. CROP DENSITY AND IRRIGATION WITH SALINE WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Feinerman, Eli

    1983-01-01

    The economic implications of plant density for irrigation water use under saline conditions are investigated, utilizing the involved physical and biological relationships. The analysis considers a single crop and is applied to cotton data. The results suggest that treating plant density as an endogenous control variable has substantial impact on profits and the optimal quantities and qualities of the applied irrigation water.

  9. Using Ethanol to Investigate Dynamic Soil Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James E.; Beatty, Sarah M.

    2016-04-01

    Large gaps remain in our fundamental understanding of the behaviour of water in dynamically repellent soils. By investigating these systems using other miscible fluids that minimize or eliminate repellency, e.g. ethanol, we seek to better understand and quantify soil water repellency. The advantages of the enhanced wettability of water repellent soils to other miscible fluids, however, come with complications including shifts in effective pore water pressures induced through variable interfacial tensions as well as differences in fluid mobility due to variable fluid viscosities and densities. With these considerations in mind, we compare and contrast the observed behaviours of fluid infiltration and retention in dynamically hydrophobic soils and hydrophilic soils. We conducted field and laboratory studies using tension disc infiltrometers along with water and ethanol solutions to investigate dynamic repellency in post-wildfire soils from Northern Ontario, Canada. Tension infiltrometers maintain a constant negative liquid pressure at the surface which proved to be useful for isolating wettable behaviours sensitive to dynamic changes in wettability. We present the data and system conceptualised and explained through contact angle dynamics and variable fractional wettability of the soil. The limitations of extending hydrophilic concepts and hydraulic functions to hydrophobic soils are discussed along with persistent challenges to advance our ability to simulate and predict system behaviours in naturally occurring water repellent soils.

  10. Prediction of the Soil Water Characteristic from Soil Particle Volume Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Modelling water distribution and flow in partially saturated soils requires knowledge of the soil-water characteristic (SWC). However, measurement of the SWC is challenging and time-consuming, and in some cases not feasible. This study introduces two predictive models (Xw-model and Xw......*-model) for the SWC, derived from readily available soil properties such as texture and bulk density. A total of 46 soils from different horizons at 15 locations across Denmark were used for models evaluation. The Xw-model predicts the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric fines content (organic matter...... (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p...

  11. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of estimated soil hydraulic parameters for simulating soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manika; Garg, Naveen Kumar; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis has been carried out for the scalar parameters (soil hydraulic parameters (SHPs)), which govern the simulation of soil water content in the unsaturated soil zone. The study involves field experiments, which were conducted in real field conditions for wheat crop in Roorkee, India under irrigated conditions. Soil samples were taken for the soil profile of 60 cm depth at an interval of 15 cm in the experimental field to determine soil water retention curves (SWRCs). These experimentally determined SWRCs were used to estimate the SHPs by least square optimization under constrained conditions. Sensitivity of the SHPs estimated by various pedotransfer functions (PTFs), that relate various easily measurable soil properties like soil texture, bulk density and organic carbon content, is compared with lab derived parameters to simulate respective soil water retention curves. Sensitivity analysis was carried out using the monte carlo simulations and the one factor at a time approach. The different sets of SHPs, along with experimentally determined saturated permeability, are then used as input parameters in physically based, root water uptake model to ascertain the uncertainties in simulating soil water content. The generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation procedure (GLUE) was subsequently used to estimate the uncertainty bounds (UB) on the model predictions. It was found that the experimentally obtained SHPs were able to simulate the soil water contents with efficiencies of 70-80% at all the depths for the three irrigation treatments. The SHPs obtained from the PTFs, performed with varying uncertainties in simulating the soil water contents. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, Uncertainty estimation, Pedotransfer functions, Soil hydraulic parameters, Hydrological modelling

  12. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  13. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Weihai; Guo, Qiuju; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Guan

    2008-07-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ((222)Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil (226)Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the (222)Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average (222)Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7+/-9.4 mBq m(-2)s(-1). Both regional and seasonal variations in the (222)Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil (226)Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China.

  14. Prediction of the P-leaching potential of arable soils in areas with high livestock densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WERNER Wilfried; TRIMBORN Manfred; PIHL Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Due to long-term positive P-balances many surface soils in areas with high livestock density in Germany are oversupplied with available P, creating a potential for vertical P losses by leaching. In extensive studies to characterize the endangering of ground water to P pollution by chemical soil parameters it is shown that the available P content and the P concentration of the soil solution in the deeper soil layers, as indicators of the P-leaching potential, cannot be satisfactorily predicted from the available P content of the topsoils. The P equilibrium concentration in the soil solution directly above ground water table or the pipe drainage system highly depends on the relative saturation of the P-sorption capacity in this layer. A saturation index of <20% normally corresponds with Pequilibrium concentrations of <0.2 mg P/L. Phytoremediation may reduce the P leaching potential of P-enriched soils only over a very long period.

  15. Modeling Water Pollution of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Doležel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The government of the Czech Republic decided that in the location to the west of Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, some deep mines should be closed because of their low efficiency of coal mined i.e. small amounts and low quality of the coal extracted in the final stage of mining. The locations near Prague influenced the decision to do maintenance on the abandoned mines, as the thread of soil pollution was unacceptably high in the neighborhood of the capital city. Before the mines were closed it was necessary to separate existed extensive horizontal location of salt water below a clay layer in order not to deteriorate the upper fresh water. The salt water could not be allowed to pollute the upper layer with the fresh water, as many wells in villages in the neighborhood of the former mines would be contaminated. Two horizontal clay layers (an insulator and a semi-insulator separated the two horizons containing salt water and fresh water. Before starting deep mining, vertical shafts had to be constructed with concrete linings to enable the miners to access the depths. The salt water was draining away throughout the existence of the mine. The drainage was designed very carefully to avoid possible infiltration of salt water into the upper horizon. Before the mines were abandoned it was necessary to prevent contact between the two kinds of waters in the shafts. Several options were put forward, the most efficient of which appeared to be one that proposed filling the shafts with spoil soil and creating a joint seal made of disparate material at the interface between the salt water and fresh water to create a reliable stopper. The material for the spoil soil was delivered from deposits located not far from the shafts. This material consisted of a variety of grains of sand, big boulders of slate, slaty clay, sandstone, etc.. Chemical admixtures were considered to improve the flocculation of the filling material. The stopper was positioned at a

  16. Prediction of the soil water retention curve for structured soil from saturation to oven-dryness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The soil water retention curve (SWRC) is the most fundamental soil hydraulic function required for modelling soil–plant–atmospheric water flow and transport processes. The SWRC is intimately linked to the distribution of the size of pores, the composition of the solid phase and the soil specific....... In this research we evaluated a new two-stage approach developed recently to predict the SWRC based onmeasurements for disturbed repacked soil samples. Our study involved undisturbed structured soil and took into account the effects of bulk density, organic matter content and particle-size distribution....... Independently measured SWRCs for 171 undisturbed soil samples with organic matter contents that ranged from 3 to 14% were used for model validation. The results indicate that consideration of the silt and organic matter fractions, in addition to the clay fraction, improved predictions for the dry-end SWRC...

  17. Uneven moisture patterns in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands, water-repellent soils are widespread and they often show irregular moisture patterns, which cause accelerated transport of water and solutes to the groundwater and surface water. Under grass cover, spatial variability in soil moisture content is high owing to fingered flow; in ar

  18. A modified soil water based Richards equation for layered soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinka, F.; Ahrens, B.

    2010-09-01

    Most Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) models like TERRA-ML (implemented e.g. in the CCLM model (www.clm-community.eu)) use the soil moisture based Richards equation to simulate vertical water fluxes in soils, assuming a homogeneous soil type. Recently, high-resolution soil type datasets (e.g. BüK 1000, only for Germany (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR, www.bgr.bund.de) or Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD, version 1.1, FAO/IIASA/ISRIC/ISSCAS/JRC, March 2009)) have been developed. Deficiencies in the numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation may occur if inhomogeneous soil type data is implemented, because there are possibly discontinuities in soil moisture due to various soil type characteristics. One way to fix this problem is to use the potential based Richards equation, but this may lead to problems in conservation of mass. This presentation will suggest a possible numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation for inhomogeneous soils. The basic idea is to subtract the equilibrium state of it from soil moisture fluxes. This should reduce discontinuities because each soil layer aspires the equilibrium state and therefore differences might be of the same order. First sensitivity studies have been done for the Main river basin, Germany.

  19. Concurrent temporal stability of the apparent electrical conductivity and soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of spatio-temporal soil water content (SWC) variability within agricultural fields is useful to improve crop management. Spatial patterns of soil water contents can be characterized using the temporal stability analysis, however high density sampling is required. Soil apparent electrical c...

  20. Soil-water interaction in unsaturated expansive soil slopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Liangtong

    2007-01-01

    The intensive soil-water interaction in unsatura- ted expansive soil is one of the major reasons for slope fail- ures. In this paper, the soil-water interaction is investigated with the full-scale field inspection of rainwater infiltration and comprehensive experiments, including wetting-induced softening tests, swelling, and shrinkage tests. It is demonstrat- ed that the soil-water interaction induced by seasonal wetting- drying cycles is very complex, and it involves coupled effects among the changes in water content, suction, stress, deforma- tion and shear strength. In addition, the abundant cracks in the expansive soil play an important role in the soil-water interaction. The cracks disintegrate the soil mass, and more importantly, provide easy pathways for rainfall infiltration. Infiltration of rainwater not only results in wetting-induced softening of the shallow unsaturated soil layers, but also leads to the increase of horizontal stress. The increase of horizontal stress may lead to a local passive failure. The seasonal wetting-drying cycles tend to result in a down-slope creeping of the shallow soil layer, which leads to progressive slope failure.

  1. Field spatial and temporal patterns of soil water content and bulk density changes Padrões espacial e temporal de mudanças da umidade e densidade do solo no campo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos Timm

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil water content (theta and bulk density (rhos greatly influence important soil and plant processes, such as water movement, soil compaction, soil aeration, and plant root system development. Spatial and temporal variability of theta and rhos during different periods of the year and different phases of crops are of fundamental interest. This work involves the characterization of spatial and temporal patterns of theta and rhos during different climatic periods of year, aiming to verify whether there are significant temporal changes in rhos at the soil surface layer when submitted to wetting and drying cycles. The field experiment was carried out in a coffee plantation, Rhodic Kandiudalf soil, clayey texture. Using a neutron/gamma surface probe, theta and rhos were measured meter by meter along a 200 m spatial transect, along an interrow contour line. During the wet period there was no difference of spatial patterns of theta while during the dry period differences were observed, and can be associated to precipitation events. It was also observed that there are rhos temporal changes at the soil surface along the studied period as a consequence of the in situ wetting and drying cycles.Umidade (teta e densidade do solo (ros influenciam importantes processos no solo e planta tais como: movimento de água, compactação do solo, aeração do solo e desenvolvimento radicular. Baseado neste fato, questões referentes à variabilidade espacial e temporal de teta e ros para diferentes períodos do ano e diferentes fases de desenvolvimento da cultura do café tornam-se de extremo interesse. Este trabalho teve como objetivo caracterizar padrões espaciais e temporais de teta e ros durante diferentes períodos do ano e verificar se existem mudanças temporais significativas de ros na superfície do solo quando submetida a ciclos de umedecimento/secagem. O experimento foi conduzido em campo cultivado com café em um solo classificado como Nitossolo Vermelho

  2. Rock fragments induce patchy distribution of soil water repellency in burned soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel; García-Moreno, Jorge; Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.

    2013-04-01

    %). Soil WR was assessed in soil samples (0-10 cm) collected monthly during 6 monhts after burning. In the second case, a fire-affected forest soil from Calañas (Huelva, southweastern Spain) was studied. Soil plots under different fire severities (low, medium and high severity burning) and rock fragment cover classes (20-40 and 60-80%) were analyzed. Soil WR was assessed in the soil surface immediately under the vertical projection of randomly selected stones and in the middle point between these and the nearest stones. Unburned adjacent soils under similar rock fragment cover classes were used as control. All soil WR assessments were carried out using the WDPT method. RESULTS In both cases, soil WR was induced in the soil surface contacting rock fragments after burning. Severity of WR ranged between subcritical or slight (low severity burning) and strong (high severity burning). Soil WR was also found to increase with rock fragment cover, especially after moderate or high severity burning, both under and between rock fragments. It is suggested that high density of rock fragments on the soil surface create a continuous surface of high residence of temperature peaks (in agreement with García-Moreno et al., 2013). Combustion of plant residues in oxygen depletion conditions between adjacent nearby rock fragments contributes to heat transfer to the soil surface and consequent enhanced soil WR. REFERENCES García-Moreno, J., Gordillo-Rivero, A.J., Gil, J., Jiménez-Morillo, N.T., Mataix-Solera, J., González-Peñaloza, F.A., Granged, A.J.P., Bárcenas-Moreno, G., Jiménez-Pinilla, P., Lozano, E., Jordán, A., Zavala, L.M. 2013. Do stones modify the spatial distribution of fire-induced soil water repellency? Preliminary data. Flamma, 4:76-80.

  3. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  4. Methods for determining actual soil water repellence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.; Oostindie, K.; Moore, D.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe a simple and quick method for determining the presence of water repellency in a soil by using a small core sampler (1.5 cm in diameter, 25 cm long) and applying the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test at different depths on the sandy soil cores. Obtained results provide

  5. Study on soil water characteristics of tobacco fields based on canonical correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hou SHAO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the principal factors influencing soil water characteristics (SWC and evaluate SWC effectively, the multivariate-statistical canonical correlation analysis (CCA method was used to study and analyze the correlation between SWC and soil physical and chemical properties. Twenty-two soil samples were taken from 11 main tobacco-growing areas in Guizhou Province in China and the soil water characteristic curves (SWCC and basic physical and chemical properties of the soil samples were determined. The results show that: (1 The soil bulk density, soil total porosity and soil capillary porosity have significant effects on SWC of tobacco fiels. Bulk density and total porosity are positively correlated with soil water retention characteristics (SWRC, and soil capillary porosity is positively correlated with soil water supply characteristics (SWSC. (2 Soil samples from different soil layers at the same soil sampling point show similarity or consistency in SWC. Inadequate soil water supply capability and imbalance between SWRC and SWSC are problems of tobacco soil. (3 The SWC of loamy clay are generally superior to those of silty clay loam.

  6. Study on soil water characteristics of tobacco fields based on canonical correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hou SHAO; Yu WANG; Li-dong BI; You-bo YUAN; Xian-kun SU; Jian-guo MO

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify the principal factors influencing soil water characteristics (SWC) and evaluate SWC effectively, the multivariate-statistical canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method was used to study and analyze the correlation between SWC and soil physical and chemical properties. Twenty-two soil samples were taken from 11 main tobacco-growing areas in Guizhou Province in China and the soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) and basic physical and chemical properties of the soil samples were determined. The results show that: (1) The soil bulk density, soil total porosity and soil capillary porosity have significant effects on SWC of tobacco fiels. Bulk density and total porosity are positively correlated with soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), and soil capillary porosity is positively correlated with soil water supply characteristics (SWSC). (2) Soil samples from different soil layers at the same soil sampling point show similarity or consistency in SWC. Inadequate soil water supply capability and imbalance between SWRC and SWSC are problems of tobacco soil. (3) The SWC of loamy clay are generally superior to those of silty clay loam.

  7. The effects of forward speed and depth of conservation tillage on soil bulk density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahmoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, production techniques and equipment have been developed for conservation of tillage systems that have been adopted by many farmers. With proper management, overall yield averages for conventional and reduced tillage systems are nearly identical. Sometimes, field operations can be combined by connecting two or more implements. Combined operations reduce both fuel consumption, and time and labor requirements by eliminating at least one individual trip over the field. Light tillage, spraying, or fertilizing operations can be combined with either primary or secondary tillage or planting operations. Tillage helps seed growth and germination through providing appropriate conditions for soil to absorb sufficient temperature and humidity. Moreover, it helps easier development of root through reducing soil penetration resistance. Tillage is a time-consuming and expensive procedure. With the application of agricultural operations, we can save substantial amounts of fuel, time and energy consumption. Conservation tillage loosens the soil without turning, but by remaining the plant left overs, stems and roots. Bulk density reflects the soil’s ability to function for structural support, water and solute movement, and soil aeration. Bulk densities above thresholds indicate impaired function. Bulk density is also used to convert between weight and volume of soil. It is used to express soil physical, chemical and biological measurements on a volumetric basis for soil quality assessment and comparisons between management systems. This increases the validity of comparisons by removing the error associated with differences in soil density at the time of sampling. The aim of conservation tillage is to fix the soil structure. This investigation was carried out considering the advantages of conservation tillage and less scientific research works on imported conservation tillage devices and those which are made inside the country

  8. Soil resistivity over root area ratio, soil humidity, and bulk density: laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastini, Enrico; Giambastiani, Yamuna; Preti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about root system distribution covers an important role in slope shallow stability stud-ies, as this factor grants an increase in soil geotechnical properties (soil cohesion and friction an-gle) and determines a different underground water circulation. Published studies (Amato et al., 2008 and 2011; Censini et al., 2014) about in situ application of ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomo-graphy) analysis show how the root presence affects the measurable soil resistivity values, confirm-ing the suitability to investigate the application of such technique, aiming to estimate root density in soil with an indirect and non-invasive method. This study, laboratory-based and led on reconstructed samples in controlled condition, aim to find a correlation between the resistivity variations and the various factors that can affect them (humid-ity, bulk density, presence of foreign bodies, temperature). The tests involved a clay-loam soil (USDA classification) taken from Quaracchi (Florence, Italy), in an experimental fir-wood (Picea abies) owned by the Department of Agricultural, Food and For-estry System, Florence University, a previously chosen site for field ERT applications. The row ma-terial has been dried out in a lab stove, grounded and sieved at 2 mm, and then placed in a lexan box (30 x 20 x 20 cm) without compaction. Inside the sample have been inserted 3 series of 4 iron electrodes, insulated along the shaft and with the conductive end placed at three different depth: 2 cm from surface, in the middle of the sample and in contact with the bottom of the box; resistivity measures are conducted on the three levels using a Syscal R2 with electrodes connected in a dipole-dipole configuration. Root presence is simulated inserting bamboo spits (simple geometry, replicable "R.A.R.") in varying number from 0 to 16 in every area between two contiguous electrodes. The tests are repeated in time, monitoring the natural variations in humidity (evapotranspiration) and bulk

  9. Root water extraction and limiting soil hydraulic conditions estimated by numerical simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong van Lier, de Q.; Metselaar, K.; Dam, van J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Root density, soil hydraulic functions, and hydraulic head gradients play an important role in the determination of transpiration-rate-limiting soil water contents. We developed an implicit numerical root water extraction model to solve the Richards equation for the modeling of radial root water

  10. Molecular Density Functional Theory of Water

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Borgis, Daniel; 10.1021/jz301956b

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional implementations of liquid state theories offer an efficient alternative to computer simulations for the atomic-level description of aqueous solutions in complex environments. In this context, we present a (classical) molecular density functional theory (MDFT) of water that is derived from first principles and is based on two classical density fields, a scalar one, the particle density, and a vectorial one, the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric constants. It has to be complemented by a solute-solvent three-body term that reinforces tetrahedral order at short range. The approach is shown to provide the correct three-dimensional microscopic solvation profile around various molecular solutes, possibly possessing H-bonding sites, at a computer cost two-three orders of magnitude lower tha...

  11. Optimality and soil water-vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important factor for nearly all hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Antecedent soil moisture impacts on infiltration and runoff generation, the soil moisture distribution within the soil together with other factors determines the soil carbon and nutrient cycling and the amount of soil moisture within the rooting zone often constitutes a major constraint for plant growth and evapo-transpiration. The main processes determining soil moisture dynamics are infiltration, percolation, evaporation and root water uptake. Therefore, modelling soil moisture dynamics requires an interdisciplinary approach that links hydrological and biological processes. Previous approaches treat either root water uptake rates or root distributions and transpiration rates as a given, and calculate the soil moisture dynamics based on the theory of flow in unsaturated media. The present study introduces a different approach to linking soil water and vegetation dynamics, based on optimality. Assuming that plants aim at minimising the costs related to the maintenance of the root system while meeting their demand for water, a model was formulated that dynamically adjusts the vertical root distribution in the soil profile to meet this objective. The model was used to compute the soil moisture dynamics in a tropical savanna over 12 months, which showed a better resemblance with the observed time series of surface soil moisture than models based on fixed root distributions. The optimality-based approach to modelling soil-vegetation interactions requires a new level of interdisciplinary synthesis, as biological and hydrological knowledge needs to be combined to derive the very basis of the model, namely the costs and benefits of different root properties. On the other hand, this approach has the potential to reduce the number of unknowns in a model (e.g. the vertical root distribution), which makes it a valuable alternative to more empirically-based approaches.

  12. Analytical reliability analysis of soil-water characteristic curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johari A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC, also known as the soil water-retention curve, is an important part of any constitutive relationship for unsaturated soils. Deterministic assessment of SWCC has received considerable attention in the past few years. However the uncertainties of the parameters which affect SWCC dictate that the problem is of a probabilistic nature rather than being deterministic. In this research, a Gene Expression Programming (GEP-based SWCC model is employed to assess the reliability of SWCC. For this purpose, the Jointly Distributed Random Variables (JDRV method is used as an analytical method for reliability analysis. All input parameters of the model which are initial void ratio, initial water content, silt and clay contents are set to be stochastic and modelled using truncated normal probability density functions. The results are compared with those of the Monte Carlo (MC simulation. It is shown that the initial water content is the most effective parameter in SWCC.

  13. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  14. Evaluation of a Non-Nuclear Soil Density Gauge on Fine-Grained Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    three different moisture contents for testing: the soil being dry of the soil’s optimum moisture content ( OMC ), at the OMC , and wet of the OMC . Then...Moisture Content ( OMC ) Maximum Dry Density (MDD) Atterberg Limits ASTM D 4318 Plastic Limit (PL) Liquid Limit (LL) Plasticity Index (PI...Geotechnical properties of soils used for evaluation. Soil ID Description Atterberg Limits Grain size (percent by weight) Cu Cc MDD (pcf) OMC (%) Gs

  15. Modeling soil bulk density through a complete data scanning procedure: Heuristic alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Jalal; Keshavarzi, Ali; Kisi, Ozgur; Karimi, Sepideh; Iturraran-Viveros, Ursula

    2017-06-01

    Soil bulk density (BD) is very important factor in land drainage and reclamation, irrigation scheduling (for estimating the soil volumetric water content), and assessing soil carbon and nutrient stock as well as determining the pollutant mass balance in soils. Numerous pedotransfer functions have been suggested so far to relate the soil BD values to soil parameters (e.g. soil separates, carbon content, etc). The present paper aims at simulating soil BD using easily measured soil variables through heuristic gene expression programming (GEP), neural networks (NN), random forest (RF), support vector machine (SVM), and boosted regression trees (BT) techniques. The statistical Gamma test was utilized to identify the most influential soil parameters on BD. The applied models were assessed through k-fold testing where all the available data patterns were involved in the both training and testing stages, which provide an accurate assessment of the models accuracy. Some existing pedotransfer functions were also applied and compared with the heuristic models. The obtained results revealed that the heuristic GEP model outperformed the other applied models globally and per test stage. Nevertheless, the performance accuracy of the applied heuristic models was much better than those of the applied pedotransfer functions. Using k-fold testing provides a more-in-detail judgment of the models.

  16. Effects of Seasonal Rainfall on Soil Temperature, Moisture and Water Movement in Different Density Stands of Quercus variabilis%降雨对不同密度栓皮栎林土壤温湿度及水分运移的影响1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田超; 孟平; 张劲松; 孙守家; 贾长荣; 李建中

    2015-01-01

    以黄河小浪底库区3种密度栓皮栎林为研究对象,运用稳定同位素技术,结合大气、土壤温湿度及土壤水分氘同位素(δD)值,探讨不同季节降雨对土壤剖面温度、水分动态及运移的影响。结果表明,降雨前后高密度林分土壤温度均最高,且下层土壤具保温效果。土壤湿度随密度增大而增加,且低密度林分下层湿度大,而中高密度林分表层湿度大。雨前土壤水分δD值与枯落物δD值变化趋势相同,均随密度增大而减小。低密度林分,降雨在枯落物及土壤表层滞留时间较短,均可较快入渗到深层土壤,随后涵养在上层水分以活塞流形式下渗。且前期降水较多时,混合水可侧向流动补给壤中流。中高密度林分,在前期土壤湿度较大的雨季和旱季初期,降雨也可较快入渗到深层,除高密度林分在前期降雨较多的雨季下渗到中层。而前期降雨较少时,降雨在中高密度林分的枯落物及表层土壤滞留时间较长。表明土壤湿度低时,中密度林分土壤可较好的蓄积水分,而高密度林分在湿度低或高时均能较好的调控土壤水分。此外,在前期降水充足和高强度降雨后,降雨在低中密度林分均可通过优先流形式快速入渗,补给深层土壤。泉水和地下水δD值没有明显改变,可为干旱季节植被生长提供重要水源。%By using stable isotope techniques , three density stands of Quercus variabilis in the Yellow River Xiaolangdi reservoir were chosen to investigate the δD of soil water , temperature and moisture of both air and soil in order to study the effect of seasonal rainfall on soil temperature , moisture and water movement .The soil temperature of high density stand was the highest before and after all the four rainfall events , and the subsoil had insulation effect .The soil moisture increased with the increase of stand density , and the subsoil

  17. [Composition and Density of Soil Fauna in the Region with Enhanced Radioactivity Level (Komi Republic, Vodnyi)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, A A; Kudrin, A A; Konakova, T N; Taskaeva, A A

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the influence of high levels of radiation on soil fauna were carried out in 2012 in the territory formed as a result of the activity of the enterprise for extraction and production of radium from reservoir water and waste of uranium ore from 1931 to 1956. At present the local radioactive pollution in this area is caused by the presence of heavy natural radionuclides 226Ra, 238U and products of their disintegration in soils. The oppression of soil invertebrate.fauna in pine forests and meadows with high levels of radionuclides and heavy metals is revealed. Also shown is the decrease in the number and density of different taxonomic groups of invertebrates, reduction of the diversity and spectrum of trophic groups and vital forms in the area with a high content of radionuclides in soil. Our results are in agreement with the results obtained by the similar studies showing negative influence of high-level ionizing radiation on soil fauna.

  18. Predicting soil particle density from clay and soil organic matter contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; McBride, R.A.; Keller, T.

    2017-01-01

    Soil particle density (Dp) is an important soil property for calculating soil porosity expressions. However, many studies assume a constant value, typically 2.65Mgm−3 for arable, mineral soils. Fewmodels exist for the prediction of Dp from soil organic matter (SOM) content. We hypothesized...... of clay particles was approximately 2.86 Mg m−3, while that of sand+silt particles could be estimated to ~2.65 Mgm−3. Multiple linear regression showed that a combination of clay and SOMcontents could explain nearly 92% of the variation in measured Dp. The clay and SOMprediction equation was validated...... against a combined data set with 227 soil samples representing A, B, and C horizons from temperate North America and Europe. The new prediction equation performed better than two SOM-based models from the literature. Validation of the new clay and SOM model using the 227 soil samples gave a root mean...

  19. Effects of Soil Bulk Density on Gas Transport Parameters and Pore-Network Properties across a Sandy Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Chamindu, T K K Deepagoda

    2015-01-01

    The gas diffusion coefficient, air permeability, and their interrelations with air-filled porosity are crucial for characterization of diffusive and convective transport of gases in soils. Variations in soil bulk density can affect water retention, air-filled pore space, pore tortuosity...

  20. Compost improves urban soil and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Construction in urban zones compacts the soil, which hinders root growth and infiltration and may increase erosion, which may degrade water quality. The purpose of our study was to determine the whether planting prairie grasses and adding compost to urban soils can mitigate these concerns. We simula...

  1. Soil Water Hysteresis at Low Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. PRUNTY; J. BELL

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the soil water characteristic curve is fundamental for understanding unsaturated soils. The objective of this work was to find scanning hysteresis loops of two fine textured soils at water potentials below wilting point. This was done by equilibration over NaCl solutions with water potentials of -6.6 to -18.8 MPa at 25 °C. When cycled repeatedly through a series of potentials in the range noted previously both soils exhibited a hysteresis effect. The experimental differences in water content between the drying and wetting soils at the same water potential were much too large to be accounted for by failure to allow sufficient time to attain equilibrium as predicted by the exponential decay model. The wetting versus drying differences were relatively small, however, at only 4 mg g-1 or less in absolute terms and about 3% of the mean of wetting and drying, in relative terms. Hysteresis should be a consideration when modeling biological and physical soil processes at water contents below the wilting point, where small differences in water content result in large potential energy changes.

  2. Indian Lakes soil and water investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this investigation is to determine whether the soil and/or water in the Indian Lakes area exceeds the EPA's hazardous waste level criterion for...

  3. The impact of land use on water loss and soil desiccation in the soil profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Li

    2017-08-01

    Farmlands have gradually been replaced by apple orchards in Shaanxi province, China, and there will be a risk of severe soil-water-storage deficit with the increasing age of the apple trees. To provide a theoretical basis for the sustainable development of agriculture and forestry in the Loess Plateau, soil water content in a 19-year-old apple orchard, a 9-year-old apple orchard, a cornfield and a wheat field in the Changwu Tableland was investigated at different depths from January to October 2014. The results showed that: (1) the soil moisture content is different across the soil profile—for the four plots, the soil moisture of the cornfield is the highest, followed by the 9-year-old apple orchard and the wheat field, and the 19-year-old apple orchard has the lowest soil moisture. (2) There are varying degrees of soil desiccation in the four plots: the most serious degree of desiccation is in the 19-year-old apple orchard, followed by the wheat field and the cornfield, with the least severe desiccation occurring in the 9-year-old apple orchard. Farmland should replace apple orchards for an indefinite period while there is an extremely desiccated soil layer in the apple orchard so as to achieve the purpose of sustainable development. It will be necessary to reduce tree densities, and to carry out other research, if development of the economy and ecology of Changwu is to be sustainable.

  4. Soil aggregation and slope stability related to soil density, root length, and mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank; Frei, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Eco-engineering measures combine the use of living plants and inert mechanical constructions to protect slopes against erosion and shallow mass movement. Whereas in geotechnical engineering several performance standards and guidelines for structural safety and serviceability of construction exist, there is a lack of comparable tools in the field of ecological restoration. Various indicators have been proposed, including the fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution, microbiological parameters, and soil aggregate stability. We present results of an soil aggregate stability investigation and compare them with literature data of the angle of internal friction ?' which is conventionally used in slope stability analysis and soil failure calculation. Aggregate stability tests were performed with samples of differently treated moraine, including soil at low (~15.5 kN/m³) and high (~19.0 kN/m³) dry unit weight, soil planted with Alnus incana (White Alder) as well as the combination of soil planted with alder and inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Melanogaster variegatus s.l. After a 20 weeks growth period in a greenhouse, a total of 100 samples was tested and evaluated. Positive correlations were found between the soil aggregate stability and the three variables dry unit weight, root length per soil volume, and degree of mycorrhization. Based on robust statistics it turned out that dry unit weight and mycorrhization degree were strongest correlated with soil aggregate stability. Compared to the non-inoculated control plants, mycorrhized White Alder produced significantly more roots and higher soil aggregate stability. Furthermore, the combined biological effect of plant roots and mycorrhizal mycelia on aggregate stability on soil with low density (~15.5 kN/m³) was comparable to the compaction effect of the pure soil from 15.5 to ~19.0 kN/m³. Literature data on the effect of vegetation on the angle of internal friction ?' of the same moraine showed

  5. Vertical variations of soil hydraulic properties within two soil profiles and its relevance for soil water simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwen, Andreas; Zimmermann, Michael; Bodner, Gernot

    2014-08-01

    a gradual decrease within each horizon. The observed water retention variations could be described by state-space models that comprised the contents of clay and total carbon, whereas variations of the hydraulic conductivity were described by clay content and total porosity. The hydraulic conductivity in the Cambisol was slightly undulating throughout the profile. Here, water retention was largest in the upper part of the profile and considerably decreased within the lower part of the Bhs-horizon. Simulated soil water balance components differed distinctly between the SHP discretizations. Compared to observed soil water contents, the simulations where the SHP were given by small-scale layers or hydropedological units performed best for both experimental sites. The different SHP discretizations mainly affected the estimated drainage losses and the simulated crop transpiration under medium to dry climatic conditions. The study confirmed the importance of an adequate spatial SHP discretization. The results indicate that SHP estimations by PTFs or the standard horizon-mean sampling strategy might fail to parameterize soil water simulations, especially in structured soils. The presented hydropedological approach showed a way to receive good simulation results by reducing the SHP observation density.

  6. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

    2001-11-12

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  7. Effect of biochar on soil structural characteristics: water retention and gas transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    Biochar addition to agricultural soil has been reported to reduce climate gas emission, as well as improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little, however, is known about biochar effects on soil structural characteristics. This study investigates if biochar-application changes soil structural...... characteristics, as indicated from water retention and gas transport measurements on intact soil samples. Soil was sampled from a field experiment on a sandy loam with four control plots (C) without biochar and four plots (B) with incorporated biochar at a rate of 20 tons per hectare (plot size, 6 x 8 m). The C......-gas diffusivity on intact 100cm3 soil samples (5 replicates in each plot). We found that biochar application significantly decreased soil bulk density, hereby creating higher porosity. At the same soil-water matric potential, all the soil-gas phase parameters (air-filled porosity, air permeability and gas...

  8. The hydrology of water repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillito, R.; Berli, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Moore, H. K.

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of wildfire throughout the western U.S. is expected to increase. So, too, will flooding and erosion associated with the aftereffects of the fires. Soil water repellency (hydrophobicity) has frequently been observed after fires and is believed to increase the post-fire runoff potential, although current runoff models cannot directly account for this effect. Many physically-based runoff models incorporate an infiltration reduction factor or manipulate the soil hydraulic conductivity parameter to account for water-repellent soils in runoff generation. Beginning with fundamental principles, we developed a methodology to physically account for soil water repellency and directly account for it in the Kineros2 runoff and erosion model.

  9. Soil layer condensation peak as a response to soil water properties under Sudanese climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Ozier-Lafontaine, H.

    2012-04-01

    The soil apparent density is strongly dependent on their physico-chemical properties. It can be negatively impacted by human activities such as soil work or animal pasture or natural salinity influenced by irrigation.. In contrast it can be improved for different depths by agricultural practices. A « condensation peak » defined as an increase in the apparent density was found for the heterogeneous soils of Niger for several profiles of 5 soil classes and for a very shallow depth (10 cm maximum) with a very variable extreme depth (from 35 to 150 cm) associated with extreme density values (from 1.45 to 2). The depth of this peak, for soils neither saline nor vertic, varies inversely with the proportion of soil fine elements (silts+clays). However it corresponds to an average value of useful water (AWC) of 100mm (CV=24.4%). In sodic and alkaline soils this peak can be observed at shallow depths (from 53 to 61cm with a CV from 15 to 40%), thus for much lower AWC values (from 74 to 87cm with a CV from 26 to 47%). It can be found either below or above an impermeable horizon of a maximal density of 2.. This peak is likely to be associated with a multi-annual alternance of humectation-dessication at this depth. Its occurrence is based on an interplay of intrinsic physical and hydric soil properties but also on extrisnic parameters sch as the pluviometry, the location at the scale of the watershed and the micromodelling.

  10. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the coarser (content. Further, compaction effort was much significant

  11. Assessment of capacity sensors for monitoring soil water content in ecological orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrícia Prazeres Marques, Karina; Horcajo, Daniel; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor

    2014-05-01

    Water is an important element for soil tillage and crop development. Its proper management is essential for the development of plants, by preventing excess or shortage in water application. Soil water content is affected by the soil-water-plant system and its monitoring is a required within a sustainable agriculture framework respectful with the natural environment. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of capacitive sensors in monitoring soil moisture from organic orchards. An experimental text was carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Agricultural Engineering School in the Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain). Soil samples were collected within the 0-20 cm depth layers from the university organic orchard. The samples were air dried and subsequently sieved in a 2 mm mesh sieve, removing roots and coarse fractions and keeping the fine soil. The amount of fine soil was calculated from the soil density and the soil samples were compacted to obtain the relative volume that corresponded to their density. The measurements were carried out in dry and in saturated soil and, also in samples where soil was stirring with: 150 cm³, 300 cm³ and 450 cm³ of water. A 1890 ml container was used to hold the fine soil and the soil moisture sensor ECH2O, type 10 HS (Decagon Devices, Inc.) was placed horizontally at 5 cm depth. Soil water readings were recorded on a datalogger Em5b from the same manufacturer. The results showed that the capacitive sensor has a linear response to soil moisture content. Its value was overestimated in comparison to the volumetric values and the largest errors (about 8%) were observed in the soils with high moisture contents. Overall, these results point out that the ECH2O sensor, model 10 HS, could determine with sufficient accuracy the volumetric soil water content from organic orchards although it could be further improved by "in situ" calibration.

  12. Moisture variability resulting from water repellency in Dutch soils

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, L.W.

    1998-01-01

    The present study suggests that many soils in the Netherlands, in natural as well as in agricultural areas, may be water repellent to some degree, challenging the common perception that soil water repellency is only an interesting aberration. When dry, water repellent soils resist or retard water infiltration into the soil matrix. Soil water repellency can lead to the development of unstable wetting and preferential flow paths. Preferential flow has wide-ranging significance for rapi...

  13. Land use, forest density, soil mapping, erosion, drainage, salinity limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassoglou, N. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The results of analyses show that it is possible to obtain information of practical significance as follows: (1) A quick and accurate estimate of the proper use of the valuable land can be made on the basis of temporal and spectral characteristics of the land features. (2) A rather accurate delineation of the major forest formations in the test areas was achieved on the basis of spatial and spectral characteristics of the studied areas. The forest stands were separated into two density classes; dense forest, and broken forest. On the basis of ERTS-1 data and the existing ground truth information a rather accurate mapping of the major vegetational forms of the mountain ranges can be made. (3) Major soil formations are mapable from ERTS-1 data: recent alluvial soils; soil on quarternary deposits; severely eroded soil and lithosol; and wet soils. (4) An estimation of cost benefits cannot be made accurately at this stage of the investigation. However, a rough estimate of the ratio of the cost for obtaining the same amount information from ERTS-1 data and from conventional operations would be approximately 1:6 to 1:10, in favor of the ERTS-1.

  14. Temporal and soil management effects on soil infiltration and water content in a hillslope vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddoccu, Marcella; Ferraris, Stefano; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    The maintenance of bare soil in the vineyard's inter-rows with tillage, as well as other mechanized operations which increase the vehicle traffic, expose the soil to degradation, favoring overland flow and further threats as compaction, reduction of soil water holding capacity and water infiltration. Water infiltration is strongly controlled by field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, which depends primarily on soil texture and structure, and it is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. Beyond the currently adopted soil management, some major causes in variability of infiltration rates are the history of cultivation and the structure of the first centimeters of the vineyard's soil. A study was carried out in two experimental vineyard plots included in the 'Tenuta Cannona Experimental Vine and Wine Centre of Regione Piemonte', located in NW Italy. The study was addressed to evaluate the temporal variations of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, in relation to the soil management adopted in the inter-rows of a hillslope vineyard. The investigation was carried out in a vineyard comparing the adoption of two different soil managements in the inter-rows: 1) conventional tillage and 2) controlled grass cover. Several series of double-ring of infiltration tests were carried out during a 2-years period of observation, using the simplified falling head technique (SFH). In order to take into account the effect of tractor traffic, the tests were done both inside the the track, the portion of soil affected by the transit of tractor wheels or tracks, and outside the track. Before the execution of each test, bulk density and initial soil water content close to the investigated area were determined. Relations among infiltration behavior and these parameters were analyzed. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) at different sampling dates showed high variability, especially in the vineyard with cultivated soil. Indeed, highest infiltration rates were

  15. Hidden force resolving water ice densities

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Inter-electron-pair Coulomb repulsion and the thermodynamic-disparity of the master-slave-segmented H bond are shown to originate the density anomalies of water ice. In the liquid and solid phases, the softer non-bond (of lower specific heat) serves as the master that contracts largely and meanwhile forces the stiffer real-bond as slave into Coulomb-repulsion-driven slight elongation, leading to the O-H:O cooling contraction and the seemingly normal cooling densification; at the transition phase, the master-slave swap roles, resulting in the O:-H-O freezing elongation and volume expansion. The O:H-O of ice is longer than that of water, and therefore, ice floats. In addition, angle relaxation also contributes to the volume change during the process of relaxation.

  16. Water holding effect of subalpine dark coniferous forest soil in Gongga Mountain, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhi-hua; LU Zhao-hua; GUAN Wen-bin

    2003-01-01

    Because of the distinction of soil property and humus content, soil water content is not ideal to indicate whether it is suitable to the growth of plant. Mainly based on the PF-a numerical value denoting the water regime of soil and connected with the growth of plant, the study combined the moisture percentage of soil with PF to research in quantity the interrelation between the moisture percentage and PF in different succession phases of subalpine dark coniferous forest in Gongga Mountain. The results showed that: (1) In the same PF value, the moisture percentage in humus horizon increased gradually with the development of the succession of the dark coniferous forest; The moisture percentage of over-mature forest was the highest and>mature forest>half-mature forest>young growth forest; (2) With the increase of soil depth, the soil bulk density increased and the moisture percentage decreased, but the difference in the percentage of moisture was not notable in different succession phases. (3) In different succession series, the vegetation affected the soil water characteristics by increasing the soil organic matter, improving the soil construction, receding the soil bulk density and enhancing the soil porosity; (4) The humus horizon of the dark coniferous forest soil has the highest water holding capability in this region.

  17. Stemflow-induced processes of soil water storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    Compared to stemflow production studies only few studies deal with the fate of stemflow at the near-stem soil. To investigate stemflow contribution to the root zone soil moisture by young and adult babassu palms (Attalea speciosa Mart.), I studied stemflow generation, subsequent soil water percolation and root distributions. Rainfall, stemflow and perched water tables were monitored on an event basis. Perched water tables were monitored next to adult palms at two depths and three stem distances. Dye tracer experiments monitored stemflow-induced preferential flow paths. Root distributions of fine and coarse roots were related to soil water redistribution. Average rainfall-collecting area per adult palm was 6.4 m², but variability between them was high. Funneling ratios ranged between 16-71 and 4-55 for adult and young palms, respectively. Nonetheless, even very small rainfall events of 1 mm can generate stemflow. On average, 9 liters of adult palm stemflow were intercepted and stemflow tended to decrease for-high intensity rainfall events. Young babassu palms funneled rainfall via their fronds, directly to their subterranean stems. The funneling of rainfall towards adult palm stems, in contrast, led to great stemflow fluxes down to the soil and induced initial horizontal water flows through the soil, leading to perched water tables next to palms, even after small rainfall events. The perched water tables extended, however, only a few decimeters from palm stems. After perched water tables became established, vertical percolation through the soil dominated. To my knowledge, this process has not been described before, and it can be seen as an addition to the two previously described stemflow-induced processes of Horton overland flow and fast, deep percolation along roots. This study has demonstrated that Babassu palms funnel water to their stems and subsequently store it in the soil next to their stems in areas where coarse root length density is very high. This might

  18. Soil water repellency affects production and transport of CO2 and CH4 in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be vital in controlling both the production and transport of C gases in soil. Water availability regulates the decomposition rates of soil organic matter by the microorganisms, while the proportion of water/air filled pores controls the transport of gases within the soil and at the soil-atmosphere interface. Many experimental studies and process models looking at soil C gas fluxes assume that soil water is uniformly distributed and soil is easily wettable. Most soils, however, exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity) and do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist. They have restricted infiltration and conductivity of water, which also results in extremely heterogeneous soil water distribution. This is a world-wide occurring phenomenon which is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. This study investigates the effect of soil water repellency on microbial respiration, CO2 transport within the soil and C gas fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. The results from the field monitoring and laboratory experiments show that soil water repellency results in non-uniform water distribution in the soil which affects the CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects the water relations in the soil, but has also a great impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  19. Simulation of soil water dynamics in a Caragana intermedia woodland in Huangfuchuan watershed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Haikun; LIU Yinghui; XU Xia; WANG Kun; GAO Qiong

    2007-01-01

    As vegetation coverage increases,soil water content can decrease due to water uptake and evapotranspiration.At a very high level of plant density,poor growth and even mortality can occur due to the decrease of soil water content.Hence,a better understanding of the relationship between soil water content and the density of plants is important to design effective restoration projects.To study these relationships,we developed a soil water dynamic simulation model of a Caragana intermedia woodland under different slope gradient and slope aspect conditions in the Huangfuchuan watershed on the basis of the previous studies and field experiments.The model took into account the major processes that address the relationships of plants and the environment,including soil characteristics,precipitation,infiltration,vegetation transpiration,and soil evaporation.Daily changes in soil water content,transpiration,and evaporation of the Caragana intermedia woodland with different vegetation coverage,slope gradient,and slope aspect were simulated from 1971 to 2000.Based on the model simulations,we determined the functional relationships among soil water content,plant coverage and slope as well as the optimal plant density on flat slopes.We also determined the effects of slope gradient and slope aspect on soil water content.When slope gradient was less than l0~,the optimal plant density was sensitive to slope gradient.In the slope range from 10° to 30°,plant density was not sensitive to slope gradient.Therefore,it is important to consider planting densities on the hillsides with slope gradients less than 10° for reconstructing vegetation.

  20. Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-vegetation systems. I - Theory and hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The solution space of an approximate statistical-dynamic model of the average annual water balance is explored with respect to the hydrologic parameters of both soil and vegetation. Within the accuracy of this model it is shown that water-limited natural vegetation systems are in stable equilibrium with their climatic and pedologic environments when the canopy density and species act to minimize average water demand stress. Theory shows a climatic limit to this equilibrium above which it is hypothesized that ecological pressure is toward maximization of biomass productivity. It is further hypothesized that natural soil-vegetation systems will develop gradually and synergistically, through vegetation-induced changes in soil structure, toward a set of hydraulic soil properties for which the minimum stress canopy density of a given species is maximum in a given climate. Using these hypotheses, only the soil effective porosity need be known to determine the optimum soil and vegetation parameters in a given climate.

  1. Water Density Raster Images for the Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geodatabase contains water density raster images for the Gulf of Maine that were interpolated from water density (sigma t or kilograms/ meters cubed) point data...

  2. Study of Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Using Microscopic Spherical Particle Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Song; LU Ting-Hao

    2012-01-01

    When variations occur in the water content or dry bulk density of soil,the contact angle hysteresis will affect the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC).The occurrence of the contact angle hysteresis can be divided into slipping and pinning.It is difficult to determine the effect of pinning existence on SWCC by tests.In this study,the effect of contact angle hysteresis on SWCC was analyzed either in the case of no variations in soil dry bulk density with changes in soil water content or no variations in soil water content with changes in soil dry bulk density.In both cases,soil particles were simplified to the spherical particle model.Based on the geometrically mechanic relationship between the particles and connecting liquid bridges,a physical model for predicting the SWCC was derived from the spherical particle model.Adjusting parameters made the model applicable to various soils,that is,the cohesive soil was considered as micron-sized spherical particles.Through the simulations on SWCC test data of sand,silt,clay,and swelling soil,it was confirmed that the physical model possessed good reliability and practicability.Finally,the analysis of rationality of contact angle was performed based on the basic assumptions of the model.

  3. Physical and water properties of selected Polish heavy soils of various origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of selected physical, chemical, and water properties of four mineral arable soils characterized with heavy and very heavy texture. Soil samples from genetic horizons of black earths from areas near Kętrzyn, Gniew and Kujawy, and alluvial soils from Żuławy were used. The following properties were determined in the samples of undisturbed and disturbed structure: texture, particle density, bulk density, porosity, natural and hygroscopic moistures, maximal hygroscopic capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, potential of water bonding in soil, total and readily available water, total retention in the horizon of 0–50 cm, drainage porosity, content of organic carbon and total nitrogen Parent rocks of these soils were clays, silts and loams of various origin. High content of clay fraction strongly influenced the values of all the analyzed properties. All the examined soils had high content of organic carbon and total nitrogen and reaction close to neutral or alkaline. High content of mineral and organic colloids and, what follows, beneficial state of top horizons’ structure, determined – apart from heavy texture – low soil bulk density and high porosity. The investigated soils were characterized by high field water capacity and wide scopes of total and readily available water. The saturated hydraulic conductivity was low and characteristic to heavy mineral arable soils. The parameter which influenced the variability of analyzed parameters most was texture.

  4. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai;

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... region-water retention curve increased with increasing biochar rates....

  5. Grey water impact on soil physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel L. Murcia-Sarmiento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing demand for food produced by the increase in population, water as an indispensable element in the growth cycle of plants every day becomes a fundamental aspect of production. The demand for the use of this resource is necessary to search for alternatives that should be evaluated to avoid potential negative impacts. In this paper, the changes in some physical properties of soil irrigated with synthetic gray water were evaluated. The experimental design involved: one factor: home water and two treatments; without treated water (T1 and treated water (T2. The variables to consider in the soil were: electrical conductivity (EC, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP, average weighted diameter (MWD and soil moisture retention (RHS. The water used in drip irrigation high frequency was monitored by tensiometer for producing a bean crop (Phaseolous vulgaris L. As filtration system used was employed a unit composed of a sand filter (FLA and a subsurface flow wetland artificial (HFSS. The treatments showed significant differences in the PSI and the RHS. The FLA+HFSS system is an alternative to the gray water treatment due to increased sodium retention.

  6. Moisture variability resulting from water repellency in Dutch soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.

    1998-01-01

    The present study suggests that many soils in the Netherlands, in natural as well as in agricultural areas, may be water repellent to some degree, challenging the common perception that soil water repellency is only an interesting aberration. When dry, water repellent soils resist or retard water in

  7. Parameterizing the soil - water - plant root system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feddes, R.A.; Raats, P.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Root water uptake is described from the local scale, to the field scale and to the regional and global scales. The local macroscopic model can be incorporated in Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) numerical models, like the SWAP, HYSWASOR, HYDRUS, ENVIRO-GRO and FUSSIM models. These SPAC models

  8. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  9. EVALUATION OF A SIMULATOR MODEL FOR PREDICTING SOIL-WATER CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED AGMCULTURAL FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Igbadun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the Soil Water Characteribtics-Hydraulic Calculator (SWC-HPC model in predicting soi-water agricultural fields in Zaria, Nigeria, was tested and reprted in this study. The goal was to establish the predictability and reliability of the nodel, and hence, its use in determining water characteristics of soils in the stud/ area. Forty soil samples collected from four irrigation sites were used in the valuation. The soils particle size distribution (specifically, percent clay and sand and organic matter contents were inputted into the model to simulate soil moistur; status at saturation, field capacity and wilting point, soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The model outputs were statistically compared with observed parameters from laboratory tests using root mean square error (RMSE, c< ^efficient of variation (CV, modeling efficiency (EF and coefficient of residual mass (CRM. The model accurately simulated the observed bulk densities of the soil tested, satisfactorily simulated soil moisture content at field capacity, and mot lerately simulated moisture content at saturation and wilting point. The model lowever, poorly simulated saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soils tested. The SWC-HPC may therefore be used only to simulate soil bulk densities and moistui e status at saturation, field capacity and wilting point in the study locations.

  10. Capacitive Soil Moisture Sensor for Plant Watering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Thomas; Kamm, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    How can you realize a water saving and demand-driven plant watering device? To achieve this you need a sensor, which precisely detects the soil moisture. Designing such a sensor is the topic of this poster. We approached this subject with comparing several physical properties of water, e.g. the conductivity, permittivity, heat capacity and the soil water potential, which are suitable to detect the soil moisture via an electronic device. For our project we have developed a sensor device, which measures the soil moisture and provides the measured values for a plant watering system via a wireless bluetooth 4.0 network. Different sensor setups have been analyzed and the final sensor is the result of many iterative steps of improvement. In the end we tested the precision of our sensor and compared the results with theoretical values. The sensor is currently being used in the Botanical Garden of the Friedrich-Alexander-University in a long-term test. This will show how good the usability in the real field is. On the basis of these findings a marketable sensor will soon be available. Furthermore a more specific type of this sensor has been designed for the EU:CROPIS Space Project, where tomato plants will grow at different gravitational forces. Due to a very small (15mm x 85mm x 1.5mm) and light (5 gramm) realisation, our sensor has been selected for the space program. Now the scientists can monitor the water content of the substrate of the tomato plants in outer space and water the plants on demand.

  11. Development of bulk density, total C distribution and OC saturation in fine mineral fractions during paddy soil evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Livia; Kölbl, Angelika; Cao, Zhi-Hong; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Paddy soils are described as important accumulator for OM (Zhang and He, 2004). In southeast China, paddy soils have the second highest OM stocks (Zhao et al, 1997) and thus a large proportion of the terrestrial carbon is conserved in wetland rice soils. The paddy soil management is believed to be favorable for accumulation of organic matter, as its content in paddy soils is statistically higher than that of non-paddy soils (Cai, 1996). However, the mechanism of OM storage and the development of OM distribution during paddy soil evolution is largely unknown. The aim of the project is to identify the role of organo-mineral complexes for the stabilization of organic carbon during management-induced paddy soil formation in a chronosequence ranging from 50 to 2000 years of paddy soil use. The soil samples were analysed for bulk density, total organic carbon (TOC) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) concentrations of bulk soils and the concentration of organic carbon as well as the organic carbon stocks of physical soil fractions. First results indicate distinctly different depth distributions between paddy and non-paddy (control) sites. The paddy soils are characterized by relatively low bulk densities in the puddled layer (between 0.9 and 1.3 g cm-3) and high values in the plough pan (1.4 to 1.6 g cm-3) and the non-paddy soils by relatively homogeneous values throughout the profiles (1.3 to 1.4 g cm-3). In contrast to the carbonate-rich non-paddy sites, we found a significant loss of carbonates during paddy soil formation, resulting in decalcification of the upper 20 cm after 100 yr of paddy soil use, and decalcification of the total soil profile in 700, 1000 and 2000 yr old paddy soils. The calculation of the organic carbon stocks of each horizon indicate that paddy sites always have higher values in topsoils compared to non-paddy sites, and show increasing values with increasing soil age. The capacity of fine mineral fractions to preserve OC was calculated according to

  12. Density and permeability of a loess soil: long-term organic matter effect and the response to compressive stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    Pa). Investigated indicators for compression resistance included compression index, precompression stress, and resistance and resilience indices based on measured soil physical properties (bulk density, air-filled porosity, air permeability, and void ratio). Soil resilience was assessed following exposure...... of compacted cores to freeze-thaw (FT) and wet-dry (WD) cycles. The OC content increased with increased fertilisation and resulted in decreased initial bulk density, higher air-filled and total porosities, and increased organisation of the pore space. Soil resistance decreased with increasing OC content...... but the correlation was not significant. However, initial bulk density (ρbi) and initial gravimetric water content (wi) were significantly positively correlated to the indices of soil compression resistance, with the effect of ρbi being significantly stronger. Significant recovery of airfilled porosity and air...

  13. STIR Proposal For Research Area 2.1.2 Surface Energy Balance: Transient Soil Density Impacts Land Surface Characteristics and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Soil density is commonly treated as static in studies on land surface property dynamics. Magnitudes of errors associated...properties, and ii) evaluate impact of changing soil density on surface energy balance and heat and water transfer. Six soil properties were...ABSTRACT 2. REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  14. Soil water repellency induced by long-term irrigation with treated sewage effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, R; Ben-Arie, O; Graber, E R

    2005-01-01

    This study describes soil water repellency developed under prolonged irrigation with treated sewage effluent in a semiarid environment. Soil surface layer (0-5 cm) and soil profile (0-50 cm) transects were sampled at a high resolution at the close of the irrigation season and rainy winter season. Samples from 0- to 5-cm transects were subdivided into 1-cm slices to obtain fine scale resolution of repellency and organic matter distribution. Extreme to severe soil water repellency in the 0- to 5-cm soil surface layer persisted throughout the 2-yr study period in the effluent-irrigated Shamouti orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck cv. Shamouti] orchard plot. Nearby Shamouti orange plots irrigated with tap water were either nonrepellent or only somewhat repellent. Repellency was very variable spatially and with depth, appearing in vertically oriented "repellency tongues." Temporal and spatial variability in repellency in the uppermost 5-cm soil surface layer was not related to seasonality, soil moisture content, or soil organic matter content. Nonuniform distribution of soil moisture and fingered flow were observed in the soil profile after both seasons, demonstrating that the repellent layer had a persistent effect on water flow in the soil profile. A lack of correlation between bulk density and volumetric water content in the soil profile demonstrates that the observed nonuniform spatial distribution of moisture results from preferential flow and not heterogeneity in soil properties. Soil water repellency can adversely affect agricultural production, cause contamination of underlying ground water resources, and result in excessive runoff and soil erosion.

  15. Soil-Water Repellency Characteristic Curves for Soil Profiles with Organic Carbon Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijewardana, Nadeeka Senani; Muller, Karin; Moldrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) of soils is a property with significant consequences for agricultural water management, water infiltration, contaminant transport, and for soil erosion. It is caused by the presence of hydrophobic agents on mineral grain surfaces. Soils were samples in different depths......, and the sessile drop method (SDM). The aim to (i) compare the methods, (ii) characterize the soil-water repellency characteristic curves (SWRCC) being SWR as a function of the volumetric soil-water content (θ) or matric potential (ψ), and (iii) find relationships between SWRCC parameters and SOC content. The WDPT...

  16. Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-vegetation systems. II - Tests and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Tellers, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    The long-term optimal climatic climax soil-vegetation system is defined for several climates according to previous hypotheses in terms of two free parameters, effective porosity and plant water use coefficient. The free parameters are chosen by matching the predicted and observed average annual water yield. The resulting climax soil and vegetation properties are tested by comparison with independent observations of canopy density and average annual surface runoff. The climax properties are shown also to satisfy a previous hypothesis for short-term optimization of canopy density and water use coefficient. Using these hypotheses, a relationship between average evapotranspiration and optimum vegetation canopy density is derived and is compared with additional field observations. An algorithm is suggested by which the climax soil and vegetation properties can be calculated given only the climate parameters and the soil effective porosity. Sensitivity of the climax properties to the effective porosity is explored.

  17. Field-scale evaluation of water fluxes and manure solution leaching in feedlot pen soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana R; Maisonnave, Roberto; Massobrio, Marcelo J; Fabrizio de Iorio, Alicia R

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of beef cattle manure on feedlot pen surfaces generates large amounts of dissolved solutes that can be mobilized by water fluxes, affecting surface and groundwater quality. Our objective was to examine the long-term impacts of a beef cattle feeding operation on water fluxes and manure leaching in feedlot pens located on sandy loam soils of the subhumid Sandy Pampa region in Argentina. Bulk density, gravimetric moisture content, and chloride concentration were quantified. Rain simulation trials were performed to estimate infiltration and runoff rates. Using chloride ion as a tracer, profile analysis techniques were applied to estimate the soil moisture flux and manure conservative chemical components leaching rates. An organic stratum was found over the surface of the pen soil, separated from the underlying soil by a highly compacted thin layer (the manure-soil interface). The soil beneath the organic layer showed greater bulk density in the A horizon than in the control soil and had greater moisture content. Greater concentrations of chloride were found as a consequence of the partial sealing of the manure-soil interface. Surface runoff was the dominant process in the feedlot pen soil, whereas infiltration was the main process in control soil. Soil moisture flux beneath pens decreased substantially after 15 yr of activity. The estimated minimum leaching rate of chloride was 13 times faster than the estimated soil moisture flux. This difference suggests that chloride ions are not exclusively transported by advective flow under our conditions but also by solute diffusion and preferential flow.

  18. Estimation of Areal Soil Water Content through Microwave Remote Sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oevelen, van P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis the use of microwave remote sensing to estimate soil water content is investigated. A general framework is described which is applicable to both passive and active microwave remote sensing of soil water content. The various steps necessary to estimate areal soil water content are disc

  19. Moisture variability resulting from water repellency in Dutch soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.

    1998-01-01

    The present study suggests that many soils in the Netherlands, in natural as well as in agricultural areas, may be water repellent to some degree, challenging the common perception that soil water repellency is only an interesting aberration. When dry, water repellent soils resist or retard

  20. Effect of restoring soil hydrological poperties on water conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, D.; Kostka, S.J.; Boerth, T.J.; Franklin, M.A.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Stoof, C.R.; Park, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Water repellency in soil is more wide spread than previously thought ¿ and has a significant impact on irrigation efficiency and water conservation. Soil water repellency has been identified in many soil types under a wide array of climatic conditions world wide. Consequences include increased

  1. Conservation and maintenance of soil and water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian G. Tavernia; Mark D. Nelson; Titus S. Seilheimer; Dale D. Gormanson; Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Peter V. Caldwell; Ge. Sun

    2016-01-01

    Forest ecosystem productivity and functioning depend on soil and water resources. But the reverse is also true—forest and land-use management activities can significantly alter forest soils, water quality, and associated aquatic habitats (Ice and Stednick 2004, Reid 1993, Wigmosta and Burges 2001). Soil and water resources are protected through the allocation of land...

  2. Effect of restoring soil hydrological poperties on water conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, D.; Kostka, S.J.; Boerth, T.J.; Franklin, M.A.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Stoof, C.R.; Park, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Water repellency in soil is more wide spread than previously thought ¿ and has a significant impact on irrigation efficiency and water conservation. Soil water repellency has been identified in many soil types under a wide array of climatic conditions world wide. Consequences include increased runof

  3. Prospects in application of thermal analysis for assessing the total water potential of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2016-10-01

    The theoretically derived dependence of the water vapor density (concentration) in the air on the absolute temperature permitted us to use the information obtained by thermogravimetric method for assessing the total potential of water remaining in colloids after drying at different temperatures. A close correlation and corresponding linear relationship fitting the fundamental physicochemical law by Landau-Derjaguin were observed between the logarithm modulus of the total potential of moisture left in soil colloids after drying at temperatures 27-70° and 70-200°C and their moisture. The total potential of water bound by hydrates and crystalline hydrates of substances in the soils varied in the range from-660 to-2394 J/g water, and that of water bound in soil clay minerals varied in the range from-714 to-2814 J/g water (which corresponds to the total soil water pressure of-7140 to-28140 atm.).

  4. Prediction of water content at different potentials from soil property data in Jazan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturki, Ali; Ibrahim, Hesham

    2016-04-01

    In dry regions effective irrigation management is crucial to maintain crop production and sustain limited water resources. Effective irrigation requires good knowledge of soil water content in the root zone. However, measurement of soil water in the root zone over time is extremely expensive and time consuming. On the other hand, weather and basic soil property data are more available, either from existing databases or by direct measurement in the field. Simulation models can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate soil water content and subsequent irrigation requirements based on the available weather and soil data. In this study we investigated three hierarchical approaches to predict water content at variable potentials (0, 10, 33, 60, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 kPa) using the Rosetta model: soil texture class (STC); percent of sand, silt, and clay (SSC); bulk density, percent of sand, silt, and clay, and water content measurements at 33 and 1500 kPa (SSC+WC). Estimation of soil water content at 43 locations in Jazan region using the three hierarchical approaches was compared with gravimetric water content. Results showed that the three approaches failed to describe water content accurately at saturation conditions (achieve effective irrigation scheduling especially in locations where only limited weather and soil date are available.

  5. Principles of water capture, evaporation, and soil water retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful dryland crop production in semiarid environments is dependent upon efficient storage of precipitation and use of stored soil water supplies. The objectives of this presentation are to: 1. Summarize information regarding the effects of time of year; environmental parameters; residue orient...

  6. Soil bulk density changes caused by mechanized harvesting: A case study in central Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux; Pam Edwards; Mark Jones; Mark Jones

    2005-01-01

    A mechanized harvesting system consisting of a feller-buncher and a grapple skidder was examined to quantify soil bulk density changes in a central Appalachian hardwood forest site. Soil bulk density was measured using a nuclear gauge pre-harvest and post-harvest systematically across the harvest unit and on transects across skid trails. Bulk density also was measured...

  7. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  8. Comparison Of Selected Pedotransfer Functions For The Determination Of Soil Water Retention Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupec, Michal; Stradiot, Peter; Rehák, Štefan

    2015-09-01

    Soil water retention curves were measured using a sandbox and the pressure plate extractor method on undisturbed soil samples from the Borská Lowland. The basic soil properties (e.g. soil texture, dry bulk density) of the samples were determined. The soil water retention curve was described using the van Genuchten model (Van Genuchten, 1980). The parameters of the model were obtained using the RETC program (Van Genuchten et al., 1991). For the determination of the soil water retention curve parameters, two pedotransfer functions (PTF) were also used that were derived for this area by Skalová (2003) and the Rosetta computer program (Schaap et al., 2001). The performance of the PTFs was characterized using the mean difference and root mean square error.

  9. Comparison Of Selected Pedotransfer Functions For The Determination Of Soil Water Retention Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupec Michal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil water retention curves were measured using a sandbox and the pressure plate extractor method on undisturbed soil samples from the Borská Lowland. The basic soil properties (e.g. soil texture, dry bulk density of the samples were determined. The soil water retention curve was described using the van Genuchten model (Van Genuchten, 1980. The parameters of the model were obtained using the RETC program (Van Genuchten et al., 1991. For the determination of the soil water retention curve parameters, two pedotransfer functions (PTF were also used that were derived for this area by Skalová (2003 and the Rosetta computer program (Schaap et al., 2001. The performance of the PTFs was characterized using the mean difference and root mean square error.

  10. Generalized Density-Corrected Model for Gas Diffusivity in Variably Saturated Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    Accurate predictions of the soil-gas diffusivity (Dp/Do, where Dp is the soil-gas diffusion coefficient and Do is the diffusion coefficient in free air) from easily measureable parameters like air-filled porosity (ε) and soil total porosity (φ) are valuable when predicting soil aeration...... and the emission of greenhouse gases and gaseous-phase contaminants from soils. Soil type (texture) and soil density (compaction) are two key factors controlling gas diffusivity in soils. We extended a recently presented density-corrected Dp(ε)/Do model by letting both model parameters (α and β) be interdependent...... and also functions of φ. The extension was based on literature measurements on Dutch and Danish soils ranging from sand to peat. The parameter α showed a promising linear relation to total porosity, while β also varied with α following a weak linear relation. The thus generalized density-corrected (GDC...

  11. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  12. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... treatments. Six months after the last biochar application, intact and disturbed soil samples were collected for analyses. Soil water retention was measured from −1 kPa to −100 kPa using tension tables and ceramic plates and from −10 MPa to −480 MPa using a Vapor Sorption Analyzer. Soil specific area...

  13. Effectiveness of apparent electrical conductivity surveys at varying soil water contents for assessing soil and water dynamics across a rainfed mountain olive orchard in SW Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aura, Pedrera,; De Vijver, Ellen, Van; Karl, Vanderlinden,; Sergio, Martos-Rosillo; Meirvenne, Marc, Van; Espejo-Pérez, Antonio, J.; Encarnación V., Taguas,; Giráldez, Juan, V.

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of soil physical and chemical properties at the field or micro-catchment scale are of prime importance for many agricultural and environmental applications that aim at soil, water and carbon conservation. Geophysical methods, such as electromagnetic induction (EMI), are nowadays a key tool to monitor these properties across relevant scales, as a result of their non-destructive nature and their capability to survey repeatedly large areas within a small time window. Geophysical instrument response depends on the electromagnetic properties of the subsoil and for EMI in particular moist soil conditions are generally considered as most suitable for data acquisition. In water-limited environments, such as those under Mediterranean climate, these conditions are not met during large periods of the year, apparently hampering the usefulness of the method in these regions. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding of the sensor response and the contribution of soil properties to the geophysical signals under varying water contents. An experimental micro-catchment in SW Spain under rainfed olive cultivation was surveyed for apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) on 11 moments in time using a Dualem-21S. In addition, ECa and soil water content (SWC) was measured at 48 locations throughout the catchment on each survey date. At each of these locations, soil profile samples were analyzed for texture, soil organic matter content (SOM), soil depth, gravel content, and bulk density. Overall, correlations between the different soil properties and ECa improved with increasing SWC, although the ECa patterns remained constant in time. Time-lapse imaging offers the most promising results under the conditions of this study, but still requires at least one survey under wet soil conditions. Despite the smaller correlations between ECa and soil properties under dry conditions, ECa patterns are still relevant for

  14. Advances in the Coupled Soil Water and Groundwater Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉峥; 王志敏

    2014-01-01

    Models simulating the reciprocal transformation between the soil water and groundwater are of great practical importance to the development and utilization of water resources and prevention and remedy of water pollution. In this paper, popular coupled models of soil water and groundwater will be analyzed. Besides, advantages and disadvantages of different models will be summarized as a reference for the numerical model of soil water and groundwater.

  15. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  16. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  17. Estimating respiration of roots in soil: interactions with soil CO2, soil temperature and soil water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Lynch, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Little information is available on the variability of the dynamics of the actual and observed root respiration rate in relation to abiotic factors. In this study, we describe I) interactions between soil CO2 concentration, temperature, soil water content and root respiration, and II) the effect of

  18. Links between matrix bulk density, macropore characteristics and hydraulic behavior of soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The relationship of soil bulk density with the hydraulic behavior of soil and the role of macropores in preferential flow and transport has been extensively studied in literatures. Yet, the influence of soil structural heterogeneity as simultaneous variation of bulk density and macropore characte......The relationship of soil bulk density with the hydraulic behavior of soil and the role of macropores in preferential flow and transport has been extensively studied in literatures. Yet, the influence of soil structural heterogeneity as simultaneous variation of bulk density and macropore...... resolution X-ray CT and linked them with laboratory measurements of air permeability and leaching experiment. In addition to macropore characteristics, we also quantified the CT-number of the matrix as a measure of the bulk density of the matrix, i.e., excluding macropores in the soil. Soils from the two...... field sites had similar texture (loam or sandy loam), yet the sand content was higher in Faardrup soils and clay and organic carbon content were higher in Silstrup soils. In general, Silstrup soil had more macropores (>1.2mm) than Faardrup soils but both the soils exhibited similar relationships between...

  19. Sediment Transport at Density Fronts in Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    in the Hudson occurred at multiple locations along the salinity gradient rather than a single interface between salty and fresh water . The fronts in...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sediment Transport at Density Fronts in Shallow Water ...suspended sediment concentration at density fronts in shallow water (< 1 m), - characterize flow and suspended sediment at a density front through the

  20. Effect of Soil Sampling Density on Detected Spatial Variability of Soil Organic Carbon in a Red Soil Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dong-Sheng; ZHANG Zhong-Qi; YANG Hao; SHI Xue-Zheng; TAN Man-Zhi; SUN Wei-Xia; WANG Hong-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) of different land use patterns and soil types was examined in a county-wide red soil region of South China, using six sampling densities, 14, 34, 68, 130, 255, and 525 samples designed by the method of grid sampling in 6 different grid sizes, labeled as D14, D34, D68, D130, D255, and D525, respectively. The results showed that the coefficients of variation (CVs) of SOC decreased gradually from 62.8% to 47.4% with the increase in soil sampling densities. The SOC CVs in the paddy field change slightly from 30.8% to 28.7%, while those of the dry farmland and forest land decreased remarkably from 58.1%to 48.7% and from 99.3% to 64.4%, respectively. The SOC CVs of the paddy soil change slightly, while those of red soil decreased remarkably from 82.8% to 63.9%. About 604, 500, and 353 (P < 0.05) samples would be needed a number of years later if the SOC change was supposedly 1.52 g kg-2, based on the CVs of SOC acquired from the present sampling densities of D14, D68, and D525,respectively. Moreover, based on the same SOC change and the present time CVs at D255, the ratio of samples needed for paddy field, dry farmland, and forest land should be 1:0.81:3.33, while the actual corresponding ratio in an equal interval grid sampling was 1:0.74:0.46. These indicated that the sampling density had important effect on the detection of SOC variability in the county-wide region, the equal interval grid sampling was not efficient enough, and the respective CV of each land use or soil type should be fully considered when determining the sampling number in the future.

  1. Seasonal changes in soil water repellency and their effect on soil CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a seasonally variable phenomenon controlled by moisture content and at the same time a regulator of the distribution and conductivity of water in the soil. The distribution and availability of water in soil is also an important factor for microbial activity, decomposition of soil organic matter and exchange of gases like CO2 and CH4 between the soil and the atmosphere. It has been therefore hypothesised that SWR by restricting water availability in soil can affect the production and the transport of CO2 in the soil and between the soil and the atmosphere. This study investigates the effect of seasonal changes in soil moisture and water repellency on CO2 fluxes from soil. The study was conducted for 3 year at four grassland and pine forest sites in the UK with contrasting precipitation. The results show the temporal changes in soil moisture content and SWR are affected by rainfall intensity and the length of dry periods between the storms. Soils exposed to very high annual rainfall (>1200mm) can still exhibit high levels of SWR for relatively long periods of time. The spatial variation in soil moisture resulting from SWR affects soil CO2 fluxes, but the most profound effect is visible during and immediately after the rainfall events. Keywords: soil water repellency, CO2 flux, hydrophobicity, preferential flow, gas exchange, rainfall

  2. Effect of Irrigation Water Quality on Soil Hydraulic Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAOZHEN-HUA; B.PRENDERGAST; 等

    1992-01-01

    The effect of irrigation water quality on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (HC) of undisturbed soil in field was studied.Results show that within the operating soil suction range (0-1.6 KPa) of disc permeameters,the higher the electric conductivity (EC) of irrigation water,the higher the soil HC became.The soil HC doubled when EC increased from 0.1 to 6.0ds m-1.High sodium-adsorption ratio(SAR) of irrigation water would have an unfavorable effect on soil HC.Soil HC decreased with the increasing of SAR,especially in the case of higher soil suction.An interaction existed between the effects of EC and SAR of irrigation water on soil HC.The HC of unsaturated soil dependent upon the macropores in surface soil decreased by one order of magnitude with 1 KPa increase of soil suction.In the study on the effect of very low soluble salt concentration (EC=0.1 ds m-1 of irrigation water on soil HC,soil HC was found to be lowered by 30% as a consequence of blocking up of some continuous pores by the dispersed and migrated clay particles.Nonlinear successive regression analysis and significance test show that the effects of EC and SAR of irrigation water on soil HC reached the extremely significant level.

  3. Effect of soil surface salt on the density and distribution of the snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Suwannatrai, Kulwadee; Haruay, Surat; Piratae, Supawadee; Thammasiri, Chalida; Khampoosa, Panita; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tarbsripair, Pairat; Suwanwerakamtorn, Rasamee; Sukchan, Somsak; Boonmars, Thidarut; Malone, John B; Kearney, Michael T; Tesana, Smarn

    2011-05-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection is associated with human cholangiocarcinoma and northeast Thailand has the highest incidence of this disease in the world. Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the major freshwater snail intermediate host of O. viverrini in this area and an analysis based on geographical information systems was used to determine the effect of variation in soil surface salt on the density and distribution of this snail. A malacological survey was carried out in 56 water bodies in the Khorat basin, northeast Thailand at locations with various soil surface salt levels. Mollusk samples were collected from 10 ecologically representative water body sites with 10-20 sampling stations in each. The shoreline of clear, shallow water bodies was found to be the preferred B. s. goniomphalos habitat. The snails were exclusively found in water with salinity levels ranging between 0.05 and 22.11 parts per thousand (ppt), which supports the notion that B. s. goniomphalos prefers water with some saline content over pure, freshwater. The highest snail population densities were in rice fields, ponds, road-side ditches and canals within a water salinity range of 2.5-5.0 ppt. However, the presence of B. s. goniomphalos was negatively correlated with water salinity (P ≤0.05), both with regard to density and distribution. The areas with the highest density of B. s. goniomphalos were those with less than 1% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.314), while the lowest densities were found in areas exceeding 50% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.015).

  4. Effect of soil surface salt on the density and distribution of the snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiporn Suwannatrai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Opisthorchis viverrini infection is associated with human cholangiocarcinoma and northeast Thailand has the highest incidence of this disease in the world. Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the major freshwater snail intermediate host of O. viverrini in this area and an analysis based on geographical information systems was used to determine the effect of variation in soil surface salt on the density and distribution of this snail. A malacological survey was carried out in 56 water bodies in the Khorat basin, northeast Thailand at locations with various soil surface salt levels. Mollusk samples were collected from 10 ecologically representative water body sites with 10-20 sampling stations in each. The shoreline of clear, shallow water bodies was found to be the preferred B. s. goniomphalos habitat. The snails were exclusively found in water with salinity levels ranging between 0.05 and 22.11 parts per thousand (ppt, which supports the notion that B. s. goniomphalos prefers water with some saline content over pure, freshwater. The highest snail population densities were in rice fields, ponds, road-side ditches and canals within a water salinity range of 2.5-5.0 ppt. However, the presence of B. s. goniomphalos was negatively correlated with water salinity (P ≤0.05, both with regard to density and distribution. The areas with the highest density of B. s. goniomphalos were those with less than 1% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.314, while the lowest densities were found in areas exceeding 50% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.015.

  5. Correlation Between Soil Water Retention Capability and Soil Salt Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The soil moisture retention capability of Chao soil and coastal saline Chao soil in Shandong and Zhejiang provinces were measured by pressure membrane method. The main factors influencing soil moisture retention capability were studied by the methods of correlation and path analyses. The results indicated that < 0.02mm physical clay and soil salt content were the main factors influencing soil moisture retention capability. At soil suction of 30~50 kPa, the soil salt content would be the dominant factor.

  6. Molecular density functional theory of water including density-polarization coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-06-22

    We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived from first-principles that relies on the particle's density and multipolar polarization density and includes the density-polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar density and vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give more physical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the full density-polarization coupling of water, that is known to be non-vanishing but has never been taken into account. Furthermore, the theory requires only the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the Fourier components of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities.

  7. Molecular density functional theory of water including density-polarization coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory (MDFT) of water derived from first-principles that relies on the particle's density and multipolar polarization density and includes the density-polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: ($i$) a scalar density and a vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give more physical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and ($ii$) it includes the full density-polarization coupling of water, that is known to be non-vanishing but has never been taken into account. Furthermore, the theory requires only the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the Fourier components of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities.

  8. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere of lupines was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. On the other hand, after irrigation the rhizosphere remained markedly dry and it rewetted only after one-two days. We hypothesize that: 1) drying/wetting rates of the rhizosphere are controlled by mucilage exuded by roots; 2) mucilage alters the soil hydraulic conductivity: in particular, wet mucilage increases the soil hydraulic conductivity and dry mucilage makes the soil water repellent; 3) mucilage exudation favors root water uptake in dry soil; and 4) dry mucilage limits water loss from roots to dry soils. We used a root pressure probe to measure the hydraulic conductance of artificial roots sitting in soils. As an artificial root we employed a suction cup with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 45 mm. The root pressure probe gave the hydraulic conductance of the soil-root continuum during pulse experiments in which water was injected into or sucked from the soil. First, we performed experiments with roots in a relatively dry soil with a volumetric water content of 0.03. Then, we repeated the experiment with artificial roots covered with mucilage and then placed into the soil. As a model for mucilage, we collected mucilage from Chia seeds. The water contents (including that of mucilage) in the experiments with and without mucilage were equal. The pressure curves were fitted with a model of root water that includes rhizosphere dynamics. We found that the artificial roots covered with wet mucilage took up water more easily. In a second experimental set-up we measured the outflow of water from the artificial roots into dry soils. We compared two soils: 1) a sandy soil and 2) the same soil wetted with mucilage from Chia seeds and then let dry. The latter soil became water repellent. Due to the water repellency, the outflow of water from

  9. Measuring Soil Water Potential for Water Management in Agriculture: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bittelli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil water potential is a soil property affecting a large variety of bio-physical processes, such as seed germination, plant growth and plant nutrition. Gradients in soil water potential are the driving forces of water movement, affecting water infiltration, redistribution, percolation, evaporation and plants’ transpiration. The total soil water potential is given by the sum of gravity, matric, osmotic and hydrostatic potential. The quantification of the soil water potential is necessary for a variety of applications both in agricultural and horticultural systems such as optimization of irrigation volumes and fertilization. In recent decades, a large number of experimental methods have been developed to measure the soil water potential, and a large body of knowledge is now available on theory and applications. In this review, the main techniques used to measure the soil water potential are discussed. Subsequently, some examples are provided where the measurement of soil water potential is utilized for a sustainable use of water resources in agriculture.

  10. Biodegradability of soil water soluble organic carbon extracted from seven different soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCAGLIA Barbara; ADANI Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is considered the most mobile and reactive soil carbon source and its characterization is an important issue for soil ecology study. A biodegradability test was set up to study WSOC extracted from 7 soils differently managed. WSOC was extracted from soil with water (soil/water ratio of 1:2, W/V) for 30 min, and then tested for biodegradability by a liquid state respirometric test. Result obtained confirmed the finding that WSOC biodegradability depended on both land use and management practice. These results suggested the biodegradability test as suitable method to characterize WSOC, adding useful information to soil fertility.

  11. Measurements of water repellency and infiltration of the soil

    OpenAIRE

    Žnidaršič, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Soil water repellency is a reduction in the rate of wetting caused by the presence of hydrophobic coatings on soil particles. The occurrence of the absorption of water from the surface of the ground in its interior is called infiltration. Water resistance and infiltration are dependent on a number of influences. All measurements were done on three different soil types at each at the ground level and in the trench. Water repellency measurements were performed by two methods, namely with wat...

  12. Measurements of infiltration and water repellency on different soils

    OpenAIRE

    Lavrač, Rožle

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration is a process of water entering soil from its surface. Field measurements of infiltration are performed with infiltrometers. Calculation of hydraulic conductivity can be done by different equations. Infiltration exhibits large spatial and temporal variability due to many affecting factors. One of those effects is soil water repellency (hydrophobicity). Water-repellent soils do not wet up spontaneously. The intensity and persistence of water repellency vary widely due to variabilit...

  13. Effect of Plant-derived Hydrophobic Compounds on Soil Water. Repellency in Dutch Sandy Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/363508287; Dekker, S.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203449827; Nierop, K.G.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/182329895

    2013-01-01

    Soil water repellency or hydrophobicity is a common and important soil property, which may diminish plant growth and promotes soil erosion leading to environmentally undesired situations. Hydrophobic organic compounds in the soil are derived from vegetation (leaves, roots, mosses) or microorganisms

  14. Effect of Plant-derived Hydrophobic Compounds on Soil Water. Repellency in Dutch Sandy Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, J.; Dekker, S.C.; Nierop, K.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Soil water repellency or hydrophobicity is a common and important soil property, which may diminish plant growth and promotes soil erosion leading to environmentally undesired situations. Hydrophobic organic compounds in the soil are derived from vegetation (leaves, roots, mosses) or microorganisms

  15. Water repellency and critical soil water content in a dune sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Doerr, S.H.; Oostindie, K.; Ziogas, A.K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    Assessments of water repellency of soils are commonly made on air-dried or oven-dried samples, without considering the soil water content. The objectives of this study were to examine the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content, actual water repellency over short distances, and the

  16. Effect of biochar on soil structural characteristics: water retention and gas transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    -gas diffusivity on intact 100cm3 soil samples (5 replicates in each plot). We found that biochar application significantly decreased soil bulk density, hereby creating higher porosity. At the same soil-water matric potential, all the soil-gas phase parameters (air-filled porosity, air permeability and gas...... and B plots were placed in a mixed sequence (C-B-C-B-C-B-C-B) and at the same time the eight plots formed a natural pH gradient ranging from pH 7.7 to 6.3. We determined bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-sat), soil water retention characteristics, soil-air permeability, and soil...... due to the high micro porosity of added biochar. In conclusion, the results showed that biochar addition to soil changed key soil structural parameters at least in the short term (1 year). In perspective, the long-term variations in soil structural parameters and related changed in microbial activity...

  17. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  18. Mitigation of water repellency in burned soils applying hydrophillic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neris, Jonay; de la Torre, Sara; Vidal-Vazquez, Eva; Lado, Marcos

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the effect of fire on water repellency was analyzed in soils from different parent materials, as well as the suitability of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) to reduce water repellency in these soils. Samples were collected in four different sites where wildfires took place: two in the Canary Islands, with soils developed on volcanic materials, and two in Galicia (NW Spain), with soils developed on plutonic rocks. In Galicia, two soil samples were collected in each site, one in the burnt area and one in an adjacent unburnt area. In the Canary Islands, four samples were collected from each site, three inside the burnt area where the soils were affected by different fire intensities, and one in an unburnt adjacent area. Samples were air-dried and sieved by a 2-mm mesh sieve. Water repellency was measured using the Water Drop Penetration Time test. An amount of 10 g of soil was placed in a tray. Five drops of deionized water were place on the soil surface with a pipette, and the time for each drop to fully penetrate into the soil was recorded. PAM solution was applied to the burnt soils simulating a field application rate of 1gm-2. The polymer used was Superfloc A-110 (Kemira Water Solutions BV, Holland) with 1x107 Da molecular weigth and 15% hydrolysis. PAM was sprayed on the soil surface as solution with a concentration 0.2 g/L. After the application, the samples were dried and the WDPT test was performed. Three replicates for each treatment and soil were used, and the treatments included: dry soil, dry soil after a wetting treatment, dry PAM-treated soil. The results showed that water repellency was modified by fire differently in the various soils. In hydrophilic soils and soils with low water repellency, water repellency was increased after the action of fire. In soils with noticeable initial water repellency, this was reduced or eliminated after the fire. Wetting repellent soils caused a decrease in water repellency most probably because of the spatial

  19. Effects of Vermicompost and Water Treatment Residuals on Soil Physical Properties and Wheat Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mahmoud M.; Mahmoud, Essawy K.; Ibrahim, Doaa A.

    2015-04-01

    The application of vermicompost and water treatment residuals to improve the physical properties in the salt affected soils is a promising technology to meet the requirements of high plant growth and cost-effective reclamation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vermicompost and its mixtures with water treatment residuals on selected physical properties of saline sodic soil and on wheat yield. The treatments were vermicompost, water treatment residuals, vermicompost + water treatment residuals (1:1 and 2:1 wet weight ratio) at levels of 5 and 10 g dry weight kg-1 dry soil. The considered physical properties included aggregate stability, mean weight diameter, pore size distribution and dry bulk density. The addition of vermicompost and water treatment residuals had significant positive effects on the studied soil physical properties, and improved the grain yield of wheat. The treatment of (2 vermicompost + 1 water treatment residuals) at level of 5 g kg-1 soil gave the best grain yield. Combination of vermicompost and water treatment residuals improved the water treatment residuals efficiency in ameliorating the soil physical properties, and could be considered as an ameliorating material for the reclamation of salt affected soils.

  20. REGIONAL SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE CONTIGUOUS US: SOURCES OF VARIABILITY AND VOLCANIC SOIL EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water retention of mineral soil is often well predicted using algorithms (pedotransfer functions) with basic soil properties but the spatial variability of these properties has not been well characterized. A further source of uncertainty is that water retention by volcanic soils...

  1. REGIONAL SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE CONTIGUOUS US: SOURCES OF VARIABILITY AND VOLCANIC SOIL EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water retention of mineral soil is often well predicted using algorithms (pedotransfer functions) with basic soil properties but the spatial variability of these properties has not been well characterized. A further source of uncertainty is that water retention by volcanic soils...

  2. Reduction in density of suspended - sediment - laden natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; Desa, E.; Smith, D.; Peshwe, V.B.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, J.A.E.

    Pressure measurements made in various turbid natural waters have led to the inference that the effective depth-mean in-situ density values peff of these waters are less than (approx equal to 2.70%) their static bulk densities and also (approx equal...

  3. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  4. Uranium in soils and water; Uran in Boden und Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienemann, Claudia; Utermann, Jens

    2012-07-15

    The report of the Umweltbundesamt (Federal Environmental Agency) on uranium in soils and water covers the following chapters: (1) Introduction. (2) Deposits and properties: Use of uranium; toxic effects on human beings, uranium in ground water and drinking water, uranium in surface waters, uranium in soils, uranium in the air. (3) Legal regulations. (4) Uranium deposits, uranium mining, polluted area recultivation. (5) Diffuse uranium entry in soils and water: uranium insertion due to fertilizers, uranium insertion due to atmospheric precipitation, uranium insertion from the air. (6) Diffuse uranium release from soils and transfer in to the food chain. (7) Conclusions and recommendations.

  5. [Effects of tillage mode on black soil's penetration resistance and bulk density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Liang, Ai-Zhen; Jia, Shu-Xia; Shi, Xiu-Huan; Fan, Ru-Qin; Wei, Shou-Cai

    2012-02-01

    Taking an eight-year field experiment site in Dehui County of Jilin Province, Northeast China as test object, this paper studied the effects of different tillage modes (no tillage and ploughing in autumn) on the penetration resistance and bulk density of black soil. No tillage increased the soil penetration resistance, especially at the soil depth of 2.5-17.5 cm. In the continuous cropping of maize and the rotation of maize-soybean, the maximum soil penetration resistance at planting zone under no tillage and ploughing in autumn was 2816 and 1931 kPa, and 2660 and 2051 kPa, respectively, which had no restriction on the crop growth. The curve of soil penetration resistance under ploughing in autumn changed with ridge shape, while that under no tillage changed less. Comparing with ploughing in autumn, no tillage increased the bulk density of 5-20 cm soil layer significantly. Under no tillage, the bulk density of 5-30 cm soil layer changed little, but under ploughing in autumn, soil bulk density increased gradually with increasing soil depth. There was no significant correlation between soil bulk density and soil penetration resistance.

  6. Soil-water fluxes modelling in a green roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamera, Carlotta; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Becciu, Gianfranco; Rosso, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Green roofs differ from a natural environment as they are on top of a building and are not connected to the natural ground; therefore it is critical that soils can drain and retain water simultaneously and that they work even in very shallow systems. The soil or growing medium used for green roofs is specifically engineered to provide the vegetation with nutrients, discharging any excess water into the drainage layer, and releasing stored water back into the substrate. In this way, medium depth and porosity plays an important role in stormwater retention and plant growth in a green roof. Due to the lack of a good understanding about the hydraulic efficiency of each green roof's layer in rainwater management, a detailed analysis of the hydrological dynamics, connected with the green roof technical design is essential in order to obtain a full characterization of the hydrologic behavior of a green roof system and its effects on the urban water cycle components. The purpose of this research is analyzing the soil-water dynamics through the different components of a green roof and modeling these processes though a detailed but clear subsurface hydrology module, based on green roof vertical soil water movement reproduction, in relation to climate forcing, basic technology components and geometric characteristics of green roof systems (thickness of the stratigraphy, soil layers and materials, vegetation typology and density). A multi-layer bucket model has been applied to examine the hydrological response of the green roof system under a temperate maritime climate, by varying the physical and geometric parameters that characterize the different components of the vegetated cover. Following a stage of validation and calibration, results confirm the suitability of the model to describe the hydrologic response of the green roof during the observed rainfall events: the discharge hydrograph profile, volume and timing, predicted by the model, matched experimental measurements

  7. Response of Eucalyptus grandis trees to soil water deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of potential transpiration models to simulate transpiration rates in areas prone to soil water deficits leads to overestimates of water use as the soil dries. Therefore, I carried out studies on Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden trees subjected to soil drying at two field sites in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa to determine the relation between transpiration rate and soil water availability. I hypothesized that, with this relationship defined, simple modeling of the soil water balance could be used to predict what fraction of potential transpiration was taking place at a given time. Site 1 supported a stand of 3-year-old E. grandis trees, whereas 9-year-old trees were growing on Site 2, situated 2 km away. At each site, plastic sheeting was laid over the ground to prevent soil water recharge and thereby allow the roots in the soil to induce a continuous progressive depletion of soil water. Measurements of predawn xylem pressure potential, leaf area index, growth and sap flow rates revealed that prevention of soil water recharge resulted in only moderate drought stress. At Site 1, the trees abstracted water down to 8 m below the surface, whereas trees at Site 2 obtained most of their water from depths below 8 m. I found that modeling the water balance of deep rooting zones is impractical for the purpose of simulating nonpotential transpiration rates because of uncertainties about the depth of the root system, the soil water recharge mechanism and the water retention characteristics of the deep subsoil strata. I conclude that predicting the occurrence and severity of soil water deficits from the soil water balance is not feasible at these sites.

  8. Validation Tests of a Non-Nuclear Combined Asphalt and Soil Density Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 14 -1 0 Validation Tests of a Non-Nuclear Combined Asphalt and Soil Density Gauge G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc tu...Validation Tests of a Non-Nuclear Combined Asphalt and Soil Density Gauge Ernest S. Berney IV and Mariely Mejías-Santiago, Geotechnical and Structures...Engineer Research and Development Center in Vicksburg, MS validated the effectiveness of the Soil Density Gauge (SDG) and the Combined Asphalt Soil

  9. An evaluation of soil retention potential as an important factor of water balance in the landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnáčová Zdena

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of soil to retain water in its profile is one of the most important soil functions. It is expressed as the water storage capacity or retention capacity of the soil, and it is primarily affected by the physical properties of the soil. Given the fact that the direct measurement of hydrological data for the soil is very difficult in terms of capacity, statistically expressed pedotransfer functions (PTF are currently used for the indirect estimation of hydrolimits. The data most commonly used for the PTF are easy-to-measure and usually readily available soil data on particle size, bulk density, organic carbon and morphometric parameters of the environment (e.g. slope of the relief, etc.. The listed pedotransfer functions are deficient for the complex evaluation of soil cover; given disagreements about the attributes, they cannot be directly used for the vector database of classified soil-ecological units in the Slovak Republic. Therefore, we have created a model of an algorithm from selected parameters compatible with the vector database of classified soil-ecological units, which also allows for the spatial distribution of the cumulative coefficient of water retention capacity (CWRC for the soils of the SR. The results of this evaluation are presented using case studies of the areas of Levoča and Hriňová.

  10. STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

  11. Water repellent soils: a state-of-the-art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard F. DeBano

    1981-01-01

    Water repellency in soils was first described by Schreiner and Shorey (1910), who found that some soils in California could not be wetted and thereby were not suitable for agriculture. Waxy organic substances were responsible for the water repellency. Other studies in the early 1900's on the fairy ring phenomenon suggested that water repellency could be caused by...

  12. Prediction of Bulk Density of Soils in the Loess Plateau Region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunqiang; Shao, Ming'an; Liu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chencheng

    2013-08-01

    Soil bulk density (BD) is a key soil physical property that may affect the transport of water and solutes and is essential to estimate soil carbon/nutrients reserves. However, BD data are often lacking in soil databases due to the challenge of directly measuring BD, which is considered to be labor intensive, time consuming, and expensive especially for the lower layers of deep soils such as those of the Chinese Loess Plateau region. We determined the factors that were closely correlated with BD at the regional scale and developed a robust pedotransfer function (PTF) for BD by measuring BD and potentially related soil and environmental factors at 748 selected sites across the Loess Plateau of China (620,000 km2) at which we collected undisturbed and disturbed soil samples from two soil layers (0-5 and 20-25 cm). Regional BD values were normally distributed and demonstrated weak spatial variation (CV = 12 %). Pearson's correlation and stepwise multiple linear regression analyses identified silt content, slope gradient (SG), soil organic carbon content (SOC), clay content, slope aspect (SA), and altitude as the factors that were closely correlated with BD and that explained 25.8, 6.3, 5.8, 1.4, 0.3, and 0.3 % of the BD variation, respectively. Based on these closely correlated variables, a reasonably robust PTF was developed for BD using multiple linear regression, which performed equally with the artificial neural network method in the current study. The inclusion of topographic factors significantly improved the predictive capability of the BD PTF and in which SG was an important input variable that could be used in place of SA and altitude without compromising its capability for predicting BD. Thus, the developed PTF with only four input variables (clay, silt, SOC, SG), including their common transformations and interactive terms, predicted BD with reasonable accuracy and is thus useful for most applications on the Loess Plateau of China. More attention should be

  13. Effects of Different Afforestation Densities ofPinus Sylvesirisvar. Mongolica on the Water-holding Capacity of Forest Litter and Soil%造林密度对樟子松人工林枯落物和土壤持水能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯瑞萍; 张克斌; 郝智如

    2015-01-01

    A case study was conducted at the Rare Sand Plant Protection Base, about 6 km north from Yulin city, which lies in north of Shaanxi province and the southern edge of Mu Us Sandland, China. For the purpose of comparing and analyzing the effects of 10 different density plantations ofPinus sylvesirisvar. mongolica on the water-holding capacity of forest litter and soil, 30 standard plots of artificial forest with the same site conditions (10 types of forest×3 replications) were investigated and the water-holding capacity of litter and soil were determined quantitatively. The ten types of sample plots were recorded asPⅠ,PⅡ,PⅢ,PⅣ,PⅤ,PⅥ,PⅦ, PⅧ,PⅨ, andPⅩ, and the afforestation densities of Pinus sylvesirisvar. mongolicawere 900, 1200, 1500, 1800, 2200, 2500, 2800, 3000, 3300 and 3600 plant·hm-2 respectively. The results showed that, (1) The total capacity of litter (TL) among 10 forest types, generally followed by the sequence of forest densities, were TLPⅢ=TLPⅣ>TLPⅩ>TLPⅧ>TLPⅨ>TLPⅥ>TLPⅦ>TLPⅤ>TLPⅡ>TLPⅠ; the maximum water-holding capacity and effective water-holding capacity of litter, for 10 forest types, were 2.46~8.23 t·hm-2 and 0.163~6.420 t·hm-2 respectively. The water-holding functions of litter inPⅢ andPⅣplotswere the best and was the worst inPⅠplot among the ten types. (2) There were no significant differences in water content, bulk density and the maximum water-holding capacity of soil amongst these forest types, with the variation ranges of 8.94%~16.54%, 1.10~1.66 g·cm-3 and 200.43~266.43 t·hm-2, respectively. However, the non-pore porosity of soil among these 10 forest types varied greatly, with a variation range of 0.99%~4.32%. The water-holding functions of soil were the highest inPⅢ andPⅣplots, and the lowest in thePⅠplot. (3) Power function model can better indicate high correlation coefficients between the water absorption rate of litter and its immersion time, and also between the water

  14. Semiempirical model of soil water hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to represent hysteretic soil water retention curves accurately using as few measurements as possible, a new semiempirical model has been developed. It has two postulates related to physical characteristics of the medium, and two parameters, each with a definite physical interpretation, whose values are determined empirically for a given porous medium. Tests of the model show that it provides high-quality optimized fits to measured water content vs. matric pressure wetting curves for a wide variety of media. A practical use of this model is to provide a complete simulated main wetting curve for a medium where only a main drying curve and two points on the wetting curve have been measured. -from Author

  15. An Alternative Approach for the Determination of Soil Water Mobility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.P.C.ENGLER; R.CICHOTA; Q.DE JONG VAN LIER; E.M.BLOEM; G.SPAROVEK; E. SCHNUG

    2008-01-01

    A new laboratory method was proposed to establish an easily performed standard for the determination of mobile soil water close to real conditions during the infiltration and redistribution of water in a soil.It consisted of applying a water volume with a tracer ion on top of an undisturbed ring sample on a pressure plate under a known suction or pressure head.Afterwards,soil water mobility was determined by analyzing the tracer-ion concentration in the soil sample.Soil water mobility showed to be a function of the applied water volume.No relation between soil water mobility and applied pressure head could be established with data from the present experiment.A simple one- or two-parameter equation can be fitted to the experimental data to parameterize soil water mobility as a function of applied solute volume.Sandy soils showed higher mobility than loamy soils at low values of applied solute volumes,and both sandy and loamy soils showed an almost complete mobility at high applied solute volumes.

  16. Diffusion of Chloride Ions in Soils: Ⅰ.Influences of Soil Moisture,Bulk Density and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMINGGANG; ZHANGYIPING; 等

    1997-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of chlorde ions in four soils of different exture with varying effective moisture content and varying bulk density from 1.1 to 1.6 g cm3 under three different temperatures were determined by the diffusion-cell method using 36Cl-labelled CaCl2 solution.The result showed that activation energy decreased with water content,which indicated that the threshold fro diffusion was lower at a higher soil moisture rate .Therefor,the diffusion coefficient(D) of chloride ions in soil increased consistently with soil moisture,Although a near linear increase in the diffusion coefficient with increasing soil moisture or bulk density in all the soils was observed,the increase rate in different soils was not the same.The D value increased with teperature,and with temperature increased by 10℃ in the range from 5℃to 45℃ the D valve increased by 10%-30%,averaging about 20%.

  17. Effects of soil moisture on cotton root length density and yield under drip irrigation with plastic mulch in Aksu Oasis farmland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yilihamu; Yimamu

    2010-01-01

    Effects of soil moisture on cotton root length density (total root length per unit soil volume) and yield under drip irrigation with plastic mulch were studied through field experiments. The results indicate that spatial distributions of root length density of cotton under various water treatments were basically similar. Horizontally, both root length densities of cotton in wide and narrow rows were similar, and higher than that between mulches. Vertically, root length density of cotton decreased with increasing soil depth. The distribution of root length density is different under different irrigation treatments. In conditions of over-irrigation, the root length density of cotton between mulches would increase. However, it would decrease in both the wide rows and narrow rows. The mean root length density of cotton increased with increasing irrigation water. Water stress caused the root length density to increase in lower soil layers. There is a significant correlation between root length density and yields of cotton at the flower-boll and wadding stages. The regression between irrigation amount and yield of cotton can be expressed as y = -0.0026x2+18.015x-24845 (R2 = 0.959). It showed that the irrigation volume of 3,464.4 m3/hm2 led to op-timal root length density. The yield of cotton was 6,360 .8 kg/hm2 under that amount of irrigation.

  18. Aliphatic and aromatic plant biopolymer dynamics in soil particles isolated from sequential density fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B.; Filley, T.; Sollins, P.; Lajtha, K.; Swanston, C.; Kleber, M.; Kramer, M.

    2007-12-01

    A recent multi-layer-based soil organic matter-mineral interaction mechanistic model to describe the nature of soil organic matter-mineral surface mechanism for soil organic matter stabilization predicts that proteinaceous and aliphatic materials establish the core of strong binding-interactions upon which other organic matter is layered. A key methodology providing data underpinning this hypothesis is sequential density fractionation where soil is partitioned into particles of increasing density with the assumption that a partial control on organic matter distribution through density series is the thickness of its layering. Four soils of varying mineralogy and texture were investigated for their biopolymer, isotopic, and mineralogical properties. Light fractions (cutin and suberin while heavier fractions, 1.8-2.6 g/cm3, exhibited a progressive decrease in concentration in plant derived biopolymers with density. Extractable lignin phenols exhibited a progressive oxidation state with density. The concentration of biopolymers roughly mirrored the C:N ratio of soil particles which dropped consistently with increasing particle density. Although, in all soils, both lignin phenols and SFA concentration generally decreased with increasing density the ratio SFA/lignin varied with density and depending upon the soil. All soils, except the oxisol, exhibited an increase in SFA with respect to lignin suggesting a selective stabilization of those material with respect to lignin. In the oxisol, which showed little variation in its hematite dominated mineralogy across density, SFA/lignin remained constant, potentially indicating a greater capacity to stabilize lignin in that system. Interestingly, the lignin oxidation state increased with density in the oxisol. Given the variation in soil character, the consistency in these trends it suggests a general phenomenon of progressive decay in plant derived material with thinness of mineral coating but an overall relative increase in

  19. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain their cell turgor and metabolism. Osmotic potential is a function of the salt concentration in the soil solution and therefore affected by both salinity (measured as electrical conductivity at a certain water content and soil water content. Soil salinity and water content vary in time and space. Understanding the effect of changes in salinity and water content on soil microorganisms is important for crop production, sustainable land use and rehabilitation of saline soils. In this review, the effects of soil salinity and water content on microbes are discussed to guide future research into management of saline soils.

  20. Recharge in northern clime calcareous sandy soils: soil water chemical and carbon-14 evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, E. J.; Mozeto, A. A.; Fritz, P.

    1980-11-01

    Chemical analyses were performed on soil water extracted from two cores taken from a sandy calcareous soil near Delhi, Ontario. Calcite saturation is attained within the unsaturated zone over short distances and short periods of time, whereas dolomite undersaturation persists to the groundwater table. The progressive dissolution of dolomite by soil water, within the unsaturated zone, after calcite saturation is reached results in calcite supersaturation. Deposition of iron and manganese oxyhydroxide phases occurs at the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary. This is a result of soil water neutralization due to carbonate dissolution during infiltration but may also reflect the increased rate of oxidation of dissolved ferrous and manganous ions at higher pH's. The role of bacteria in this process has not been investigated. The depth of the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary in a calcareous soil has important implications for 14C groundwater dating. The depth of this interface at the study site (-2 m) does not appear to limit 14C diffusion from the root zone to the depth at which carbonate dissolution occurs. Thus, soil water achieves open system isotopic equilibrium with the soil CO 2 gas phase. It is calculated that in soils with similar physical properties to the study soil but with depths of leaching of 5 m or more, complete 14C isotopic equilibration of soil water with soil gas would not occur. Soil water, under these conditions would recharge to the groundwater exhibiting some degree of closed system 14C isotopic evolution.

  1. KBRA OPWP Soil Depth to Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  2. Liquid Water Structure from Anomalous Density under Ambient Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qiang; ZHENG Hai-Fei

    2006-01-01

    @@ From discussion of the structure of liquid water, we deduce that water under ambient condition is mainly composed of ice Ih-like molecular clusters and clathrate-like molecular clusters. The water molecular clusters remain in a state of chemical equilibrium (reversible clustering reactions). This structural model can be demonstrated by quantitative study on anomalous density with increasing temperature at ambient pressure.

  3. The use of soil electrical resistivity to monitor plant and soil water relationships in vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillante, L.; Mathieu, O.; Bois, B.; van Leeuwen, C.; Lévêque, J.

    2015-03-01

    Soil water availability deeply affects plant physiology. In viticulture it is considered a major contributor to the "terroir" effect. The assessment of soil water in field conditions is a difficult task, especially over large surfaces. New techniques are therefore required in order to better explore variations of soil water content in space and time with low disturbance and with great precision. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) meets these requirements for applications in plant sciences, agriculture and ecology. In this paper, possible techniques to develop models that allow the use of ERT to spatialise soil water available to plants are reviewed. An application of soil water monitoring using ERT in a grapevine plot in Burgundy (north-east France) during the vintage 2013 is presented. We observed the lateral heterogeneity of ERT-derived fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW) variations, and differences in water uptake depend on grapevine water status (leaf water potentials measured both at predawn and at solar noon and contemporary to ERT monitoring). Active zones in soils for water movements were identified. The use of ERT in ecophysiological studies, with parallel monitoring of plant water status, is still rare. These methods are promising because they have the potential to reveal a hidden part of a major function of plant development: the capacity to extract water from the soil.

  4. Predicting sub-grid variability of soil water content from basic soil information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Vanderborght, Jan; Schuh, Max; Priesack, Eckart; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of unresolved soil water content variability within model grid cells (i.e. sub-grid variability) is important for accurate predictions of land-surface energy and hydrologic fluxes. Here, we derived a closed-form expression to describe how soil water content variability depends on mean soil water content using stochastic analysis of 1D unsaturated gravitational flow based on the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model. A sensitivity analysis of this closed-form expression showed that the n parameter strongly influenced both the shape and magnitude of the maximum of this relationship. In a next step, the closed-form expression was used to predict soil water content variability for eight datasets with varying soil texture using VGM parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions that rely on readily available soil information. Generally, there was good agreement between observed and predicted soil water content variability despite the obvious simplifications that were used to derive the closed-form expression (e.g. gravity flow in dry soils). A simplified closed-form expression that neglected the effect of pressure head fluctuations showed that the good performance in the dry soil range is related to the dominant role of the variability in MVG parameters determining water retention as compared to the effect of water flow. Furthermore, the novel closed-form expression was successfully used to inversely estimate the variability of hydraulic properties from observed data on soil water content variability from several test sites in Germany, China and Australia.

  5. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  6. Improvement of Water Movement in an Undulating Sandy Soil Prone to Water Repellency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Dekker, L.W.; Wesseling, J.G.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of water repellency in soils strongly influence water flow. We investigated the variability of soil water content in a slight slope on a sandy fairway exhibiting water-repellent behavior. A time domain reflectometry (TDR) array of 60 probes measured water contents at 3-h

  7. Gamma-ray beam attenuation as an auxiliary technique for the evaluation of the soil water retention curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchi, O.O.S.; Reichardt, K. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Nielsen, D.R. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources; Oliveira, J.C.M

    1998-09-01

    The soil water retention curve is fundamental for the hydraulic characterization of a soil and has many applications in agricultural research as well as in practical agriculture. A new procedure for soil moisture and soil bulk density evaluation inside closed pressure chambers through gamma-ray beam attenuation is presented. The proposed procedure presents several advantages in relation to the traditional process: avoids the need of continuous sample manipulation; minimizes the problem of hysteresis; allows a more precise evaluation of soil moisture by taking into account changes of soil bulk density due to swelling or shrinking on addition or removal of water allows frequent evaluation of soil moisture without the need of opening the pressure chamber; allows a more precise judgement of equilibrium; reduces drastically the time of the determination of the retention curve and alloys easy automation of data acquisition by a computer. (author) 6 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Response of Eucalyptus grandis trees to soil water deficits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dye, P. J. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research, Division of Forest Science and Technology, Nelspruit (South Africa)

    1996-01-01

    Eucalyptus grandis trees subjected to soil drying at two field sites in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa were studied to determine the relation between transpiration rate and soil water availability. It was expected that by defining this relationship, modeling of the soil water balance could be used to predict the fraction of transpiration taking place at any given time. As part of the experimental procedure soil water recharge was prevented by plastic sheeting, thus allowing the roots in the soil to induce continuous progressive depletion of soil water. Measurements of predawn xylem pressure potential, leaf area index, growth and sap flow rates revealed only moderate drought stress; trees at both sites extracted water down to eight meters and more, below the surface. These results suggest that because of uncertainties about the depth of the root system, the soil water recharge mechanisms and other related factors, soil water balance studies are not useful in predicting the occurrence and severity of soil water deficits at these sites. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. Water repellency of clay, sand and organic soils in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. RASA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Water repellency (WR delays soil wetting process, increases preferential flow and may give rise to surface runoff and consequent erosion. WR is commonly recognized in the soils of warm and temperate climates. To explore the occurrence of WR in soils in Finland, soil R index was studied on 12 sites of different soil types. The effects of soil management practice, vegetation age, soil moisture and drying temperature on WR were studied by a mini-infiltrometer with samples from depths of 0-5 and 5-10 cm. All studied sites exhibited WR (R index >1.95 at the time of sampling. WR increased as follows: sand (R = 1.8-5.0 < clay (R = 2.4-10.3 < organic (R = 7.9-undefined. At clay and sand, WR was generally higher at the soil surface and at the older sites (14 yr., where organic matter is accumulated. Below 41 vol. % water content these mineral soils were water repellent whereas organic soil exhibited WR even at saturation. These results show that soil WR also reduces water infiltration at the prevalent field moisture regime in the soils of boreal climate. The ageing of vegetation increases WR and on the other hand, cultivation reduces or hinders the development of WR.;

  10. farmers' preference for soil and water conservation practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Four soil and water conservation (SWC) practices; (i) soil bunds alone (SB), (ii) soil bunds with vetiver grass. (SB+Vg), (iii) .... The farming system is a ... This method has been widely used by ..... multi-criteria evaluation as a decision support.

  11. Nature of water molecular bridging of the soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerik, Jiri; Siewert, Christian; Quilesfogel-Esparza, Claudia; Schaumann, Gabriele E.

    2014-05-01

    Soil is a complex anisotropic and porous system consisting of both inorganic and organic parts, air and water, inhabited and successively transformed by soil biota. Processes of soil formation are influenced by several factors. Among the most important factors belong the inorganic and organic input materials, which are mixed and transformed during soil formation. As a result, specific interactions and interrelationships develop between soil compartments. Although, they are important for soil function and its stability, they are still not well understood. This work deals with water molecule bridges (WaMB), as one of those interactions, and their relation to organic matter functioning. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) belongs to the family of methods of thermal analysis, i.e. it uses heat as a probe of the sample's nature. In soil science, the application of this common method is quite rare. In our previous works, DSC revealed a physical stabilization of organic matter segments in soils by development of WaMB. Results suggested the development of those bridges at ambient temperature accompanied with condensation of water into small nanodroplets. In another work, we found out that water, evaporating at the same temperature as WaMB transition occurs, correlates with the activity of soil microorganisms measured via CO2respiration. In this work, the enthalpy and kinetic parameters of water evaporation are studied in two kinds of soil: in clay-rich chernozem soils originating from Siberia and a histosol collected in Germany. We discuss the details of application of DSC, experimental arrangement and advantages and disadvantages of this approach. It is shown that enthalpy of evaporation can be used for understanding the nature of water binding in soils with well-developed aggregates. In contrast, the evaporation of water from histosol, without a typical soil texture, is more complicated because of diffusion processes. Further, the connection between enthalpy of

  12. The Effect of Bulk Density on Emission Behavior of Soil at Microwave Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric constant and dielectric loss (ε′ and ε″ of different soil samples with bulk densities varying from 1.3 to 2.0 gm/cm3 are determined at a single microwave frequency 9.78 GHz and at temperature 37.0°C. Different bulk densities of same soil are achieved by filling the wave guide cell with an equal volume but a different mass of soil. Further, ε′ and ε″ of these soil samples are also estimated by semiempirical model and compared with the experimental results. The values of ε′ and ε″ increase as bulk density of the soil increases. In view of microwave remote sensing, the Fresnel reflectivity of soil is computed from the knowledge of the complex dielectric constant and the surface boundary condition. Using Kirchhoff’s reciprocity theorem the microwave emissivity is estimated from Fresnel reflectivity of the surface. It is observed that the microwave emission from the soil surface inhibits as bulk density of soil increases. Further, the roughness of soil surface has been taken into consideration in the emissivity computation and observed that the emissivity increases with increasing roughness of the soil surface.

  13. Density-Corrected Models for Gas Diffusivity and Air Permeability in Unsaturated Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) and air permeability (ka) and their variations with air-filled porosity (e) in soil is critical for simulating subsurface migration and emission of climate gases and organic vapors. Gas diffusivity and air permeability measurements from Danish soil...... in subsurface soil. The data were regrouped into four categories based on compaction (total porosity F 0.4 m3 m-3) and soil texture (volume-based content of clay, silt, and organic matter 15%). The results suggested that soil compaction more than soil type was the major control on gas...... diffusivity and to some extent also on air permeability. We developed a density-corrected (D-C) Dp(e)/Do model as a generalized form of a previous model for Dp/ Do at -100 cm H2O of matric potential (Dp,100/Do). The D-C model performed well across soil types and density levels compared with existing models...

  14. Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, Eva; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is controlled by the properties of the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the rhizosphere. In particular, the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere are altered by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by the roots. In this paper we present experimental results and a conceptual model of water flow in unsaturated soils mixed with mucilage. A central hypothesis of the model is that the different drying/wetting rate of mucilage compared to the bulk soil results in nonequilibrium relations between water content and water potential in the rhizosphere. We coupled this nonequilibrium relation with the Richards equation and obtained a constitutive equation for water flow in soil and mucilage. To test the model assumptions, we measured the water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil mixed with mucilage from chia seeds. Additionally, we used neutron radiography to image water content in a layer of soil mixed with mucilage during drying and wetting cycles. The radiographs demonstrated the occurrence of nonequilibrium water dynamics in the soil-mucilage mixture. The experiments were simulated by numerically solving the nonequilibrium model. Our study provides conceptual and experimental evidences that mucilage has a strong impact on soil water dynamics. During drying, mucilage maintains a greater soil water content for an extended time, while during irrigation it delays the soil rewetting. We postulate that mucilage exudation by roots attenuates plant water stress by modulating water content dynamics in the rhizosphere.

  15. Soil water evaporation under densities of coverage with vegetable residue Evaporação da água do solo em função da densidade de cobertura com resíduo vegetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gava

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at the Agronomic Institute of Paraná (IAPAR in Londrina, State of Paraná (PR, Brazil (latitude 23º18'S, longitude 51º09'W and average altitude of 585 m. The local climate, according to the classification of Köeppen, is Cfa type, i.e., humid subtropical climate, with rain in all seasons and can occur dry seasons during the winter. It was determined soil evaporation (E under different coverage densities with residue from the wheat crop. The treatments were installed in weighting lysimeters of 2.66 m² and 1.3 m deep, which allows to determine E by the mass difference with measuring precision of 0.1mm at one hour intervals. Treatments consisted of 0; 2.5; 5 and 10 t ha-1 of wheat crop residues, placed evenly over each lysimeter. In the first cycle (September 22nd to October 20th, 2008, the reduction of E, as compared to a bare soil, was 4; 15 and 24%, while in the second cycle (December 1st to 30th, 2008, the reduction was of 15; 22 and 25%, respectively, for the treatments of 2.5; 5 and 10 t ha-1.O presente estudo foi realizado no Instituto Agronômico do Paraná (IAPAR, em Londrina, Estado do Paraná (latitude de 23º18'S, longitude de 51º09'W e altitude média de 585 m. O clima local, segundo a classificação do Köppen, é do tipo Cfa, ou seja, subtropical úmido, com chuvas em todas as estações, podendo ocorrer secas no período de inverno. Determinou-se a evaporação (E da água do solo sob diferentes densidades de cobertura com resíduo da cultura de trigo. Os tratamentos foram instalados em lisímetros de pesagem de 2,66 m² e 1,3 m de profundidade, que permitem determinar E por diferença de massa com precisão equivalente a 0,1 mm em intervalos de uma hora. Os tratamentos consistiram em 0; 2,5; 5 e 10 t ha-1 de resíduos da cultura do trigo, colocadas de forma homogênea em cada lisímetro. No primeiro ciclo (22/09 a 20/10/2008, a redução de E em relação ao solo descoberto foi de 4; 15 e 24

  16. Correction of resistance to penetration by pedofunctions and a reference soil water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir Tuzzin de Moraes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The soil penetration resistance is an important indicator of soil compaction and is strongly influenced by soil water content. The objective of this study was to develop mathematical models to normalize soil penetration resistance (SPR, using a reference value of gravimetric soil water content (U. For this purpose, SPR was determined with an impact penetrometer, in an experiment on a Dystroferric Red Latossol (Rhodic Eutrudox, at six levels of soil compaction, induced by mechanical chiseling and additional compaction by the traffic of a harvester (four, eight, 10, and 20 passes; in addition to a control treatment under no-tillage, without chiseling or additional compaction. To broaden the range of U values, SPR was evaluated in different periods. Undisturbed soil cores were sampled to quantify the soil bulk density (BD. Pedotransfer functions were generated correlating the values of U and BD to the SPR values. By these functions, the SPR was adequately corrected for all U and BD data ranges. The method requires only SPR and U as input variables in the models. However, different pedofunctions are needed according to the soil layer evaluated. After adjusting the pedotransfer functions, the differences in the soil compaction levels among the treatments, previously masked by variations of U, became detectable.

  17. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  18. Soil water repellency in north-eastern Greece with adverse effects of drying on the persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziogas, A.K.; Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Many soils may be water repellent to some degree, challenging the common perception that soil water repellency is only an interesting aberration. When dry, water repellent soils resist or retard water infiltration into the soil matrix. Soil water repellency often leads to the development of unstable

  19. Soil water repellency in north-eastern Greece with adverse effects of drying on the persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziogas, A.K.; Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Many soils may be water repellent to some degree, challenging the common perception that soil water repellency is only an interesting aberration. When dry, water repellent soils resist or retard water infiltration into the soil matrix. Soil water repellency often leads to the development of unstable

  20. Impacts of thinning of a Mediterranean oak forest on soil properties influencing water infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Prima Simone

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean ecosystems, special attention needs to be paid to forest–water relationships due to water scarcity. In this context, Adaptive Forest Management (AFM has the objective to establish how forest resources have to be managed with regards to the efficient use of water, which needs maintaining healthy soil properties even after disturbance. The main objective of this investigation was to understand the effect of one of the AFM methods, namely forest thinning, on soil hydraulic properties. At this aim, soil hydraulic characterization was performed on two contiguous Mediterranean oak forest plots, one of them thinned to reduce the forest density from 861 to 414 tree per ha. Three years after the intervention, thinning had not affected soil water permeability of the studied plots. Both ponding and tension infiltration runs yielded not significantly different saturated, Ks, and unsaturated, K−20, hydraulic conductivity values at the thinned and control plots. Therefore, thinning had no an adverse effect on vertical water fluxes at the soil surface. Mean Ks values estimated with the ponded ring infiltrometer were two orders of magnitude higher than K−20 values estimated with the minidisk infiltrometer, revealing probably soil structure with macropores and fractures. The input of hydrophobic organic matter, as a consequence of the addition of plant residues after the thinning treatment, resulted in slight differences in terms of both water drop penetration time, WDPT, and the index of water repellency, R, between thinned and control plots. Soil water repellency only affected unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity measurements. Moreover, K−20 values showed a negative correlation with both WDPT and R, whereas Ks values did not, revealing that the soil hydrophobic behavior has no impact on saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  1. Soil volumetric water content measurements using TDR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vincenzi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A physical model to measure some hydrological and thermal parameters in soils will to be set up. The vertical profiles of: volumetric water content, matric potential and temperature will be monitored in different soils. The volumetric soil water content is measured by means of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR technique. The result of a test to determine experimentally the reproducibility of the volumetric water content measurements is reported together with the methodology and the results of the analysis of the TDR wave forms. The analysis is based on the calculation of the travel time of the TDR signal in the wave guide embedded in the soil.

  2. The Initial Water Content Dependent Swelling Behavior of Clayey Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet Öngen, Ali; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    The variation in water content is known as a main controlling parameter for many physical and mechanical behaviors of clayey soils, particularly soils found in arid and semi-arid regions. Expansive soils found in such regions are naturally subjected to many volume increase and decrease cycles within unsaturated zone during rainy and dry periods, and thus these soils constitute severe hazard to low-rise light buildings and infrastructures constructed in shallow unsaturated depths. Although the relationships between swelling parameters (swelling pressure and swelling percent) and soils' physical - index properties have been investigated in details in previous researches, the continuous effect of water content on swelling mechanisms of soils is not yet sufficiently studied. The water content of unsaturated zone naturally fluctuates with changes in both seasonal climatic conditions and increasing in depths, and therefore, swelling parameters of a soil within unsaturated soils should not be represented with only one single value. For achieving accurate understanding of swelling behavior at field condition, soils should be subjected to swelling tests by considering different initial water content conditions. Considering requirement for further understanding in water content dependent swelling behavior of soils, a research program was aimed to investigate the effect of initial water content on swelling behavior of soil materials. For this purpose, soils having wide range of physical properties such as grain size distributions, mineralogical composition and consistency limits were collected from different locations in Turkey. To minimize the effect of dry unit weight on swelling behavior of soils, samples prepared at same dry unit weight (14.6 kN/m3) with various initial water contents ranging from 0% to approximately 37% were subjected to swelling tests by using convenient odometer device. Beside these tests, grain size distribution, Atterberg limits and mineralogical

  3. Moditored unsaturated soil transport processes as a support for large scale soil and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanclooster, Marnik

    2010-05-01

    The current societal demand for sustainable soil and water management is very large. The drivers of global and climate change exert many pressures on the soil and water ecosystems, endangering appropriate ecosystem functioning. The unsaturated soil transport processes play a key role in soil-water system functioning as it controls the fluxes of water and nutrients from the soil to plants (the pedo-biosphere link), the infiltration flux of precipitated water to groundwater and the evaporative flux, and hence the feed back from the soil to the climate system. Yet, unsaturated soil transport processes are difficult to quantify since they are affected by huge variability of the governing properties at different space-time scales and the intrinsic non-linearity of the transport processes. The incompatibility of the scales between the scale at which processes reasonably can be characterized, the scale at which the theoretical process correctly can be described and the scale at which the soil and water system need to be managed, calls for further development of scaling procedures in unsaturated zone science. It also calls for a better integration of theoretical and modelling approaches to elucidate transport processes at the appropriate scales, compatible with the sustainable soil and water management objective. Moditoring science, i.e the interdisciplinary research domain where modelling and monitoring science are linked, is currently evolving significantly in the unsaturated zone hydrology area. In this presentation, a review of current moditoring strategies/techniques will be given and illustrated for solving large scale soil and water management problems. This will also allow identifying research needs in the interdisciplinary domain of modelling and monitoring and to improve the integration of unsaturated zone science in solving soil and water management issues. A focus will be given on examples of large scale soil and water management problems in Europe.

  4. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  5. Linkages between forest soils and water quality and quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary; George G. Ice; C. Rhett Jackson

    2009-01-01

    The most sustainable and best quality fresh water sources in the world originate in forest ecosystems. The biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of forest soils are particularly well suited to delivering high quality water to streams, moderating stream hydrology, and providing diverse aquatic habitat. Forest soils feature litter layers and...

  6. Soil and Water Challenges for Pacific Northwest Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil and water conservation has been a major concern in the Inland Pacific Northwest since the onset of farming 125 years ago. Some of the highest historic water erosion rates in the USA have occurred on steep slopes in the Palouse region where soil loss averaged 45 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and could reach 450 ...

  7. Visible NearInfrared Spectroscopy Predicts Water Repellency in Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Cecilie; Møldrup, Per; Clothier, Brent;

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a property which has consequences for agricultural water management. The SWR is caused by hydrophobic organic coatings on mineral particles and the severity is highly depending on the organic matter quantity and quality and on the moisture status of the soil...

  8. Response of Eucalyptus grandis trees to soil water deficits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dye, PJ

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available sites in the Mpu- malanga province of South Africa to determine the relation between transpiration rate and soil water availability. I hy- pothesized that, with this relationship defined, simple model- ing of the soil water balance could be used...

  9. Characteristics of soil water retention curve at macro-scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Scale adaptable hydrological models have attracted more and more attentions in the hydrological modeling research community, and the constitutive relationship at the macro-scale is one of the most important issues, upon which there are not enough research activities yet. Taking the constitutive relationships of soil water movement--soil water retention curve (SWRC) as an example, this study extends the definition of SWRC at the micro-scale to that at the macro-scale, and aided by Monte Carlo method we demonstrate that soil property and the spatial distribution of soil moisture will affect the features of SWRC greatly. Furthermore, we assume that the spatial distribution of soil moisture is the result of self-organization of climate, soil, ground water and soil water movement under the specific boundary conditions, and we also carry out numerical experiments of soil water movement at the vertical direction in order to explore the relationship between SWRC at the macro-scale and the combinations of climate, soil, and groundwater. The results show that SWRCs at the macro-scale and micro-scale presents totally different features, e.g., the essential hysteresis phenomenon which is exaggerated with increasing aridity index and rising groundwater table. Soil property plays an important role in the shape of SWRC which will even lead to a rectangular shape under drier conditions, and power function form of SWRC widely adopted in hydrological model might be revised for most situations at the macro-scale.

  10. Effects of fine root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghu Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The study was conducted to characterize the impacts of plant roots systems (e.g., root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems. Area of study: The study was carried out in Jiufeng National Forest Park, Beijing, China. Material and methods: The flow patterns were measured by field dye tracing experiments. Different species (Sophora japonica Linn,Platycladus orientalis Franco, Quercus dentata Thunbwere quantified in two replicates, and 12 soil depth were applied. Plant roots were sampled in the sieving methods. Root length density and root biomass were measured by WinRHIZO. Dye coverage was implied in the image analysis, and maximum depth of dye infiltration by direct measurement. Main results: Root length density and root biomass decreased with the increasing distance from soil surface, and root length density was 81.6% higher in preferential pathways than in soil matrix, and 66.7% for root biomass with respect to all experimental plots. Plant roots were densely distributed in the upper soil layers. Dye coverage was almost 100% in the upper 5-10 cm, but then decreased rapidly with soil depth. Root length density and root biomass were different from species: Platycladus orientalis Franco > Quercus dentata Thunb > Sophora japonica Linn. Research highlights: The results indicated that fine roots systems had strong effects on soil preferential flow, particularly root channels enhancing nutrition transport across soil profiles in forest dynamics.

  11. Soil water balance scenario studies using predicted soil hydraulic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Wösten, J.H.M.; Bouma, J.; Várallyay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have become a topic drawing increasing interest within the field of soil and environmental research because they can provide important soil physical data at relatively low cost. Few studies, however, explore which contributions PTFs can make to land-use planning, in ter

  12. Soil respiration (CO2 efflux) response to spatio-temporal variability of soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Doerr, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a common feature of many soils which restricts water infiltration and movement within the soil. SWR is expected to become more spread according to current climatic prediction, but its effect on soil carbon dynamics and specifically on soil CO2 fluxes is still not clear. Based on previous laboratory experiments it has been suggested that water repellency reduces soil respiration, but the responses of soil CO2 efflux to naturally varying hydrological conditions created by SWR are not yet known. This is the first field-based study testing the hypothesis that water repellency indeed reduces soil CO2 efflux. In situ field measurements of soil CO2 fluxes, temperature, water contents and water repellency were carried out over three consecutive years at a grassland and pine forest site under the humid temperate climate of the UK. SWR was observed for the majority of the warmer period, but exhibited high spatial variability. Soils showed similar levels of extreme water repellency only on a few occasions following long dry spells and this indeed resulted in reduction in CO2 efflux. Spatially patchy SWR with variable soil moisture content induced the highest respiration rates, significantly higher than when SWR was absent. This rather unexpected behaviour can be explained by SWR-induced preferential flow which created flow paths with water and nutrients supply to the microorganisms, while water repellent zones provided air-filled pathways to facilitate soil-atmosphere gas exchanges. This study demonstrates that SWR can have contrasting effects on CO2 fluxes and, when spatially-variable, enhance CO2 efflux.

  13. Infiltration characteristics of water in forest soils in the Simian mountains, Chongqing City, southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Hongjiang ZHANG; Meng LI; Jinhua CHENG; Bo WANG; Weili LU

    2009-01-01

    Spearman rank-correlation analysis and grey relational grade analysis were used to study infiltration characteristics of water in different forest soils in the Simian mountains, Chongqing City. The results indicate that the soil bulk density, contents of coarse sand, and porosity of macropores were significantly correlated with saturated hydraulic conductivity. Porosity of macropores and contents of coarse sand were positively correlated with soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil bulk density negatively. Based on the initial infiltration rate, the stable infiltration rate, time required for infiltration to reach a stable state, and cumulative infiltration, all of which are crucial parameters determining soil infiltration capacity, the results of grey relational grade analysis showed that the grey relational grades of the different forest soils were listed from high to low as broad-leaved forest (0.8031) > Phyllostachys pubescens forest (0.7869) > mixed coniferbroadleaf forest (0.4454)>coniferous forest (0.4039). Broadleaf forest had the best ability to be infiltrated among the four soils studied. The square roots of the coefficients of determination obtained from fitting the Horton infiltration equation, simulated in our study of forest soils, were higher than 0.950. We conclude that soils of broad-leaved forests were the best suited for infiltration processes of forestry in the Simian mountains.

  14. Pedotransfer functions for Irish soils - estimation of bulk density (ρb) per horizon type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, B.; Simo, I.; Sills, P.; Creamer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Soil bulk density is a key property in defining soil characteristics. It describes the packing structure of the soil and is also essential for the measurement of soil carbon stock and nutrient assessment. In many older surveys this property was neglected and in many modern surveys this property is omitted due to cost both in laboratory and labour and in cases where the core method cannot be applied. To overcome these oversights pedotransfer functions are applied using other known soil properties to estimate bulk density. Pedotransfer functions have been derived from large international data sets across many studies, with their own inherent biases, many ignoring horizonation and depth variances. Initially pedotransfer functions from the literature were used to predict different horizon type bulk densities using local known bulk density data sets. Then the best performing of the pedotransfer functions were selected to recalibrate and then were validated again using the known data. The predicted co-efficient of determination was 0.5 or greater in 12 of the 17 horizon types studied. These new equations allowed gap filling where bulk density data were missing in part or whole soil profiles. This then allowed the development of an indicative soil bulk density map for Ireland at 0-30 and 30-50 cm horizon depths. In general the horizons with the largest known data sets had the best predictions, using the recalibrated and validated pedotransfer functions.

  15. Experimental study on pore water pressure dissipation of mucky soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianwei ZHANG; Changming WANG; Junxia LI; Bin WANG

    2008-01-01

    Pore water pressure has an important influence on mechanical properties of soil. The authors studied the characteristics of pore water pressure dissipating of mucky soil under consolidated-drained condition by using refitted triaxial instrument and analyzed the variation of pore pressure coefficient with consolidation pressure. The results show that the dissipating of pore water pressure behaves in different ways depends on different styles of loading. What is more, the pore water pressure coefficient of mucky soil is less than 1. As the compactness of soil increases and moisture content reduces, the value of B reduces. There is a staggered dissipating in the process of consolidation, in which it is a mutate point when U/P is 80%. It is helpful to establish the pore water pressure model and study the strength-deformation of soil in process of consolidation.

  16. Application of actinomycetes to soil to ameliorate water repellency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, F; El-Tarabily, K A; Petrie, S; Chen, C; Dell, B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel isolation technique using a mixture of Bacillus and Streptomyces phages to selectively isolate wax-utilizing non-streptomycete actinomycetes effective in ameliorating water repellency in a problem soil. Phages added to a soil suspension reduced the dominance of Bacillus and Streptomyces isolates and significantly increased the number of non-streptomycete actinomycetes on isolation plates. Promising isolates, grown on a medium containing beeswax as sole carbon source, were selected for application to water repellent soil. Their addition significantly reduced water repellency. Phage application significantly increased the isolation of non-streptomycete actinomycetes. Wax-utilizing isolates were found to significantly reduce water repellency in a problem soil. The phage technique can be used for the routine isolation of non-streptomycete actinomycetes. Beeswax medium can be used to selectively isolate wax-utilizing micro-organisms with the potential to ameliorate water repellency in soil.

  17. Implications of Topographically Induced Variations in Solar Radiation for Water Balance, Vegetation and Soil Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Flerchinger, G. N.; Link, T. E.; McNamara, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Vegetation cover and stature in semiarid regions are highly sensitive to variations in evaporative demand and precipitation. Where the terrain is complex, this may result in a spatial mosaic of vegetation cover related to topographically induced variations in solar radiation and hence evaporative demand. The associated energy and water fluxes and carbon stocks probably do not scale linearly, but are potentially predictable. Johnston Draw, a small, semiarid, granitic catchment in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in Idaho, is dominated by steep north and south-facing slopes. Vegetation on North-facing slopes is more complete. We made spatially extensive, periodic measurements of soil temperature (Ts) soil water content (Ws) to establish the spatial variability of those parameters. In addition, we monitored Ts and Ws in profiles to bedrock, snow depth and meteorological parameters at three paired, north- and south-facing slope locations. These data were compared to simulations of water and energy flux calculated using the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model. We found dramatic differences in Ts, with the annual average soil temperature about 5 C warmer on south-facing slopes. Differences varied seasonally, with the biggest differences in the summer, exactly out of phase with the solar radiation differences. Each year soils dried to consistent, low values, but the north-facing soils retained water about one month longer, on average, owing mostly to the greater depth, and hence available water, on those soils. Modeling results indicate that water is retained longer in north-facing soils and the differences in Ts are due to differences in soil cover, primarily from the greater density of vegetative cover. These differences appear to have evolved over time as the result of feedbacks between atmospheric forcings and vegetation response, which promote greater carbon accumulations and deeper soil formation.

  18. Rhizosphere: a leverage for tolerance to water deficits of soil microflora ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérard, Annette; Ruy, Stéphane; Coronel, Anaïs; Toussaint, Bruce; Czarnes, Sonia; Legendre, Laurent; Doussan, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Microbial soil communities play a fundamental role in soil organic matter mineralization, which is a key process for plant nutrition, growth and production in agro-ecosystems. A number of these microbial processes take place in the rhizosphere: the soil zone influenced by plant roots activity, which is a "hotspot " of biological and physico-chemical activity, transfers and biomass production. The knowledge of rhizosphere processes is however still scanty, especially regarding the interactions between physico-chemical processes occurring there and soil microorganisms. The rhizosphere is a place where soil aggregates are more stable, and where bulk density, porosity, water and nutrients transfer are modified with respect to the bulk soil (e.g. because of production of mucilage, of which exo-polysaccharides (EPS) produced by roots and microorganisms. During a maize field experiment, rhizospheric soil (i.e. soil strongly adhering to maize roots) and bulk soil were sampled twice in spring and summer. These soil samples were characterized for physicochemical parameters (water retention curves and analysis of exopolysaccarides) and microflora (microbial biomass, catabolic capacities of the microbial communities assessed with the MicroRespTM technique, stability of soil microbial respiration faced to a heat-drought disturbance). We observed differences between rhizospheric and bulk soils for all parameters studied: Rhizospheric soils showed higher microbial biomasses, higher quantities of exopolysaccarides and a higher water retention capacity compared to bulk soil measurements. Moreover, microbial soil respiration showed a higher stability confronted to heat-drought stress in the rhizospheric soils compared to bulk soils. Results were more pronounced during summer compared to spring. Globally these data obtained from field suggest that in a changing climate conditions, the specific physico-biological conditions in the rhizosphere partially linked to exopolysaccarides

  19. Retrieving Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using Linear Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin XU; Binbin ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    A simple linear regression method is developed to retrieve daily averaged soil water content from diurnal variations of soil temperature measured at three or more depths. The method is applied to Oklahoma Mesonet soil temperature data collected at the depths of 5, 10, and 30 cm during 11-20 June 1995. The retrieved bulk soil water contents are compared with direct measurements for one pair of nearly collocated Mesonet and ARM stations and also compared with the retrievals of a previous method at 14 enhanced Oklahoma Mesonet stations. The results show that the current method gives more persistent retrievals than the previous method. The method is also applied to Oklahoma Mesonet soil temperature data collected at the depths of 5, 25, 60, and 75 cm from the Norman site during 20 30 July 1998 and 1-31 July 2000. The retrieved soil water contents are verified by collocated soil water content measurements with rms differences smaller than the soil water observation error (0.05 ma m-a). The retrievals are found to be moderately sensitive to random errors (±0.1 K) in the soil temperature observations and errors in the soil type specifications.

  20. Effects of water salinity on the correlation scale of Root density and Evapotranspiration fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeel, Ali; Saeed, Ali; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Spatial pattern and the correlation of different soil and plant parameters were examined in a green bean field experiment carried out at the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari, Italy. The experiment aimed to evaluate the role of local processes of salt accumulation and transport which mainly influences the evapotranspiration (and thus the root uptake) processes under different water salinity levels. The experiment consisted of three transects of 30m length and 4.2 m width, irrigated with three different salinity levels (1dSm-1, 3dSm-1, 6dSm-1). Soil measurements (electrical conductivity and soil water content) were monitored along transects in 24 sites, 1 m apart by using TDR probes and Diviner 2000. Water storage measured by TDR and Diviner sensor were coupled for calculating directly the evapotranspiration fluxes along the whole soil profile under the different salinity levels imposed during the experiment. In the same sites, crop monitoring involved measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI), Osmotic Potential (OP), Leaf Water Potential (LWP), and Root length Density (RlD). Soil and plant properties were analyzed by classical statistics, geostatistics methods and spectral analysis. Results indicated moderate to large spatial variability across the field for soil and plant parameters under all salinity treatments. Furthermore, cross-semivariograms exhibited a strong positive spatial interdependence between electrical conductivity of soil solution ECw with ET and RlD in transect treated with 3dSm-1 as well as with LAI in transect treated with 6dSm-1 at all 24 monitoring sites. Spectral analysis enabled to identify the observation window to sample the soil salinity information responsible for a given plant response (ET, OP, RlD). It is also allowed a clear identification of the spatial scale at which the soil water salinity level and distribution and the crop response in terms of actual evapotranspiration ET, RlD and OP, are actually correlated. Additionally

  1. Characteristic of Soil Hydro-Physical Properties and Water Dynamics under Different Vegetation Restoration Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zelong; GONG Yuanbo; HU Tingxing

    2006-01-01

    By combining the observation of the soil profile at field and the chemical and physical analysis in laboratory, a study on the hydro-physical properties of soil in six different vegetation types and the dynamics of water content after rain was conducted in Wanchanggou, Guangyuan City to find out the vegetation types with effective water-conservation functions in order to serve the ecological restoration in the low hill heavy rain area upper the Jialing River. Results showed that:the hydro-physical properties of soil in the mixed Alnus cremastogyne and Cupressua Leyland forest (AcCl) were best. But in the depth of 0-20 cm. The properties of soil in the abandoned cropland (Fm) was better than that in the AcCl. The soil bulk densities varied significantly between the layers of 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm in all the six vegetation types except that in the Robinia pseudoacacia shrub forest (RpⅡ), and the changes of the maximum and the capillary moisture capacity between layers were significant only in the Fm and in the AcCl. Of these stands, the AcCl had the shortest water-absorbing period and the strongest moisture changes in the upper layer (0-15 cm). In the same stand, the deeper the soil layer, the slighter the soil moisture varied, and the longer the soil moisture accumulating process lasted.

  2. CO2 response to rewetting of hydrophobic soils - Can soil water repellency inhibit the 'Birch effect'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Carmen; Urbanek, Emilia; Doerr, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Rewetting of dry soils is known to cause a short-term CO2 pulse commonly known as the 'Birch effect'. The displacement of CO2 with water during the process of wetting has been recognised as one of the sources of this pulse. The 'Birch effect' has been extensively observed in many soils, but some studies report a lack of such phenomenon, suggesting soil water repellency (SWR) as a potential cause. Water infiltration in water repellent soils can be severely restricted, causing overland flow or increased preferential flow, resulting in only a small proportion of soil pores being filled with water and therefore small gas-water replacement during wetting. Despite the suggestions of a different response of CO2 fluxes to wetting under hydrophobic conditions, this theory has never been tested. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that CO2 pulse does not occur during rewetting of water repellent soils. Dry homogeneous soils at water-repellent and wettable status have been rewetted with different amounts of water. CO2 flux as a response to wetting has been continuously measured with the CO2 flux analyser. Delays in infiltration and non-uniform heterogeneous water flow were observed in water repellent soils, causing an altered response in the CO2 pulse in comparison to typically observed 'Birch effect' in wettable systems. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects water relations in soil, but has also an impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  3. Water erosion and soil water infiltration in different stages of corn development and tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. de Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study evaluated soil and water losses, soil water infiltration and infiltration rate models in soil tillage systems and corn (Zea mays, L. development stages under simulated rainfall. The treatments were: cultivation along contour lines, cultivation down the slope and exposed soil. Soil losses and infiltration in each treatment were quantified for rains applied using a portable simulator, at 0, 30, 60 and 75 days after planting. Infiltration rates were estimated using the models of Kostiakov-Lewis, Horton and Philip. Based on the obtained results, the combination of effects between soil tillage system and corn development stages reduces soil and water losses. The contour tillage system promoted improvements in soil physical properties, favoring the reduction of erosion in 59.7% (water loss and 86.6% (soil loss at 75 days after planting, and the increase in the stable infiltration rate in 223.3%, compared with the exposed soil. Associated to soil cover, contour cultivation reduces soil and water losses, and the former is more influenced by management. Horton model is the most adequate to represent soil water infiltration rate under the evaluated conditions.

  4. Fractal behavior of soil water storage at multiple depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wenjun; Lin, Mi; Biswas, Asim; Si, Bing C.; Chau, Henry W.; Cresswell, Hamish P.

    2016-08-01

    Spatiotemporal behavior of soil water is essential to understand the science of hydrodynamics. Data intensive measurement of surface soil water using remote sensing has established that the spatial variability of soil water can be described using the principle of self-similarity (scaling properties) or fractal theory. This information can be used in determining land management practices provided the surface scaling properties are kept at deep layers. The current study examined the scaling properties of sub-surface soil water and their relationship to surface soil water, thereby serving as supporting information for plant root and vadose zone models. Soil water storage (SWS) down to 1.4 m depth at seven equal intervals was measured along a transect of 576 m for 5 years in Saskatchewan. The surface SWS showed multifractal nature only during the wet period (from snowmelt until mid- to late June) indicating the need for multiple scaling indices in transferring soil water variability information over multiple scales. However, with increasing depth, the SWS became monofractal in nature indicating the need for a single scaling index to upscale/downscale soil water variability information. In contrast, all soil layers during the dry period (from late June to the end of the growing season in early November) were monofractal in nature, probably resulting from the high evapotranspirative demand of the growing vegetation that surpassed other effects. This strong similarity between the scaling properties at the surface layer and deep layers provides the possibility of inferring about the whole profile soil water dynamics using the scaling properties of the easy-to-measure surface SWS data.

  5. Soil water repellency under stones, forest residue mulch and bare soil following wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Martinho A. S.; Prats, Sérgio A.; van Keulen, Daan; Vieira, Diana C. S.; Silva, Flávio C.; Keizer, Jan J.; Verheijen, Frank G. A.

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a physical property that is commonly defined as the aptitude of soil to resist wetting. It has been documented for a wide range of soil and vegetation types, and can vary with soil organic matter (SOM) content and type, soil texture, soil moisture content (SMC) and soil temperature. Fire can induce, enhance or destroy SWR and, therefore, lead to considerable changes in soil water infiltration and storage and increase soil erosion by water, thereby weakening soil quality. In Portugal, wildfires occur frequently and affect large areas, on average some 100000 ha per year, but over 300000 ha in extreme years such as 2003 and 2005. This can have important implications in geomorphological and hydrological processes, as evidenced by the strong and sometimes extreme responses in post-fire runoff and erosion reported from various parts of the world, including Portugal. Thereby, the application of mulches from various materials to cover burned areas has been found to be an efficient stabilization treatment. However, little is known about possible side effects on SWR, especially long term effects. Forest SWR is very heterogeneous, as a result of variation in proximity to trees/shrubs, litter type and thickness, cracks, roots, and stones. This study targeted the spatial heterogeneity of soil water repellency under eucalypt plantation, five years after a wildfire and forest residue mulching application. The main objectives of this work were: 1) to assess the long-term effect of mulching application on the strength and spatial heterogeneity of topsoil SWR, by comparing SWR on bare soil, under stones, and under mulching remains; 2) to assess SWR at 1 cm depth between O and Ah horizons. The soil surface results showed that untreated bare soil areas were slightly more water repellent than mulched areas. However, under stones there were no SWR differences between mulched and control areas. At 1 cm depth, there was a marked mulching effect on SWR, even

  6. Impact of shade and cocoa plant densities on soil organic carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Shade effects on organic carbon pools within the top soil (0-30 cm) under cocoa were ... soils under cocoa with density of 1111 trees ha-1 for shaded and unshaded farms respectively. ... The effect of these changes on the climate has resulted.

  7. Soil management and green water in sloping rainfed vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Marqués Pérez, María; Ruíz-Colmenero, Marta; García-Díaz, Andrés; Bienes Allas, Ramón

    2017-04-01

    Improved crop production in areas with restricted water availability is of particular interest. Farmers need to maximize the water use efficiency when the possibilities of further extension of irrigation are limited and water is becoming scarce and expensive. Water in rainfed crops depends on rainfall depth and soil characteristics such as texture and structure, water holding capacity, previous moisture, infiltration, soil surface conditions, steepness and slope length. Land management practices can be used to maximise water availability. In previous studies the unwillingness of farmers to change their practices towards more sustainable use was mainly due to the worry about water competition. This work is aimed at understanding the influence of management practices in the water partitioning of this land use. This study was conducted in a sloping vineyard in the centre of Spain. A rain gauge recorded rainfall depth and intensity in the area. Three different soil management practices were considered: 1) traditional tillage, 2) permanent cover and 3) mowed cover of cereals, both sown in the strips between vines. Two moisture sensors were buried at 10 and 35 cm depths. Three replicates per management practice were performed. It is expected that the lack of tillage increase the potential for litter to protect the soil surface against raindrop impact and to contribute to increasing soil organic carbon, and the corresponding increase in infiltration and water holding capacity. The analysis of two years of daily records of rainfall, runoff and soil moisture are intended to establish any influence of management practices on the partitioning of water. Particularly, the so-called "green water" was estimated, i.e. the fraction of rainfall that infiltrates into the soil and will be further available to plants. Soil characteristics such as texture, structure, moisture, infiltration were established. In addition simulated rainfalls carried out in summer and winter over bounded

  8. Validation of a spatial–temporal soil water movement and plant water uptake model

    KAUST Repository

    HEPPELL, J.

    2014-06-01

    © 2014, (publisher). All rights reserved. Management and irrigation of plants increasingly relies on accurate mathematical models for the movement of water within unsaturated soils. Current models often use values for water content and soil parameters that are averaged over the soil profile. However, many applications require models to more accurately represent the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum, in particular, water movement and saturation within specific parts of the soil profile. In this paper a mathematical model for water uptake by a plant root system from unsaturated soil is presented. The model provides an estimate of the water content level within the soil at different depths, and the uptake of water by the root system. The model was validated using field data, which include hourly water content values at five different soil depths under a grass/herb cover over 1 year, to obtain a fully calibrated system for plant water uptake with respect to climate conditions. When compared quantitatively to a simple water balance model, the proposed model achieves a better fit to the experimental data due to its ability to vary water content with depth. To accurately model the water content in the soil profile, the soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity needed to vary with depth.

  9. Laboratory Performance of Five Selected Soil Moisture Sensors Applying Factory and Own Calibration Equations for Two Soil Media of Different Bulk Density and Salinity Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Svatopluk; Báťková, Kamila; Legese, Wossenu Lemma

    2016-11-15

    Non-destructive soil water content determination is a fundamental component for many agricultural and environmental applications. The accuracy and costs of the sensors define the measurement scheme and the ability to fit the natural heterogeneous conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate five commercially available and relatively cheap sensors usually grouped with impedance and FDR sensors. ThetaProbe ML2x (impedance) and ECH₂O EC-10, ECH₂O EC-20, ECH₂O EC-5, and ECH₂O TE (all FDR) were tested on silica sand and loess of defined characteristics under controlled laboratory conditions. The calibrations were carried out in nine consecutive soil water contents from dry to saturated conditions (pure water and saline water). The gravimetric method was used as a reference method for the statistical evaluation (ANOVA with significance level 0.05). Generally, the results showed that our own calibrations led to more accurate soil moisture estimates. Variance component analysis arranged the factors contributing to the total variation as follows: calibration (contributed 42%), sensor type (contributed 29%), material (contributed 18%), and dry bulk density (contributed 11%). All the tested sensors performed very well within the whole range of water content, especially the sensors ECH₂O EC-5 and ECH₂O TE, which also performed surprisingly well in saline conditions.

  10. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  11. Comprehensive analysis of soil nitrogen removal by catch crops based on growth and water use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, D.; Kondo, K.; Yamane, S.; Kitano, M.; Mori, M.; Fujiwara, T.

    2016-07-01

    A new methodology for comprehensive analysis of the characteristics of nitrogen (N) removal from greenhouse soil by catch crop was proposed in relation to its growth and water use. The N removal is expressed as the product of five parameters: net assimilation rate, specific leaf area, shoot dry weight, water use efficiency for N removal, and water requirement for growth. This methodology was applied to the data of a greenhouse experiment where corn was cultivated under three plant densities. We analyzed the effect of plant density and examined the effectiveness of the methodology. Higher plant densities are advantageous not only for total N removal but also for water use efficiency in N removal and growth because of the large specific leaf area, shoot dry weight, and decreased soil evaporation. On the other hand, significant positive or negative linear relationships were found between all five parameters and N removal. This should improve the understanding of the N removal mechanisms and the interactions among its components. We show the effectiveness of our analytical methodology, which can contribute to identifying the optimum plant density according to the field situations (available water amount, soil N quantity to be removed) for practical catch crop cultivation.

  12. Can Soil Penetration Resistance and Bulk Density Be Determined in a Single Undisturbed Sample?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Fernandes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil quality indicators such as penetration resistance (PR and bulk density (BD are traditionally determined in a single undisturbed soil sample. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of PR measurements of undisturbed samples on the determination of BD in the same sample of two soils differing in clay contents. To this end, samples were collected from the 0.00-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m layers of two soils of clayey and very clayey texture. Volumetric rings were used to collect a total of 120 undisturbed soil samples from each soil layer that were divided into two subsets containing 60 units each. One sample set, designated “perforated samples”, was used to determine PR and BD in the same undisturbed sample; the other, named “intact samples”, was used to determine BD only. Bulk density values for perforated and intact samples were compared by analysis of variance, using a completely randomized experimental design. Means were compared by the t-test at 5 %. The BD values for the clayey soil were similar in perforated and intact samples from the two layers. However, BD of the very clayey soil was lower in the perforated than in the intact samples at both depths. Therefore, PR and BD in clayey soils can be accurately determined in the same undisturbed sample whereas in very clayey soils, different samples are required for this purpose.

  13. Effects of coal-bed methane discharge waters on the vegetation and soil ecosystem in Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, M.; Tindall, J.A.; Cronin, G.; Friedel, M.J.; Bergquist, E.

    2005-01-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) co-produced discharge waters in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, resulting from extraction of methane from coal seams, have become a priority for chemical, hydrological and biological research during the last few years. Soil and vegetation samples were taken from affected and reference sites (upland elevations and wetted gully) in Juniper Draw to investigate the effects of CBM discharge waters on soil physical and chemical properties and on native and introduced vegetation density and diversity. Results indicate an increase of salinity and sodicity within local soil ecosystems at sites directly exposed to CBM discharge waters. Elevated concentrations of sodium in the soil are correlated with consistent exposure to CBM waters. Clay-loam soils in the study area have a much larger specific surface area than the sandy soils and facilitate a greater sodium adsorption. However, there was no significant relation between increasing water sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values and increasing sediment SAR values downstream; however, soils exposed to the CBM water ranged from the moderate to severe SAR hazard index. Native vegetation species density was highest at the reference (upland and gully) and CBM affected upland sites. The affected gully had the greatest percent composition of introduced vegetation species. Salt-tolerant species had the greatest richness at the affected gully, implying a potential threat of invasion and competition to established native vegetation. These findings suggest that CBM waters could affect agricultural production operations and long-term water quality. ?? Springer 2005.

  14. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diest, H.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-04-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentration, soil water content (WC) and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd) as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS), indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  15. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  16. Soil atmosphere exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as significant sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  17. Citrus orchards management and soil water repellency in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, A.; González Peñaloza, F. A.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Water repellent soils are found around the world, although originally was found on fire affected soil (DeBano, 1981). However, for decades, water repellency was found to be a rare soil property. One of the pioneer research that shown that water repellency was a common soil property is the Wander (1949) publication in Science. Wander researched the water repellency on citrus groves, and since then, no information is available about the water repellency on citrus plantations. The Mediterranean soils are prone to water repellency due to the summer dry conditions (Cerdà and Doerr, 2007). And Land Use and Land Management are key factors (Harper et al., 2000; Urbanek et al., 2007) to understand the water repellency behaviour of agriculture soils. Valencia region (Eastern Spain) is the largest exporter in the world and citrus plantations located in the alluvial plains and fluvial terraces are moving to alluvial fans and slopes where the surface wash is very active (Cerdà et al., 2009). This research aims to show the water repellency on citrus orchards located on the sloping terrain (water repellency in citrus orchards under different managements: annual addition of plant residues and manure with no tilling and no fertilizer (MNT), annual addition of plant residues with no tillage (NT), application of conventional herbicides and no tilling (HNT) and conventional tillage in June (CT). The period for each type of management ranged from 2 and 27 (MNT), 1 and 25 (NT), 2 and 27 (HNT) and 3 and 29 years (CT). At each plot, a ten points were selected every 10 cm along inter-rows and water drop penetration time test (WDTP; DeBano, 1981) was performed. The results show that the MNT treatment induced slight water repellency in citrus-cropped soils compared to other treatments. Small but significant soil water repellency was observed under NT and HNT treatments (mean WDTP 4 ± 4 s and 2 ± 2 s, respectively), which may be regarded as subcritical soil water repellency. Slight water

  18. [Effects of soil texture and water content on the mineralization of soil organic carbon in paddy soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-lin; Wu, Jin-shui; Ge, Ti-da; Tang, Guo-yong; Tong, Cheng-li

    2009-01-01

    To understand how soil texture and water content affect the mineralization of organic C in paddy soil, 3 selected soils (sandy loam, clay loam, and silty clay) were incubated (25 degrees C) with 14 C-labelled rice straw (1.0 g x kg(-1)) at water content varied from 45% to 105% of water holding capacity (WHC). Data indicated that, in the sandy loam and clay loam, the mineralization rate of 14 C-labelled rice straw reached the maximum at 75% WHC, as 53% and 58% of the straw C mineralized in the incubation period of 160 d, whereas in the silty clay, it increased gradually (from 41.8% to 49.0%) as water content increased up to 105% WHC. For all of the three soils, the mineralization rate of soil native organic C reached the maximum at 75% WHC, with 5.8% of the organic C mineralized in the same period for the sandy loam, and 8.0% and 4.8% for the clay loam and silty clay, respectively. As water content increased further, the mineralization rate of native organic C in the three soils significantly declined. The mineralization rate of added rice straw and native organic C in all the three soils, was well fitted with a conic curve. These results suggest that water-logging can decrease the mineralization of organic C in paddy soils.

  19. Little effects on soil organic matter chemistry of density fractions after seven years of forest soil warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby increase the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated decomposition rates might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. To investigate the effect of soil warming on functionally different soil organic matter pools, we here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three density fractions (free particulate organic matter, fPOM; occluded particulate organic matter, oPOM; and mineral associated organic matter, MaOM) of a C-rich soil from a long-term warming experiment in a spruce forest in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling, the soil in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for seven consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results, which included organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, δ(13)C, Δ(14)C, δ(15)N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. Surprisingly, the differences in the three density fractions were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and soil depth. Warming led to reduced N content in topsoil oPOM and subsoil fPOM and to reduced relative abundance of N-bearing compounds in subsoil MaOM. Further, warming increased the δ(13)C of MaOM at both sampling depths, reduced the relative abundance of carbohydrates while it increased the relative abundance of lignins in subsoil oPOM. As the size of the functionally different SOM pools did not significantly change, we assume that the few and small modifications

  20. Associations between soil texture, soil water characteristics and earthworm populations of grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Lamandé, Mathieu; Torp, Søren Bent;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between soil physical characteristics and earthworms in a regional-scale field study in Denmark. The earthworm populations along within-field gradients in soil texture were quantified at five field sites, representing dominant soil......) was not causally associated with the soil parameters studied. This indicates that there must be other causal factors associated with the abundance (and composition) of anecic worms that are not among the soil texture and structure parameters studied. On the other hand, soil texture (Coarse sand) was associated...... with the abundance of the dominant endogeic species, A. tuberculata, but not endogeic worms in general. It was hypothesized that anecic and endogeic earthworms might respond to local soil water characteristics rather than soil texture, but this hypothesis could not be confirmed with the present data....

  1. Measuring and understanding soil water repellency through novel interdisciplinary approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balshaw, Helen; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Davies, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Food security and production is one of the key global issues faced by society. It has become evermore essential to work the land efficiently, through better soil management and agronomy whilst protecting the environment from air and water pollution. The failure of soil to absorb water - soil water repellency - can lead to major environmental problems such as increased overland flow and soil erosion, poor uptake of agricultural chemicals and increased risk of groundwater pollution due to the rapid transfer of contaminants and nutrient leaching through uneven wetting and preferential flow pathways. Understanding the causes of soil hydrophobicity is essential for the development of effective methods for its amelioration, supporting environmental stability and food security. Organic compounds deposited on soil mineral or aggregate surfaces have long been recognised as a major factor in causing soil water repellency. It is widely accepted that the main groups of compounds responsible are long-chain acids, alkanes and other organic compounds with hydrophobic properties. However, when reapplied to sands and soils, the degree of water repellency induced by these compounds and mixtures varied widely with compound type, amount and mixture, in a seemingly unpredictable way. Our research to date involves two new approaches for studying soil wetting. 1) We challenge the theoretical basis of current ideas on the measured water/soil contact angle measurements. Much past and current discussion involves Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models to explain anomalously high contact angles for organics on soils, however here we propose that these anomalously high measured contact angles are a consequence of the measurement of a water drop on an irregular non-planar surface rather than the thermodynamic factors of the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel models. In our analysis we have successfully used a much simpler geometric approach for non-flat surfaces such as soil. 2) Fluorescent and phosphorescent

  2. Fresh water-salt water density currents, a major cause of siltation in estuaries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schultz, E.A; Simmons, H.B

    1957-01-01

    ... the effects of changing the upland discharge into estuaries, rivers, and harbours where the fresh water-salt water density currents are present in some degree, and in some cases are the major cause of siltation; and 4...

  3. Inhibiting water evaporation of sandy soil by the soil particles modified with Japanese wax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zeng-Zhi; WANG Hong-Juan; Li Cui-Lan

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to resolve the problems of water conservation of sandy soil in desertification areas. The surface of soil particles was modified by molecules of natural Japanese wax through some specially screened surfactant. The modified particles were then well sprayed onto the sand, which was placed in an artificial climate box with simulating desert environment, to form a soil film with effect of suppressing water and gas-permeability. Structure of soil film was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectrometry (IR). And its mechanism of water inhibition was illustrated with DSC and TG curves. Its influence on grass-planting was tested through the instruments of water detector. The results show that sorbitol anhydride stearate(Span 80)could well disperse the Japanese wax and make it combine with the clay which is also dispersed. The pores among soil particles grew smaller and turned from hydrophilic into hydrophobic, in which way resistance to water penetrating through the film was increased. Experimental grass grows normally on sandy soil with the soil film in the artificial desert climate box, indicating that the soil particles modified with Japanese wax is an effective method to inhibit water evaporation.

  4. Critical Zone Soil Properties effects on Soil Water Storage and Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, P. R.; McNamara, J. P.; Seyfried, M. S.; Marks, D. G.; Flores, A. N.; Marshall, H.; Williams, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil properties control a wide range of hydrologic processes including recharge to regional aquifers. Soil water must pass through the critical zone to contribute to ground water recharge. Deep percolation (DP) from catchments is considered to be an estimate of mountain block recharge to regional aquifers. DP is also an important term in water mass balance studies, which attempt to estimate hydrologic states and fluxes in watersheds with fractured or transmissive bedrock. Few studies estimate the magnitude of this water balance term and it is often considered negligible. The objective of this study is to estimate the timing and magnitude of DP in the 0.015 km2 Tree Line experimental catchment (TL) from the 2011 water year. The catchment, which is located within the Dry Creek Experimental Watershed, Boise, ID, contains thin sandy soil over fractured granitic bedrock. We introduce modeling methods that focus on achieving a high degree of agreement between measured and modeled catchment storage. A distributed physically-based snow energy balance model is loosely coupled to a capacitance-based soil moisture model to estimate soil storage. Measured and calculated soil model parameters, including field capacity, saturated soil moisture content, and plant extraction limits, control the flux of water through the critical zone. Variability in soil storage and soil water fluxes through the critical zone is driven by soil properties. Parameters describing a leaf area index time series are calibrated to minimize the difference between measured and modeled soil dry down in the spring. DP is estimated to be 126 mm from Dec. 13, 2010 to June 30, 2011, which is 18% of the precipitation measured during that time. Rain-on-snow events are estimated to contribute 79 mm, which is 11% of precipitation or 63% of the calculated DP.

  5. Modeling root water uptake in soils: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, Mathieu; Couvreur, Valentin; Huber, Katrin; Meunier, Félicien; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Root water uptake modeling concepts have evolved over time. On one hand, mesoscopic models have been developed, which explicitly represent the fluxes at the soil root interfaces. On the other hand macroscopic approaches were proposed, which embedded root water uptake into a sink term in the macroscopic mass balance equation. Today, new techniques for imaging root architecture, water fluxes and soil properties open new possibilities to the understanding of water depletion in planted soils. Amongst others, architectural hydraulic root and soil models can be used to bridge the scale gap between single root and plant scales. In this talk, several new promising experimental approaches will be presented together with new models and upscaling procedures, possibly paving the way for the future models of root water uptake. Furthermore, open challenges will also be presented.

  6. Least limiting water range in soil under crop rotations and chiseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Carlos Calonego

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil water availability to plants is affected by soil compaction and other variables. The Least Limiting Water Range (LLWR comprises soil physical variables affecting root growth and soil water availability, and can be managed by either mechanical or biological methods. There is evidence that effects of crop rotations could last longer than chiseling, so the objective of this study was to assess the effect of soil chiseling or growing cover crops under no-till (NT on the LLWR. Crop rotations involving triticale (X Triticosecale and sunflower (Helianthus annuus in the fall-winter associated with millet (Pennisetum glaucum, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor and sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea as cover crops preceding soybean (Glycine max were repeated for three consecutive years. In the treatment with chiseling (performed only in the first year, the area was left fallow between the fall-winter and summer crops. The experiment was carried out in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil, from 2003 to 2006 on a Typic Rhodudalf. The LLWR was determined in soil samples taken from the layers 0-20 cm and 20- 40 cm, after chemical desiccation of the cover crops in December of the first and third year of the experiment. Chiseling decreases soil bulk density in the 0-20 cm soil layer, increasing the LLWR magnitude by lowering the soil water content at which penetration resistance reaches 2.0 MPa; this effect is present up to the third year after chiseling and can reach to a depth of 0.40 m. Crop rotations involving sunflower + sunn hemp, triticale + millet and triticale + sunn hemp for three years prevented soil bulk density from exceeding the critical soil bulk density in the 0- 0.20 m layer. This effect was observed to a depth of 0.40 m after three years of chiseling under crop rotations involving forage sorghum. Hence, chiseling and some crop rotations under no tillage are effective in increasing soil quality assessed by the LLWR.

  7. Formation of Soil Water Repellency by Laboratory Burning and Its Effect on Soil Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Im, Sangjun

    2010-05-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency can vary with burning conditions, and may lead to significant changes in soil hydraulic properties. However, isolation of the effects of soil water repellency from other factors is difficult, particularly under field conditions. This study was conducted to (i) investigate the effects of burning using different plant leaf materials and (ii) of different burning conditions on the formation of soil water repellency, and (iii) isolate the effects of the resulting soil water repellency on soil evaporation from other factors. Burning treatments were performed on the surface of homogeneous fully wettable sand soil contained in a steel frame (60 x 60 cm; 40 cm depth). As controls a sample without a heat treatment, and a heated sample without fuel, were also used. Ignition and heat treatments were carried out with a gas torch. For comparing the effects of different burning conditions, fuel types included oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora), pine needle litter (litter on a coniferous forest floor, P. densiflora + P. rigida), and broad-leaf litter (Quercus mongolica + Q. aliena + Prunus serrulata var. spontanea + other species); fuel loads were 200 g, 300 g, and 500 g; and heating duration was 40 s, 90 s and 180 s. The heating duration was adjusted to control the temperature, based on previous experiments. The temperature was measured continuously at 3-second intervals and logged with two thermometers. After burning, undisturbed soil columns were sampled for subsequent experiments. Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test was performed at every 1 mm depth of the soil columns to measure the severity of soil water repellency and its vertical extent. Soil water repellency was detected following all treatments. As the duration of heating increased, the thickness of the water repellent layer increased, whilst the severity of soil water repellency decreased. As regards fuel amount, the most severe soil water repellency was

  8. Performance of chromatographic systems to model soil-water sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Marta; Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí

    2012-08-24

    A systematic approach for evaluating the goodness of chromatographic systems to model the sorption of neutral organic compounds by soil from water is presented in this work. It is based on the examination of the three sources of error that determine the overall variance obtained when soil-water partition coefficients are correlated against chromatographic retention factors: the variance of the soil-water sorption data, the variance of the chromatographic data, and the variance attributed to the dissimilarity between the two systems. These contributions of variance are easily predicted through the characterization of the systems by the solvation parameter model. According to this method, several chromatographic systems besides the reference octanol-water partition system have been selected to test their performance in the emulation of soil-water sorption. The results from the experimental correlations agree with the predicted variances. The high-performance liquid chromatography system based on an immobilized artificial membrane and the micellar electrokinetic chromatography systems of sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium taurocholate provide the most precise correlation models. They have shown to predict well soil-water sorption coefficients of several tested herbicides. Octanol-water partitions and high-performance liquid chromatography measurements using C18 columns are less suited for the estimation of soil-water partition coefficients.

  9. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  10. Integrating water by plant roots over spatially distributed soil salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaee, Mehdi; Schmidhalter, Urs

    2010-05-01

    In numerical simulation models dealing with water movement and solute transport in vadose zone, the water budget largely depends on uptake patterns by plant roots. In real field conditions, the uptake pattern largely changes in time and space. When dealing with soil and water salinity, most saline soils demonstrate spatially distributed osmotic head over the root zone. In order to quantify such processes, the major difficulty stems from lacking a sink term function that adequately accounts for the extraction term especially under variable soil water osmotic heads. The question of how plants integrate such space variable over its rooting depth remains as interesting issue for investigators. To move one step forward towards countering this concern, a well equipped experiment was conducted under heterogeneously distributed salinity over the root zone with alfalfa. The extraction rates of soil increments were calculated with the one dimensional form of Richards equation. The results indicated that the plant uptake rate under different mean soil salinities preliminary reacts to soil salinity, whereas at given water content and salinity the "evaporative demand" and "root activity" become more important to control the uptake patterns. Further analysis revealed that root activity is inconstant when imposed to variable soil salinity. It can be concluded that under heterogeneously distributed salinity, most water is taken from the less saline increment while the extraction from other root zone increments with higher salinities never stops.

  11. Light Fraction Carbon and Water-Stable Aggregates in Black Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yi; CHEN Xin; SHEN Shan-Min

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of light fraction carbon (LF-C) in the various size classes of aggregates and its relationship to waterstable aggregates as well as the influence of cultivation on the organic components in virgin and cultivated black soils were studied by wet sieving and density separation methods. The total organic carbon (TOC) and LF-C were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) in the virgin soils than in the cultivated soils. The LF-C in aggregates of different size classes varied from 0.9 to 2.5 g kg-1 in the cultivated soils and from 2.5 to 7.1 g kg-1 in the virgin soils, whereas the ratio of LF-C to TOC varied from 1.9% to 7.3% and from 5.0% to 12.2%, respectively. After being incubated under constant temperature and controlled humidity for three months, the contribution of LF-C to TOC sharply decreased to an amount (1.7%-8.5%)close to the level in soils that had been cultivated for 20 to 25 years (1.3%-8.8%). As a result, the larger water-stable macro-aggregates (especially > 1 mm) decreased sharply, indicating that the LF-C pool in virgin soils declined quickly after cultivation, which reduced the water stability of soil aggregates.

  12. Water and Heavy Metal Transport in Roadside Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. KOCHER; G. WESSOLEK; H. STOFFREGEN

    2005-01-01

    Roads with very high traffic loads in regions where soils are low in both pH and sorption capacity might be a source of percolation water loaded with heavy metals. Looking at some "worst case" scenarios, this study focused on the input of traffic related pollutants and on Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr concentrations in the soil matrix and soil solution, respectively.The analysis also included pH and electrical conductivity and at some sites DOC. The investigations were carried out on sandy soils with more or less low pH values at four motorway sites in Germany. The average of daily traffic was about 50 000 up to 90 000 vehicles. Soil pore water was collected in two soil depths and at four distances from the road. The pH in general decreased with increasing distance from the roadside. The elevated pH near the roadside was presumably caused by deposition of dust and weathering residues of the road asphalt, as well as by infiltration of salt that was used during winter time. At these road sites, increased heavy metal concentrations in the soil matrix as well as in the soil solution were found. However, the concentrations seldom exceeded reference values of the German Soil Protection Act. The soil solution concentrations tended to increase from the road edge to 10 m distance, whereas the concentration in the soil matrix decreased. Elevated DOC concentrations corresponded with elevated Cu concentrations but did not substantially change this tendency. High soil water percolation rates were found near the roads. Thus, even low metal concentrations of percolation water could yield high metal loads in a narrow area beside the road.

  13. MECHANISM OF WATER-SOIL COUPLED ACTION DURING MINING SUBSIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄乾生; 黄山民

    1991-01-01

    This paper,on the basis ot the scientific research of engineering geological exploration in a mining area ,systematically studies the reasons and influence factors of consolidation and deformation of the saturated soil included in the thick loose water-bearing overburden due to mining subsidence ,and analyses the dissipation of hyperstatic pore water pressure during the change of original stress and strain state of, the soil. Again,by means of the coupled model based on Cambridge model and Biot's three-dimensional consolidation theory,adopting a great many physico-mechanical parameters measured in various soil layers,the paper analyses the consolidation and deformation of saturated soil affected by mining subsidence with elasto-plastic finite element method. Thus ,the research not only reveals the regulation of stress ,straln,displacement and hyperstatic pore water pressure dissipation in overlying soil mass,but also opens up a new direction and way for the research of mining subsidence.

  14. Modelling of the water retention characteristic of deformable soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A recently proposed water retention model has been further developed for the application on unsaturated deformable soils. The physical mechanisms underpinning the water retention characteristic of soils was at first described in terms of traditional theories of capillarity and interfacial physical chemistry at pore level. Then upscaling to macroscopic level of material scale in terms of average volume theorem produces an analytical formula for the water retention characteristic. The methodology produces an explicit form of the water retention curve as a function of three state parameters: the suction, the degree-of-water-saturation and the void-ratio. At last, the model has been tested using experimental measurements.

  15. Evaluation of the Arya-Paris model for estimating water retention characteristics of lignitic mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buczko, U.; Gerke, H.H. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Mine soil materials may be viewed as man-made systems that consist of spatially disordered soil and sediment components, which are in an initial stage of soil development. A question is whether methods and approaches developed for natural soils, may also be used for such artificially created soil materials. The applicability of the Arya and Paris pedotransfer function to obtain hydraulic properties from the particle size distribution and bulk density was tested for lignitic mine soil material of the Lusatian Lignite Mining District in eastern Germany. The scaling factor a in this model was evaluated by (I) fitting of the water retention curves estimated with the Arya-Paris model (APM) to measured water retention data and (ii) interpretation of a as a fractal dimension of the pore channels and derivation of this fractal dimension from the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution. The two tested fractal approaches resulted in relatively inaccurate predictions of the water content. The use of a single fitted a value for each depth yielded a values between 1.05 and 1.47. Because of the inability of the APM to account for residual water contents in this sandy soil material, a correction was applied. The cumulative mass fraction fractal method did not improve the estimation in comparison with the retention curves calculated with a constant a value of 1.38. The closest fits with the data were obtained by using a variable a value that depended on the particle size. The accuracy of the predictions of the APM in the higher suction range could be improved (lower mean deviations and root mean square deviations of water content) by using a linear water content-dependent correction factor. Better estimates of water retention in the relatively dry range may be significant for simulation of water budgets of mine spoil sites in the Lusatian Mining District.

  16. Integrated Water-Less Management of Night Soil for Depollution of Water Resources and Water Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod R. Chaudhari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Use of water for flushing night soil and enormous sewage disposal are responsible for pollution and depletion of fresh water resources in India and other countries. The review of traditional methods in the world provides idea of zero-waste discharge residential units. Experiences and research in India, China, Japan, America and Sweden has indicated feasibility of waterless management of night soil, composting and use of biofertilizer product in agriculture. A novel idea of ecological management of night soil and urine is presented in which night soil may be conditioned for transportation and treatment by adding suitable waste product(s from industry and other sources. Different night soil treatment methods are reviewed and emphasized the need for further research on whole cycle of ecological management or sustainable sanitation depending on local conditions. The benefits of this system are zero sewage discharge, reuse of waste as resource, recovery of nutrients in waste as fertilizer, production of fuel gas and reduction of pathogens in biofertilizer. This will help in water conservation and regenerating the quality and quantity of river flow for use as water ways and irrigation and to improve the public health. Potential technical intervention and research needs are discussed in this article

  17. Modeling cation exchange capacity and soil water holding capacity from basic soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idowu Olorunfemi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cation exchange capacity (CEC is a good indicator of soil productivity and is useful for making recommendations of phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium for soils of different textures. Soil water holding capacity (SWHC defines the ability of a soil to hold water at a particular time of the season. This research predicted CEC and SWHC of soils using pedotransfer models developed (using Minitab 17 statistical software from basic soil properties (Sand(S, Clay(C, soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC and verify the model by comparing the relationship between measured and estimated (obtained by PTFs CEC and SWHC in the Forest Vegetative Zone of Nigeria. For this study, a total of 105 sampling points in 35 different locations were sampled in the study areas. Three sampling points were randomly selected per location and three undisturbed samples were collected at each sampling point. The results showed success in predicting CEC and SWHC from basic soil properties. In this study, five linear regression models for predicting soil CEC and seven linear regression models for predicting SWHC from some soil physical and chemical properties were suggested. Model 5 [CEC = -13.93+2.645 pH +0.0446 C (%+2.267 SOC (%] was best for predicting CEC while model 12 [SWHC (%=36.0- 0.215 S (%+0.113 C (%+10.36 SOC (%] is the most acceptable model for predicting SWHC.

  18. Modeling Soil Water Retention Curve with a Fractal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Many empirical models have been developed to describe the soil water retention curve (SWRC). In this study, a fractal model for SWRC was derived with a specially constructed Menger sponge to describe the fractal scaling behavior of soil; relationships were established among the fractal dimension of SWRC, the fractal dimension of soil mass, and soil texture; and the model was used to estimate SWRC with the estimated results being compared to experimental data for verification. The derived fractal model was in a power-law form, similar to the Brooks-Corey and Campbell empirical functions. Experimental data of particle size distribution (PSD), texture, and soil water retention for 10 soils collected at different places in China were used to estimate the fractal dimension of SWRC and the mass fractal dimension. The fractal dimension of SWRC and the mass fractal dimension were linearly related. Also, both of the fractal dimensions were dependent on soil texture, i.e., clay and sand contents. Expressions were proposed to quantify the relationships. Based on the relationships, four methods were used to determine the fractal dimension of SWRC and the model was applied to estimate soil water content at a wide range of tension values. The estimated results compared well with the measured data having relative errors less than 10% for over 60% of the measurements. Thus, this model, estimating the fractal dimension using soil textural data, offered an alternative for predicting SWRC.

  19. Exponential increase of publications related to soil water repellency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Soil water repellency is much more wide-spread than formerly thought. During the last decades, it has been a topic of study for soil scientists and hydrologists in at least 21 States of the USA, in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Chile, Congo, Nepal, India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, China

  20. Exponential increase of publications related to soil water repellency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Soil water repellency is much more wide-spread than formerly thought. During the last decades, it has been a topic of study for soil scientists and hydrologists in at least 21 States of the USA, in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Chile, Congo, Nepal, India, Hong Kong, Taiwan,

  1. Soil surfactant stops water repellency and preferential flow paths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Dekker, L.W.; Wesseling, J.G.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the effects of a soil surfactant on reduction and prevention of water repellency and preferential flow paths in a sandy soil of a golf course fairway, located at Bosch en Duin near Utrecht, the Netherlands. The golf course is constructed on inland dunes composed of fine sand with

  2. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  3. Water repellency of two forest soils after biochar addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. S. Page-Dumroese; P. R. Robichaud; R. E. Brown; J. M. Tirocke

    2015-01-01

    Practical application of black carbon (biochar) to improve forest soil may be limited because biochar is hydrophobic. In a laboratory, we tested the water repellency of biochar application (mixed or surface applied) to two forest soils of varying texture (a granitic coarse-textured Inceptisol and an ash cap fine-textured Andisol) at four different application rates (0...

  4. Structure-Dependent Water-Induced Linear Reduction Model for Predicting Gas Diffusivity and Tortuosity in Repacked and Intact Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Per; Chamindu, Deepagoda; Hamamoto, Shoichiro;

    2013-01-01

    but also on the local-scale variability of these. Different predictive models have been developed to estimate Dp in intact and repacked soil, but clear guidelines for model choice at a given soil state are lacking. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) model for repacked soil is made...... adaptive for different soil structure conditions (repacked, intact) by introducing a media complexity factor (Cm) in the dry media term of the model. With Cm = 1, the new structure-dependent WLR (SWLR) model accurately predicted soil-gas diffusivity (Dp/Do, where Do is the gas diffusion coefficient in free...... air) in repacked soils containing between 0 and 54% clay. With Cm = 2.1, the SWLR model on average gave excellent predictions for 290 intact soils, performing well across soil depths, textures, and compactions (dry bulk densities). The SWLR model generally outperformed similar, simple Dp/Do models...

  5. Improved or Unimproved Urban Areas Effect on Soil and Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally D. Logsdon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Construction in urban areas usually results in compacted soil, which restricts plant growth and infiltration. Nutrients may be lost in storm runoff water and sediment. The purpose of this study was to determine if existing lawns benefit from aeration and surface compost additions without the negative impact of nutrient loss in runoff. Four sets of lawns were compared, with or without compost plus aeration, as a paired comparison. Surface bulk density was significantly reduced in the treated lawns (1.32 versus 1.42 Mg·m−3. Visual evaluation of soil structure showed improvement in the treated lawns. Of fifteen measurement dates over four years, four dates showed significantly higher surface soil water contents in the treated lawns compared with the untreated lawns. When compared over time, three of the four treated lawns had significantly higher soil water content than the untreated lawns. Nutrient concentrations in rainfall simulator runoff were not significantly different between treated and control lawns, which showed that compost did not negatively impact water quality. Compost and aeration helped restore soil quality for urban soils of recent construction.

  6. Modelling soil water retention using support vector machines with genetic algorithm optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Moreno, Felix; Barna, Gyöngyi; Skierucha, Wojciech; Arrue, José L

    2014-01-01

    This work presents point pedotransfer function (PTF) models of the soil water retention curve. The developed models allowed for estimation of the soil water content for the specified soil water potentials: -0.98, -3.10, -9.81, -31.02, -491.66, and -1554.78 kPa, based on the following soil characteristics: soil granulometric composition, total porosity, and bulk density. Support Vector Machines (SVM) methodology was used for model development. A new methodology for elaboration of retention function models is proposed. Alternative to previous attempts known from literature, the ν-SVM method was used for model development and the results were compared with the formerly used the C-SVM method. For the purpose of models' parameters search, genetic algorithms were used as an optimisation framework. A new form of the aim function used for models parameters search is proposed which allowed for development of models with better prediction capabilities. This new aim function avoids overestimation of models which is typically encountered when root mean squared error is used as an aim function. Elaborated models showed good agreement with measured soil water retention data. Achieved coefficients of determination values were in the range 0.67-0.92. Studies demonstrated usability of ν-SVM methodology together with genetic algorithm optimisation for retention modelling which gave better performing models than other tested approaches.

  7. Modelling Soil Water Retention Using Support Vector Machines with Genetic Algorithm Optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lamorski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents point pedotransfer function (PTF models of the soil water retention curve. The developed models allowed for estimation of the soil water content for the specified soil water potentials: –0.98, –3.10, –9.81, –31.02, –491.66, and –1554.78 kPa, based on the following soil characteristics: soil granulometric composition, total porosity, and bulk density. Support Vector Machines (SVM methodology was used for model development. A new methodology for elaboration of retention function models is proposed. Alternative to previous attempts known from literature, the ν-SVM method was used for model development and the results were compared with the formerly used the C-SVM method. For the purpose of models’ parameters search, genetic algorithms were used as an optimisation framework. A new form of the aim function used for models parameters search is proposed which allowed for development of models with better prediction capabilities. This new aim function avoids overestimation of models which is typically encountered when root mean squared error is used as an aim function. Elaborated models showed good agreement with measured soil water retention data. Achieved coefficients of determination values were in the range 0.67–0.92. Studies demonstrated usability of ν-SVM methodology together with genetic algorithm optimisation for retention modelling which gave better performing models than other tested approaches.

  8. Shear band in soil with heterogeneous density and degree of saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X.; Borja, R. I.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the paper is to numerically investigate the effect of spatial heterogeneity in density and degree of saturation on the mechanical properties of unsaturated soils. It is generally recognized that the strength and stiffness of a granular material correlate very well with density, and that the degree of saturation influences the strength and permeability of a soil. Furthermore, it is generally recognized that material imperfection is an important trigger of shear band in granular materials. Heterogeneous density and degree of saturation are two forms of imperfection that can trigger a shear band in unsaturated soils. In our model, we treat density and degree of saturation as continuum variables at the mesoscale, defined herein as a scale larger than the soil grains but smaller than the soil specimen. We then treat the soil specimen as a structure, instead of an element, with spatially varying density and degree of saturation. More recently, it has been shown that density and degree of saturation can be quantified nondestructively using CT imaging techniques and Digital Image Processing. These new experimental developments further motivate the hydro-mechanical model proposed in this research. We use a three-invariant elastic-plastic constitutive model for unsaturated soil that can take into account density and degree of saturation as basic state variables. The constitutive model contains a state parameter that uncouples the void ratio from the critical state line, allowing a spatially varying density to be specified independent of the state of stress. The degree of saturation is incorporated into the model by imposing both balance of momentum and balance of mass in a finite element setting, and solving the resulting coupled equations simultaneously. Numerical simulations are compared with experimental results on a dry silica-concrete sand specimen with quantified heterogeneity in density. Results indicate that the model can predict the persistent shear

  9. Water Balance Components in Covered and Uncovered Soil Growing Irrigated Muskmelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Leonel Libardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Knowledge of the terms (or processes of the soil water balance equation or simply the components of the soil water balance over the cycle of an agricultural crop is essential for soil and water management. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze these components in a Cambissolo Háplico (Haplocambids growing muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. under drip irrigation, with covered and uncovered soil, in the municipality of Baraúna, State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil (05º 04’ 48” S, 37º 37’ 00” W. Muskmelon, variety AF-646, was cultivated in a flat experimental area (20 × 50 m. The crop was spaced at 2.00 m between rows and 0.35 m between plants, in a total of ten 50-m-long plant rows. At points corresponding to ⅓ and ⅔ of each plant row, four tensiometers (at a distance of 0.1 m from each other were set up at the depths of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 m, adjacent to the irrigation line (0.1 m from the plant row, between two selected plants. Five random plant rows were mulched using dry leaves of banana (Musa sp. along the drip line, forming a 0.5-m-wide strip, which covered an area of 25 m2 per of plant row with covered soil. In the other five rows, there was no covering. Thus, the experiment consisted of two treatments, with 10 replicates, in four phenological stages: initial (7-22 DAS - days after sowing, growing (22-40 DAS, fruiting (40-58 DAS and maturation (58-70 DAS. Rainfall was measured with a rain gauge and water storage was estimated by the trapezoidal method, based on tensiometer readings and soil water retention curves. For soil water flux densities at 0.3 m, the tensiometers at the depths of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 m were considered; the tensiometer at 0.3 m was used to estimate soil water content from the soil water retention curve at this depth, and the other two to calculate the total potential gradient. Flux densities were calculated through use of the Darcy-Buckingham equation, with hydraulic conductivity determined by

  10. Difficulties in assessing outcomes of soil and water conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Difficulties in assessing outcomes of soil and water conservation extension messages in ... learning objective is what the student wants to learn in the process to ... knowledge was done through individual interviews, or oral .... environment.

  11. Elevated carbon dioxide: impacts on soil and plant water relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirkham, M. B

    2011-01-01

    .... Focusing on this critical issue, Elevated Carbon Dioxide: Impacts on Soil and Plant Water Relations presents research conducted on field-grown sorghum, winter wheat, and rangeland plants under elevated CO2...

  12. Modeling of soil-water-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian

    The trend towards the installation of more offshore constructions for the production and transmission of marine oil, gas and wind power is expected to continue over the coming years. An important process in the offshore construction design is the assessment of seabed soil stability exposed...... to dynamic ocean waves. The goal of this research project is to develop numerical soil models for computing realistic seabed response in the interacting offshore environment, where ocean waves, seabed and offshore structure highly interact with each other. The seabed soil models developed are based...... on the ’modified’ Biot’s consolidation equations, in which the soil-pore fluid coupling is extended to account for the various nonlinear soil stress-strain relations included. The Finite volume method (FVM) together with a segregated solution strategy has been used to numerically solve the governing equations...

  13. [Review of monitoring soil water content using hyperspectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-hui; Fan, Wen-jie; Cui, Yao-kui; Yan, Bin-yan; Xu, Xi-ru

    2010-11-01

    Soil water content is a key parameter in monitoring drought. In recent years, a lot of work has been done on monitoring soil water content based on hyperspectral remotely sensed data both at home and abroad. In the present review, theories, advantages and disadvantages of the monitoring methods using different bands are introduced first. Then the unique advantages, as well as the problems, of the monitoring method with the aid of hyperspectral remote sensing are analyzed. In addition, the impact of soil water content on soil reflectance spectrum and the difference between values at different wavelengths are summarized. This review lists and summarizes the quantitative relationships between soil water content and soil reflectance obtained through analyzing the physical mechanism as well as through statistical way. The key points, advantages and disadvantages of each model are also analyzed and evaluated. Then, the problems in experimental study are pointed out, and the corresponding solutions are proposed. At the same time, the feasibility of removing vegetation effect is discussed, when monitoring soil water content using hyperspectral remote sensing. Finally, the future research trend is prospected.

  14. Relative Density of Backfilled Soil Material around Monopiles for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Frigaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The relative density of backfilled soil material around offshore monopiles is assessed through experimental testing in the Large Wave Channel (GWK) of the Coastal Research Centre (FZK) in Hannover. The relative density of the backfill material was found to vary between 65 and 80 %. The dependency...... of the relative density of backfill on the maximum pile bending moment is assessed through three-dimensional numerical modeling of a monopile foundation located at the offshore wind farm at Horns Reef, Denmark....

  15. Soil penetration resistance in a rhodic eutrudox affected by machinery traffic and soil water content.

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes,Moacir T. de; Debiasi,Henrique; Julio C. Franchini; Silva,Vanderlei R. da

    2013-01-01

    Soil compaction caused by machinery traffic reduces crop yields. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of intensive traffic, and the soil water content, on the soil penetration resistance (PR) of a Rhodic Eutrudox (Distroferric Red Latosol, Brazilian Classification), managed under no-tillage (NT). The experiment consisted of six treatments: NT with recent chiseling, NT without additional compaction, and NT with additional compaction by 4, 8, 10 and 20 passes of a harvester with a weight of...

  16. Soil Surface Structure: A key factor for the degree of soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.; Bryant, R.; Hamlett, C.; McHale, G.; Newton, M.; Shirtcliffe, N.

    2012-04-01

    Despite of considerable efforts, the degree of water repellency has not always been fully explained by chemical property of soil (termed hydrophobicity). That might be because the structure of a soil surface was not considered properly, which is another main factor determining the severity of soil water repellency. Surface structure has only recently been considered in soil science, whilst it has been paid attention for several decades in materials science due to its relevance to industrial applications. In this contribution, comparison of critical contact angles measured on different surface structures (made with glass beads, glass shards and beach sands) is presented and the effect of surface structure on manifestation of soil water repellency is discussed in terms of several different variables such as the individual particles shape, and areal and structural factors of the actual surface.

  17. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  18. Pollutants impact bioassay from waters and soils in Banat region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crina Laura Mosneang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of water and soil samples by chemical methods identified the quantities of chlorides, nitrates and phosphates by comparison with the maximum limits of law. Acute toxicity tests on zebra fish embryos is an alternative test of water samples around swine farms in Banat region, because embryos are not subject to animal protection legislation during experiments. The use of Eisenia fetida earthworms as pollution indicators allowed assessment of avoidance behavior of potentially polluting soils collected from different distances from farms.

  19. Plant root tortuosity: an indicator of root path formation in soil with different composition and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Liyana; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Fiorani, Fabio; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Root soil penetration and path optimization are fundamental for root development in soil. We describe the influence of soil strength on root elongation rate and diameter, response to gravity, and root-structure tortuosity, estimated by average curvature of primary maize roots. Methods Soils with different densities (1·5, 1·6, 1·7 g cm−3), particle sizes (sandy loam; coarse sand mixed with sandy loam) and layering (monolayer, bilayer) were used. In total, five treatments were performed: Mix_low with mixed sand low density (three pots, 12 plants), Mix_medium - mixed sand medium density (three pots, 12 plants), Mix_high - mixed sand high density (three pots, ten plants), Loam_low sandy loam soil low density (four pots, 16 plants), and Bilayer with top layer of sandy loam and bottom layer mixed sand both of low density (four pots, 16 plants). We used non-invasive three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging to quantify effects of these treatments. Key Results Roots grew more slowly [root growth rate (mm h–1); decreased 50 %] with increased diameters [root diameter (mm); increased 15 %] in denser soils (1·7 vs. 1·5 g cm–3). Root response to gravity decreased 23 % with increased soil compaction, and tortuosity increased 10 % in mixed sand. Response to gravity increased 39 % and tortuosity decreased 3 % in sandy loam. After crossing a bilayered–soil interface, roots grew more slowly, similar to roots grown in soil with a bulk density of 1·64 g cm–3, whereas the actual experimental density was 1·48±0·02 g cm–3. Elongation rate and tortuosity were higher in Mix_low than in Loam_low. Conclusions The present study increases our existing knowledge of the influence of physical soil properties on root growth and presents new assays for studying root growth dynamics in non-transparent media. We found that root tortuosity is indicative of root path selection, because it could result from both mechanical deflection and

  20. Assessment of soil sample quality used for density evaluations through computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Bacchi, Osny O.S. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: lfpires@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    There are several methods to measure soil bulk density ({rho}{sub s}) like the paraffin sealed clod (PS), the volumetric ring (VR), the computed tomography (CT), and the neutron-gamma surface gauge (SG). In order to evaluate by a non-destructive way the possible modifications in soil structure caused by sampling for the PS and VR methods of {rho}{sub s} evaluation we proposed to use the gamma ray CT method. A first generation tomograph was used having a {sup 241}Am source and a 3 in x 3 in NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Results confirm the effect of soil sampler devices on the structure of soil samples, and that the compaction caused during sampling causes significant alterations of soil bulk density. Through the use of CT it was possible to determine the level of compaction and to make a detailed analysis of the soil bulk density distribution within the soil sample. (author)

  1. Non-destructive image analysis of soil surface porosity and bulk density dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F., E-mail: lfpires@uepg.b [Laboratory of Soil Physics and Environmental Sciences, State University of Ponta Grossa, UEPG, C.E.P. 84.030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Cassaro, F.A.M. [Laboratory of Soil Physics and Environmental Sciences, State University of Ponta Grossa, UEPG, C.E.P. 84.030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Bacchi, O.O.S.; Reichardt, K. [Laboratory of Soil Physics, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP/CENA, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2011-04-15

    A gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to evaluate changes in the structure of clayey soil samples with surface compaction submitted to wetting and drying (W-D) cycles. The obtained results indicate that W-D cycles promoted an increasing of about 10% in soil porosity with a decreasing of about 6% in soil bulk density of this compacted region. With the use of the CT it was also possible to define the thickness of the compacted region that in our case was of about 8.19 mm. This last information is very important, for instance, to estimate hydraulic parameters in infiltration models. Finally, CT analysis showed that the compacted region remained at the surface samples, even after the application of the W-D cycles. -- Research highlights: {yields} Gamma-ray tomography allowed non-destructive analysis of soil bulk density and porosity changes. {yields} Soil porosity increased about 10% with the wetting and drying cycles. {yields} Soil bulk density in the compacted region decreased about 6% with the wetting and drying cycles. {yields} Detailed bulk density and porosity analysis changes were obtained for layers of 1.17 mm.

  2. Soil water repellency characteristic curves for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Ken; Müller, Karin; Moldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis; Clothier, Brent; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a phenomenon that influences many soil hydrologic processes such as reduction of infiltration, increase in overland flow, and enhanced preferential flow. SWR has been observed in various soil types and textures, and the degree of SWR is greatly controlled by soil moisture content and levels of organic matter and clay. One of the key topics in SWR research is how to describe accurately the seasonal and temporal variation of SWR with the controlling factors such as soil moisture, organic matter, and clay contents for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients. In the present study, we summarize measured SWR data for soil profiles under different land uses and vegetation in Japan and New Zealand, and compared these with literature data. We introduce the contact angle-based evaluation of SWR and predictive models for soil water repellency characteristic curves, in which the contact angle is a function of the moisture content. We also discuss a number of novel concepts, including i) the reduction in the contact angle with soil-water contact time to describe the time dependence of SWR, ii) the relationship between the contact angles from the measured scanning curves under controlled wetting and drying cycles, and iii) the initial contact angles measured by the sessile drop method.

  3. Causes and consequences of fire-induced soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letey, J.

    2001-10-01

    A wettable surface layer overlying a water-repellent layer is commonly observed following a fire on a watershed. High surface temperatures burn off organic materials and create vapours that move downward in response to a temperature gradient and then condense on soil particles causing them to become water repellent. Water-repellent soils have a positive water entry pressure hp that must be exceeded or all the water will runoff. Water ponding depths ho that exceeds hp will cause infiltration, but the profile is not completely wetted. Infiltration rate and soil wetting increase as the value of ho/hp increases. The consequence is very high runoff, which also contributes to high erosion on fire-induced water-repellent soils during rain storms. Grass establishment is impaired by seeds being eroded and lack of soil water for seeds that do remain and germinate. Extrapolation of these general findings to catchment or watershed scales is difficult because of the very high temporal and spatial variabilities that occur in the field.

  4. Human activity response and prevention strategies on soil and water loss in Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yiping; CHEN Guojie

    2003-01-01

    Ten major factors have been selected to judge the degree of disturbance from human activity and the corresponding relationship of the impact on soil and water loss in Sichuan Province. Correlation analysis has demonstrated that stock-carrying capacity, percentage of land reclamation, population density, GDP per capita, mineral modulus and percentage of forest coverage are the 6 most relevant human activity factors. The analysis on the degree of disturbance has shown that population pressure, excessive or unreasonable activities in development of resources and destructive behavior of humans are the main causes of soil and water loss. Consequently, solving the various problems in the negative activity of humans and regulating human behavior are the first tasks that should be tackled in the conservation of water and soil. In the new era, the prevention and rectification of soil and water loss are measures based on the foundation of the ecosystem, which is a kind of management strategy for sustainable development. The foundation of this method is made up of the system innovations and breakthroughs in terms of aims, philosophy, measures, and aspects of the prevention and rectification of soil and water loss, simultaneous advance from the conceptual, policy, spatial, technical and mode levels and system integration on the treatment strategies.

  5. Modeling the soil water retention properties of same-textured soils with different initial void ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fang; Zhou, Wan-Huan; Yuen, Ka-Veng

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a method of predicting the soil water retention curve (SWRC) of a soil using a set of measured SWRC data from a soil with the same texture but different initial void ratio. The relationships of the volumetric water contents and the matric suctions between two samples with different initial void ratios are established. An adjustment parameter (β) is introduced to express the relationships between the matric suctions of two soil samples. The parameter β is a function of the initial void ratio, matric suction or volumetric water content. The function can take different forms, resulting in different predictive models. The optimal predictive models of β are determined for coarse-grained and fine-grained soils using the Bayesian method. The optimal models of β are validated by comparing the estimated matric suction and measured data. The comparisons show that the proposed method produces more accurate SWRCs than do other models for both coarse-grained and fine-grained soils. Furthermore, the influence of the model parameters of β on the predicted matric suction and SWRC is evaluated using Latin Hypercube sampling. An uncertainty analysis shows that the reliability of the predicted SWRC decreases with decreasing water content in fine-grained soils, and the initial void ratio has no apparent influence on the reliability of the predicted SWRCs in coarse-grained and fine-grained soils.

  6. Detecting soil water use by Mediterranean vegetation on rocky soils using electrical resistivity tomography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, W.; van der Meijde, M.; Addink, E. A.; de Jong, S. M.; van der Meer, F. D.

    2009-01-01

    Water availability is an important constraint on tree and shrub development in Mediterranean ecosystems. During prolonged periods of summer drought, water stored in the soil column is the only available water source. Some Mediterranean tree species are known to have extensive root system penetrating

  7. Multifractal Model of Soil Water Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, Klaudia

    2017-04-01

    Breaking of solid surface symmetry during the interaction between the rainfall of high erosivity index and internally unstable volcanic soil/vegetation systems, results in roughness increasing as well as fertile horizon loosing. In these areas, the sustainability of management practices depends on the ability to select and implement the precise indicators of soil erodibility and vegetation capacity to protect the system against the extreme damaging precipitation events. Notwithstanding, the complex, non-linear and scaling nature of the phenomena involved in the interaction among the soil, vegetation and precipitation is still not taken into account by the numerous commonly used empirical, mathematical and computer simulation models: for instance, by the universal soil loss equation (USLE). The soil erodibility factor (K-factor) is still measuring by a set of empirical, dimensionless parameters and indexes, without taking into account the scaling (frequently multifractal) origin of a broad range of heterogeneous, anisotropic and dynamical phenomena involved in hydric erosion. Their mapping is not representative of this complex system spatial variability. In our research, we propose to use the toolbox of fractals and multifractals techniques in vista of its ability to measure the scale invariance and type/degree of soil, vegetation and precipitation symmetry breaking. The hydraulic units are chosen as the precise measure of soil/vegetation stability. These units are measured and modeled for soils with contrasting architecture, based on their porosity/permeability (Poroperm) as well as retention capacity relations. The simple Catalog of the most common Poroperm relations is proposed and the main power law relations among the elements of studied system are established and compared for some representative agricultural and natural Biogeosystems of Mexico. All resulted are related with the Mandelbrot' Baby Theorem in order to construct the universal Phase Diagram which

  8. 基于高密度电阻率成像法的陇中半干旱区土壤含水量监测研究%A soil water content monitoring in Longzhong semi-arid region by high-density electrical resistivity tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳宁; 董军; 李玲; 阚飞; 王刚; 黄少文; 魏国孝

    2016-01-01

    土壤含水量是影响半干旱区农作物生长的重要因素。为了准确测定土壤含水量的变化动态以指导农业高效用水,近年来,利用地球物理测量方法研究高分辨率的水流入渗,已经越来越受到欢迎和重视。本文以陇中半干旱区玉米田为例,通过在土壤表面布置电极,利用高密度电阻率成像法(ERT)对降雨前后土壤二维剖面进行电阻率数据测量,实现对土壤二维剖面电阻率值和含水量监测,解释不同条件下土壤含水量变化的原因,建立陇中半干旱区农田土壤电阻率和含水量之间的相关关系。结果表明:降水入渗使得二维剖面土壤电阻率整体呈明显降低趋势,反演得到的电阻率图像局部电阻值“高-低-高”的变化过程,与一次降水过程前后“干-湿-干”的循环过程一致。土壤含水量实测值与估计值之间有较为显著的线性关系(R2=0.6518, n=96)。在0~2.0 m深度范围内,总体估计偏差较小,为0.74%;土壤含水率的估计精度较高,为2.64%。0~0.5 m 土层(H1)含水量监测探头分布密集,数据采集较为准确,故 H1层估计精度略高于0.5~2.0 m 层(H2)。相比之前利用实测工具进行野外测量, ERT 测量方法精度较高。本文提供了一个高分辨率的土壤结构二维分布与水分运移过程的图像,同时为实现精确和高效的农业用水管理提供一种新途径。%Soil water content (SWC) is a key factor influencing crop growth in semi-arid regions. Monitoring the variations in SWC is critical for agriculture. In recent years, geophysical survey has been used in the study of high-resolution detection of water infiltration and it is hugely popular because of its zero-damage to soil micro-structure and easy measurement. With a maize field in Longzhong semi-arid region as the case study, we used high-density electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to measure (before and after the precipitation) two

  9. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  10. Soil water repellency in long term drought and warming experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Emmett, Bridget; Tietema, Albert; Robinson, David

    2017-04-01

    Increased global temperatures, altered rainfall patterns and frequently occurring extreme climatic events are already observed globally as a result of the climatic changes and further increases are predicted by the climatic models. Extreme weather events such as prolonged dry spells and heat waves can significantly affect soil ecosystem functions mainly due to decrease in soil moisture. Several studies suggested an increase in soil water repellency severity and spread as a consequence of the warming and drought, however, such understanding is based on the laboratory experimentations with soil treated as a 'black box'. In this study we tested the hypothesis of increased severity of soil water repellency subjected to drought and warming under field conditions. Occurrence and severity of soil water repellency was tested in soils subjected to a long-term (10 years) climatic simulation at two upland heathland sites in Oldebroek (Netherlands) and in Clocaenog (UK)[1]. Soil plots with similar vegetation were subjected to repeated drought and warming, compared with the control plots. Drought effect was created by a rainfall exclusion using an automatic self-retracting waterproof curtains while the warming effect was made by using a self-retracting curtains reflecting infrared radiation overnight. The results available to date provide a strong indication that climatic conditions do affect the development of SWR.

  11. Joint Multifractal Analysis of Scaling Relationships Between Soil Water-Retention Parameters and Soil Texture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-Ying; SHU Qiao-Sheng; XIE Li-Ya; LIU Zuo-Xin; B.C.SI

    2011-01-01

    Soil water-retention characteristics at measurement scales are generally different from those at application scales, and there is scale disparity between them and soil physical properties. The relationships between two water-retention parameters,the scaling parameter related to the inverse of the air-entry pressure (αvG, cm-1) and the curve shape factor related to soil pore-size distribution (n) of the van Genuchten water-retention equation, and soil texture (sand, silt, and clay contents)were examined at multiple scales. One hundred twenty-eight undisturbed soil samples were collected from a 640-m transect located in Fuxin, China. Soil water-retention curves were measured and the van Genuchten parameters were obtained by curve fitting. The relationships between the two parameters and soil texture at the observed scale and at multiple scales were evaluated using Pearson correlation and joint multifractal analyses, respectively. The results of Pearson correlation analysis showed that the parameter αvG was significantly correlated with sand, silt, and clay contents at the observed scale. Joint multifractal analyses, however, indicated that the parameter αvG was not correlated with silt and sand contents at multiple scales. The parameter n was positively correlated with clay content at multiple scales. Sand content was significantly correlated with the parameter n at the observed scale but not at multiple scales. Clay contents were strongly correlated to both water-retention parameters because clay content was relatively low in the soil studied, indicating that water retention was dominated by clay content in the field of this study at all scales. These suggested that multiple-scale analyses were necessary to fully grasp the spatial variability of soil water-retention characteristics.

  12. SOTER-Based Soil Water Erosion Simulation in Hainan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YUGUO; ZHANG GANLIN; GONG ZITONG

    2003-01-01

    The actual and potential water erosion rates of soils with different land covers in Hainan Island, China,were estimated based on the universal soil loss equation (USLE) and a 1:200 000 Soils and Terrain Digital Database (SOTER) database, from which soil water erosion factors could be extracted. 92.8% of the whole island had a current erosion rate of lower than 500 t km-2 a-1. Soil erosion risk was considered to be high because of its abundant rainfall. Without vegetation cover, the potential soil erosion rate would be extremely high and 90.8% of the island would have a soil erosion rate higher than 2 500 t km-2 a-1. Relative erosion vulnerability of different soil zones, landform types, and lithological regions of the island was compared by introducing a relative erosion hazard parameter α. Cambosols developed from siltstone and mudstone in low hill regions were pinpointed as soils with the highest erosion risk in the island.

  13. Density measurement of confined water with neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kamitakahara, William [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University; Mou, Chung-Yuan [National Taiwan University; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chang, Sung C [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This is a response to Soper's two comments (1) regarding our papers (2, 3) in PNAS that (a) the distribution of water across the pores is not uniform and (b) the majority of water may reside outside the pores. Here, we show that we have given proper consideration to both issues and have reconfirmed the validity of our method and conclusion as elaborated in the following. The possibility that layering effects across the pores may introduce errors in associating the (100) interchannel peak height with density is not a new idea (reference 3 in ref. 1), and it has already been addressed (2). The arguments of Sopor (4) mainly rest on the assumption that the average density of water does not depend on temperature.

  14. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  15. Modeling of soil-water-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian

    to dynamic ocean waves. The goal of this research project is to develop numerical soil models for computing realistic seabed response in the interacting offshore environment, where ocean waves, seabed and offshore structure highly interact with each other. The seabed soil models developed are based...... as the developed nonlinear soil displacements and stresses under monotonic and cyclic loading. With the FVM nonlinear coupled soil models as a basis, multiphysics modeling of wave-seabed-structure interaction is carried out. The computations are done in an open source code environment, OpenFOAM, where FVM models...... of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and structural mechanics are available. The interaction in the system is modeled in a 1-way manner: First detailed free surface CFD calculations are executed to obtain a realistic wave field around a given structure. Then the dynamic structural response, due to the motions...

  16. A multi-scale "soil water structure" model based on the pedostructure concept

    OpenAIRE

    Braudeau, Erik; Mohtar, Rabi,; El Ghezal, Nadim; Salahat, Mohammed; Martin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Current soil water models do not take into account the internal organization of the soil medium and, consequently, ignore the physical interaction between the water film at the surface of solids making the soil structure, and this structure. In that sense they empirically deal with the physical soil properties that are all generated from this soil water – structure interaction. As a result, the thermodynamic state of the soil water medium, which constitutes the local p...

  17. Soil Water Dynamics In Central Europe and Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Markus; Mahler, Claudio F.; Trapp, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The comprehension of the soil water dynamics is important for the study of environmental processes. Precipitation, temperature, and water balance of Rio de Janeiro, Southeast Brazil and locations in Germany, Central Europe, are significantly different. Experience from one region could not be used...... directly in the other region. This means that models of the water balance need to be tested again and the coefficients at least must be adapted to the new environmental conditions. Two methods for the calculation of water movement in the unsaturated soil zone are described. Simulation programs based...... on both approaches are applied to an actual case with the conditions in Germany. This case is also analyzed under the conditions of Rio de Janeiro. The effects of tropical environmental conditions on water transport in unsaturated soils are also discussed....

  18. Adult trees cause density-dependent mortality in conspecific seedlings by regulating the frequency of pathogenic soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Gilbert, Gregory S; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Shan; Huang, Fengmin; Yu, Shixiao

    2016-12-01

    Negative density-dependent seedling mortality has been widely detected in tropical, subtropical and temperate forests, with soil pathogens as a major driver. Here we investigated how host density affects the composition of soil pathogen communities and consequently influences the strength of plant-soil feedbacks. In field censuses of six 1-ha permanent plots, we found that survival was much lower for newly germinated seedlings that were surrounded by more conspecific adults. The relative abundance of pathogenic fungi in soil increased with increasing conspecific tree density for five of nine tree species; more soil pathogens accumulated around roots where adult tree density was higher, and this greater pathogen frequency was associated with lower seedling survival. Our findings show how tree density influences populations of soil pathogens, which creates plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to community-level and population-level compensatory trends in seedling survival.

  19. An Improved Frequency Domain Technique for Determining Soil Water Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-Rui; MA Dao-Kun; LIN Jian-Hui; P. SCHULZE LAMMERS; L. DAMEROW

    2005-01-01

    For many years a soil water content sensor with low cost, reliability and sufficient accuracy has been desirable. Thus,an improved measurement method based on the frequency domain (FD) principle for determining soil water content was considered. Unlike other measurement principles, a new measurable index, η, which was independent of the output impedance and the amplitude of the oscillator while relying on the electrical impedance of a multi-pin probe, was proposed. Moreover, a model for processing the impedance of the multi-pin soil probe was developed, and several important electrical parameters for establishing their operating ranges applicable to this probe were evaluated. In order to confirm the theoretical analysis, an experiment was conducted with a 4-pin probe. Using the developed model, the relationship between the proposed indexηand soil volumetric water content was shown to be linear (R2 = 0.9921). Thus, as the measurable index, ηseemed satisfactory.

  20. Soil water dynamics during precipitation in genetic horizons of Retisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Tomasz; Klimek, Mariusz; Kajdas, Bartłomiej

    2017-04-01

    Retisols derived from silty deposits dominate in the soil cover of the Carpathian Foothills. The hydrophysical properties of these are determined by the grain-size distribution of the parent material and the soil's "primary" properties shaped in the deposition process. The other contributing factors are the soil-forming processes, such as lessivage (leaching of clay particles), and the morphogenetic processes that presently shape the relief. These factors are responsible for the "secondary" differentiation of hydrophysical properties across the soil profile. Both the primary and secondary hydrophysical properties of soils (the rates of water retention, filtration and infiltration, and the moisture distribution over the soil profile) determine their ability to take in rainfall, the amount of rainwater taken in, and the ways of its redistribution. The aims of the study, carried out during 2015, were to investigate the dynamics of soil moisture in genetic horizons of Retisol derived from silty deposits and to recognize how fast and how deep water from precipitation gets into soil horizons. Data of soil moisture were measured using 5TM moisture and temperature sensor and collected by logger Em50 (Decagon Devices USA). Data were captured every 10 minutes from 6 sensors at depths: - 10 cm, 20 cm, 40 cm, 60 cm and 80 cm. Precipitation data come from meteorological station situated 50 m away from the soil profile. Two zones differing in the type of water regime were distinguished in Retisol: an upper zone comprising humic and eluvial horizons, and a lower zone consisting of illuvial and parent material horizons. The upper zone shows smaller retention of water available for plants, and relatively wide fluctuations in moisture content, compared to the lower zone. The lower zone has stable moisture content during the vegetation season, with values around the water field capacity. Large changes in soil moisture were observed while rainfall. These changes depend on the volume

  1. Quantifying Uncertainty of Pedotransfer Functions on Soil Water Retention and Hydrologic Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhler, Maren; Mai, Juliane; Zacharias, Steffen; Cuntz, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Pedotransfer Functions are often used to estimate soil water retention which is an important physical property of soils and hence quantifying their uncertainty is of high interest. Three independent uncertainties with regard to uncertainty in Pedotransfer Functions are analysed using a probabilistic approach: (1) uncertainty resulting through a limited data base for Pedotransfer Function calibration, (2) uncertainty arising through unknown errors in the measurements which are used for developing the Pedotransfer Functions, and (3) uncertainty arising through the application of the Pedotransfer Functions in a modeling procedure using soil maps with textural classifications. The third uncertainty, arising through the application of the functions to random textural compositions, appears to be the most influential uncertainty in water retention estimates especially for soil classes where sparse data was available for calibration. Furthermore, the bulk density is strongly influencing the variability in the saturated water content and spatial variations in soil moisture. Furthermore, the propagation of the uncertainty arising from random sampling of the calibration data set has a large effect on soil moisture computed with a mesoscale hydrologic model. The evapotranspiration is the most affected hydrologic model output, whereas the discharge shows only minor variation. The analysis of the measurement error remains difficult due to high correlation between the Pedotransfer function coefficients.

  2. WATER INFILTRATION IN TWO CULTIVATED SOILS IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildegardis Bertol

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration is the passage of water through the soil surface, influenced by the soil type and cultivation and by the soil roughness, surface cover and water content. Infiltration absorbs most of the rainwater and is therefore crucial for planning mechanical conservation practices to manage runoff. This study determined water infiltration in two soil types under different types of management and cultivation, with simulated rainfall of varying intensity and duration applied at different times, and to adjust the empirical model of Horton to the infiltration data. The study was conducted in southern Brazil, on Dystric Nitisol (Nitossolo Bruno aluminoférrico húmico and Humic Cambisol (Cambissolo Húmico alumínico léptico soils to assess the following situations: simulated rains on the Nitisol from 2001 to 2012 in 31 treatments, differing in crop type, sowing direction, type of soil opener on the seeder, amount and type of crop residue and amount of liquid swine manure applied; on the Cambisol, rains were simlated from 2006 to 2012 and 18 treatments were evaluated, differing in crop, seeding direction and crop residue type. The constant of the water infiltration rate into the soil varies significantly with the soil type (30.2 mm h-1 in the Nitisol and 6.6 mm h-1 in the Cambisol, regardless of the management system, application time and rain intensity and duration. At the end of rainfalls, soil-water infiltration varies significantly with the management system, with the timing of application and rain intensity and duration, with values ranging from 13 to 59 mm h-1, in the two studied soils. The characteristics of the sowing operation in terms of relief, crop type and amount and type of crop residue influenced soil water infiltration: in the Nitisol, the values of contour and downhill seeding vary between 27 and 43 mm h-1, respectively, with crop residues of corn, wheat and soybean while in the Cambisol, the variation is between 2 and 36 mm h-1

  3. Water Drainage from Unsaturated Soils in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, G.; McCartney, J.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study involves an analysis of water drainage from an initially saturated silt layer in a centrifuge permeameter to evaluate the hydraulic properties of the soil layer in unsaturated conditions up to the point where the water phase becomes discontinuous. These properties include the soil water retention curve (SWRC) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The hydraulic properties of unsaturated silt are used in soil-atmosphere interaction models that take into account the role of infiltration and evaporation of water from soils due to atmospheric interaction. These models are often applied in slope stability analyses, landfill cover design, aquifer recharge analyses, and agricultural engineering. The hydraulic properties are also relevant to recent research concerning geothermal heating and cooling, as they can be used to assess the insulating effects of soil around underground heat exchangers. This study employs a high-speed geotechnical centrifuge to increase the self-weight of a compacted silt specimen atop a filter plate. Under a centrifuge acceleration of N times earth's gravity, the concept of geometric similitude indicates that the water flow process in a small-scale soil layer will be similar to those in a soil layer in the field that is N times thicker. The centrifuge acceleration also results in an increase in the hydraulic gradient across the silt specimen, which causes water to flow out of the pores following Darcy's law. The drainage test was performed until the rate of liquid water flow out of the soil layer slowed to a negligible level, which corresponds to the transition point at which further water flow can only occur due to water vapor diffusion following Fick's law. The data from the drainage test in the centrifuge were used to determine the SWRC and HCF at different depths in the silt specimen, which compared well with similar properties defined using other laboratory tests. The transition point at which liquid water flow stopped (and

  4. Pedotransfer functions to estimate water retention parameters of soils in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hugo Cezar Barros

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pedotransfer functions (PTF were developed to estimate the parameters (α, n, θr and θs of the van Genuchten model (1980 to describe soil water retention curves. The data came from various sources, mainly from studies conducted by universities in Northeast Brazil, by the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa and by a corporation for the development of the São Francisco and Parnaíba river basins (Codevasf, totaling 786 retention curves, which were divided into two data sets: 85 % for the development of PTFs, and 15 % for testing and validation, considered independent data. Aside from the development of general PTFs for all soils together, specific PTFs were developed for the soil classes Ultisols, Oxisols, Entisols, and Alfisols by multiple regression techniques, using a stepwise procedure (forward and backward to select the best predictors. Two types of PTFs were developed: the first included all predictors (soil density, proportions of sand, silt, clay, and organic matter, and the second only the proportions of sand, silt and clay. The evaluation of adequacy of the PTFs was based on the correlation coefficient (R and Willmott index (d. To evaluate the PTF for the moisture content at specific pressure heads, we used the root mean square error (RMSE. The PTF-predicted retention curve is relatively poor, except for the residual water content. The inclusion of organic matter as a PTF predictor improved the prediction of parameter a of van Genuchten. The performance of soil-class-specific PTFs was not better than of the general PTF. Except for the water content of saturated soil estimated by particle size distribution, the tested models for water content prediction at specific pressure heads proved satisfactory. Predictions of water content at pressure heads more negative than -0.6 m, using a PTF considering particle size distribution, are only slightly lower than those obtained by PTFs including bulk density and organic matter

  5. Manipulating Crop Density to Optimize Nitrogen and Water Use: An Application of Precision Agroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. T.; Huggins, D. R.; Smith, J. L.; Keller, C. K.; Kruger, C.

    2011-12-01

    Rising levels of reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the environment coupled with increasing population positions agriculture as a major contributor for supplying food and ecosystem services to the world. The concept of Precision Agroecology (PA) explicitly recognizes the importance of time and place by combining the principles of precision farming with ecology creating a framework that can lead to improvements in Nr use efficiency. In the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest, USA, relationships between productivity, N dynamics and cycling, water availability, and environmental impacts result from intricate spatial and temporal variations in soil, ecosystem processes, and socioeconomic factors. Our research goal is to investigate N use efficiency (NUE) in the context of factors that regulate site-specific environmental and economic conditions and to develop the concept of PA for use in sustainable agroecosystems and science-based Nr policy. Nitrogen and plant density field trials with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were conducted at the Washington State University Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA under long-term no-tillage management in 2010 and 2011. Treatments were imposed across environmentally heterogeneous field conditions to assess soil, crop and environmental interactions. Microplots with a split N application using 15N-labeled fertilizer were established in 2011 to examine the impact of N timing on uptake of fertilizer and soil N throughout the growing season for two plant density treatments. Preliminary data show that plant density manipulation combined with precision N applications regulated water and N use and resulted in greater wheat yield with less seed and N inputs. These findings indicate that improvements to NUE and agroecosystem sustainability should consider landscape-scale patterns driving productivity (e.g., spatial and temporal dynamics of water availability and N transformations) and would benefit from policy incentives that promote a PA

  6. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.; Zhang, T.; Veldhuis, H.; Czimczik, C.I.; Winston, G.C.; O'Donnell, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4??C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30. years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Study on Soil Magnetic Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIYAN-LI; LIUXIAO-YI

    1995-01-01

    A study on the effect of applied magnetic field was performed with six types of soils collected from northeastern China.Magnetic field was found to cause changes of soil physico-chemical properties and soil enzyme activities.An appropriate applied magnetic field could cut down soil zeta-potential,soil specific surface,soil water potential and soil swelling capacity;raise the charge density on soil colloids and the activities of invertase,hydrogen peroxidase and amylase in the soils;enhance soil aggregation and improve soil structural status and soil water-releasing capability.

  8. COSMOS soil water sensing affected by crop biomass and water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water sensing methods are widely used to characterize water content in the root zone and below, but only a few are capable of sensing soil volumes larger than a few hundred liters. Scientists with the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, evaluated: a) the Cos...

  9. Thermodynamic mechanism of density anomaly of liquid water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto eYasutomi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although density anomaly of liquid water has long been studied by many different authors up to now, it is not still cleared what thermodynamic mechanism induces the anomaly. The thermodynamic properties of substances are determined by interparticle interactions. We analyze what characteristics of pair potential cause the density anomaly on the basis of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics using a thermodynamically self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation (SCOZA. We consider a fluid of spherical particles with a pair potential given by a hard-core repulsion plus a soft-repulsion and an attraction. We show that the density anomaly occurs when the value of the soft-repulsive potential at hard-core contact is in some proper range, and the range depends on the attraction. Further, we show that the behavior of the excess internal energy plays an essential role in the density anomaly and the behavior is mainly determined by the values of the soft-repulsive potential, especially near the hard core contact. Our results show that most of ideas put forward up to now are not the direct causes of the density anomaly of liquid water.

  10. The dependence of water potential in shoots of Picea abies on air and soil water status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sellin

    Full Text Available Where there is sufficient water storage in the soil the water potential (Ψx in shoots of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] is strongly governed by the vapour pressure deficit of the atmosphere, while the mean minimum values of Ψx usually do not drop below –1.5 MPa under meteorological conditions in Estonia. If the base water potential (Ψb is above –0.62 MPa, the principal factor causing water deficiency in shoots of P. abies may be either limited soil water reserves or atmospheric evaporative demand depending on the current level of the vapour pressure deficit. As the soil dries the stomatal control becomes more efficient in preventing water losses from the foliage, and the leaf water status, in turn, less sensitive to atmospheric demand. Under drought conditions, if Ψb falls below –0.62 MPa, the trees' water stress is mainly caused by low soil water availability. Further declines in the shoot water potential (below –1.5 MPa can be attributed primarily to further decreases in the soil water, i.e. to the static water stress.Key words. Hydrology (evapotranspiration · plant ecology · soil moisture.

  11. Water Repellency, Infiltration and Water Retention Properties of Forest Soils Under Different Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, N. A.; Bens, O.; Schäfer, B.; Hüttl, R. F.

    For soils under both agricultural and forest use, management and tillage practice can have significant influence on the hydraulic properties. It is therefore supposed, that management practices are capable of altering surface runoff, water retention and flood- ing risk for river catchments. Soil water repellency (hydrophobicity) can adversely affect soil hydrological properties, e.g. reduce infiltration capacity and induce pref- erential flow, thus enhancing the overall risk of flooding in river catchment areas. Hydrophobic effects are especially pronounced in coniferous forest soils. Investigations were carried out on several study plots in the German Northeastern Lowlands, located app. 50 km NE of Berlin in Brandenburg. Soils found in the area are mainly of glacifluvial origin with a pronounced sandy texture (with medium sized sand dominating). The four stands investigated represent different stages of forest transfor- mation, in a sense of a SfalseT chronosequence and are made up of populations of & cedil;Pinus sylvestris and Fagus sylvatica of different ages. Infiltration was measured with hood infiltrometers, and single infiltration rings at soil surface. Water retention capacity and the influence of soil organic matter on water storage were evaluated with laboratory methods. Water repellency was quantified with the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test, for determining the persistence of water repellency, and the ethanol percentage (EP) test, for measuring the severity/degree of water repellency. Soil samples from the four forest plots and different soil depths (0U160 cm) were used for the measurements. SPotentialT water repellencies were & cedil;determined after 3-day oven-drying at 45 C. The results indicate that for sandy forest soils, the overall infiltration capacity of the plots is low due to the effects of water repellency. The inter-variability of the plots is mainly caused by changes in the textural composition of the soils. For all plots a

  12. Assessment of pedotransfer functions for estimating soil water retention curves for the amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Medeiros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil water retention curve (SWRC is essential for understanding and modeling hydraulic processes in the soil. However, direct determination of the SWRC is time consuming and costly. In addition, it requires a large number of samples, due to the high spatial and temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties. An alternative is the use of models, called pedotransfer functions (PTFs, which estimate the SWRC from easy-to-measure properties. The aim of this paper was to test the accuracy of 16 point or parametric PTFs reported in the literature on different soils from the south and southeast of the State of Pará, Brazil. The PTFs tested were proposed by Pidgeon (1972, Lal (1979, Aina & Periaswamy (1985, Arruda et al. (1987, Dijkerman (1988, Vereecken et al. (1989, Batjes (1996, van den Berg et al. (1997, Tomasella et al. (2000, Hodnett & Tomasella (2002, Oliveira et al. (2002, and Barros (2010. We used a database that includes soil texture (sand, silt, and clay, bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil pH, cation exchange capacity, and the SWRC. Most of the PTFs tested did not show good performance in estimating the SWRC. The parametric PTFs, however, performed better than the point PTFs in assessing the SWRC in the tested region. Among the parametric PTFs, those proposed by Tomasella et al. (2000 achieved the best accuracy in estimating the empirical parameters of the van Genuchten (1980 model, especially when tested in the top soil layer.

  13. High-resolution prediction of soil available water content within the crop root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghverdi, Amir; Leib, Brian G.; Washington-Allen, Robert A.; Ayers, Paul D.; Buschermohle, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    A detailed understanding of soil hydraulic properties, particularly soil available water content (AWC) within the effective root zone, is needed to optimally schedule irrigation in fields with substantial spatial heterogeneity. However, it is difficult and time consuming to directly measure soil hydraulic properties. Therefore, easily collected and measured soil properties, such as soil texture and/or bulk density, that are well correlated with hydraulic properties are used as proxies to develop pedotransfer functions (PTF). In this study, multiple modeling scenarios were developed and evaluated to indirectly predict high resolution AWC maps within the effective root zone. The modeling techniques included kriging, co-kriging, regression kriging, artificial neural networks (NN) and geographically weighted regression (GWR). The efficiency of soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) as proximal data in the modeling process was assessed. There was a good agreement (root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.052 cm3 cm-3 and r = 0.88) between observed and point prediction of water contents using pseudo continuous PTFs. We found that both GWR (mean RMSE = 0.062 cm3 cm-3) and regression kriging (mean RMSE = 0.063 cm3 cm-3) produced the best water content maps with these accuracies improved up to 19% when ECa was used as an ancillary soil attribute in the interpolation process. The maps indicated fourfold differences in AWC between coarse- and fine-textured soils across the study site. This provided a template for future investigations for evaluating the efficiency of variable rate irrigation management scenarios in accounting for the spatial heterogeneity of soil hydraulic attributes.

  14. Difficulties in the evaluation and measuring of soil water infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2013-04-01

    Soil water infiltration is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the evaluation and measurement of water infiltration rates has become indispensable for the evaluation and modeling of the previously mentioned processes. Infiltration is one of the most difficult hydrological parameters to evaluate or measure accurately. Although the theoretical aspects of the process of soil water infiltration are well known since the middle of the past century, when several methods and models were already proposed for the evaluation of infiltration, still nowadays such evaluation is not frequently enough accurate for the purposes being used. This is partially due to deficiencies in the methodology being used for measuring infiltration, including some newly proposed methods and equipments, and in the use of non appropriate empirical models and approaches. In this contribution we present an analysis and discussion about the main difficulties found in the evaluation and measurement of soil water infiltration rates, and the more commonly committed errors, based on the past experiences of the author in the evaluation of soil water infiltration in many different soils and land conditions, and in their use for deducing soil water balances under variable and changing climates. It is concluded that there are not models or methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil

  15. Modelling soil water content variations under drought stress on soil column cropped with winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csorba Szilveszter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models are effective tools for evaluating the impact of predicted climate change on agricultural production, but it is difficult to test their applicability to future weather conditions. We applied the SWAP model to assess its applicability to climate conditions, differing from those, for which the model was developed. We used a database obtained from a winter wheat drought stress experiment. Winter wheat was grown in six soil columns, three having optimal water supply (NS, while three were kept under drought-stressed conditions (S. The SWAP model was successfully calibrated against measured values of potential evapotranspiration (PET, potential evaporation (PE and total amount of water (TSW in the soil columns. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (N-S for TWS for the stressed columns was 0.92. For the NS treatment, we applied temporally variable soil hydraulic properties because of soil consolidation caused by regular irrigation. This approach improved the N-S values for the wetting-drying cycle from -1.77 to 0.54. We concluded that the model could be used for assessing the effects of climate change on soil water regime. Our results indicate that soil water balance studies should put more focus on the time variability of structuredependent soil properties.

  16. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (Psoils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks.

  17. Mechanical impedance of soil crusts and water content in loamy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa March, Ramon; Verdú, Antoni M. C.; Mas, Maria Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Soil crust development affects soil water dynamics and soil aeration. Soil crusts act as mechanical barriers to fluid flow and, as their mechanical impedance increases with drying, they also become obstacles to seedling emergence. As a consequence, the emergence of seedling cohorts (sensitive seeds) might be reduced. However, this may be of interest to be used as an effective system of weed control. Soil crusting is determined by several factors: soil texture, rain intensity, sedimentation processes, etc. There are different ways to characterize the crusts. One of them is to measure their mechanical impedance (MI), which is linked to their moisture level. In this study, we measured the evolution of the mechanical impedance of crusts formed by three loamy soil types (clay loam, loam and sandy clay loam, USDA) with different soil water contents. The aim of this communication was to establish a mathematical relationship between the crust water content and its MI. A saturated soil paste was prepared and placed in PVC cylinders (50 mm diameter and 10 mm height) arranged on a plastic tray. Previously the plastic tray was sprayed with a hydrophobic liquid to prevent the adherence of samples. The samples on the plastic tray were left to air-dry under laboratory conditions until their IM was measured. To measure IM, a food texture analyzer was used. The equipment incorporates a mobile arm, a load cell to apply force and a probe. The arm moves down vertically at a constant rate and the cylindrical steel probe (4 mm diameter) penetrates the soil sample vertically at a constant rate. The equipment is provided with software to store data (time, vertical distance and force values) at a rate of up to 500 points per second. Water content in crust soil samples was determined as the loss of weight after oven-drying (105°C). From the results, an exponential regression between MI and the water content was obtained (determination coefficient very close to 1). This methodology allows

  18. Improving Estimates of Root-zone Soil Water Content Using Soil Hydrologic Properties and Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D. C.; Miller, D. A.; Singha, K.; Davis, K. J.; Smithwick, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Newly defined relationships between remotely sensed soil moisture and soil hydraulic parameters were used to develop fine-scale (100 m) maps of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) content at the regional scale on a daily time-step. There are several key outcomes from our research: (1) the first multi-layer regional dataset of soil hydraulic parameters developed from gSSURGO data for hydrologic modeling efforts in the Chequemegon Ecosystem Atmospheric Study (ChEAS) region, (2) the operation and calibration of a new model for estimating soil moisture flow through the root-zone at eddy covariance towers across the U.S. using remotely sensed active and passive soil moisture products, and (3) region-wide maps of estimated root-zone soil moisture content. The project links soil geophysical analytical approaches (pedotransfer functions) to new applications in remote sensing of soil moisture that detect surface moisture (~5 cm depth). We answer two key questions in soil moisture observation and prediction: (1) How do soil hydrologic properties of U.S. soil types quantitatively relate to surface-to-subsurface water loss? And (2) Does incorporation of fine-scale soil hydrologic parameters with remotely sensed soil moisture data provide improved hindcasts of in situ RZSM content? The project meets several critical research needs in estimation of soil moisture from remote sensing. First, soil moisture is known to vary spatially with soil texture and soil hydraulic properties that do not align well with the spatial resolution of current remote sensing products of soil moisture (~ 50 km2). To address this, we leveraged new advances in gridded soil parameter information (gSSURGO) together with existing remotely sensed estimates of surface soil moisture into a newly emerging semi-empirical modeling approach called SMAR (Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship). The SMAR model was calibrated and cross-validated using existing soil moisture data from a portion of AMERIFLUX tower sites and

  19. Uptake of water from soils by plant roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, P.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Uptake of water by plant roots can be considered at two different Darcian scales, referred to as the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. At the mesoscopic scale, uptake of water is represented by a flux at the soil¿root interface, while at the macroscopic scale it is represented by a sink term in the

  20. Modelling Soil Water Retention for Weed Seed Germination Sensitivity to Water Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. John Bullied

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil water retention is important for the study of water availability to germinating weed seeds. Six soil water retention models (Campbell, Brooks-Corey, four- and five-parameter van Genuchten, Tani, and Russo with residual soil water parameter derivations were evaluated to describe water retention for weed seed germination at minimum threshold soil water potential for three hillslope positions. The Campbell, Brooks-Corey, and four-parameter van Genuchten model with modified or estimated forms of the residual parameter had superior but similar data fit. The Campbell model underestimated water retention at a potential less than −0.5 MPa for the upper hillslope that could result in underestimating seed germination. The Tani and Russo models overestimated water retention at a potential less than −0.1 MPa for all hillslope positions. Model selection and residual parameter specification are important for weed seed germination by representing water retention at the level of minimum threshold water potential for germination. Weed seed germination models driven by the hydrothermal soil environment rely on the best-fitting soil water retention model to produce dynamic predictions of seed germination.

  1. Intercomparison of Lab-Based Soil Water Extraction Methods for Stable Water Isotope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D.; Orlowski, N.; McDonnell, J.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of pore water extraction technique on resultant isotopic signature is poorly understood. Here we present results of an intercomparison of five common lab-based soil water extraction techniques: high pressure mechanical squeezing, centrifugation, direct vapor equilibration, microwave extraction, and cryogenic extraction. We applied five extraction methods to two physicochemically different standard soil types (silty sand and clayey loam) that were oven-dried and rewetted with water of known isotopic composition at three different gravimetric water contents (8, 20, and 30%). We tested the null hypothisis that all extraction techniques would provide the same isotopic result independent from soil type and water content. Our results showed that the extraction technique had a significant effect on the soil water isotopic composition. Each method exhibited deviations from spiked reference water, with soil type and water content showing a secondary effect. Cryogenic extraction showed the largest deviations from the reference water, whereas mechanical squeezing and centrifugation provided the closest match to the reference water for both soil types. We also compared results for each extraction technique that produced liquid water on both an OA-ICOS and IRMS; differences between them were negligible.

  2. Soil Water Dynamics In Central Europe and Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Markus; Mahler, Claudio F.; Trapp, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The comprehension of the soil water dynamics is important for the study of environmental processes. Precipitation, temperature, and water balance of Rio de Janeiro, Southeast Brazil and locations in Germany, Central Europe, are significantly different. Experience from one region could not be used...... on both approaches are applied to an actual case with the conditions in Germany. This case is also analyzed under the conditions of Rio de Janeiro. The effects of tropical environmental conditions on water transport in unsaturated soils are also discussed....

  3. Lidar point density analysis: implications for identifying water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worstell, Bruce B.; Poppenga, Sandra; Evans, Gayla A.; Prince, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and therefore do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting void regions within the lidar point cloud. Thus, an analysis of lidar voids has implications for identifying water bodies. Data analysis techniques to detect reduced lidar return densities were evaluated for test sites in Blackhawk County, Iowa, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to delineate contiguous areas that have few or no lidar returns. Results from this study indicated a 5-meter radius moving window with fewer than 23 returns (28 percent of the moving window) was sufficient for delineating void regions. Techniques to provide elevation values for void regions to flatten water features and to force channel flow in the downstream direction also are presented.

  4. A Model of Debris Flow Forecast Based on the Water-Soil Coupling Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaojie Zhang; Hongjuan Yang; Fangqiang Wei; Yuhong Jiang; Dunlong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Debris flow forecast is an important means of disaster mitigation. However, the accuracy of the statistics-based debris flow forecast is unsatisfied while the mechanism-based forecast is un-available at the watershed scale because most of existing researches on the initiation mechanism of de-bris flow took a single slope as the main object. In order to solve this problem, this paper developed a model of debris flow forecast based on the water-soil coupling mechanism at the watershed scale. In this model, the runoff and the instable soil caused by the rainfall in a watershed is estimated by the distrib-uted hydrological model (GBHM) and an instable identification model of the unsaturated soil. Because the debris flow is a special fluid composed of soil and water and has a bigger density, the density esti-mated by the runoff and instable soil mass in a watershed under the action of a rainfall is employed as a key factor to identify the formation probability of debris flow in the forecast model. The Jiangjia Gulley, a typical debris flow valley with a several debris flow events each year, is selected as a case study wa-tershed to test this forecast model of debris flow. According the observation data of Dongchuan Debris Flow Observation and Research Station, CAS located in Jiangjia Gulley, there were 4 debris flow events in 2006. The test results show that the accuracy of the model is satisfied.

  5. Water retention, gas transport, and pore network complexity during short-term regeneration of soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2013-01-01

    was done using water retention (pore size distribution), soil gas diffusivity, air permeability, and derived pore network complexity parameters. Significant decreases in bulk density (increased total porosity) and increases in pores > 100 1m was observed for incubated samples compared with SR samples....... The proportion of pores > 100 1m increased in order: smectite gas diffusivity, air permeability, and derived pore network indices was greater for incubated samples than SR. For illitic soils...... for convective air transport when analyzing pore network complexity. Overall, our results showed that short-term regeneration...

  6. Soil water repellency changes with depth and relationship to physical properties within wettable and repellent soil profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehrnia Nasrollah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effect of soil water repellency (SWR on soil hydrophysical properties with depth. Soils were sampled from two distinctly wettable and water repellent soil profiles at depth increments from 0-60 cm. The soils were selected because they appeared to either wet readily (wettable or remain dry (water repellent under field conditions. Basic soil properties (MWD, SOM, θv were compared to hydrophysical properties (Ks, Sw, Se, Sww, Swh, WDPT, RIc, RIm and WRCT that characterise or are affected by water repellency. Our results showed both soil and depth affected basic and hydrophysical properties of the soils (p <0.001. Soil organic matter (SOM was the major property responsible for water repellency at the selected depths (0-60. Water repellency changes affected moisture distribution and resulted in the upper layer (0-40 cm of the repellent soil to be considerably drier compared to the wettable soil. The water repellent soil also had greater MWDdry and Ks over the entire 0-60 cm depth compared to the wettable soil. Various measures of sorptivity, Sw, Se, Sww, Swh, were greater through the wettable than water repellent soil profile, which was also reflected in field and dry WDPT measurements. However, the wettable soil had subcritical water repellency, so the range of data was used to compare indices of water repellency. WRCT and RIm had less variation compared to WDPT and RIc. Estimating water repellency using WRCT and RIm indicated that these indices can detect the degree of SWR and are able to better classify SWR degree of the subcritical-repellent soil from the wettable soil.

  7. Dispersion corrections to density functionals for water aromatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Urs; Parrinello, Michele; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-02-08

    We investigate recently published methods for extending density functional theory to the description of long-range dispersive interactions. In all schemes an empirical correction consisting of a C6r(-6) term is introduced that is damped at short range. The coefficient C6 is calculated either from average molecular or atomic polarizabilities. We calculate geometry-dependent interaction energy profiles for the water benzene cluster and compare the results with second-order Møller-Plesset calculations. Our results indicate that the use of the B3LYP functional in combination with an appropriate mixing rule and damping function is recommended for the interaction of water with aromatics.

  8. Acoustic metamaterial with negative mass density in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huaijun; Zhai, Shilong; Ding, Changlin; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng, E-mail: xpzhao@nwpu.edu.cn [Smart Materials Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710129 (China)

    2015-09-07

    A two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with negative effective mass density in water is designed by periodically arranging hollow tube “meta-atoms.” Experimental and simulated results demonstrate that transmission dips accompanied with inverse phases are presented in the transmission spectra of the 2D AM at the ultrasonic frequency band. Effective parameters extracted from the experimental measured transmission and reflection coefficients of the 2D AM show that the effective mass density and refractive index are negative near the dip frequency range of 35.31–35.94 kHz. The simulation also shows the negative response in the 2D AM. Due to the excellent properties, the 2D AM is appealing for the potential applications in areas such as subwavelength imaging, ultrasonic cloaking in water, and so on.

  9. A molecular density functional theory to study solvation in water

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    A classical density functional theory is applied to study solvation of solutes in water. An approx- imate form of the excess functional is proposed for water. This functional requires the knowledge of pure solvent direct correlation functions. Those functions can be computed by using molecular simulations such as molecular dynamic or Monte Carlo. It is also possible to use functions that have been determined experimentally. The functional minimization gives access to the solvation free energy and to the equilibrium solvent density. Some correction to the functional are also proposed to get the proper tetrahedral order of solvent molecules around a charged solute and to reproduce the correct long range hydrophobic behavior of big apolar solutes. To proceed the numerical minimization of the functional, the theory has been discretized on two tridimensional grids, one for the space coordinates, the other for the angular coordinates, in a functional minimization code written in modern Fortran, mdft. This program i...

  10. [Effects of water storage in deeper soil layers on the root growth, root distribution and economic yield of cotton in arid area with drip irrigation under mulch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong-Hai; Zhang, Hong-Zhi; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhang, Wang-Feng

    2012-02-01

    Taking cotton cultivar Xinluzao 13 as test material, a soil column culture expenment was conducted to study the effects of water storage in deeper (> 60 cm) soil layer on the root growth and its relations with the aboveground growth of the cultivar in arid area with drip irrigation under mulch. Two levels of water storage in 60-120 cm soil layer were installed, i. e., well-watered and no watering, and for each, the moisture content in 0-40 cm soil layer during growth period was controlled at two levels, i.e., 70% and 55% of field capacity. It was observed that the total root mass density of the cultivar and its root length density and root activity in 40-120 cm soil layer had significant positive correlations with the aboveground dry mass. When the moisture content in 0-40 cm soil layer during growth season was controlled at 70% of field capacity, the total root mass density under well-watered and no watering had less difference, but the root length density and root activity in 40-120 cm soil layer under well-watered condition increased, which enhanced the water consumption in deeper soil layer, increased the aboveground dry mass, and finally, led to an increased economic yield and higher water use efficiency. When the moisture content in 0-40 cm soil layer during growth season was controlled at 55% of field capacity and the deeper soil layer was well-watered, the root/shoot ratio and root length density in 40-120 cm soil layer and the root activity in 80-120 cm soil layer were higher, the water consumption in deeper soil layer increased, but it was still failed to adequately compensate for the negative effects of water deficit during growth season on the impaired growth of roots and aboveground parts, leading to a significant decrease in the economic yield, as compared with that at 70% of field capacity. Overall, sufficient water storage in deeper soil layer and a sustained soil moisture level of 65% -75% of field capacity during growth period could promote the

  11. [Soil seed bank and its correlations with aboveground vegetation and environmental factors in water level fluctuating zone of Danjiangkou Reservoir, Central China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui-Xue; Zhan, Juan; Shi, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Long-qing

    2013-03-01

    Taking the water level fluctuating zone of the Danjiangkou Reservoir as a case, and by the method of hierarchical cluster analysis, the soil seed banks at 37 sampling plots within the areas of 140-145 m elevation were divided into 6 groups, and the species composition, density, and diversity of the soil seed banks among the groups were compared. The differences between the soil seed banks and the aboveground vegetations were analyzed by S0rensen similarity coefficient, and the correlations among the soil seed banks, aboveground vegetations, and environmental factors were explored by principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariable regression analysis. At the same altitudes of the water level fluctuating zone, the species composition of the soil seed banks had obvious heterogeneity, and the density and diversity indices of the soil seed banks among different groups were great. The similarity coefficient between the soil seed banks and aboveground vegetations was low, and the species number in the soil seed banks was obviously lesser than that in the aboveground vegetations. The density of the soil seed banks was highly positively correlated with the aboveground vegetations coverage and species number and the soil texture, but highly negatively correlated with the soil water-holding capacity and soil porosity.

  12. Water quality and surfactant effects on the water repellency of a sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differences in irrigation water quality may affect the water repellency of soils treated or untreated with surfactants. Using simulated irrigations, we evaluated water quality and surfactant application rate effects upon the water repellency of a Quincy sand (Xeric Torripsamment). We used a split ...

  13. Scaling Soil Microbe-Water Interactions from Pores to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scales relevant to soil microbial activity are much finer than scales relevant to whole-ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. On the one hand, how to link such different scales and develop scale-aware biogeochemical and ecohydrological models remains a major challenge. On the other hand, resolving these linkages is becoming necessary for testing ecological hypotheses and resolving data-theory inconsistencies. Here, the relation between microbial respiration and soil moisture expressed in water potential is explored. Such relation mediates the water availability effects on ecosystem-level heterotrophic respiration and is of paramount importance for understanding CO2 emissions under increasingly variable rainfall regimes. Respiration has been shown to decline as the soil dries in a remarkably consistent way across climates and soil types (open triangles in Figure). Empirical models based on these respiration-moisture relations are routinely used in Earth System Models to predict moisture effects on ecosystem respiration. It has been hypothesized that this consistency in microbial respiration decline is due to breakage of water film continuity causing in turn solute diffusion limitations in dry conditions. However, this hypothesis appears to be at odds with what is known about soil hydraulic properties. Water film continuity estimated from soil water retention (SWR) measurements at the 'Darcy' scale breaks at far less negative water potential (tools from percolation theory, it is demonstrated that hydrological measurements can be spatially downscaled at a micro-level relevant to microbial activity. Such downscaling resolves the inconsistency between respiration thresholds and hydrological thresholds. This result, together with observations of residual microbial activity well below -15 MPa (dashed back curve in Figure), lends support to the hypothesis that soil microbes are substrate-limited in dry conditions.

  14. Simulation of distribution of radiation energy density in water balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shi-Biao; MA Qing-Li; YIN Ze-Jie; TANG Yu; HUANG Huan; RAO Nan-Xia; ZHU Da-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of energy deposition density in radiate region and its surrounding areas from γ-rays was simulated and analyzed for a water-ball model with Geant4 package ( Geant4.7.0,2005 ) developed by CERN (the Center of European Research of Nucleus). The results show that the distribution depends strongly on the collimating condition of radiation beam. A well-collimated beam would reduce radiation effects on surrounding areas.

  15. Measurements of soil temperature for monitoring of the soil water behavior in an embankment slope during periodic rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, M.; Takakura, S.; Ishizawa, T.; Sakai, N.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most common causes of slope disaster (e.g. landslide, slope failure and debris flow) is heavy rainfall. Distributions of soil moisture and soil suction stress are changed by rain water infiltration. Monitoring of soil water behavior is crucial for prediction of the slope disaster. This study focuses on soil temperatures of a slope as a detector for monitoring soil water behavior. Soil temperature is varied by soil water condition, this is, infiltrating water transports thermal energy downward and thermal property of soil is shifted by containing of soil water. The purpose of this study is to detect the changes in soil water behavior caused by infiltration of rainfalls using measurement of soil temperature. For this purpose, we had carried out the measurements of soil temperature during various rainfalls (Yoshioka et al., 2013). In addition, we measured soil temperature and soil water content at several depths in a slope of an experimental embankment during various intensities of periodic and/or continuous rainfalls. In this presentation, we represent the details of the experiments and the results. Experiments were performed using the experimental embankment at NIED in Japan, which is about 7.3 meters tall and 27 meters wide. The embankment is located in a large-scale rainfall simulator. This facility is about 73 meters long, 48 meters wide and 20 meters tall. We measured soil temperature and volumetric water contents in the slope of the embankment, meteorological condition and rain water temperature. The rainfall intensities were 30, 60, 90 and 120 mm/h. The artificial rainfalls were carried out 10th, 17th, 24th, 31st, May and 10th, 11th, 12th June, 2013. As the results, soil temperature at many points in all experimental days rose caused by rainfalls, but the temperature at some points didn't change. We had two forms of soil temperature changes; one was a steep rise and the other was a gradual rise. In the case of periodic rainfall, soil temperature at

  16. Biogenic NO emissions from savanna soils as a function of fire regime, soil type, soil nitrogen, and water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Dirk A. B.; Scholes, Mary C.; Scholes, Robert J.; Levine, Joel S.

    1996-10-01

    A study of NOx emissions from soils representative of nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich savannas and their response to burning and soil water content was carried out in the southern Kruger National Park, South Africa. The study spanned the end of the dry season and the beginning of the wet season (September-December 1992). Nitrogen mineralization rates were measured using an in situ technique simultaneously with measurements of NOx emissions. NOx emissions were almost entirely as NO. The relationship between NO emission rate and soil moisture was parabolic regardless of soil type and management practice, with the lowest NO emission rates being measured at low (0.542) water-filled pore space values. The initial increase in NO emission rates with increasing soil moisture are paralleled by increases in the nitrate concentration in the soil. The highest NO emission rates (20 ng N-NO m-2 s-1—excluding the brief initial peak) were measured on plots from which fire had been excluded for 35 years. The next highest rates (8 ng N-NO m-2 s-1) were measured on the more fertile soils. Infertile soils, burned every second year, had rates of 3.5 ng N-NO m-2 s-1. The NO emission rates show a positive correlation with soil total N content and N nitrification rate. The effect of excluding fire from a savanna is to increase the soil nitrogen content through increased litter inputs, which in turn increases nitrification rates and soil NO emissions.

  17. Wetting properties of fungi mycelium alter soil infiltration and soil water repellency in a γ-sterilized wettable and repellent soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Henry Wai; Goh, Yit Kheng; Vujanovic, Vladimir; Si, Bing Cheng

    2012-12-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has a drastic impact on soil quality resulting in reduced infiltration, increased runoff, increased leaching, reduced plant growth, and increased soil erosion. One of the causes of SWR is hydrophobic fungal structures and exudates that change the soil-water relationship. The objective of this study was to determine whether SWR and infiltration could be manipulated through inoculation with fungi. The effect of fungi on SWR was investigated through inoculation of three fungal strains (hydrophilic -Fusarium proliferatum, chrono-amphiphilic -Trichoderma harzianum, and hydrophobic -Alternaria sp.) on a water repellent soil (WR-soil) and a wettable soil (W-soil). The change in SWR and infiltration was assessed by the water repellency index and cumulative infiltration respectively. F. proliferatum decreased the SWR on WR-soil and slightly increased SWR in W-soil, while Alternaria sp. increased SWR in both the W-soil and the WR-soil. Conversely T. harzianum increased the SWR in the W-soil and decreased the SWR in the WR-soil. All strains showed a decrease in infiltration in W-soil, while only the F. proliferatum and T. harzianum strain showed improvement in infiltration in the WR-soil. The ability of fungi to alter the SWR and enmesh soil particles results in changes to the infiltration dynamics in soil. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling and Prediction of Soil Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Soil water vapor sorption isotherms describe the relationship between water activity (aw) and moisture content along adsorption and desorption paths. The isotherms are important for modeling numerous soil processes and are also used to estimate several soil (specific surface area, clay content......, cation exchange capacity) and engineering properties (e.g., swelling potential). Our objectives for this work were to: (i) evaluate the potential of several theoretical and empirical isotherm models to accurately describe measured moisture adsorption/desorption isotherms (aw range of 0.03 to 0.......93) for a wide range of soils; and (ii) develop and test regression models for estimating the isotherms from clay content. Preliminary results show reasonable fits of the majority of the investigated empirical and theoretical models to the measured data although some models were not capable to fit both sorption...

  19. Water storage variability in a vineyard soil in the southern highlands of Santa Catarina state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Luciano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the subtropical regions of southern Brazil, rainfall distribution is uneven, which results in temporal variability of soil water storage. For grapes, water is generally available in excess and water deficiency occurs only occasionally. Furthermore, on the Southern Plateau of Santa Catarina, there are differences in soil properties, which results in high spatial variability. These two factors affect the composition of wine grapes. Spatio-temporal analyses are therefore useful in the selection of cultural practices as well as of adequate soils for vineyards. In this way, well-suited areas can produce grapes with a more appropriate composition for the production of quality wines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatio-temporal variability of water storage in a Cambisol during the growth cycle of a Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard and its relation to selected soil properties. The experimental area consisted of a commercial 8-year-old vineyard in São Joaquim, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A sampling grid with five rows and seven points per row, spaced 12 m apart, was outlined on an area of 3,456 m². Soil samples were collected with an auger at these points, 0.30 m away from the grapevines, in the 0.00-0.30 m layer, to determine gravimetric soil moisture. Measurements were taken once a week from December 2008 to April 2009, and every two weeks from December 2009 to March 2010. In December 2008, undisturbed soil samples were collected to determine bulk density, macro- and microporosity, and disturbed samples were used to quantify particle size distribution and organic carbon content. Results were subjected to descriptive analysis and semivariogram analysis, calculating the mean relative difference and the Pearson correlation. The average water storage in a Cambisol under grapevine on ridges had variable spatial dependence, i.e., the lower the average water storage, the higher the range of spatial dependence. Water storage had a stable spatial

  20. Boreal coniferous forest density leads to significant variations in soil physical and geochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianelli, Carole; Ali, Adam A.; Beguin, Julien; Bergeron, Yves; Grondin, Pierre; Hély, Christelle; Paré, David

    2017-07-01

    At the northernmost extent of the managed forest in Quebec, Canada, the boreal forest is currently undergoing an ecological transition between two forest ecosystems. Open lichen woodlands (LW) are spreading southward at the expense of more productive closed-canopy black spruce-moss forests (MF). The objective of this study was to investigate whether soil properties could distinguish MF from LW in the transition zone where both ecosystem types coexist. This study brings out clear evidence that differences in vegetation cover can lead to significant variations in soil physical and geochemical properties.Here, we showed that soil carbon, exchangeable cations, and iron and aluminium crystallinity vary between boreal closed-canopy forests and open lichen woodlands, likely attributed to variations in soil microclimatic conditions. All the soils studied were typical podzolic soil profiles evolved from glacial till deposits that shared a similar texture of the C layer. However, soil humus and the B layer varied in thickness and chemistry between the two forest ecosystems at the pedon scale. Multivariate analyses of variance were used to evaluate how soil properties could help distinguish the two types at the site scale. MF humus (FH horizons horizons composing the O layer) showed significantly higher concentrations of organic carbon and nitrogen and of the main exchangeable base cations (Ca, Mg) than LW soils. The B horizon of LW sites held higher concentrations of total Al and Fe oxides and particularly greater concentrations of inorganic amorphous Fe oxides than MF mineral soils, while showing a thinner B layer. Overall, our results show that MF store three times more organic carbon in their soils (B+FH horizons, roots apart) than LW. We suggest that variations in soil properties between MF and LW are linked to a cascade of events involving the impacts of natural disturbances such as wildfires on forest regeneration that determines the vegetation structure (stand density

  1. Assessment of Temporal and spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties and its implications on soil water content predictions for a maize field in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Mouna; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Ceppi, Alessandro; Mancini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Use of hydrological models to simulate water movement from soil surface to groundwater requires intensive, time consuming and expensive soil related parameters collection, such as, water retention curve (WRC) parameters and hydraulic conductivity (K).Typically, soils to be characterized, , exhibit large variations in space and time as well during the cropping cycle, due to biological processes and agricultural management practices : tillage , irrigation , fertilization and harvest. Soil properties are subjected to diverse physical and chemical changes that leads to a non-stability in term of water and chemical movements within the soil as well to the groundwater. The aim of this study is to assess the variability of soil hydraulic properties dynamics over a cropping cycle. The study site is a surface irrigated Maize field (typical in this area) located in Secugnago (45°13'31.70'' N, 9°36'26.82 E), in Northern Italy-Lombardy region. The field belongs to the Consortium Muzza Bassa Lodigiana, within which meteorological data together with soil moisture were monitored during the cropping season of 2015 . To investigate soil properties variations, both measurements in the field and laboratory tests on both undisturbed and disturbed collected samples were performed. Soil samples were taken from different locations within the study area and at different depths( 0cm , 20cm and 40cm) as well at different growth stages of the plant ,after irrigation events or tillage and as well after harvest. During three measuring campaigns, for each soil samples several parameters were monitored (Organic matter , bulk density) together with soil-water related parameters (Soil water retention curve parameters , saturated hydraulic conductivity). Soil water retention curves parameters were measured following the evaporative method, using the Hyprop (Hydraulic Property Analyzer; UMS Munich, 2010). Parameters were assessed using Hyprop-fit software, by fitting data to Brooks and Corey and

  2. Water and heat fluxes in desert soils: 2. Numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Milly, P. C. D.

    1994-03-01

    Transient one-dimensional fluxes of soil water (liquid and vapor) and heat in response to 1 year of atmospheric forcing were simulated numerically for a site in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas. The model was initialized and evaluated using the monitoring data presented in a companion paper (Scanlon, this issue). Soil hydraulic and thermal properties were estimated a priori from a combination of laboratory measurements, models, and other published information. In the first simulation, the main drying curves were used to describe soil water retention, and hysteresis was ignored. Remarkable consistency was found between computed and measured water potentials and temperatures. Attenuation and phase shift of the seasonal cycle of water potentials below the shallow subsurface active zone (0.0- to 0.3-m depth) were similar to those of temperatures, suggesting that water potential fluctuations were driven primarily by temperature changes. Water fluxes in the upper 0.3 m of soil were dominated by downward and upward liquid fluxes that resulted from infiltration of rain and subsequent evaporation from the surface. Upward flux was vapor dominated only in the top several millimeters of the soil during periods of evaporation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, water fluxes varied slowly and were dominated by downward thermal vapor flux that decreased with depth, causing a net accumulation of water. In a second simulation, nonhysteretic water retention was instead described by the estimated main wetting curves; the resulting differences in fluxes were attributed to lower initial water contents (given fixed initial water potential) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities that were lower than they were in the first simulation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, the thermal vapor fluxes dominated and were similar to those in the first simulation. Two other simulations were performed, differing from the first only in the prescription of different (wetter) initial water potentials. These three simulations

  3. Measurements and modeling of soil water distribution around landmines in natural soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensen, H.A.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Marín, G.R.; Hendrickx, J.M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Soil water content, dielectric constant, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and heat capacity affect the performance of many sensors (e.g. GPR, TIR) and therefore the detection of landmines. The most important of these is water content since it directly influences the other properties. We

  4. Measurements and modeling of soil water distribution around landmines in natural soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensen, H.A.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Marín, G.R.; Hendrickx, J.M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Soil water content, dielectric constant, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and heat capacity affect the performance of many sensors (e.g. GPR, TIR) and therefore the detection of landmines. The most important of these is water content since it directly influences the other properties. We

  5. A Spreadsheet for Estimating Soil Water Characteristic Curves (SWCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    predict the water retention curve from basic geotechnical properties. Canadian Geotechnical Journal 40: 1104–1122. Benson, C., I. Chiang, T... Canadian Geotechnical Journal , 47, 1382-1400. Farrel, D. A., and W. E. Larson. 1972. Modelling the pore structure of porous media. Water Resour. Res., 3...699-706. Fredlund, D. G., and A. Xing. 1994. Equations for the soil-water characteristic curve. Canadian Geotechnical Journal 31:521-532

  6. Observing plants dealing with soil water stress: Daily soil moisture fluctuations derived from polymer tensiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Martine; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Periods of soil water deficit often occur within a plant's life cycle, even in temperate deciduous and rain forests (Wilson et al. 2001, Grace 1999). Various experiments have shown that roots are able to sense the distribution of water in the soil, and produce signals that trigger changes in leaf expansion rate and stomatal conductance (Blackman and Davies 1985, Gollan et al. 1986, Gowing et al. 1990 Davies and Zhang 1991, Mansfield and De Silva 1994, Sadras and Milroy 1996). Partitioning of water and air in the soil, solute distribution in soil water, water flow through the soil, and water availability for plants can be determined according to the distribution of the soil water potential (e.g. Schröder et al. 2013, Kool et al. 2014). Understanding plant water uptake under dry conditions has been compromised by hydrological instrumentation with low accuracy in dry soils due to signal attenuation, or a compromised measurement range (Whalley et al. 2013). Development of polymer tensiometers makes it possible to study the soil water potential over a range meaningful for studying plant responses to water stress (Bakker et al. 2007, Van der Ploeg et al. 2008, 2010). Polymer tensiometer data obtained from a lysimeter experiment (Van der Ploeg et al. 2008) were used to analyse day-night fluctuations of soil moisture in the vicinity of maize roots. To do so, three polymer tensiometers placed in the middle of the lysimeter from a control, dry and very dry treatment (one lysimeter per treatment) were used to calculate water content changes over 12 hours. These 12 hours corresponded with the operation of the growing light. Soil water potential measurements in the hour before the growing light was turned on or off were averaged. The averaged value was used as input for the van Genuchten (1980) model. Parameters for the model were obtained from laboratory determination of water retention, with a separate model parameterization for each lysimeter setup. Results show daily

  7. 21st century hydrological modeling for optimizing traditional soil and water conservation practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, Jasmien; Garba, Maman; Sabiou, Mahaman; Al-Barri, Bashar; Cornelis, Wim

    2017-04-01

    transpiration increased with WSC and highest millet yields were found with zaï pits (4 to 5 times higher than under the fertilized control). Although rainwater was better partitioned in case of demi-lune microcatchments resulting in highest amounts of water stored in the soil, yield was only 40-60% of that with zaï pits. This was due to a higher plant density within each demi-lune microcatchment in an attempt to attain similar plant densities at field scale across the treatments. An optimized design for demi-lune microcatchments, in which the number of catchments per surface area is increased while reducing plant density per catchment, is therefore suggested. This was demonstrated using the fully coupled surface-subsurface process-based model that enabled to simulate at field scale overland and soil-water flow in 3D under various WSC designs. The model would also allow to evaluate the effect of WSC practices at catchment scale.

  8. Gamma-ray attenuation method as an efficient tool to investigate soil bulk density spatial variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F., E-mail: lfpires@uepg.b [Laboratory of Soil Physics and Environmental Sciences, State University of Ponta Grossa, UEPG, C.E.P. 84.030-900 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Rosa, J.A. [Laboratory of Soil Physics, Agricultural Research Institute of Parana, IAPAR, C.E.P. 84.001-970 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pereira, A.B. [Laboratory of Agrometeorology, State University of Ponta Grossa, UEPG, C.E.P. 84.030-900 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Arthur, R.C.J.; Bacchi, O.O.S. [Laboratory of Soil Physics, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP/CENA, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    The spatial variability of soil bulk density (rho{sub b}) was measured by using the volumetric ring method (VRM) and the gamma-ray attenuation method (GAM). Collimated radiation from 3.7 GBq of {sup 241}Am was used to evaluate the soil mass attenuation coefficient and its bulk density. Circular lead collimators were adjusted and aligned between source (D = 1, 2 and 3 mm) and detector (D = 4.5 mm). Results of GAM for average rho{sub b} provided good agreement with the corresponding values obtained gravimetrically. Variations in bulk density for different collimator dimensions can be attributed to multiple scattering after photons interaction with soil, mainly for 3 mm collimator size. The best result of rho{sub b} by the nuclear technique was obtained when rho{sub b} represents an average of the measurements for collimators of 1 and 2 mm. Another cause for the differences in rho{sub b} by GAM and VRM is the heterogeneity of soil when the collimated beam can interact with stones or large air-filled holes or channels present in the sample. Therefore, the pattern of spatial variability obtained by VRM was confirmed by GAM for all collimator sizes. This result is a good indication that GAM can be used with success to analyze soil spatial variability.

  9. Soil-pore water distribution of silver and gold engineered nanoparticles in undisturbed soils under unsaturated conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavares, D.S.; Rodrigues, S.M.; Cruz, N.; Carvalho, C.; Teixeira, T.; Carvalho, L.; Duarte, A.C.; Trindade, T.; Pereira, E.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to soil is well documented but little is known on the subsequent soil-pore water distribution of ENPs once present in soil. In this study, the availability and mobility of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) ENPs added to agricultural soils were assessed in two se

  10. Amyloid proteins are highly abundant in water-repellent but not wettable soils: microbial differentiation matters to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Quinn, Gerry; Sinclair, Kat; Dudley, Ed; Swain, Martin; Doerr, Stefan; Matthews, Peter; Francis, Lewis; Gazze, Andrea; Hallin, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is a common phenomenon affecting the hydrological responses of many soil and land use types in different climates. This in turn leads to decreased water infiltration, reduced vegetation cover, fertiliser run off and soil erosion. The fundamental (biological) causes of (bulk) soil repellency and its dynamic behaviour remain poorly understood. We have applied soil metaproteomics, the systemic extraction and identification of proteins from a soil, to understand the biological (adaptive) processes and potential for bio-modification of mineral surfaces, which occur at the molecular level in soils switching between wettable and repellent states. Extreme, moderate and sub-critical water-repellent UK silt-loam soils under permanent grass vegetation, including Park Grass at Rothamsted Research, were sampled below the root zone depth under wettable and repellent conditions. Soils were subjected to our new extraction methods for determining the specific ultrahydrophobic and total metaproteomes. Using our ultrahydrophobic extraction protocol, we have identified more than 200, mostly novel amyloid, proteins, which could be extracted from water-repellent soils, but were absent in the comparable wettable soils. One of the novel amyloid proteins was highly abundant in all soils, which has the potential as a soil biomarker for precision land management, especially in irrigation. Comparative profiling of the total metaproteomes of wettable and repellent soils has revealed similarities and dissimilarities in microbial diversity and their activities, which have created a deeper understanding of soil system processes common and adaptive to soil moisture and to the severity of repellence.

  11. Soil-pore water distribution of silver and gold engineered nanoparticles in undisturbed soils under unsaturated conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavares, D.S.; Rodrigues, S.M.; Cruz, N.; Carvalho, C.; Teixeira, T.; Carvalho, L.; Duarte, A.C.; Trindade, T.; Pereira, E.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to soil is well documented but little is known on the subsequent soil-pore water distribution of ENPs once present in soil. In this study, the availability and mobility of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) ENPs added to agricultural soils were assessed in two

  12. Abundance of macrozoobenthos in relation to bottom soil textural types and water depth In aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nupur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural classes and different water depths on abundance of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds. Three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (TS2 and with clay loam (T3 were considered in this experiment. Samples were collected from three different depths (60.96 cm, 106.68 cm and 152.40 cm with three replications. The ranges of water quality parameters were suitable for the growth of macrozoobenthos during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed comparatively higher ranges in T2. Eight genera were recorded belonging to major groups of Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, Mollusca and Ceratoponogonidae. The highest population densities of Oligochaeta (1200±4.25 per m2, Chironomidae (1422±4.88 per m2, Ceratopogonidae (399±1.56 per m2 and Mollusca (977±2.24 per m2 were found in T2. The population densities of macrozoobenthos showed fortnightly variations in all the treatments. Among the three depths, significantly highest densities of macrozoobenthos were recorded in 106.68 cm in every treatment. The mean abundance of macrozoobenthos was significantly highest in T2. The present study indicates that loamy soil pond bottom along with water depth 106.68 cm is suitable for the growth and production of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds.

  13. Water dynamics in hyperarid soils of Antarctica including water adsorption and salt hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Soils in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica contain ice and considerable amounts of salt. Ice often occurs at shallow depth throughout the dry valleys and other areas of hyperarid permafrost, notably on Mars. This common occurrence of shallow ice is enigmatic; however, since according to published sublimation models it should disappear relatively quickly (at rates of order 0.1 mm a-1) due to vapor loss to the atmosphere. The disagreement between the occurrence of ice on one hand and process-based vapor transport models on other hand suggests that processes in addition to vapor transport have influence on ice stability. From a number of possible processes, infiltration of snowmelt during summer month and vapor trapping due to overlaying snow cover in winter have been discussed in more detail and both processes are likely to slow down ice sublimation. At this point, however, there are only limited field-observations to confirm the presence of such processes. The present study aims to investigate the effect of water adsorption, salt hydration, and freezing point depression on water transport and ice stability. We hypothesize that hydration of salts and water adsorption on grain surfaces play an important role in the survival of ground ice and as water reservoir in these areas and should be taken into account when modeling vapor transport. Furthermore, there is evidence that salt content in ground ice is high enough to cause formation of brines at subfreezing temperatures that can lead to a growth of ground ice. To support our hypothesis we set up a field experiment by monitoring soil temperature, soil humidity, and soil moisture along with climate data and snow cover. In addition we collected soil samples to measure water potential, salt composition, ice content, and soil texture. Soil samples were extracted with water to measure soluble salt content along dry and ice rich soil profiles. In addition we measured soil moisture retention curves at different vapor

  14. Natural and fire-induced soil water repellency in a Portugese Shrubland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, C.R.; Moore, D.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2011-01-01

    Post-fire land degradation is often attributed to fire-induced soil water repellency, despite the fact that soil water repellency is a natural phenomenon in many soils and is therefore not necessarily caused by fire. To improve our understanding of the role of soil water repellency in causing fire-i

  15. Natural and fire-induced soil water repellency in a Portugese Shrubland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, C.R.; Moore, D.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2011-01-01

    Post-fire land degradation is often attributed to fire-induced soil water repellency, despite the fact that soil water repellency is a natural phenomenon in many soils and is therefore not necessarily caused by fire. To improve our understanding of the role of soil water repellency in causing

  16. Economies of density for on-site waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggimann, Sven; Truffer, Bernhard; Maurer, Max

    2016-09-15

    Decentralised wastewater treatment is increasingly gaining interest as a means of responding to sustainability challenges. Cost comparisons are a crucial element of any sustainability assessment. While the cost characteristics of centralised waste water management systems (WMS) have been studied extensively, the economics of decentralised WMS are less understood. A key motivation for studying the costs of decentralised WMS is to compare the cost of centralised and decentralised WMS in order to decide on cost-efficient sanitation solutions. This paper outlines a model designed to assess those costs which depend on the spatial density of decentralised wastewater treatment plants in a region. Density-related costs are mostly linked to operation and maintenance activities which depend on transportation, like sludge removal or the visits of professionals to the plants for control, servicing or repairs. We first specify a modelled cost-density relationship for a region in a geometric two-dimensional space by means of heuristic routing algorithms that consider time and load-capacity restrictions. The generic model is then applied to a Swiss case study for which we specify a broad range of modelling parameters. As a result, we identify a 'hockey-stick'-shaped cost curve that is characterised by strong cost reductions at high density values which level out at around 1 to 1.5 plants per km(2). Variations in the cost curves are mostly due to differences in management approaches (scheduled or unscheduled emptying). In addition to the well-known diseconomies of scale in the case of centralised sanitation, we find a similar generic cost behaviour for decentralised sanitation due to economies of density. Low densities in sparsely populated regions thus result in higher costs for both centralised and decentralised system. Policy implications are that efforts to introduce decentralised options in a region should consider the low-density/high-cost problem when comparing centralised

  17. Effects of white grubs on soil water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-López, A A; Rodríguez-Palacios, E; Alarcón-Gutiérrez, E; Geissert, D; Barois, I

    2015-04-01

    Water infiltration rates k were measured in mesocosms with soil and "white grubs" of Ancognatha falsa (Arrow) (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae). Three third instars of A. falsa and three adult earthworms Pontoscolex corethrurus were selected, weighted, and introduced into the mesocosms setting three treatments: soil + A. falsa, soil + P. corethrurus, and control (soil without any macroorganism). The experiment had a completely random design with four replicates per treatment (n = 4). The infiltration rates of soil matrix were assessed in each mesocosms with a minidisk tension infiltrometer. Six measurements were made along the experiment. Results showed that larvae of A. falsa promoted a higher water infiltration in the soil, compared to the control. On day 7, k values were similar among treatments, but k values after 28 days and up to 100 days were much higher in the A. falsa treatment (k = 0.00025 cm s(-1)) if compared to control (k = 0.00011 cm s(-1)) and P. corethrurus (k = 0.00008 cm s(-1)) treatments. The k values were significantly higher in the presence of larvae of A. falsa compared to the control and P. corethrurus treatments. The larvae of A. falsa are potential candidates for new assays on soil water infiltration with different tensions to evaluate the role of pores and holes created by the larvae on soils.

  18. Capacity of soil to protect organic carbon and biochemical characteristics of density fractions in Ziwulin Haplic Greyxems soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; WANG Chunyan; WANG Wenying; WANG Qiji

    2005-01-01

    Physical protection is one of the important ways to stabilize organic carbon in soils. In order to understand the role of soils as a carbon sink or source in global climatic change and carbon cycles and properly manage soils as a carbon sink, we ought to know how many organic carbon (OC) in a given soil could be protected. By a density fractionation approach and ultrasonic technique, each soil sample was divided into three fractions: free light fraction (free-LF), occluded fraction (occluded-LF) and heavy fraction (HF). The obtained fractions were analyzed for total OC content, carbohydrate content and recalcitrant OC content. The results showed: (ⅰ) In the whole soil profile, dominance of OC consistently decreased in the following order: HF, free-LF, occluded-LF. This suggested that OC in soils were mostly protected. From 0-10 to 60-80 cm horizons, the OC in free-LF decreased from 25.27% to 3.72%, while OC in HF they were increased from 72.57% to 95.39%. The OC in occluded-LF was between 2.16% and 0.89%. (ⅱ) Organic carbon recalcitrance in free-LF was similar to that in HF, and was even higher than that in HF below the surface horizon. This suggested that free-LF was not always the most fresh and non-decomposed fraction. OM quality of HF was higher than that of free-LF in the surface 10 cm below, namely the protected OM had higher quality than free OM in these horizons.

  19. Soil nutrients affect spatial patterns of aboveground biomass and emergent tree density in southwestern Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Gary D; Curran, Lisa M; Slik, J W F

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the relationship between soil fertility and aboveground biomass in lowland tropical forests have yielded conflicting results, reporting positive, negative and no effect of soil nutrients on aboveground biomass. Here, we quantify the impact of soil variation on the stand structure of mature Bornean forest throughout a lowland watershed (8-196 m a.s.l.) with uniform climate and heterogeneous soils. Categorical and bivariate methods were used to quantify the effects of (1) parent material differing in nutrient content (alluvium > sedimentary > granite) and (2) 27 soil parameters on tree density, size distribution, basal area and aboveground biomass. Trees > or =10 cm (diameter at breast height, dbh) were enumerated in 30 (0.16 ha) plots (sample area = 4.8 ha). Six soil samples (0-20 cm) per plot were analyzed for physiochemical properties. Aboveground biomass was estimated using allometric equations. Across all plots, stem density averaged 521 +/- 13 stems ha(-1), basal area 39.6 +/- 1.4 m(2) ha(-1) and aboveground biomass 518 +/- 28 Mg ha(-1) (mean +/- SE). Adjusted forest-wide aboveground biomass to account for apparent overestimation of large tree density (based on 69 0.3-ha transects; sample area = 20.7 ha) was 430 +/- 25 Mg ha(-1). Stand structure did not vary significantly among substrates, but it did show a clear trend toward larger stature on nutrient-rich alluvium, with a higher density and larger maximum size of emergent trees. Across all plots, surface soil phosphorus (P), potassium, magnesium and percentage sand content were significantly related to stem density and/or aboveground biomass (R (Pearson) = 0.368-0.416). In multiple linear regression, extractable P and percentage sand combined explained 31% of the aboveground biomass variance. Regression analyses on size classes showed that the abundance of emergent trees >120 cm dbh was positively related to soil P and exchangeable bases, whereas trees 60-90 cm dbh were negatively related to these

  20. Impact of Ca-amendments and soil management in physical properties linked to soil-water relationship in degraded Ultisols from South-Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal-Sancho, I.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, P.; León, P.; Gómez-Paccard, C.; Benito, M.; Espejo, R.

    2012-04-01

    Cañamerós raña formation in western Spain was cleared for cropping in 1940´s. Its highly weathered acidic soils (Ultisols) were deeply affected by tillage. The soil organic matter (SOM) content and specially the particulate organic matter (POM), a labile fraction, were drastically reduced, and most of their chemical and physical soil properties related to its quality were negatively affected. The extraction of Ca through the harvest and the release of Al retained in organic-Al complexes resulted in a lower Ca/Al ratio which increased the Al toxicity. These effects led to a drastic yield reduction and the abandon of many degraded fields after 20-70 years of unsustainable managements. On these degraded soils we studied the effect of different soil management strategies (no-till with wild pasture (WP) and no-till with an improved pasture (IP)), and amendment applications (sugar foam waste (SF), and SF + Phosphogypsum (PH) versus control (C)). One of the objectives of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of these practices to recover soil quality parameters, especially those related to soil-water relationship. A Split-plot experiment was established in a degraded field. We evaluated the changes in superficial infiltration, bulk density, and content of water-stable aggregates per 100 g of soil before the Ca-amendment applications and pasture establishments, and after 4.5 years. We also measured the changes in SOM and POM contents which are closely related with the previous parameters. The Ca applications reduced Al toxicity, improved the pasture yield and increased organic matter inputs to soil. The results showed a significant increase of POM in all treatment compared with the POM content at the beginning of this experiment. However the "SOM minus POM" which could be classified as recalcitrant organic matter did not show significant increments. The increase of POM had a positive effect on the content of water-stable aggregates per 100 g of soil and the water

  1. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  2. Comparison among monitoring strategies to assess water flow dynamic and soil hydraulic properties in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Valdes-Abellan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Irrigated agriculture is usually performed in semi-arid regions despite scarcity of water resources. Therefore, optimal irrigation management by monitoring the soil is essential, and assessing soil hydraulic properties and water flow dynamics is presented as a first measure. For this purpose, the control of volumetric water content, θ, and pressure head, h, is required. This study adopted two types of monitoring strategies in the same experimental plot to control θ and h in the vadose zone: i non-automatic and more time-consuming; ii automatic connected to a datalogger. Water flux was modelled with Hydrus-1D using the data collected from both acquisition strategies independently (3820 daily values for the automatic; less than 1000 for the non-automatic. Goodness-of-fit results reported a better adjustment in case of automatic sensors. Both model outputs adequately predicted the general trend of θ and h, but with slight differences in computed annual drainage (711 mm and 774 mm. Soil hydraulic properties were inversely estimated from both data acquisition systems. Major differences were obtained in the saturated volumetric water content, θs, and the n and α van Genuchten model shape parameters. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, shown lower variability with a coefficient of variation range from 0.13 to 0.24 for the soil layers defined. Soil hydraulic properties were better assessed through automatic data acquisition as data variability was lower and accuracy was higher.

  3. Comparison among monitoring strategies to assess water flow dynamic and soil hydraulic properties in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes-Abellan, J.; Jiménez-Martínez, J.; Candela, L.; Tamoh, K.

    2015-07-01

    Irrigated agriculture is usually performed in semi-arid regions despite scarcity of water resources. Therefore, optimal irrigation management by monitoring the soil is essential, and assessing soil hydraulic properties and water flow dynamics is presented as a first measure. For this purpose, the control of volumetric water content, θ, and pressure head, h, is required. This study adopted two types of monitoring strategies in the same experimental plot to control θ and h in the vadose zone: i) non-automatic and more time-consuming; ii) automatic connected to a datalogger. Water flux was modelled with Hydrus-1D using the data collected from both acquisition strategies independently (3820 daily values for the automatic; less than 1000 for the non-automatic). Goodness-of-fit results reported a better adjustment in case of automatic sensors. Both model outputs adequately predicted the general trend of θ and h, but with slight differences in computed annual drainage (711 mm and 774 mm). Soil hydraulic properties were inversely estimated from both data acquisition systems. Major differences were obtained in the saturated volumetric water content, θs, and the n and α van Genuchten model shape parameters. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, shown lower variability with a coefficient of variation range from 0.13 to 0.24 for the soil layers defined. Soil hydraulic properties were better assessed through automatic data acquisition as data variability was lower and accuracy was higher. (Author)

  4. Density-corrected models for gas diffusivity and air permeability in unsaturated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    . Also, a power-law ka model with exponent 1.5 (derived from analogy with a previous gas diffusivity model) used in combination with the D-C approach for ka,100 (reference point) seemed promising for ka(e) predictions, with good accuracy and minimum parameter requirements. Finally, the new D-C model......Accurate prediction of gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) and air permeability (ka) and their variations with air-filled porosity (e) in soil is critical for simulating subsurface migration and emission of climate gases and organic vapors. Gas diffusivity and air permeability measurements from Danish soil...... profile data (total of 150 undisturbed soil samples) were used to investigate soil type and density effects on the gas transport parameters and for model development. The measurements were within a given range of matric potentials (-10 to -500 cm H2O) typically representing natural field conditions...

  5. Modelling Soil Water Characteristic Curves for the Investigation of Hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Matthews, Peter; Laudone, Maurizio; Van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan; Francis, Lewis; Dudley, Ed; Gazze, Andrea; Quinn, Gerry; Whalley, Richard; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity presents a major challenge for the future, as it reduces both plant-available water and irrigation efficiency, and can increase flooding hazards and erosion. A collaborative research project has been set up in the UK to study hydrophobicity over a wide range of length scales. At core scale, we are investigating the wetting behaviour of water repellent soils in order to model percolation through hydrophobic pore spaces. To that end, water retention measurements were carried out on both wettable and forcibly-wetted water-repellent soils collected from three locations in England and Wales. The data were then fitted with both the commonly used Van Genuchten model and an alternative model from PoreXpert, a software program that analyses and models porous materials. The Van Genuchten model fits a curve to the data using parameters related to air entry suction, irreducible water content and pore size distribution. By contrast, PoreXpert uses a Boltzmann-annealed simplex to find a best-fit curve based on parameters directly related to the void structure of the soil: the size of the voids, the shape of the void size distribution, and how the voids are connected to each other. Both Van Genuchten and PoreXpert fit the experimental data well, but where Van Genuchten forces an S-shaped curve that can mask small variations, PoreXpert gives a closer fit of no pre-defined shape that captures subtle differences between data points. This allows us to calculate differences in the effective pore and throat size distributions, and provides a mechanistic framework from which to model additional hydrologic behaviour in water repellent soil. Simulations of capillary induced wetting based on these mechanistic postulates are then compared to wicking experiments at the core scale, which can then be upscaled and applied to other soils.

  6. Mediterranean shrub vegetation: soil protection vs. water availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Estringana, Pablo; Nieves Alonso-Blázquez, M.; Alegre, Alegre; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    Soil Erosion and Land Degradation are closely related to the changes in the vegetation cover (Zhao et al., 2013). Although other factors such as rainfall intensiy or slope (Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) the plant covers is the main factor that controls the soil erosion (Haregeweyn, 2013). Plant cover is the main factor of soil erosion processes as the vegetation control the infiltration and runoff generation (Cerdà, 1998a; Kargar Chigani et al., 2012). Vegetation cover acts in a complex way in influencing on the one hand on runoff and soil loss and on the other hand on the amount and the way that rainfall reaches the soil surface. In arid and semiarid regions, where erosion is one of the main degradation processes and water is a scant resource, a minimum percentage of vegetation coverage is necessary to protect the soil from erosion, but without compromising the availability of water (Belmonte Serrato and Romero Diaz, 1998). This is mainly controlled by the vegetation distribution (Cerdà, 1997a; Cammeraat et al., 2010; Kakembo et al., 2012). Land abandonment is common in Mediterranean region under extensive land use (Cerdà, 1997b; García-Ruiz, 2010). Abandoned lands typically have a rolling landscape with steep slopes, and are dominated by herbaceous communities that grow on pasture land interspersed by shrubs. Land abandonment use to trigger an increase in soil erosion, but the vegetation recovery reduces the impact of the vegetation. The goal of this work is to assess the effects of different Mediterranean shrub species (Dorycnium pentaphyllum Scop., Medicago strasseri, Colutea arborescens L., Retama sphaerocarpa, L., Pistacia Lentiscus L. and Quercus coccifera L.) on soil protection (runoff and soil losses) and on rainfall reaching soil surface (rainfall partitioning fluxes). To characterize the effects of shrub vegetation and to evaluate their effects on soil protection, two field experiments were carried out. The presence of shrub vegetation reduced runoff by

  7. Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Si; Zhenjiang, Zhou; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of tomato yield and water use efficiency (WUE) to soil water content at different growth stages, the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed in a five-factor-five-level pot experiment under regulated deficit irrigation. Two regression models concerning...... the effects of stage-specific soil water content on tomato yield and WUE were established. The results showed that the lowest available soil water (ASW) content (around 28%) during vegetative growth stage (here denoted θ1) resulted in high yield and WUE. Moderate (around 69% ASW) during blooming and fruit...... of the regression model showed that the maximum yield, 1166 g per plant, was obtained by the combination of θ1 (c. 28% ASW), θ2 (c. 82% ASW), θ3 (c. 92% ASW), θ4 (c. 92% ASW), and θ5 (c. 92% ASW). This result may guide irrigation scheduling to achieve higher tomato yield and WUE based on specific soil water...

  8. Vegetation/Soil Synthesis Water Index Using MODIS Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In consideration of the spectral character of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data and the reflective spectrum of vegetation and soil, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and NDWI (Normalized Difference Water Index) are deduced using one visible band (0.66μm) and two near-infrared bands (0.86μm, 1.24 μm). Vegetation canopy temperature is derived using two thermal infrared bands (8.6 μm and 11μm). Then the vegetation/soil synthesis water index (VSWI) is acquired through analyzing the coupling character of three indexes which can reflect the water condition of vegetation. Finally, the synthesis index is verified by equivalent water content of a single leaf. The matching results show that the synthesis index is directly proportional to the modeled data, which means that the vegetation water content can be reflected using the synthesis index effectively.

  9. Impact of regression methods on improved effects of soil structure on soil water retention estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Minh; De Pue, Jan; Le, Khoa Van; Cornelis, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Increasing the accuracy of pedotransfer functions (PTFs), an indirect method for predicting non-readily available soil features such as soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), is of crucial importance for large scale agro-hydrological modeling. Adding significant predictors (i.e., soil structure), and implementing more flexible regression algorithms are among the main strategies of PTFs improvement. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the improved effect of categorical soil structure information on estimating soil-water content at various matric potentials, which has been reported in literature, could be enduringly captured by regression techniques other than the usually applied linear regression. Two data mining techniques, i.e., Support Vector Machines (SVM), and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), which have been recently introduced as promising tools for PTF development, were utilized to test if the incorporation of soil structure will improve PTF's accuracy under a context of rather limited training data. The results show that incorporating descriptive soil structure information, i.e., massive, structured and structureless, as grouping criterion can improve the accuracy of PTFs derived by SVM approach in the range of matric potential of -6 to -33 kPa (average RMSE decreased up to 0.005 m3 m-3 after grouping, depending on matric potentials). The improvement was primarily attributed to the outperformance of SVM-PTFs calibrated on structureless soils. No improvement was obtained with kNN technique, at least not in our study in which the data set became limited in size after grouping. Since there is an impact of regression techniques on the improved effect of incorporating qualitative soil structure information, selecting a proper technique will help to maximize the combined influence of flexible regression algorithms and soil structure information on PTF accuracy.

  10. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  11. Optimizing rainwater partitioning and millet production on degraded land in Niger using Water and Soil Conservation practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, Jasmien C. J.; Garba, Maman; Al-Barri, Bashar; Sabiou, Mahamane; Cornelis, Wim M.

    2015-04-01

    As a result of growing population pressure and severe soil erosion, farmers in the Sahel increasingly rely on degraded lands for millet production. The adverse Sahelian rainfall distribution and imbalanced rainfall partitioning over the rootzone of these degraded lands therefore calls for sustainable land management strategies that are water resource efficient. This study evaluates the soil-water balance of promising Nigerien Water and Soil Conservation (WSC) techniques (i.e., zaï pits, demi-lune microcatchments and scarification with standing crop residue) and their impact on millet yield by means of an in-situ field experiment (2011-2013) on degraded laterite soil classified as Plinthosol with a 1% slope. All WSC practices received the same amount of fertilizer and were compared to two control practices, one with and one without fertilizer. Soil-water content was recorded with a neutron probe till 105 cm depth and runoff by means of a cemented gutter directing runoff water with a multi-pipe divisor into a collector drum. WSC techniques proved to significantly reduce runoff (blue water) with overall runoff coefficients beings reduced from 25% (control practice) to 5-10%. Consequently, significantly more water was stored inside the catchments of the zaï pits and demi-lunes (green water). With the scarification treatment, no considerable differences in soil-water storage were found with the control. On the other hand, WSC practices had little impact on soil evaporation, which was only 12% of rainfall by the self-mulching soil. Crop transpiration increased with WSC and highest millet yields were found with zaï pits (4 to 5 times higher than under the fertilized control). Although rainwater was better partitioned in case of demi-lune microcatchments resulting in highest amounts of water stored in the soil, yield was only 40-60% of that with zaï pits. This was due to a higher plant density within each demi-lune microcatchment in an attempt to attain similar plant

  12. Interactions among Climate Forcing, Soil Water, and Groundwater for Enhanced Water Management Practices in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J.; Hubbard, K. G.; Chen, X.

    2009-12-01

    Water is one of the most valuable and vulnerable resources. The varying precipitation regimes together with the varying land use and land cover types over the state of Nebraska necessitate continuous monitoring and modeling of soil water, particularly in the root zone. Underlying the irrigated lands is the High Plains Aquifer, one of the largest in the world. The Ogallala Aquifer is hydrologically connected with streams in numerous river valleys and with rainfall/soil water at the surface. To sustain water reserves the net effect of groundwater pumping for irrigation and recharging the ground water system by precipitation/irrigation. If the net effect is zero or positive the reserves will not shrink. The Automated Weather Data Network (AWDN) of Nebraska has intensive soil water observation and critical weather measurements. Nebraska also has ground water wells, co-located with or near some of the AWDN stations. This work was conducted to continuously monitor the soil water and groundwater table and to model the surface and subsurface hydrologic processes as an integrated/linked system. The further task is to quantify the recharge under different initial conditions, land use practices, and to combine the new information with a surface hydrology model over various sites in Nebraska. To accomplish these objectives two weather stations were installed and enhanced at Shelton and Kearney and soil probes were buried directly under the crop lands. The newly installed soil water probes are co-located with the nearby weather stations and ground water wells. All the data recorded from the atmosphere, soil and aquifer will be incorporated into AWDN data archives and will be analyzed to examine the interactions between precipitation, soil moisture and groundwater.

  13. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  14. A Quick Dielectric Method to Determine Insitu Soil Water Content for Precision Water Use under Sustainable Agricultural Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandi Hermawan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Precise water use systems under sustainable agriculture may only be achieved if in-situ soil water content and availability of the plant can be measured quickly.  Soil water content can be determined directly using the gravimetrical method by calculating the loss of water when the soil dries out, and indirectly by measuring other variables from which soil water can be calculated.  The indirect methods have some advantages when compared to the direct gravimetrical method because measured; non-destructive soil water data are available instantly.  Soil dielectric properties have strong relationships with soil water content and have been used widely as indirect methods of soil water determination, but the cost of the available instrument is too expensive for small-scale farmers.  Two studies were conducted in 2011 and 2015 to develop a quick, cheap method to determine in-situ soil water content and precise water use by crops.  The method applied a non-linear relation between soil water content (θ, in gg-1 and soil electrical impedance (Z, in kΩ as follows: θ = a.Zb where a and b are constants.  Parameter Z showed a good predictor for soil water content (R ≥ 0.90 therefore can be used to quickly determine soil water content in the field.  The dielectric method has been successfully used to determine the water balance in the vegetated soils, in wich changes in soil water content caused by daily rainfall as low as 10 mm was detected up to the depth of 60 cm.  The method was also successfully capable of calculating the amount of water used by palm oil nursery grown in media with different levels of soil organic matter.

  15. Response of broccoli to soil water tension under drip irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomeu Felix Tangune

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of different soil water tensions on the production of broccoli cultivated in a protected environment under drip irrigation in order to establish criteria for the adequate management of irrigation. A completely randomized block design was used, comprising six treatments and four replicates. The treatments included six soil water tensions (15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 kPa. Soil water tension was monitored with granular matrix sensors installed at depths of 0.2 m (decision sensors and 0.4 m (seepage control sensors. Total and marketable fresh weight of broccoli heads, average diameter of marketable heads, height of marketable heads, and total and marketable yield were greatest when the soil water tension at a depth of 0.2 m was 15 kPa, at which the mean values of the evaluated variables were 0.84 kg, 0.76 kg, 20.5 cm, 11.7 cm; 26.5 t ha?1, and 23.7 t ha?1, respectively. Treatments did not significantly affect efficiency of water use or height of marketable heads.

  16. The Soil Characteristic Curve at Low Water Contents: Relations to Specific Surface Area and Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    Accurate description of the soil-water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics, plant-water relations, and microbial processes in surface soil. Soil-water retention at soil-water matric potential of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate...... that measurements by traditional pressure plate apparatus generally overestimated water contents at -1.5 MPa (plant wilting point). The 41 soils were classified into four textural classes based on the so-called Dexter index n (= CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing the water film...... thickness at a given soil-water matric potential (low organic soils with n > 10, the estimated SA from the dry soil-water retention was in good agreement with the SA measured using ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME). A strong relationship between the ratio...

  17. Water percolation through the root-soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Pascal; Kroener, Eva; Vontobel, Peter; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Plant roots exude a significant fraction of the carbon assimilated via photosynthesis into the soil. The mucilaginous fraction of root exudates affects the hydraulic properties of the soil near the roots, the so called rhizosphere, in a remarkable and dynamic way. After drying, mucilage becomes hydrophobic and limits the rewetting of the rhizosphere. Here, we aim to find a quantitative relation between rhizosphere rewetting, particle size, soil matric potential and mucilage concentration. We used a pore-network model in which mucilage was randomly distributed in a cubic lattice. The general idea was that the mucilage concentration per solid soil surface increases the contact angle between the liquid and solid phases consequently limiting the rewetting of pores covered with dry mucilage. We used the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the mucilage concentration at which pores are not wettable for varying particle sizes and matric potentials. Then, we simulated the percolation of water across a cubic lattice. Our simulations predicted that above a critical mucilage concentration water could not flow through the porous medium. The critical mucilage concentration decreased with increasing particle size and decreasing matric potential. The model was compared with experiments of capillary rise in soils of different particle size and mucilage concentration. The experiments confirmed the percolation behaviour of the rhizosphere rewetting. Mucilage turned hydrophobic at concentrations above 0.1 mg/cm2. The critical mucilage concentration at matric potential of -2.5 hPa was ca. 1% [g/g] for fine sand and 0.1 % [g/g] for coarse sand. Our conceptual model is a first step towards a better understanding of the water dynamics in the rhizosphere during rewetting and it can be used to predict in what soil textures rhizosphere water repellency becomes a critical issue for root water uptake.

  18. On the Links Between Photosynthesis and Soil Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Porporato, A.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2002-12-01

    The equations of soil moisture dynamics and a model of leaf gas exchange and water transport through the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) are coupled to explore the dependence of plant CO2 assimilation on soil moisture. The model is also coupled with a daily growing boundary layer model, that gives the values of air specific humidity and potential temperature during the day. Two different approaches for modeling stomatal conductance gs are implemented and compared. One is the mixed-empirical formulation of stomatal conductance used by Jarvis (1976), who assumed a multiplicative relationship among the main environmental factors affecting stomatal movement; the other one is the empirical relationship between stomatal conductance and assimilation introduced by Ball et al. (1987) and modified by Leuning (1990, 1995), that assume a direct dependence of stomatal movement on the assimilation rate. This second approach is extended to include drought conditions and the common bases underlying the two approaches are elucidated. The model also gives the soil moisture value below which plants are under stress and the moisture content at the wilting point. These are used to evaluate the probability distribution of soil moisture, carbon assimilation by photosynthesis and plant water stress, thus providing a more physical basis to a previous stochastic model of soil moisture by the authors.

  19. Organic C and N stabilization in a forest soil: evidence from sequential density fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sollins, P; Swanston, C; Kleber, M; Filley, T; Kramer, M; Crow, S; Caldwell, B; Lajtha, K; Bowden, R

    2005-07-15

    In mineral soil, organic matter (OM) accumulates mainly on and around surfaces of silt- and clay-size particles. When fractionated according to particle density, C and N concentration (per g fraction) and C/N of these soil organo-mineral particles decrease with increasing particle density across soils of widely divergent texture, mineralogy, location, and management. The variation in particle density is explained potentially by two factors: (1) a decrease in the mass ratio of organic to mineral phase of these particles, and (2) variations in density of the mineral phase. The first explanation implies that the thickness of the organic accumulations decreases with increasing particle density. The decrease in C/N can be explained at least partially by especially stable sorption of cationic peptidic compounds (amine, amide, and pyrrole) directly to mineral surfaces, a phenomenon well documented both empirically and theoretically. These peptidic compounds, along with ligand-exchanged carboxylic compounds, could then form a stable inner organic layer onto which less polar organics could sorb more readily than onto the highly charged mineral surfaces (''onion'' layering model). To explore mechanisms underlying this trend in C concentration and C/N with particle density, we sequentially density fractionated an Oregon andic soil at 1.65, 1.85, 2.00, 2.28, and 2.55 g cm{sup -3} and analyzed the six fractions for measures of organic matter and mineral phase properties. All measures of OM composition showed either: (1) a monotonic change with density, or (2) a monotonic change across the lightest fractions, then little change over the heaviest fractions. Total C, N, and lignin phenol concentration all decreased monotonically with increasing density, and {sup 14}C mean residence time (MRT) increased with particle density from ca. 150 y to >980 y in the four organo-mineral fractions. In contrast, C/N, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N concentration all showed the

  20. Statement on the Tianshui Experimental Site of Soil and Water Conservation in 1940s

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei; YANG

    2013-01-01

    The Tianshui Experimental Site of Soil and Water Conservation was set up in 1942.Then the first construction publicized the thinking of soil and water conservation,and popularized the technologies of soil and water conservation and related plants.Their efforts established the foundation of the science of soil and water conservation with the first high-tech and high quality R&D team,and pushed the research of soil and water conservation building on the stage of systematization.All of this provided rare good scientific data and theoretical support for the soil and water conservation and the development of the regional economy in Northwest China.

  1. The Role of Vegetation Dynamics on the Soil Water Balance in Water-Limited Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Rondena, R.; Albertson, J. D.; Mancini, M.

    2003-12-01

    The structure and function of the vegetation regulates the exchange of mass, energy and momentum across the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Vegetation dynamics are usually neglected, other than seasonal phenology, in land surface models (LSMs). However, changes in vegetation densities, influencing the partitioning of incoming solar energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes, can result in long-term changes in both local and global climates (e.g., precipitation and temperature), which in turn will feedback to affect the vegetation growth. In semi-arid regions, this may result in persistent drought and desertification, with substantial impacts on the human populations of these regions through reduction in agricultural productivity and reduction in quantity and quality of water supply. With an objective of finding a simple vegetation model able to accurately simulate the leaf area index (LAI) dynamics, vegetation models of different level of complexity (e.g., including or not the modeling of the root biomass or the modeling of the dead biomass) are developed and compared. The vegetation dynamics models are coupled to a LSM, with the vegetation models providing the green biomass and the LAI evolution through time, and the LSM using this information in the computation of the land surface fluxes and updating the soil water content in the root-zone. We explore the models on a case study of a water limited grass field in California. Results show that a simple vegetation model that simulates the living aboveground green biomass (i.e., with low parameterization and computational efforts) is able to accurately simulate the LAI. Results also highlight the importance of including the plant growth model in the LSM when studying the climate-soil-vegetation interactions and the impact of watershed management practices on the scarce water resources over moderate to long time scales. The inclusion of the vegetation model in the LSM is demonstrated to be essential for assessing the

  2. Influence of Soil Water Retention Properties on Hydrological Cycle and Water Budgeting Module Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Čustović

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of water budgeting module as shown in this paper is represented in phases. By experimental measurement of precipitation and lysimetric measurement of percolation runoff the fi rst phase establishes monthly and annual soil-water budgets of skeletal and clayey soils, and hence the influence of soil water-retention potential on hydrologic cycle and water budget over a four year period in the area of Mostar. Then, a soil-water budget model is simulated in a simplified procedure in order to determine the corresponding soil productive water reserve (R for given soils.In this way, depending on R values, the output parameters of the simulated model may produce different results in: calculated surplus or percolation runoff, real evapotranspiration (RET and water deficit.The lysimetric measuring of the water input and output in skeletal and clayey soils determined significant differences in the water budgets of these, by physical properties, divergent soils. Such correlations indicate that there is a realistic possibility of computing new, relatively reliable and pragmatically significant agro-hydrological parameters using measured precipitation and calculated PET.Also, this paper addresses a correlative analysis between the apple and maize ET on one side, and evaporation measured by Piche and by Class A, as well as PET calculated by Thornthwaite, Turc and Penman, on the other side. The results show a reliable reaction between ET of apple and maize with E by Piche, while the same relation is even more reliable with Class A. Other methods in this correlative analysis are less reliable.

  3. SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT THROUGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    high and step-faulted western sides of the Ethiopian rift system. ... The traditional and indigenous methods were applied and practiced as fallowing land ..... Water Conservation Decision Behavior of .... Current land holding to support the family.

  4. Selenium status in soil, water and essential crops of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazemi Lyly

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts As a contributing factor to health, the trace element selenium (Se is an essential nutrient of special interest for humans and all animals. It is estimated that 0.5 to 1 billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency. In spite of the important role of Se, its concentrations in soil, water and essential crops have not been studied in Iran. Therefore, the main aim of the current study was to determine the Se content of soil, water, and essential crops (rice in North, wheat in Center, date, and pistachio in South of different regions of Iran. Sampling was performed in the North, South, and Central regions of Iran. In each selected area in the three regions, 17 samples of surface soil were collected; samples of water and essential crops were also collected at the same sampling points. Upon preliminary preparation of all samples, the Se concentrations were measured by ICP-OES Model Varian Vista-MPX. The amount of soil-Se was found to be in the range between 0.04 and 0.45 ppm in the studied areas; the Se content of soil in the central region of Iran was the highest compared to other regions (p

  5. The effect of land use on spatial variability of soil water repelency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovský, Andrej; Dlapa, Pavel; Chrenková, Katarína; Šimkovic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency was identified as a fundamental phenomenon during a soil survey dedicated to soil hydrological properties and processes in watersheds of the Little Carpathians Mts. (SW Slovakia). The investigated area represents the viticulture region with various soil management practices. Thus, soils of the region are influenced by deep ploughing during vineyard establishment, by cultivation of vineyards, by reforestation of abandoned vineyards as well as by long-term forestry practices. The soils developed from granitic rocks are naturally susceptible to water repellency development. The obtained results showed marked variability in physical and chemical soil properties. In particular, the soil pH values, the clay and organic carbon contents differed significantly depending on soil management. Due to these differences, the soil water repellency increased from wettable to extremely water repellent approximately in order: deeply ploughed vineyard soils water repellency on infiltration process was observed by means of field experiments.

  6. Biochar Improves Soil Aggregate Stability and Water Availability in a Mollisol after Three Years of Field Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Ma

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of organic amendments on soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, bulk density, aggregate stability, field capacity and plant available water in a representative Chinese Mollisol. Four treatments were as follows: no fertilization (CK, application of inorganic fertilizer (NPK, combined application of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw (NPK+S and addition of biochar with inorganic fertilizer (NPK+B. Our results showed that after three consecutive years of application, the values of soil bulk density were significantly lower in both organic amendment-treated plots than in unamended (CK and NPK plots. Compared with NPK, NPK+B more effectively increased the contents of soil organic carbon, improved the relative proportion of soil macro-aggregates and mean weight diameter, and enhanced field capacity as well as plant available water. Organic amendments had no obvious effect on soil C/N ratio or wilting coefficient. The results of linear regression indicated that the improvement in soil water retention could be attributed to the increases in soil organic carbon and aggregate stability.

  7. Sensible heat balance measurements of soil water evaporation beneath a maize canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the water budget in a cropped field. Few methods are available for continuous and independent measurement of soil water evaporation. A sensible heat balance (SHB) approach has recently been demonstrated for continuously determining soil water evapo...

  8. Morphology of Rain Water Channeling in Systematically Varied Model Sandy Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuli; Cejas, Cesare M.; Barrois, Rémi; Dreyfus, Rémi; Durian, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different rain conditions using a quasi-2D experimental setup and systematically determine the impact of the soil grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the water channeling phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of the soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed rain condition, we combine the effects of the grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to the rain water channeling phenomenon, including prewetting sandy soils at different levels before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  9. Vapor Flow Resistance of Dry Soil Layer to Soil Water Evaporation in Arid Environment: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation from bare sandy soils is the core component of the hydrologic cycle in arid environments, where vertical water movement dominates. Although extensive measurement and modeling studies have been conducted and reported in existing literature, the physics of dry soil and its function in evaporation is still a challenging topic with significant remaining issues. Thus, an overview of the previous findings will be very beneficial for identifying further research needs that aim to advance our understanding of the vapor flow resistance (VFR effect on soil water evaporation as influenced by characteristics of the dry soil layer (DSL and evaporation zone (EZ. In this regard, six measurement and four modeling studies were overviewed. The results of these overviewed studies, along with the others, affirm the conceptual dynamics of DSL and EZ during drying or wetting processes (but not both within dry sandy soils. The VFR effect tends to linearly increase with DSL thickness (δ when δ < 5 cm and is likely to increase as a logarithmic function of δ when δ ≥ 5 cm. The vaporization-condensation-movement (VCM dynamics in a DSL depend on soil textures: sandy soils can form a thick (10 to 20 cm DSL while sandy clay soils may or may not have a clear DSL; regardless, a DSL can function as a transient EZ, a vapor condensation zone, and/or a vapor transport medium. Based on the overview, further studies will need to generate long-term continuous field data, develop hydraulic functions for very dry soils, and establish an approach to quantify the dynamics and VFR effects of DSLs during wetting-drying cycles as well as take into account such effects  when using conventional (e.g., Penman-Monteith evaporation models.

  10. Effect of Clay Content and Soil-water Potential On Mobilization and Leaching of Colloids In Unsaturated Macroporous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, C.; de Jonge, L. W.; Moldrup, P.

    The transport of strongly sorbed environmental contaminants may be enhanced due to sorption to mobile soil colloids. The most common source of mobile colloids in soil is the in-situ release of water-dispersible colloids (WDC), however experimental investigations of colloid mobilization in unsaturated macroporous soil are scarce. An understanding of the arrangement of colloids in aggregates, and the influence of clay on the development of the soil fabric and pore-size distributions is essential for the in- terpretation of colloid mobilization in soils. This emphasizes the important role of clay content, when evaluating the susceptibility of soils to release colloids and associated contaminants. This study was conducted to determine the effect of clay content and initial soil- water potential on colloid mobilization and leaching. Intact soil cores were sampled from an arable field at six locations along a naturally occurring texture gradient. Soil dispersibility was investigated using capillary saturation and drainage of field-moist packed aggregates. The amount of WDC in the soil was measured for each com- bination of clay content and initial soil-water potential (-2.5, -98 and -15530 hPa). Mobilization and leaching of colloids was investigated from unsaturated intact soil cores. The soils were irrigated at low intensity (1 mm/h), and effluent sampling was conducted at 5 cm tension. The results showed that colloid dispersion was significantly affected by both clay con- tent and initial soil-water potential. With a soil-water potential of -15530 hPa the col- loid release was generally low and no variation occurred between the soils. With in- creasing soil-water potential there was an increase in the amount of WDC for all soils. The increase in WDC was negatively correlated with clay content. The leaching of colloids from intact soil cores also decreased with increasing clay content at an ini- tial soil-water potential of -98 and -2.5 hPa, and no difference between

  11. A method to extract soil water for stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, K.; Woods, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to extract soil water for determination of deuterium (D) and 18O content. The principle of this method is based on the observation that water and toluene form an azeotropic mixture at 84.1??C, but are completely immiscible at ambient temperature. In a specially designed distillation apparatus, the soil water is distilled at 84.1??C with toluene and is separated quantitatively in the collecting funnel at ambient temperature. Traces of toluene are removed and the sample can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Kerosene may be substituted for toluene. The accuracy of this technique is ?? 2 and ?? 0.2???, respectively, for ??D and ??18O. Reduced accuracy is obtained at low water contents. ?? 1990.

  12. A New Two-Stage Approach to predicting the soil water characteristic from saturation to oven-dryness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup Jensen, Dan; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2015-01-01

    The present study proposes a new two-step approach to prediction of the continuous soil water characteristic (SWC) from saturation to oven-dryness from a limited number of measured textural data, organic matter content and dry bulk density. The approach combines dry- and wet-region functions...... to pore size fractions and utilizes the capillary rise equation to predict water content and matric potential pairs. Twenty-one Arizona source soils with clay and organic carbon contents ranging from 0.01 to 0.52 kg kg−1 and 0 to 0.07 kg kg−1, respectively, were used for the model development. The SWCs...... to obtain the entire SWC by means of parameterizing a previously developed continuous equation. The dry region function relates gravimetric soil fractions to adsorptive forces and the corresponding water adsorbed to soil particles. The wet region function converts the volumetric particle size fractions...

  13. Modeling benzene permeation through drinking water high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Feng; Ong, Say Kee; Gaunt, James A

    2015-09-01

    Organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-, m-, and p-xylene from contaminated soil and groundwater may permeate through thermoplastic pipes which are used for the conveyance of drinking water in water distribution systems. In this study, permeation parameters of benzene in 25 mm (1 inch) standard inside dimension ratio (SIDR) 9 high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes were estimated by fitting the measured data to a permeation model based on a combination of equilibrium partitioning and Fick's diffusion. For bulk concentrations between 6.0 and 67.5 mg/L in soil pore water, the concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients of benzene were found to range from 2.0×10(-9) to 2.8×10(-9) cm2/s while the solubility coefficient was determined to be 23.7. The simulated permeation curves of benzene for SIDR 9 and SIDR 7 series of HDPE pipes indicated that small diameter pipes were more vulnerable to permeation of benzene than large diameter pipes, and the breakthrough of benzene into the HDPE pipe was retarded and the corresponding permeation flux decreased with an increase of the pipe thickness. HDPE pipes exposed to an instantaneous plume exhibited distinguishable permeation characteristics from those exposed to a continuous source with a constant input. The properties of aquifer such as dispersion coefficients (DL) also influenced the permeation behavior of benzene through HDPE pipes.

  14. Hysteresis and uncertainty in soil water-retention curve parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likos, William J.; Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil hydraulic parameters representing wetting and drying paths are required for predicting hydraulic and mechanical responses in a large number of applications. A comprehensive suite of laboratory experiments was conducted to measure hysteretic soil-water characteristic curves (SWCCs) representing a wide range of soil types. Results were used to quantitatively assess differences and uncertainty in three simplifications frequently adopted to estimate wetting-path SWCC parameters from more easily measured drying curves. They are the following: (1) αw=2αd, (2) nw=nd, and (3) θws=θds, where α, n, and θs are fitting parameters entering van Genuchten’s commonly adopted SWCC model, and the superscripts w and d indicate wetting and drying paths, respectively. The average ratio αw/αd for the data set was 2.24±1.25. Nominally cohesive soils had a lower αw/αd ratio (1.73±0.94) than nominally cohesionless soils (3.14±1.27). The average nw/nd ratio was 1.01±0.11 with no significant dependency on soil type, thus confirming the nw=nd simplification for a wider range of soil types than previously available. Water content at zero suction during wetting (θws) was consistently less than during drying (θds) owing to air entrapment. The θws/θds ratio averaged 0.85±0.10 and was comparable for nominally cohesive (0.87±0.11) and cohesionless (0.81±0.08) soils. Regression statistics are provided to quantitatively account for uncertainty in estimating hysteretic retention curves. Practical consequences are demonstrated for two case studies.

  15. Soil specific re-calibration of water content sensors for a field-scale sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Brown, David J.; Anderson, Todd; Brooks, Erin S.; Yourek, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining accurate soil moisture data from a sensor network requires sensor calibration. Soil moisture sensors are factory calibrated, but multiple site specific factors may contribute to sensor inaccuracies. Thus, sensors should be calibrated for the specific soil type and conditions in which they will be installed. Lab calibration of a large number of sensors prior to installation in a heterogeneous setting may not be feasible, and it may not reflect the actual performance of the installed sensor. We investigated a multi-step approach to retroactively re-calibrate sensor water content data from the dielectric permittivity readings obtained by sensors in the field. We used water content data collected since 2009 from a sensor network installed at 42 locations and 5 depths (210 sensors total) within the 37-ha Cook Agronomy Farm with highly variable soils located in the Palouse region of the Northwest United States. First, volumetric water content was calculated from sensor dielectric readings using three equations: (1) a factory calibration using the Topp equation; (2) a custom calibration obtained empirically from an instrumented soil in the field; and (3) a hybrid equation that combines the Topp and custom equations. Second, we used soil physical properties (particle size and bulk density) and pedotransfer functions to estimate water content at saturation, field capacity, and wilting point for each installation location and depth. We also extracted the same reference points from the sensor readings, when available. Using these reference points, we re-scaled the sensor readings, such that water content was restricted to the range of values that we would expect given the physical properties of the soil. The re-calibration accuracy was assessed with volumetric water content measurements obtained from field-sampled cores taken on multiple dates. In general, the re-calibration was most accurate when all three reference points (saturation, field capacity, and wilting

  16. Predicting the film and lens water volume between soil particles using particle size distribution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, M. H.; Meskini-Vishkaee, F.

    2012-12-01

    SummaryWe develop four conceptual approaches to quantify the volume of water lenses between soil particles (ɛi) and adsorbed water films (δi) coating soil particles based on soil Particle Size Distribution (PSD) data. Method 1 is based on expression of the ɛi as matric suction independent pendular rings and method 2 is based on expression of the ɛi as function of matric suction. Methods 3 and 4 are based on the coupling of δi estimated with van der Waals and electrostatic forces, with ɛi estimated with methods 1 and 2 respectively. We show that the filling angle of the lens water is independent of surface tension but increases with the porosity. The four methods are applied to predict effects of ɛi and δi on Soil Moisture Characteristics (SMC) in eighty soil samples selected from UNSODA database. The total component of the ɛi in soil water content ranged from 0.0111 (L3 L-3) to 0.1604 (L3 L-3), with the average of 0.0703 (L3 L-3) for method 1 and from 0.0082 (L3 L-3) to 0.0523 (L3 L-3), with the average of 0.0237 (L3 L-3) for method 2. The component of δi is less than 0.0121 of each pore water content. Results showed that for methods 1 and 2, the component of the ɛi in the soil water content was partially relevant for the prediction of SMC, especially in dry range. Moreover, the accuracy of the method 1 was slightly greater than that of the method 2. We attribute the methods error to the roughness of soil particles, high surface energy content of clay particles and, to the simplified pore geometric concepts that does not effectively reflect the pore geometry. We conclude that the main advantage of the present approaches is developing two different methods for estimation of the volume of the lens water by using only the PSD data and bulk density which are measured easily.

  17. Relationship Between Meloidogyne hapla Density and Damage to Carrots in Organic Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Vrain, T. C.

    1982-01-01

    Field and growth chamber experiments were conducted to determine the effect of five initial densities (Pi - 20 - 240/100 cm³ soil) of Meloidogyne hapla on carrot development and yield of storage roots at maturity. Carrots growing in infested and noninfested organic soil were harvested after 15, 29, 44, 59, and 106 days of growth in controlled environment chambers and after l l 0 days in field plots. Nematodes affected weight of roots and foliage, weight and length of the storage portion of ta...

  18. A simplified Excel® algorithm for estimating the least limiting water range of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leão Tairone Paiva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The least limiting water range (LLWR of soils has been employed as a methodological approach for evaluation of soil physical quality in different agricultural systems, including forestry, grasslands and major crops. However, the absence of a simplified methodology for the quantification of LLWR has hampered the popularization of its use among researchers and soil managers. Taking this into account this work has the objective of proposing and describing a simplified algorithm developed in Excel® software for quantification of the LLWR, including the calculation of the critical bulk density, at which the LLWR becomes zero. Despite the simplicity of the procedures and numerical techniques of optimization used, the nonlinear regression produced reliable results when compared to those found in the literature.

  19. Water-repellent soil and its relationship to granularity, surface roughness and hydrophobicity: a materials science view

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael; Shirtcliffe, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Considerable soil water repellency has been observed at a wide range of locations worldwide. The soil exhibiting water repellency is found within the upper part of the soil profile. The reduced rate of water infiltration into these soils leads to severe run-off erosion, and reduction of plant growth. Soil water repellency is promoted by drying of soil, and can be induced by fire or intense heating of soil containing hydrophobic organic matter. Recent studies outside of soil science have shown...

  20. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:I.Salt—Water Dynamics in Unsaturated Soils Under Stable Evaporation Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA; 等

    1992-01-01

    A long term simulation test on salt-water dynamics in unsaturated soils with different groundwater depths and soil texture profiles under stable evaporation condition was conducted.Salinity sensors and tensiometers were used to monitor salt and water variation in soils.The experiment revealed that in the process of fresh groundwater moving upwards by capillary rise in the column,the salts in subsoil were brought upwards and accumulated in the surface soil,and consequently the salinization of surface soil took place.The rate of salt accumulation is determined mainly by the volume of capillary water flow and the conditions of salts contained in the soil profile.Water flux in soils decreased obviously when groundwater depths fell below 1.5m.When there was an interbedded clay layer 30cm in thickness in the silty loam soil profile or a clay layer 100cm in thickness at the top layer,the water flux was 3-5 times less than in the soil profile of homogeneous silty loam soil.Therefore,the rate of salt accumulation was decreased and the effect of variation of groundwater depth on the water flux in soils was weakened comparatively.If there was precipitation or irrigation supplying water to the soil,the groundwater could rarely take a direct part in the process of salt accumulation in surface soil,especially,in soil profiles with an interbedded stratum or a clayey surface soil layer.

  1. Application of minidisk infiltrometer to estimate soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Lichner, Ľubomír

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) reduces affinity of soils to water resulting in detrimental implication for plants growth as well as for hydrological processes. During the last decades, it has become clear that SWR is much more widespread than formerly thought, having been reported for a wide variety of soils, land uses and climatic conditions. The repellency index (RI), based on soil-water to soil-ethanol sorptivity ratio, was proposed to characterize subcritical SWR that is the situation where a low degree of repellency impedes infiltration but does not prevent it. The minidisk infiltrometer allows adequate field assessment of RI inherently scaled to account for soil physical properties other than hydrophobicity (e.g., the volume, connectivity and the geometry of pores) that directly influence the hydrological processes. There are however some issues that still need consideration. For example, use of a fixed time for both water and ethanol sorptivity estimation may lead to inaccurate RI values given that water infiltration could be negligible whereas ethanol sorptivity could be overestimated due to influence of gravity and lateral diffusion that rapidly come into play when the infiltration process is very fast. Moreover, water and ethanol sorptivity values need to be determined at different infiltration sites thus implying that a large number of replicated runs should be carried out to obtain a reliable estimate of RI for a given area. Minidisk infiltrometer tests, conducted under different initial soil moisture and management conditions in the experimental sites of Ciavolo, Trapani (Italy) and Javea, Alicante (East Spain), were used to investigate the best applicative procedure to estimate RI. In particular, different techniques to estimate the water, Sw, and ethanol, Se, sorptivities were compared including i) a fixed 1-min time interval, ii) the slope of early-time 1D infiltration equation and iii) the two-term transient 3D infiltration equation that explicitly

  2. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. An automated microinfiltrometer to measure small-scale soil water infiltration properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Dennis C.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed an automated miniature constant-head tension infiltrometer that measures very small infiltration rates at millimetre resolution with minimal demands on the operator. The infiltrometer is made of 2.9 mm internal radius glass tube, with an integrated bubbling tower to maintain constant negative head and a porous mesh tip to avoid air-entry. In the bubbling tower, bubble formation and release changes the electrical resistance between two electrodes at the air-inlet. Tests were conducted on repacked sieved sands, sandy loam soil and clay loam soil, packed to a soil bulk density ρd of 1200 kg m-3 or 1400 kg m-3 and tested either air-dried or at a water potential ψ of -50 kPa. The change in water volume in the infiltrometer had a linear relationship with the number of bubbles, allowing bubble rate to be converted to infiltration rate. Sorptivity measured with the infiltrometer was similar between replicates and showed expected differences from soil texture and ρd, varying from 0.15 ± 0.01 (s.e. mm s-1/2 for 1400 kg m-3 clay loam at ψ = -50 kPa to 0.65 ± 0.06 mm s-1/2 for 1200 kg m-3 air dry sandy loam soil. An array of infiltrometers is currently being developed so many measurements can be taken simultaneously.

  4. The influence of vegetation on soil water repellency-markers and soil hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiefei; Nierop, Klaas G J; Rietkerk, Max; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Dekker, Stefan C

    2016-10-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) markers are defined as hydrophobic compounds in soil causing SWR and are mainly derived from plants. Previous studies have shown the types and abundance of SWR-markers in soils. However, how these SWR-markers are exactly related to SWR and their origin is poorly understood. This study aims to understand the relationship between SWR-markers, vegetation type and cover and SWR for a simple sandy soil ecosystem, consisting of oaks with sedge and six grass species. All the soil (at different depth) and vegetation samples were collected in the field along a 6m transect, starting from an oak tree. Further along the transect grasses and sedges became more abundant. Free and ester-bound lipids from soils and plant leaves/roots were obtained using a sequential extraction method and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Significant linear correlations were found between the main soil characteristics, such as total organic carbon content, and SWR. Single long-chain (>C20) SWR-markers derived from both plant leaf waxes and roots positively related to SWR. Both ester-bound ω-hydroxy fatty acids and C22 and C24 α,ω-dicarboxylic acids were predominantly present in the grass roots, but to a lesser extent in the roots of oak and sedge. These suberin-derived ω-hydroxy fatty acids and α,ω-dicarboxylic acids characteristic of roots could well predict the SWR. Additionally, the SWR predictors abundantly present in the soils matched well with high concentrations of the corresponding biomarkers in the dominant vegetation species that covered the soils. Our analyses demonstrated that grass roots influenced SWR more due to their more substantial contribution of organic matter to the topsoils than oak roots. This led to a stronger SWR of the soils covered with grass than those covered with oak vegetation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of soil pollution on water for mixing of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M. Cecilia Soto; Tapia Alvarez, Carolina; Decinti Weiss, Alejandra; Zamorano Vargas, Macarena; Corail Sanchez, Camila; Hurtado Nuñez, Camilo; Guzman Hermosilla, Matías; Pardo Fabregat, Francisco; Vidal, Manuel Miguel Jordan; Borras, Jaume Bech; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    ISO 12439, in addition to chemical and physical requirements, establishes maximum levels for harmful substances that may be present in the mixing water of concrete, when they come from natural sources from contaminated soils. These harmful substances considered in the ISO are sugars, phosphates (P2O5), nitrate (NO3-), lead (P2+) and zinc (Zn2+). As an alternative to the maximum values, ISO verifies the effect of these substances in water from contaminated soils. This measurement is made on the effect on the mechanical strength of the concrete (compression at 7 and 28 days) and the setting times (start and end setting). This paper presents the results obtained on samples of concrete made with smaller, similar and more content to the maximum levels set by ISO 12439 are presented. The results establish that in the case of nitrate, a substance present in many contaminated soils margins resistance variation or setting times allowed by ISO 12439 are not met. Finally, it is concluded that in case of presence of these pollutants should be performed strength tests and setting times before authorizing the use of water. Keywords: Harmful substances, contaminated soils, water pollution.

  6. Water flow in soil from organic dairy rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Eriksen, Jørgen; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2017-01-01

    and fertilizer practice on the movement of water through sandy loam soil profiles were investigated in managed grassland of a dairy operation. Experiments using tracer chemicals were performed, with or without cattle slurry application, with cutting or grazing, in the 1st and the 3rd year of ley, and in winter...

  7. Soil and water conservation investments and rural development in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, N.; Bao, X.; Li, R.; Lu, K.; Feng, S.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a unique set of annual provincial data on soil and water conservation (SWC) investments during the period 1989–2005 to estimate the impact of such investments on the extent and severity of erosion, the growth rate of agricultural gross domestic product (GDP) and rural poverty reducti

  8. Water repellency of soils; the influence of ambient relative humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doerr, S.H.; Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.; Shakesby, R.A.; Bryant, R.

    2002-01-01

    Adverse effects of soil water repellency (hydrophobicity) are of concern during or following rainfall or irrigation, and are often preceded by conditions of high atmospheric relative humidity (RH). Assessments of repellency are, however, commonly conducted on air-dried samples at ambient laboratory

  9. Using Gypsum to Affect Soil Erosion Processes and Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    A driving force in soil erosion is the low electrolyte content of rain water. Various electrolyte sources have proven useful in serving as electrolyte sources such as phosphogypsum, lime and various salts, however, each has other potential problems. We performed a number of studies on low cost gypsu...

  10. Effective Calibration of Low-Cost Soil Water Content Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heye Reemt Bogena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil water content is a key variable for understanding and modelling ecohydrological processes. Low-cost electromagnetic sensors are increasingly being used to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water content, despite the reduced accuracy of such sensors as compared to reference electromagnetic soil water content sensing methods such as time domain reflectometry. Here, we present an effective calibration method to improve the measurement accuracy of low-cost soil water content sensors taking the recently developed SMT100 sensor (Truebner GmbH, Neustadt, Germany as an example. We calibrated the sensor output of more than 700 SMT100 sensors to permittivity using a standard procedure based on five reference media with a known apparent dielectric permittivity (1 < Ka < 34.8. Our results showed that a sensor-specific calibration improved the accuracy of the calibration compared to single “universal” calibration. The associated additional effort in calibrating each sensor individually is relaxed by a dedicated calibration setup that enables the calibration of large numbers of sensors in limited time while minimizing errors in the calibration process.

  11. Soil Organic Carbon Density in Hebei Province, China:Estimates and Uncertainty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong-Cun; SHI Xue-Zheng; YU Dong-Sheng; T. F. PAGELLA; SUN Wei-Xia; XU Xiang-Hua

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the precision of soil organic carbon (SOC) estimates, the sources of uncertainty in soil organic carbon density (SOCD) estimates and SOC stocks were examined using 363 soil profiles in Hebei Province, China, with three methods: the soil profile statistics (SPS), GIS-based soil type (GST), and kriging interpolation (KI). The GST method, utilizing both pedological professional knowledge and GIS technology, was considered the most accurate method of the three estimations, with SOCD estimates for SPS 10% lower and KI 10% higher. The SOCD range for GST was 84% wider than KI as KI smoothing effect narrowed the SOCD range. Nevertheless, the coefficient of variation for SOCD with KI (41.7%) was less than GST and SPS. Comparing SOCD's lower estimates for SPS versus GST, the major sources of uncertainty were the conflicting area of proportional relations. Meanwhile, the fewer number of soil profiles and the necessity of using the smoothing effect with KI were its sources of uncertainty. Moreover, for local detailed variations of SOCD, GST was more advantageous in reflecting the distribution pattern than KI.

  12. Predicting Soil-Air and Soil-Water Transport Properties During Soil Vapor Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe

    designing and operating remediation systems. Simple and accurate models for estimating soil properties from soil parameters that are easy to measure are useful in connection with preliminary remedial investigations and evaluation of remedial technologies. In this work simple models for predicting transport...

  13. Modelling the water balance of irrigated fields in tropical floodplain soils using Hydrus-1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Abebech; Frankl, Amaury; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Tilahun, Seifu; Alamirew, Tena; Adgo, Enyew; Nyssen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimation of evaporation, transpiration and deep percolation is crucial in irrigated agriculture and the sustainable management of water resources. Here, the Hydrus-1D process-based numerical model was used to estimate the actual transpiration, soil evaporation and deep percolation from irrigated fields of floodplain soils. Field experiments were conducted from Dec 2015 to May 2016 in a small irrigation scheme (50 ha) called 'Shina' located in the Lake Tana floodplains of Ethiopia. Six experimental plots (three for onion and three for maize) were selected along a topographic transect to account for soil and groundwater variability. Irrigation amount (400 to 550 mm during the growing period) was measured using V-notches installed at each plot boundary and daily groundwater levels were measured manually from piezometers. There was no surface runoff observed in the growing period and rainfall was measured using a manual rain gauge. All daily weather data required for the evapotranspiration calculation using Pen Man Monteith equation were collected from a nearby metrological station. The soil profiles were described for each field to include the vertical soil heterogeneity in the soil water balance simulations. The soil texture, organic matter, bulk density, field capacity, wilting point and saturated moisture content were measured for all the soil horizons. Soil moisture monitoring at 30 and 60 cm depths was performed. The soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon was estimated using KNN pedotransfer functions for tropical soils and were effectively fitted using the RETC program (R2= 0.98±0.011) for initial prediction. A local sensitivity analysis was performed to select and optimize the most important hydraulic parameters for soil water flow in the unsaturated zone. The most sensitive parameters were saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), saturated moisture content (θs) and pore size distribution (n). Inverse modelling using Hydrus-1D further optimized

  14. Mapping soil resistance under different soil water content conditions using indicator kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras-Avalos, J. M.; Bonnin-Acosta, J.; Sande-Fouz, P.; Pereira-Lanças, K.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.

    2009-04-01

    In many agricultural problems, it is of interest to map the zones where the variable under study shows the probability of being greater than a threshold value. Soil resistances higher than 2 MPa might difficult the establishment of cultures; therefore, further management or tillage techniques should be undertaken. The aim of this work was to map soil resistance using geostatistical techniques, therefore, an analysis of the spatial distribution of soil compaction and the influence of soil water content on the resistance to penetration was carried out. The studied clay-textured soil was managed under no-tillage practices. Soil resistance was described by the cone index which was obtained using a penetrometer. This attribute was assessed at 5 different depths, i.e. 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, 30-40 cm and deeper than 40 cm, whereas soil water content was described at 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm. In the end, 73 data points were surveyed. Soil water conditions varied during the five different samplings. Statistical analysis showed that datasets followed a normal distribution, therefore, no transformation was required. Studied attributes showed low and non-significant correlation coefficients which impeded the application of cross-variogram and cokriging techniques. Because of the limited number of measured data, only the omnidirectional semivariogram was computed, and hence the spatial variability is assumed to be identical in all directions. Spatial dependence was observed in 33 out of 35 data series, both for cone index and soil water content. Fitted theoretical structures corresponded to exponential models in 20 cases, 10 Gaussian models and 3 spherical models. Nugget effect varied from 0 to 44.4 depending on the dataset and spatial dependence maximum range was 90 m. A strong spatial dependence was observed in 18 of the data sets whereas only 2 showed a weak autocorrelation. Taking into account the 2 MPa threshold, indicator kriging was used to map the soil resistance

  15. Effect of maize canopy and water repellency on moisture patterns in a Dutch black plaggen soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Man-made raised sandy soils in the Netherlands are classified as `brown' or `black' plaggen soils. When dry, the brown soils are wettable, but the black soils are water repellent. For one growing season, transects were sampled in a maize cropped black plaggen soil at the Heino experimental farm. Due

  16. A Manual on Conservation of Soil and Water. Appropriate Technologies for Development. R-38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    In order to keep the land productive, a good conservation program is imperative. The primary purpose of soil and water conservation is to prevent soil erosion and heal its scars. This handbook explains the causes, processes, and consequences of soil erosion and depletion, and describes major soil- and water-conservation measures. This book was…

  17. Predicting subgrid variability of soil water content from basic soil information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W.; Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Vanderborght, J.; Schuh, M.; Priesack, E.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of unresolved soil water content variability within model grid cells (i.e., subgrid variability) is important for accurate predictions of land-surface energy and hydrologic fluxes. Here we derived a closed-form expression to describe how soil water content variability depends on mean soil water content (σθ()) using stochastic analysis of 1-D unsaturated gravitational flow based on the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model. A sensitivity analysis showed that the n parameter strongly influenced both the shape and magnitude of the maximum of σθ(). The closed-form expression was used to predict σθ() for eight data sets with varying soil texture using VGM parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions that rely on available soil information. Generally, there was good agreement between observed and predicted σθ() despite the obvious simplifications that were used to derive the closed-form expression. Furthermore, the novel closed-form expression was successfully used to inversely estimate the variability of hydraulic properties from observed σθ() data.

  18. When do Acacia mellifera trees use water? Responses of sap velocity to soil water availability, vapour pressure deficit and global radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Thomsen, Simon; Gröngröft, Alexander; Eschenbach, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Acacia mellifera (multi-stem deciduous tree) is one of the dominant woody species responsible for bush encroachment in southern African savannahs. However, very little is known on water use, transpiration or xylem sap flow of A. mellifera. We analyzed the responses of sap velocity in A. mellifera to soil moisture, vapour pressure deficit and global radiation. This knowledge is necessary to improve hydrological modelling and will as such contribute to our understanding of the impacts of bush encroachment in (semi) arid savannahs on the soil water balance. We monitored sap velocities at two sites that differed in tree density in a semi-arid thornbush savannah in central Namibia (mean annual precipitation = 346 mm). Sap velocities were derived using the Heat Ratio Method. Measurements were done in four periods of 3-4 months between November 2014 and September 2016. The measurement periods covered the transitions between the dry and rainy season and vice versa, and the dry season. In two of these periods we did measurements at all stems of three trees per site (a total of 17-19 stems), while in the other two periods sap velocities were measured on one stem per tree for six to eight trees per site. The study was done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management) granted by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Preliminary results indicate that the day-to-day fluctuations in cumulative daily sap velocity showed a three-phase interaction with soil water tension (minimum soil water tension of four sensors to 1-m depth). Phase I: At soil water tension radiation. Phase II: At soil water tensions between pF 2.5 and pF 3.2, sap velocities were negatively related to soil water tension. Phase III: At soil water tensions > pF 3.2 no sap flow could be detected.

  19. Regional Differences and Characteristics of Soil Organic Carbon Density Between Dry Land and Paddy Field in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; RUI Wen-yi; BIAN Xin-min; ZHANG Wei-jian

    2007-01-01

    Study on the regional characteristics of soil organic carbon (SOC) density in farmland will not only contribute greatly to the technique of soil productivity enhancement, but also give evidences of technique selection and policy making for carbon sequestration in soils. Based on the second national soil survey of China, the situation of SOC density in the plow layer of farmland was analyzed under different land use patterns. Results showed that SOC density in the plow layer was about 3.15 kg m-2 in average ranging from 0.81 to 12.68 kg m-2. The highest density was found in the southeastern region with an average of 3.63 kg m-2, while the lowest occurring in the northwestern region with an average of 3.00 kg m-2. The variation coefficient of SOC density in the plow layer of farmland was 57%, which was 35% lower than that of non-farmland soils. Compared to SOC density in the dry land, SOC density in paddy soils was 13% higher with a lower variation coefficient between different regions. In addition, the relationships between the climatic factors (annual average temperature and precipitation) and SOC density were lower in farmland than those in non-farmland soils, as well as lower in paddy soils than those in dry land of farmland. These results suggest that anthropogenic disturbances have great impacts on SOC density in farmland soils, especially in paddy soils, indicating that Chinese rice cropping may contribute greatly to the SOC stability and sequestration in paddy field.

  20. Aerobic degradation and photolysis of tylosin in water and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dingfei; Coats, Joel R

    2007-05-01

    Veterinary antibiotics enter the environment through the application of organic fertilizers to cropland. In this study, the aerobic degradation of tylosin, a widely used antibiotic in the production of livestock and poultry, was conducted in water and in soil in an effort to further investigate its environmental fate. Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic, which consists of four factors (A, B, C, D). Water and soil were sampled at selected times and analyzed for tylosin and its degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with product identification confirmed by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Tylosin A is degraded with a half-life of 200 d in the light in water, and the total loss of tylosin A in the dark is 6% of the initial spiked amount during the experimental period. Tylosin C and D are relatively stable except in ultrapure water in the light. Slight increases of tylosin B after two months and formation of two photoreaction isomers of tylosin A were observed under exposure to light. However, tylosin probably would degrade faster if the experimental containers did not prevent ultraviolet transmission. In soil, tylosin A has a dissipation half-life of 7 d, and tylosin D is slightly more stable, with a dissipation half-life of 8 d in unsterilized and sterilized soil. Sorption and abiotic degradation are the major factors influencing the loss of tylosin in the environment, and no biotic degradation was observed at the test concentration either in pond water or in an agronomic soil, as determined by comparing dissipation profiles in sterilized and unsterilized conditions.

  1. How can climate, soil, and monitoring schedule affect temporal stability of soil water contents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal stability (TS) of soil water content (SWC) reflects the spatio-temporal organization of soil water. The TS SWC was originally recognized as a phenomenon that can be used to provide temporal average SWC of an area of interest from observations at a representative location(s). Currently application fields of TS SWC are numerous, e.g. up- and downscaling SWC, SWC monitoring and data assimilation, precision farming, and sensor network design and optimization. However, the factors that control the SWC organization and TS SWC are not completely understood. Among these factors are soil hydraulic properties that are considered as local controls, weather patterns, and the monitoring schedule. The objective of this work was to use modeling to assess the effect of these factors on the spatio-temporal patterns of SWC. We ran the HYDRUS6 code to simulate four years of SWC in 4-m long soil columns. The columns were assumed homogeneous, soil hydraulic conductivity was drawn from lognormal distributions. Sets of columns were generated separately for sandy loam and loamy soils, soil water retention was set to typical values for those soil textures. Simulations were carried out for four climates present at the continental US. The climate-specific weather patterns were obtained with the CLIGEN code using climate-specific weather observation locations that were humid subtropical from College Station (TX), humid continental from Indianapolis (IN), cold semiarid from Moscow (ID) and hot semiarid from Tucson (AZ). We evaluated the TS and representative location (RL) selections by comparing i) different climates; ii) for the same climates different years; iii) different time intervals between samplings; iv) one year duration surveys vs. one month summer campaigns; and v) different seasons of the same year. Spatial variability of the mean relative differences (MRD) differed among climates for both soils, as the probability of observing the same variance in the MRD was lower than

  2. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  3. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  4. Soil quality assessment of urban green space under long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Sidan; Chen, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    Reclaimed water is widely used for landscape irrigation with the benefits of saving fresh water and ameliorating soil quality. Field samples were collected from seven parks in Beijing irrigated reclaimed water with different irrigation history in 2011 and 2014 to evaluate the long-term impacts of reclaimed water irrigation on soil quality. Soil quality index method was used to assess the comprehensive effects of reclaimed water irrigation on soil. Results showed that the effects of reclaimed water irrigation on the soil nutrient conditions were limited. Compared with tap water irrigation, soil salinity was significantly higher in 2011, while the difference was insignificant in 2014; soil heavy metals were slightly higher by 0.5-10.6 % in 2011 and 2014, while the differences were insignificant. Under reclaimed water irrigation, soil biological activities were significantly improved in both years. Total nitrogen in reclaimed water had a largest effect on soil quality irrigated reclaimed water. Soil quality irrigated with reclaimed water increased by 2.6 and 6.8 % respectively in 2011 and 2014, while the increases were insignificant. Soil quality of almost half samples was more than or closed to soil quality of natural forest in Beijing. Soil quality was ameliorated at some extent with long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

  5. Artificial Neural Networks for Estimating Soil Water Retention Curve Using Fitted and Measured Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirzah Moreira de Melo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks for estimating the soil water retention curve have been developed considering measured data and require a large quantity of soil samples because only retention curve data obtained for the same set of matric potentials can be used. In order to preclude this drawback, we present two ANN models which tested the performance of ANNs trained with fitted water contents data. These models were compared to a recent new ANN approach for predicting water retention curve, the pseudocontinuous pedotransfer functions (PTFs, which is also an attempt to deal with limited data. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis was carried out to verify the influence of each input parameter on each output. Results showed that fitted ANNs provided similar statistical indexes in predicting water contents to those obtained by the pseudocontinuous method. Sensitivity analysis revealed that bulk density and porosity are the most important parameters for predicting water contents in wet regime, whereas sand and clay contents are more significant in drier conditions. The sensitivity analysis for the pseudocontinuous method demonstrated that the natural logarithm of the matric potential became the most important parameter, and the influences of all other inputs were reduced to be not relevant, except the bulk density.

  6. Soil erosion by water - model concepts and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated surface runoff events, whose erosional effects are determined by numerous temporally and spatially varying variables. Thus the monitoring of soil loss by direct observation is extremely limited with respect to space and time. Usually observation plots cover an area of less than 100 m2 and the observation period is less than 10 years. In order to estimate soil losses by water erosion for others than empirically observable conditions, mathematical models are needed, which are able to describe the interaction of the different physical mechanisms involved either statistically or on the basis of physical algorithms. Such models are absolutely essential for risk prognoses on catchment and regional scale. Besides the aspect of soil conservation the delivery of sediments and sediment bound pollutants into surface water bodies are of increasing relevance in this context. Based on an exemplary selection of existing water erosion models this contribution aims to give an overview over different mathematical approaches used for the description of particle detachment, transport and deposition of soil particles. According to the chronology in the development of soil erosion models empirical algorithms will be presented first based on the USLE approach. However, since purely empirical models like USLE are limited to the estimation of annual soil loss further attempts in soil erosion modelling are focussed on event based estimations considering the fact that soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated runoff events. One of the first models of this type was CREAMS using physically based algorithms in combination with empirical ones in order to describe the basic erosion processes. Today there are diverse soil erosion models available following in principle the CREAMS concept but using different algorithms in detail. Concerning particle detachment, transport and deposition alternative

  7. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macropore characteristics inferred from X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, S.; Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil macropores often control fluid flow and solute transport, and quantification of macropore characteristics including their variability in space and time are essential to predict soil hydraulic and hydrogeochemical functions. In this study, measurements of air and solute transport properties...... and direct macropore visualization by X-ray CT scanning were carried out on 17 large (19-cm diam.; 20-cm length) undisturbed soil columns sampled across a field site (Silstrup, Denmark) with natural gradients in texture and density. Air permeability (ka) at in-situ water content and -20 hPa of matric...

  8. Soil water and transpirable soil water fraction variability within vineyards of the Penedès DO (NE Spain) affected by management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepción Ramos, Maria

    2015-04-01

    This work investigated the variability in soil water recorded within the vineyard plots related to soil properties and management practices and its influence on the transpirable sol water fraction. The study was carried out in vineyards in the Penedès Designation of Origin, planted with Chardonnay, with different disturbance degree and with compost treated and untreated areas within the plots. The response in years with different rainfall distributions, included years with extreme situations were evaluated. The main soil types are Typic Xerorthent and Calcixerollic Xerorthent and soil is bare most of the time. Soil water content was measured at different depths using TDR probes. The transpirable soil water fraction was estimated as the ratio between available soil water (ASW) at a given date and the total transpirable soil water (TTSW). TTSW was estimated as the soil water reserve held between an upper and lower limit (respectively, the soil water content near field capacity and soil water content at the end of a dry summer) and integrated over the estimated effective rooting depth. Both minimum and maximum soil water values varied within the plot at all depths. On the surface the minimum values ranged between 4.45 to about 10%, while on deeper layers it ranged between 7.8 and 17.8%. Regarding the maximum value varied between 17.45 and 24.8%. The transpirable soil water fraction for a given year varied significantly within the plot, with differences greater than 20% between the treated and untreated areas. The results were more exacerbated in the driest years an in those with more irregular distribution. Water available has a significant effect on yield. The results indicate the need of using different strategies for water management within the plots.

  9. Evaluation of soil and water salinity for irrigation in North-eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... soils, water, climate, drainage condition and irrigation methods before action are crucial for sustainability of ... semiarid regions results in land degradation through soil ..... Impact of climate change on the water resources of.

  10. Impacts of grass removal on wetting and actual water repellency in a sandy soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klaas Oostindie; Louis W. Dekker; Jan G. Wesseling; Violette Geissen; Coen J. Ritsema

    2017-01-01

    Soil water content and actual water repellency were assessed for soil profiles at two sites in a bare and grasscovered plot of a sand pasture, to investigate the impact of the grass removal on both properties...

  11. Archaeol: An Indicator of Methanogenesis in Water-Saturated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. H. Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxic soils typically are a sink for methane due to the presence of high-affinity methanotrophic Bacteria capable of oxidising methane. However, soils experiencing water saturation are able to host significant methanogenic archaeal communities, potentially affecting the capacity of the soil to act as a methane sink. In order to provide insight into methanogenic populations in such soils, the distribution of archaeol in free and conjugated forms was investigated as an indicator of fossilised and living methanogenic biomass using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring. Of three soils studied, only one organic matter-rich site contained archaeol in quantifiable amounts. Assessment of the subsurface profile revealed a dominance of archaeol bound by glycosidic headgroups over phospholipids implying derivation from fossilised biomass. Moisture content, through control of organic carbon and anoxia, seemed to govern trends in methanogen biomass. Archaeol and crenarchaeol profiles differed, implying the former was not of thaumarcheotal origin. Based on these results, we propose the use of intact archaeol as a useful biomarker for methanogen biomass in soil and to track changes in moisture status and aeration related to climate change.

  12. Soil water repellency and infiltration in coarse-textured soils of burned and unburned sagebrush ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millions of dollars are spent each year in the United States to mitigate the effects of wildfires and reduce the risk of flash floods and debris flows. Research from forested, chaparral, and rangeland communities indicate severe wildfires can cause significant increases in soil water repellency res...

  13. Soil water repellency and infiltration in coarse-textured soils of burned and unburned sagebrush ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. B. Pierson; P. R. Robichaud; C. A. Moffet; K. E. Spaeth; C. J. Williams; S. P. Hardegree; P. E. Clark

    2008-01-01

    Millions of dollars are spent each year in the United States to mitigate the effects of wildfires and reduce the risk of flash floods and debris flows. Research from forested, chaparral, and rangeland communities indicate that severe wildfires can cause significant increases in soil water repellency resulting in increased runoff and erosion. Few data are available to...

  14. Influence of the initial soil water content on Beerkan water infiltration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassabatere, L.; Loizeau, S.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Winiarski, T.; Rossier, Y.; Delolme, C.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and modeling of water flow in the vadose zone are important with regards water management and infiltration devices design. Water infiltration process clearly depends on initial soil water content, in particular for sandy soils with high organic matter content. This study investigates the influence of initial water content on water infiltration in a hydrophobic sandy soil and on the related derivation of hydraulic parameters using the BEST algorithm (Lassabatere et al., 2006). The studied sandy soil has a high total organic content decreasing from 3.5% (w/w) at the surface to 0.5% (w/w) below 1cm depth. The highest TOC at surface was due to the presence of a dense biofilm and resulted in a high surface hydrophobicity under dry conditions (low initial water contents). The water infiltration experiments consisted in infiltrating known volumes of water through a simple ring at null pressure head (Beerkan method). The infiltrations were performed during three successive days after a dry period with a storm event between the first and the second day (5 mm) and another between the second and the third day (35 mm). These events resulted in an increase in initial water contents, from less than 5% for the first day to around 10% for the last day. Experiments were performed for appropriate conditions for Beerkan experiments: initial water contents below 1/4 of the saturated water content and uniform water profile resulting from water redistribution after each rainfall event. The analysis of the infiltration data clearly highlights the strong effect of hydrophobicity. For the driest initial conditions (first day), infiltration rates increased with time, whereas they decreased with time for wetter conditions. Such a decrease agreed with the principles of water infiltration without hydrophobicity. In addition, total cumulative infiltrations were far higher for the wettest conditions. Regarding hydraulic characterization, only the data obtained during the last

  15. The effect of plant water storage on water fluxes within the coupled soil-plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Ward, Eric J; Duman, Tomer; Manoli, Gabriele; Parolari, Anthony J; Katul, Gabriel G

    2017-02-01

    In addition to buffering plants from water stress during severe droughts, plant water storage (PWS) alters many features of the spatio-temporal dynamics of water movement in the soil-plant system. How PWS impacts water dynamics and drought resilience is explored using a multi-layer porous media model. The model numerically resolves soil-plant hydrodynamics by coupling them to leaf-level gas exchange and soil-root interfacial layers. Novel features of the model are the considerations of a coordinated relationship between stomatal aperture variation and whole-system hydraulics and of the effects of PWS and nocturnal transpiration (Fe,night) on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in the soil. The model results suggest that daytime PWS usage and Fe,night generate a residual water potential gradient (Δψp,night) along the plant vascular system overnight. This Δψp,night represents a non-negligible competing sink strength that diminishes the significance of HR. Considering the co-occurrence of PWS usage and HR during a single extended dry-down, a wide range of plant attributes and environmental/soil conditions selected to enhance or suppress plant drought resilience is discussed. When compared with HR, model calculations suggest that increased root water influx into plant conducting-tissues overnight maintains a more favorable water status at the leaf, thereby delaying the onset of drought stress.

  16. Spatial variability of soil water conductivities obtained with classical laboratory methods and their relation to electrical resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Annette; Nemes, Attila; Bloem, Esther; Patterson, Matthew; Giménez, Daniel; Szõcs, Júlia; Koestel, Johannes; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Soil water conductivity plays a critical role when estimating water transport using the Richard's equation. Modelers often take one value of the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) per soil layer and that value is decreased for unsaturated conditions following the equations of Mualem and van Genuchten. This approach can lead to inconsistencies between model and natural soil, because in the field Ksat can vary by several orders of magnitude on short (centimeter) distances and Ksat often expresses water movement through macropores which cannot be downscaled without caution towards matrix flux. To improve existing knowledge we established a field experiment on an agriculturally used silty clay loam (Stagnosol) in SE Norway. More than 100 undisturbed soil samples were taken to determine soil water retention, saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities and bulk density in the laboratory. A subset of these samples was scanned at the computer tomography facility at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala with special emphasis on characterizing macroporosity. Centimeter to decimeter scale heterogeneities were investigated in the field by using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a quasi-3D and a real 3D approach. The latter covered the soil volume of 2x1x1 m where the soil samples were taken. We will present comparisons between hydraulic conductivities obtained in the laboratory using different methods, and between laboratory hydraulic conductivity results and electrical resistivities obtained in the field.

  17. Influences affecting the soil-water characteristic curve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jian; YU Jian-lin

    2005-01-01

    The soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC) is the primary partially saturated soil information as its behavior and properties can be derived from it. Although there have been many studies of unsaturated soils and the SWCC, there is still no combined constitutive model that can simulate soil characteristics accurately. In cases when hydraulic hysteresis is dominant (e.g.under cyclic loading) it is particularly important to use the SWCC. In the past decades, several mathematical expressions have been proposed to model the curve. There are various influences on the SWCC as a source of information, so the curves obtained from conventional tests often cannot be directly applied;and the mathematical expressions from one scenario cannot be used to simulate another situation. The effects of void ratio, initial water content, stress state and high suction were studied in this work revealing that water content and stress state are more important than the other effects;but that the influences tend to decrease when suction increases. The van Genuchten model was modified to simulate better the changes in the degree of saturation at low values of suction. Predictions were compared with experimental results to determine the simulation capability of the model.

  18. Distribution of available soil water capacity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUWenzuo; LIUGaohuan; PANJianjun; FENGXianfeng

    2005-01-01

    The available soil water capacity (ASWC) is important for studying crop production, agro-ecological zoning, irrigation planning, and land cover changes. Laboratory determined data of ASWC are often not available for most of soil profiles and the nationwide ASWC largely remains lacking in relevant soil data in China. This work was to estimate ASWC based on physical and chemical properties and analyze the spatial distribution of ASWC in China. The pedo-transfer functions (PTFs), derived from 220 survey data of ASWC, and the empirical data of ASWC based on soil texture were applied to quantify the ASWC. GIS technology was used to develop a spatial file of ASWC in China and the spatial distribution of ASWC was also analyzed. The results showed the value of ASWC ranges from 15×10-2 cm3·cm-3 to 22×10-2 cm3·cm-3 for most soil types, and few soil types are lower than 15×10-2 cm3·cm-3 or higher than 22×10-2 cm3·cm-3, The ASWC is different according to the complex soil types and their distribution, It is higher in the east than that in the west, and the values reduce from south to north except the northeastern part of China. The “high” values of ASWC appear in southeast, northeastern mountain regions and Northeast China Plain. The relatively “high” values of ASWC appear in Sichuan basin, Huang-Huai-Hai plain and the east of Inner Mongolia. The relatively “low” values are distributed in the west and the Loess Plateau of China. The “very low” value regions are the northern Tibetan Plateau and the desertified areas in northern China. In some regions, the ASWC changes according to the complex topography and different types of soils. Though there remains precision limitation, the spatial data of ASWC derived from this study are improved on current data files of soil water retention properties for Chinese soils. This study presents basic data and analysis methods for estimation and evaluation of ASWC in China.

  19. Integrated double mulching practices optimizes soil temperature and improves soil water utilization in arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen; Feng, Fuxue; Zhao, Cai; Yu, Aizhong; Hu, Falong; Chai, Qiang; Gan, Yantai; Guo, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Water shortage threatens agricultural sustainability in many arid and semiarid areas of the world. It is unknown whether improved water conservation practices can be developed to alleviate this issue while increasing crop productivity. In this study, we developed a "double mulching" system, i.e., plastic film coupled with straw mulch, integrated together with intensified strip intercropping. We determined (i) the responses of soil evaporation and moisture conservation to the integrated double mulching system and (ii) the change of soil temperature during key plant growth stages under the integrated systems. Experiments were carried out in northwest China in 2009 to 2011. Results show that wheat-maize strip intercropping in combination with plastic film and straw covering on the soil surface increased soil moisture (mm) by an average of 3.8 % before sowing, 5.3 % during the wheat and maize co-growth period, 4.4 % after wheat harvest, and 4.9 % after maize harvest, compared to conventional practice (control). The double mulching decreased total evapotranspiration of the two intercrops by an average of 4.6 % ( P < 0.05), compared to control. An added feature was that the double mulching system decreased soil temperature in the top 10-cm depth by 1.26 to 1.31 °C in the strips of the cool-season wheat, and by 1.31 to 1.51 °C in the strips of the warm-season maize through the 2 years. Soil temperature of maize strips higher as 1.25 to 1.94 °C than that of wheat strips in the top 10-cm soil depth under intercropping with the double mulching system; especially higher as 1.58 to 2.11 °C under intercropping with the conventional tillage; this allows the two intercrops to grow in a well "collaborative" status under the double mulching system during their co-growth period. The improvement of soil moisture and the optimization of soil temperature for the two intercrops allow us to conclude that wheat-maize intensification with the double mulching system can be used as an

  20. [Water productivity of apple orchards with different planting densities in semi-arid mountainous regions of Loess Plateau, Northwest China: a simulation study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Fan, Peng; Cao, Yu; Guo, Zheng; Yang, Xiao-Li

    2013-10-01

    By adopting the revised WinEPIC model, a simulation study was conducted to investigate the responses of the apple yield and deeper soil moisture content to 7 planting densities in the appl orchards in Yan'an of Shaanxi and in Jingning of Gansu in 1965-2009. Under the 7 planting densities, the annual yields of the 4-45 years apple orchards increased rapidly at early growth stage, and then decreased with fluctuation after reached the maximum. The higher the planting density, the higher the annual yield was obtained at early growth stage, but the yield at late growth stage fluctuated dramatically with annual precipitation. The orchards with different planting densities had the similar soil water stress process, i. e., no water stress at early growth stage, and water stress occurred and fluctuated dramatically with increasing planting years. The days of water stress at late growth stage changed oppositely to annual precipitation. At early growth stage, the soil available moisture content in 0-15 m layer under the 7 planting densities all decreased rapidly with strong fluctuation, ranged in a low level of 0-600 mm after 17-22 years in Yan' an and after 13-20 years in Jingning. The soil moisture content in 0-15 m layer changed similarly under different planting densities, i. e., decreased gradually with the deepening of soil desiccation, and the stable depth of drying layer could reach 12 m. Considering the apple yield and the soil available moisture content in 0-15 m layer, the reasonable planting density of apple orchard was 650-800 plants x hm(-2) in Yan'an and 550-700 plants x hm(-2) in Jingning.

  1. Dosimetric impact of density variations in Solid Water 457 water-equivalent slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzenberg, Dale W; Amro, Hanan; Prisciandaro, Joann I; Acosta, Eduardo; Gallagher, Ian; Roberts, Don A

    2011-04-22

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric impact of density variations observed in water-equivalent solid slabs. Measurements were performed using two 30 cm × 30 cm water-equivalent slabs, one being 4 cm think and the other 5 cm thick. The location and extent of density variations were determined by computed tomography (CT) scans. Additional imaging measurements were made with an amorphous silicon megavoltage portal imaging device and an ultrasound unit. Dosimetric measurements were conducted with a 2D ion chamber array, and a scanned diode in water. Additional measurements and calculations were made of small rectilinear void inhomogeneities formed with water-equivalent slabs, using a 2D ion chamber array and the convolution superposition algorithm. Two general types of density variation features were observed on CT images: 1) regions of many centimeters across, but typically only a few millimeters thick, with electron densities a few percent lower than the bulk material, and 2) cylindrical regions roughly 0.2 cm in diameter and up to 20 cm long with electron densities up to 5% lower than the surrounding material. The density variations were not visible on kilovoltage, megavoltage or ultrasound images. The dosimetric impact of the density variations were not detectable to within 0.1% using the 2D ion chamber array or the scanning photon diode at distances 0.4 cm to 2 cm beyond the features. High-resolution dosimetric calculations using the convolution-superposition algorithm with density corrections enabled on CT-based datasets showed no discernable dosimetric impact. Calculations and measurements on simulated voids place the upper limit on possible dosimetric variations from observed density variations at much less than 0.6%. CT imaging of water-equivalent slabs may reveal density variations which are otherwise unobserved with kV, MV, or ultrasound imaging. No dosimetric impact from these features was measureable with an ion chamber array or

  2. Testing plant use of mobile vs immobile soil water sources using stable isotope experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ana I; Schaffer, Bruce; Yuhong, Li; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2017-07-01

    We tested for isotope exchange between bound (immobile) and mobile soil water, and whether there is isotope fractionation during plant water uptake. These are critical assumptions to the formulation of the 'two water worlds' hypothesis based on isotope profiles of soil water. In two different soil types, soil-bound water in two sets of 19-l pots, each with a 2-yr-old avocado plant (Persea americana), were identically labeled with tap water. After which, one set received isotopically enriched water whereas the other set received tap water as the mobile phase water. After a dry down period, we analyzed plant stem water as a proxy for soil-bound water as well as total soil water by cryogenic distillation. Seventy-five to 95% of the bound water isotopically exchanged with the mobile water phase. In addition, plants discriminated against (18) O and (2) H during water uptake, and this discrimination is a function of the soil water loss and soil type. The present experiment shows that the assumptions for the 'two water worlds' hypothesis are not supported. We propose a novel explanation for the discrepancy between isotope ratios of the soil water profile and other water compartments in the hydrological cycle. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Infiltration and water storage in forest soils at the plot and the micro- catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimm, Eva-Maria; Lange, Benjamin; Lüscher, Peter; Germann, Peter; Weingartner, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    Tree roots generate and conserve hydrologically active macropores. We explored the influence of root density on infiltration and water storage at six 1-m2 plots along an 8-m transect between two mature trees (spruce). The soil is a Flysch-based stagnic Cambisol with a flow-impeding horizon at a depth of about 60 cm. At a plot the experimental set up consisted of a 1m x 1m sprinkler and five Decagon HS-10 soil-moisture probes that were horizontally mounted from a trench into the centre of each horizon. We irrigated each plot three times at 24-hour intervals during one hour with a rate of 70 mm h-1. Data logging was at 60-seconds intervals that produced time series of water contents due to irrigation and drainage. After irrigation, soil cores of 10 cm diameter were sampled. Roots were extracted from the cores and their densities were optically analysed with the program "whinRIZO". The application of a rivulet approach to the time series of water contents produced the thickness F (μm) and the specific contact length L (m m-2) per cross-sectional area of the water films that represent Stokes-flow. The procedure leads to estimates of storage capacity and hydraulic connectivity in the vertical and lateral directions along the transect. Extrapolation from the transect to the micro-catchment scale is based on maps showing the spatial arrangements of trees, shrubs and soil properties like thickness and hydrological parameters of horizons.

  4. Monitoring Changes in Soil Water Content Using Subsurface Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, C. J.; Miller, S.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L. N.; Gates, J. B.; Volkmer, A.; Weinburg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Closing the water balance is important in many research and water resource applications, but it can be difficult to accomplish due to a variety of factors. A new technique that measures vertical displacement of soil in order to estimate the change in mass of water stored in overlying material is being developed. The measurement technique uses an extensometer that functions as a lysimeter, and we refer to the technique as Displacement Extensometry for Lysimetric Terrain Analysis (DELTA). DELTA extensometers are 2-m-long devices deployed by creating a friction fit with intact soil below a cased borehole. The instrument measures small displacements (better than 10 nm resolution) in response to changes of mass in the overlying soil, or other factors. The instrument averages over a region that scales with the depth of installation (the radius of influence is approximately 2x the depth). The spatial averaging of this instrument extends over regions representative of agricultural fields, hydrologic model grid blocks, and small watersheds. Five DELTA extensometers have been deployed at a field site near Clemson, SC at depths of 3, 6, and 9 m within saprolite derived from biotite gneiss. Barometric pressure, precipitation, and soil moisture are being measured along with displacement. Signals from the co-located extensometers are remarkably similar, demonstrating reproducibility of the technique. Rainfall causes soil compression, and at 6 m depth there is approximately 200 nm of compression per 1 mm of rainfall. There is gradual expansion, which ranges from 0.15 to 1.75 μm/day, following rainfall. The gradual unloading of the soil is interpreted as water loss due to evapotranspiration. Superimposed on the signal are diurnal fluctuations of 0.5 to 1 μm, which correlate to changes in barometric pressure. Four DELTA extensometers were recently deployed in hard, clayey sediments at two field locations south of Amarillo, TX. The instruments will compliment current research on

  5. Selected physical and water properties of soils located in the vicinity of proposed opencast lignite mine “Drzewce” (middle Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajewski Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents physical and water properties of six soils located in the areas directly adjacent to “Drzewce” lignite open cast mine (KWB Konin. The conducted works included preparation of pits of various soil types in points characteristic to large and representative soil allotments. The selected soil types represented mineral and organic soils. Samples of disturbed and undisturbed structure were taken from various genetic horizons for laboratory analysis. Such properties as content of total carbon, texture, specific density, bulk density, total and drainage porosity, moisture, saturated hydraulic conductivity, the potential of water bonding, total and readily available water, and total retention were determined in the samples from the horizons of 0–100 cm. The investigated soils showed mostly sandy texture with few local loam insertions. Texture and the content of organic matter were the most important parameters which influenced all analyzed properties. Morphology and the properties of the examined soils as well as deep level of soil – ground water were decisive factors when categorizing them as a precipitation-water type. Such soils will not undergo degradation caused by the dehydrating depression cone of open cast mine.

  6. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Scharnagl; J.A. Vrugt; H. Vereecken; M. Herbst

    2011-01-01

    In situ observations of soil water state variables under natural boundary conditions are often used to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. However, many contributions to the soil hydrological literature have demonstrated that the information content of such data is insufficient to accurately and

  7. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  8. Solute leaching in a sandy soil with a water-repellent surface layer: a simulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Vries, de P.

    1996-01-01

    Many sandy soils in the Netherlands have a water-repellent surface layer covering a wettable soil with a shallow groundwater table. Fingers form in the water-repellent surface layer and rapidly transport water and solutes to the wettable soil in which the streamlines diverge. Although several field

  9. Rethinking soil and water conservation in a changing society : A case study in eastern Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzucato, V.M.; Niemeijer, D.

    2000-01-01

    Soil and water conservation is at the top of development agendas in Africa. Virtually every project related to agriculture or the environment has a soil and water conservation component to it and environmental protection plans are being drawn up by African governments in which soil and water conserv

  10. 26 CFR 1.175-2 - Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of soil and water conservation... (continued) § 1.175-2 Definition of soil and water conservation expenditures. (a) Expenditures treated as a... of soil or water conservation in respect of land used in farming, or for the prevention of erosion...

  11. 26 CFR 1.175-1 - Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soil and water conservation expenditures; in... (continued) § 1.175-1 Soil and water conservation expenditures; in general. Under section 175, a farmer may deduct his soil or water conservation expenditures which do not give rise to a deduction for...

  12. COSMOS soil water sensor compared with EM sensor network & weighing lysimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water sensing methods are widely used to characterize the root zone and below, but only a few are capable of delivering water content data with accuracy for the entire soil profile such that evapotranspiration (ET) can be determined by soil water balance and irrigations can be scheduled with mi...

  13. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL