WorldWideScience

Sample records for density rotation axis

  1. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  2. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Louis [Albuquerque, NM; Christenson, Todd [Albuquerque, NM; Aaronson, Gene [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  3. Verticality Perception During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoets, R.A.A.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Medendorp, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    During prolonged rotation about a tilted yaw axis, often referred to as off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), a percept of being translated along a conical path slowly emerges as the sense of rotation subsides. Recently, we found that these perceptual changes are consistent with a canal-otolith interac

  4. Verticality perception during off-vertical axis rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoets, R.A.A.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Medendorp, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    During prolonged rotation about a tilted yaw axis, often referred to as off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), a percept of being translated along a conical path slowly emerges as the sense of rotation subsides. Recently, we found that these perceptual changes are consistent with a canal-otolith interac

  5. Angular momentum projection of tilted axis rotating states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, M.; Onishi, N.; Tajima, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Horibata, T.

    1998-03-01

    We applied an exact angular momentum projection to three dimensional cranked HFB (3d-CHFB) states. Tilted axis rotating states (TAR) and principal axis rotating states (PAR) are compared. It is shown that TAR is more adequate than PAR for description of the back bending phenomena driven by tilted rotation or wobbling motion. (author)

  6. Rotation Axis Variation Due To Spin Orbit Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Gallavotti, G

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: rotation axis variation due to spin orbit resonance: conference report; keywords: planetary precession, rigid body, chaos, KAM, Arnold diffusion, averaging, celestial mechanics, classical mechanics, large deviations

  7. Sequence-dependent rotation axis changes in tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Clint; Martin, Caroline; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Bideau, Benoit; Isableu, Brice

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of rotation axes during a tennis serve. A motion capture system was used to evaluate the contribution of the potential axes of rotation (minimum inertia axis, shoulder-centre of mass axis and the shoulder-elbow axis) during the four discrete tennis serve phases (loading, cocking, acceleration and follow through). Ten ranked athletes (International Tennis Number 1-3) repeatedly performed a flat service aiming at a target on the other side of the net. The four serve phases are distinct and thus, each movement phase seems to be organised around specific rotation axes. The results showed that the limbs' rotational axis does not necessarily coincide with the minimum inertia axis across the cocking phase of the tennis serve. Even though individual serving strategies were exposed, all participants showed an effect due to the cocking phase and changed the rotation axis during the task. Taken together, the results showed that despite inter-individual differences, nine out of 10 participants changed the rotation axis towards the minimum inertia and/or the mass axis in an endeavour to maximise external rotation of the shoulder to optimally prepare for the acceleration phase.

  8. Thermally induced reversible easy axis rotations in permalloy thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, Winfried H.G.; Eijkel, Kees J.M.; Ridder, de René M.; Leeuwis, Henk

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stability of the easy axis orientation in thin Permalloy films was studied. This orientation was measured by two methods, i.e. the magneto-optic Kerr effect and a novel measurement scheme based on magnetoresistive effects. It appeared that even for small temperature changes rotations of

  9. A rotating inertial navigation system with the rotating axis error compensation consisting of fiber optic gyros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHA Feng; HU Bai-qing; QIN Fang-jun; LUO Yin-bo

    2012-01-01

    An effective and flexible rotation and compensation scheme is designed to improve the accuracy of rotating inertial navigation system (RINS).The accuracy of single-axial RINS is limited by the errors on the rotating axis.A novel inertial measurement unit (IMU) scheme with error compensation for the rotating axis of fiber optic gyros (FOG) RINS is presented.In the scheme,two couples of inertial sensors with similar error characteristics are mounted oppositely on the rotating axes to compensate the sensors error.Without any change for the rotation cycle,this scheme improves the system's precision and reliability,and also offers the redundancy for the system.The results of 36 h navigation simulation prove that the accuracy of the system is improved notably compared with normal strapdown INS,besides the heading accuracy is increased by 3 times compared with single-axial RINS,and the position accuracy is improved by 1 order of magnitude.

  10. A Singular Limit Problem for Rotating Capillary Fluids with Variable Rotation Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper we study a singular perturbation problem for a Navier-Stokes-Korteweg model with Coriolis force. Namely, we perform the incompressible and fast rotation asymptotics simultaneously, while we keep the capillarity coefficient constant in order to capture surface tension effects in the limit. We consider here the case of variable rotation axis: we prove the convergence to a linear parabolic-type equation with variable coefficients. The proof of the result relies on compensated compactness arguments. Besides, we look for minimal regularity assumptions on the variations of the axis.

  11. A Singular Limit Problem for Rotating Capillary Fluids with Variable Rotation Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper we study a singular perturbation problem for a Navier-Stokes-Korteweg model with Coriolis force. Namely, we perform the incompressible and fast rotation asymptotics simultaneously, while we keep the capillarity coefficient constant in order to capture surface tension effects in the limit. We consider here the case of variable rotation axis: we prove the convergence to a linear parabolic-type equation with variable coefficients. The proof of the result relies on compensated compactness arguments. Besides, we look for minimal regularity assumptions on the variations of the axis.

  12. Symmetry axis based object recognition under translation, rotation and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Mashud; Islam, Md Monirul; Akhand, M A H; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a new approach, known as symmetry axis based feature extraction and recognition (SAFER), for recognizing objects under translation, rotation and scaling. Unlike most previous invariant object recognition (IOR) systems, SAFER puts emphasis on both simplicity and accuracy of the recognition system. To achieve simplicity, it uses simple formulae for extracting invariant features from an object. The scheme used in feature extraction is based on the axis of symmetry and angles of concentric circles drawn around the object. SAFER divides the extracted features into a number of groups based on their similarity. To improve the recognition performance, SAFER uses a number of neural networks (NNs) instead of single NN are used for training and recognition of extracted features. The new approach, SAFER, has been tested on two of real world problems i.e., English characters with two different fonts and images of different shapes. The experimental results show that SAFER can produce good recognition performance in comparison with other algorithms.

  13. Propagation of angular errors in two-axis rotation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrington, Geoffrey K.

    2003-10-01

    Two-Axis Rotation Systems, or "goniometers," are used in diverse applications including telescope pointing, automotive headlamp testing, and display testing. There are three basic configurations in which a goniometer can be built depending on the orientation and order of the stages. Each configuration has a governing set of equations which convert motion between the system "native" coordinates to other base systems, such as direction cosines, optical field angles, or spherical-polar coordinates. In their simplest form, these equations neglect errors present in real systems. In this paper, a statistical treatment of error source propagation is developed which uses only tolerance data, such as can be obtained from the system mechanical drawings prior to fabrication. It is shown that certain error sources are fully correctable, partially correctable, or uncorrectable, depending upon the goniometer configuration and zeroing technique. The system error budget can be described by a root-sum-of-squares technique with weighting factors describing the sensitivity of each error source. This paper tabulates weighting factors at 67% (k=1) and 95% (k=2) confidence for various levels of maximum travel for each goniometer configuration. As a practical example, this paper works through an error budget used for the procurement of a system at Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Enhanced gamma radiation toward the rotation axis from the immediate vicinity of extremely rotating black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yoogeun; Pu, Hung-Yi; Hirotani, Kouichi; Matsushita, Satoki; Kong, Albert K. H.; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the acceleration of electrons and positrons by magnetic-field-aligned electric fields in the polar funnel of an accreting black hole (BH). Applying the pulsar outer-gap theory to BH magnetospheres, we find that such a lepton accelerator arises in the immediate vicinity of the event horizon due to frame-dragging, and that their gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing accretion rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the gamma-ray flux is enhanced along the rotation axis by...

  15. Titan's interior from its rotation axis orientation and its Love number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baland, Rose-Marie; Gabriel, Tobie; Axel, Lefèvre

    2013-04-01

    The tidal Love number k2 of Titan has been recently estimated from Cassini flybys radio-tracking and is consistent with the presence of a global ocean in Titan's interior, located between two ice layers (Iess et al. 2012), in accordance with prediction from interior and evolutionary models for Titan. Previously, the orientation of the rotation axis of Titan has been measured on the basis of radar images from Cassini (Stiles et al. 2008). Titan's obliquity, is about 0.3. The measured orientation is more consistent with the presence of a global internal liquid ocean than with an entirely solid Titan (Baland et al. 2011). The global topography data of Titan seem to indicate some departure from the hydrostatic shape expected for a synchronous satellite under the influence of its rotation and the static tides raised by the central planet (Zebker et al. 2009). This may be explained by a differential tidal heating in the ice shell which flattens the poles (Nimmo and Bills 2010). A surface more flattened than expected implies compensation in depth to explain the measured gravity coefficients C20 and C22 of Iess et al. (2012). Here, all layers are assumed to have a tri-axial ellipsoid shape, but with polar and equatorial flattenings that differ from the hydrostatic expected ones. We assess the influence of this non-hydrostatic shape on the conclusions of Baland et al. (2011), which developped a Cassini state model for the orientation of the rotation axis of a synchronous satellite having an internal liquid layer. We assess the possibility to constrain Titan's interior (and particularly the structure of the water/ice layer) from both the rotation axis orientation and the Love number. We consider a range of internal structure models consistent with the mean density and the mean radius of Titan, and made of a shell, an ocean, a mantle, and a core, from the surface to the center, with various possible compositions (e.g. ammonia mixed with water for the ocean). The internal

  16. Assessment of movement distribution in the lumbar spine using the instantaneous axis of rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ki Won [Trine University, Angola (Indonesia)

    2014-12-15

    The position of the torso and the magnitude of exertion are thought to influence the distribution pattern of intervertebral movements within the lumbar spine. Abnormal intervertebral movements have been correlated with the risk of spine injuries. Since the capability to measure movement distribution within the lumbar spine noninvasively is limited, a convenient method to diagnose joint motion function was proposed. The goal of this research was to test the efficacy of the instantaneous axis of rotation for assessment of the distribution of movement within the lumbar spine. The proposed method was evaluated in the bio mechanical model. The results showed that the location of instantaneous axis of rotation lowered with increased trunk exertion force, and slightly moved higher with increased trunk angle. Recognizing that abnormal location of the instantaneous axis of rotation correlated with spinal pain, these results suggest potential the location of the instantaneous axis of rotation relates to the risk of low back pain on distributed spinal kinematics.

  17. Vertical-Axis Rotations Within the Peruvian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, P.; Carlotto, V.

    2007-05-01

    During the last two decades, numerous paleomagnetic studies have reported tectonic rotations in the Central Andes but only few data are available for a key tectonic region like the southern Peruvian Altiplano. Clockwise rotations (> 25°) are recorded in Mesozoic to Early Paleogene rocks along the forearc of northern Chile (23-28°S) [Arriagada et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001923]. Within the forearc of southern Peru, counterclockwise rotations recorded by flat lying red-beds (Moquegua Formation) increase from south to north from about -30° to more than -45° and rotations decrease with time from late Eocene to late Oligocene - early Miocene time [Roperch et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001882]. Rotations in the forearc seems concomitant with deformation localized in the Eastern Cordillera. We speculate that the rotations within the forearc are related to shortening to the east of the Altiplano leading to the first stage of oroclinal bending. If this model is correct, rotations within the Altiplano should have similar magnitude than those of the forearc. We have undertaken a new paleomagnetic sampling (490 samples) along a transect from Nazca (8 sites in the early Miocene Nazca ignimbrites and 7 sites in Oligocene volcanics near Puquio, Western Altiplano) to Abancay (8 sites in Paleocene - Eocene red beds and dikes, Central Altiplano) and Cusco (20 sites in Eocene - Oligocene red beds, Eastern Altiplano). We will present the new results and discuss the spatial and temporal distribution of the tectonic rotations within the Andes of southern Peru.

  18. Tilted axis rotation in odd-odd {sup 164}Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Wang, X.Z.; Zhang, J.Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Ten band structures are observed in {sup 164}Tm, among them sets of parallel and anti-parallel couplings of the proton and neutron spins. The Tilted Axis Cranking scheme is applied for the first time to an odd-odd nucleus in a prominent region of nuclear deformation.

  19. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  20. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD MEASURED BY A ROTATING HALL PROBE IN A SOLENOID TO LOCATE ITS MAGNETIC AXIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KPONOU,A.; PIKIN,A.; BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.

    2000-11-06

    We have analyzed the motion of a Hall probe, which is rotated about an axis that is arbitrarily displaced and oriented with respect to the magnetic axis of a solenoid. We outline how the magnetic field measured by the rotating Hall probe can be calculated. We show how to compare theoretical results with actual measurements, to determine the displacement and orientation of the axis of rotation of the probe from the magnetic axis. If the center of rotation of the probe is known by surveying, the corresponding point on the magnetic axis of the solenoid can be located. This is applied to a solenoid that was built for BNL by Oxford Instruments.

  2. Binocular Coordination of the Human Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Off-axis Pitch Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Kaufman, G. D.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Head movements in the sagittal pitch plane typically involve off-axis rotation requiring both vertical and horizontal vergence ocular reflexes to compensate for angular and translational motion relative to visual targets of interest. The purpose of this study was to compare passive pitch VOR responses during rotation about an Earth-vertical axis (canal only cues) with off-axis rotation (canal and otolith cues). Methods. Eleven human subjects were oscillated sinusoidally at 0.13, 0.3 and 0.56 Hz while lying left-side down with the interaural axis either aligned with the axis of rotation or offset by 50 cm. In a second set of measurements, twelve subjects were also tested during sinusoidally varying centrifugation over the same frequency range. The modulation of vertical and horizontal vergence ocular responses was measured with a binocular videography system. Results. Off-axis pitch rotation enhanced the vertical VOR at lower frequencies and enhanced the vergence VOR at higher frequencies. During sinusoidally varying centrifugation, the opposite trend was observed for vergence, with both vertical and vergence vestibulo-ocular reflexes being suppressed at the highest frequency. Discussion. These differential effects of off-axis rotation over the 0.13 to 0.56 Hz range are consistent with the hypothesis that otolith-ocular reflexes are segregated in part on the basis of stimulus frequency. At the lower frequencies, tilt otolith-ocular responses compensate for declining canal input. At higher frequencies, translational otolith-ocular reflexes compensate for declining visual contributions to the kinematic demands required for fixating near targets.

  3. Off-vertical axis rotation: a test of the otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, J. M.; Schor, R. H.; Schumann, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex was studied via off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark. The axis of the turntable could be tilted from vertical by up to 30 degrees. Eye movements were measured with electro-oculography. Results from healthy asymptomatic subjects indicated that 1) a reliable otolith-induced response could be obtained during constant velocity OVAR using a velocity of 60 degrees/s with a tilt of 30 degrees; 2) constant velocity OVAR rotation was nausea-producing and, especially if subjects were rotated in the dark about an earth-vertical axis prior to being tilted, disorienting; and 3) sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea; the eye movement response appeared to be the result of a combination of semicircular canal and otolith components. We conclude that OVAR has the potential of becoming a useful method for clinically assessing both the otolith-ocular reflex and semicircular canal-otolith interaction.

  4. Implementation of Unsteady Double-Axis of Rotation Motion to Predict Pitch-Damping Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-18

    becomes important when eventually defining initial Euler angles. This coordinate system defines the inertial reference frame. Approved for public...coordinates, except when defining the initial Euler angles set in “Initialization based on:” select “ Euler Angles.” For this example, set the coning angle...to the global longitudinal axis before setting the Euler angles. Since the rotation is about the global +y-axis, Euler_y is set to 0.5 (note degrees

  5. Paleomagnetic investigation of late Neogene vertical axis rotation and remagnetization in central coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Daniel M.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    1995-03-01

    Outcrops of shallow marine sedimentary rocks of the Neogene Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone occur throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains and along the coast of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties in California. Within the Santa Cruz Mountains, the Purisima Formation has been extensively folded and offset by reverse faults. Along the coast, the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone are only gently folded although the Purisima Formation is cut by the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Previous paleomagnetic studies have shown that vertical axis rotation has occurred within some parts of the San Gregorio Fault Zone. As part of a kinematic study of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, this paleomagnetic investigation of the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone was conducted to determine the extent of the vertical axis rotation. The characteristic paleomagnetic directions of the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone, which we interpret as the primary directions, indicate that a clockwise vertical axis rotation of 35 deg to 60 deg has occurred throughout the San Gregorio Zone, whereas no rotation has occurred away from the fault zone. This result suggests that vertical axis rotation is fundamentally related to shear across the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Our work also indicates that while the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone along the coast have retained their primary magnetizations, the Purisima Formation within the Santa Cruz Mountains has been remagnetized after folding.

  6. Accurate Compensation of Attitude Angle Error in a Dual-Axis Rotation Inertial Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; Yang, Gongliu; Zou, Rui; Wang, Jing; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    In the dual-axis rotation inertial navigation system (INS), besides the gyro error, accelerometer error, rolling misalignment angle error, and the gimbal angle error, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle also affect the attitude accuracy. Through the analysis of the structure, we can see that the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal angle will produce coning errors which cause the fluctuation of the attitude. According to the analysis of the rotation vector, it can be seen that the coning error will generate additional drift velocity along the rotating shaft, which can reduce the navigation precision of the system. In this paper, based on the establishment of the modulation average frame, the vector projection is carried out, and then the attitude conversion matrix and the attitude error matrix mainly including the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal are obtained. Because the attitude angles are given under the static condition, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle are estimated by the static Kalman filter (KF). This kind of KF method has been widely recognized as the standard optimal estimation tool for estimating the parameters such as coning angles (α1 , α2), initial phase angles (ϕ1,ϕ2), and the non-perpendicular angle (η). In order to carry out the system level verification, a dual axis rotation INS is designed. Through simulation and experiments, the results show that the amplitudes of the attitude angles’ variation are reduced by about 20%–30% when the shaft rotates. The attitude error equation is reasonably simplified and the calibration method is accurate enough. The attitude accuracy is further improved. PMID:28304354

  7. Manifestation of the rotational Doppler effect by use of an off-axis optical vortex beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basistiy, I V; Slyusar, V V; Soskin, M S; Vasnetsov, M V; Bekshaev, A Ya

    2003-07-15

    We report what is to our knowledge the first all-optical detection of the frequency beats between Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian LG0(1) modes in their axial superposition, caused by the rotational Doppler effect. The relation between the observable off-axis optical vortex rotation and the rotational frequency shift of the Laguerre-Gaussian component is ascertained. The results can be used as a physical basis for recognition of Laguerre-Gaussian mode spectra along their orbital angular momenta.

  8. Vortex Breakdown Generated by off-axis Bifurcation in a cylinder with rotating covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Anders; Brøns, Morten; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2006-01-01

    Vortex breakdown of bubble type is studied for the flow in a cylinder with rotating top and bottom covers. For large ratios of the angular velocities of the covers, we observe numerically that the vortex breakdown bubble in the steady regime may occur through the creation of an off-axis vortex ring...

  9. Numerical results in a vertical wind axis turbine with relative rotating blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayeul-Laine, Annie-Claude; Dockter, Aurore; Simonet, Sophie; Bois, Gerard [Arts et Metiers PARISTECH (France)

    2011-07-01

    The use of wind energy to produce electricity through wind turbines has spread world-wide. The quantity of electricity produced is affected by numerous factors such as wind speed and direction and turbine design; the aim of this paper is to assess the influence of different blades on the performance of a turbine. This study was performed on a turbine in which the blades have a rotating movement, each around its own axis and around the turbine's axis. Unsteady simulations were carried out with several blade stagger angles and one wind speed and 2 different blade geometries were used for 4 rotational speeds. Results showed that the studied turbine gave better performance than vertical axis wind turbines and that blade sketch, blade speed ratios, and blade stagger angle were important influences on the performance. This study showed that this kind of turbine has the potential to achieve good performance but that further work needs to be done.

  10. Attitude Heading Reference System Using MEMS Inertial Sensors with Dual-Axis Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a low cost and small size attitude and heading reference system based on MEMS inertial sensors. A dual-axis rotation structure with a proper rotary scheme according to the design principles is applied in the system to compensate for the attitude and heading drift caused by the large gyroscope biases. An optimization algorithm is applied to compensate for the installation angle error between the body frame and the rotation table’s frame. Simulations and experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the AHRS. The results show that the proper rotation could significantly reduce the attitude and heading drifts. Moreover, the new AHRS is not affected by magnetic interference. After the rotation, the attitude and heading are almost just oscillating in a range. The attitude error is about 3° and the heading error is less than 3° which are at least 5 times better than the non-rotation condition.

  11. Attitude heading reference system using MEMS inertial sensors with dual-axis rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Li; Ye, Lingyun; Song, Kaichen; Zhou, Yang

    2014-09-29

    This paper proposes a low cost and small size attitude and heading reference system based on MEMS inertial sensors. A dual-axis rotation structure with a proper rotary scheme according to the design principles is applied in the system to compensate for the attitude and heading drift caused by the large gyroscope biases. An optimization algorithm is applied to compensate for the installation angle error between the body frame and the rotation table's frame. Simulations and experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the AHRS. The results show that the proper rotation could significantly reduce the attitude and heading drifts. Moreover, the new AHRS is not affected by magnetic interference. After the rotation, the attitude and heading are almost just oscillating in a range. The attitude error is about 3° and the heading error is less than 3° which are at least 5 times better than the non-rotation condition.

  12. Investigating the effect of a targets time-varying doppler generating axis of rotation on isar image distortion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available in ISAR imaging mostly under the limited assumption that a targets axis of rotation is constant over the CPI. This paper investigates how the targets time-varying Doppler generating axis of rotation, caused by the complex 3D motion of a target at sea...

  13. On steady rotations of a rigid body bearing a single-axis powered gyroscope whose precession axis is parallel to a principal plane of inertia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amel'kin, N. I.

    2009-01-01

    The set of steady motions of the system named in the title is represented parametrically via the gyro gimbal rotation angle for an arbitrary position of the gimbal axis. We study the set of steady motions for a system in which the gyro gimbal axis is parallel to a principal plane of inertia as well

  14. A self-calibration method for tri-axis rotational inertial navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pengyu; Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun

    2016-11-01

    The navigation accuracy of the rotational inertial navigation system (RINS) could be greatly improved by periodically rotating the inertial measurement unit (IMU) with gimbals. However, error parameters in RINS should be effectively calibrated and compensated. In this paper, a self-calibration method is proposed for tri-axis RINS using attitude errors and velocity errors as measurements. The proposed calibration scheme is designed as three separate steps, and a certain gimbal rotates continuously in each step. All the error parameters in the RINS are calibrated when the whole scheme finishes. The separate calibration steps reduce the correlations between error parameters, and the observability of errors in this method is clear to demonstrate according to the relations between navigation errors and error parameters when gimbals rotate. Each calibration step only lasts 12 min, thus gyro drifts and accelerometers biases could be regarded as constant. The proposed calibration scheme is tested in both simulation and actual tri-axis RINS, and simulation and experimental results show that all 23 error parameters could be well estimated in tri-axis RINS. A long-term vehicle navigation experiment results show that after calibration and compensation, the navigation performance has doubled approximately, and the velocity accuracy is less than 2 m s-1 while the position accuracy is less than 1500 m, fully illustrating the significance of the proposed self-calibration method in improving the navigation performance of RINS.

  15. Antimagnetic rotation in 108,110In with tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu-Ji; Xu, Hai-Dan; Li, Jian; Liu, Yong-Hao; Ma, Ke-Yan; Yang, Dong; Lu, Jing-Bing; Ma, Ying-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Based on tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field theory within point-coupling interaction PC-PK1, the rotational structure and the characteristic features of antimagnetic rotation for ΔI = 2 bands in 108,110In are studied. Tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field calculations reproduce the experimental energy spectrum well and are in agreement with the experimental I ∼ ω plot, although the calculated spin overestimates the experimental values. In addition, the two-shears-like mechanism in candidate antimagnetic rotation bands is clearly illustrated and the contributions from two-shears-like orbits, neutron (gd) orbits above Z = 50 shell and Z = 50, N = 50 core are investigated microscopically. The predicted B(E2), dynamic moment of inertia ℑ(2), deformation parameters β and γ, and ℑ(2)/B(E2) ratios in tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field calculations are discussed and the characteristic features of antimagnetic rotation for the bands before and after alignment are shown. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205068, 11205069, 11405072, 11475072, 11547308) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2012M520667)

  16. A Kinematic Model for Vertical Axis Rotation within the Mina Deflection of the Walker Lane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, T.; Pluhar, C. J.; Johnson, S. A.; Lindeman, J. R.; Petronis, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Mina Deflection, at the boundary between the Central and Southern Walker Lane, spans the California-Nevada border and includes a heavily-faulted Pliocene volcanic field overlying Miocene ignimbrites. The dextral Walker Lane accommodates 25% of relative Pacific-North America plate motion and steps right across the sinistral Mina deflection. Ours and previous work shows that the Mina Deflection partially accommodates deformation by vertical-axis rotation of up to 99.9o ± 6.1o rotation since 11 Ma. This rotation is evident in latite ignimbrite of Gilbert et al. (1971), which we have formalized as three members of Tuff of Huntoon Creek (THC). The welded, basal, normal-polarity Huntoon Valley Member of THC is overlain by the unwelded to partially-welded, reversed-polarity Adobe Hills Mbr. This member includes internal breaks suggesting multiple eruptive phases, but the paleomagnetic results from each are statistically indistinguishable, meaning that they were likely erupted in rapid succession (within a few centuries of one another). THC ends with a welded member exhibiting very shallow inclination and south declination that we call Excursional Mbr. One of the upper members has been dated at 11.17 ± 0.04 Ma. These Miocene units are overlain by Pliocene basalts, Quaternary alluvium, and lacustrine deposits. Our paleomagnetic results show a gradient between the zero rotation domain and high rotation across a 20km baseline. A micropolar model, based on 25 years of earthquake data from the Northern and Southern California Seismic Network, suggest the Mina Deflection is currently experiencing transpressional seismogenic deformation (Unruh et al., 2003). Accepting Unruh's model and assuming continuous rotation since 11 Ma, we propose a kinematic model for the western Mina Deflection that accommodates 90o of vertical axis rotation from N-S to ENE-WSW oriented blocks.

  17. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefer, H., E-mail: johann.schiefer@kssg.ch; Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L. [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, Kantonsspital St.Gallen, Rorschacherstrasse 107, St.Gallen CH-9007 (Switzerland); Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J. [Kantonsschule am Burggraben St.Gallen, Burggraben 21, St.Gallen CH-9000 (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery.

  18. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force.

  19. Periodicity Signatures of Lightcurves of Active Comets in Non-Principal-Axis Rotational States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Barrera, Jose G.

    2016-10-01

    There are two comets (1P/Halley, 103P/Hartley 2) that are unambiguously in non-principal-axis (NPA) rotational states in addition to a few more comets that are candidates for NPA rotation. Considering this fact, and the ambiguities associated with how to accurately interpret the periodicity signatures seen in lightcurves of active comets, we have started an investigation to identify and characterize the periodicity signatures present in simulated lightcurves of active comets. We carried out aperture photometry of simulated cometary comae to generate model lightcurves and analyzed them with Fourier techniques to identify their periodicity signatures. These signatures were then compared with the input component periods of the respective NPA rotational states facilitating the identification of how these periodicity signatures are related to different component periods of the NPA rotation. Ultimately, we also expect this study to shed light on why only a small fraction of periodic comets is in NPA rotational states, whereas theory indicates a large fraction of them should be in NPA states (e.g., Jewitt 1999, EMP, 79, 35). We explore the parameter space with respect to different rotational states, different orientations for the total rotational angular momentum vector, and different locations on the nucleus for the source region(s). As for special cases, we also investigate potential NPA rotational states representative of comet 103P/Hartley2, the cometary target of the EPOXI mission. The initial results from our investigation will be presented at the meeting. The NASA DDAP Program supports this work through grant NNX15AL66G.

  20. Description of multi-quasiparticle bands by the tilted axis cranking model 21.60.-n; High K rotational bands; Tilted axis cranking; Multi-quasiparticle configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Frauendorf, S

    2000-01-01

    The selfconsistent cranking approach is extended to the case of rotation about an axis which is tilted with respect to the principal axes of the deformed potential (Tilted Axis Cranking). Expressions for the energies and the intra bands electro-magnetic transition probabilities are given. The mean field solutions are interpreted in terms of quantal rotational states. The construction of the quasiparticle configurations and the elimination of spurious states is discussed. The application of the theory to high spin data is demonstrated by analyzing the multi-quasiparticle bands in the nuclides with N=102,103 and Z=71,72,73.

  1. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  2. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  3. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Clifford W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  4. Tropical rotation crops influence nematode densities and vegetable yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, R; Dickson, D W; de Brito, J A; Hochmuth, R C

    1994-09-01

    The effects of eight summer rotation crops on nematode densities and yields of subsequent spring vegetable crops were determined in field studies conducted in north Florida from 1991 to 1993. The crop sequence was as follows: (i) rotation crops during summer 1991; (ii) cover crop of rye (Secale cereale) during winter 1991-92; (iii) 'Lemondrop L' squash (Cucurbita pepo) during spring 1992; (iv) rotation crops during summer 1992; (v) rye during winter 1992-93; (vi) 'Classic' eggplant (Solanum melongena) during spring 1993. The eight summer crop rotation treatments were as follows: 'Hale' castor (Ricinus communis), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), sesame (Sesamum indicum), American jointvetch (Aeschynomene americana), weed fallow, 'SX- 17' sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. sudanense), 'Kirby' soybean (Glycine max), and 'Clemson Spineless' okra (Hibiscus esculentus) as a control. Rotations with castor, velvetbean, American jointvetch, and sorghum-sudangrass were most effective in maintaining the lowest population densities of Meloidogyne spp. (a mixture of M. incognita race 1 and M. arenaria race 1), but Paratrichodorus minor built up in the sorghum-sudangrass rotation. Yield of squash was lower (P crops evaluated here may be useful for managing nematodes in the field and for improving yields of subsequent vegetable crops.

  5. Transmitting characteristic analysis of antenna with off-axis parabolic rotating surfaces configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianyu; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Huajun; Niu, Ye; Xianyu, Jiawei

    2017-03-20

    A novel optical antenna with an off-axis confocal parabolic rotating surfaces configuration is designed for achieving maximum transmission efficiency. An improved 3-D ray tracing method based on the vector theory of reflection is used to simulate spatial rays transmitting through the antenna system. Aberrations and the spatial divergence angles of the output beam, which are caused by on-axial defocusing and off-axial defocusing between the primary reflector and secondary reflector, are visualized and effects on receiver efficiency of the antenna system are analyzed in detail. This work will provide a reference for improving the transmission efficiency of long-range communication systems.

  6. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1992-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  7. Design, Analysis, Hybrid Testing and Orientation Control of a Floating Platform with Counter-Rotating Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Samuel Adam Chinman

    The design and operation of two counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbines on a floating, semi-submersible platform is studied. The technology, called the Multiple Integrated and Synchronized Turbines (MIST) platform has the potential to reduce the cost of offshore wind energy per unit of installed capacity. Attached to the platform are closely-spaced, counter-rotating turbines, which can achieve a higher power density per planform area because of synergistic interaction effects. The purpose of the research is to control the orientation of the platform and rotational speeds of the turbines by modifying the energy absorbed by each of the generators of the turbines. To analyze the various aspects of the platform and wind turbines, the analysis is drawn from the fields of hydrodynamics, electromagnetics, aerodynamics and control theory. To study the hydrodynamics of the floating platform in incident monochromatic waves, potential theory is utilized, taking into account the slow-drift yaw motion of the platform. Steady, second-order moments that are spatially dependent (i.e., dependent on the platform's yaw orientation relative to the incident waves) are given special attention since there are no natural restoring yaw moment. The aerodynamics of the counter-rotating turbines are studied in collaboration with researchers at the UC Berkeley Mathematics Department using a high-order, implicit, large-eddy simulation. An element flipping technique is utilized to extend the method to a domain with counter-rotating turbines and the effects from the closely-spaced turbines is compared with existing experimental data. Hybrid testing techniques on a model platform are utilized to prove the controllability of the platform in lieu of a wind-wave tank. A 1:82 model-scale floating platform is fabricated and tested at the UC Berkeley Physical-Model Testing Facility. The vertical-axis wind turbines are simulated by spinning, controllable actuators that can be updated in real-time of

  8. A bead on a hoop rotating about a horizontal axis: a 1-D ponderomotive trap

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Andrew K

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple mechanical system that operates as a ponderomotive particle trap, consisting of a circular hoop and a frictionless bead, with the hoop rotating about a horizontal axis lying in the plane of the hoop. The bead in the frame of the hoop is thus exposed to an effective sinusoidally-varying gravitational field. This field's component along the hoop is a zero at the top and bottom. In the same frame, the bead experiences a time-independent centrifugal force that is zero at the top and bottom as well. The system is analyzed in the ideal case of small displacements from the minimum, and the motion of the particle is shown to satisfy the Mathieu equation. In the particular case that the axis of rotation is tangential to the hoop, the system is an exact analog for the rf Paul ion trap. Various complicating factors such as anharmonic terms, friction and noise are considered. A working model of the proposed system has been constructed, using a ball-bearing rolling in a tube along the outside of a sec...

  9. Counter-rotating vortex pairs in the wake of a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Vincent; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Despite the rising popularity of vertical axis wind turbines, or VAWTs, the wakes behind these machines is much less well understood than those behind horizontal axis wind turbines, or HAWTs. A thorough understanding of wakes is important as they can cause turbines in wind farms to produce less power than anticipated and increase the fatigue loading on turbines due to vibrations. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the wake behind a vertical axis wind turbine in atmospheric flow stereo-PIV is implemented in a boundary-layer wind tunnel to produce snapshots of the 3-component velocity field in the wake at various downstream positions. The boundaries of the wake are readily observed due to the high velocity gradients and turbulence present here. Two pairs of counter-rotating vortices similar to those in the wake of yawed HAWTs are also observed. An examination of the momentum fluxes behind the turbine demonstrates that the mean flow induced by these vortices entrains a large quantity of momentum from the unperturbed boundary layer flow above the wake. This effect proves to play an even more significant role than turbulence in reintroducing momentum into the wake. In order to comprehend why the VAWT produces these vortices we modify the double-multiple stream-tube model typically used to predict VAWT performance to incorporate crosswind forces. The similarity between VAWT and yawed HAWT wakes is found not to be coincidental as both cases feature rotors which exert a lateral thrust on the incoming wind which leads to the creation of counter-rotating vortex pairs.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamically stable plasma with supercritical current density at the axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdakov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marks Avenue, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Postupaev, V. V., E-mail: V.V.Postupaev@inp.nsk.su; Sudnikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, an analysis of magnetic perturbations in the GOL-3 experiment is given. In GOL-3, plasma is collectively heated in a multiple-mirror trap by a high-power electron beam. During the beam injection, the beam-plasma interaction maintains a high-level microturbulence. This provides an unusual radial profile of the net current (that consists of the beam current, current of the preliminary discharge, and the return current). The plasma core carries supercritical current density with the safety factor well below unity, but as a whole, the plasma is stable with q(a) ≈ 4. The net plasma current is counter-directed to the beam current; helicities of the magnetic field in the core and at the edge are of different signs. This forms a system with a strong magnetic shear that stabilizes the plasma core in good confinement regimes. We have found that the most pronounced magnetic perturbation is the well-known n = 1, m = 1 mode for both stable and disruptive regimes.

  11. Modification of Eye Movements and Motion Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Denise, P.; CLement, G.

    2006-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both torsional and horizontal eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane, and modulation of vertical and vergence eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the sagittal plane. Previous studies have demonstrated that tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses, as well as motion perception, vary as a function of stimulus frequency during OVAR. The purpose of this study is to examine normative OVAR responses in healthy human subjects, and examine adaptive changes in astronauts following short duration space flight at low (0.125 Hz) and high (0.5 Hz) frequencies. Data was obtained on 24 normative subjects (14 M, 10 F) and 14 (13 M, 1F) astronaut subjects. To date, astronauts have participated in 3 preflight sessions (n=14) and on R+0/1 (n=7), R+2 (n= 13) and R+4 (n= 13) days after landing. Subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography. Perceived motion was evaluated using verbal reports and a two-axis joystick (pitch and roll tilt) mounted on top of a two-axis linear stage (anterior-posterior and medial-lateral translation). Eye responses were obtained in ten of the normative subjects with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias of the responses over several cycles at each stimulus frequency. Eye responses during 0.125 Hz OVAR were dominated by modulation of torsional and vertical eye position, compensatory for tilt relative to gravity. While there is a bias horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV), the

  12. Rotationally-Resolved Scattering of Formaldehyde from the 111Au Surface: AN Axis Specific Rotational Rainbow and its Role in Trapping Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Barratt; Krueger, Bastian C.; Meyer, Sven; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec; Schaefer, Tim

    2017-06-01

    The conversion of translational to rotational motion often plays a major role in the trapping of small molecules at surfaces, a crucial first step for a wide variety of chemical processes that occur at gas-surface interfaces. However, to date most quantum-state resolved surface scattering experiments have been performed on diatomic molecules, and very little detailed information is available about how the structure of non-linear polyatomic molecules influences the mechanisms for energy exchange with surfaces. In the current work, we employ a new rotationally-resolved 1+1' resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) scheme to measure rotational distribution in formaldehyde molecules directly scattered from the Au(111) surface at incident kinetic energies in the range 0.3-1.2 eV. The results indicate a pronounced propensity to excite a-axis rotation (twirling) rather than b- or c-axis rotation (tumbling or cartwheeling), and are consistent with a rotational rainbow scattering model. Classical trajectory calculations suggest that the effect arises--to zeroth order--from the three-dimensional shape of the molecule (steric effects). The results have broad implications for the enhanced trapping probability of prolate and near-prolate molecules at surfaces.

  13. Reconstruction of the Electron Density of Molecules with Single-Axis Alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodub, Dmitri

    2011-08-12

    Diffraction from the individual molecules of a molecular beam, aligned parallel to a single axis by a strong electric field or other means, has been proposed as a means of structure determination of individual molecules. As in fiber diffraction, all the information extractable is contained in a diffraction pattern from incidence of the diffracting beam normal to the molecular alignment axis. We present two methods of structure solution for this case. One is based on the iterative projection algorithms for phase retrieval applied to the coefficients of the cylindrical harmonic expansion of the molecular electron density. Another is the holographic approach utilizing presence of the strongly scattering reference atom for a specific molecule.

  14. Goldstone radar evidence for short-axis mode non-principal-axis rotation of near-Earth asteroid (214869) 2007 PA8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozović, Marina; Benner, Lance A. M.; Magri, Christopher; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Busch, Michael W.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Nolan, Michael C.; Jao, Joseph S.; Lee, Clement G.; Snedeker, Lawrence G.; Silva, Marc A.; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Slade, Martin A.; Hicks, Michael D.; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Sanchez, Juan A.; Reddy, Vishnu; Dykhuis, Melissa; Corre, Lucille Le

    2017-04-01

    We report radar and optical photometric observations of near-Earth asteroid (214869) 2007 PA8 obtained during October 2-November 13, 2012. We observed 2007 PA8 on sixteen days with Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) and on five days with the 0.6 m telescope at Table Mountain Observatory. Closest approach was on November 5 at a distance of 0.043 au. Images obtained with Goldstone's new chirp system achieved range resolutions as fine as 3.75 m, placing thousands of pixels on the asteroid's surface, and revealing that 2007 PA8 is an elongated, asymmetric object. Surface features include angularities, facets, and a concavity approximately 400 m in diameter. We used the Shape software to estimate the asteroid's 3D shape and spin state. 2007 PA8 has a broad, rounded end and a tapered, angular end with sharp-crested ridges. The asteroid's effective diameter is 1.35 ± 0.07 km, which in combination with the absolute magnitude of 16.30 ± 0.52 gives an optical albedo of pV = 0.29 ± 0.14. The shape modeling of the radar data revealed that 2007 PA8 is a non-principal axis (NPA) rotator in the short-axis mode with an average period of precession by the long axis around the angular momentum vector of 4.26 ± 0.02 days and an oscillatory period around the long axis of 20.55 ± 3.75 days. The amplitude of rolling around the long axis is 42 ± 7° . The angular momentum vector points toward ecliptic longitude and latitude of 273.6 ± 10°, +16.9 ± 5°. 2007 PA8 is only the second confirmed short-axis mode NPA rotator known in the near-Earth asteroid population after (99942) Apophis (Pravec et al., 2014). 2007 PA8 has a geopotential high at the equator, where the equator is defined as the plane that contains the long and intermediate axis. This geopotential extreme could be interpreted as a large, hidden surface depression, or as evidence that 2007 PA8 is a multi-component body.

  15. On the Measurement and Analysis of Rotation and Spin Axis of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, D.; Andres, N.; Noomen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The University of Maryland has, for the past 15 years, been monitoring the rotation of LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and other satellites by the sun-glint method. This has resulted in the first determination of the orientation of the spin axis, and has provide a history of the motion of the spin. The accuracy ellipse is typically better than 1 degree by 10 degrees, and when two passes are available for the same night, the error ellipse improves to 1 degree by 1 degree. This accuracy has been verified by internal consistency and by the agreement with the model of Andres. The current status of the observations and the method will be presented. The role of the thermal thrust will be addressed on the orbit will be addressed, as well as the effect of the satellite orientation. The relation of these measurement and the thermal thrust to the joint Italian/University of Maryland program for the measurement of the Lense-Thirring will be also discussed.

  16. Rotational kinematics of a rigid body about a fixed axis: development and analysis of an inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2015-07-01

    We present the development, administration, and analysis of a focused inventory on the rotational kinematics of a rigid body around a fixed axis. The inventory, which is made up of 13 multiple-choice questions, was developed on the basis of interactions with students and teachers. The systematic and iterative aspects of the construction of the inventory are illustrated. The questions, which were validated, were administered to a set of teachers (N = 25) and two groups of preuniversity students (N = 74 and 905) in India. Students, as well as teachers, exhibited difficulties in applying the operational definition of angular velocity to a rigid body. Many erroneously assumed that an angular acceleration cannot exist without a net torque. Patterns of reasoning resulting in errors were identified and categorized under four broad themes. These include inappropriate extensions of familiar procedural practices, reasoning cued by primitive elements in thought, lack of differentiation between related but distinct concepts, and indiscriminate use of equations. The inventory was also administered to introductory-level students (N = 384) at the University of Washington. Popular distractors to most items were similar to the Indian students.

  17. Salt structures and vertical axis rotations; a case study in the Barbastro-Balaguer anticline, Southern Pyrenees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Emilio L.; Oliván, Carlota; Soto, Ruth; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; Santolaria, Pablo; Luzón, Aránzazu; Casas, Antonio M.; Ayala, Conxi

    2017-04-01

    Vertical axis rotations are common in all deformation settings. At larger scales, for example in fold and thrust belts, they are usually related to differential shortening along strike and this may be caused by a number of reasons (interplay of plate boundaries, sedimentary wedges, detachment level distribution, etc.). At smaller scales, local stress fields, interference of non-coaxial deformation phases, development of non-cylindrical structures, etc. may play an important role to accommodate significant magnitudes of rotation. Apart from their implication in the truly 4D understanding of geological structures, the occurrence of vertical axis rotation usually precludes the application of most 3D restoration techniques and thus, increases the uncertainty in any 3D reconstruction. Salt structures may form in different geological settings, but focusing on compressive regimes, very little is known about the relation between their geometry and kinematics and their ability to accommodate vertical axis rotations (i.e. local or regional lateral gradients of shortening). The Barbastro-Balaguer anticline (BBA) is the southernmost structure of the Central Pyrenees. It is a large detachment fold spreading more than 150 km along the front. In contrast to most frontal Pyrenean structures, the BBA is detached in Priabonian evaporites and was folded during Oligocene times as witnessed by well exposed growth strata. Along strike changes in the fold axis trend may reach 50°, an overall the anticline displays a convex shape towards the foreland (south). A residual Bouguer anomaly map based on a densely sampled gravimetric surveying (10.000 stations) has helped delineating a heterogeneous distribution of the Eocene detachment level in the subsurface. In this contribution we explore the interplay between vertical axis rotations, detachment level distribution and the fold geometry (structural trend and style based on hundreds of data). Seventy paleomagnetic sites evenly and densely

  18. Galaxy rotation curves with log-normal density distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Marr, John H

    2015-01-01

    The log-normal distribution represents the probability of finding randomly distributed particles in a micro canonical ensemble with high entropy. To a first approximation, a modified form of this distribution with a truncated termination may represent an isolated galactic disk, and this disk density distribution model was therefore run to give the best fit to the observational rotation curves for 37 representative galaxies. The resultant curves closely matched the observational data for a wide range of velocity profiles and galaxy types with rising, flat or descending curves in agreement with Verheijen's classification of 'R', 'F' and 'D' type curves, and the corresponding theoretical total disk masses could be fitted to a baryonic Tully Fisher relation (bTFR). Nine of the galaxies were matched to galaxies with previously published masses, suggesting a mean excess dynamic disk mass of dex0.61+/-0.26 over the baryonic masses. Although questionable with regard to other measurements of the shape of disk galaxy g...

  19. Calculations of Optical Rotation from Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    António Canal Neto; Francisco Elias Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Density function theory calculations of frequency-dependent optical rotations [α]ω for three rigid chiral molecules are reported. Calculations have been carried out at the sodium D line frequency, using the ADZP basis set and a wide variety of functionals. Gauge-invariant atomic orbitals are used to guarantee origin-independent values of [α]D. In addition, study of geometry dependence of [α]D. Is reported. Using the geometries optimized at the B3LYP/ADZP level, the mean absolute deviation of B3LYP/ADZP and experimental [α]D values yields 60.1°/(dm g/cm3). According to our knowledge, this value has not been achieved until now with any other model.

  20. Estimating the angle of inclination of the Earth's rotational axis: a potentially meaningful practical activity for astronomy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Danda de Oliveira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a practical activity to estimate the angle of inclination of the Earth's rotation axis as a teaching resource with potential to promote the meaningful learning on topics related to astronomy and Earth science. Some topics of interest for carrying out the activity as the apparent movement of the sun, the angle of incidence of sunlight throughout the year and the seasons are discussed. The procedures and materials used in measuring the length of the shadow of a gnomon, the collected data, and the estimating of the angle of inclination of the rotation axis are presented. The article ends with a reflection on the implementation of this activity in elementary and high school level.

  1. Estimating the angle of inclination of the Earth's rotational axis: a potentially meaningful practical activity for astronomy education

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Danda de Oliveira; Letícia Zolet; Odilon Giovannini Junior

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a practical activity to estimate the angle of inclination of the Earth's rotation axis as a teaching resource with potential to promote the meaningful learning on topics related to astronomy and Earth science. Some topics of interest for carrying out the activity as the apparent movement of the sun, the angle of incidence of sunlight throughout the year and the seasons are discussed. The procedures and materials used in measuring the length of the shadow of a gnomon, th...

  2. Active correction of the tilt angle of the surface plane with respect to the rotation axis during azimuthal scan

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, M; Debiossac, M; Kalashnyk, N; Roncin, P

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to measure the residual tilt angle $\\tau$ between a flat surface and the azimuthal rotation axis of the sample holder is described. When the incidence angle $\\theta$ and readout of the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ are controlled by motors, an active compensation mechanism can be implemented to reduce the effect of the tilt angle during azimuthal motion. After this correction, the effective angle of incidence is kept fixed, and only the small residual oscillation of the scattering plane remains.

  3. Nanometer-level axis of rotation metrology for a high-precision macromolecular X-ray diffractometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, B.; Marsh, E.; Cipriani, F.; Arneson, D.; Oss, D.; Liebers, M.; Keller, E.

    2013-03-01

    The availability of micro-focused beams at 3rd generation synchrotrons makes collecting X-ray data from macromolecular crystals down to a fraction of micron size possible. This requires using goniometers with nanometer-level errors. Crystal positioning is typically realized with a multi-axis goniometer designed to minimize error motion during rotation of the crystal by the data-collection axis. In this paper, five degree-of-freedom error motions of an air bearing diffractometer data-collection axis are evaluated using a multiprobe method. As spindle errors and artifact out-of-roundness approach equal magnitudes, techniques must be used to distinguish and separate each error. A purpose-built fixture orients a single capacitive sensor in three asymmetrical positions to separate artifact form error from spindle error motion. Metrology results of this air bearing Omega spindle demonstrate synchronous errors of 16 nm radial, 4 nm axial and 0.28 μrad tilt.

  4. Method to rotate an endovascular device around the axis of a vessel using an external magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, E; Rangwala, H S; Rudin, S

    2007-01-01

    A magnetic guidance methodology to rotate a device around the catheter axis is proposed. The specific medical application is to intracranial aneurysms. An endovascular device, the asymmetric stent, has a low porosity region that is rotated to cover the aneurysm neck so as to reduce the blood flow into and hence obliterate the aneurysm. The magnetic guidance system consists of a magnetic device attached to the asymmetric stent and an external homogeneous magnetic field of 0.1 T. This magnetic field puts a torque on the magnetic moment of the magnetic device, thereby rotating the stent for proper orientation. For the magnetic device with the required magnetic moment of 0.001 A m2, a cylindrical neodymium permanent magnet is proposed due to its favorable material characteristics while a coil electromagnet with iron core appears impractical due to demagnetizing effects.

  5. Sensation of rotation about a vertical axis with a fixed visual field in different illuminations and in the dark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the oculogyro illusion of the relative motion of a spot fixed with respect to the subject during subject rotation and of a fixed striped peripheral visual field under different levels of illumination on perceptions of rotation about a vertical axis are investigated. Subjects were seated in a rotatable flight trainer cockpit with visual fields consisting of darkness, a dim peripheral field, and a bright peripheral field, all fixed with respect to the subject, and subject perceptual thresholds, frequency responses and sensations of displacement and velocity were measured during trainer rotation at constant and varying angular accelerations. The perception of angular acceleration is found to exhibit a significantly lower threshold and a reduced latency time in the illuminated visual fields which was independent of the level of illumination. Subjective frequency responses showed a higher gain in the illuminated presentations, while subjective displacements during triangular velocity stimuli exhibited no difference for the different visual cues. Finally, magnitude estimations of the after-rotation associated with deceleration from a constant velocity showed a greater rising speed, larger velocity and longer duration under illumination. Results show that, for low accelerations, the visual input enhances sensitivity to self-motion, an effect explained by the oculogyral illusion.

  6. Dike orientations in the late jurassic independence dike swarm and implications for vertical-axis tectonic rotations in eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, R.F.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Howard, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the strikes of 3841 dikes in 47 domains in the 500-km-long Late Jurassic Independence dike swarm indicates a distribution that is skewed clockwise from the dominant northwest strike. Independence dike swarm azimuths tend to cluster near 325?? ?? 30??, consistent with initial subparallel intrusion along much of the swarm. Dike azimuths in a quarter of the domains vary widely from the dominant trend. In domains in the essentially unrotated Sierra Nevada block, mean dike azimuths range mostly between 300?? and 320??, with the exception of Mount Goddard (247??). Mean dike azimuths in domains in the Basin and Range Province in the Argus, Inyo, and White Mountains areas range from 291?? to 354?? the mean is 004?? in the El Paso Mountains. In the Mojave Desert, mean dike azimuths range from 318?? to 023??, and in the eastern Transverse Ranges, they range from 316?? to 051??. Restoration for late Cenozoic vertical-axis rotations, suggested by paleodeclinations determined from published studies from nearby Miocene and younger rocks, shifts dike azimuths into better agreement with azimuths measured in the tectonically stable Sierra Nevada. This confirms that vertical-axis tectonic rotations explain some of the dispersion in orientation, especially in the Mojave Desert and eastern Transverse Ranges, and that the dike orientations can be a useful if imperfect guide to tectonic rotations where paleomagnetic data do not exist. Large deviations from the main trend of the swarm may reflect (1) clockwise rotations for which there is no paleomagnetic evidence available, (2) dike intrusions of other ages, (3) crack filling at angles oblique or perpendicular to the main swarm, (4) pre-Miocene rotations, or (5) unrecognized domain boundaries between dike localities and sites with paleomagnetic determinations. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Development of a Low-Cost Attitude and Heading Reference System Using a Three-Axis Rotating Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Bin Hsiao

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A development procedure for a low-cost attitude and heading reference system (AHRS with a self-developed three-axis rotating platform has been proposed. The AHRS consists of one 3-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, and one 3-axis digital compass. Both the accelerometer and gyroscope triads are based on micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS technology, and the digital compass is based on anisotropic-magnetoresistive (AMR technology. The calibrations for each sensor triad are readily accomplished by using the scalar calibration and the least squares methods. The platform is suitable for the calibration and validation of the low-cost AHRS and it is affordable for most laboratories. With the calibrated parameters and data fusion algorithm for the orientation estimation, the self-developed AHRS demonstrates the capabilities of compensating for the sensor errors and outputting the estimated orientation in real-time. The validation results show that the estimated orientations of the developed AHRS are within the acceptable region. This verifies the practicability of the proposed development procedure.

  8. Development of a low-cost attitude and heading reference system using a three-axis rotating platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Chih; Jan, Shau-Shiun; Hsiao, Fei-Bin

    2010-01-01

    A development procedure for a low-cost attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) with a self-developed three-axis rotating platform has been proposed. The AHRS consists of one 3-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, and one 3-axis digital compass. Both the accelerometer and gyroscope triads are based on micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, and the digital compass is based on anisotropic-magnetoresistive (AMR) technology. The calibrations for each sensor triad are readily accomplished by using the scalar calibration and the least squares methods. The platform is suitable for the calibration and validation of the low-cost AHRS and it is affordable for most laboratories. With the calibrated parameters and data fusion algorithm for the orientation estimation, the self-developed AHRS demonstrates the capabilities of compensating for the sensor errors and outputting the estimated orientation in real-time. The validation results show that the estimated orientations of the developed AHRS are within the acceptable region. This verifies the practicability of the proposed development procedure.

  9. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  10. Effects of Density-Dependent Bag Constant and Strange Star Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-Er; GUO Hua

    2003-01-01

    With the emphasis on the effects of the density-dependent bag constant and the rotation of strange star the limiting mass of strange star is calculated. The obtained results show that the limiting mass and the corresponding radius of strange star increase as the rotation frequency increases, and tend to be lowered when the density-dependent bag constant is considered.

  11. Estimating the Error of an Asymptotic Solution Describing the Angular Oscillations of the Axis of Symmetry of a Rotating Rigid Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konosevich, B. I.

    2014-07-01

    The error of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin solution of the equations describing the angular motion of the axis of symmetry of rotation of a rigid body (projectile) is estimated. It is established that order of this estimate does not depend on whether the low-frequency oscillations of the axis of symmetry are damped or not

  12. Modulation of vergence by off-vertical yaw axis rotation in the monkey: normal characteristics and effects of space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal movements of both eyes were recorded simultaneously using scleral search coils in 2 rhesus monkeys before and after the COSMOS 2229 space-flight of 1992-1993. Another 9 monkeys were tested at comparable time intervals and served as controls. Ocular vergence, defined as the difference in horizontal position between the left and right eyes, was measured during off-vertical yaw axis rotation (OVAR) in darkness. Vergence was modulated sinusoidally as a function of head position with regard to gravity during OVAR. The amplitude of peak-to-peak modulation increased with increments in tilt of the angle of the rotational axis (OVAR tilt angle) that ranged from 15 degrees to 90 degrees. Of the 11 monkeys tested, 1 had no measurable modulation in vergence. In the other 10, the mean amplitude of the peak to peak modulation was 5.5 degrees +/- 1.3 degrees at 90 degrees tilt. Each of these monkeys had maximal vergence when its nose was pointed close to upward (gravity back; mean phase: -0.9 degree +/- 26 degrees). After space flight, the modulation in vergence was reduced by over 50% for the two flight monkeys, but the phase of vergence modulation was not altered. The reduction in vergence modulation was sustained for the 11-day postflight testing period. We conclude that changes in vergence are induced in monkeys by the sinusoidal component of gravity acting along the naso-occipital axis during yaw axis OVAR, and that the modulation of the vergence reflex is significantly less sensitive to linear acceleration after space flight.

  13. Live-Axis Turning for the Fabrication of Non-Rotationally Symmetric Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this proposal is to develop a new method to create Non-Rotationally Symmetric (NRS) surfaces that overcomes the limitations of the current techniques and...

  14. Magnetogasdynamic shock wave generated by a moving piston in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of perfect gas with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field, and with or without axisymmetric rotational effects, is investigated. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The ambient medium is assumed to have radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The fluid velocities, the initial density and the initial magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obey power laws. Solutions are obtained, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. The effects of variation of the initial density and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  15. Ocular Reflex Phase During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation In Humans Is Modified By Head-On-Trunk Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott; Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard

    2005-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both horizontal and torsional eye velocity as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the modulation of these ocular reflexes would be modified by different head-on-trunk positions. Ten human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple cycles for each head-on-trunk position. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of torsional eye movements was greater at 0.125 Hz while the modulation of horizontal eye movements was greater at 0.5 Hz. Neither amplitude nor bias velocities were significantly altered by head-on-trunk position. The phases of both torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes, on the other hand, shifted towards alignment with the head. These results are consistent with the modulation of torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes during OVAR being primarily mediated by the otoliths in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration along the interaural head axis.

  16. A rotational framework to reduce weed density in organic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds are a major obstacle to successful crop production in organic farming. Producers may be able to reduce inputs for weed management by designing rotations to disrupt population dynamics of weeds. Population-based management in conventional farming has reduced herbicide use 50% because weed den...

  17. Paleomagnetic Determination of Vertical-Axis Block Rotation and Magnetostratigraphy in the Coachella Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, C.; Housen, B. A.; McNabb, J. C.; Dorsey, R. J.; Burmester, R. F.; Messe, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report new paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy data from the Palm Spring Fm of the Mecca Hills, the Pleistocene conglomeratic sandstone in Desert Hot Springs and the Plio-Pleistocene San Timoteo beds from Live Oak Canyon. From the Mecca Hills, new data are from 29 sites and 112 samples. The paleomagnetic results yielded well-defined components of magnetization- defining seven polarity zones within the Ocotillo and upper Palm Spring Fm. Correlation to the geomagnetic polarity timescale, using the Bishop Ash near the top of the section as a tie point, places the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary near the base of the Ocotillo Fm, and the Jaramillo, Olduvai, and Reunion normal polarity sub-chrons in the upper Palm Spring Fm. This indicates the upper Palm Spring Fm in the Mecca Hills was deposited between 2.3 and 0.9 Ma. Sites from the Mecca Hills section have mean directions of D = 343, I = 53, α95 =11.3 N = 5 for normal sites, D = 175, I = -50, α95 = 4.9 N = 24 for reverse sites, and normal and reverse sites combined have a mean direction of D = 353, I = 51 α95 = 4.4. This indicates modest (7 degrees) CCW rotation of the section. Results from 19 sites (53 samples) of the Pleistocene conglomeritic sandstone from Desert Hot Springs have very well-defined paleomagnetic components. Six of the sites have normal polarity- 13 sites have reverse polarity. Sites with normal polarity have a mean direction of D = 358, I = 45, α95 = 13 and reverse sites have a mean of D = 182, I = -50, α95 = 6.6.The combined mean direction (in tilt-corrected coordinates) is D = 0.7, I = 49, α95 = 5.6 and indicates that 3.1° ± 2.3° of CW rotation has occurred at this location since ~1 to 1.5 Ma. Results from 8 sites (35 samples) of the upper-most San Timoteo beds from Live Oak Canyon also have well-defined paleomagnetic components for 6 sites. All of the results have normal polarity, and one site has a direction that is >40 degree from the other sites- the mean of the remaining 5

  18. Intersegmental dynamics of 3D upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations during baseball pitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kozo; Takagi, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Norimasa; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The shoulder internal rotation (IR) and forearm pronation (PR) are important elements for baseball pitching, however, how rapid rotations of IR and PR are produced by muscular torques and inter-segmental forces is not clear. The aim of this study is to clarify how IR and PR angular velocities are maximized, depending on muscular torque and interactive torque effects, and gain a detailed knowledge about inter-segmental interaction within a multi-joint linked chain. The throwing movements of eight collegiate baseball pitchers were recorded by a motion capture system, and induced-acceleration analysis was used to assess the respective contributions of the muscular (MUS) and interactive torques associated with gyroscopic moment (GYR), and Coriolis (COR) and centrifugal forces (CEN) to maximum angular velocities of IR (MIRV) and PR (MPRV). The results showed that the contribution of MUS account for 98.0% of MIRV, while that contribution to MPRV was indicated as negative (-48.1%). It was shown that MPRV depends primarily on the interactive torques associated with GYR and CEN, but the effects of GYR, COR and CEN on MIRV are negligible. In conclusion, rapid PR motion during pitching is created by passive-effect, and is likely a natural movement which arises from 3D throwing movement. Applying the current analysis to IR and PR motions is helpful in providing the implications for improving performance and considering conditioning methods for pitchers.

  19. Dynamic motion analysis of dart throwers motion visualized through computerized tomography and calculation of the axis of rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisinghe, Y; Troupis, J M; Patel, M; Smith, J; Crossett, M

    2014-05-01

    We used a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) mapping method to model the wrist in dynamic unrestricted dart throwers motion in three men and four women. With the aid of precision landmark identification, a 3D coordinate system was applied to the distal radius and the movement of the carpus was described. Subsequently, with dynamic 3D reconstructions and freedom to position the camera viewpoint anywhere in space, we observed the motion pathways of all carpal bones in dart throwers motion and calculated its axis of rotation. This was calculated to lie in 27° of anteversion from the coronal plane and 44° of varus angulation relative to the transverse plane. This technique is a safe and a feasible carpal imaging method to gain key information for decision making in future hand surgical and rehabilitative practices.

  20. Comparison of three formal methods used to estimate the functional axis of rotation: an extensive in-vivo analysis performed on the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Francesca; Lopomo, Nicola; Visani, Andrea; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the main axis of rotation (AoR) of a human joint represents an important issue in biomechanics. This study compared three formal methods used to estimate functional AoR, namely a cylindrical fitting method, a mean helical axis transformation, and a symmetrical axis approach. These methods were tested on 106 subjects undergoing navigated total knee arthroplasty. AoR orientation in 3D and in the frontal and coronal planes provided by each method was compared to the transepicondylar axis direction. Although all the methods resulted effective, significant differences were identified among them, relatively to the orientation in 3D and in the frontal plane projection. This was probably due to the presence of secondary rotations during the first degrees of knee flexion.

  1. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  2. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W.

    2017-01-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  3. A convolutional neural network approach to calibrating the rotation axis for X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaogang; De Carlo, Francesco; Phatak, Charudatta; Gürsoy, Dogˇa

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to calibrate the center-of-rotation for X-ray tomography by using a machine learning approach, the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The algorithm shows excellent accuracy from the evaluation of synthetic data with various noise ratios. It is further validated with experimental data of four different shale samples measured at the Advanced Photon Source and at the Swiss Light Source. The results are as good as those determined by visual inspection and show better robustness than conventional methods. CNN has also great potential for reducing or removing other artifacts caused by instrument instability, detector non-linearity, etc. An open-source toolbox, which integrates the CNN methods described in this paper, is freely available through GitHub at tomography/xlearn and can be easily integrated into existing computational pipelines available at various synchrotron facilities. Source code, documentation and information on how to contribute are also provided.

  4. Model tests of wind turbine with a vertical axis of rotation type Lenz 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwierzchowski Jaroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A building design of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT was presented in the article. The construction and operating principle of a wind turbine were described therein. Two VAWT turbine models were compared, i.a. Darrieus and Lenz2, taking their strengths and weaknesses into consideration. 3D solid models of turbine components were presented with the use of SolidWorks software. Using CFD methods, the air flow on two aerodynamic fins, symmetrical and asymmetrical, at different angles of attack were tested. On the basis of flow simulation conducted in FlowSimulation, an asymmetrical fin was chosen as the one showing greater load bearing capacities. Due to the uncertainty of trouble-free operation of Darrieus turbine on construction elements creating the basis thereof, a 3D model of Lenz2 turbine was constructed, which is more reliable and makes turbine self-start possible. On the basis of the research, components were designed and technical docu mentation was compiled.

  5. A convolutional neural network approach to calibrating the rotation axis for X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaogang; De Carlo, Francesco; Phatak, Charudatta; Gürsoy, Dogˇa

    2017-01-24

    This paper presents an algorithm to calibrate the center-of-rotation for X-ray tomography by using a machine learning approach, the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The algorithm shows excellent accuracy from the evaluation of synthetic data with various noise ratios. It is further validated with experimental data of four different shale samples measured at the Advanced Photon Source and at the Swiss Light Source. The results are as good as those determined by visual inspection and show better robustness than conventional methods. CNN has also great potential forreducing or removingother artifacts caused by instrument instability, detector non-linearity,etc. An open-source toolbox, which integrates the CNN methods described in this paper, is freely available through GitHub at tomography/xlearn and can be easily integrated into existing computational pipelines available at various synchrotron facilities. Source code, documentation and information on how to contribute are also provided.

  6. Superdeformed rotational bands with density dependent pairing interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasaki, J. [Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique, Brussels (Belgium); Heenen, P.H. [Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique, Brussels (Belgium); Bonche, P. [SPhT - CE Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dobaczewski, J. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Flocard, H. [Division de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1995-10-09

    The cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method, applied in a previous study to SD bands of even Hg and Pb isotopes, is extended by including pairing correlations described by a zero-range density-dependent interaction. This more realistic description of the pairing channel modifies the balance between the neutron and proton pairing energies and introduces an orbital variation of the pairing gaps. This results in a retarded alignment, significantly improving the agreement with data in both the A=150 and 190 mass regions. The behavior expected for SD bands in odd-N or odd-Z nuclei is discussed on the basis of the quasiparticle routhians calculated for the even-even isotopes. (orig.).

  7. Superdeformed rotational bands with density dependent pairing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, J.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bonche, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Flocard, H.

    1995-02-01

    The cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method, applied in a previous study to SD bands of even Hg and Pb isotopes, is extended by including pairing correlations described by a zero-range density-dependent interaction. This more realistic description of the pairing channel modifies the balance between the neutron and proton pairing energies and introduces an orbital variation of the pairing gaps. This results in a retarded alignment, significantly improving the agreement with data in both the A = 150 and 190 mass regions. The behavior expected for SD bands in odd- N or odd- Z nuclei is discussed on the basis of the quasiparticle routhians calculated for the even-even isotopes.

  8. Disguising Rotational Gain for Redirected Walking in Virtual Reality:Effect of Visual Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan, Anders Glud; Elbaek, Jacob; Mortensen, Mathias;

    2016-01-01

    In virtual reality environments that allow users to walk freely, the area of the virtual environment (VE) is constrained to the size of the tracking area. By using redirection techniques, this problem can be partially circumvented; one of the techniques involves rotating the user more or less...... in the virtual world than in the physical world; this technique is referred to as rotational gain. This paper seeks to further investigate this area, examining the effect of visual density in the VE....

  9. Numerical simulation of rotating body movement in medium with various densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenev, Valentin A.; Korolev, Stanislav A.; Rusyak, Ivan G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper proposes an approach to calculate the motion of rotating bodies in resisting medium by solving the Kirchhoff equations of motion in a coordinate system moving with the body and in determination of aerodynamic characteristics of the body with a given geometry by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. We present the phase trajectories of the perturbed motion of a rotating projectile in media with different densities: gas and liquid.

  10. Effects of crop rotation on weed density, biomass and yield of wheat (Titicum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zareafeizabadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the weed populations in wheat, under different crop rotations an experiment was carried out at Agricultural Research Station of Jolgeh Rokh, Iran. During growing season this project was done in five years, based on Randomized Complete Bloch Design with three replications, on Crop rotations included: wheat monoculture for the whole period (WWWWW, wheat- wheat- wheat- canola- wheat (WWWCW, wheat- sugar beet- wheat-sugar beet- wheat (WSWSW, wheat- potato- wheat- potato- wheat (WPWPW, wheat- potato- wheat- canola- wheat (WPWCW, wheat- sugar beet- wheat- potato- wheat (WSWPW, wheat- maize- wheat- potato- wheat (WMWPW, wheat- maize- wheat- sugar beet- wheat (WMWSW. Data analysis was done in fifth year. Weed sampling was done at four growth stages of wheat, including tillering, shooting, heading and soft dough stage of grains. Density, dry and fresh weight of each weed species per unit area, besides wheat grain yield were determined. All analysis of variances for traits related to weed were statistically significant (p≤0.01. The highest weed biomass was obtained in heading stage of wheat, and the greatest weed dry matter in all four growth stages was achieved in WWWWW rotation and the least one in WMWSW rotation. The highest weed density in different growth stages was achieved in rotations 7, 3, and 6. Wheat grain yield in all crop rotation treatments had a significant increase compared to monoculture. It seems that, yield reduction of wheat monoculture is related to weed density, its population and higher weed biomass in this treatment.

  11. Randomized study on the safety and efficacy of dual-axis rotational versus standard coronary angiography in the Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-liang; JIN Zhi-geng; YANG Sheng-li; LUO Jian-ping; MA Dong-xing; LIU Ying; HAN Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (DARCA) was developed as an innovative adaptation of rotational angiography (RA),but it requires a longer coronary injection compared to standard coronary angiography (SA).As the body of the average Chinese patient is smaller than that of most western patients,with the same contrast injection time,the risk of complications from the contrast agent is increased in this population.The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of DARCA in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Chinese population by directly comparing it to SA.Methods Two hundred Chinese patients were randomized to either the SA group (n=100) or DARCA group (n=100).Contrast utilization,radiation exposure and procedure time were recorded for each modalities.Blood pressure (BP),heart rate (HR) pre and post injection symptoms and any arrhythmias were recorded.Results Compared to the SA group,there was a 42% reduction in contrast utilization,55% reduction in radiation exposure and a 31% shorter procedure time in the DARCA group.In both groups,there were slight declines in the systolic BP values in the left coronary artery (LCA) post injection (P <0.01).Moreover,post injection HRs for the LCA were also reduced in the DARCA group (P <0.01).But all of these changes were small,transient and without clinical importance.Only one patient (1%) in the DARCA group had an attack of ventricular tachycardia immediately post injection and it resolved by itself during LCA angiography.No arrhythmias occurred in the SA group.Conclusion DARCA is a safe,efficient,and clinically comparable altemative to SA in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in the Chinese population with less contrast utilized,which is less radiation exposure and a shorter procedure time than SA.

  12. Q-adjusting technique applied to vertical deflections estimation in a single-axis rotation INS/GPS integrated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Xingshu; Wang, Jun; Dai, Dongkai; Xiong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Former studies have proved that the attitude error in a single-axis rotation INS/GPS integrated system tracks the high frequency component of the deflections of the vertical (DOV) with a fixed delay and tracking error. This paper analyses the influence of the nominal process noise covariance matrix Q on the tracking error as well as the response delay, and proposed a Q-adjusting technique to obtain the attitude error which can track the DOV better. Simulation results show that different settings of Q lead to different response delay and tracking error; there exists optimal Q which leads to a minimum tracking error and a comparatively short response delay; for systems with different accuracy, different Q-adjusting strategy should be adopted. In this way, the DOV estimation accuracy of using the attitude error as the observation can be improved. According to the simulation results, the DOV estimation accuracy after using the Q-adjusting technique is improved by approximate 23% and 33% respectively compared to that of the Earth Model EGM2008 and the direct attitude difference method.

  13. Analysis of response delay of the attitude in a single-axis rotation INS/GPS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Xingshu; Wang, Jun; Dai, Dongkai; Xiong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Deflections of the vertical (DOV) are normally ignored in the gravity compensation procedure, which become one of the primary error sources in inertial navigation. In a single-axis rotation INS/GPS system, bias of the gyro and the accelerometer can be ignored, the attitude error is mainly affected by DOV. In this paper, the ideal system assumption is abandoned and the influence of DOV on the attitude is comprehensively discussed, which can be divided into two parts i.e. the direct influence and the indirect influence. The attitude error tracks the DOV along the trajectory belongs to the former. A relatively fixed delay between the attitude error and the DOV belongs to the latter. The delay is essentially induced by the weak observability of the system to the violent DOV. Factors which affect the delay are carefully analyzed. The simulation results show that the delay is mainly affected by accuracies of the inertial sensors and the GPS. It decreases with the GPS accuracy increasing, but increases with the inertial sensor accuracy increasing. The process noise covariance matrix Q plays an important role. With analysis of the characteristics of the delay, influence of the DOV on attitude is studied further, which is necessary for the attitude correction in future.

  14. Development of a Robotic Assembly for Analyzing the Instantaneous Axis of Rotation of the Foot Ankle Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N. Salb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankle instantaneous axis of rotation (IAR measurements represent a more complete parameter for characterizing joint motion. However, few studies have implemented this measurement to study normal, injured, or pathological foot ankle biomechanics. A novel testing protocol was developed to simulate aspects of in vivo foot ankle mechanics during mid-stance gait in a human cadaveric specimen. A lower leg was mounted in a robotic testing platform with the tibia upright and foot flat on the baseplate. Axial tibia loads (ATLs were controlled as a function of a vertical ground reaction force (vGRF set at half body weight (356 N and a 50% vGRF (178 N Achilles tendon load. Two specimens were repetitively loaded over 10 degrees of dorsiflexion and 20 degrees of plantar flexion. Platform axes were controlled within 2 microns and 0.008 degrees resulting in ATL measurements within ±2 N of target conditions. Mean ATLs and IAR values were not significantly different between cycles of motion, but IAR values were significantly different between dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. A linear regression analysis showed no significant differences between slopes of plantar flexion paths. The customized robotic platform and advanced testing protocol produced repeatable and accurate measurements of the IAR, useful for assessing foot ankle biomechanics under different loading scenarios and foot conditions.

  15. Human Ocular Counter-Rolling and Roll Tilt Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation after Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) induced by whole body tilt in roll has been explored after spaceflight as an indicator of the adaptation of the otolith function to microgravity. It has been claimed that the overall pattern of OCR responses during static body tilt after spaceflight is indicative of a decreased role of the otolith function, but the results of these studies have not been consistent, mostly due to large variations in the OCR within and across individuals. By contrast with static head tilt, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) presents the advantage of generating a sinusoidal modulation of OCR, allowing averaged measurements over several cycles, thus improving measurement accuracy. Accordingly, OCR and the sense of roll tilt were evaluated in seven astronauts before and after spaceflight during OVAR at 45 /s in darkness at two angles of tilt (10 and 20 ). There was no significant difference in OCR during OVAR immediately after landing compared to preflight. However, the amplitude of the perceived roll tilt during OVAR was significantly larger immediately postflight, and then returned to control values in the following days. Since the OCR response is predominantly attributed to the shearing force exerted on the utricular macula, the absence of change in OCR postflight suggests that the peripheral otolith organs function normally after short-term spaceflight. However, the increased sense of roll tilt indicates an adaptation in the central processing of gravitational input, presumably related to a re-weigthing of the internal representation of gravitational vertical as a result of adaptation to microgravity.

  16. Modelling the influence of temperature anisotropies on poloidal asymmetries of density in the core of rotating plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilato, R.; Maj, O.; Angioni, C.

    2014-07-01

    A consistent set of equations is derived to model poloidal density asymmetries induced by temperature anisotropies in tokamak rotating plasmas. The model can be applied to compute poloidal density asymmetry of highly charged impurities due to additional plasma heating.

  17. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  18. Reconstruction from a single diffraction pattern of azimuthally projected electron density of molecules aligned parallel to a single axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D K; Shneerson, V L; Starodub, D; Spence, J C H

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction from the individual molecules of a molecular beam, aligned parallel to a single axis by a strong electric field or other means, has been proposed as a means of structure determination of individual molecules. As in fiber diffraction, all the information extractable is contained in a diffraction pattern from incidence of the diffracting beam normal to the molecular alignment axis. The limited size of the object results in continuous diffraction patterns characterized by neither Bragg spots nor layer lines. Equations relating the scattered amplitudes to the molecular electron density may be conveniently formulated in terms of cylindrical harmonics. For simulated diffraction patterns from short C nanotubes aligned along their axes, iterative solution of the equation for the zeroth-order cylindrical harmonic and its inverse with appropriate constraints in real and reciprocal space enables the phasing of the measured amplitudes, and hence a reconstruction of the azimuthal projection of the molecule.

  19. Cervical helical axis characteristics and its center of rotation during active head and upper arm movements-comparisons of whiplash-associated disorders, non-specific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grip, Helena; Sundelin, Gunnevi; Gerdle, Björn; Stefan Karlsson, J

    2008-09-18

    The helical axis model can be used to describe translation and rotation of spine segments. The aim of this study was to investigate the cervical helical axis and its center of rotation during fast head movements (side rotation and flexion/extension) and ball catching in patients with non-specific neck pain or pain due to whiplash injury as compared with matched controls. The aim was also to investigate correlations with neck pain intensity. A finite helical axis model with a time-varying window was used. The intersection point of the axis during different movement conditions was calculated. A repeated-measures ANOVA model was used to investigate the cervical helical axis and its rotation center for consecutive levels of 15 degrees during head movement. Irregularities in axis movement were derived using a zero-crossing approach. In addition, head, arm and upper body range of motion and velocity were observed. A general increase of axis irregularity that correlated to pain intensity was observed in the whiplash group. The rotation center was superiorly displaced in the non-specific neck pain group during side rotation, with the same tendency for the whiplash group. During ball catching, an anterior displacement (and a tendency to an inferior displacement) of the center of rotation and slower and more restricted upper body movements implied a changed movement strategy in neck pain patients, possibly as an attempt to stabilize the cervical spine during head movement.

  20. Bulk Density of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 Based on Orbital and Rotational Nongravitational Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Belton, M.; Farnham, T.; Gutierrez, P.; Mueller, B.; Chesley, S.

    2009-09-01

    The accurate determination of bulk densities of cometary nuclei provides a strong indicator of their interior structure and will furnish insights into the conditions in the early solar system. The primary technique to determine cometary bulk densities is by correlating the secular orbital changes of the comet with the corresponding forces due to outgassing. However, significant uncertainties persist in these determinations as the accurate assessment of forces due to outgassing is difficult. Davidsson et al. (2007) derived a bulk density of 200-700 kg m-3 for comet 9P/Tempel 1 based on the orbital nongravitational forces. Richardson and colleagues (e.g,, Richardson et al. 2007) independently determined a density of 200-1000 kg m-3 for comet 9P/Tempel 1 based on the analysis of the ejecta fallback caused by the impactor of the Deep Impact mission. These density determinations based on widely different techniques yield consistent results; however, the allowed density range is relatively large. A simultaneous modeling of orbital and rotational changes in 9P/Tempel 1 is expected to yield more constraining results for the bulk density. Accurate determinations of the rotational changes (Belton et al. 2009) and the localized activity (cf. Farnham et al. 2007, Feaga et al. 2007, Schleicher 2006) of comet 9P/Tempel 1 allow us to simultaneously model the orbital and rotational changes caused by outgassing in a self-consistent manner. Initial results from this study will be presented at the meeting. We thank NASA Outer Planets Research Program. References: Belton, M.J.S. et al. 2009. Icarus, in preparation. Davidsson, B.J.R. et al. 2007, Icarus, 187, 306-320. Farnham, T.L. et al. 2007. Icarus, 187, 26-40. Feaga, L.M. et al. 2007. Icarus, 190, 345-356. Richardson, J.E. et al. 2007. Icarus, 190, 357-390. Schleicher D.G. 2006. Icarus, 181, 442-457.

  1. Parametric and mechanical characterization of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) using rotational moulding technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P L Ramkumar; D M Kulkarni; V V Chaudhari

    2014-06-01

    In this research work, extensive literature review of the rotational moulding process using linear low density polythene (LLDPE) has been carried out to summarize the present status of the characterization in order to maintain quality and reliability of the products.The present characterization of rotomoulded products using LLDPE is based on the mechanical properties which are being altered by changing process parameters. However, it is observed that in the majority of applications of the products made of LLDPE using rotational moulding technology are prone to cracking failure due to manufacturing defects at room temperature. Therefore, study of fracture characterization of the material is equally important in relation to quality and reliability. In this article, the present characterization of the rotational moulded products using different polymers is summarized in the form of review and the importance of evaluation of the fracture behaviour of rotomoulded products is emphasized.

  2. ANALISIS KINERJA MESIN PENGUPAS LADA (Piper Nigrum L. TIPE SILINDER PUTARAN VERTIKAL Performance Analysis of Vertical Axis Rotating Cylinder Type of Pepper Decorticator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendra Suhendra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available White pepper is produced by decorticating the pericarp of the pepper which commonly be done manually or mechani­ cally. A pepper decorticator without soaking process was developed in order to improve quality and capasity of decor­ tication. The decortication mechanism was designed by shearing the pepper on a gap between a static vertical cylinder and a vertical axis rotating tube. This research was done to analyze the decortication and working performances of the machine. Dimension analysis approach was applied in order to develope a mathematical relation to be used for prediction of the machine performance based on their design and operational variables. The machine variables varied were linear speed of tube (v, width of clearance (s, and length of rotated cylinder (L. The material variables were diameter of pepper (D , decortication force (F , and density of pepper (ρ . From the analysis result, there were de­bkbfined mathematical equations for prediction of decorticated pepper (p , damaged pepper (p and working capacity ofkrthe machine (K . Validation analysis shows that the equations could be used for prediction and determination of themachine performances needed. ABSTRAK Lada putih dihasilkan melalui proses pengupasan kulit lada yang dilakukan secara manual atau mekanis. Untuk meng­ atasi masalah rendahnya kapasitas dan kualitas pengupasan telah dikembangkan rancangbangun mesin pengupas kulit lada dengan sistem gesekan pada silinder dengan putaran poros secara vertikal tanpa melalui proses perendaman. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk menganalisis kinerja pengupasan, kerusakan dan kapasitas kerja mesin. Pendekatan analisis dimensi diterapkan untuk mendapatkan persamaan matematis yang dapat digunakan untuk memprediksi dan merencanakan kinerja mesin berdasarkan variabel rancangbangun dan operasionalnya. Variabel bebas mesin yang di­ variasikan meliputi kecepatan linier silinder (v, lebar celah (s dan panjang silinder pengupas (L. Variabel

  3. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo, E-mail: bzuniga.51@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias Computacionales, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica [Universidad Tecnológica de Tecámac, División A2, Procesos Industriales, Carretera Federal México Pachuca Km 37.5, Col. Sierra Hermosa, C.P. 55740 Tecámac, Estado de México (Mexico); Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso [Universidad Tecnológica de Tecámac, División A3, Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicaciones, Carretera Federal México Pachuca Km 37.5, Col. Sierra Hermosa, C.P. 55740 Tecámac, Estado de México (Mexico); Simon-Bastida, Patricia [Universidad Tecnlógica de Tulancingo, División Electromecánica, Camino a Ahuehuetitla No. 301, Col. Las Presas, C.P. 43642 Tulancingo, Hidalgo (Mexico); Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M. [Departamento de Química, CINVESTAV, Avenida Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, A.P. 14-740, México D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H{sup 12}C–{sup 12}CH–DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  4. Optical Rotation from Coupled Cluster and Density Functional Theory: The Role of Basis Set Convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Koch, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    We have calculated the electronic optical rotation of seven molecules using coupled cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) and the second-order approximation (CC2) employing the aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, or Q) basis sets. We have also compared to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) by utilizing two functionals B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP and the same basis sets. Using relative and absolute error schemes, our calculations demonstrate that the CAM-B3LYP functional predicts optical rotation with the minimum deviations compared to CCSD at λ = 355 and 589.3 nm. Furthermore, our results illustrate that the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set provides the optical rotation in good agreement with the larger basis sets for molecules not possessing small-angle optical rotation at λ = 589.3 nm. We have also performed several two-point inverse power extrapolations for the basis set convergence, i.e., OR(∞) + AX(-n), using the CC2 model at λ = 355 and 589.3 nm. Our results reveal that a two-point inverse power extrapolation with the aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets at n = 5 provides optical rotation deviations similar to those of aug-cc-pV5Z with respect to the basis limit.

  5. Transition densities in the context of the generalized rotation-vibration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Botero, D. F.; Chamon, L. C.; Carlson, B. V.

    2017-10-01

    A collective model for the description of heavy-ion nuclear structure, called the generalized rotation-vibration model (GRVM), was proposed in an earlier paper. In the present work, we use this model to study transition densities for the low-lying states of several nuclei. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the model, we test the GRVM transition densities in the description of experimental results corresponding to elastic and inelastic electron-nucleus scattering. We also compare the GRVM densities with those arising from microscopic Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov theoretical calculations. The GRVM transition densities can be used in future works to calculate folding-type coupling potentials in coupled-channel data analyses for heavy-ion systems.

  6. Effect of Rotation Crops on Heterodera glycines Population Density in a Greenhouse Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, S.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Wyse, D.L.; Johnson, G.A.; Porter, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Crop rotation is a common means of reducing pathogen populations in soil. Several rotation crops have been shown to reduce soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) populations, but a comprehensive study of the optimal crops is needed. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effect of growth and decomposition of 46 crops on population density of H. glycines. Crops were sown in soil infested with H. glycines. Plants were maintained until 75 days after planting, when the soil was mixed, a sample of the soil removed to determine egg density, and shoots and roots chopped and mixed into the soil. After 56 days, soil samples were again taken for egg counts, and a susceptible soybean (‘Sturdy’) was planted in the soil as a bioassay to determine egg viability. Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), forage pea (Pisum sativum), lab-lab bean (Lablab purpureus), Illinois bundleflower (Desman-thus illinoensis), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) generally resulted in smaller egg population density in soil or number of cysts formed on soybean in the bioassay than the fallow control. Sunn hemp most consistently showed the lowest numbers of eggs and cysts. As a group, legumes resulted in lower egg population densities than monocots, Brassica species, and other dicots. PMID:19259545

  7. Three-axis attitude control by two-step rotations using only magnetic torquers in a low Earth orbit near the magnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takaya; Otsuki, Kensuke; Sugawara, Yoshiki; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    This study proposes a novel method for three-axis attitude control using only magnetic torquers (MTQs). Previously, MTQs have been utilized for attitude control in many low Earth orbit satellites. Although MTQs are useful for achieving attitude control at low cost and high reliability without the need for propellant, these electromagnetic coils cannot be used to generate an attitude control torque about the geomagnetic field vector. Thus, conventional attitude control methods using MTQs assume the magnetic field changes in an orbital period so that the satellite can generate a required attitude control torque after waiting for a change in the magnetic field direction. However, in a near magnetic equatorial orbit, the magnetic field does not change in an inertial reference frame. Thus, satellites cannot generate a required attitude control torque in a single orbital period with only MTQs. This study proposes a method for achieving a rotation about the geomagnetic field vector by generating a torque that is perpendicular to it. First, this study shows that the three-axis attitude control using only MTQs is feasible with a two-step rotation. Then, the study proposes a method for controlling the attitude with the two-step rotation using a PD controller. Finally, the proposed method is assessed by examining the results of numerical simulations.

  8. The global shape, density and rotation of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from preperihelion Rosetta/OSIRIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, L.; Gaskell, R.; Capanna, C.; Hviid, S.; Lamy, P.; Ďurech, J.; Faury, G.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P.; Jackman, C.; Keihm, S. J.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; Marchi, S.; Mottola, S.; Palmer, E.; Schloerb, F. P.; Sierks, H.; Vincent, J.-B.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barbieri, C.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J. L.; Bertini, I.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Güttler, C.; Ip, W.-H.; Kramm, J. R.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    2016-10-01

    gravity and the center of figure suggests that the big lobe has a slightly higher bulk density compared to the small one. the center of mass position cannot be explained by different, but homogenous densities in the two lobes. The initial rotational period of 12.4041 ± 0.0001 h of the nucleus persisted until October 2014. It then slightly increased to a maximum of 12.4304 h reached on 19 May 2015 and finally dropped to 12.305 h just before perihelion on August 10, 2015. A periodogram analysis of the (RA, Dec) direction of the Z-axis of the comet obtained in parallel with the shape reconstruction exhibits a highly significant minima at 11.5 ± 0.5 day clearly indicating an excited rotational state with an amplitude of 0.15 ± 0.03°.

  9. Time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory: Rotating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasjev, A V; 10.1103/PhysRev.82.034329

    2010-01-01

    Time-odd mean fields (nuclear magnetism) and their impact on physical observables in rotating nuclei are studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). It is shown that they have profound effect on the dynamic and kinematic moments of inertia. Particle number, configuration and rotational frequency dependences of their impact on the moments of inertia have been analysed in a systematic way. Nuclear magnetism can also considerably modify the band crossing features such as crossing frequencies and the properties of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia in the band crossing region. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the moments of inertia in the regions away from band crossing only weakly depends on the relativistic mean field parametrization, reflecting good localization of the properties of time-odd mean fields in CDFT. The moments of inertia of normal-deformed nuclei considerably deviate from the rigid body value. On the contrary, superdeformed and hyperdeformed nuclei have ...

  10. Vertical axis rotations in fold and thrust belts: Comparison of AMS and paleomagnetic data in the Western External Sierras (Southern Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Ó.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví Juan, A.; Gil Imaz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Geometry and kinematics of fold-and-thrust belts can be complex settings when oblique structures and vertical-axis rotations (VAR) take place during thrust emplacement. Many techniques can be used to unravel such complex tectonic histories, from classic ones like strain analysis and changes of paleocurrents, to more modern approaches such as paleomagnetism and calcite twin analysis. In this paper, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility is compared to vertical axis rotations deduced from paleomagnetic data along three cross-sections in the External Sierras and the Jaca Basin (southwestern Pyrenees). These data enable us to state that: 1) AMS represents pre-tilting deformation fabrics and magnetic lineation behaves like a passive marker during later deformation; and 2) a primary record of the paleomagnetic field can be found in the area. Therefore, the difference with the paleomagnetic reference is the local VAR. The comparison of the two datasets allows us to draw the following conclusions: A) the changes in both paleomagnetic VAR and magnetic lineation orientation between neighbouring sites are similar; and B) there is a significant linear regression between VAR and trend changes in magnetic lineation. Deviations in magnetic lineation with respect to the expected local magnetic lineation permit vertical axis rotations to be quantified using the AMS dataset. The combined analysis of paleomagnetic and AMS data enables: 1) a quicker comparison of the kinematic evolution in areas with similar AMS patterns; 2) the identification of anomalous orientations of magnetic lineation linked to VARs; and 3) the use of AMS analysis as a homogeneity test for VARs determined from other techniques. AMS is proposed as a suitable preliminary technique to select further sites for paleomagnetic analysis since paleomagnetic laboratory procedures are much more time-consuming than AMS measurements, AMS does not usually modify sample remanence and hence samples can be used for both types of

  11. Transfer and reconstruction of the density matrix in off-axis electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Falk; Lubk, Axel

    2014-11-01

    The reduced density matrix completely describes the quantum state of an electron scattered by an object in transmission electron microscopy. However, the detection process restricts access to the diagonal elements only. The off-diagonal elements, determining the coherence of the scattered electron, may be obtained from electron holography. In order to extract the influence of the object from the off-diagonals, however, a rigorous consideration of the electron microscope influences like aberrations of the objective lens and the Möllenstedt biprism in the presence of partial coherence is required. Here, we derive a holographic transfer theory based on the generalization of the transmission cross-coefficient including all known holographic phenomena. We furthermore apply a particular simplification of the theory to the experimental analysis of aloof beam electrons scattered by plane silicon surfaces.

  12. Growth hormone - insulin-like growth factor-I axis and bone mineral density in adults with thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bone disease and short stature are frequent clinical features of patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Dysfunction of the GH-IGF-1 axis has been described in many thalassemics children and adolescents with short stature and reduced growth velocity. Assessment of the GH-IGF-1 axis in short adults with TM after attainment of final height may be required to select those who are candidates for replacement therapy and to prevent the development of bone disease. The aim of our study was to investigate GH secretion in adult thalassemic patients in relation to their bone mineral density (BMD and serum ferritin concentrations. Materials and Methods: We performed clonidine stimulation test in 30 thalassemic patients (18 males, 12 females with a mean age of 31.5± 7.2 years. The cut-off level for GH response was set at 7ug/l, according to the literature. Serum ferritin, IGF-I, liver enzymes, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and type 1 Collagen Carboxy Telopeptide (CCT1 were also determined. Results: We diagnosed GH deficiency (GHD in 12 patients (40% and IGF-I deficiency (IGF-I SDS <-2 was diagnosed in 20 patients (67%. Adult patients with TM had significantly decreased IGF-I concentrations and bone mineral density (BMD at the femur neck and lumbar spine compared to normal controls. Thalassemic patients with GHD and IGF-I deficiency had significantly lower BMD T score at the lumbar spine compared to patients with normal GH and IGF-I levels. Thalassemic patients had higher serum CCT1 concentrations compared to normal controls. Peak GH levels were correlated significantly with IGF- I concentrations and IGF-I levels were correlated significantly with the height SDS (HtSDS of thalassemic patients. Neither GH peak nor IGF-I concentrations were correlated to serum ferritin concentrations. Conclusions: We conclude that GH status should be tested in adult thalassemic patients especially those with short stature and/or decreased BMD. Clonidine test appears

  13. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields : Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2007-01-01

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose stre

  14. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  15. The influence of an inner core, tides, and precession of the pericenter on the orientation of the rotation axis of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baland, Rose-Marie; Yseboodt, Marie; Van Hoolst, Tim; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2016-10-01

    Mercury's spin axis occupies the Cassini state 1, in which the orbit normal and spin axis precess together with a long period of about 300 000 years. An accurate model of the Cassini state is needed to get a reliable estimate of its polar moment of inertia from the measured orientation of its spin axis. The polar moment of inertia provides a strong constraint on the interior structure. For long, it has been assumed that Mercury precesses as a solid body, meaning that the estimate of the polar moment of inertia may be inaccurate. Recently, there has been renewed interest for the topic, because of the recent determination of Mercury's rotation state (Earth-based radar observations, MESSENGER data), as well as the possibility of future more accurate measurements with the BepiColombo mission.Here, we revisit the influence of the liquid outer core, solid inner core, and precession of the pericenter (period of about 127 000 years). Previous studies have concluded that those effects may have an influence above or up to about an order of magnitude below the present uncertainty on the obliquity. We consider three-layer interior models with a mantle (including the crust), a liquid outer core and a solid inner core. Those models are constrained by the mass, radius, second-degree gravity field coefficients and libration amplitude. We adapt to Mercury a Cassini state model previously developed for synchronous satellites, in which we express the spin axis motion in a frame based on the Laplace plane. We take into account the solar gravitational torque exerted on each layer, the internal gravitational torques between the internal layers and the pressure torques as well as the dissipative viscous torques exerted at the interfaces. We reassess the effect of tidal periodic deformations on the torques, currently thought to be two orders of magnitude below the present uncertainty on the spin orientation determination. Finally, we use the current rotation data to constrain Mercury

  16. Phase diagram for rotating compact stars with two high density phases

    CERN Document Server

    Blaschke, David B; Poghosyan, G

    2002-01-01

    For the classification of rotating compact stars with two high density phases a phase diagram in the angular velocity (Omega) - baryon number (N) plane is investigated. The dividing line N_crit(Omega) between configurations with one and two phases is correlated to a local maximum of the moment of inertia and can thus be subject to experimental verification by observation of the rotational behavior of accreting compact stars. Another characteristic line, which also can be measured is the transition line to black holes that of the maximum mass configurations. The positions and the shape of these lines are sensitive to changes in the equation of state (EoS) of stellar matter. A comparison of the regional structure of phase diagrams is performed for polytropic and relativistic mean field type EoS and correlations between the topology of the transition lines and the properties of two-phase EoS are obtained. Different scenarios of compact star evolution are discussed as trajectories in the phase diagram. It is show...

  17. Unconventional superconductors under a rotating magnetic field. I. Density of states and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, A. B.; Vekhter, I.

    2007-06-01

    We develop a fully microscopic theory for the calculations of the angle-dependent properties of unconventional superconductors under a rotated magnetic field. We employ the quasiclassical Eilenberger equations and use a variation of the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt (BPT) method to obtain a closed-form solution for the Green’s function. The equations are solved self-consistently for quasi-two-dimensional dx2-y2(dxy) superconductors with the field rotated in the basal plane. The solution is used to determine the density of states and the specific heat. We find that applying the field along the gap nodes may result in minima or maxima in the angle-dependent specific heat, depending on the location in the T-H plane. This variation is attributed to the scattering of the quasiparticles on vortices, which depends on both the field and the quasiparticle energy, and is beyond the reach of the semiclassical approximation. We investigate the anisotropy across the T-H phase diagram and compare our results with the experiments on heavy fermion CeCoIn5 .

  18. PMSE strength during enhanced D region electron densities: Faraday rotation and absorption effects at VHF frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Jorge L.; Röttger, Jürgen; Rapp, Markus

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we study the effects of absorption and Faraday rotation on measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). We found that such effects can produce significant reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the D region electron densities (Ne) are enhanced, and VHF radar systems with linearly polarized antennas are used. In particular we study the expected effects during the strong solar proton event (SPE) of July 2000, also known as the Bastille day flare event. During this event, a strong anti-correlation between the PMSE SNR and the D-region Ne was found over three VHF radar sites at high latitudes: Andøya, Kiruna, and Svalbard. This anti-correlation has been explained (a) in terms of transport effects due to strong electric fields associated to the SPE and (b) due to a limited amount of aerosol particles as compared to the amount of D-region electrons. Our calculations using the Ne profiles used by previous researchers explain most, if not all, of the observed SNR reduction in both time (around the SPE peak) and altitude. This systematic effect, particularly the Faraday rotation, should be recognized and tested, and possibly avoided (e.g., using circular polarization), in future observations during the incoming solar maximum period, to contribute to the understanding of PMSE during enhanced D region Ne.

  19. A method for evaluating models that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    de Almeida, Álefe O F; Rodrigues, Davi C

    2016-01-01

    There are some approaches, either based on General Relativity (GR) or modified gravity, that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the matter density of the corresponding galaxy, and this procedure would either indicate a partial or a complete elimination of dark matter in galaxies. Here we review these approaches, clarify the difficulties on this inverted procedure, present a method for evaluating them, and use it to test two specific approaches that are based on GR: the Cooperstock-Tieu (CT) and the Balasin-Grumiller (BG) approaches. Using this new method, we find that neither of the tested approaches can satisfactorily fit the observational data without dark matter. The CT approach results can be significantly improved if some dark matter is considered, while for the BG approach no usual dark matter halo can improve its results.

  20. A method for evaluating models that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Álefe O. F.; Piattella, Oliver F.; Rodrigues, Davi C.

    2016-11-01

    There are some approaches, either based on General Relativity (GR) or modified gravity, that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the matter density of the corresponding galaxy, and this procedure would either indicate a partial or a complete elimination of dark matter in galaxies. Here we review these approaches, clarify the difficulties on this inverted procedure, present a method for evaluating them, and use it to test two specific approaches that are based on GR: the Cooperstock-Tieu (CT) and the Balasin-Grumiller (BG) approaches. Using this new method, we find that neither of the tested approaches can satisfactorily fit the observational data without dark matter. The CT approach results can be significantly improved if some dark matter is considered, while for the BG approach no usual dark matter halo can improve its results.

  1. Hip axis length is a FRAX- and bone density-independent risk factor for hip fracture in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Lix, Lisa M; Morin, Suzanne N; Johansson, Helena; Odén, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V; Kanis, John A

    2015-05-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) measurement from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely used to assess skeletal strength in clinical practice, but DXA instruments can also measure biomechanical parameters related to skeletal shape. The objective of the study was to determine whether DXA-derived hip geometry measures provide information on fracture prediction that is independent of hip fracture probability determined from the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) algorithm. This was a retrospective registry study using BMD results for Manitoba, Canada. Women aged 40 years and older with baseline hip DXA, derived hip geometry measures, and FRAX scores (n = 50 420) participated in the study. Hospitalized hip fracture (n = 1020) diagnosed during 319 137 person-years of follow-up (median 6.4 y) was measured. Among the hip geometry measures, hip axis length (HAL) showed a consistent association with hip fracture risk when adjusted for age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.38], and this was unaffected by further adjustment for BMD or FRAX score. Adjusted for FRAX score with BMD, there was a significant effect of increasing HAL quintile on hip fracture risk (linear trend P hip geometry measurements are associated with incident hip fracture risk, but many do not confer significant independent predictive information. HAL was found to predict hip fractures when adjusted for BMD or FRAX score and may be of clinical value in refining hip fracture risk.

  2. Effect of Bone Mineral Density on Rotator Cuff Tear: An Osteoporotic Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Chen

    Full Text Available An increased bone mineral density (BMD in the proximity to tendon insertion can improve rotator cuff repair and healing. However, how a decrease of BMD in the humeral head affects the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff tendon is still unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated ovariectomy in animals to lead to osteoporosis and decreased BMD, and Teriparatide (PTH administration to improve BMD and strength of bone. This study aimed to explore the correlation between humeral head BMD and infraspinatus (ISP tendon insertion strength, and if an increase in bone quantity of the humeral head can improve the strength of the rotator cuff.Eighteen New England white rabbits were divided into the 3 groups: Control, Ovariectomy-Saline (OVX-Saline, and Ovariectomy-PTH (OVX-PTH. The OVX-Saline group and the OVX-PTH were administered daily saline and Teriparatide injections for 8 weeks starting at 17 weeks of OVX. BMD of the humeral head was measured, the ISP tendon failure load was tested and the failure stress was calculated. One specimen from each group was used for histological analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to derive equations for the BMD and failure stress.Significant differences were observed in the measured humeral head BMD of the Control and OVX-PTH groups compared to the OVX-Saline group (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0024, respectively. No significant difference was found in failure stress among the three groups, but an expected trend with the control group and OVX-PTH group presenting higher failure strength compared to the OVX-Saline group. BMD at the humeral head showed a positive linear correlation with stress (r2 = 0.54. Histology results showed the superiority in OVX-PTH group ISP enthesis compared to the OVX-Saline group.Bone loss of the humeral head leads to decreased tendon/bone insertion strength of the infraspinatus tendon enthesis. Teriparatide administration can increase bone density of the humeral head and may improve

  3. Effect of Bone Mineral Density on Rotator Cuff Tear: An Osteoporotic Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobin; Giambini, Hugo; Ben-Abraham, Ephraim; An, Kai-Nan; Nassr, Ahmad; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    An increased bone mineral density (BMD) in the proximity to tendon insertion can improve rotator cuff repair and healing. However, how a decrease of BMD in the humeral head affects the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff tendon is still unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated ovariectomy in animals to lead to osteoporosis and decreased BMD, and Teriparatide (PTH) administration to improve BMD and strength of bone. This study aimed to explore the correlation between humeral head BMD and infraspinatus (ISP) tendon insertion strength, and if an increase in bone quantity of the humeral head can improve the strength of the rotator cuff. Eighteen New England white rabbits were divided into the 3 groups: Control, Ovariectomy-Saline (OVX-Saline), and Ovariectomy-PTH (OVX-PTH). The OVX-Saline group and the OVX-PTH were administered daily saline and Teriparatide injections for 8 weeks starting at 17 weeks of OVX. BMD of the humeral head was measured, the ISP tendon failure load was tested and the failure stress was calculated. One specimen from each group was used for histological analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to derive equations for the BMD and failure stress. Significant differences were observed in the measured humeral head BMD of the Control and OVX-PTH groups compared to the OVX-Saline group (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0024, respectively). No significant difference was found in failure stress among the three groups, but an expected trend with the control group and OVX-PTH group presenting higher failure strength compared to the OVX-Saline group. BMD at the humeral head showed a positive linear correlation with stress (r2 = 0.54). Histology results showed the superiority in OVX-PTH group ISP enthesis compared to the OVX-Saline group. Bone loss of the humeral head leads to decreased tendon/bone insertion strength of the infraspinatus tendon enthesis. Teriparatide administration can increase bone density of the humeral head and may improve the

  4. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2007-06-01

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose stress fields vanish. We explain that a grain boundary (a dislocation wall satisfying Frank’s formula) has vanishing stress in the continuum limit. We show that the general stress-free state can be written explicitly as a (perhaps continuous) superposition of flat Frank walls. We show that the stress-free states are also naturally interpreted as configurations generated by a general spatially dependent rotational deformation. Finally, we propose a least-squares definition for the spatially dependent rotation field of a general (stressful) dislocation density field.

  5. Entropy generation in a channel resembling gas turbine cooling passage: Effect of rotation number and density ratio on entropy generation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Basha; M Al-Qahtani; B S Yilbas

    2009-06-01

    Flow into a passage resembling a gas turbine blade cooling passage is considered and entropy generation rate in the passage is examined for unique rotation number and density ratios. In the simulations, leading and trailing walls of the passage are assumed to be at constant temperature. A control volume approach is introduced to discretize the governing equations of flow, heat transfer, and entropy generation. Reynolds stress turbulence model is accommodated in the simulation to account for the turbulence. The study is extended to include two rotational speeds and three density ratios. The passage aspect ratio is kept 10:1. It is found that volumetric entropy generation rate attains high values at passage inlet due to attainment of high temperature gradient in this region. Increasing rotation number and density ratio enhances volumetric entropy generation rate in the passage.

  6. Using syntectonic remagnetizations for fold geometry and vertical axis rotation: the example of the Cévennes border (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Bernard; Rouvier, Henri; Le Goff, Maxime

    2004-06-01

    Classical progressive unfolding makes a distinction between pre-folding, post-folding or synfolding magnetization. It yields the direction of magnetization only in the two first cases. To determine the direction of synfolding magnetization, possible different unfolding percentages during remagnetization have to be assumed according to the site. The small circle approach of Surmont et al. not only leads to this direction, but also to the dip value at each site during remagnetization. In the Cévennes area, extensive palaeomagnetic study reveals syntectonic remagnetization enabling the reconstruction of the shape of a fold for the time of the magnetic overprinting as well as analysis of the rotations undergone by some sites after the remagnetization.

  7. A conformal mapping technique to correlate the rotating flow around a wing section of vertical axis wind turbine and an equivalent linear flow around a static wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Hiromichi; Hara, Yutaka; Kawamura, Takafumi; Nakamura, Takuju; Lee, Yeon-Seung

    2013-12-01

    In a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), turbine blades are subjected to the curved flow field caused by the revolution of turbine. However, performance prediction of VAWT is usually based on the fluid dynamic coefficients obtained in wind tunnel measurements of the two-dimensional static wing. The difference of fluid dynamic coefficients in the curved flow and straight flow deteriorates the accuracy of performance prediction. To find the correlation between the two conditions of curved and straight flow, the authors propose a conformal mapping method on complex plane. It provides bidirectional mapping between the two flow fields. For example, the flow around a symmetric wing in the curved flow is mapped to that around a curved (cambered) wing in the straight flow. Although the shape of mapped wing section is different from the original one, its aerodynamic coefficients show a good correlation to those of the original in the rotating condition. With the proposed method, we can reproduce the local flow field around a rotating blade from the flow data around the mapped static wing in the straight flow condition.

  8. Design of non-selective refocusing pulses with phase-free rotation axis by gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm in parallel transmission at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massire, Aurélien; Cloos, Martijn A; Vignaud, Alexandre; Le Bihan, Denis; Amadon, Alexis; Boulant, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    At ultra-high magnetic field (≥ 7T), B1 and ΔB0 non-uniformities cause undesired inhomogeneities in image signal and contrast. Tailored radiofrequency pulses exploiting parallel transmission have been shown to mitigate these phenomena. However, the design of large flip angle excitations, a prerequisite for many clinical applications, remains challenging due the non-linearity of the Bloch equation. In this work, we explore the potential of gradient ascent pulse engineering to design non-selective spin-echo refocusing pulses that simultaneously mitigate severe B1 and ΔB0 non-uniformities. The originality of the method lays in the optimization of the rotation matrices themselves as opposed to magnetization states. Consequently, the commonly used linear class of large tip angle approximation can be eliminated from the optimization procedure. This approach, combined with optimal control, provides additional degrees of freedom by relaxing the phase constraint on the rotation axis, and allows the derivative of the performance criterion to be found analytically. The method was experimentally validated on an 8-channel transmit array at 7T, using a water phantom with B1 and ΔB0 inhomogeneities similar to those encountered in the human brain. For the first time in MRI, the rotation matrix itself on every voxel was measured by using Quantum Process Tomography. The results are complemented with a series of spin-echo measurements comparing the proposed method against commonly used alternatives. Both experiments confirm very good performance, while simultaneously maintaining a low energy deposition and pulse duration compared to well-known adiabatic solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized deq in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  10. Analogy between rotation and density for Dirac fermions in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hao-Lei; Huang, Xu-Guang; Mameda, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the energy spectra of Dirac fermions in the presence of rotation and magnetic field. We find that the Landau degeneracy is resolved by rotation. A drastic change in the energy dispersion relation leads to the "rotational magnetic inhibition" that is a novel phenomenon analogous to the inverse magnetic catalysis in a magnetic system at finite chemical potential.

  11. Systematics of nuclear densities, deformations and excitation energies within the context of the generalized rotation-vibration model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamon, L.C., E-mail: luiz.chamon@dfn.if.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2010-11-30

    We present a large-scale systematics of charge densities, excitation energies and deformation parameters for hundreds of heavy nuclei. The systematics is based on a generalized rotation-vibration model for the quadrupole and octupole modes and takes into account second-order contributions of the deformations as well as the effects of finite diffuseness values for the nuclear densities. We compare our results with the predictions of classical surface vibrations in the hydrodynamical approximation.

  12. Yields in high density, short rotation intensive culture (SRIC)—plantations of Eucalyptus and Other Hardwood Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.M. Sachs; C.B. Low

    1983-01-01

    Initial high density (17,200 trees ha-1, 6961 trees a-1) plantations of Eucalyptus grandis yielded up to 22 oven dry tons (ODT) ha-l yr-I (10 ta-1 yr-1) on an approximate 6 month rotation. Border effects could not be eliminated from the small sized plots used...

  13. Effect of Coriolis and centrifugal forces on flow and heat transfer at high rotation number and high density ratio in non orthogonally internal cooling channel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brahim Berrabah Miloud Aminallah

    .... The density ratios were 0.13, 0.23 and 0.50. The results show that at high buoyancy parameter and high rotation number with a low density ratio, the flow in the first passage is governed by the secondary flow induced by the rotation whereas...

  14. Benchmarking density-functional-theory calculations of rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities using accurate coupled-cluster calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutnæs, Ola B.; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    An accurate set of benchmark rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the results obtained is established for the rotational g tensors by careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. After an analysis of the basis sets employed, extrapolation techniques are used to provide estimates of the basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. The utility of the data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of density functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the density-functional methods are competitive with the CCSD or CCSD(T) methods. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of density-functional calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. The importance of current dependence in exchange-correlation functionals is discussed in light of this comparison.

  15. Transient Simulation of a Rotating Conducting Cylinder in a Transverse Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    analysis. Therefore, the magnitude and direction (phase shift angle) of the magnetic flux density vector at the center of the cylinder’s axis of...UNCLASSIFIED 2 sensor used to measure the magnitude and direction (angle) of a magnetic field, was placed at the center of the cylinder’s axis of rotation for...vector at the center of the cylinder’s axis of rotation was evaluated. The factors that may affect the eddy current interactions and magnetic field

  16. The variation of rotation curve shapes as a signature of the effects of baryons on dark matter density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Chris B.

    2015-12-01

    Rotation curves of galaxies show a wide range of shapes, which can be paramaterized as scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax , i.e. the ratio of the rotation velocity measured at 1 kpc and the maximum measured rotation velocity. We examine whether the observed scatter can be accounted for by combining scatters in disc scalelengths, the concentration-halo mass relation, and the M⋆-Mhalo relation. We use these scatters to create model galaxy populations; when housed within dark matter haloes that have universal, Navarro, Frenk & White density profiles, the model does not match the lowest observed values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and has too little scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax compared to observations. By contrast, a model using a mass-dependent dark matter profile, where the inner slope is determined by the ratio of M⋆/Mhalo, produces galaxies with low values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and a much larger scatter, both in agreement with observation. We conclude that the large observed scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax favours density profiles that are significantly affected by baryonic processes. Alternative dark matter core formation models such as self-interacting dark matter may also account for the observed variation in rotation curve shapes, but these observations may provide important constraints in terms of core sizes, and whether they vary with halo mass and/or merger history.

  17. The Eastern Mono Basin Transtensional Zone: New Paleomagnetic and 40AR/39AR Data Bearing on the Timing and Extent of Vertical Axis Rotation Associated with Intercontinental Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, M. S.; Grondin, D.; Castillo, G., Sr.; Shields, S.; Lindline, J.; Romero, B.; Pluhar, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Deformation between the North American and Pacific plates is distributed across a wide zone of the western margin of the continent, where at least 25-30% of the plate boundary strain is accommodated via intraplate deformation. We hypothesize that during the early to mid-Miocene transtensional deformation was located east of the Sierra Nevada in the Mono Basin prior to stepping east into the Mina Deflection. Seventeen 40Ar/39Ar age determinations were obtained from sequences of lava flows that yield relatively stable plateau ages that indicate eruption in the late Miocene to early Pliocene. Paleomagnetic data were collected from the Miocene Jack Springs Tuff (JST) east of Huntoon Valley, and stratigraphically continuous sections of Mio-Pliocene basalt flows near Marietta, NV (MB), Pizona, CA (PB), Queens Valley, CA/NV (QVB), and in the Adobe Hills (AH). Nineteen sites from the JST yield clockwise discordant results, with respect to the reference location, from +20°±10° to +60°±11°. The results from the basalts yield discordant data with respect to the Miocene expected field direction (D=353°, I=58°, A95= 3°). Twelve of 13 sites from the MB yield a group mean direction D=027°, I=57°, a95=12.4° that is clockwise discordant with an inferred rotation (R) and flattening (F) of R=+33.9°+/-18.4° and F=1.3°+/-10.6°. Seventeen of 22 sites from four sections in the PB indicate that three sections are counter-clockwise discordant and one section plots on the expected field direction. Sixteen of 23 sites from five sections in the QVB indicate that three sections are counter-clockwise discordant and two sections are clockwise discordant. Thirty-four sites of the >100 sites collected in the Adobe Hills are clockwise discordant ranging from +15°±10° to +50°±10°. This study provides the first paleomagnetic data for this area, which supports the hypothesis of strain accommodated by vertical axis rotation in the Mono Basin and constrains the timing of intraplate

  18. Influence of crop rotation and meteorological conditons on density and biomass of weeds in spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wanic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of changes in weed infestation in spring barley cultivated in the years 1990-2004 in crop rotation with a 25% proportion of this cereal (potato - spring barley - sowing peas - winter triticale, when it was grown after potato, and in crop rotation with its 75% proportion (potato - spring barley - spring barley - spring barley, when it was grown once or twice after spring barley. In the experiment, no weed control was applied. Every year in the spring (at full emergence of the cereal and before the harvest, the composition of weed species and weed density of particular weed species were determined, and before the harvest also their biomass. Weed density increased linearly on all plots during the 15-year period. The average values confirm the increase in weed biomass in the case when spring barley was grown once or twice after this crop; however, those differences were influenced by the previous situation only during some seasons. Weed density and biomass showed high year-to-year variability and a positive correlation with the amount of precipitation and a negative correlation with temperature during the period of the study. A negative correlation between the yield of barley and weed biomass was shown.

  19. Validation of improved Multi-Mode model for density, temperature and toroidal rotation profiles using PTRANSP simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, L.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A. H.; Pankin, A. Y.; Rafiq, T.; McCune, D. C.; Budny, R. V.

    2010-11-01

    Advances in the Multi-Mode model include an improved Weiland model for the ITG and TEM modes [1] and a new model for the drift resistive inertial ballooning modes (DRIBM) [2]. Advances in the PTRANSP code include an improved algorithm for the particle density evolution. Validation studies are carried out for the improved Multi-Mode model using PTRANSP simulations. In order to allow tight coupling with stiff transport models, all of the transport equations for main ion and impurity density profiles as well as electron temperature, ion temperature and toroidal angular rotation profiles are advanced simultaneously by the PTRANSP solver. The Plasma State connects the new solver to the rest of PTRANSP. The solver uses several techniques to control numerical stability. Simulation results for density, temperature and rotation frequency profiles are compared with experimental data for L-mode and H-mode discharges. [4pt] [1] J.Weiland et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 965933; F.D. Halpern et al., Phys. Plasmas 15 (2008) 065033 [2] T. Rafiq et al., to appear in Phys. Plasmas (2010)

  20. Numerical simulations of rotating axisymmetric sunspots

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, G. J. J.; Busse, F.H.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Rucklidge, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model of axisymmetric convection in the presence of a vertical magnetic flux bundle and rotation about the axis is presented. The model contains a compressible plasma described by the nonlinear MHD equations, with density and temperature gradients simulating the upper layer of the sun's convection zone. The solutions exhibit a central magnetic flux tube in a cylindrical numerical domain, with convection cells forming collar flows around the tube. When the numerical domain is rotat...

  1. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  2. Introduction to modeling convection in planets and stars magnetic field, density stratification, rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzmaier, Gary

    2013-01-01

    This book provides readers with the skills they need to write computer codes that simulate convection, internal gravity waves, and magnetic field generation in the interiors and atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. Using a teaching method perfected in the classroom, Gary Glatzmaier begins by offering a step-by-step guide on how to design codes for simulating nonlinear time-dependent thermal convection in a two-dimensional box using Fourier expansions in the horizontal direction and finite differences in the vertical direction. He then describes how to implement more efficient and accura

  3. Piezostrain tuning non-volatile 90° magnetic easy axis rotation in Co2FeAl Heusler alloy film grown on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cai; Wang, Fenglong; Dunzhu, Gesang; Yao, Jinli; Jiang, Changjun

    2016-11-01

    Non-volatile electric field-based control of magnetic anisotropy in Co2FeAl/ Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (CFA/PMN-PT) heterostructures is investigated at room temperature. The remnant magnetization response under different electric fields shows a asymmetric butterfly-like behavior; specifically, this behavior is consistent with the asymmetric butterfly-like piezostrain versus applied electric field curve. Thus electric field-induced non-volatile 90° magnetic easy axis rotation can be attributed to the piezostrain effect. Further, the result measured by rotating-angle ferromagnetic resonance demonstrates piezostrain-mediated non-volatile 90° magnetic easy axis rotation at the initial state and the two remnant polarization states after application of the poling fields of 10 and  -10 kV cm-1 turned off. The angular dependence of magnetic damping also indicates a 90° phase shift at the above mentioned three different states. Additionally, the piezostrain-mediated non-volatile stable magnetization reversal in the two directions of easy and hard magnetization axes are observed under positive and negative pulsed electric fields, which can be used to improve the performance of low-loss multiple-state memory devices.

  4. Model-independent measurement of the charge density distribution along an Fe atom probe needle using off-axis electron holography without mean inner potential effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, V., E-mail: v.migunov@fz-juelich.de; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); London, A. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Farle, M. [Fakultät für Physik and Center of Nanointegration (CeNIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-04-07

    The one-dimensional charge density distribution along an electrically biased Fe atom probe needle is measured using a model-independent approach based on off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. Both the mean inner potential and the magnetic contribution to the phase shift are subtracted by taking differences between electron-optical phase images recorded with different voltages applied to the needle. The measured one-dimensional charge density distribution along the needle is compared with a similar result obtained using model-based fitting of the phase shift surrounding the needle. On the assumption of cylindrical symmetry, it is then used to infer the three-dimensional electric field and electrostatic potential around the needle with ∼10 nm spatial resolution, without needing to consider either the influence of the perturbed reference wave or the extension of the projected potential outside the field of view of the electron hologram. The present study illustrates how a model-independent approach can be used to measure local variations in charge density in a material using electron holography in the presence of additional contributions to the phase, such as those arising from changes in mean inner potential and specimen thickness.

  5. Stocking density affects the growth performance and metabolism of Amur sturgeon by regulating expression of genes in the GH/IGF axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuanyuan; Wen, Haishen; Li, Yun; Li, Jifang

    2017-07-01

    The effects of stocking density on the growth and metabolism of Amur sturgeon were assessed. Amur sturgeon were grown for 70 days at three different stocking densities (low stocking density, LSD: 5.5 kg/m3; medium stocking density, MSD: 8.0 kg/m3; and high stocking density, HSD: 11.0 kg/m3), and the biometric index, muscle composition, and serum biochemical parameters were evaluated. In addition, pituitary, liver, and muscle samples were collected for gene cloning and expression analyses. After 70 days of growth, the fish maintained at HSD had significantly lower final body weight and specific growth rate, and a higher feed conversion ratio than those of the fish in the MSD and LSD groups. The HSD group had the lowest lipid and protein concentrations in serum and muscle. The serum cortisol concentration increased significantly in the HSD group, indicating that the stress-response system was activated in these fish. There was no change in the concentration of serum insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2), while the concentrations of serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) decreased in the HSD group. The full-length cDNAs of GH and IGF-2 genes (995-bp and 1 207-bp long, respectively), were cloned and analyzed. In the HSD group, the expressions of GH in the pituitary and growth hormone receptor (GHR) and IGF-1 in the liver were down-regulated at the end of the 70-day experiment. In the HSD group, the transcript level of IGF-2 significantly decreased in the liver, but did not change in muscle. Overall, our results indicated that a HSD negatively affects the growth performance and leads to changes in lipid and protein metabolism in Amur sturgeon. The down-regulated expression of genes related to the GH/IGF axis may be responsible for the poor growth performance of Amur sturgeon under crowding stress.

  6. Influence of the spatially inhomogeneous gap distribution on the quasiparticle current in c-axis junctions involving d-wave superconductors with charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekino, T.; Gabovich, A. M.; Li, Mai Suan; Szymczak, H.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The quasiparticle tunnel current J(V) between the superconducting ab-planes along the c-axis and the corresponding conductance G(V)=\\text{d}J/\\text{d}V were calculated for symmetric junctions composed of disordered d-wave layered superconductors partially gapped by charge density waves (CDWs). Here, V is the voltage. Both the checkerboard and unidirectional CDWs were considered. It was shown that the spatial spread of the CDW-pairing strength substantially smears the peculiarities of G(V) appropriate to uniform superconductors. The resulting curves G(V) become very similar to those observed for a number of cuprates in intrinsic junctions, e.g. mesas. In particular, the influence of CDWs may explain the peak-dip-hump structures frequently found for high-T c oxides.

  7. Effect of gravity level fluctuations for rotating fluids in high and low rotating speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of the free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out with sinusoidal-function vibration of the gravity environment at high and low cylinder speeds.

  8. Propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gorakh Nath

    2010-01-01

    Non-similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic flow behind strong cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas,which has a variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocity.The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas.The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained,and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law.The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assumed to obey exponential laws.The shock wave moves with variable velocity.The effects of variation of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture,and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables in the region behind the shock are investigated at given times.Also,a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  9. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh, E-mail: rramesh@iisermohali.ac.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, Manauli, P.O. Box-140306, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  10. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-01

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R2 experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  11. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R(2)) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R(2) experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  12. Growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis, calciotropic hormones and bone mineral density in young patients with chronic viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Bogdan; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Niedziołka, Danuta; Borgiel-Marek, Halina; Nowak, Mariusz; Siemińska, Lucyna; Ostrowska, Zofia; Głogowska-Szeląg, Joanna; Piecha, Tomasz; Otremba, Łukasz; Holona, Karol; Kazimierczak, Aleksandra; Wierzbicka-Chmiel, Joanna; Kos-Kudła, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease caused by HBV and HCV infections, due to its great prevalence and serious medical consequences, is at the present time a significant clinical problem. An impaired liver function can provoke severe disturbances in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and consequently in the bone metabolism resulting in hepatic osteodystrophy. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are significant differences in bone mineral density (BMD) and/or circadian levels of hormones connected with bone metabolism and bone turnover markers in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Circadian levels (AUC, area under the curve) of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3, osteocalcin (BGLAP), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), PTH, 25(OH)D, total calcium and total phosporus were measured in the blood of members of the study group (n = 80). BMD was assessed using the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry method of the L2-L4 lumbar spine. Data was compared to that of healthy individuals (n = 40). BMD (1.05 g/cm3 vs. 1.20 g/cm3), total calcium concentration (2.20 mmol/L vs. 2.45 mmol/L), total phosphorus concentration (1.06 mmol/L vs. 1.33 mmol/L), IGF-I (AUC 3,982.32 ng/mL vs. 5,167.61 ng/mL), IGFBP-3 (AUC 725.09 ng/L vs. 944.35 ng/L), 25(OH)D (AUC 356.35 ng/mL vs. 767.53 ng/mL) and BGLAP (AUC 161.39 ng/L vs. 298 ng/L) were lower in the study group. GH (AUC 88.3 ng/mL vs. 48.04 ng/mL), iPTH (AUC 1,201.94 pg/mL vs. 711.73 pg/mL) and ICTP (AUC 104.30 μg/L vs. 54.49 μg/L) were higher in patients with hepatitis. Positive correlations were noted between bone mineral density and IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and BGLAP levels. Chronic viral hepatitis causes a decrease in bone mineral density. Impaired liver function disrupts homeostasis of the calcium- vitamin D-parathyroid hormone axis and provokes secondary hyperparathyroidism. Chronic viral hepatitis induces a decrease in the synthesis of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and an increase in GH secretion. Hepatic osteodystrophy is probably caused by both

  13. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on Earth rotation in tidal frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanbo Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth orientation parameters (EOP (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8 and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the preliminary reference earth model (PREM. Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the Earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. However, this is the gap that has not been explained to close the gap of the observation and modeling in PM and LOD. By computing the PM and LOD caused by 3D heterogeneity of the mantle during the period of continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94 and the contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon in the same period, we got the lump-sum values of PM and LOD. The computed total effects and the observed PM and LOD are generally agree with each other. In another word, the difference of the observed PM and LOD and the model only considering ocean tides, at all tidal frequencies (long periods, diurnals, and semidiurnals contains the contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free Earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the reference earth model (REM, which is the next major objective in global

  14. The influence of canopy density on willow leaf rust (Melampsora epitea) severity in willow short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toome, M.; Heinsoo, K.; Holm, B.; Luik, A. [Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1A, Tartu 51014 (Estonia)

    2010-08-15

    Willow short rotation coppice is used as a renewable energy source and also as a vegetation filter for purifying wastewater. Wastewater irrigation might change microclimatic conditions and increase the canopy density in plantations, which might decrease production due to leaf rust (Melampsora epitea). The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of the canopy density on rust abundance on willows. For that, we counted rust pustules on leaves of five different willow clones from dense and sparse areas in both the wastewater irrigated and control part of the plantation. The results demonstrated clear differences between clones; clone '81090' was very susceptible, '78183' susceptible, '78021' fairly tolerant and 'Tora' rust resistant. Clone 'Gudrun', which was previously reported resistant, had severe rust damages in Estonia. In the case of clones '78183' and '78021' there were significantly more rust pustules per leaf unit area at areas with denser canopy, which confirmed that higher plant density could result in biomass losses caused by leaf rust. No differences, however, were detected between dense and sparse areas of hybrid clone 'Gudrun', most probably because in this particular case leaves from upper canopy layer were used. There was a tendency detected that clones with a higher number of shoots per plant had more rust damages on their leaves, however, the correlation was not statistically confirmed. In conclusion, the impact of canopy density on rust abundance is clone-specific and significant in the case of clones on which infection starts from the lower part of the canopy. (author)

  15. The influence of tides and of the precession of the pericenter on the orientation of the rotation axis of a solid Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baland, Rose-Marie; Yseboodt, Marie; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Mercury’s spin axis nearly occupies the Cassini state 1, in which the orbit normal and spin axis precess together with a long period of about 300 000 years. Mercury slightly deviates from that state which is defined for a uniformly precessing rigid planet. Variations in obliquity and deviation from the coplanarity between the spin axis, the normal to the orbit and the normal to the Laplace plane are induced by the slow precession of the pericenter. Moreover, the short-periodic tidal deformations induce a constant shift over time in mean obliquity and deviation, characterized by the tidal love number k2 and by the ratio k2/Q of the tidal Love number over the tidal quality factor, respectively. Including theses effects, we analytically develop a new Cassini state model and reinterpret recent determination of Mercury's orientation in terms of parameters of Mercury's interior. We also show explicitly that Peale's equation is sometimes wrongly cited in the literature, resulting in wrong estimates of the polar moment of inertia.From the orientation of Stark et al. (2015, Planetary and Space Science, Vol. 117), we find C/MR2=0.3433+/-0.0134, which is 0.9% smaller than the estimate by Stark et al. (2015) themselves, because of our refinements of the Cassini state model (0.1%) and their wrong use of Peale's equation (0.8%). That difference is below the actual precision (3-4%) on the polar moment of inertia but may be of the order of precision that can be reached with BepiColombo mission (<0.3%). Given the actual precision on the spin axis orientation, we place an upper limit of about 0.02 on the ratio k2/Q and of about 350 on Q (assuming k2=0.5) at the 1 sigma level. The parameter k2 cannot be estimated from the spin axis orientation, because of its correlation with the polar moment of inertia. In the future, the relative precision on the determination of k2/Q from the spin axis orientation could be as good as 30% with BepiColombo, so that the non-elastic parameter of

  16. DESIGN OF MULTI-MIRROR REFLECTIVE CONCENTRATOR FOR SINGLE-AXIS ROTATING TRACKER%单轴旋转跟日式多平面镜反射聚光器的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海燕; 王建平; 张崇巍

    2011-01-01

    主要设计了一种新型的单轴旋转跟日式多镜面聚光系统,该系统与目前常见的聚光器相比,价格低廉、易于维护,仅通过单轴的转动来实现反射聚光,耗能较小.对系统中各镜面的位置及尺寸进行了详细的讨论和计算,并通过实验验证了其可行性和有效性,该方法能实现4倍以上的聚光,能有效减少跟踪系统消耗的能量,从而提高整个跟踪聚光系统的性价比.%A novel type of the multi-mirror concentrator system for single-axis rotating tracker was presented. Comparing with the current solar concentrating, the new concentrator performs reflective concentration through single-axis rotation, which possesses the characteristics of cheap cost, easy maintenance and low energy-consumption. The correlative quantitative analysis and numerical calculation were done for this system, and their feasibility and effectiveness were verified by experiment. By establishing the tracking motion relationship between solar module and multi-mirror, the tracking control relationship between solar module and multi-mirror was achieved.

  17. Aeroelastically coupled blades for vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew F.

    2016-02-23

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a vertical axis wind turbine blade configured to rotate about a rotation axis. The vertical axis wind turbine blade includes at least an attachment segment, a rear swept segment, and optionally, a forward swept segment. The attachment segment is contiguous with the forward swept segment, and the forward swept segment is contiguous with the rear swept segment. The attachment segment includes a first portion of a centroid axis, the forward swept segment includes a second portion of the centroid axis, and the rear swept segment includes a third portion of the centroid axis. The second portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced ahead of the first portion of the centroid axis and the third portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced behind the first portion of the centroid axis in the direction of rotation about the rotation axis.

  18. A paleomagnetic investigation of vertical-axis rotations in coastal Sonora, Mexico: Evidence for distributed transtensional deformation during the Proto-Gulf shift from a subduction-dominated to transform-dominated plate boundary in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Scott William

    The history of late Miocene (Proto-Gulf) deformation on the Sonoran margin of the Gulf of California is key to understanding how Baja California was captured by the Pacific plate and how strain was partitioned during the Proto-Gulf period (12.5-6 Ma). The Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen are located in southwestern coastal Sonora, Mexico, and represent the eastern rifted margin of the central Gulf of California. The ranges are composed of volcanic units and their corresponding volcaniclastic units which are the result of persistent magmatic activity between 20 and 8.8 Ma, including three packages of basalt and andesite that make excellent paleomagnetic recorders. Based on cross cutting relations and geochronologic data for pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic volcanic units, most of the faulting and tilting in the Sierra El Aguaje is bracketed between 11.9 and 9.0 Ma, thus falling entirely within Proto-Gulf time. A paleomagnetic investigation into possible vertical axis rotations in the Sierra el Aguaje has uncovered evidence of clockwise rotations between ~13º and ~105º with possible translations. These results are consistent with existing field relations, which suggest the presence of large (>45°) vertical axis rotations in this region. This evidence includes: a) abrupt changes in the strike of tilted strata in different parts of the range, including large domains characterized by E-W strikes b) ubiquitous NE-SW striking faults with left lateral-normal oblique slip, that terminate against major NW-trending right lateral faults, and c) obliquity between the general strike of tilted strata and the strike of faults. These rotations occurred after 12 Ma and largely prior to 9 Ma, thus falling into the Proto-Gulf period. Such large-scale rotations lend credence to the theory that the area inboard of Baja California was experiencing transtension during the Proto-Gulf period, rather than the pure extension that would be the result of strain partitioning

  19. Four-Component Relativistic Density-Functional Theory Calculations of Nuclear Spin-Rotation Constants: Relativistic Effects in p-Block Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-08-11

    We present an implementation of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) constants based on the relativistic four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. This formalism has been implemented in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham theory, allowing assessment of both pure and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. In the density-functional theory (DFT) implementation of the response equations, a noncollinear generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used. The present approach enforces a restricted kinetic balance condition for the small-component basis at the integral level, leading to very efficient calculations of the property. We apply the methodology to study relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants by performing calculations on XHn (n = 1-4) for all elements X in the p-block of the periodic table and comparing the effects of relativity on the nuclear SR tensors to that observed for the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. Correlation effects as described by the density-functional theory are shown to be significant for the spin-rotation constants, whereas the differences between the use of GGA and hybrid density functionals are much smaller. Our calculated relativistic spin-rotation constants at the DFT level of theory are only in fair agreement with available experimental data. It is shown that the scaling of the relativistic effects for the spin-rotation constants (varying between Z(3.8) and Z(4.5)) is as strong as for the chemical shieldings but with a much smaller prefactor.

  20. Electromagnetism of rotating conductors revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redzic, Dragan V. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)]. E-mail: redzic@ff.bg.ac.yu

    2002-03-01

    The charge distribution and electromagnetic fields in a rotating, charged conductor under stationary conditions are investigated, assuming that the electrons are at rest relative to the conductor. The basic equations are found, referred to the inertial rest frame of the rotational axis, in the relativistic case, and applied to the case of a cylindrical conductor. The results obtained are compared with those of Groen and Voeyenli (Groen Oe and Voeyenli K 1982 Eur. J. Phys. 3 210-4) who considered the same problem but without taking into account the relative permittivity of the rotating conductor. It is found that the E- and B-fields do not depend on {epsilon}{sub r} and coincide with those calculated by Groen and Voeyenli; the space and surface charge densities, however, depend on {epsilon}{sub r}. (author)

  1. Numerical simulations of rotating axisymmetric sunspots

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, Gert; Busse, F.H.; Hurlburt, Neal; Rucklidge, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model of axisymmetric convection in the presence of a vertical magnetic flux bundle and rotation about the axis is presented. The model contains a compressible plasma described by the non-linear MHD equations, with density and temperature gradients simulating the upper layer of the Sun’s convection zone. The solutions exhibit a central magnetic flux tube in a cylindrical numerical domain, with convection cells forming collar flows around the tube. When the numerical domain is rota...

  2. Two-axis angular effector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Phelan, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Van Zuiden, Don M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  3. Two-axis angular effector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, M.R.; Robinett, R.D. III; Phelan, J.R.; Zuiden, D.M. Van

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors is described. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation. 11 figs.

  4. Laser radar studies: A study of the feasibility of remote measurement of atmospheric density and turbidity by means of rotational Raman scattering of laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A remote sensing technique is described which utilizes elastic scattering and rotational Raman scattering of laser light in the atmosphere to obtain soundings of turbidity, transmissivity and density. A scheme is devised whereby, through selective weighting of the rotational Raman lines, the effect of atmospheric temperature structure may be eliminated. The close spectral proximity of the elastic and Raman-scattered signals, combined with the fact that the Raman scattering is quite weak, produces special requirements for the spectroscopic and light-gathering components of a rotational Raman laser radar system. These requirements are investigated. A computation of typical signal-to-noise ratios is made. It is shown that daytime signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 db are to be expected for observation heights of 5 km and below. For nighttime work, 10 db signal-to-noise ratios are achievable to altitudes as high as 15 km.

  5. Magnetizability and rotational g tensors for density fitted local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using gauge-including atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Stefan; Schütz, Martin

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we present theory and implementation of an efficient program for calculating magnetizabilities and rotational g tensors of closed-shell molecules at the level of local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) using London orbitals. Density fitting is employed to factorize the electron repulsion integrals with ordinary Gaussians as fitting functions. The presented program for the calculation of magnetizabilities and rotational g tensors is based on a previous implementation of NMR shielding tensors reported by S. Loibl and M. Schütz [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084107 (2012)]. Extensive test calculations show (i) that the errors introduced by density fitting are negligible, and (ii) that the errors of the local approximation are still rather small, although larger than for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors. Electron correlation effects for magnetizabilities are tiny for most of the molecules considered here. MP2 appears to overestimate the correlation contribution of magnetizabilities such that it does not constitute an improvement over Hartree-Fock (when comparing to higher-order methods like CCSD(T)). For rotational g tensors the situation is different and MP2 provides a significant improvement in accuracy over Hartree-Fock. The computational performance of the new program was tested for two extended systems, the larger comprising about 2200 basis functions. It turns out that a magnetizability (or rotational g tensor) calculation takes about 1.5 times longer than a corresponding NMR shielding tensor calculation.

  6. 单轴旋转式惯导系统误差抑制机理分析%The analysis of error control mechanism for single-axis rotation inertial navigation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高贤志; 王丹

    2012-01-01

    It is significantly important to improve the performance of inertial navigation system navigation by controlling the negative effects on inertial navigation system for inertial measurement units. This paper analyses the error equations of the inertial navigation system, makes a focus on the inertial components accumulation effect on symmetrical position error, analyses the automatic constant error compensation mechanism of the inertial navigation system, and then discusses the error depressing of inertial components constant error, the scale factor error cased by rotating. Finally, the simulation for single-axis rotation mechanism validates the theory analysis.%提高惯导系统对于惯性器件误差负面影响的抑制能力,对于改善系统的导航精度具有重要意义.本文对惯导系统误差方程进行分析,重点讨论对称位置上惯性器件误差的积累效果,系统地研究了单轴旋转调制对捷联惯性导航系统惯性器件误差的自动补偿机理,详细分析了单轴旋转对惯性器件常值误差、标度因数误差的抑制情况.对单轴旋转调制方案进行仿真,验证了理论分析的正确性.

  7. Numerical Study on Fixed-Axis Rotation of Rigid Body under Variable Moment Inertia%变转动惯量刚体定轴转动的数值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐军杰; 王爱军; 赵昆; 张鹏

    2012-01-01

    Given a model of variable moment inertia of rigid body,a numerical method with Matlab has been applied to study the fixed-axis rotation of rigid body under variable moment inertia and constant external torque. Because at the initial stage the changes in variable moment inertia are very small , the movement of rigid body is similar to that when moment inertia is constant. As the changes in moment inertia become greater,the angular velocity of rigid body changes periodically under the impact of elastic restoring forces.%给出一个变转动惯量刚体模型,用数值方法研究了在恒力矩作用下变转动惯量刚体的定轴转动问题.在开始阶段由于转动惯量变化很小,刚体运动与刚体转动惯量不变的情况相似,随着转动惯量变化增大,在弹性恢复力的作用下,刚体角速度呈周期性变化.

  8. Transport currents along c-axis and (a,b) planes in YBCO single domain materials. Critical current densities and normal-superconducting transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcar, L.; Bourgault, D.; Chaud, X.; Noudem, J.G.; Tournier, R. [CNRS, Grenoble (France). EPM-Matformag; Belmont, O.; Barbut, J.M.; Barrault, M. [Schneider Electric SA, Usine A, Rue Volta, 38050 Grenoble cedex 09 (France); Tixador, P. [CRTBT, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

    1998-05-01

    High transport currents along the (a,b) planes and along the c-axis have been measured in pulsed current of different pseudo-frequencies. Self field losses and transport current of 8000 A (20000 A cm{sup -2}) have been measured in Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} bars textured by the melting zone technique. Critical currents as high as 500 A (90000 A cm{sup -2}) along the (a,b) planes or 3000 A (7500 A cm{sup -2}) along the c-axis have been measured. For both orientations, the transition from the normal state to the superconducting state has been observed. Electric field of 1000 V m{sup -1} and study of the superconducting state recovery are reported. (orig.) 6 refs.

  9. Density functional theory studies of screw dislocation core structures in bcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Søren Lund; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    The core structures of (I 11) screw dislocations in bee metals are studied using density functional theory in the local-density approximation. For Mo and Fe, direct calculations of the core structures show the cores to be symmetric with respect to 180degrees rotations around an axis perpendicular...

  10. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  11. Ray-tracing for qP waves in media with rotated axis of symmetry%旋转轴对称介质中的qP波射线追踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文军; 孙福利

    2011-01-01

    本文使用qP波一阶射线追踪方程(FORT)计算光滑、非均匀旋转轴对称弱各向异性介质中qP波传播的路径和走时.此FORT方程只依赖于15个弱各向异性参数,而非标准射线方程中的21个弹性参数.通常弹性参数模型是在局部坐标系中给定的,而在实际中需要的是全局坐标系下的弹性参数,因此为了解决两个坐标系下弹,性参数的变换问题,本文从Bond变换方程出发,推导出了旋转轴对称介质中的弹性参数张量变换方程.全局坐标系中的弹性参数是由局部坐标系中弹性参数通过两个坐标系间极角和方位角的正、余弦函数组合给出的,所得到的弹性参数能够完全匹配FORT方程.最后通过对旋转TI模型和正交模型进行数值模拟验证本方法的有效性和适应性,结果表明本方法对于具有不同各向异性类型、各向异性强度和旋转角度的介质都具有很高的计算精度.%We use the first-order ray tracing (FORT) formulas of qP waves to calculate pathes and traveltimes of qP waves propagation in smooth, inhomogeneous and weakly anisotropic medium with arbitrarily symmetric axes. The FORT equations depend only on 15 weak-anisotropy parameters, not on the 21 elastic moduli used in the standard raytracing equations. The elastic modulus of anisotropic media is presented in the local coordinate system, while practical coordinate is in the global system, the Cartesian coordinate system. In order to solve the inconsistency problem between the global coordinate system and the local coordinate system, in this paper, the tensor transformation equations of elastic modulus in media with rotated axis of symmetry are derived from the Bond transformation equations. The weak-anisotropy parameters in the global coordinate system can be explicitly expressed as the combination with the sine and cosine functions of polar angle and azimuth between these different coordinate systems,and the weak

  12. Effect of difference of cupula and endolymph densities on the dynamics of semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A V; Sirenko, S P; Boyle, R

    2008-01-01

    The effect of different densities of a cupula and endolymph on the dynamics of the semicircular canals is considered within the framework of a simplified one-dimensional mathematical model where the canal is approximated by a torus. If the densities are equal, the model is represented by Steinhausen's phenomenological equation. The difference of densities results in the complex dynamics of the cupulo-endolymphatic system, and leads to a dependence on the orientation of both the gravity vector relative to the canal plane and the axis of rotation, as well as on the distance between the axis of rotation and the center of the semicircular canal. Our analysis focused on two cases of canal stimulation: rotation with a constant velocity and a time-dependent (harmonically oscillating) angular velocity. Two types of spatial orientation of the axis of rotation, the axis of canal symmetry, and the vector of gravity were considered: i) the gravity vector and axis of rotation lie in the canal plane, and ii) the axis of rotation and gravity vector are normal to the canal plane. The difference of the cupula and endolymph densities reveals new features of cupula dynamics, for instance--a shift of the cupula to a new position of equilibrium that depends on the gravity vector and the parameters of head rotation, and the onset of cupula oscillations with multiple frequencies that results in the distortion of cupula dynamics relative to harmonic stimulation. Factors that might influence the density difference effects and the conditions under which these effects occur are discussed.

  13. 单轴旋转惯导转轴方向高精度标定方法研究%Shaft orientation calibration method for single-axis rotation INS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李有; 王省书; 黄宗升; 战德军

    2014-01-01

    在单轴旋转激光陀螺惯导系统中,转轴方向误差将导致船体姿态解算结果中出现阶跃跳变。本文在分析转轴方向误差与姿态解算误差之间的数学关系的基础上,提出了一种转轴方向的在线标定方法。利用转轴角编码器和惯性测量单元(IMU)的输出数据,解调出船体姿态信息,再根据解调所得到的转轴旋转前后船体姿态的误差,反解出转轴实际方向。通过对实际系统数据实验,验证了该方法的有效性。%In single-axis rotation inertial navigation system, shaft orientation error will lead to the step effect in the ship attitude result. We derived the mathematical relationship between the shaft orientation error and the ship attitude measurement error, and proposed an online shaft orientation calibration method based on the mathematical relationship. The output data of the shaft an-gle-encoder and the inertial measurement unit (IMU) was adopted to calculate the ship attitude, and then the real shaft orientation was calculated inversely according to the measured ship attitude error. Experimental results showed that this method can calibrate the shaft orientation in a high accuracy.

  14. Interplay between antimagnetic and collective rotation in Fe-58

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, J; Zhang, S Q; Meng, J

    2015-01-01

    The self-consistent tilted axis cranking covariant density functional theory based on the point- coupling interaction PC-PK1 is applied to investigate the possible existence of antimagnetic ro- tation in the nucleus Fe-58. The observed data for Band 3 and Band 4 are reproduced well with two assigned configurations. It is found that both bands correspond to a rotation of antimagnetic character, but, due to the presence of considerable deformation, the interplay between antimag- netic rotation and collective motion plays an essential role. In particular for Band 4, collective rotation is dominant in the competition with antimagnetic rotation. Moreover, it is shown that the behavior of the ratios between the dynamic moments of inertia and the B(E2) values reflects the interplay between antimagnetic and collective rotation.

  15. Evidence for two modes of water release in Comet 103P/Hartley 2: Distributions of column density, rotational temperature, and ortho-para ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Mumma, Michael J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents long-slit spectra of H2O emission from the inner coma of Comet 103P/Hartley 2, acquired with NIRSPEC/Keck 2 during the comet's close approach to Earth in 2010. On UT 19.6 October 2010 the slit was oriented nearly orthogonal to the projected (in the plane of the sky) Sun-comet line, and the H2O rotational temperature and column density showed similar spatial distributions as a function of projected distance from the nucleus. On UT 22.5 October, the slit was oriented along the Sun-comet line, and the rotational temperatures revealed pronounced asymmetry while the column densities were nearly symmetric about the nucleus. We suggest this dichotomy reflects two qualitatively different mechanisms of volatile release, which introduce distinct rotational distributions in the sublimated material. Future modeling can test this hypothesis. We also report new retrievals of water nuclear spin species (ortho, para) in this comet, and we present the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) for various projected nucleocentric distances. Our most precise individual measurement is OPR = 2.59 ± 0.13, corresponding to a nuclear spin temperature (Tspin) of 31 ± 3 K. A weighted mean of five independent measurements provides OPR = 2.79 ± 0.13 (T=37-4+8K). Hartley 2 is the first comet for which the OPR has been measured in multiple apparitions. Our values (in 2010) are in good agreement with those obtained two apparitions earlier by the Infrared Space Observatory. Since the comet lost a substantial amount of material between 1998 and 2010, we see no evidence for variation of the OPR with depth in the nucleus. Further discussion of the advantages, assumptions, and biases introduced by various approaches when quantifying nuclear spin species (observing techniques, models and model parameters, sources of uncertainty) would likely aid in interpreting the OPRs measured in cometary volatiles.

  16. 47 CFR 25.223 - Off-axis EIRP spectral density limits for feeder link earth stations in the 17/24 GHz BSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... The amount of such increase in excess of the actual amount of monitored excess attenuation over clear....209(a) and (b), and/or the proposed power density levels are in excess of those specified in § 25.212... this part, each applicant for earth station license(s) that proposes levels in excess of those...

  17. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  18. Analysis of Torque and Airgap Flux-Density Distribution in Surface Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with q-Axis Salient Pole Core by Finite Element Method.

    OpenAIRE

    三重野, 保男; 篠原, 勝次; 実成, 義孝; 東, 義高; ミエノ, ヤスオ; シノハラ, カツジ; ミナリ, ヨシタカ; ヒガシ, ヨシタカ; MIENO, Yasuo; SHINOHARA, Katsuji; MINARI, Yoshitaka; Higashi, Yoshitaka

    1995-01-01

    The use of permanent magnet motors in variable speed drives is increasing with the development of power electronics.In the design of drive motors, an analysis of torque has always been important.In this paper, a salient-pole type rotor with a surface mounted permanent magnet is proposed, and an analysis of torque characteristics as compared to normal type surface magnet motor is made by calculationof airgap flux density distribution.

  19. Benchmarking density-functional theory calculations of NMR shielding constants and spin-rotation constants using accurate coupled-cluster calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teale, Andrew M; Lutnæs, Ola B; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-14

    Accurate sets of benchmark nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants and spin-rotation constants are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the calculated coupled-cluster constants is established by a careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. Coupled-cluster basis-set convergence is analyzed and extrapolation techniques are employed to estimate basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. Together with the set provided for rotational g-tensors and magnetizabilities in our previous work [O. B. Lutnæs, A. M. Teale, T. Helgaker, D. J. Tozer, K. Ruud, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 144104 (2009)], it provides a substantial source of consistently calculated high-accuracy data on second-order magnetic response properties. The utility of this benchmark data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the existing approximate functionals provide an accuracy competitive with that provided by CCSD or CCSD(T) theory. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of Kohn-Sham calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. Routes to future improvements are discussed in light of this comparison.

  20. Cross-linking density alters early metabolic activities in chondrocytes encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels and cultured in the rotating wall vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Idalis; Klement, Brenda J; von Deutsch, Daniel; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2009-03-01

    In designing a tissue engineering strategy for cartilage repair, selection of both the bioreactor, and scaffold is important to the development of a mechanically functional tissue. The hydrodynamic environment associated with many bioreactors enhances nutrient transport, but also introduces fluid shear stress, which may influence cellular response. This study examined the combined effects of hydrogel cross-linking and the hydrodynamic environment on early chondrocyte response. Specifically, chondrocytes were encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels having two different cross-linked structures, corresponding to a low and high cross-linking density. Both cross-linked gels yielded high water contents (92% and 79%, respectively) and mesh sizes of 150 and 60 A respectively. Cell-laden PEG hydrogels were cultured in rotating wall vessels (RWV) or under static cultures for up to 5 days. Rotating cultures yielded low fluid shear stresses (production, and matrix deposition for glycosaminoglycans (GAG). In static cultures, gel cross-linking had no effect on DNA content, NO production, or GAG production; although GAG production increased with culture time for both cross-linked gels. In rotating cultures, DNA content increased, NO production decreased, and overall GAG production decreased when compared to static controls for the low cross-linked gels. For the high cross-linked gels, the hydrodynamic environment had no effect on DNA content, but exhibited similar results to the low cross-linked gel for NO production, and matrix production. Our findings demonstrated that at early culture times, when there is limited matrix production, the hydrodynamic environment dramatically influences cell response in a manner dependent on the gel cross-linking, which may impact long-term tissue development.

  1. Reliability of using DXA around RTHAs. Bone Mineral Density of the femoral neck in resurfacing hip arthroplasty. Precision biased by region of interest and rotation of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Varmarken, Jens-Erik; Ovesen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

      Introduction:  Resurfacing Total Hip Arthroplasty (RTHA) may preserve the femoral neck bone-stock post-operatively. Bone Mineral Density (BMD), could theoretically be affected by the hip-position, and bias longitudinal studies. We aimed to investigate BMD precision dependency on type of ROI...... and position of hip.   Method and Materials  We DXA scanned the femoral neck of 15 resurfacing patients twice with the hip in 3 different rotations; 15° internal, neutral, and 15° external. For each position BMD was analyzed with 3 different surface area models. One model measured BMD in the total femoral neck......, the second model divided the neck in two and the third model had 6 divisions.   Results  When all hip positions were pooled a mean Coefficient of variation (CV) of 3.1%, 3.6% and 4.6% was found in the 1, 2 and 6-region models, respectively, The external rotated hip position was less reproducible. When...

  2. Influence of self-irradiation on the magnitude of the superfluid density in PuCoGa{sub 5} probed by muon spin rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohishi, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: ohishi.kazuki@jaea.go.jp; Heffner, R.H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ito, T.U. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Higemoto, W. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Morris, G.D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bauer, E.D.; Graf, M.J.; Zhu, J.-X.; Morales, L.A.; Sarrao, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fluss, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); MacLaughlin, D.E.; Shu, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2008-04-01

    We have performed muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements in the radioactive Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} to study the effects of radiation damage on the superconducting properties. The same single crystals were studied 25 days (fresh) and 400 days (aged) after initial preparation. We find that the {mu}SR rate {sigma}{sub v}, which is proportional to superfluid density {rho}{sub s}, is steeply reduced in the aged sample compared with its reduction of T{sub c}. This result is inconsistent with conventional Abrikosov-Gor'kov pair-breaking theory, but can be explained by the local suppression of the order parameter in a strong-scattering, short-coherence-length superconductor.

  3. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Hall, G N; Patankar, S; Stewart, N H; Smith, R A; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Burdiak, G C; de Grouchy, P; Skidmore, J; Suttle, L; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Bland, S N; Kwek, K H; Pickworth, L; Bennett, M; Hare, J D; Rozmus, W; Yuan, J

    2014-11-01

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7-14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation.

  4. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swadling, G. F., E-mail: swadling@imperial.ac.uk; Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.; Patankar, S.; Stewart, N. H.; Smith, R. A.; Burdiak, G. C.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S. N.; Kwek, K. H.; Pickworth, L.; Bennett, M.; Hare, J. D. [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College, London SW6 7LZ (United Kingdom); Harvey-Thompson, A. J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Yuan, J. [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAE, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7–14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation.

  5. 不同密实度垂直轴潮流能水轮机的相位干扰%Impaction of initial phase angle on performance of the vertical axis tidal turbines with different density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 孙科; 张亮

    2016-01-01

    为研究不同密实度双机组垂直轴潮流能水轮机在不同初始相位角下的水动力性能,采用CFD数值模拟方法得到各个水轮机组的效率曲线变化规律,并通过分析不同密实度水轮机在不同初始相位角下的压力云图和涡量图,解释变化机理。研究结果表明:相位角对不同密实度双机组水轮机的效率影响规律相似,随着相位角的增大,1号机组中高速比效率逐渐减小,而2号机组效率随着相位角增加而增大;当不同密实度水轮机处于中间相位角时,两个机组的效率基本一致,有利于电能输送,且此时机组受到的压力最小。所以不同密实度潮流能双机组水轮机应选取中间相位角为最优相位角。%In order to examine the impaction of different initial phase angles on the hydrodynamic performance of vertical axis tidal twin⁃turbine with different densities, this paper used CFD numerical simulation method to obtain the variation law of efficiency curves, and then explained the change mechanism through the detail analysis of the pressure diagram and vorticity graph of different density vertical axis tidal turbine with different phase angles. The results show that the influences of the phase angle on different density twin⁃turbine are similar. With the increase of phase angle, the efficiency of unit 1 with middle and high ratios is reduced gradually, unit 2 is the exact opposite of unit 1; When different density tidal turbine works at the respective middle phase angle, the efficiency of unit 1 and unit 2 of almost the same, which benefits the power delivery. Moreover, middle phase angles minimize the pressure of units. So the respective middle phase angle should be chosen as the optimal phase angle for different density tidal twin⁃turbines.

  6. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  7. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

  8. Solar polar rotation and its effect on heliospheric neutral fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, J. M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Bzowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic field in the solar polar corona exhibit a regular "ray-like" structure associated with large polar coronal holes during solar minimum. The solar rotation twists the magnetic field lines of the expanding fast solar wind over the poles. The twist induces a toroidal component of the polar magnetic field which results in magnetic forces directed towards the rotation axis. That is tantamount to a (weak) zeta pinch, known also in other astrophysical contexts (e.g. AGN plasmas). The pinch compresses the polar solar corona plasma and a cone-like enhancement in the solar wind density forms along the rotation axis. Though the effect is likely very dynamic, a time independent description is used here to get an order-of-magnitude estimate. The weak pinch is treated as a 1st order perturbation to the zero-order radial flow. The obtained density enhancement may affect the near and far heliosphere, modifying the charge-exchange and electron impact ionization rates of neutral atoms in interplanetary space. The charge exchange is the most effective ionization process for hydrogen and oxygen atoms, and electron impact ionization is a significant loss reaction for the helium atoms at close distances to the Sun. The change in the polar density due to the solar polar corona rotation could be of importance in the inner heliosphere for low energy atoms. We will present the influence of this effect on interstellar neutral gas distribution and H ENA fluxes observed by IBEX.

  9. Synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations from a charge rotating around a cylindrical grating

    CERN Document Server

    Saharian, A A; Mkrtchyan, A R; Khachatryan, B V

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the radiation from a charge rotating around conductors with cylindrical symmetry. First the problem is considered with a charge rotating around a conducting cylinder immersed in a homogeneous medium. The surface charge and current densities induced on the cylinder surface are evaluated. A formula is derived for the spectral-angular density of the radiation intensity. In the second part, we study the radiation for a charge rotating around a diffraction grating on a cylindrical surface with metallic strips parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the grating on the radiation intensity is approximated by the surface currents induced on the strips by the field of the rotating charge. The expressions are derived for the electric and magnetic fields and for the angular density of the radiation intensity on a given harmonic. We show that the interference between the synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations may lead to interesting features. In particular, the behavior of the radiation intensity on ...

  10. Electrical-Discharge Machining With Additional Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, Roger M.; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electrical-discharge-machining (EDM) apparatus uses moveable vertical wire as electrode. Wire positionable horizontally along one axis as it slides vertically past workpiece. Workpiece indexed in rotation about horizontal axis. Because of symmetry of parts, process used to make two such parts at a time by defining boundary between them. Advantages: cost of material reduced, imparts less residual stress to workpiece, and less time spent machining each part when parts produced in such symmetrical pairs.

  11. Complementarity of rotating video and underwater visual census for assessing species richness, frequency and density of reef fish on coral reef slopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Mallet

    Full Text Available Estimating diversity and abundance of fish species is fundamental for understanding community structure and dynamics of coral reefs. When designing a sampling protocol, one crucial step is the choice of the most suitable sampling technique which is a compromise between the questions addressed, the available means and the precision required. The objective of this study is to compare the ability to sample reef fish communities at the same locations using two techniques based on the same stationary point count method: one using Underwater Visual Census (UVC and the other rotating video (STAVIRO. UVC and STAVIRO observations were carried out on the exact same 26 points on the reef slope of an intermediate reef and the associated inner barrier reefs. STAVIRO systems were always deployed 30 min to 1 hour after UVC and set exactly at the same place. Our study shows that; (i fish community observations by UVC and STAVIRO differed significantly; (ii species richness and density of large species were not significantly different between techniques; (iii species richness and density of small species were higher for UVC; (iv density of fished species was higher for STAVIRO and (v only UVC detected significant differences in fish assemblage structure across reef type at the spatial scale studied. We recommend that the two techniques should be used in a complementary way to survey a large area within a short period of time. UVC may census reef fish within complex habitats or in very shallow areas such as reef flat whereas STAVIRO would enable carrying out a large number of stations focused on large and diver-averse species, particularly in the areas not covered by UVC due to time and depth constraints. This methodology would considerably increase the spatial coverage and replication level of fish monitoring surveys.

  12. Dual Axis Light Sensor for Tracking Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Miki; Tambo, Toyokazu

    We have developed convenient light sensors to control a platform of solar cell panel. Dual axis light sensor in the present paper has structure of 5 PD (photodiode) light sensor which is composed of 5 photodiodes attached on a frustum of pyramid(1). Light source can be captured in front of the sensor by rotating the X and Y axis as decreasing the output deviation between two pairs of outside photodiodes. We here report the mechanism of sun tacking using the dual axis 5 PD light sensor and the fundamental results performed in the dark room.

  13. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exits, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte-Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z<~0.1 with member galaxies selected from the SDSS DR10 spectroscopic database. We find that ~35% of our clusters are rotating when using a set of strict criteria, while loosening the criteria we find this fraction increasing to ~48%. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation that the significance and strength of their...

  14. State reconstruction of molecular spatial rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Xiao; Gao Jun-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We establish a reconstruction approach for the rotational quantum state of linear molecules possessing a magnetic manifold.Our approximate method contains an iteration with generalized matrix inverses,processing the tomographic integral of the time-dependent molecular-axis distribution in a polar angle.As shown in a simulated example for an alignment state,the density matrix is determined in a high fidelity.An analytic tomographic formula is also derived for the symmetric top rotation.The state coherent in the quantun space of both the angular momentum and its magnetic projection can be approximately retrieved from the observable time-resolved solid-angle distribution of the molecular.

  15. The precision and influence of rotation for measurements of bone mineral density of the distal femur following total knee arthroplasty: a methodological study using DEXA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therbo, Matthias; Petersen, Michael M; Schrøder, Henrik M; Nielsen, Palle K; Zerahn, Bo; Lund, Bjarne

    2003-12-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of DEXA (Norland XR-26 mark II) for quantitative measurements of bone mineral density (BMD) in the lateral plane of the distal femur after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BMD was measured in 5-6 regions of interest (ROI) in close relation to the femoral component. In an in vitro study using 3 different distal femur phantoms, we found that the precision was affected by rotation of the distal femur. When BMD measurements were repeated within a range of motion of 40 degrees, 20 degrees, and 0 degrees, the coefficient of variation (CV) was approximately 15%, 10%, and 0.6%, respectively. We found that the use of bone cement for implant fixation had no effect on the level of BMD. Double measurements performed in 28 patients gave average CV values of 3.3%, 3.0%, and 2.6% for the uncemented Duracon, and Interax femoral components and the cemented AGC components, respectively. Our in vivo average CV measurements of BMD of the distal femur after TKA were on a level, suitable for repeated BMD measurements in prospective studies, which evaluate adaptive bone remodeling of the distal femur after cemented and uncemented TKA.

  16. Electron cyclotron heating and core intrinsic rotation reversal in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassie, J. S. de, E-mail: degrassie@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Boedo, J. A. [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 94550 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    The effect of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the intrinsic rotation profile in DIII-D is shown experimentally. Former DIII-D experiments have shown that ECH tends to cause an interior reduction in the normally co-Ip directed intrinsic rotation profile, and this core rotation can be fully reversed to the opposite direction. This effect is due to a turbulent rearrangement of the interior rotation profile. Here, we show results that there is more than one mechanism causing this. We compare two low density L-mode discharges where the only operational difference is the location of the ECH deposition. At low ECH power, comparable to the Ohmic power, the primary change is in the q-profile accompanied by a reversal of the core intrinsic rotation direction for the more off-axis deposition. The change in the shear of the q-profile fits well with a recent theoretical prediction for this rotation reversal. At higher ECH power, the primary change is in the core electron temperature, Te, accompanied by a hollowing of the rotation profile near the magnetic axis. This effect appears to be due to the change in electron collisionality, consistent with another theoretical, gyrokinetic prediction. The variety of phenomena that could allow ECH to modify the intrinsic rotation profile give some expectation that regions of large velocity shear in the interior could be generated, with the possibility of triggering internal transport barriers.

  17. Analysis of the Drivetrain Performance of a Large Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine: An Aeroelastic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebhardt, Cristian; Preidikman, Sergio; Massa, Julio C

    2010-01-01

    blades’, the drivetrain and the generator. The blades are the part of the turbine that touches energy in the wind and rotates about an axis. Extracting energy from the wind is typically accomplished by first mechanically converting the velocity of the wind into a rotational motion of the wind turbine...... by means of the rotor blades, and then converting the rotational energy of the rotor blades into electrical energy by using a generator. The amount of available energy which the wind transfers to the rotor depends on the mass density of the air, the sweep area of the rotor blades, and the wind speed......Due to increasing environmental concern, and approaching limits to fossil fuel consumption, green sources of energy are gaining interest. Among the several energy sources being explored, wind energy shows much promise in selected areas where the average wind speeds is high. Wind turbines are used...

  18. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T; Do-Quang, M; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Re(p)=Gd(2)ν(-1) (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St=αRe(p) (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St=Re(p)) at low Re(p), particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Re(p), fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕ(c) to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α, particle aspect ratio r(p), and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high r(p) and low α.

  19. Model for modulated and chaotic waves in zero-Prandtl-number rotating convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alaka Das; Krishna Kumar

    2008-09-01

    The effects of time-periodic forcing in a few-mode model for zero-Prandtl-number convection with rigid body rotation is investigated. The time-periodic modulation of the rotation rate about the vertical axis and gravity modulation are considered separately. In the presence of periodic variation of the rotation rate, the model shows modulated waves with a band of frequencies. The increase in the external forcing amplitude widens the frequency band of the modulated waves, which ultimately leads to temporally chaotic waves. The gravity modulation, on the other hand, with small frequencies, destroys the quasiperiodic waves at the onset and leads to chaos through intermittency. The spectral power density shows more power to a band of frequencies in the case of periodic modulation of the rotation rate. In the case of externally imposed vertical vibration, the spectral density has more power at lower frequencies. The two types of forcing show different routes to chaos.

  20. Cross-axis adaptation of torsional components in the yaw-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillenberg, P.; Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The three pairs of semicircular canals within the labyrinth are not perfectly aligned with the pulling directions of the six extraocular muscles. Therefore, for a given head movement, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends upon central neural mechanisms that couple the canals to the muscles with the appropriate functional gains in order to generate a response that rotates the eye the correct amount and around the correct axis. A consequence of these neural connections is a cross-axis adaptive capability, which can be stimulated experimentally when head rotation is around one axis and visual motion about another. From this visual-vestibular conflict the brain infers that the slow-phase eye movement is rotating around the wrong axis. We explored the capability of human cross-axis adaptation, using a short-term training paradigm, to determine if torsional eye movements could be elicited by yaw (horizontal) head rotation (where torsion is normally inappropriate). We applied yaw sinusoidal head rotation (+/-10 degrees, 0.33 Hz) and measured eye movement responses in the dark, and before and after adaptation. The adaptation paradigm lasted 45-60 min, and consisted of the identical head motion, coupled with a moving visual scene that required one of several types of eye movements: (1) torsion alone (-Roll); (2) horizontal/torsional, head right/CW torsion (Yaw-Roll); (3) horizontal/torsional, head right/CCW torsion (Yaw+Roll); (4) horizontal, vertical, torsional combined (Yaw+Pitch-Roll); and (5) horizontal and vertical together (Yaw+Pitch). The largest and most significant changes in torsional amplitude occurred in the Yaw-Roll and Yaw+Roll conditions. We conclude that short-term, cross-axis adaptation of torsion is possible but constrained by the complexity of the adaptation task: smaller torsional components are produced if more than one cross-coupling component is required. In contrast, vertical cross-axis components can be easily trained to occur with yaw head

  1. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: rotation axes, bistability, and controllability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  2. Streaming potential near a rotating porous disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieve, Dennis C; Sides, Paul J

    2014-09-23

    Theory and experimental results for the streaming potential measured in the vicinity of a rotating porous disk-shaped sample are described. Rotation of the sample on its axis draws liquid into its face and casts it from the periphery. Advection within the sample engenders streaming current and streaming potential that are proportional to the zeta potential and the disk's major dimensions. When Darcy's law applies, the streaming potential is proportional to the square of the rotation at low rate but becomes invariant with rotation at high rate. The streaming potential is invariant with the sample's permeability at low rate and is proportional to the inverse square of the permeability at high rate. These predictions were tested by determining the zeta potential and permeability of the loop side of Velcro, a sample otherwise difficult to characterize; reasonable values of -56 mV for zeta and 8.7 × 10(-9) m(2) for the permeability were obtained. This approach offers the ability to determine both the zeta potential and the permeability of materials having open structures. Compressing them into a porous plug is unnecessary. As part of the development of the theory, a convenient formula for a flow-weighted volume-averaged space-charge density of the porous medium, -εζ/k, was obtained, where ε is the permittivity, ζ is the zeta potential, and k is the Darcy permeability. The formula is correct when Smoluchowski's equation and Darcy's law are both valid.

  3. Pairing reentrance in warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, N Quang; Agrawal, B K; Datar, V M; Mitra, A; Chakrabarty, D R

    2015-01-01

    Pairing reentrance phenomenon in the warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus is studied within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-based approach (the FTBCS1). The theory takes into account the effect of quasiparticle number fluctuations on the pairing field at finite temperature and angular momentum within the pairing model plus noncollective rotation along the symmetry axis. The numerical calculations for the pairing gaps and nuclear level densities (NLD), of which an anomalous enhancement has been experimentally observed at low excitation energy $E^*$ and high angular momentum $J$, show that the pairing reentrance is seen in the behavior of pairing gap obtained within the FTBCS1 at low $E$ and high $J$. This leads to the enhancement of the FTBCS1 level densities, in good agreement with the experimental observation. This agreement indicates that the observed enhancement of the NLD might be the first experimental detection of the pairing reentrance in a finite nucleus.

  4. Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

  5. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendic...

  6. Rotationally symmetric viscous gas flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigant, W.; Plotnikov, P. I.

    2017-03-01

    The Dirichlet boundary value problem for the Navier-Stokes equations of a barotropic viscous compressible fluid is considered. The flow region and the data of the problem are assumed to be invariant under rotations about a fixed axis. The existence of rotationally symmetric weak solutions for all adiabatic exponents from the interval (γ*,∞) with a critical exponent γ* < 4/3 is proved.

  7. The model of cupular dynamics in the case of the difference of the cupula and endolymph densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A V; Sirenko, S P; Boyle, R

    2007-07-01

    The function of semicircular canals (SC) is based on the precise equality of densities of the cupula and endolymph. Otherwise the information provided by SC would depend on the orientation of both the gravity vector relative to canal plane and the axis of rotation. It would also depend on the distance between the axis of rotation and the center of the SC. We believe that the equality of densities is approximate and expect that due to the high sensitivity of the SC, even the small differences of densities (approximately 10(-4) g/cm3) can influence the SC dynamics, and this influence depends on the conditions of canal stimulation. The work aims to examine this hypothesis and analyze the parameters of the SC and mechanical stimulation under which the effect of the difference of densities on the SC functioning could be observed.

  8. Dimensionality constraints of light induced rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Oroszi, László; Galajda, Péter; Kelemen, Lóránd; Mathesz, Anna; Vicsek, Tamás; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Ormos, Pál

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the conditions of rotation induced by collimated light carrying no angular momentum. Objects of different shapes and optical properties were examined in the nontrivial case where the rotation axis is perpendicular to the direction of light propagation. This geometry offers important advantages for application as it fundamentally broadens the possible practical arrangements to be realised. We found that collimated light cannot drive permanent rotation of 2D or prism-like 3D objects (i.e. fixed cross-sectional profile along the rotation axis) in the case of fully reflective or fully transparent materials. Based on both geometrical optics simulations and theoretical analysis, we derived a general condition for rotation induced by collimated light carrying no angular momentum valid for any arrangement: Permanent rotation is not possible if the scattering interaction is two-dimensional and lossless. In contrast, light induced rotation can be sustained if partial absorption is present or the object ...

  9. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium R and D field. Third year report. Advanced multi-axis machining system with non-rotating tools; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu bun'ya. 6 jiku koseido heru kako system no kaihatsu (dai 3 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    As element technology to continuously control attitude and feed of tools, development was made of precision machining technology, 6-axis CAM/CAE system and high speed high precision NC control technology. A high precision non-rotating tool machine was trial-manufactured which enables the heightening of precision in machining of mold curved surfaces/complicated shaped parts, and the practicality was verified. In FY 2000, as to the machining technology relation, it was verified that it is possible to machine the mirror surface at 0.1{mu}mRy using diamond non-rotating tool to aluminum materials. In CAD/CAM relations, a high speed high precision CAM/NC interface system based on ISO14649 was developed. Then, by the tool path made by this system, cutting experiment/evaluation were conducted. Further, a new system for cutting reversely tapered grooves was designed, and the cutting experiment was carried out. In the NC relation, development was made of the NC system loaded with the work coordinate interpolation function for conducting high precision multi-axial interpolation on high speed NC board and also of the high speed servo network using IEEE1394. (NEDO)

  10. Estimation of Displacement and Rotation by Magnetic Tactile Sensor Using Stepwise Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human is covered with soft skin and has tactile receptors inside. The skin deforms along a contact surface. The tactile receptors detect the mechanical deformation. The detection of the mechanical deformation is essential for the tactile sensation. We propose a magnetic type tactile sensor which has a soft surface and eight magnetoresistive elements. The soft surface has a permanent magnet inside and the magnetoresistive elements under the soft surface measure the magnetic flux density of the magnet. The tactile sensor estimates the displacement and the rotation on the surface based on the change of the magnetic flux density. Determination of an estimate equation is difficult because the displacement and the rotation are not geometrically decided based on the magnetic flux density. In this paper, a stepwise regression analysis determines the estimate equation. The outputs of the magnetoresistive elements are used as explanatory variables, and the three-axis displacement and the two-axis rotation are response variables in the regression analysis. We confirm the regression analysis is effective for determining the estimate equations through simulation and experiment. The results show the tactile sensor measures both the displacement and the rotation generated on the surface by using the determined equation.

  11. Changes in non-pine woody species density, composition, and diversity following herbicide and fertilization application to mid-rotation loblolly pine stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hal O. Liechty; Conner Fristoe

    2012-01-01

    We monitored woody vegetation (dbh>1.0 in) response for up to six years following a herbicide (16 ounces imazapyr /acre), a fertilizer (365 pounds urea and 175 pounds diammonium phosphate/acre ) and a combined fertilizer and herbicide application in four mid-rotation loblolly pine stands located within the Upper Gulf Coastal Plain in Arkansas. Approximately 60-80%...

  12. ELONGATED ODONTOID PROCESS OF AXIS VERTEBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathap Kumar J,

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Odontoid process is a bony projection of axis around which the atlas rotates. It measures 1 to 1.25 cms in length and projects upwards from the body of Axis. An elongated odontoid process may narrow the foramen magnum causing compressive neurological symptoms. It can cause cervical stiffness, serious restrictions of neck movement, and even a bone-derived torticollis. Observation: During routine osteology classes, we encountered an Axis vertebra with an elongated odontoid process. The measurements of the elongated odontoid process were taken using digital Vernier slide calipers. Conclusion: Elongated odontoid process can be mistaken for fracture of dens in radiological images; hence the knowledge of elongated odontoid process is useful for the radiologists, neurosurgeons and orthopaedicians for accurate diagnosis and treatment involving cranio-vertebral junctions.

  13. Uniformly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the recent results on the equilibrium configurations of static and uniformly rotating neutron stars within the Hartle formalism. We start from the Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations formulated and extended by Belvedere et al. (2012, 2014). We demonstrate how to conduct numerical integration of these equations for different central densities ${\\it \\rho}_c$ and angular velocities $\\Omega$ and compute the static $M^{stat}$ and rotating $M^{rot}$ masses, polar $R_p$ and equatorial $R_{\\rm eq}$ radii, eccentricity $\\epsilon$, moment of inertia $I$, angular momentum $J$, as well as the quadrupole moment $Q$ of the rotating configurations. In order to fulfill the stability criteria of rotating neutron stars we take into considerations the Keplerian mass-shedding limit and the axisymmetric secular instability. Furthermore, we construct the novel mass-radius relations, calculate the maximum mass and minimum rotation periods (maximum frequencies) of neutron stars. Eventually, we compare a...

  14. Determining the Stellar Spin Axis Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Anna-Lea; Wiedemann, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    We present an observing method that permits the determination of the absolute stellar spin axis position angle based on spectro-astrometric observations for slowly-rotating late-type stars. This method is complementary to current interferometric observations that determine the orientation of stellar spin axis for early-type fast-rotating stars. Spectro-astrometry enables us to study phenomena below the diffraction limit, at the milli-arcsecond scale. It relies on the wavelength dependent variations of the centroid position of a structured source in a long-slit spectrum. A rotating star has a slight tilt in its spectral lines, which induces a displacement of the photocentre's position. By monitoring the amplitude of the displacement for varying slit orientations, we can infer the absolute position angle of the stellar spin axis. Finally, we present first observational results on Aldebaran obtained with the Thüringer Landesternwarte high resolution spectrograph. We were able to retrieve Aldebaran's position angle with less than 10° errors.

  15. Disambiguation of Mental Rotation by Spatial Frames of Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko Asakura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that our ability to imagine object rotations is limited and associated with spatial reference frames; performance is poor unless the axis of rotation is aligned with the object-intrinsic frame or with the environmental frame. Here, we report an active effect of these reference frames on the process of mental rotation: they can disambiguate object rotations when the axis of rotation is ambiguous. Using novel mental rotation stimuli, in which the rotational axes between pairs of objects can be defined with respect to multiple frames of reference, we demonstrate that the vertical axis is preferentially used for imagined object rotations over the object-intrinsic axis for an efficient minimum rotation. In contrast, the object-intrinsic axis can play a decisive role when the vertical axis is absent as a way of resolving the ambiguity of rotational motion. When interpreted in conjunction with recent advances in the Bayesian framework for motion perception, our results suggest that these spatial frames of reference are incorporated into an internal model of object rotations, thereby shaping our ability to imagine the transformation of an object's spatial structure.

  16. Single-Axis Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor); Capo-Lugo, Pedro A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single-axis accelerometer includes a housing defining a sleeve. An object/mass is disposed in the sleeve for sliding movement therein in a direction aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A first piezoelectric strip, attached to a first side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The first piezoelectric strip includes a first strip of a piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A second piezoelectric strip, attached to a second side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The second piezoelectric strip includes a second strip of the piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A voltage sensor is electrically coupled to at least one of the first and second piezoelectric strips.

  17. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  18. Physics of Rotating and Expanding Black Hole Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshavatharam U. V. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its journey universe follows strong gravity. By unifying general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics a simple derivation is given for rotating black hole's temperature. It is shown that when the rotation speed approaches light speed temperature approaches Hawking's black hole temperature. Applying this idea to the cosmic black hole it is noticed that there is "no cosmic temperature" if there is "no cosmic rotation". Starting from the Planck scale it is assumed that universe is a rotating and expanding black hole. Another key assumption is that at any time cosmic black hole rotates with light speed. For this cosmic sphere as a whole while in light speed rotation "rate of decrease" in temperature or "rate of increase" in cosmic red shift is a measure of "rate of cosmic expansion". Since 1992, measured CMBR data indicates that, present CMB is same in all directions equal to $2.726^circ$ K, smooth to 1 part in 100,000 and there is no continuous decrease! This directly indicates that, at present rate of decrease in temperature is practically zero and rate of expansion is practically zero. Universe is isotropic and hence static and is rotating as a rigid sphere with light speed. At present galaxies are revolving with speeds proportional to their distances from the cosmic axis of rotation. If present CMBR temperature is $2.726^circ$ K, present value of obtained angular velocity is $2.17 imes 10^{-18}$ rad/sec $cong$ 67 Km/sec$imes$Mpc. Present cosmic mass density and cosmic time are fitted with a $ln (volume ratio$ parameter. Finally it can be suggested that dark matter and dark energy are ad-hoc and misleading concepts.

  19. Partially locally rotationally symmetric perfect fluid cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Mustapha, N; Van Elst, H; Marklund, M; Mustapha, Nazeem; Ellis, George F R; Elst, Henk van; Marklund, Mattias

    2000-01-01

    We show that there are no new consistent perfect fluid cosmologies with the kinematic variables and the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl curvature all rotationally symmetric about a common axis in an open neighbourhood ${\\cal U}$ of an event. The consistent solutions of this kind are either locally rotationally symmetric, or are subcases of the Szekeres model.

  20. Rotational image deblurring with sparse matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Nagy, James G.; Tigkos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    We describe iterative deblurring algorithms that can handle blur caused by a rotation along an arbitrary axis (including the common case of pure rotation). Our algorithms use a sparse-matrix representation of the blurring operation, which allows us to easily handle several different boundary cond...

  1. Convection and segregation in a flat rotating sandbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    A flat box, almost completely filled with a mixture of granulate, is rotated slowly about its horizontal central axis. In this experiment, a regular vortex flow of the granular material is observed in the cell plane. These vortex structures have a superficial analogy to convection rolls in dissipative structures of ordinary liquids. Whereas in the latter, the origin of the convection can often be attributed to gradients e.g. of densities or surface tensions, there is no trivial explanation at present for the convection of the granulate in the rotating container. Despite the simplicity of the experiment, the underlying mechanisms for convection and segregation are difficult to extract. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental study of the patterns under various experimental conditions and propose a mechanism for the convection.

  2. Application of Radial Basis Function Network for Identification of Axial RLG Drifts in Single-axis Rotation Inertial Navigation System%RBF神经网络在单轴旋转惯导系统轴向陀螺漂移辨识中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于旭东; 魏学通; 李莹; 龙兴武

    2012-01-01

    在激光陀螺单轴旋转惯性导航系统中,单轴旋转可以自动补偿垂直于旋转轴上的惯性器件误差,却不能消除旋转轴方向上惯性器件的误差,因此单轴旋转惯性导航系统的导航精度主要由轴向陀螺漂移决定.提出了一种基于径向基函数神经网络的轴向陀螺漂移辨识方法,利用系统纬度误差和温度变化量作为训练集,针对系统热态、冷态两种情况对RBF神经网络进行训练,对轴向陀螺漂移的辨识精度达到0.0003°/h.试验结果表明:该方法能够有效地辨识轴向陀螺漂移,使系统达到较高的导航精度,满足实际应用的需要.%In the single-axis rotation inertial navigation system with ring laser gyroscope ( RLG), the single-axis rotation can compensate the vertical errors of the inertial apparatus automatically, but cannot compensate the axial vertical errors, so the precision of the system is determined by the drift of the axial RLG. A novel identification method based on radial basis function network is proposed for the axial RLG drift. The inputs of the network are the latitude error and change of the temperature, and the network is trained for steady and non-steady state, in which the identification capability is less than 0. 0003°/h. The experiments show that this method can estimate the axial RLG drift efficaciously, and the result of the navigation is excellent and can meet the practical demand.

  3. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  4. Application of Circulation Controlled Blades for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Shires, A.; Kourkoulis, V

    2013-01-01

    The blades of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor see an inconsistent angle of attack through its rotation. Consequently, VAWT blades generally use symmetrical aerofoils with a lower lift-to-drag ratio than cambered aerofoils tailored to maximise horizontal axis wind turbine rotor performance. This paper considers the feasibility of circulation controlled (CC) VAWT blades, using a tangential air jet to provide lift and therefore power augmentation. However CC blade sections require a hi...

  5. Earth rotation prevents exact solid body rotation of fluids in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Boisson, J; Moisy, F; Cortet, P -P

    2012-01-01

    We report direct evidence of a secondary flow excited by the Earth rotation in a water-filled spherical container spinning at constant rotation rate. This so-called {\\it tilt-over flow} essentially consists in a rotation around an axis which is slightly tilted with respect to the rotation axis of the sphere. In the astrophysical context, it corresponds to the flow in the liquid cores of planets forced by precession of the planet rotation axis, and it has been proposed to contribute to the generation of planetary magnetic fields. We detect this weak secondary flow using a particle image velocimetry system mounted in the rotating frame. This secondary flow consists in a weak rotation, thousand times smaller than the sphere rotation, around a horizontal axis which is stationary in the laboratory frame. Its amplitude and orientation are in quantitative agreement with the theory of the tilt-over flow excited by precession. These results show that setting a fluid in a perfect solid body rotation in a laboratory exp...

  6. Development of methodology for horizontal axis wind turbine dynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugundji, J.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine dynamics were studied. The following findings are summarized: (1) review of the MOSTAS computer programs for dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines; (2) review of various analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients; (3) review of structural dynamics analysis tools for large wind turbine; (4) experiments for yaw characteristics of a rotating rotor; (5) development of a finite element model for rotors; (6) development of simple models for aeroelastics; and (7) development of simple models for stability and response of wind turbines on flexible towers.

  7. Measurements of Rotational Temperatures in Atmospheric-Pressure Capillary Plasma Electrode (CPE) Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figus, Margaret; Abramzon, Nina; Becker, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    We report the results of rotational temperature measurements in atmospheric-pressure capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharges in ambient air using the unresolved N2 second positive band. Assuming that the emitting N2 molecules can be described by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution characterized by a single rotational temperature, this temperature is determined from a fit of the measured emission spectrum to a calculated spectrum. If the emitting species are in equilibrium with the bulk gas in the plasma, then this temperature can be interpreted as the gas kinetic temperature in the plasma. We determined rotational temperatures for three different plasma regions: inside the capillary by analyzing radiation emitted along the axis of the capillary, between the capillaries, and perpendicular to the axis of the capillary. Each region has a different plasma density and, therefore, a different gas temperature with the plasma inside the capillary being the hottest. We also measured the rotational temperatures in each region as a function of the plasma power. As expected, the rotational temperatures increase with increasing discharge power. Work supported by the NSF and by ARO through a DURIP award.

  8. Changes in density fluctuations associated with confinement transitions close to a rational edge rotational transform in the W7-AS stellarator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoletnik, S,; Basse, Nils Plesner; Saffman, Mark;

    2002-01-01

    or by a small plasma current, these transitions offer a precise way to systematically analyse differences in plasma turbulence between bad and good confinement cases. This paper presents results of the study of electron density fluctuations associated with confinement changes. Wavenumber and frequency spectra...... and radial profiles are compared., A slow and reproducible transition is induced by a small plasma current and the sequence of events leading to bad confinement is investigated. The laser scattering core plasma density fluctuation measurements are complemented by edge beam emission spectroscopy results...

  9. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics

  10. Mechanical effects in a vortex device with a rotating core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    The process of the appearance of forced rotation of an axial core mounted in a modified vortex tube in the direction opposite to the rotation of the air vortex and the precession of its axis have been studied. It has been established that dynamical bending of a metal axial core arises in the process of rotation which causes mechanical wear of its end part and fracture in the fastening area of the bearing without residual curvature of the core axis. The excitation of rotation and observed force effects are not related to the mechanical action of rotating air flow on the axial core.

  11. Physics of Rotating and Expanding Black Hole Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshavatharam U. V. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its journey universe follows strong gravity. By unifying general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics a simple derivation is given for rotating black hole’s temperature. It is shown that when the rotation speed approaches light speed temperature approaches Hawking’s black hole temperature. Applying this idea to the cosmic black hole it is noticed that there is “no cosmic temperature” if there is “no cosmic rotation”. Starting from the Planck scale it is assumed that- universe is a rotating and expanding black hole. Another key assumption is that at any time cosmic black hole rotates with light speed. For this cosmic sphere as a whole while in light speed rotation “rate of decrease” in temperature or “rate of increase” in cosmic red shift is a measure of “rate of cosmic expansion”. Since 1992, measured CMBR data indicates that, present CMB is same in all directions equal to 2 : 726 K ; smooth to 1 part in 100,000 and there is no continuous decrease! This directly indicates that, at present rate of decrease in temperature is practically zero and rate of expansion is practically zero. Universe is isotropic and hence static and is rotating as a rigid sphere with light speed. At present galaxies are revolving with speeds proportional to their distances from the cosmic axis of rotation. If present CMBR temperature is 2 : 726 K, present value of obtained angular velocity is 2 : 17 10 Present cosmic mass density and cosmic time are fitted with a ln ( volume ratio parameter. Finally it can be suggested that dark matter and dark energy are ad-hoc and misleading concepts.

  12. On the problems of describing joint axis alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kevin A; Greiner, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    Each three-dimensional joint possesses at least one potentially oblique axis of rotation. Several systems are used to express joint axis alignment. One system, designated the plane projection (PP) method, describes angles based on orthogonal projections onto two, of the three, anatomical planes. Alternatively, a joint axis may be described in two different ways using two sequential Cardan angle rotations. These expression systems all lay claim to similar descriptive labels, such as deviation and elevation. Difficulties arise as researchers use these various methods to compare their own data to the results of others. A joint axis alignment, described as 27 degrees deviation and 41 degrees elevation in PP, differs by as much as 6 degrees when expressed as Cardan angles. Differences among expression systems increase as the joint axis alignment becomes more oblique -- eventually differing by as much as 75 degrees . This paper explores implications for this lack of congruence among the joint axis expression systems. Effective steps in dealing with these issues begin with recognizing the existence and extent of the problem. The paper provides a common set of algorithms to illustrate and alleviate the possible problems associated with the exchange of joint axis alignment data.

  13. Changes in the earth's rotation by tectonics : gravito-elastodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The rotation of the Earth is not regular. It changes on virtually every timescale we know in both position of the rotation axis and rotation rate. Even in our daily lives we sometimes experience the consequences of such changes, such as the second that is subtracted or added to clocks at the

  14. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  15. Two-axis joint assembly and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thang D. (Inventor); Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In an embodiment, a two-axis joint that utilizes planar reactions to handle moments applied to the side of the joint thereby allowing the device to remain low profile and compact with minimal intrusion to the mounting surface of the two-axis joint. To handle larger moments, the diameter of the planar member can be increased without increasing the overall height of the joint assembly thereby retaining the low profile thereof. Upper and lower antifriction bearings may be positioned within a housing engage the planar member to reduce rotational friction. The upper and lower bearings and a hub which supports the planar member transfer forces produced by moments applied to the side of the joint so as to spread the forces over the area of the housing.

  16. Performance Characterization of a Three-Axis Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    here represents the first efforts to operate and quantify the performance of a three-axis Hall effect thruster. This thruster is based on the Busek BHT ...thruster were developed and thrust and current density measurements were performed and compared with the baseline BHT -200. The three-axis thruster was...efficiencies than the BHT -200. Beam current density measurements conducted using a guarded Faraday probe showed significant differences in plume divergence

  17. Oblique Axis Body Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takai, Hirokazu; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen;

    2016-01-01

    was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion......Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced...

  18. Effect of Relative Marker Movement on the Calculation of the Foot Torsion Axis Using a Combined Cardan Angle and Helical Axis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline S. Graf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The two main movements occurring between the forefoot and rearfoot segment of a human foot are flexion at the metatarsophalangeal joints and torsion in the midfoot. The location of the torsion axis within the foot is currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop a method based on Cardan angles and the finite helical axis approach to calculate the torsion axis without the effect of flexion. As the finite helical axis method is susceptible to error due to noise with small helical rotations, a minimal amount of rotation was defined in order to accurately determine the torsion axis location. Using simulation, the location of the axis based on data containing noise was compared to the axis location of data without noise with a one-sample t-test and Fisher's combined probability score. When using only data with helical rotation of seven degrees or more, the location of the torsion axis based on the data with noise was within 0.2 mm of the reference location. Therefore, the proposed method allowed an accurate calculation of the foot torsion axis location.

  19. Effect of relative marker movement on the calculation of the foot torsion axis using a combined Cardan angle and helical axis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Eveline S; Wright, Ian C; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2012-01-01

    The two main movements occurring between the forefoot and rearfoot segment of a human foot are flexion at the metatarsophalangeal joints and torsion in the midfoot. The location of the torsion axis within the foot is currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop a method based on Cardan angles and the finite helical axis approach to calculate the torsion axis without the effect of flexion. As the finite helical axis method is susceptible to error due to noise with small helical rotations, a minimal amount of rotation was defined in order to accurately determine the torsion axis location. Using simulation, the location of the axis based on data containing noise was compared to the axis location of data without noise with a one-sample t-test and Fisher's combined probability score. When using only data with helical rotation of seven degrees or more, the location of the torsion axis based on the data with noise was within 0.2 mm of the reference location. Therefore, the proposed method allowed an accurate calculation of the foot torsion axis location.

  20. Off-axis Modal Active Vibration Control Of Rotational Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babakhani, B.; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.; van Amerongen, J.

    Collocated active vibration control is an effective and robustly stable way of adding damping to the performance limiting vibrations of a plant. Besides the physical parameters of the Active Damping Unit (ADU) containing the collocated actuator and sensor, its location with respect to the

  1. Dependence of polar hole density on magnetic and solar conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Electron densities from the Langmuir probes on the Atmospheric Explorer C and Dynamics Explorer 2 are used for analyzing the behavior of the high-altitude night-side F region polar hole as a function of solar and magnetic activity and of universal time (UT). The polar region of invariant latitude from 70 deg to 80 deg and MLT from 22 to 03 hours is examined. The strongest dependencies are observed in F10.7 and UT; a strong hemispherical difference due to the offset of the magnetic poles from the earth's rotation axis is observed in the UT dependence of the ionization hole. A seasonal variation in the dependence of ion density on solar flux is indicated, and an overall asymmetry in the density level between hemispheres is revealed, with the winter-hole density about a factor of 10 greater in the north than in the south.

  2. Slowly rotating homogeneous masses revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Reina, Borja

    2015-01-01

    Hartle's model for slowly rotating stars has been extensively used to compute equilibrium configurations of slowly rotating stars to second order in perturbation theory in General Relativity, given a barotropic equation of state (EOS). A recent study based on the modern theory of perturbed matchings show that the model must be amended to accommodate EOS's in which the energy density does not vanish at the surface of the non rotating star. In particular, the expression for the change in mass given in the original model, i.e. a contribution to the mass that arises when the perturbations are chosen so that the pressure of the rotating and non rotating configurations agree, must be modified with an additional term. In this paper, the amended change in mass is calculated for the case of constant density stars.

  3. Alfven eigenmode structure during off-axis neutral beam injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobias, B.; Bass, E. M.; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C.W.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The spatial structure of Alfven eigenmodes on the DIII-D tokamak is compared for contrasting fast ion deposition profiles resulting from on- and off-axis neutral beam injection (NBI). In both cases, poloidal mode rotation and eigenmode twist, or radial phase variation, are correlated with the direct

  4. Studying rotational dynamics with a smartphone—accelerometer versus gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braskén, Mats; Pörn, Ray

    2017-07-01

    The wide-spread availability of smartphones makes them a valuable addition to the measurement equipment of both the physics classroom and the instructional physics laboratory, encouraging an active interaction between measurements and modeling activities. Two useful sensors, available in most modern smartphones and tablets, are the 3-axis acceleration sensor and the 3-axis gyroscope. We explore the strengths and weaknesses of each type of sensor and use them to study the rotational dynamics of objects rotating about a fixed axis. Care has to be taken when interpreting acceleration sensor data, and in some cases the gyroscope will allow for rotational measurements not easily replicated using the acceleration sensor.

  5. Vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Krivospitski, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Maksimov, Vasili [Miass, RU; Halstead, Richard [Rohnert Park, CA; Grahov, Jurij [Miass, RU

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  6. Rotating ice blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  7. Common Genetic Variation in the DKK1 Gene is Associated with Hip Axis Length but not with Bone Mineral Density and Bone Turnover Markers in Young Adult Men: Results from the Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piters, Elke; Balemans, Wendy; Nielsen, Torben Leo

    2010-01-01

    LRP5 was recently confirmed as an important susceptibility gene for osteoporosis. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of DKK1 polymorphisms on bone mineral density (BMD), hip geometry, and bone turnover. DKK1 is a secreted protein that binds to LRP5/6 receptors and inhibits canonical Wnt...

  8. The rotational memory effect of a multimode fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Amitonova, L V; Pinkse, P W H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the rotational memory effect in a multimode fiber. Rotating the incident wavefront around the fiber core axis leads to a rotation of the resulting pattern of the fiber output without significant changes in the resulting speckle pattern. The rotational memory effect can be exploited for non-invasive imaging or ultrafast high-resolution scanning through a multimode fiber. Our experiments demonstrate this effect over a full range of angles in two experimental configurations.

  9. Synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations from a charge rotating around a cylindrical grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharian, A. A.; Kotanjyan, A. S.; Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Khachatryan, B. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study the radiation for a charge rotating around a diffraction grating on a cylindrical surface with metallic strips parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the grating on the radiation intensity is approximated by the surface currents induced on the strips by the field of the rotating charge. The expressions are derived for the vector potential and for the angular density of the radiation intensity on a given harmonic. We show that the behavior of the radiation intensity on large harmonics can be essentially different from that for a charge rotating in the vacuum. For the geometry of diffraction grating the radiation intensity on higher harmonics does not vanish for small angles with respect to the cylinder axis. For given characteristics of the charge, by the choice of the parameters of the diffraction grating, one can have highly directional radiation near the normal to the plane of the charge rotation. With decreasing energy, the relative contribution of the synchrotron radiation decreases and the Smith-Purcell part is dominant.

  10. Rotation of cometary meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, D.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: The rotation of meteoroids caused by gas drag during the ejection from a cometary nucleus has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to estimate the rotational characteristics of meteoroids after their release from a comet during normal activity. Methods: The basic dependence of spin rate on ejection velocity and meteoroid size is determined analytically. A sophisticated numerical model is then applied to meteoroids ejected from the 2P/Encke comet. The meteoroid shapes are approximated by polyhedrons, which have been determined by a 3D laser scanning method of 36 terrestrial rock samples. These samples come from three distinct sets with different origins and characteristics, such as surface roughness or angularity. Two types of gas-meteoroid interactions and three gas ejection models are assumed. The rotational characteristics of ejected meteoroid population are obtained by numerical integration of equations of motion with random initial conditions and random shape selection. Results: It is proved that the results do not depend on a specific set of shape models and that they are applicable to the (unknown) shapes of real meteoroids. A simple relationship between the median of meteoroid spin frequencies bar{f} (Hz), ejection velocities vej (m s-1), and sizes D (m) is determined. For diffuse reflection of gas molecules from meteoroid's surface it reads as bar{f≃ 2× 10-3 v_ej D-0.88}, and for specular reflection of gas molecules from meteoroid's surface it is bar{f≃ 5× 10-3 v_ej D-0.88}. The distribution of spin frequencies is roughly normal on log scale, and it is relatively wide: a 2σ-interval can be described as (0.1, 10)× bar{f}. Most of the meteoroids are non-principal axis rotators. The median angle between angular momentum vector and spin vector is 12°. About 60% of meteoroids rotate in long-axis mode. The distribution of angular momentum vectors is not random. They are concentrated in the perpendicular direction with respect to the gas

  11. Elliptical Galaxies: Rotationally Distorted, After All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi, R.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of earlier investigations onhomeoidally striated Mac Laurin spheroids and Jacobi ellipsoids (Caimmi and Marmo2005, Caimmi 2006a, 2007, different sequences of configurations are defined and represented in the ellipticity-rotation plane, $({sf O}hat{e}chi_v^2$. The rotation parameter, $chi_v^2$, is defined as the ratio, $E_mathrm{rot}/E_mathrm{res}$, of kinetic energy related to the mean tangential equatorial velocity component, $M(overline{v_phi}^2/2$, to kineticenergy related to tangential equatorial component velocity dispersion, $Msigma_{phiphi}^2/2$, andresidual motions, $M(sigma_{ww}^2+sigma_{33}^2/2$.Without loss of generality (above a thresholdin ellipticity values, the analysis is restricted to systems with isotropic stress tensor, whichmay be considered as adjoint configurationsto any assigned homeoidally striated density profile with anisotropic stress tensor, different angular momentum, and equal remaining parameters.The description of configurations in the$({sf O}hat{e}chi_v^2$ plane is extendedin two respects, namely (a from equilibriumto nonequilibrium figures, where the virialequations hold with additional kinetic energy,and (b from real to imaginary rotation, wherethe effect is elongating instead of flattening,with respect to the rotation axis.An application is made toa subsample $(N=16$ of elliptical galaxies extracted from richer samples $(N=25,~N=48$of early type galaxies investigated within theSAURON project (Cappellari et al. 2006, 2007.Sample objects are idealized as homeoidallystriated MacLaurinspheroids and Jacobi ellipsoids, and theirposition in the $({sf O}hat{e}chi_v^2$plane is inferred from observations followinga procedure outlined in an earlier paper(Caimmi 2009b. The position of related adjoint configurations with isotropic stresstensor is also determined. With a singleexception (NGC 3379, slow rotators arecharacterized by low ellipticities $(0lehat{e}<0.2$, low anisotropy parameters$(0ledelta<0

  12. The infrared bands Pechan prism axis parallel detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hua; Ji, Ming; He, Yu-lan; Wang, Nan-xi; Chang, Wei-jun; Wang, Ling; Liu, Li

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we put forward a new method to adjust the air gap of the total reflection air gap of the infrared Pechan prism. The adjustment of the air gap in the air gap of the Pechan prism directly affects the parallelism of the optical axis, so as to affect the consistency of the optical axis of the infrared system. The method solves the contradiction between the total reflection and the high transmission of the infrared wave band, and promotes the engineering of the infrared wave band. This paper puts forward the method of adjusting and controlling, which can ensure the full reflection and high penetration of the light, and also can accurately measure the optical axis of the optical axis of the different Pechan prism, and can achieve the precision of the level of the sec. For Pechan prism used in the infrared band image de rotation, make the product to realize miniaturization, lightweight plays an important significance.

  13. Rotation curve of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Y.S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We use SEGUE and Hipparcos data to restrict the behaviour of the rotation curve of the Milky Way in the solar neighbourhood. Then we construct a density model of the Milky Way which best reproduces the available observations of the rotation curve and is consistent with the density constraints in the solar neighbourhood.

  14. Using the axis of elongation to align shapes: Developmental changes between 18 and 24 months

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Linda B.; Street, Sandra; Jones, Susan S.; James, Karin H.

    2014-01-01

    An object’s axis of elongation serves as an important frame of reference for forming 3-dimensional representations of object shape. By several recent accounts, the formation of these representations is also related to experiences of acting on objects. Four experiments examined 18- to 24-month-old (N = 103) infants’ sensitivity to the elongated axis in action tasks that required extracting, comparing and physically rotating an object so that its major axis was aligned with that of a visual sta...

  15. The axis of evil

    CERN Document Server

    Land, K; Land, Kate; Magueijo, Joao

    2005-01-01

    We examine previous claims for a preferred axis at $(b,l)\\approx (60,-100)$ in the cosmic radiation anisotropy, by generalizing the concept of multipole planarity to any shape preference (a concept we define mathematically). Contrary to earlier claims, we find that the amount of power concentrated in planar modes for $\\ell=2,3$ is not inconsistent with isotropy and Gaussianity. The multipoles' alignment, however, is indeed anomalous, and extends up to $\\ell=5$ rejecting statistical isotropy with a probability in excess of 99.9%. There is also an uncanny correlation of azimuthal phases between $\\ell=3$ and $\\ell=5$. We are unable to blame these effects on foreground contamination or large-scale systematic errors. We show how this reappraisal may be crucial in identifying the theoretical model behind the anomaly.

  16. Preferred axis in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The foundation of modern cosmology relies on the so-called cosmological principle which states an homogeneous and isotropic distribution of matter in the universe on large scales. However, recent observations, such as the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, the motion of galaxies in the universe, the polarization of quasars and the acceleration of the cosmic expansion, indicate preferred directions in the sky. If these directions have a cosmological origin, the cosmological principle would be violated, and modern cosmology should be reconsidered. In this paper, by considering the preferred axis in the CMB parity violation, we find that it coincides with the preferred axes in CMB quadrupole and CMB octopole, and they all align with the direction of the CMB kinematic dipole. In addition, the preferred directions in the velocity flows, quasar alignment, anisotropy of the cosmic acceleration, the handedness of spiral galaxies, and the angular distribution of the fine-structu...

  17. Oblique Axis Body Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takai, Hirokazu; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced...... Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as "oblique type axis body fracture." Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic "oblique...... type" fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1-C3/4 posterior fusion and the course...

  18. Density functional theory studies of screw dislocation core structures in bcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Søren Lund; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    The core structures of (I 11) screw dislocations in bee metals are studied using density functional theory in the local-density approximation. For Mo and Fe, direct calculations of the core structures show the cores to be symmetric with respect to 180degrees rotations around an axis perpendicular...... to the dislocation line. The magnetic moment in the Fe core is shown to be reduced relative to the bulk value. Calculations of gamma surfaces and the elastic constants B, C' and c(44) are reported for Fe and all group VB and VIB metals. Using a criterion suggested by Vitek and Duesbery the calculations point...

  19. Solution on Deformation of High Density Polyethylene Kayak/Canoe Prepared by Rotational Molding%高密度聚乙烯滚塑皮划艇变形的解决方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温原; 陈郭伟; 杜章外; 陆国峰; 邓正勇; 陈海垠

    2016-01-01

    According to the deformation problems of high density polyethylene kayak/canoe product prepared by rotational molding,the rotational molding process of the product was studied,it is found that the bad evenness of the product wall thickness, a large number of pores in the product wall and the nonuniform temperature in mould are the key factors which cause the product de-formation. Firstly,the evenness of the wall thickness is improved through adding the preheating procedure and extending the swing residence time. Then,the temperature in mould is adjusted by preheating and improving the heating chamber temperature for achiev-ing the purpose of eliminating the pores in wall. Lastly,the temperature in mould is balanced further with using natural cooling and heating once more in the cooling stage etc.. Through the adjustment and improvement of the rotational molding process mentioned above,the deformation problems of kayak/canoe were solvedfinally and the qualified kayak/canoe products were gained.%针对高密度聚乙烯滚塑皮划艇的变形问题,对皮划艇的滚塑工艺进行了研究,发现壁厚均匀度差、壁内存在大量气孔和模内温度不均匀是造成皮划艇变形的重要因素。首先通过增加预热程序以及延长摇摆停留时间来提高壁厚的均匀度;然后通过预热及提高加热室温度来调节模内温度,达到消除壁内气孔的目的;最后,通过采用自然冷却并在冷却阶段再次加热等手段,进一步平衡模内温度。经过上述工艺的调整和改进,最终解决了皮划艇的变形问题,获得了合格的皮划艇产品。

  20. Acoustic equations for a gas stream in rigid-body rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ybarra, Pedro L.; Marin-Antuña, Jose M.

    2017-02-01

    The classical topic of wave propagation in a rotating gas is revisited by deducing scalar wave equations for propagation of acoustic and rotational waves through a plug flow of gas in rigid-body rotation with arbitrary intensities of the radial stratification. In the light of these novel equations, wave propagation is analyzed in two different base gas states: isothermal and homentropic. In both cases, previous findings are recovered that assess the validity of the equations and new results are established. In the non-homentropic but isothermal case, the set of governing equations is reduced to two coupled scalar wave equations with space dependent coefficients for the disturbances of density and pressure. Travelling wave solutions with variable amplitude have been obtained in the limit of weak stratification both for inertial waves as for acoustic waves which, in general, propagate on different frequency bands that overlap in the small wavenumber region. Furthermore, the entropy stratification in the base state is stable and compels the propagation of internal waves, leading to hybrid acoustic-inertial-vortical modes. In the homentropic case, the adiabatic relation between pressure and density disturbances allows to reduce further the governing equations to a single fourth-order scalar wave equation. In this case, the sound propagation velocity depends on the distance to the rotation axis and solutions are found by multiple-scale analyses in the form of waves with slowly varying amplitude and wavenumber. The corresponding eikonal equation shows that acoustic rays are refracted towards the rotation axis, propagating and spinning along and around it. In that way, the swirling gas behaves as an axial waveguide trapping inside any acoustic ray propagating in the vortex with large enough azimuthal and/or vertical wavenumber component.

  1. Micromachined dual input axis rate gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Thor Nelson

    The need for inexpensive yet reliable angular rate sensors in fields ranging from automotive to consumer electronics has motivated prolific micromachined rate gyroscope research. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes based upon either translational resonance, such as tuning forks, or structural mode resonance, such as vibrating rings. However, this work presents a novel, contrasting approach based on angular resonance of a rotating rigid rotor suspended by torsional springs. The inherent symmetry of the circular design allows angular rate measurement about two axes simultaneously, hence the name micromachined dual-axis rate gyroscope. The underlying theory of operation, mechanical structure design optimization, electrical interface circuitry, and signal processing are described in detail. Several operational versions were fabricated using two different fully integrated surface micromachining processes as proof of concept. The heart of the dual-axis rate gyroscope is a ˜2 mum thick polysilicon disk or rotor suspended above the substrate by a four beam suspension. When this rotor in driven into angular oscillation about the axis perpendicular to the substrate, a rotation rate about the two axes parallel to the substrate invokes an out of plane rotor tilting motion due to Coriolis acceleration. This tilting motion is capacitively measured and on board integrated signal processing provides two output voltages proportional to angular rate input about the two axes parallel to the substrate. The design process begins with the derivation of gyroscopic dynamics. The equations suggest that tuning sense mode frequencies to the drive oscillation frequency can vastly increase mechanical sensitivity. Hence the supporting four beam suspension is designed such that electrostatic tuning can match modes despite process variations. The electrostatic tuning range is limited only by rotor collapse to the substrate when tuning-voltage induced

  2. Effect of surface tension on the dynamical behavior of bubble in rotating fluids under low gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Leslie, Fred W.; Hong, B. B.

    1988-01-01

    Time dependent evolutions of the profile of free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out with the following situations: (1) linear functions of spin-up and spin-down in low and microgravity environments, (2) linear functions of increasing and decreasing gravity enviroment in high and low rotating cylidner speeds, (3) step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low gravity environment, and (4) sinusoidal function oscillation of gravity environment in high and low rotating cylinder speeds. The initial condition of bubble profiles was adopted from the steady-state formulations in which the computer algorithms have been developed by Hung and Leslie (1988), and Hung et al. (1988).

  3. Calculation of pediatric femoral fracture rotation from direct roentgenograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, M S; Ketenci, I E; Kaya, E; Tuna, S; Saygi, B

    2013-12-01

    Radiologic determination of pediatric femoral fracture rotation has been debated. Measuring the antetorsion angle of the fractured femur by computed tomography and comparing it with the opposite side has been the method of choice for this purpose. However, no simple method for direct measurement of femoral fracture rotation exists in the literature. In this study, our aim was to test a mathematical method of measuring the axial plane malrotation from direct roentgenograms. A pediatric femoral shaft fracture model was produced. The bone was secured to a wooden frame that allowed the distal part of the fracture to rotate around an axis. Radiographs were taken at known intervals of rotation ranging from the neutral position to 60° external rotation and to 60° internal rotation in 5° increments of rotation. Five independent, blinded observers measured the radiographs and calculated the fracture rotation according to a standard formula. Calculated rotation values were compared with known rotation values. Calculated rotation values were close to actual rotation values throughout the arc of rotation. The mean absolute error of five observers for all measurements of external and internal rotation was 3.97° (±0.83). The correlation coefficient between calculated and actual rotation values was 0.9927. The interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient for calculated rotation was 0.997. Absolute error and correlation coefficient values indicate that this method is accurate and reliable in determining the fracture rotation.

  4. Dynamics of immiscible liquids in a rotating horizontal cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, N. V.; Kozlova, A. N.; Shuvalova, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of an interface between two immiscible liquids of different density is studied experimentally in a horizontal cylinder at rotation in the gravity field. Two liquids entirely fill the cavity volume, and the container is rotated sufficiently fast so that the liquids are centrifuged. The light liquid forms a column extended along the rotation axis, and the heavy liquid forms an annular layer. Under the action of gravity, the light liquid column displaces steadily along the radius, downwards in the laboratory frame. As a result, fluid oscillations in the cavity frame are excited at the interface, which lead to the generation of a steady streaming, and the fluid comes into a slow lagging rotation with respect to the cylinder walls. The dynamics of the studied system is determined by the ratio of the gravity acceleration to the centrifugal one—the dimensionless acceleration. In experiments, the system is controlled by the means of variation of the rotation rate, i.e., of the centrifugal force. At a critical value of the dimensionless acceleration the circular interface looses stability, and an azimuthal wave is excited. This leads to a strong increase in the interface differential velocity. A theoretical analysis is done based on the theory of centrifugal waves and a frequency equation is obtained. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theory at the condition of small wave amplitudes. Mechanism of steady streaming generation is analyzed based on previously published theoretical results obtained for the limiting case when the light phase is a solid cylinder. A qualitative agreement is found.

  5. Octahedral Rotation Preferences in Perovskite Iodides and Bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joshua; Rondinelli, James M

    2016-03-03

    Phase transitions in ABX3 perovskites are often accompanied by rigid rotations of the corner-connected BX6 octahedral network. Although the mechanisms for the preferred rotation patterns of perovskite oxides are fairly well recognized, the same cannot be said of halide variants (i.e., X = Cl, Br, or I), several of which undergo an unusual displacive transition to a tetragonal phase exhibiting in-phase rotations about one axis (a(0)a(0)c(+) in Glazer notation). To discern the chemical factors stabilizing this unique phase, we investigated a series of 12 perovskite bromides and iodides using density functional theory calculations and compared them with similar oxides. We find that in-phase tilting provides a better arrangement of the larger bromide and iodide anions, which minimizes the electrostatic interactions, improves the bond valence of the A-site cations, and enhances the covalency between the A-site metal and Br(-) or I(-) ions. The opposite effect is present in the oxides, with out-of-phase tilting maximizing these factors.

  6. Automatic Identification of Axis Orbit Based on Both Wavelet Moment Invariants and Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FuXiang-qian; LiuGuang-lin; JiangJing; LiYou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Axis orbit is an important characteristic to be used in the condition monitoring and diagnosis system of rotating machine. The wavelet moment has the invariant to the translation, scaling and rotation. A method, which uses a neural network based on Radial Basis Function (RBF) and wavelet moment invariants to identify the orbit of shaft centerline of rotating machine is discussed in this paper. The principle and its application procedure of the method are introduced in detail. It gives simulation results of automatic identification for three typical axis orbits. It is proved that the method is effective and practicable.

  7. Automatic Identification of Axis Orbit Based on Both Wavelet Moment Invariants and Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiang-qian; Liu Guang-lin; Jiang Jing; Li You-ping

    2003-01-01

    Axis orbit is an important characteristic to be used in the condition monitoring and diagnosis system of rota-ting machine. The wavelet moment has the invariant to the translation, scaling and rotation. A method, which uses a neural network based on Radial Basis Function (RBF) and wavelet moment invariants to identify the orbit of shaft centerline of rotating machine is discussed in this paper. The principle and its application procedure of the method are intro-duced in detail. It gives simulation results of automatic identi-fication for three typical axis orbits. It is proved that the method is effective and practicable.

  8. Static Atmospheres in a Rotating Space Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses O'Neill's proposal for the colonization of space as it offers new problems in pure physics. Addresses specifically the distribution of the atmosphere in O'Neill's habitat and whether there will be enough air at the axis of rotation to allow human-powered flight, with particular reference to the habitat's "artificial gravity."…

  9. Automated Shell Theory for Rotating Structures (ASTROS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Computer program can be used to analyze any disk or shell of revolution of arbitrary cross section under inertial loads caused by rotation about shell axis and under various static loads, including thermal gradients. Geometric shapes incorporated in program are ellipsoidal, spherical, ogival, toroidal, conical, circular plate, cylindrical, and parabolic.

  10. Isosynchronous paths on a rotating surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ashby, Neil

    2014-01-01

    In special relativity, clock networks may be self-consistently synchronized in an inertial frame by slowly transporting clocks, or by exchanging electromagnetic signals between network nodes. However, clocks at rest in a rotating coordinate system--such as on the surface of the rotating earth--cannot be self-consistently synchronized by such processes, due to the Sagnac effect. Discrepancies that arise are proportional to the area swept out by a vector from the rotation axis to the portable clock or electromagnetic pulse, projected onto a plane normal to the rotation axis. This raises the question whether paths of minimal or extremal length can be found, for which the Sagnac discrepancies are zero. This paper discusses the variational problem of finding such "isosynchronous" paths on rotating discs and rotating spheres. On a disc, the problem resembles the classical isoperimetric problem and the paths turn out to be circular arcs. On a rotating sphere, however, between any two endpoints there are an infinite ...

  11. Electric Power Generation from Earth's Rotation through its Own Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Christopher F.; Hand, Kevin P.

    2016-07-01

    We examine electric power generation from Earth's rotation through its own nonrotating magnetic field (that component of the field symmetric about Earth's rotation axis). There is a simple general proof that this is impossible. However, we identify a loophole in that proof and show that voltage can be continuously generated in a low-magnetic-Reynolds-number conductor rotating with Earth, provided magnetically permeable material is used to ensure curl(v ×B0)≠0 within the conductor, where B0 derives from the axially symmetric component of Earth's magnetic flux density, and v is Earth's rotation velocity at the conductor's location. We solve the relevant equations for one laboratory realization, and from this solution, we predict the voltage magnitude and sign dependence on system dimensions and orientation relative to Earth's rotation. The effect, which would be available nearly globally with no intermittency, requires testing and further examination to see if it can be scaled to practical emission-free power generation.

  12. Invalidity of Geometrical Interpretation of F-Spin Structure of Nuclear Rotations by Otsuka's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Guilu

    1995-06-01

    In Otsuka's view of nuclear rotations neutrons and protons are not rotating around a common axis, but rather around separate axis. In this letter, we pointed out that this invalidates the geometrical interpretation of F-spin structure of the neutron-proton interacting boson model, where the angle between the axis of symmetries of neutron ellipsoid and proton ellipsoid is used to determine whether a state is F-spin symmetric or mixed symmetric.

  13. Spontaneous Magnetization through Non-Abelian Vortex Formation in Rotating Dense Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Vinci, Walter; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-01-01

    When a color superconductor of high density QCD is rotating, super- fluid vortices are inevitably created along the rotation axis. In the color-flavor locked phase realized at the asymptotically large chemical potential, there appear non-Abelian vortices carrying both circulations of superfluid and color magnetic fluxes. A family of solutions has a degeneracy characterized by the Nambu-Goldtone modes CP2, associ- ated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the vicinity of the vortex. In this paper, we study electromagnetic coupling of the non-Abelian vortices and find that the degeneracy is removed with the induced effective potential. We obtain one stable vortex solu- tion and a family of metastable vortex solutions, both of which carry ordinary magnetic fluxes in addition to color magnetic fluxes. We dis- cuss quantum mechanical decay of the metastable vortices by quantum tunneling, and compare the effective potential with the other known po- tentials, the quantum mechanically induced...

  14. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  15. Destabilization of free convection by weak rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfgat, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This study offers an explanation of a recently observed effect of destabilization of free convective flows by weak rotation. After studying several models where flows are driven by a simultaneous action of convection and rotation, it is concluded that the destabilization is observed in the cases where centrifugal force acts against main convective circulation. At relatively low Prandtl numbers this counter action can split the main vortex into two counter rotating vortices, where the interaction leads to instability. At larger Prandtl numbers, the counter action of the centrifugal force steepens an unstable thermal stratification, which triggers Rayleigh-B\\'enard instability mechanism. Both cases can be enhanced by advection of azimuthal velocity disturbances towards the axis, where they grow and excite perturbations of the radial velocity. The effect was studied considering a combined convective/rotating flow in a cylinder with a rotating lid and a parabolic temperature profile at the sidewall. Next, explana...

  16. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  17. A new device for blockout procedures in rotational path removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, K C; Chen, P S

    1993-05-01

    The rationale of a rotation axis is discussed and on this basis a blockout device is designed for rotational path removable partial dentures. This device has three basic components, which are (1) the acrylic resin block, (2) the rotation axis, and (3) the functional part. In the blockout procedures for removable partial dentures with tilted mandibular molars, the rotation axis of the prosthesis is first localized by the blockout device. A knife edge, made of Duralay resin that corresponds to the survey lines of teeth to be used as supports, is constructed and is joined to the functional part of the blockout device. Blockout regions are determined by the rotational movement of the Duralay resin knife edge along the rotation axis of the blockout device. In addition to the function of blockout, the device can also be used to analyze diagnostic casts for critical undercuts. Internal and external types of blockout devices are also discussed.

  18. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  19. Rotation-independent representations for haptic movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takanori; Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The existence of a common mechanism for visual and haptic representations has been reported in object perception. In contrast, representations of movements might be more specific to modalities. Referring to the vertical axis is natural for visual representations whereas a fixed reference axis might be inappropriate for haptic movements and thus also inappropriate for its representations in the brain. The present study found that visual and haptic movement representations are processed independently. A psychophysical experiment examining mental rotation revealed the well-known effect of rotation angle for visual representations whereas no such effect was found for haptic representations. We also found no interference between processes for visual and haptic movements in an experiment where different stimuli were presented simultaneously through visual and haptic modalities. These results strongly suggest that (1) there are separate representations of visual and haptic movements, and (2) the haptic process has a rotation-independent representation. PMID:24005481

  20. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mattijs Arnoldussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. 1. Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit.We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow’s rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals.2. Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semicircular canals (SCC? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those BOLD signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes.3. We investigated if subject’s sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is not arranged into

  1. A microscopic rotational cranking model and its connection to conventional cranking and other collective rotational models

    CERN Document Server

    Gulshani, P

    2016-01-01

    A simple derivation from first principles of the conventional cranking model for nuclear collective rotation about a single axis and its coupling to intrinsic motion is given. The microscopic cranking model is derived by transforming the nuclear Schrodinger equation to a rotating frame using a rotation-intrinsic product wavefunction and imposing no constraints on either the wavefunction or the nucleon coordinates. The no-constraint feature of the transformation makes it possible to share the angular momentum of the nucleus between the rotating frame and intrinsic system. The rotation of the frame is driven by a combination of rigid and irrotational flows generated by the motion of the nucleons. The resulting transformed, time-reversal invariant Schrodinger equation is readily reduced to the equations of the conventional cranking, particle-plus-rotor, phenomenological and microscopic collective rotation-vibration, and two-fluid semi-classical collective models. In particular, the reduction of the microscopic m...

  2. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. Data Sources: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of “gut microbiota”, “gut-brain axis”, and “neuroscience”. Study Selection: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of s...

  3. Simulation of MHD collimation from differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Christopher

    2005-10-01

    Recent observations indicate that astrophysical outflows from active galactic nuclei are permeated with helical magnetic fields[1]. The most promising theory for the formation of the magnetic configurations in these magnetically driven jets is the coiling of an initial seed field by the differential rotation of the accretion disk surrounding the central object. We have begun simulations that are relevant to these Poynting jets using the NIMROD code[2]. To simulate dynamics on length scales that are significantly larger than the accretion disk, the non-relativistic MHD equations are evolved on a hemispherical logarithmic mesh. The accretion disk is treated as a condition on the lower boundary by applying a Keplerian velocity to the azimuthal component of the fluid velocity and a prescribed flux of mass through the boundary. The magnetic field configuration is initialized to a dipole like field. Formation of a jet outflow is observed later in time. The initial field is coiled up and collimated, driving a large current density on the axis of symmetry. Slipping of magnetic field lines due to non-ideal effects has been investigated. 1. Asada K. et. al., Pub. of the Astr. Soc. of Japan, 54, L39-L43, 2002 2. Sovinec C. et. al., J. Comp. Phys., 195, 355-386, 2004

  4. Relating Changes in Cometary Rotation to Activity: Current Status and Applications to Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinha, Nalin

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a parameter, X, to predict the changes in the rotational period of a comet in terms of the rotational period itself, the nuclear radius, and the orbital characteristics. We show that X should be a constant if the bulk densities and shapes of nuclei are nearly identical and the activity patterns are similar for all comets. For four nuclei for which rotational changes are well documented, despite the nearly factor 30 variation observed among the effective active fractions of these comets, X is constant to within a factor two. We present an analysis for the sungrazing comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) to explore what rotational changes it could undergo during the upcoming perihelion passage where its perihelion distance will be ~2.7 solar radii. When close to the sun, barring a catastrophic disruption of the nucleus, the activity of ISON will be sufficiently strong to put the nucleus into a non-principal-axis rotational state and observable changes to the rotational period should also occur. Additional causes ...

  5. Rotation of vertically oriented objects during earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzen, Klaus-G.

    2012-10-01

    Vertically oriented objects, such as tombstones, monuments, columns, and stone lanterns, are often observed to shift and rotate during earthquake ground motion. Such observations are usually limited to the mesoseismal zone. Whether near-field rotational ground motion components are necessary in addition to pure translational movements to explain the observed rotations is an open question. We summarize rotation data from seven earthquakes between 1925 and 2009 and perform analog and numeric rotation testing with vertically oriented objects. The free-rocking motion of a marble block on a sliding table is disturbed by a pulse in the direction orthogonal to the rocking motion. When the impulse is sufficiently strong and occurs at the `right' moment, it induces significant rotation of the block. Numeric experiments of a free-rocking block show that the initiation of vertical block rotation by a cycloidal acceleration pulse applied orthogonal to the rocking axis depends on the amplitude of the pulse and its phase relation to the rocking cycle. Rotation occurs when the pulse acceleration exceeds the threshold necessary to provoke rocking of a resting block, and the rocking block approaches its equilibrium position. Experiments with blocks subjected to full 3D strong motion signals measured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake confirm the observations from the tests with analytic ground motions. Significant differences in the rotational behavior of a monolithic block and two stacked blocks exist.

  6. Collapse and Fragmentation of Magnetic Molecular Cloud Cores with the Enzo AMR MHD Code. I. Uniform Density Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important contributers to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer (1979) standard isothermal test case for three dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics (HD) codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) c...

  7. A rotating directional probe for the measurements of fast ion losses and plasma rotation at Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, M; Liang, Y; Jaegers, H; Assmann, J; Satheeswaran, G; Xu, Y; Pearson, J; Yang, Y; Denner, P; Zeng, L

    2013-08-01

    This work discusses a new directional probe designed for measurements of fast ion losses and the plasma rotation with a high angular resolution in magnetically confined plasmas. Directional and especially Mach probes are commonly used diagnostics for plasma flow measurements, and their applicability for the fast ion losses detection has been demonstrated. A limitation of static Mach probes is their low angular resolution. At the Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research, the angular resolution is strongly restricted by the finite number of available measurement channels. In a dynamic plasma, where instabilities can lead to local changes of the field line pitch-angle, plasma flow, or fast ion losses, a low angular resolution makes a precise data analysis difficult and reduces the quality of the measured data. The new probe design, the rotating directional probe, combines the features of early directional probes and Mach probes. It consists of two radially aligned arrays of nine Langmuir probe pins with each array facing opposite directions. During the measurement the probe head rotates along its axis to measure the ion saturation current from all directions. As a result, the rotating directional probe simultaneously provides an angular dependent plasma flow and fast ion losses measurement at different radial positions. Based on the angular dependent data, a precise determination of the current density is made. In addition, the simultaneous measurement of the ion saturation current at different radial positions allows for resolving radially varying field line pitch-angles and identifying the radial dynamic of processes like fast ion losses.

  8. Numerical and Experimental Investigations of a Rotating Heat Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowski, Todd A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Rotating and revolving heat pipes have been used in a variety of applications including heat pipe heat exchangers, cooling of rotating electrical machines, and heat removal in high speed cutting operations. The use of heat pipes in rotating environments has prompted many analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of these devices. Past investigations, however, have been restricted to the study of straight heat pipes. In this work, a curved rotating heat pipe is studied numerically and experimentally. In certain types of rotating machines, heat generating components, which must be cooled during normal operation, are located at some radial distance from the axis of rotation. The bent heat pipe studied here is shown to have advantages when compared to the conventional straight heat pipes in these off-axis cooling scenarios. The heat pipe studied here is built so that both the condenser and evaporator sections are parallel to the axis of rotation. The condenser section is concentric with the axis of rotation while the evaporator section can be placed in contact with off-axis heat sources in the rotating machine. The geometry is achieved by incorporating an S-shaped curve between the on-axis rotating condenser section and the off-axis revolving evaporator section. Furthermore, the heat pipe uses an annular gap wick structure. Incorporating an annular gap wick structure into the heat pipe allows for operation in a non-rotating environment. A numerical model of this rotating heat pipe is developed. The analysis is based on a two-dimensional finite-difference model of the liquid flow coupled to a one-dimensional model of the vapor flow. Although the numerical model incorporates many significant aspects of the fluid flow, the flow in the actual heat pipe is expected to be threedimensional. The rotating heat pipe with the S-shaped curve is also studied experimentally to determine how well the numerical model captures the key

  9. Modal Parameter Identification of New Design of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines have lower power efficiency than the horizontal axis wind turbines. However vertical axis wind turbines are proven to be economical and noise free on smaller scale. A new design of three bladed vertical axis wind turbine by using two airfoils in construction of each...... blade has been proposed to improve power efficiency. The purpose of two airfoils in blade design of vertical axis wind turbine is to create high lift which in turns gives higher power output. In such case the structural parameter identification is important to understand the system behavior due to its...... first kind of design before experimental analysis. Therefore a study is carried out to determine the natural frequency to avoid unstable state of the system due to rotational frequency of rotor. The present paper outlines a conceptual design of vertical axis wind turbine and a modal analysis by using...

  10. Modal Parameter Identification of New Design of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines have lower power efficiency than the horizontal axis wind turbines. However vertical axis wind turbines are proven to be economical and noise free on smaller scale. A new design of three bladed vertical axis wind turbine by using two airfoils in construction of each...... blade has been proposed to improve power efficiency. The purpose of two airfoils in blade design of vertical axis wind turbine is to create high lift which in turns gives higher power output. In such case the structural parameter identification is important to understand the system behavior due to its...... first kind of design before experimental analysis. Therefore a study is carried out to determine the natural frequency to avoid unstable state of the system due to rotational frequency of rotor. The present paper outlines a conceptual design of vertical axis wind turbine and a modal analysis by using...

  11. The chaotic rotation of Hyperion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, J.; Peale, S. J.; Mignard, F.

    1984-01-01

    Under the assumption that the satellite is rotating about a principal axis that is normal to its orbit plane, a plot of spin rate-versus-orientation for Hyperion at the pericenter of its orbit has revealed a large, chaotic zone surrounding Hyperion's synchronous spin-orbit state. The chaotic zone is so large that it surrounds the 1/2 and 2 states, and libration in the 3/2 state is not possible. Rotation in the chaotic zone is also attitude-unstable. As tidal dissipation drives Hyperion's spin toward a nearly synchronous value, Hyperion necessarily enters the large chaotic zone, becoming attitude-unstable and tumbling. It is therefore predicted that Hyperion will be found to be tumbling chaotically.

  12. Whirling skirts and rotating cones

    CERN Document Server

    Guven, Jemal; Müller, Martin Michael

    2013-01-01

    Steady, dihedrally symmetric patterns with sharp peaks may be observed on a spinning skirt, lagging behind the material flow of the fabric. These qualitative features are captured with a minimal model of traveling waves on an inextensible, flexible, generalized-conical sheet rotating about a fixed axis. Conservation laws are used to reduce the dynamics to a quadrature describing a particle in a three-parameter family of potentials. One parameter is associated with the stress in the sheet, the second is the Noether current associated with rotational invariance, and the third is a Rossby number which indicates the relative strength of Coriolis forces. Solutions are quantized by enforcing a topology appropriate to a skirt and a particular choice of dihedral symmetry. A perturbative analysis of nearly axisymmetric cones shows that Coriolis effects are essential in establishing skirt-like solutions. Fully non-linear solutions with three-fold symmetry are presented, which bear a suggestive resemblance to the observ...

  13. Psoas major and its controversial rotational action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyrme, A D; Cahill, D J; Marsh, H P; Ellis, H

    1999-01-01

    The action of psoas major muscle as a primary flexor of the hip joint is undisputed. However it is also variably reported as being a medial and a lateral rotator of the femur at the hip joint. The psoas and iliacus muscles, along with their common insertion, were isolated by dissection in six adult cadaveric specimens. The action of psoas muscle was assessed by pulling the muscle along its long axis and then observing the effects on rotation of the femur, with a visual estimation of the rotation in degrees. The experiment was repeated with the hip joint capsule removed. In the anatomical position, applied traction along the long axis of the muscle produced hip flexion with no rotational component. With the hip in the abducted position, traction produced flexion, adduction, and lateral rotation of the femur at the hip joint. In adduction of the hip, traction on psoas produced only flexion at the hip joint, with no rotation. In maximal flexion, traction also produced adduction. The results were unaffected by the removal of the joint capsule.

  14. Instability of counter-rotating stellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlfeld, R. G.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2015-09-01

    We use an N-body simulation, constructed using GADGET-2, to investigate an accretion flow onto an astrophysical disk that is in the opposite sense to the disk's rotation. In order to separate dynamics intrinsic to the counter-rotating flow from the impact of the flow onto the disk, we consider an initial condition in which the counter-rotating flow is in an annular region immediately exterior the main portion of the astrophysical disk. Such counter-rotating flows are seen in systems such as NGC 4826 (known as the "Evil Eye Galaxy"). Interaction between the rotating and counter-rotating components is due to two-stream instability in the boundary region. A multi-armed spiral density wave is excited in the astrophysical disk and a density distribution with high azimuthal mode number is excited in the counter-rotating flow. Density fluctuations in the counter-rotating flow aggregate into larger clumps and some of the material in the counter-rotating flow is scattered to large radii. Accretion flow processes such as this are increasingly seen to be of importance in the evolution of multi-component galactic disks.

  15. Coupling Onset of Cyclone Upward and Rotation Flows in a Little Bottle

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    A coupling onset of the cyclone upward and rotation flows is experimentally demonstrated in a little bottle. The rotating flow provides a pressure increase in the outer part of the rotating flow by its centrifugal force. When a gradient of the fluid rotation appears along the rotation axis, the higher-pressure area is localized and pushes the fluid in a low pressure. Then the fluid staying in the central area of the rotation is pushed up along the rotation axis, and the upward wind is enhanced. In this coupling mechanism the rotation gradient is the key; the coupling of the rotation and the upward fluid flow is essentially important for a cyclone buildup, and is well explained experimentally and theoretically.

  16. The role of Stewartson and Ekman layers in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, Rudie P.J.; Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Overkamp, Jim; Sun, Chao; van Heijst, GertJan F.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    When the classical Rayleigh–Bénard (RB) system is rotated about its vertical axis roughly three regimes can be identified. In regime I (weak rotation) the largescale circulation (LSC) is the dominant feature of the flow. In regime II (moderate rotation) the LSC is replaced by vertically aligned

  17. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xing Wang; Yu-Ping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis.Data Sources:All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18,2016,were identified through a literature search on PubMed,ScienceDirect,and Web of Science,with the keywords of"gut microbiota","gut-brain axis",and "neuroscience".Study Selection:All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed,with no limitation of study design.Results:It is well-recognized that gut microbiota affects the brain's physiological,behavioral,and cognitive functions although its precise mechanism has not yet been fully understood.Gut microbiota-brain axis may include gut microbiota and their metabolic products,enteric nervous system,sympathetic and parasympathetic branches within the autonomic nervous system,neural-immune system,neuroendocrine system,and central nervous system.Moreover,there may be five communication routes between gut microbiota and brain,including the gut-brain's neural network,neuroendocrine-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis,gut immune system,some neurotransmitters and neural regulators synthesized by gut bacteria,and barrier paths including intestinal mucosal barrier and blood-brain barrier.The microbiome is used to define the composition and functional characteristics of gut microbiota,and metagenomics is an appropriate technique to characterize gut microbiota.Conclusions:Gut microbiota-brain axis refers to a bidirectional information network between the gut microbiota and the brain,which may provide a new way to protect the brain in the near future.

  18. Visual information processing in the lion-tailed macaque (Macaca silenus): mental rotation or rotational invariance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmann, Britta; Dehnhardt, Guido; Mauck, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Mental rotation is a widely accepted concept indicating an image-like mental representation of visual information and an analogue mode of information processing in certain visuospatial tasks. In the task of discriminating between image and mirror-image of rotated figures, human reaction times increase with the angular disparity between the figures. In animals, tests of this kind yield inconsistent results. Pigeons were found to use a time-independent rotational invariance, possibly indicating a non-analogue information processing system that evolved in response to the horizontal plane of reference birds perceive during flight. Despite similar ecological demands concerning the visual reference plane, a sea lion was found to use mental rotation in similar tasks, but its processing speed while rotating three-dimensional stimuli seemed to depend on the axis of rotation in a different way than found for humans in similar tasks. If ecological demands influence the way information processing systems evolve, hominids might have secondarily lost the ability of rotational invariance while retreating from arboreal living and evolving an upright gait in which the vertical reference plane is more important. We therefore conducted mental rotation experiments with an arboreal living primate species, the lion-tailed macaque. Performing a two-alternative matching-to-sample procedure, the animal had to decide between rotated figures representing image and mirror-image of a previously shown upright sample. Although non-rotated stimuli were recognized faster than rotated ones, the animal's mean reaction times did not clearly increase with the angle of rotation. These results are inconsistent with the mental rotation concept but also cannot be explained assuming a mere rotational invariance. Our study thus seems to support the idea of information processing systems evolving gradually in response to specific ecological demands.

  19. A mechanical rotator for neutron scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, A.; Northen, E.; Aczel, A. A.; MacDougall, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    We have designed and built a mechanical rotation system for use in single crystal neutron scattering experiments at low temperatures. The main motivation for this device is to facilitate the application of magnetic fields transverse to a primary training axis, using only a vertical cryomagnet. Development was done in the context of a triple-axis neutron spectrometer, but the design is such that it can be generalized to a number of different instruments or measurement techniques. Here, we discuss some of the experimental constraints motivating the design, followed by design specifics, preliminary experimental results, and a discussion of potential uses and future extension possibilities.

  20. Revisit of rotational dynamics of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2's flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Hu, Shoucun; Ji, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of the rotational parameters of Toutatis based on the observational results from Chang'e-2's close flyby. The 3-D shape model derived from ground-based radar observation is used to calculate the 3-1-3 Euler angles at the flyby epoch, which are evaluated to be -20.1° +/- 1°, 27.6° +/- 1° and 42.2° +/- 1°. The large amplitude of Toutatis' tumbling attitude is demonstrated to be the result of the large deviation of the angular momentum axis and the rotational axis. Two rotational periods are evaluated to be 5.38+/-0.03 days for rotation about the long axis and 7.40+/-0.03 days for precession of the long axis about the angular momentum vector based on Fourier analysis. These results provide a further understanding of rotational state of Toutatis.

  1. Revisit of rotational dynamics of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2's flyby

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yuhui; Ji, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of the rotational parameters of Toutatis based on the observational results from Chang'e-2's close flyby. The 3-D shape model derived from ground-based radar observation is used to calculate the 3-1-3 Euler angles at the flyby epoch, which are evaluated to be $-20.1^\\circ\\pm1^\\circ$, $27.6^\\circ\\pm1^\\circ$ and $42.2^\\circ\\pm1^\\circ$. The large amplitude of Toutatis' tumbling attitude is demonstrated to be the result of the large deviation of the angular momentum axis and the rotational axis. Two rotational periods are evaluated to be $5.38\\pm0.03$ days for rotation about the long axis and $7.40\\pm0.03$ days for precession of the long axis about the angular momentum vector based on Fourier analysis. These results provide a further understanding of rotational state of Toutatis.

  2. Helical spin rotators and snakes for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsin, V.I.; Shatunov, Yu.M. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Peggs, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The RHIC collider, now under construction at BNL, will have the possibility of polarized proton-proton collisions up to a beam energy of 250 Gev. Polarized proton beams of such high energy can be only obtained with the use of siberian snakes, a special kind of spin rotator that rotates the particle spin by 180{degree} around an axis lying in the horizontal plane. Siberian snakes help to preserve the beam polarization while numerous spin depolarizing resonances are crossed, during acceleration. In order to collide longitudinally polarized beams, it is also planned to install spin rotators around two interaction regions. This paper discusses snake and spin rotator designs based on sequences of four helical magnets. The schemes that were chosen to be applied at RHIC are presented.

  3. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xing; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. Data Sources: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of “gut microbiota”, “gut-brain axis”, and “neuroscience”. Study Selection: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of study design. Results: It is well-recognized that gut microbiota affects the brain's physiological, behavioral, and cognitive functions although its precise mechanism has not yet been fully understood. Gut microbiota-brain axis may include gut microbiota and their metabolic products, enteric nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic branches within the autonomic nervous system, neural-immune system, neuroendocrine system, and central nervous system. Moreover, there may be five communication routes between gut microbiota and brain, including the gut-brain's neural network, neuroendocrine-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, gut immune system, some neurotransmitters and neural regulators synthesized by gut bacteria, and barrier paths including intestinal mucosal barrier and blood-brain barrier. The microbiome is used to define the composition and functional characteristics of gut microbiota, and metagenomics is an appropriate technique to characterize gut microbiota. Conclusions: Gut microbiota-brain axis refers to a bidirectional information network between the gut microbiota and the brain, which may provide a new way to protect the brain in the near future. PMID:27647198

  4. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  5. Rotator cuff exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000357.htm Rotator cuff exercises To use the sharing features on this ... gov/pubmed/25560729 . Read More Frozen shoulder Rotator cuff problems Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder ...

  6. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  7. Experimental investigation of a rapidly rotating turbulent duct flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, G.E.; Johansson, A.V. [Department of Mechanics, KTH, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Gunnarsson, J. [Bombardier Transportation, Vaesteraas (Sweden); Moberg, H. [Alfa Laval, 14780 Tumba (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    Rapidly rotating duct flow is studied experimentally with Rotation numbers in the interval. To achieve this, in combination with relatively high Reynolds numbers (5,000-30,000 based on the hydraulic radius), water was used as the working medium. Square and rectangular duct cross-sections were used and the angle between the rotation vector and the main axis of the duct was varied. The influence of the rotation on the pressure drop in the duct was investigated and suitable scalings of this quantity were studied. (orig.)

  8. Unidirectional Heat Transport Driven by Rotating Cholesteric Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sayumi; Bono, Shinji; Tabe, Yuka

    2017-02-01

    When a cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) is submitted to a thermal gradient, it exhibits continuous director rotation. The phenomenon is called the Lehmann effect and is understood as a thermomechanical coupling in chiral LCs without mirror symmetry. Since the Lehmann effect is considered to possess time-reversal symmetry, one can expect the inverse process, i.e., rotating chiral LCs to pump heat along the rotational axis. We report the first observation of heat transport driven by rotating cholesteric droplets. This result suggests a new function of the cholesterics as a micro heat pump.

  9. Comparison of Efficiencies of Solar Tracker systems with static panel Single- Axis Tracking System and Dual-Axis Tracking System with Fixed Mount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanabal.R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Electricity plays a key role now in our daily lives but the energy sources to electric power has been used in abundance and so researchers were compelled to find an alternate source of power leading to the discovery of solar energy. Solar energy is inexhaustible and eco-friendly and can be converted into electricityusing photovoltaic panels. These panels can be used in a fixed form or used in a solar tracking system for single axis as well as for dual axis. In a fixed form their efficiency is low since the panels will be tilted in a particular angle whereas in a tracking system the panel is made to move either in single axis or dual axis. In a single axis system the panel is moved in an east to west direction with respect to the sun and it has better efficiency than panels in fixed form. But in a dual axis system the panel is made to rotate in all four directions in accordance with the sun. And dual axis has proved to have more efficiency than both fixed panels and single axis system.

  10. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating...

  11. Anatomical study of the gastrointestinal tract in free-living axis deer (Axis axis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, W; Erdogan, S; Ungerfeld, R

    2015-02-01

    The macroscopic anatomy of the stomach and intestines of adult axis deer (Axis axis), a cervid species considered intermediate/mixed feeder, was observed and recorded. Nine adult wild axis deers of both sexes were used and studied by simple dissection. The ruminal papillae were distributed unevenly in the overall area of the inner surface of rumen and primarily were more large and abundant within the atrium. The ruminal pillars had no papillae. There was an additional ruminal pillar located between the right longitudinal and right coronary ventral pillars connected to the caudal pillar. No dorsal coronary pillars were found, and the ventral coronary pillars are connected. The reticulum was the third compartment in size, and the maximum height of the reticular crests was 1.0 mm. The Cellulae reticuli were not divided and rarely contained secondary crests. There were no Papillae unguiculiformes. The omasum was the smallest gastric compartment. The abomasum had about twelve spiral plicae, and a small pyloric torus was present. The intraruminal papillation was similar to those species that are characterized by a higher proportion of grass in their natural diet. The finding of the small reticular crests is typical for browser ruminants and was coincident with data reported for other deer. The comparative ratio of the small intestine to the large intestine was 1.69, in terms of length measurements in axis deer and appears below of the 'browser range'. We concluded that the gastrointestinal system of axis deer reflected similar morphological characteristics of the both types of ruminants: browser and grazer, and we consider it as an intermediate feeder. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Automated segmentation of the human hippocampus along its longitudinal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma-Usabiaga, Garikoitz; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Insausti, Ricardo; Greve, Douglas N; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M

    2016-09-01

    The human hippocampal formation is a crucial brain structure for memory and cognitive function that is closely related to other subcortical and cortical brain regions. Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed differences along the hippocampal longitudinal axis in terms of structure, connectivity, and function, stressing the importance of improving the reliability of the available segmentation methods that are typically used to divide the hippocampus into its anterior and posterior parts. However, current segmentation conventions present two main sources of variability related to manual operations intended to correct in-scanner head position across subjects and the selection of dividing planes along the longitudinal axis. Here, our aim was twofold: (1) to characterize inter- and intra-rater variability associated with these manual operations and compare manual (landmark based) and automatic (percentage based) hippocampal anterior-posterior segmentation procedures; and (2) to propose and test automated rotation methods based on approximating the hippocampal longitudinal axis to a straight line (estimated with principal component analysis, PCA) or a quadratic Bézier curve (fitted with numerical methods); as well as an automated anterior-posterior hippocampal segmentation procedure based on the percentage-based method. Our results reveal that automated rotation and segmentation procedures, used in combination or independently, minimize inconsistencies generated by the accumulation of manual operations while providing higher statistical power to detect well-known effects. A Matlab-based implementation of these procedures is made publicly available to the research community. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3353-3367, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The electron density of Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Morooka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated statistically the electron density below 5 cm−3 in the magnetosphere of Saturn (7–80 RS, Saturn radii using 44 orbits of the floating potential data from the RPWS Langmuir probe (LP onboard Cassini. The density distribution shows a clear dependence on the distance from the Saturnian rotation axis (√X2+Y2 as well as on the distance from the equatorial plane (|Z|, indicating a disc-like structure. From the characteristics of the density distribution, we have identified three regions: the extension of the plasma disc, the magnetodisc region, and the lobe regions. The plasma disc region is at L<15, where L is the radial distance to the equatorial crossing of the dipole magnetic field line, and confined to |Z|<5 RS. The magnetodisc is located beyond L=15, and its density has a large variability. The variability has quasi-periodic characteristics with a periodicity corresponding to the planetary rotation. For Z>15 RS, the magnetospheric density distribution becomes constant in Z. However, the density still varies quasi-periodically with the planetary rotation also in this region. In fact, the quasi-periodic variation has been observed all over the magnetosphere beyond L=15. The region above Z=15 RS is identified as the lobe region. We also found that the magnetosphere can occasionally move latitudinally under the control of the density in the magnetosphere and the solar wind. From the empirical distributions of the electron densities obtained in this study, we have constructed an electron density model of the Saturnian nightside magnetosphere beyond 7 RS. The obtained model can well reproduce the observed density distribution, and can thus be useful for magnetospheric modelling studies.

  14. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of a non-ideal gas in magnetogasdynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nath

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-similar solutions are obtained for unsteady, one-dimensional isothermal flow behind a shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas in the presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying a power law. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. The gas is assumed to be non-ideal having infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The effects of the non-idealness of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. It is shown that the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and the rotation of the medium has decaying effect on the shock wave. Also, a comparison is made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  15. Fetal and Neonatal HPA Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles E; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2015-12-15

    Stress is an integral part of life. Activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the adult can be viewed as mostly adaptive to restore homeostasis in the short term. When stress occurs during development, and specifically during periods of vulnerability in maturing systems, it can significantly reprogram function, leading to pathologies in the adult. Thus, it is critical to understand how the HPA axis is regulated during developmental periods and what are the factors contributing to shape its activity and reactivity to environmental stressors. The HPA axis is not a passive system. It can actively participate in critical physiological regulation, inducing parturition in the sheep for instance or being a center stage actor in the preparation of the fetus to aerobic life (lung maturation). It is also a major player in orchestrating mental function, metabolic, and cardiovascular function often reprogrammed by stressors even prior to conception through epigenetic modifications of gametes. In this review, we review the ontogeny of the HPA axis with an emphasis on two species that have been widely studied-sheep and rodents-because they each share many similar regulatory mechanism applicable to our understanding of the human HPA axis. The studies discussed in this review should ultimately inform us about windows of susceptibility in the developing brain and the crucial importance of early preconception, prenatal, and postnatal interventions designed to improve parental competence and offspring outcome. Only through informed studies will our public health system be able to curb the expansion of many stress-related or stress-induced pathologies and forge a better future for upcoming generations.

  16. Instabilities of a rotating helical rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yunyoung; Ko, William; Kim, Yongsam; Lim, Sookkyung

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus have helical flagellar filament. By rotating a motor, which is located at the bottom end of the flagellar filament embedded in the cell body, CCW or CW, they swim forward or backward. We model a left-handed helix by the Kirchhoff rod theory and use regularized Stokes formulation to study an interaction between the surrounding fluid and the flagellar filament. We perform numerical studies focusing on relations between physical parameters and critical angular frequency of the motor, which separates overwhiring from twirling. We are also interested in the buckling instability of the hook, which is very flexible elastic rod. By measuring buckling angle, which is an angle between rotational axis and helical axis, we observe the effects of physical parameters on buckling of the hook.

  17. Distribution of magnetically confined circumstellar matter in oblique rotators

    CERN Document Server

    Preuss, O; Holzwarth, V R; Solanki, S K

    2004-01-01

    We consider the mechanical equilibrium and stability of matter trapped in the magnetosphere of a rapidly rotating star. Assuming a dipolar magnetic field and arbitrary inclination of the magnetic axis with respect to the axis of rotation we find stable equilibrium positions a) in a (warped) disk roughly aligned with the magnetic equatorial plane and b) at two locations above and below the disk, whose distance from the star increases with decreasing inclination angle between dipole and rotation axis. The distribution of matter is not strongly affected by allowing for a spatial offset of the magnetic dipole. These results provide a possible explanation for some observations of corotating localized mass concentrations in hot magnetic stars.

  18. Superdeformed rotational bands in the presence of Y44 deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Ikuko; Mottelson, Ben

    1994-08-01

    The observation of ΔI = 4 staggering in the rotational spectra of superdeformed nuclei suggests the occurence of Y44 deformations in the nuclear shape with associated C4 v point-symmetry for the rotational Hamiltonian. We have investigated the general class of Hamiltonians with such symmetry. In addition, we require the axially symmetric terms to favour rotation about an axis that is perpendicular to the long axis of nuclear shape. The δI = 4 staggering can indeed result from the tunneling between the four equivalent minima that occur in the plane perpendicular to the superdeformation symmetry axis, but the occurence of this effect is a subtle matter depending sensitively on the axially symmetric terms in the Hamiltonian.

  19. Two-axis MEMS scanner with transfer-printed high-reflectivity, broadband monolithic silicon photonic crystal mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Woong; Park, Bryan; Keum, Hohyun; Kim, Seok; Rogers, John A; Solgaard, Olav

    2013-06-03

    We present a two-axis electrostatic MEMS scanner with high-reflectivity monolithic single-crystal-silicon photonic crystal (PC) mirrors suitable for applications in harsh environments. The reflective surfaces of the MEMS scanner are transfer-printed PC mirrors with low polarization dependence, low angular dependence, and reflectivity over 85% in the wavelength range of 1490nm~1505nm and above 90% over the wavelength band of 1550~1570nm. In static mode, the scanner has total scan range of 10.2° on one rotation axis and 7.8° on the other. Dynamic operation on resonance increase the scan range to 21° at 608Hz around the outer rotation axis and 9.5° at 1.73kHz about the inner rotation axis.

  20. Computational analysis of vertical axis wind turbine arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremseth, J.; Duraisamy, K.

    2016-10-01

    Canonical problems involving single, pairs, and arrays of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are investigated numerically with the objective of understanding the underlying flow structures and their implications on energy production. Experimental studies by Dabiri (J Renew Sustain Energy 3, 2011) suggest that VAWTs demand less stringent spacing requirements than their horizontal axis counterparts and additional benefits may be obtained by optimizing the placement and rotational direction of VAWTs. The flowfield of pairs of co-/counter-rotating VAWTs shows some similarities with pairs of cylinders in terms of wake structure and vortex shedding. When multiple VAWTs are placed in a column, the extent of the wake is seen to spread further downstream, irrespective of the direction of rotation of individual turbines. However, the aerodynamic interference between turbines gives rise to regions of excess momentum between the turbines which lead to significant power augmentations. Studies of VAWTs arranged in multiple columns show that the downstream columns can actually be more efficient than the leading column, a proposition that could lead to radical improvements in wind farm productivity.

  1. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  2. THE CLOSE T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM V4046 Sgr: ROTATIONALLY MODULATED X-RAY EMISSION FROM ACCRETION SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argiroffi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Maggio, A.; Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Montmerle, T. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis bd Arago, FR-75014 Paris (France); Huenemoerder, D. P. [MIT, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Alecian, E. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Audard, M. [ISDC Data Center for Astrophysics, University of Geneva, Ch. d' Ecogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Bouvier, J. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041, Grenoble (France); Donati, J.-F. [IRAP-UMR 5277, CNRS and Universite de Toulouse, 14 Av. E. Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Gregory, S. G. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Trkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Hussain, G. A. J. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Kastner, J. H.; Sacco, G. G., E-mail: argi@astropa.unipa.it [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We report initial results from a quasi-simultaneous X-ray/optical observing campaign targeting V4046 Sgr, a close, synchronous-rotating classical T Tauri star (CTTS) binary in which both components are actively accreting. V4046 Sgr is a strong X-ray source, with the X-rays mainly arising from high-density (n{sub e}{approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}) plasma at temperatures of 3-4 MK. Our multi-wavelength campaign aims to simultaneously constrain the properties of this X-ray-emitting plasma, the large-scale magnetic field, and the accretion geometry. In this paper, we present key results obtained via time-resolved X-ray-grating spectra, gathered in a 360 ks XMM-Newton observation that covered 2.2 system rotations. We find that the emission lines produced by this high-density plasma display periodic flux variations with a measured period, 1.22 {+-} 0.01 d, that is precisely half that of the binary star system (2.42 d). The observed rotational modulation can be explained assuming that the high-density plasma occupies small portions of the stellar surfaces, corotating with the stars, and that the high-density plasma is not azimuthally symmetrically distributed with respect to the rotational axis of each star. These results strongly support models in which high-density, X-ray-emitting CTTS plasma is material heated in accretion shocks, located at the base of accretion flows tied to the system by magnetic field lines.

  3. Enhanced terahertz radiation from high stacking fault density nonpolar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Grace D.; Shen, Hongen; Wraback, Michael; Hirai, Asako; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.

    2008-06-01

    Terahertz emission from high stacking fault density m-GaN has been observed using ultrafast pulse excitation. The terahertz signal exhibits a 360° periodicity with sample rotation and a polarity flip at 180°, characteristic of real carrier transport in an in-plane electric field parallel to the c axis induced by stacking fault (SF)-terminated internal polarization at wurtzite domain boundaries. The terahertz emission can be enhanced by several times relative to that from a SF-free m-GaN sample, for which the terahertz signal emanates from surface surge currents and diffusion-driven carrier transport normal to the surface and is independent of the c-axis orientation.

  4. Models of cuspy triaxial stellar systems. IV: Rotating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpintero, D D

    2016-01-01

    We built two self-consistent models of triaxial, cuspy, rotating stellar systems adding rotation to non-rotating models presented in previous papers of this series. The final angular velocity of the material is not constant and varies with the distance to the center and with the height over the equator of the systems, but the figure rotation is very uniform in both cases. Even though the addition of rotation to the models modifies their original semiaxes ratios, the final rotating models are considerably flattened and triaxial. An analysis of the orbital content of the models shows that about two thirds of their orbits are chaotic yet the models are very stable over intervals of the order of one Hubble time. The bulk of regular orbits are short axis tubes, while long axis tubes are replaced by tubes whose axes lie on the short-long axes plane, but do not coincide with the major axis. Other types of regular orbits that do not appear in non-rotating systems, like horseshoes and orbits that cross themselves, are...

  5. Face seal assembly for rotating drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. Giles; Rennich, Mark J.; Whatley, Marvin E.

    1982-01-01

    A seal assembly comprises a tube rotatable about its longitudinal axis and having two longitudinally spaced flanges projecting radially outwardly from the outer surface thereof. Slidably positioned against one of the flanges is a seal ring, and disposed between this seal ring and the other flange are two rings that are forced apart by springs, one of the latter rings being attached to a flexible wall.

  6. Bounds on the dragging rate and on the rotational mass-energy in slowly and differentially rotating relativistic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pareja, M J

    2003-01-01

    For relativistic stars rotating slowly and differentially with a positive angular velocity, some properties in relation to the positiveness of the rate of rotational dragging and of the angular momentum density are derived. Also, a new proof for the bounds on the rotational mass-energy is given.

  7. Synchronous states of slowly rotating pendula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Centre for Applied Dynamics Research, School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom); Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Kapitaniak, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.kapitaniak@p.lodz.pl [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-08-01

    Coupled systems that contain rotating elements are typical in physical, biological and engineering applications and for years have been the subject of intensive studies. One problem of scientific interest, which among others occurs in such systems is the phenomenon of synchronization of different rotating parts. Despite different initial conditions, after a sufficiently long transient, the rotating parts move in the same way — complete synchronization, or a permanent constant shift is established between their displacements, i.e., the angles of rotation — phase synchronization. Synchronization occurs due to dependence of the periods of rotating elements motion and the displacement of the base on which these elements are mounted. We review the studies on the synchronization of rotating pendula and compare them with the results obtained for oscillating pendula. As an example we consider the dynamics of the system consisting of n pendula mounted on the movable beam. The pendula are excited by the external torques which are inversely proportional to the angular velocities of the pendula. As the result of such excitation each pendulum rotates around its axis of rotation. It has been assumed that all pendula rotate in the same direction or in the opposite directions. We consider the case of slowly rotating pendula and estimate the influence of the gravity on their motion. We classify the synchronous states of the identical pendula and observe how the parameters mismatch can influence them. We give evidence that synchronous states are robust as they exist in the wide range of system parameters and can be observed in a simple experiment.

  8. Instabilities in Coaxial Rotating Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is the characterization of the cylindrical mixing layer resulting layer resulting from the interaction of two coaxial swirling jets.The experimental part of this study was performed in a cylindrical water tunnel,permitting an independent rotation of two coaxial jets.The rotations are generated by means of 2×36 blades localized in two swirling chambers.As expected,the evolution of the main instabiltiy modes presents certain differences compared to the plane-mixing-layer case ,Experimental results obtained by tomography showed the existence of vortex rings and streamwise vortex paris in the near field region.This method also permitted the observation of the evolution and interaction of different modes.PIV velocity measurements realized in the meridian plans and the plans perpendicular to the jet axis show that rotation distrots the typical top-hat axial velocity profile.The transition of the the axial velocity profile from jet-like into wake-like is also observed.

  9. Neospora caninum is a cause of perinatal mortality in axis deer (Axis axis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Walter; Moré, Gastón; Quiroga, Maria Alejandra; Balducchi, Diego; Schares, Gereon; Venturini, Maria Cecilia

    2014-01-31

    Neospora caninum is a worldwide distributed protozoan that may cause neuromuscular disease in dogs and reproductive failure in domestic and wild ruminants. One axis fawn (Axis axis) and four neonates from the same deer herd died at a zoo in Argentina within a four-month period. The fawn presented with dilatation of the anal sphincter at birth and incontinence, developed weakness and ataxia and died at 14 days of age. At necropsy, a mega formation of the distal large intestine was observed. Microscopically, non-suppurative encephalitis, suppurative bronchopneumonia, fibrin necrotic enteritis and degenerative changes in the liver were observed in hematoxilin and eosin-stained tissue sections, and thick-walled N. caninum-like cysts were observed in fresh brain samples. Serologic studies for N. caninum revealed an IFAT titer of 1:6400 in the fawn and 1:25, 1:400, 1:3200 and 1:6400 in the neonates. N. caninum DNA was detected in brain samples from the fawn and from one neonate by PCR, and the parasite was isolated in vitro from the fawn' brain after passage through gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and gamma-interferon knock-out mice. N. caninum DNA obtained from the fawn, neonate and isolated parasites showed the same microsatellite pattern. This suggests a common infection source for both animals. The diagnosis of N. caninum infection was confirmed, suggesting its association with perinatal mortality in captive axis deer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical disease associated to N. caninum infection in axis deer and of isolation of the parasite from this wild ruminant species.

  10. Quasi-periodical variations of pulsars spin as mimicry of differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, I.; Gusev, A.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT Observation of pulsars is a powerful source of information for studying the dynamics and internal structure of neutron stars. Known about quasi-periodical fluctuations of the time-of-arrival of radiation(TOA) for some pulsars, which we explain as Chandler wobble, Free core nutation, Free inner core nutation and Inner core wobble in case three layer model. Using hamilton approximation to theory rotation of multilayer celestial bodies we estimate dynamical flattening for different layers for PSR B1828-11. It is known that an innate feature of pulsar radiation is high stability of the time-of-arrival (TOA) of pulses, and therefore the analysis of TOA fluctuations can reflect subtle effects of neutron stars dynamics. TOA variations of pulsars can be interpreted by three reasons: gravitational perturbation of pulsar by planetary bodies, peculiarities of a pulsar interior like Tkachenko oscillations and free precession motion, when axis of rotation do not coincide with vectors of the angular moment of solid crust, liquid outer core and crystal core. The radial velocity of a star is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the Doppler effect in its spectrum. Stars showing a small amplitude variation of the radial velocity can be interpreted as systems having planetary companions. Assuming that the pulsar PSR B1257+12 has a mass of 1:35M¯, the Keplerian orbital radii are 0.9, 1.4 and 2.1 AU and with masses are 3:1M©=sin(i), 10:2M©=sin(i), 4:6M©=sin(i), where i is the orbital inclination [7]. In 2000, Stairs, Lyne and Shemar reported about their discovery of long-term, highly-periodic and correlated variations of pulse shape and the rate of slow-down of the pulsar PSR B182811 with period variations approximately 1000, 500, 250 and 167 days, which may be a result of the spin axis caused by an asymmetry in the shape of the pulsar. The long-periodic precession phenomenon was also detected for a few pulsars: PSR 2217+47, PSR 0531+21, PSR B083345, PSR B182811, PSR B

  11. Faraday rotation system. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, L.E.; Wang, W.

    1994-07-01

    The Faraday Rotation System (FRS) is one of the advanced laser-based diagnostics developed at DIAL to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the MHD channel, the system directly measures electron density through a measurement of the induced rotation in the polarization of a far infrared laser beam after passing through the MHD flow along the magnetic field lines. A measurement of the induced polarization ellipticity provides a measure of the electron collision frequency which together with the electron density gives the electron conductivity, a crucial parameter for MHD channel performance. The theory of the measurements, a description of the system, its capabilities, laboratory demonstration measurements on seeded flames with comparison to emission absorption measurements, and the current status of the system are presented in this final report.

  12. Downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, F. B.; Klatte, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    NASA and industry are currently cooperating in the conduct of extensive experimental and analytical studies to understand and predict the noise of large, horizontal axis wind turbines. This effort consists of (1) obtaining high quality noise data under well controlled and documented test conditions, (2) establishing the annoyance criteria for impulse noise of the type generated by horizontal axis wind turbines with rotors downwind of the support tower, (3) defining the wake characteristics downwind of the axial location of the plane of rotation, (4) comparing predictions with measurements made by use of wake data, and (5) comparing predictions with annoyance criteria. The status of work by Hamilton Standard in the above areas which was done in support of the cooperative NASA and industry studies is briefly summarized.

  13. Angle estimation of simultaneous orthogonal rotations from 3D gyroscope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2011-01-01

    A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA) is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation.

  14. Angle Estimation of Simultaneous Orthogonal Rotations from 3D Gyroscope Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Stančin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation.

  15. Boundary Layer Transition Detection on a Rotor Blade Using Rotating Mirror Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineck, James T.; Schuelein, Erich; Raffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Laminar-to-turbulent transition on a rotor blade in hover has been imaged using an area-scan infrared camera. A new method for tracking a blade using a rotating mirror was employed. The mirror axis of rotation roughly corresponded to the rotor axis of rotation and the mirror rotational frequency is 1/2 that of the rotor. This permitted the use of cameras whose integration time was too long to prevent image blur due to the motion of the blade. This article will show the use of this method for a rotor blade at different collective pitch angles.

  16. CFD-RANS analysis of the rotational effects on the boundary layer of wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carcangiu, Carlo Enrico; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Cambuli, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    The flow field past the rotating blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine has been modeled with a full 3-D steady-RANS approach. Flow computations have been performed using the commercial finite-volume solver Fluent. A number of blade sections from the 3-D rotating geometry were chosen and the cor......The flow field past the rotating blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine has been modeled with a full 3-D steady-RANS approach. Flow computations have been performed using the commercial finite-volume solver Fluent. A number of blade sections from the 3-D rotating geometry were chosen...

  17. Effective solidity in vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-11-01

    The flow surrounding vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) is investigated using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). This is done in a low-speed wind tunnel with a scale model that closely matches geometric and dynamic properties tip-speed ratio and Reynolds number of a full size turbine. Previous results have shown a strong dependance on the tip-speed ratio on the wake structure of the spinning turbine. However, it is not clear whether this is a speed or solidity effect. To determine this, we have measured the wakes of three turbines with different chord-to-diameter ratios, and a solid cylinder. The flow is visualized at the horizontal mid-plane as well as the vertical mid-plane behind the turbine. The results are both ensemble averaged and phase averaged by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine. By keeping the Reynolds number constant with both chord and diameter, we can determine how each effects the wake structure. As these parameters are varied there are distinct changes in the mean flow of the wake. Additionally, by looking at the vorticity in the phase averaged profiles we can see structural changes to the overall wake pattern.

  18. The Axis of Evil revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Land, K; Land, Kate; Magueijo, Joao

    2006-01-01

    In light of the three-year data release from WMAP we re-examine the evidence for the ``Axis of Evil''. We discover that previous frequentist methods are not robust with respect to the data-sets available and different treatments of the galactic plane. We identify the cause of the instability and show that this result is not a weakness of the data. This is further confirmed by exhibiting an alternative approach, Bayesian in flavour, and based on a likelihood method and the information criteria. We find strong (and sometimes decisive) evidence for the ``Axis of Evil'' in almost all renditions of the WMAP data. However some significant differences between data-sets remain, and the quantitative aspects of the result depend on the particular information criteria used.

  19. Effective diffusivity of passive scalars in rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Imazio, P Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    We use direct numerical simulations to compute turbulent transport coefficients for passive scalars in turbulent rotating flows. Effective diffusion coefficients in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the rotations axis are obtained by studying the diffusion of an imposed initial profile for the passive scalar, and calculated by measuring the scalar average concentration and average spatial flux as a function of time. The Rossby and Schmidt numbers are varied to quantify their effect on the effective diffusion. It is find that rotation reduces scalar diffusivity in the perpendicular direction. The perpendicular diffusion can be estimated from mixing length arguments using the characteristic velocities and lengths perpendicular to the rotation axis. Deviations are observed for small Schmidt numbers, for which turbulent transport decreases and molecular diffusion becomes more significant.

  20. Centripetal focusing of gyrotactic phytoplankton in solid-body rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Cencini, M; Santamaria, F; Boffetta, G

    2015-01-01

    A suspension of gyrotactic microalgae Chlamydomonas augustae swimming in a cylindrical water vessel in solid-body rotation is studied. Our experiments show that swimming algae form an aggregate around the axis of rotation, whose intensity increases with the rotation speed. We explain this phenomenon by the centripetal orientation of the swimming direction towards the axis of rotation. This centripetal focusing is contrasted by diffusive fluxes due to stochastic reorientation of the cells. The competition of the two effects lead to a stationary distribution, which we analytically derive from a refined mathematical model of gyrotactic swimmers. The temporal evolution of the cell distribution, obtained via numerical simulations of the stochastic model, is in quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements in the range of parameters explored.

  1. Three-axis atomic magnetometer based on spin precession modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. C.; Dong, H. F., E-mail: hfdong@buaa.edu.cn; Hu, X. Y.; Chen, L.; Gao, Y. [School of Instrumentation Science and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate a three-axis atomic magnetometer with one intensity-modulated pump beam and one orthogonal probe beam. The main field component is measured using the resonance of the pumping light, while the transverse field components are measured simultaneously using the optical rotation of the probe beam modulated by the spin precession. It is an all-optical magnetometer without using any modulation field or radio frequency field. Magnetic field sensitivity of 0.8 pT/Hz{sup 1∕2} is achieved under a bias field of 2 μT.

  2. Measurement Axis Searching Model for Terrestrial Laser Scans Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, terrestrial Lidar scans can cover rather a large area; the point densities are strongly varied because of the line-of-sight measurement principle in potential overlaps with scans taken from different viewpoints. Most of the traditional methods focus on registration algorithm and ignore searching model. Sometimes the traditional methods are directly used to align two point clouds; a large critically unsolved problem of the large biases will be created in areas distant from the overlaps while the local overlaps are often aligned well. So a novel measurement axis searching model (MASM has been proposed in this paper. The method includes four steps: (1 the principal axis fitting, (2 the measurement axis generation, (3 low-high-precision search, and (4 result generation. The principal axis gives an orientation to the point cloud; the search scope is limited by the measurement axis. The point cloud orientation can be adjusted gradually until the achievement of the global optimum using low- and high-precision search. We perform some experiments with simulated point clouds and real terrestrial laser scans. The results of simulated point clouds have shown the processing steps of our method, and the results of real terrestrial laser scans have shown the sensitivity of the approach with respect to the indoor and outdoor scenes.

  3. Localized waves supported by the rotating waveguide array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-09-01

    We show that truncated rotating square waveguide arrays support new types of localized modes that exist even in the linear case, in complete contrast to localized excitations in nonrotating arrays requiring nonlinearity for their existence and forming above the energy flow threshold. These new modes appear either around array center, since rotation leads to the emergence of the effective attractive potential with a minimum at the rotation axis, or in the array corners, in which case localization occurs due to competition between centrifugal force (in terms of quasi-particle analogy) and total internal reflection at the interface of the truncated array. The degree of localization of the central and corner modes mediated by rotation increases with rotation frequency. Stable rotating soliton families bifurcating from linear modes are analyzed in both focusing and defocusing media.

  4. Localized waves supported by the rotating waveguide array

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We show that truncated rotating square waveguide arrays support new types of localized modes that exist even in the linear case, in complete contrast to localized excitations in nonrotating arrays requiring nonlinearity for their existence and forming above the energy flow threshold. These new modes appear either around array center, since rotation leads to the emergence of the effective attractive potential with a minimum at the rotation axis, or in the array corners, in which case localization occurs due to competition between centrifugal force (in terms of quasi-particle analogy) and total internal reflection at the interface of the truncated array. The degree of localization of the central and corner modes mediated by rotation increases with rotation frequency. Stable rotating soliton families bifurcating from linear modes are analyzed in both focusing and defocusing media.

  5. Faraday resonance in dynamical bar instability of differentially rotating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Saijo, Motoyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear behaviour of the dynamically unstable rotating star for the bar mode by three-dimensional hydrodynamics in Newtonian gravity. We find that an oscillation along the rotation axis is induced throughout the growth of the unstable bar mode, and that its characteristic frequency is twice as that of the bar mode, which oscillates mainly along the equatorial plane. A possibility to observe Faraday resonance in gravitational waves is demonstrated and discussed.

  6. Magnetic rotation and chiral symmetry breaking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Kumar Jain; Amita

    2001-08-01

    The deformed mean field of nuclei exhibits various geometrical and dynamical symmetries which manifest themselves as various types of rotational and decay patterns. Most of the symmetry operations considered so far have been defined for a situation wherein the angular momentum coincides with one of the principal axes and the principal axis cranking may be invoked. New possibilities arise with the observation of rotational features in weakly deformed nuclei and now interpreted as magnetic rotational bands. More than 120 MR bands have now been identified by filtering the existing data. We present a brief overview of these bands. The total angular momentum vector in such bands is tilted away from the principal axes. Such a situation gives rise to several new possibilities including breaking of chiral symmetry as discussed recently by Frauendorf. We present the outcome of such symmetries and their possible experimental verification. Some possible examples of chiral bands are presented.

  7. Rotational Doppler effect in nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-08-01

    The translational Doppler effect of electromagnetic and sound waves has been successfully applied in measurements of the speed and direction of vehicles, astronomical objects and blood flow in human bodies, and for the Global Positioning System. The Doppler effect plays a key role for some important quantum phenomena such as the broadened emission spectra of atoms and has benefited cooling and trapping of atoms with laser light. Despite numerous successful applications of the translational Doppler effect, it fails to measure the rotation frequency of a spinning object when the probing wave propagates along its rotation axis. This constraint was circumvented by deploying the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves--the so-called rotational Doppler effect. Here, we report on the demonstration of rotational Doppler shift in nonlinear optics. The Doppler frequency shift is determined for the second harmonic generation of a circularly polarized beam passing through a spinning nonlinear optical crystal with three-fold rotational symmetry. We find that the second harmonic generation signal with circular polarization opposite to that of the fundamental beam experiences a Doppler shift of three times the rotation frequency of the optical crystal. This demonstration is of fundamental significance in nonlinear optics, as it provides us with insight into the interaction of light with moving media in the nonlinear optical regime.

  8. The effects of rotation and positional change of stump tissues upon morphogenesis of the regenerating axolotl limb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlson, Bruce M.

    1972-01-01

    Rotation of a skin cuff 180° around the proximodistal axis of the upper arm in the axolotl results in the formation of multiple regenerates in about 80° of cases after amputation of the limb through the rotated skin. Rotation of the dermis or the flexor and extensor muscles folowed by amputation pro

  9. On the Structure Orientation in Rotating and Sheared Homogeneous Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Joylene C.; Moreau, Adam F.; Jacobitz, Frank G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of rotation on the orientation of structures and the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy in homogeneous sheared turbulence. Shear flows without rotation, with moderate rotation, and with strong rotation are considered and the rotation axis is either parallel or anti-parallel to the mean flow vorticity. In the case of moderate rotation, an anti-parallel configuration increases the growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, while a parallel configuration decreases the growth rate as compared to the flow without rotation. The orientation of turbulent structures present in the flows are characterized using the three-dimensional, two-point autocorrelation coefficient of velocity magnitude and vorticity magnitude. An ellipsoid is fitted to the surface defined by a constant autocorrelation coefficient value and the major and minor axes are used to determine the inclination angle of flow structures in the plane of shear. It was found that the inclination angle assumes a maximum value for the anti-parallel configuration with moderate rotation. Again, the inclination angle for the parallel configuration with moderate rotation is reduced as compared to the case without rotation. The smallest inclination angles are found for the strongly rotating cases. Hence, the inclination angle is directly related to the growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy. University of San Diego Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering and McNair Scholars.

  10. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornikov, Maxim [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), 142190 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  11. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Jun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  12. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin; Cai, Sheng; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  13. Design of h-Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Teresa; Vega, Carmen; Gallegos, A.; Uzarraga, N. C.; Castro, F.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical simulation is used to predict the performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) H-Darrieus. The rotor consists of three straight blades with shape of aerofoil of the NACA family attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The influence of the solidity is tested to get design tendencies. The mesh has two fluid volumes: one sliding mesh for the rotor where the rotation velocity is established while the other is the environment of the rotor. Bearing in mind the overall flow is characterized by important secondary flows, the turbulence model selected was realizable k-epsilon with non-equilibrium wall functions. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order Muscl scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. During VAWT operation, the performance depends mainly on the relative motion of the rotating blade and has a fundamental period which depends both on the rate of rotation and the number of blades. The transient study is necessary to characterise the hysteresis phenomenon. Hence, more than six revolutions get the periodic behaviour. Instantaneous flows provide insight about wake structure interaction. Time averaged parameters let obtain the characteristic curves of power coefficient.

  14. Design of h-Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is used to predict the performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT H-Darrieus. The rotor consists of three straight blades with shape of aerofoil of the NACA family attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The influence of the solidity is tested to get design tendencies. The mesh has two fluid volumes: one sliding mesh for the rotor where the rotation velocity is established while the other is the environment of the rotor. Bearing in mind the overall flow is characterized by important secondary flows, the turbulence model selected was realizable k-epsilon with non-equilibrium wall functions. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order Muscl scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. During VAWT operation, the performance depends mainly on the relative motion of the rotating blade and has a fundamental period which depends both on the rate of rotation and the number of blades. The transient study is necessary to characterise the hysteresis phenomenon. Hence, more than six revolutions get the periodic behaviour. Instantaneous flows provide insight about wake structure interaction. Time averaged parameters let obtain the characteristic curves of power coefficient.

  15. Velocity measurement of model vertical axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; McWilliam, M. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An increasingly popular solution to future energy demand is wind energy. Wind turbine designs can be grouped according to their axis of rotation, either horizontal or vertical. Horizontal axis wind turbines have higher power output in a good wind regime than vertical axis turbines and are used in most commercial class designs. Vertical axis Savonius-based wind turbine designs are still widely used in some applications because of their simplistic design and low wind speed performance. There are many design variables that must be considered in order to optimize the power output in a given wind regime in a typical wind turbine design. Using particle image velocimetry, a study of the air flow around five different model vertical axis wind turbines was conducted in a closed loop wind tunnel. A standard Savonius design with two semi-circular blades overlapping, and two variations of this design, a deep blade and a shallow blade design were among the turbine models included in this study. It also evaluated alternate designs that attempt to increase the performance of the standard design by allowing compound blade curvature. Measurements were collected at a constant phase angle and also at random rotor orientations. It was found that evaluation of the flow patterns and measured velocities revealed consistent and stable flow patterns at any given phase angle. Large scale flow structures are evident in all designs such as vortices shed from blade surfaces. An important performance parameter was considered to be the ability of the flow to remain attached to the forward blade and redirect and reorient the flow to the following blade. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S. [Technical Univ. of Cottbus (Germany)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  17. On the role of rotation in the outflows of the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Irakli, Gudavadze; Andria, Rogava

    2014-01-01

    In order to study constraints imposed on kinematics of the Crab pulsar's jet we consider motion of particles along co-rotating field lines in the magnetosphere of the Crab pulsar. It is shown that particles following the co-rotating magnetic field lines may attain velocities close to observable values. In particular, we demonstrate that if the magnetic field lines are within the light cylinder, the maximum value of the velocity component parallel to the rotation axis is limited by 0.5c. This result in the context of the X-ray observations performed by Chandra X-ray Observatory seems to be quite indicative and useful to estimate the density of field lines inside the jet. Considering the three-dimensional (3D) field lines crossing the light cylinder, we found that for explaining the force-free regime of outflows the magnetic field lines must asymptotically tend to the Archimedes' spiral configuration. It is also shown that the 3D case may explain the observed jet velocity for appropriately chosen parameters of ...

  18. INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF ASTEROIDS HAVING SURFACE SHEDDING DUE TO ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi [Research Associate, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States); Sánchez, Diego Paul [Senior Research Associate, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States); Scheeres, Daniel J., E-mail: masatoshi.hirabayashi@colorado.edu [Richard Seebass Chair, Professor, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Surface shedding of an asteroid is a failure mode where surface materials fly off due to strong centrifugal forces beyond the critical spin period, while the internal structure does not deform significantly. This paper proposes a possible structure of an asteroid interior that leads to surface shedding due to rapid rotation rates. A rubble pile asteroid is modeled as a spheroid composed of a surface shell and a concentric internal core, the entire assembly called the test body. The test body is assumed to be uniformly rotating around a constant rotation axis. We also assume that while the bulk density and the friction angle are constant, the cohesion of the surface shell is different from that of the internal core. First, developing an analytical model based on limit analysis, we provide the upper and lower bounds for the actual surface shedding condition. Second, we use a Soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) to study dynamical deformation of the test body due to a quasi-static spin-up. In this paper we show the consistency of both approaches. Additionally, the SSDEM simulations show that the initial failure always occurs locally and not globally. In addition, as the core becomes larger, the size of lofted components becomes smaller. These results imply that if there is a strong core in a progenitor body, surface shedding is the most likely failure mode.

  19. Internal Structure of Asteroids Having Surface Shedding due to Rotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Surface shedding of an asteroid is a failure mode where surface materials fly off due to strong centrifugal forces beyond the critical spin period, while the internal structure does not deform significantly. This paper proposes a possible structure of an asteroid interior that leads to such surface shedding due to rapid rotation rates. A rubble pile asteroid is modeled as a spheroid composed of a surface shell and a concentric internal core, the entire assembly called the test body. The test body is assumed to be uniformly rotating around a constant rotation axis. We also assume that while the bulk density and the friction angle are constant, the cohesion of the surface shell is different from that of the internal core. First, developing an analytical model based on limit analysis, we provide the upper and lower bounds for the actual surface shedding condition. Second, we use a Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) to study dynamical deformation of the test body due to a quasi-static spin-up. In this pa...

  20. Eye Formation in Rotating Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, L; Dormy, E

    2016-01-01

    We consider rotating convection in a shallow, cylindrical domain. We examine the conditions under which the resulting vortex develops an eye at its core; that is, a region where the poloidal flow reverses and the angular momentum is low. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to steady, axisymmetric flows in a Boussinesq fluid. Our numerical experiments show that, in such systems, an eye forms as a passive response to the development of a so-called eyewall, a conical annulus of intense, negative azimuthal vorticity that can form near the axis and separates the eye from the primary vortex. We also observe that the vorticity in the eyewall comes from the lower boundary layer, and relies on the fact the poloidal flow strips negative vorticity out of the boundary layer and carries it up into the fluid above as it turns upward near the axis. This process is effective only if the Reynolds number is sufficiently high for the advection of vorticity to dominate over diffusion. Finally we observe that, in the vicinity o...

  1. Eye formation in rotating convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruba, L.; Davidson, P. A.; Dormy, E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider rotating convection in a shallow, cylindrical domain. We examine the conditions under which the resulting vortex develops an eye at its core; that is, a region where the poloidal flow reverses and the angular momentum is low. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to steady, axisymmetric flows in a Boussinesq fluid. Our numerical experiments show that, in such systems, an eye forms as a passive response to the development of a so-called eyewall, a conical annulus of intense, negative azimuthal vorticity that can form near the axis and separates the eye from the primary vortex. We also observe that the vorticity in the eyewall comes from the lower boundary layer, and relies on the fact the poloidal flow strips negative vorticity out of the boundary layer and carries it up into the fluid above as it turns upward near the axis. This process is effective only if the Reynolds number is sufficiently high for the advection of vorticity to dominate over diffusion. Finally we observe that, in the vicinity of the eye and the eyewall, the buoyancy and Coriolis forces are negligible, and so although these forces are crucial to driving and shaping the primary vortex, they play no direct role in eye formation in a Boussinesq fluid.

  2. Numerical studies of Siberian snakes and spin rotators for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A.

    1995-04-17

    For the program of polarized protons in RHIC, two Siberian snakes and four spin rotators per ring will be used. The Snakes will produce a complete spin flip. Spin Rotators, in pairs, will rotate the spin from the vertical direction to the horizontal plane at a given insertion, and back to the vertical after the insertion. Snakes, 180{degrees} apart and with their axis of spin precession at 90{degrees} to each other, are an effective means to avoid depolarization of the proton beam in traversing resonances. Classical snakes and rotators are made with magnetic solenoids or with a sequence of magnetic dipoles with fields alternately directed in the radial and vertical direction. Another possibility is to use helical magnets, essentially twisted dipoles, in which the field, transverse the axis of the magnet, continuously rotates as the particles proceed along it. After some comparative studies, the authors decided to adopt for RHIC an elegant solution with four helical magnets both for the snakes and the rotators proposed by Shatunov and Ptitsin. In order to simplify the construction of the magnets and to minimize cost, four identical super conducting helical modules will be used for each device. Snakes will be built with four right-handed helices. Spin rotators with two right-handed and two left-handed helices. The maximum field will be limited to 4 Tesla. While small bore helical undulators have been built for free electron lasers, large super conducting helical magnets have not been built yet. In spite of this difficulty, this choice is dictated by some distinctive advantages of helical over more conventional transverse snakes/rotators: (i) the devices are modular, they can be built with arrangements of identical modules, (ii) the maximum orbit excursion in the magnet is smaller, (iii) orbit excursion is independent from the separation between adjacent magnets, (iv) they allow an easier control of the spin rotation and the orientation of the spin precession axis.

  3. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that ...

  4. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  5. Model of a rotating magnetic cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that magnetic clouds rotate while they propagate antisunward was investigated. Magnetic clouds are modeled as magnetic flux ropes which rotate rigidly about the axis of symmetry. An ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, in which the evolution of the magnetic structure is related to the time evolution of the angular frequency, is developed. A class of 'separable' magnetic fields is employed to reduce the problem to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the evolution function, and it is solved numerically. The corresponding effective potential gives rise to two modes of evolution--expansion and oscillation--depending on the energy and on the value of a dimensionless parameter, k. Parameter k depends on the gas pressure, the ratio of the magnetic field components, and the frequency of rotation. There is a critical value of k, k(sub c), above which the oscillatory regime disappears and the flux rope invariably expands, regardless of the energy. Below k(sub c) the energy determines whether the configuration is confined or unbounded. Rotation always helps expansion by lowering the potential barrier. A data example was studied and features which are interpreted as signatures of rotation are presented. The angular speed is comparable to the Alfven speed, and the core of the rotating cloud completes on average one full revolution every three days at 1 AU. The parameter k is calculated from observations, and it is found to be close to, but below, critical. Only three out of the nine clouds examined showed signatures of rotation. Theoretical analysis suggests that close to the Sun rotation effects may play a more important role in the evolution of magnetic clouds than 1 AU.

  6. Application of Circulation Controlled Blades for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velissarios Kourkoulis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The blades of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT rotor see an inconsistent angle of attack through its rotation. Consequently, VAWT blades generally use symmetrical aerofoils with a lower lift-to-drag ratio than cambered aerofoils tailored to maximise horizontal axis wind turbine rotor performance. This paper considers the feasibility of circulation controlled (CC VAWT blades, using a tangential air jet to provide lift and therefore power augmentation. However CC blade sections require a higher trailing-edge thickness than conventional sections giving rise to additional base drag. The choice of design parameters is a compromise between lift augmentation, additional base drag as well as the power required to pump the air jet. Although CC technology has been investigated for many years, particularly for aerospace applications, few researchers have considered VAWT applications. This paper considers the feasibility of the technology, using Computational Fluid Dynamics to evaluate a baseline CC aerofoil with different trailing-edge ellipse shapes. Lift and drag increments due to CC are considered within a momentum based turbine model to determine net power production. The study found that for modest momentum coefficients significant net power augmentation can be achieved with a relatively simple aerofoil geometry if blowing is controlled through the blades rotation.

  7. CFD Simulation of Twin Vertical Axis Tidal Turbines System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shah Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As concerns about rising fossil-fuel prices, energy security and climate-change increase, renewable energy can play a vital role in producing local, clean and inexhaustible energy to supply world rising demand for electricity. In this study, hydrodynamic analysis of vertical axis tidal turbine operating side-by-side is numerically analyzed. Two-dimensional numerical modeling of the unsteady flow through the blades of the turbine is performed using ANSYS CFX, hereafter CFX; this is based on a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS model. The purpose is to find an optimal distance between the turbines where interaction effect is minimal and constructive, where the turbines operate more efficiently than stand alone turbine. A transient simulation is done on Vertical Axis Tidal Turbine (VATT using the Shear Stress Transport Turbulence (SST model. Main hydrodynamic parameters like torque T, coefficients of performance CP and coefficient of torque CT are investigated. The gap spacing between the turbines has an important role in performance improvement and also in vortex shedding suppression for the flows around two counters rotating systems. The simulation results are validated with Ye and Calisal data. The results of this study prove that the total power output of a twin-turbine system with an optimal layout can be about 24% higher than two times that of a stand-alone turbine. We conclude that the optimally configured counter-rotating twin turbines should be a side-by-side arrangement.

  8. Measurement of the screw-home motion of the knee is sensitive to errors in axis alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, S J; Cavanagh, P R

    2000-08-01

    Measurements of joint angles during motion analysis are subject to error caused by kinematic crosstalk, that is, one joint rotation (e. g., flexion) being interpreted as another (e.g., abduction). Kinematic crosstalk results from the chosen joint coordinate system being misaligned with the axes about which rotations are assumed to occur. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that measurement of the so-called "screw-home" motion of the human knee, in which axial rotation and extension are coupled, is especially prone to errors due to crosstalk. The motions of two different two-segment mechanical linkages were examined to study the effects of crosstalk. The segments of the first linkage (NSH) were connected by a revolute joint, but the second linkage (SH) incorporated gearing that caused 15 degrees of screw-home rotation to occur with 90 degrees knee flexion. It was found that rotating the flexion axis (inducing crosstalk) could make linkage NSH appear to exhibit a screw-home motion and that a different rotation of the flexion axis could make linkage SH apparently exhibit pure flexion. These findings suggest that the measurement of screw-home rotation may be strongly influenced by errors in the location of the flexion axis. The magnitudes of these displacements of the flexion axis were consistent with the inter-observer variability seen when five experienced observers defined the flexion axis by palpating the medial and lateral femoral epicondyles. Care should be taken when interpreting small internal-external rotations and abduction-adduction angles to ensure that they are not the products of kinematic crosstalk.

  9. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  10. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  11. Rapid fabrication of miniature lens arrays by four-axis single point diamond machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Brian; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2013-02-11

    A novel method for fabricating lens arrays and other non-rotationally symmetric free-form optics is presented. This is a diamond machining technique using 4 controlled axes of motion - X, Y, Z, and C. As in 3-axis diamond micro-milling, a diamond ball endmill is mounted to the work spindle of a 4-axis ultra-precision computer numerical control (CNC) machine. Unlike 3-axis micro-milling, the C-axis is used to hold the cutting edge of the tool in contact with the lens surface for the entire cut. This allows the feed rates to be doubled compared to the current state of the art of micro-milling while producing an optically smooth surface with very low surface form error and exceptionally low radius error.

  12. Identifying Broadband Rotational Spectra with Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    A typical broadband rotational spectrum may contain several thousand observable transitions, spanning many species. Identifying the individual spectra, particularly when the dynamic range reaches 1,000:1 or even 10,000:1, can be challenging. One approach is to apply automated fitting routines. In this approach, combinations of 3 transitions can be created to form a "triple", which allows fitting of the A, B, and C rotational constants in a Watson-type Hamiltonian. On a standard desktop computer, with a target molecule of interest, a typical AUTOFIT routine takes 2-12 hours depending on the spectral density. A new approach is to utilize machine learning to train a computer to recognize the patterns (frequency spacing and relative intensities) inherit in rotational spectra and to identify the individual spectra in a raw broadband rotational spectrum. Here, recurrent neural networks have been trained to identify different types of rotational spectra and classify them accordingly. Furthermore, early results in applying convolutional neural networks for spectral object recognition in broadband rotational spectra appear promising. Perez et al. "Broadband Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy for structure determination: The water heptamer." Chem. Phys. Lett., 2013, 571, 1-15. Seifert et al. "AUTOFIT, an Automated Fitting Tool for Broadband Rotational Spectra, and Applications to 1-Hexanal." J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2015, 312, 13-21. Bishop. "Neural networks for pattern recognition." Oxford university press, 1995.

  13. Characterization of Flow and Ohm's Law in the Rotating Wall Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, David; Brookhart, M.; Forest, C. B.; Kendrick, R.; Mengin, G.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2010-11-01

    The rotating wall machine is a linear screw-pinch built to study the role of different electromagnetic boundary conditions on the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM). Its plasma is created by an array of electrostatic washer guns which can be biased to discharge up to 1 kA of current each. Individual flux ropes from the guns shear, merge, and expand into a 20 cm diameter, ˜1 m long plasma column. Langmuir (singletip) and tri-axial B-dot probes move throughout the column to measure radial and axial profiles of key plasma parameters. As the plasma current increases, more H2 fuel is ionized, raising ne to 5 x10^20 m-3 while Te stays at a constant 3 eV. The electron density expands to the wall while the current density (Jz) stays pinched to the central axis. E xB and diamagnetic drifts create radially and axially sheared plasma rotation. Plasma resistivity follows the Spitzer model in the core while exceeding it at the edge. These measurements improve the model used to predict the RWM growth rate.

  14. Blade pitch optimization methods for vertical-axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Peter

    Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) offer an inherently simpler design than horizontal-axis machines, while their lower blade speed mitigates safety and noise concerns, potentially allowing for installation closer to populated and ecologically sensitive areas. While VAWTs do offer significant operational advantages, development has been hampered by the difficulty of modeling the aerodynamics involved, further complicated by their rotating geometry. This thesis presents results from a simulation of a baseline VAWT computed using Star-CCM+, a commercial finite-volume (FVM) code. VAWT aerodynamics are shown to be dominated at low tip-speed ratios by dynamic stall phenomena and at high tip-speed ratios by wake-blade interactions. Several optimization techniques have been developed for the adjustment of blade pitch based on finite-volume simulations and streamtube models. The effectiveness of the optimization procedure is evaluated and the basic architecture for a feedback control system is proposed. Implementation of variable blade pitch is shown to increase a baseline turbine's power output between 40%-100%, depending on the optimization technique, improving the turbine's competitiveness when compared with a commercially-available horizontal-axis turbine.

  15. Calculating pure rotational transitions of water molecule with a simple Lanczos method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pranab Sarkar

    2001-04-01

    We have calculated pure rotational transitions of water molecule from a kinetic energy operator (KEO) with the -axis perpendicular to the molecular plane. We have used rotational basis functions which are linear combinations of symmetric top functions so that all matrix elements are real. The calculated spectra agree well with the observed values.

  16. Crystal structure and physical properties of a dithiolene complex crystal with adamantane supramolecular rotator

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yin-Nan; Kubo, Kazuya; Noro, Shin-ichiro; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular cation salt of adamantane rotator with a dithiolene complex, (fluoroadamantylammonium(+))([18]-crown-6)[Ni(dmit)(2)](-) (1) was synthesized. The fluorine atom of the adamantane unit showed a large thermal factor elongated latitudinally, suggesting molecular rotation in the solid state. Crystal 1 exhibited a large dielectric response by applying an AC field along the a axis.

  17. [A new blockout instrument for the construction of rotational path removable partial dentures. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, K C; Chen, P S

    1991-03-01

    This article introduces a new blockout device for rotational path removable partial dentures. The concept of rotation axis is discussed, from which a more convenient tool for clinical use is derived. The blockout instrument can be divided into three parts: the acrylic block, the rotation axis and the functional part. In the case of tilted mandibular molars, distal and lingual surfaces of anterior abutments should be blocked out according to the rotational path of insertion. In the blockout procedures, the blockout instrument is mounted between the two rotation centers on the two distal abutments with dental stone, so as to coincide the rotation axis of the instrument and that of the denture to be constructed. After the areas below the survey line of the anterior abutments are aproned with wax, Duralay resin is applied onto the areas above the survey line, and extended to join the functional parts of the blockout instrument. After setting, Duralay resin is removed and the portion above the survey line is trimmed to form a knife edge which corresponds to the survey line. Thereafter, the blockout areas are determined by the rotation movement of the knife-edge shaped Duralay resin along the rotation axis of the blockout instrument. This blockout method is more easily performed compared to the method mentioned by Firtell and Jacobson. In addition to the function of blockout, it can also be assisted in analyzing undercut and diagnosis.

  18. Predictors of human rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  19. COUNTER-ROTATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayatte, V.; Sauty, C. [Laboratoire Univers et Théories, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8102 du CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, F-92190 Meudon (France); Vlahakis, N.; Tsinganos, K. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Matsakos, T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lima, J. J. G., E-mail: veronique.cayatte@obspm.fr [Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2014-06-10

    Young stellar object observations suggest that some jets rotate in the opposite direction with respect to their disk. In a recent study, Sauty et al. showed that this does not contradict the magnetocentrifugal mechanism that is believed to launch such outflows. Motion signatures that are transverse to the jet axis, in two opposite directions, have recently been measured in M87. One possible interpretation of this motion is that of counter-rotating knots. Here, we extend our previous analytical derivation of counter-rotation to relativistic jets, demonstrating that counter-rotation can indeed take place under rather general conditions. We show that both the magnetic field and a non-negligible enthalpy are necessary at the origin of counter-rotating outflows, and that the effect is associated with a transfer of energy flux from the matter to the electromagnetic field. This can be realized in three cases: if a decreasing enthalpy causes an increase of the Poynting flux, if the flow decelerates, or if strong gradients of the magnetic field are present. An illustration of the involved mechanism is given by an example of a relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jet simulation.

  20. The spatial rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan; Hahn, Ute; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2013-01-01

    to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases......This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making...... the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient...

  1. Research on the aerodynamic characteristics of a lift drag hybrid vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with a drag-type vertical axis wind turbines, one of the greatest advantages for a lift-type vertical axis wind turbines is its higher power coefficient (Cp. However, the lift-type vertical axis wind turbines is not a self-starting turbine as its starting torque is very low. In order to combine the advantage of both the drag-type and the lift-type vertical axis wind turbines, a lift drag hybrid vertical axis wind turbines was designed in this article and its aerodynamics and starting performance was studied in detail with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulations. Numerical results indicate that the power coefficient of this lift drag hybrid vertical axis wind turbines declines when the distance between its drag-type blades and the center of rotation of the turbine rotor increases, whereas its starting torque can be significantly improved. Studies also show that unlike the lift-type vertical axis wind turbines, this lift drag hybrid-type vertical axis wind turbines could be able to solve the problem of low start-up torque. However, the installation position of the drag blade is very important. If the drag blade is mounted very close to the spindle, the starting torque of the lift drag hybrid-type vertical axis wind turbines may not be improved at all. In addition, it has been found that the power coefficient of the studied vertical axis wind turbines is not as good as expected and possible reasons have been provided in this article after the pressure distribution along the surfaces of the airfoil-shaped blades of the hybrid turbine was analyzed.

  2. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  3. Hindered rotational energy barriers of BH4- tetrahedra in β-Mg(BH4)2 from quasielastic neutron scattering and DFT calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchard, Didier; Maronsson, Jon Bergmann; Riktor, M.D.;

    2012-01-01

    In this work, hindered rotations of the BH4- tetrahedra in Mg(BH4)2 were studied by quasielastic neutron scattering, using two instruments with different energy resolution, in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Two thermally activated reorientations of the BH4- units......, around the 2-fold (C2) and 3-fold (C3) axes were observed at temperatures from 120 to 440 K. The experimentally obtained activation energies (EaC2 = 39 and 76 meV and EaC3 = 214 meV) and mean residence times between reorientational jumps are comparable with the energy barriers obtained from DFT...... calculations. A linear dependency of the energy barriers for rotations around the C2 axis parallel to the Mg-Mg axis with the distance between these two axes was revealed by the DFT calculations. At the lowest temperature (120 K) only 15% of the BH4- units undergo rotational motion and from comparison with DFT...

  4. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  5. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  6. Rotational dynamics of propylene inside Na-Y zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Sharma; Mala N Rao; Siddharth Gautam; A K Tripathi; V S Kamble; S L Chaplot; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-11-01

    We report here the quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) studies on the dynamics of propylene inside Na-Y zeolite using triple axis spectrometer (TAS) at Dhruva reactor, Trombay. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the system had shown that the rotational motion involves energy larger than that involved in the translational motion. Therefore, rotational motion was not observed in our earlier QENS studies on propylene adsorbed Na-Y zeolite using a higher resolution spectrometer at Dhruva. Analysis of the TAS spectra revealed that the quasielastic broadening observed in propylene-loaded zeolite spectra is due to the rotational motion of the propylene molecules. This is consistent with our simulation result. Further, the rotational motion is found to be isotropic. The rotational diffusion coefficient has been obtained.

  7. On the rotational dynamics of Prometheus and Pandora

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, A V; 10.1007/s10569-008-9131-z

    2013-01-01

    Possible rotation states of two satellites of Saturn, Prometheus (S16) and Pandora (S17), are studied by means of numerical experiments. The attitude stability of all possible modes of synchronous rotation and the motion close to these modes is analyzed by means of computation of the Lyapunov spectra of the motion. The stability analysis confirms that the rotation of Prometheus and Pandora might be chaotic, though the possibility of regular behaviour is not excluded. For the both satellites, the attitude instability zones form series of concentric belts enclosing the main synchronous resonance center in the phase space sections. A hypothesis is put forward that these belts might form "barriers" for capturing the satellites in synchronous rotation. The satellites in chaotic rotation can mimic ordinary regular synchronous behaviour: they preserve preferred orientation for long periods of time, the largest axis of satellite's figure being directed approximately towards Saturn.

  8. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  9. On the invariant motions of rigid body rotation over the fixed point, via Euler angles

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    The generalized Euler case (rigid body rotation over the fixed point) is discussed here: - the center of masses of non-symmetric rigid body is assumed to be located at the equatorial plane on axis Oy which is perpendicular to the main principal axis Ox of inertia at the fixed point. Such a case was presented in the rotating coordinate system, in a frame of reference fixed in the rotating body for the case of rotation over the fixed point (at given initial conditions). In our derivation, we have represented the generalized Euler case in the fixed Cartesian coordinate system; so, the motivation of our ansatz is to elegantly transform the proper components of the previously presented solution from one (rotating) coordinate system to another (fixed) Cartesian coordinates. Besides, we have obtained an elegantly analytical case of general type of rotations; also, we have presented it in the fixed Cartesian coordinate system via Euler angles.

  10. Coherent Structures and Extreme Events in Rotating Multiphase Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Biferale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available By using direct numerical simulations (DNS at unprecedented resolution, we study turbulence under rotation in the presence of simultaneous direct and inverse cascades. The accumulation of energy at large scale leads to the formation of vertical coherent regions with high vorticity oriented along the rotation axis. By seeding the flow with millions of inertial particles, we quantify—for the first time—the effects of those coherent vertical structures on the preferential concentration of light and heavy particles. Furthermore, we quantitatively show that extreme fluctuations, leading to deviations from a normal-distributed statistics, result from the entangled interaction of the vertical structures with the turbulent background. Finally, we present the first-ever measurement of the relative importance between Stokes drag, Coriolis force, and centripetal force along the trajectories of inertial particles. We discover that vortical coherent structures lead to unexpected diffusion properties for heavy and light particles in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the rotation axis.

  11. Coherent Structures and Extreme Events in Rotating Multiphase Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biferale, L.; Bonaccorso, F.; Mazzitelli, I. M.; van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Lanotte, A. S.; Musacchio, S.; Perlekar, P.; Toschi, F.

    2016-10-01

    By using direct numerical simulations (DNS) at unprecedented resolution, we study turbulence under rotation in the presence of simultaneous direct and inverse cascades. The accumulation of energy at large scale leads to the formation of vertical coherent regions with high vorticity oriented along the rotation axis. By seeding the flow with millions of inertial particles, we quantify—for the first time—the effects of those coherent vertical structures on the preferential concentration of light and heavy particles. Furthermore, we quantitatively show that extreme fluctuations, leading to deviations from a normal-distributed statistics, result from the entangled interaction of the vertical structures with the turbulent background. Finally, we present the first-ever measurement of the relative importance between Stokes drag, Coriolis force, and centripetal force along the trajectories of inertial particles. We discover that vortical coherent structures lead to unexpected diffusion properties for heavy and light particles in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the rotation axis.

  12. Antenna Axis Offset Estimation from VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdubov, Sergey; Skurikhina, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The antenna axis offsets were estimated from global solutions and single sessions. We have built a set of global solutions from R1 and R4 sessions and from the sets of sessions between SVETLOE repairs. We compared our estimates with local survey data for the stations of the QUASAR network. Svetloe station axis offset values have changed after repairs. For non-global networks, the axis offset value of a single station can significantly affect the EOP estimations.

  13. Rotation of single live mammalian cells using dynamic holographic optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Cao; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Chan, Samantha; Shetty, Rishabh M.; Smith, Dean; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2017-05-01

    We report on a method for rotating single mammalian cells about an axis perpendicular to the optical system axis through the imaging plane using dynamic holographic optical tweezers (HOTs). Two optical traps are created on the opposite edges of a mammalian cell and are continuously transitioned through the imaging plane along the circumference of the cell in opposite directions, thus providing the torque to rotate the cell in a controlled fashion. The method enables a complete 360° rotation of live single mammalian cells with spherical or near-to spherical shape in 3D space, and represents a useful tool suitable for the single cell analysis field, including tomographic imaging.

  14. Time-odd mean fields in the rotating frame microscopic nature of nuclear magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, A V

    2000-01-01

    The microscopic role of nuclear magnetism in rotating frame is investigated for the first time in the framework of the cranked relativistic mean field theory. It is shown that nuclear magnetism modifies the expectation values of single-particle spin, orbital and total angular momenta along the rotational axis effectively creating additional angular momentum. This effect leads to the increase of kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia at given rotational frequency and has an impact on effective alignments.

  15. 3D CFD Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alaimo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the complex and unsteady aerodynamic flow associated with wind turbine functioning, computational fluid dynamics (CFD is an attractive and powerful method. In this work, the influence of different numerical aspects on the accuracy of simulating a rotating wind turbine is studied. In particular, the effects of mesh size and structure, time step and rotational velocity have been taken into account for simulation of different wind turbine geometries. The applicative goal of this study is the comparison of the performance between a straight blade vertical axis wind turbine and a helical blade one. Analyses are carried out through the use of computational fluid dynamic ANSYS® Fluent® software, solving the Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations. At first, two-dimensional simulations are used in a preliminary setup of the numerical procedure and to compute approximated performance parameters, namely the torque, power, lift and drag coefficients. Then, three-dimensional simulations are carried out with the aim of an accurate determination of the differences in the complex aerodynamic flow associated with the straight and the helical blade turbines. Static and dynamic results are then reported for different values of rotational speed.

  16. Spontaneous transfer of chirality in an atropisomerically enriched two-axis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kimberly T; Metrano, Anthony J; Rablen, Paul R; Miller, Scott J

    2014-05-01

    One of the most well-recognized stereogenic elements in a chiral molecule is an sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom that is connected to four different substituents. Axes of chirality can also exist about bonds with hindered barriers of rotation; molecules containing such axes are known as atropisomers. Understanding the dynamics of these systems can be useful, for example, in the design of single-atropisomer drugs or molecular switches and motors. For molecules that exhibit a single axis of chirality, rotation about that axis leads to racemization as the system reaches equilibrium. Here we report a two-axis system for which an enantioselective reaction produces four stereoisomers (two enantiomeric pairs): following a catalytic asymmetric transformation, we observe a kinetically controlled product distribution that is perturbed from the system's equilibrium position. As the system undergoes isomerization, one of the diastereomeric pairs drifts spontaneously to a higher enantiomeric ratio. In a compensatory manner, the enantiomeric ratio of the other diastereomeric pair decreases. These observations are made for a class of unsymmetrical amides that exhibits two asymmetric axes--one axis is defined through a benzamide substructure, and the other axis is associated with differentially N,N-disubstituted amides. The stereodynamics of these substrates provides an opportunity to observe a curious interplay of kinetics and thermodynamics intrinsic to a system of stereoisomers that is constrained to a situation of partial equilibrium.

  17. Tunable magnetocrystalline easy axis in cobalt nanowire arrays by zinc additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manouchehri, A. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramazani, A., E-mail: rmzn@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kashi, M. Almasi [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Montazer, A.H. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pure Co and Co-rich CoZn NW arrays were fabricated into AAO templates. • Effect of Zn additive on magnetic properties and crystal structure was investigated. • Coercivity and squareness of Co NWs increased up to 2150 Oe and 0.93 by Zn additive. • Incorporation of Zn rotated Co c-axis from perpendicular to parallel to NW axis. - Abstract: A new approach to tuning the crystalline characteristics and magnetic properties of cobalt nanowire (NW) arrays embedded in AAO templates is reported using zinc additive. This is realized by adding low concentrations of Zn when pulse-electrodepositing cobalt NWs while also increasing the solution pH from 3 to 5. Using hysteresis loop measurements with a magnetic field applied parallel to the NW axis, coercivity and squareness of pure cobalt NWs increased from 890 Oe and 0.45 to 2150 Oe and 0.93 in Co{sub 97}Zn{sub 3} NWs, respectively, using a Zn concentration of 0.01 M at pH = 4. XRD patterns obtained from the cobalt-rich CoZn NWs revealed that the crystalline texture of cobalt changes from [1 0 0] direction to [1 0 1] and [0 0 2] at pH = 3 and 4, respectively. For the latter, the magnetocrystalline easy axis of cobalt rotates from nearly perpendicular to parallel to the NW axis, induced by the incorporation of zinc into the hcp structure of cobalt.

  18. A numerical method of tracing a vortical axis along local topological axis line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A new numerical method is presented to trace or identify a vortical axis in flow, which is based on Galilean invariant flow topology. We focus on the local flow topology specified by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor, and extract the axis component from its flow trajectory. Eigen-vortical-axis line is defined from the eigenvector of the real eigenvalue of the velocity gradient tensor where the tensor has the conjugate complex eigenvalues. This numerical method integrates the eigen-vortical-axis line and traces a vortical axis in terms of the invariant flow topology, which enables to investigate the feature of the topology-based vortical axis.

  19. Principles of the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebel, Jakob; Bertsch, Thomas; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Rios-Barrera, Daniel; Pearce, Christy F; Hüfner, Michael; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Clapp, Carmen

    2015-11-15

    The hormonal family of vasoinhibins, which derive from the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin, are known for their inhibiting effects on blood vessel growth, vasopermeability, and vasodilation. As pleiotropic hormones, vasoinhibins act in multiple target organs and tissues. The generation, secretion, and regulation of vasoinhibins are embedded into the organizational principle of an axis, which integrates the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the target tissue microenvironment. This axis is designated as the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis. Disturbances of the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis are associated with the pathogenesis of retinal and cardiac diseases and with diseases occurring during pregnancy. New phylogenetical, physiological, and clinical implications are discussed.

  20. Acute injuries of the axis vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J.T. (United General Hospital, Sedro Woolley, WA (USA)); Harris, J.H. (Texas Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-08-01

    A retrospective analysis of 165 patients admitted to Hermann Hospital with acute injuries of the axis vertebra revealed 68 (41%) dens fractures, 62 (38%) cases of traumatic spondylolisthesis ('hangman's' fracture), 21 (13%) extension teardrop fractures, 10 (6%) hyperextension dislocations, and 2 (1.0%) fractures each of the laminae and spinous processes. Of the axis injuries 31 (18%) were limited to the axis body alone. Of these, 21 (61%) were hyperextension teardrop fractures and 10 (32%) were hyperextension dislocations. Axis injuries were associated with acute injuries of other cervical vertebrae in 14 (8%) of the patients. (orig./GDG).

  1. Relativistic stars in differential rotation: bounds on the dragging rate and on the rotational energy

    CERN Document Server

    Pareja, M J

    2004-01-01

    For general relativistic equilibrium stellar models (stationary axisymmetric asymptotically flat and convection-free) with differential rotation, it is shown that for a wide class of rotation laws the distribution of angular velocity of the fluid has a sign, say "positive", and then both the dragging rate and the angular momentum density are positive. In addition, the "mean value" (with respect to an intrinsic density) of the dragging rate is shown to be less than the mean value of the fluid angular velocity (in full general, without having to restrict the rotation law, nor the uniformity in sign of the fluid angular velocity); this inequality yields the positivity and an upper bound of the total rotational energy.

  2. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r -modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, John L.; Lindblom, Lee; Lockitch, Keith H.

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the r -modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by Sá. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance ϖ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the r -mode instability removes this gauge freedom; the exponentially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order r -mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for slowly rotating models with polytropic equations of state.

  3. Protodiscs around Hot Magnetic Rotator Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maheswaran, M

    2008-01-01

    We develop equations and obtain solutions for the structure and evolution of a protodisc region that is initially formed with no radial motion and super-Keplerian rotation speed when wind material from a hot rotating star is channelled towards its equatorial plane by a dipole-type magnetic field. Its temperature is around $10^7$K because of shock heating and the inflow of wind material causes its equatorial density to increase with time. The centrifugal force and thermal pressure increase relative to the magnetic force and material escapes at its outer edge. The protodisc region of a uniformly rotating star has almost uniform rotation and will shrink radially unless some instability intervenes. In a star with angular velocity increasing along its surface towards the equator, the angular velocity of the protodisc region decreases radially outwards and magnetorotational instability (MRI) can occur within a few hours or days. Viscosity resulting from MRI will readjust the angular velocity distribution of the pro...

  4. Perceptual strategies of pigeons to detect a rotational centre--a hint for star compass learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Alert

    Full Text Available Birds can rely on a variety of cues for orientation during migration and homing. Celestial rotation provides the key information for the development of a functioning star and/or sun compass. This celestial compass seems to be the primary reference for calibrating the other orientation systems including the magnetic compass. Thus, detection of the celestial rotational axis is crucial for bird orientation. Here, we use operant conditioning to demonstrate that homing pigeons can principally learn to detect a rotational centre in a rotating dot pattern and we examine their behavioural response strategies in a series of experiments. Initially, most pigeons applied a strategy based on local stimulus information such as movement characteristics of single dots. One pigeon seemed to immediately ignore eccentric stationary dots. After special training, all pigeons could shift their attention to more global cues, which implies that pigeons can learn the concept of a rotational axis. In our experiments, the ability to precisely locate the rotational centre was strongly dependent on the rotational velocity of the dot pattern and it crashed at velocities that were still much faster than natural celestial rotation. We therefore suggest that the axis of the very slow, natural, celestial rotation could be perceived by birds through the movement itself, but that a time-delayed pattern comparison should also be considered as a very likely alternative strategy.

  5. Perceptual strategies of pigeons to detect a rotational centre--a hint for star compass learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alert, Bianca; Michalik, Andreas; Helduser, Sascha; Mouritsen, Henrik; Güntürkün, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Birds can rely on a variety of cues for orientation during migration and homing. Celestial rotation provides the key information for the development of a functioning star and/or sun compass. This celestial compass seems to be the primary reference for calibrating the other orientation systems including the magnetic compass. Thus, detection of the celestial rotational axis is crucial for bird orientation. Here, we use operant conditioning to demonstrate that homing pigeons can principally learn to detect a rotational centre in a rotating dot pattern and we examine their behavioural response strategies in a series of experiments. Initially, most pigeons applied a strategy based on local stimulus information such as movement characteristics of single dots. One pigeon seemed to immediately ignore eccentric stationary dots. After special training, all pigeons could shift their attention to more global cues, which implies that pigeons can learn the concept of a rotational axis. In our experiments, the ability to precisely locate the rotational centre was strongly dependent on the rotational velocity of the dot pattern and it crashed at velocities that were still much faster than natural celestial rotation. We therefore suggest that the axis of the very slow, natural, celestial rotation could be perceived by birds through the movement itself, but that a time-delayed pattern comparison should also be considered as a very likely alternative strategy.

  6. Increasing Plant Availability by Mechanical Checking of the Cement Rotary Kiln Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A periodic check of the cement rotary kiln axis is needed within the framework of preventive maintenance for maintaining high plant availability. The fourth generation “KAS-4” measuring system was developed by Wuhan University of Technology in 1999. The system can be carried out with rotating or stationary kiln plant. The same is true of the measurement of tire and supporting roller diameters, the clearance of tires, the position of rollers, the machining of tires and rollers, the slopes of roller surfaces, the deflection of gear, the axis of kiln. The system has been applied to the measurement for 10 sets of cement rotary kiln in China.

  7. Self-similar solution of cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic unsteady flow behind a strong cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas, which has a variable azimuthal fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity. The experimental studies and astrophysical observations show that the outer atmosphere of the planets rotates due to rotation of the planets. Macroscopic motion with supersonic speed occurs in an interplanetary atmosphere and shock waves are generated. Thus rotation of planets or stars significantly affect the process taking place in their outer layers, therefore question connected with the explosions in rotating gas atmospheres are of definite astrophysical interest. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The shock Mach number is not infinite, but has a finite value. The azimuthal and axial component of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws, and the density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. Effects of the variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  8. An explicit reconstruction algorithm for the transverse ray transform of a second rank tensor field from three axis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Naeem M.; Lionheart, William R. B.

    2016-11-01

    We give an explicit plane-by-plane filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithm for the transverse ray transform of symmetric second rank tensor fields on Euclidean three-space, using data from rotation about three orthogonal axes. We show that in the general case two-axis data is insufficient, but we give an explicit reconstruction procedure for the potential case with two-axis data. We describe a numerical implementation of the three-axis algorithm and give reconstruction results for simulated data.

  9. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  10. Entropy generation of radial rotation convective channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alić, Fikret

    2012-03-01

    The exchange of heat between two fluids is established by radial rotating pipe or a channel. The hotter fluid flows through the pipe, while the cold fluid is ambient air. Total length of pipe is made up of multiple sections of different shape and position in relation to the common axis of rotation. In such heat exchanger the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of the hotter and colder fluid occur. Therefore, the total entropy generated within the radial rotating pipe consists of the total entropy of hotter and colder fluid, taking into account all the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of both fluids. Finding a mathematical model of the total generated entropy is based on coupled mathematical expressions that combine hydraulic and thermal effects of both fluids with the complex geometry of the radial rotating pipe. Mathematical model follows the each section of the pipe and establishes the function between the sections, so the total generated entropy is different from section to section of the pipe. In one section of the pipe thermal irreversibility may dominate over the hydraulic irreversibility, while in another section of the pipe the situation may be reverse. In this paper, continuous analytic functions that connect sections of pipe in geometric meaning are associated with functions that describe the thermo-hydraulic effects of hotter and colder fluid. In this way, the total generated entropy of the radial rotating pipe is a continuous analytic function of any complex geometry of the rotating pipe. The above method of establishing a relationship between the continuous function of entropy with the complex geometry of the rotating pipe enables indirect monitoring of unnecessary hydraulic and thermal losses of both fluids. Therefore, continuous analytic functions of generated entropy enable analysis of hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of individual sections of pipe, as well as the possibility of improving the thermal-hydraulic performance of the rotating

  11. Superdeformed Rotational Bands in 240Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi, M.; Gassmann, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Habs, D.; Csatlos, M.; Eisermann, Y.; Faestermann, T.; Graw, G.; Gulyas, J.; Hertenberger, R.; Maier, H. J.; Mate, Z.; Metz, A.; Thirolf, P.; Chromik, M.; van der Werf, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    The intermediate structure of the fission resonances has been observed in 240Pu. A resonance structure found around the excitation energy of 4.5 MeV was interpreted as a group of Kπ =0+ superdeformed rotational bands. The moments of inertia and level density distributions were also deduced for the individually observed band-heads.

  12. Superdeformed rotational bands in Pu-240

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; Gassmann, D; Krasznahorkay, A; Habs, D; Csatlos, M; Eisermann, Y; Faestermann, T; Graw, G; Gulyas, J; Hertenberger, R; Maier, HJ; Mate, Z; Metz, A; Thirolf, P; Chromik, M; van der Werf, SY

    The intermediate structure of the fission resonances has been observed in Pu-240. A resonance structure found around the excitation energy of 4.5 MeV was interpreted as a group of K-pi = 0(+) superdeformed rotational bands. The moments of inertia and level density distributions were also deduced for

  13. Image data rate converter having a drum with a fixed head and a rotatable head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, F. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A data-rate converter is disclosed comprising a rotatable data-storing drum with at least one fixed read/record head and a rotatable read/record head. The latter is rotatable in a circular path about the drum axis of rotation. The drum is positionable in any one of a plurality of axial positions with respect to the heads, so that at least one drum track is aligned with the fixed head in one drum position and with the rotatable head in another drum position. When a track is aligned with the fixed head, data may be recorded therin or read out therefrom at a rate which is a function of drum rotation, while when aligned with the rotatable head, data may be recorded or read out at a rate which is a function of the rates and directions of rotation of both the drum and the head.

  14. Relativistic Rotating Vector Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    The direction of polarization produced by a moving source rotates with the respect to the rest frame. We show that this effect, induced by pulsar rotation, leads to an important correction to polarization swings within the framework of rotating vector model (RVM); this effect has been missed by previous works. We construct relativistic RVM taking into account finite heights of the emission region that lead to aberration, time-of-travel effects and relativistic rotation of polarization. Polarizations swings at different frequencies can be used, within the assumption of the radius-to-frequency mapping, to infer emission radii and geometry of pulsars.

  15. Design and analysis of a dual-axis resonator fiber-optic gyroscope employing a single source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Nayak, Jagannath

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, design of a resonator fiber-optic gyroscope comprised of a single laser source and two optical fiber resonator rings is presented. A typical gyroscope measures angular rotation around a fixed axis, whereas the proposed design can sense simultaneous rotation about two orthogonal axes. Two variants of the design are proposed and analyzed using a mathematical model based on Jones matrix methodology.

  16. Arbitrary photonic wave plate operations on chip: realizing Hadamard, Pauli-X, and rotation gates for polarisation qubits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heilmann, René; Gräfe, Markus; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    .... In our work we close this gap and present Hadamard, Pauli-X, and rotation gates of high fidelity for photonic polarisation qubits on chip by employing a reorientation of the optical axis of birefringent waveguides...

  17. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic waves arise in many area of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. In this paper, we numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited to deal with such artificial singularities related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object is rotating like for instance a star, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. In order to study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity as well as quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we compute the spindown luminosity exp...

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow Between Concentric Rotating Porous Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Dube

    1971-10-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to study the steady laminar flow of a incompressible electrically conducting fluid between infinitely long concentric rotating porous cylinders under the influence of radial magnetic field. A solution has been obtained under the assumption of uniform conditions along the axis of the cylinders. The cylinders being porous, a hyperbolic radial velocity distribution has been superimposed over the circumferential velocity produced due to rotation. There is a Bernoulli type pressure variation in the radial in the direction. When the inner cylinder is at rest the shearing stress at it and the torque transmitted to it decrease as R (=v/Sub/1y/Sub1/v= v/Sub2y/Sub2/v increases and the magnetic parameter lambda (=4sigma mue/sube/sup2A/Sup2/Mue will further decrease them.

  19. MEMS inertial sensors with integral rotation means.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Stewart M.

    2003-09-01

    The state-of-the-art of inertial micro-sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) has advanced to the point where they are displacing the more traditional sensors in many size, power, and/or cost-sensitive applications. A factor limiting the range of application of inertial micro-sensors has been their relatively poor bias stability. The incorporation of an integral sensitive axis rotation capability would enable bias mitigation through proven techniques such as indexing, and foster the use of inertial micro-sensors in more accuracy-sensitive applications. Fabricating the integral rotation mechanism in MEMS technology would minimize the penalties associated with incorporation of this capability, and preserve the inherent advantages of inertial micro-sensors.

  20. Precession Relaxation of Viscoelastic Oblate Rotators

    CERN Document Server

    Frouard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Various perturbations (collisions, close encounters, YORP) destabilise the rotation of a small body, leaving it in a non-principal spin state. Then the body experiences alternating stresses generated by the inertial forces. The ensuing inelastic dissipation reduces the kinetic energy, without influencing the angular momentum. This yields nutation relaxation, i.e., evolution of the spin towards rotation about the maximal-inertia axis. Knowledge of the timescales needed to damp the nutation is crucial in studies of small bodies' dynamics. In the past, nutation relaxation has been described by an empirical quality factor introduced to parameterise the dissipation rate and to evade the discussion of the actual rheological parameters and their role in dissipation. This approach is unable to describe the dependence of the relaxation rate upon the nutation angle, because we do not know the quality factor's dependence on the frequency (which is a function of the nutation angle). This leaves open the question of relax...

  1. Optical design of a rotating eyepiece telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, M.; Nasim, F.; Khan, A. N.; Gul, A.

    2016-08-01

    Flexible eyepiece telescope has been designed and verified. The rotating eyepiece of telescope will facilitate viewing of objects in a remote or out of sight target. Eyepiece arm of telescope can be rotated upto 360o keeping objective and reticule unchanged and ensuring zero deviation in reticule inclination. Main application of this scope is off axis viewing of objects. Image inversion has been carried out by using pair of mirrors and length of telescope is controlled by using relay lenses. The optical design, simulation and image analysis has been carried out by using ZEMAX®. Magnification of telescope is between 10∼⃒12 times with FOV of 60. Experiment has been carried out using uncoated Edmund Optics and optical tool box of Micro Series Kit, NEWPORT.

  2. Differentially rotating force-free magnetosphere of an aligned rotator: analytical solutions in split-monopole approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Timokhin, Andrey

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we consider stationary force-free magnetosphere of an aligned rotator when plasma in the open field line region rotates differentially due to presence of a zone with the accelerating electric field in the polar cap of pulsar. We study the impact of differential rotation on the current density distribution in the magnetosphere. Using split-monopole approximation we obtain analytical expressions for physical parameters of differentially rotating magnetosphere. We find the range of admitted current density distributions under the requirement that the potential drop in the polar cap is less than the vacuum potential drop. We show that the current density distribution could deviate significantly from the ``classical'' Michel distribution and could be made almost constant over the polar cap even when the potential drop in the accelerating zone is of the order of 10 per cents of the vacuum potential drop. We argue that differential rotation of the open magnetic field lines could play an important role ...

  3. Innovative Design of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    The wind turbines can be classified as: i) Horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT), and ii) Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT). The HAWT is fully developed and the size is growing higher. Whereas, the VAWT is not developed because of the less efficiency and vibration issues of big structure. However...

  4. Differential rotation in solar-like stars from global simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, G.; Kosovichev, A. G. [Solar Physics, HEPL, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P. K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); Mansour, N. N., E-mail: gag@stanford.edu, E-mail: sasha@sun.stanford.edu, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: nagi.n.mansour@nasa.gov [NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94040 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    To explore the physics of large-scale flows in solar-like stars, we perform three-dimensional anelastic simulations of rotating convection for global models with stratification resembling the solar interior. The numerical method is based on an implicit large-eddy simulation approach designed to capture effects from non-resolved small scales. We obtain two regimes of differential rotation, with equatorial zonal flows accelerated either in the direction of rotation (solar-like) or in the opposite direction (anti-solar). While the models with the solar-like differential rotation tend to produce multiple cells of meridional circulation, the models with anti-solar differential rotation result in only one or two meridional cells. Our simulations indicate that the rotation and large-scale flow patterns critically depend on the ratio between buoyancy and Coriolis forces. By including a sub-adiabatic layer at the bottom of the domain, corresponding to the stratification of a radiative zone, we reproduce a layer of strong radial shear similar to the solar tachocline. Similarly, enhanced super-adiabaticity at the top results in a near-surface shear layer located mainly at lower latitudes. The models reveal a latitudinal entropy gradient localized at the base of the convection zone and in the stable region, which, however, does not propagate across the convection zone. In consequence, baroclinicity effects remain small, and the rotation isocontours align in cylinders along the rotation axis. Our results confirm the alignment of large convective cells along the rotation axis in the deep convection zone and suggest that such 'banana-cell' pattern can be hidden beneath the supergranulation layer.

  5. Instability of coupled geostrophic density fronts and its nonlinear evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Emilie; Zeitlin, Vladimir

    Instability of coupled density fronts, and its fully nonlinear evolution are studied within the idealized reduced-gravity rotating shallow-water model. By using the collocation method, we benchmark the classical stability results on zero potential vorticity (PV) fronts and generalize them to non-zero PV fronts. In both cases, we find a series of instability zones intertwined with the stability regions along the along-front wavenumber axis, the most unstable modes being long wave. We then study the nonlinear evolution of the unstable modes with the help of a high-resolution well-balanced finite-volume numerical scheme by initializing it with the unstable modes found from the linear stability analysis. The most unstable long-wave mode evolves as follows: after a couple of inertial periods, the coupled fronts are pinched at some location and a series of weakly connected co-rotating elliptic anticyclonic vortices is formed, thus totally changing the character of the flow. The characteristics of these vortices are close to known rodon lens solutions. The shorter-wave unstable modes from the next instability zones are strongly concentrated in the frontal regions, have sharp gradients, and are saturated owing to dissipation without qualitatively changing the flow pattern.

  6. Yield physiology of short rotation intensively cultured poplars

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. G. Isebrands; N. D. Nelson; D. I. Dickmann; D. A. Michael

    1983-01-01

    An integrated research approach is described for studying yield physiology of short rotation intensively cultured (SRIC) poplar plantations. Branch architecture differs with clone and stand density, but the clonal ranking of important branch characteristics does not change with spacing.

  7. Experimental evaluation of the drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a rotating prolate spheroid

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Kvurt, Y.; Miles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a spheroid rotating around its axis of symmetry and moving perpendicularly to this axis in initially quiescent water were studied using experimental data and numerical simulation. The prolate spheroid with ratio of the axes 4/3 was speeded up in special device, which ensured the required rotational and translational velocity in the given plane. A video system was used to record the spheroid motion in water. Using the video records the sph...

  8. From solar-like to anti-solar differential rotation in cool stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gastine, T; Morin, J; Reiners, A; Wicht, J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar differential rotation can be separated into two main regimes: solar-like when the equator rotates faster than the poles and anti-solar when the polar regions rotate faster than the equator. We investigate the transition between these two regimes with 3-D numerical simulations of rotating spherical shells. We conduct a systematic parameter study which also includes models from different research groups. We find that the direction of the differential rotation is governed by the contribution of the Coriolis force in the force balance, independently of the model setup (presence of a magnetic field, thickness of the convective layer, density stratification). Rapidly-rotating cases with a small Rossby number yield solar-like differential rotation, while weakly-rotating models sustain anti-solar differential rotation. Close to the transition, the two kinds of differential rotation are two possible bistable states. This study provides theoretical support for the existence of anti-solar differential rotation i...

  9. Coherent spin-rotational dynamics of oxygen super rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, Alexander A; Milner, Valery

    2014-01-01

    We use state- and time-resolved coherent Raman spectroscopy to study the rotational dynamics of oxygen molecules in ultra-high rotational states. While it is possible to reach rotational quantum numbers up to $N \\approx 50$ by increasing the gas temperature to 1500 K, low population levels and gas densities result in correspondingly weak optical response. By spinning O$_2$ molecules with an optical centrifuge, we efficiently excite extreme rotational states with $N\\leqslant 109$ in high-density room temperature ensembles. Fast molecular rotation results in the enhanced robustness of the created rotational wave packets against collisions, enabling us to observe the effects of weak spin-rotation coupling in the coherent rotational dynamics of oxygen. The decay rate of spin-rotation coherence due to collisions is measured as a function of the molecular angular momentum and explained in terms of the general scaling law. We find that at high values of $N$, the rotational decoherence of oxygen is much faster than t...

  10. Rotational motion of Foton M-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrashkin, V. I.; Voronov, K. E.; Piyakov, I. V.; Puzin, Yu. Ya.; Sazonov, V. V.; Semkin, N. D.; Chebukov, S. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The actual controlled rotational motion of the Foton M-4 satellite is reconstructed for the mode of single-axis solar orientation. The reconstruction was carried out using data of onboard measurements of vectors of angular velocity and the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. The reconstruction method is based on the reconstruction of the kinematic equations of the rotational motion of a solid body. According to the method, measurement data of both types collected at a certain time interval are processed together. Measurements of the angular velocity are interpolated by piecewise-linear functions, which are substituted in kinematic differential equations for a quaternion that defines the transition from the satellite instrument coordinate system to the inertial coordinate system. The obtained equations represent the kinematic model of the satellite rotational motion. A solution of these equations that approximates the actual motion is derived from the condition of the best (in the sense of the least squares method) match between the measurement data of the strength vector of the Earth's magnetic field and its calculated values. The described method makes it possible to reconstruct the actual rotational satellite motion using one solution of kinematic equations over time intervals longer than 10 h. The found reconstructions have been used to calculate the residual microaccelerations.

  11. The Short Rotation Period of Nereid

    CERN Document Server

    Grav, T; Kavelaars, J J

    2003-01-01

    We determine the period, p = 11.52 \\pm 0.14 h, and a light curve peak-to-peak amplitude, a = 0.029 \\pm 0.003 magnitudes, of the Neptunian irregular satellite Nereid. If the light curve variation is due to albedo variations across the surface, rather than solely to the shape of Nereid variations, the rotation period would be a factor of two shorter. In either case, such a rotation period and light curve amplitude, together with Nereid's orbital period, p=360.14 days, imply that Nereid is almost certainly in a regular rotation state, rather than the chaotic rotation state suggested by Schaefer and Schaefer (1988,2000) and Dobrovolskis (1995). Assuming that Nereid is perfectly spherical, the albedo variation is 3% across the observed surface. Assuming a uniform geometric albedo, the observed cross sectional area varies by 3%. We caution that the lightcurve found in this paper only sets limits on the combination of albedo and physical irregularity and that we cannot determine the orientation of Nereid's spin axis...

  12. Active Blade Pitch Control for Straight Bladed Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine of New Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    at low rotational speed producing very less noise during operation, although these are less efficient than Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT). The efficiency of a VAWT has been significantly improved by H-Darrieus VAWT design based on double airfoil technology as demonstrated by the authors...... in a previous publication. Further, it is well know that the variation of the blade pitch angle during the rotation improves the power efficiency. A blade pitch variation is implemented by active blade pitch control, which operates as per wind speed and position of the blade with respect to the rotor. A double...

  13. Development of methodology for horizontal-axis wind-turbine dynamic analysis. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugundji, J.

    1982-09-01

    The 3-year effort reported included: (1) review of the MOSTAS computer programs for dynamic analysis of horizontal-axis wind turbines; (2) review of various analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients; (3) review of structural dynamics analysis tools for large wind turbine; (4) experiments for yaw characteristics of a rotating rotar; (5) development of a finite element model for rotors; (6) development of simple models for aeroelastic; and (7) development of simple models for stability and response of wind turbines on flexible towers.

  14. Deconstructing Mental Rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A random walk model of the classical mental rotation task is explored in two experiments. By assuming that a mental rotation is repeated until sufficient evidence for a match/mismatch is obtained, the model accounts for the approximately linearly increasing reaction times (RTs) on positive trials...... alignment take place during fixations at very high speed....

  15. Short-rotation plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip E. Pope; Jeffery O. Dawson

    1989-01-01

    Short-rotation plantations offer several advantages over longer, more traditional rotations. They enhance the natural productivity of better sites and of tree species with rapid juvenile growth. Returns on investment are realized in a shorter period and the risk of loss is reduced compared with long term investments. Production of wood and fiber can be maximized by...

  16. Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentjens, MA; de Bruyn, AG

    2005-01-01

    We extend the rotation measure work of Burn ( 1966, MNRAS, 133, 67) to the cases of limited sampling of lambda(2) space and non-constant emission spectra. We introduce the rotation measure transfer function (RMTF), which is an excellent predictor of n pi ambiguity problems with the lambda(2) coverag

  17. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  18. Design and implementation of five-axis transformation function in CNC system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To implement five-axis functions in CNC system, based on domestic system Lan Tian series, an improved design method for the system software structure is proposed in this paper. The numerical control kernel of CNC system is divided into the task layer and the motion layer. A five-axis transformation unit is integrated into the motion layer. After classifying five-axis machines into different types and analyzing their geometry information, the five-axis kinematic library is designed according to the abstract factory pattern. Furthermore, by taking CA spindle-tilting machine as an example, the forward and the inverse kinematic transformations are deduced. Based on the new software architecture and the five-axis kinematic library, algorithms of RTCP (rotation tool center point control and 3D radius compensation for end-milling are designed and realized. The milling results show that, with five-axis functions based on such software structure, the instructions with respect to the cutter’s position and orientation can be directly carried out in the CNC system.

  19. Identification of Kinematic Errors of Five-axis Machine Tool Trunnion Axis from Finished Test Piece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ya; FU Jianzhong; CHEN Zichen

    2014-01-01

    Compared with the traditional non-cutting measurement, machining tests can more accurately reflect the kinematic errors of five-axis machine tools in the actual machining process for the users. However, measurement and calculation of the machining tests in the literature are quite difficult and time-consuming. A new method of the machining tests for the trunnion axis of five-axis machine tool is proposed. Firstly, a simple mathematical model of the cradle-type five-axis machine tool was established by optimizing the coordinate system settings based on robot kinematics. Then, the machining tests based on error-sensitive directions were proposed to identify the kinematic errors of the trunnion axis of cradle-type five-axis machine tool. By adopting the error-sensitive vectors in the matrix calculation, the functional relationship equations between the machining errors of the test piece in the error-sensitive directions and the kinematic errors of C-axis and A-axis of five-axis machine tool rotary table was established based on the model of the kinematic errors. According to our previous work, the kinematic errors of C-axis can be treated as the known quantities, and the kinematic errors of A-axis can be obtained from the equations. This method was tested in Mikron UCP600 vertical machining center. The machining errors in the error-sensitive directions can be obtained by CMM inspection from the finished test piece to identify the kinematic errors of five-axis machine tool trunnion axis. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method can reduce the complexity, cost, and the time consumed substantially, and has a wider applicability. This paper proposes a new method of the machining tests for the trunnion axis of five-axis machine tool.

  20. A Rotating Quantum Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    1996-01-01

    We investigate which mapping we have to use to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a "Lorentz-like" coordinate transformation we obtain that creation-anihilation operators of a massless scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state (a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. After this, introducing an apparatus device coupled linearly with the field we obtain that there is a strong correlation between number of rotating particles (in a given state) obtained via canonical quantization and via response function of the rotating detector. Finally, we analyse polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view.

  1. Observations of the stratorotational instability in rotating concentric cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Ibanez, Ruy; Rodenborn, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of density stratified flow between co-rotating vertical cylinders with rotation rates $\\Omega_o r_i/r_o$, but we find that this stability criterion is violated for $N$ sufficiently large; however, the destabilizing effect of the density stratification diminishes as the Reynolds number increases. At large Reynolds number the primary instability leads not to the SRI but to a previously unreported nonperiodic state that mixes the fluid.

  2. Stability analysis of the fluttering and autorotation of flow-induced rotation of a hinged flat plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIRZAEISEFAT Sina; FERNANDES Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This work describes investigations performed on the interaction of uniform current and freely rotating plate about a fixed vertical axis. Fluttering and autorotation are two different motions that may occur during the flow induced rotation. The dimensional analysis proves that the motion in flow induced rotation motion is governed essentially by the dimensionless moment of inertia and Reynolds number. Certain combinations define the stability boundaries between fluttering and autorotation. Fluttering is oscillation of body about a vertical axis and the autorotation is a name given to the case when the body turns continuously about the vertical axis. First, the loads and moment coefficients are calculated by experiments and streamline theory for different angles of attack for a fixed flat plate. Then for dynamic case, a bifurcation diagram is presented based on experiments to classify different motion states of flow induced rotation. Finally, a dynamical model is proposed for stability analysis of flow induced rotation of a flat plate.

  3. Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Jansen, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig is an apparatus for vibration testing of turbomachine blades in a vacuum at rotational speeds from 0 to 40,000 rpm. This rig includes (1) a vertically oriented shaft on which is mounted an assembly comprising a rotor holding the blades to be tested, (2) two actively controlled heteropolar radial magnetic bearings at opposite ends of the shaft, and (3) an actively controlled magnetic thrust bearing at the upper end of the shaft. This rig is a more capable successor to a prior apparatus, denoted the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), that included a vertically oriented shaft with a mechanical thrust bearing at the upper end and a single actively controlled heteropolar radial magnetic bearing at the lower end.

  4. Numerical modeling and preliminary validation of drag-based vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysiński Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to verify and validate the mathematical description of the airflow around a wind turbine with vertical axis of rotation, which could be considered as representative for this type of devices. Mathematical modeling of the airflow around wind turbines in particular those with the vertical axis is a problematic matter due to the complex nature of this highly swirled flow. Moreover, it is turbulent flow accompanied by a rotation of the rotor and the dynamic boundary layer separation. In such conditions, the key aspects of the mathematical model are accurate turbulence description, definition of circular motion as well as accompanying effects like centrifugal force or the Coriolis force and parameters of spatial and temporal discretization. The paper presents the impact of the different simulation parameters on the obtained results of the wind turbine simulation. Analysed models have been validated against experimental data published in the literature.

  5. An Experimental Investigation of Passive Variable-Pitch Vertical-Axis Ocean Current Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridho Hantoro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbines with fixed pitch blades typically suffer from poor starting torque, low efficiency and shaking due to large fluctuations in both radial and tangential force with azimuth angle. Maximizing the turbine power output can be achieved only if the mechanism of generation of the hydrodynamic force on the blades is clearly identified and tools to design high-performance rotors are developed. This paper describes an initial experimental investigation to understand more of the performance on vertical-axis turbine related to the effect of fixed-pitch and passive variable-pitch application using airfoil NACA 0018. Comparative analysis according to aspects of rotation and tip speed ratios was discussed. Information regarding the changes of foil position in passive variable-pitch during rotation at a limited range of flow velocity variations test was obtained and analyzed.

  6. Design and Development of a Solar Thermal Collector with Single Axis Solar Tracking Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theebhan Mogana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar energy is a source of energy that is abundant in Malaysia and can be easily harvested. However, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, it is impossible to harvest the solar energy to the maximum capacity if the solar thermal collector is placed fix to a certain angle. In this research, a solar thermal dish with single axis solar tracking mechanism that will rotate the dish according to the position of the sun in the sky is designed and developed, so that more solar rays can be reflected to a focal point and solar thermal energy can be harvested from the focal point. Data were collected for different weather conditions and performance of the solar thermal collector with a solar tracker were studied and compared with stationary solar thermal collector.

  7. Comparison with Tilted Axis Cranking and particle rotor model for triaxial nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsubo, Shin-ichi; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1998-03-01

    An extension of the cranking model in such a way to allow a rotation axis to deviate from the principal axes of the deformed mean-field is a promising tool for the spectroscopic study of rapidly rotating nuclei. We have applied such a `Tilted Axis Cranking` (TAC) method to a simple system of one-quasiparticle coupled to a triaxial rotor and compared it with a particle-rotor coupling calculation in order to check whether the spin-orientation degrees of freedom can be well described within the mean-field approximation. The result shows that the TAC method gives a good approximation to observable quantities and it is a suitable method to understand the dynamical interplay between the collective and single-particle angular momenta. (author)

  8. Modelling of convective heat and mass transfer in rotating flows

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchuk, Igor V

    2016-01-01

     This monograph presents results of the analytical and numerical modeling of convective heat and mass transfer in different rotating flows caused by (i) system rotation, (ii) swirl flows due to swirl generators, and (iii) surface curvature in turns and bends. Volume forces (i.e. centrifugal and Coriolis forces), which influence the flow pattern, emerge in all of these rotating flows. The main part of this work deals with rotating flows caused by system rotation, which includes several rotating-disk configurations and straight pipes rotating about a parallel axis. Swirl flows are studied in some of the configurations mentioned above. Curvilinear flows are investigated in different geometries of two-pass ribbed and smooth channels with 180° bends. The author demonstrates that the complex phenomena of fluid flow and convective heat transfer in rotating flows can be successfully simulated using not only the universal CFD methodology, but in certain cases by means of the integral methods, self-similar and analyt...

  9. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r-modes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, John L; Lockitch, Keith H

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the $r$-modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation-reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by S\\'a. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance $\\varpi$ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the $r$-mode instability removes this gauge freedom: The expontially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order $r$-mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for s...

  10. The apolipoprotein m-sphingosine-1-phosphate axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkensteijn, Bas W C; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein M (apoM) is a plasma apolipoprotein that mainly associates with high-density lipoproteins. Hence, most studies on apoM so far have investigated its effect on and association with lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis. The insight into apoM biology recently took a major turn. Apo......-receptor-1, affecting the function of endothelial cells, and apoM-deficient mice display impaired endothelial permeability in the lung. This review will focus on the putative biological roles of the new apoM-S1P axis in relation to lipoprotein metabolism, lipid disorders and atherosclerosis....

  11. Giant Faraday rotation of high-order plasmonic modes in graphene-covered nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPP propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ~ 100 degrees on scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications.

  12. Ligament length patterns, strength, and rotational axes of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, P S; Walker, P S; Wolf, B

    1976-06-01

    Using intact fresh specimens, the cruciate ligament lengths for positions of flexion and internal-external rotation were computed using a non-invasive technique; using photographic methods, the centers of transverse rotation on the tibia and the direction of the flexion axis were also obtained. The anterior cruciate was found to be particularly effective in restraining internal tibial rotation; the ability of the posterior cruciate to restrain external rotation, however, depended strongly on the transverse axis location. Ligament length changes during flexion were found to be small in the absence of rotary torque and anteroposterior forces. The average internal rotation occurring during flexion was 37 degrees, half of which took place during the first 15 degrees of flexion. Ultimate rupture strengths of approximately 60 kh for the cruciates were measured, with stiffnesses of 16 kg/mm.

  13. Giant Faraday Rotation of High-Order Plasmonic Modes in Graphene-Covered Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Bychkov, Igor V; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPPs propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ∼100° on the length scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning the carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications.

  14. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  15. Differential Rotation and Angular Momentum Transport Caused by Thermal Convection in a Rotating Spherical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.; Yamada, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate generation mechanisms of differential rotation and angular momentum transport caused by Boussinesq thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell based on weakly nonlinear numerical calculations for various values of the Prandtl and Ekman numbers under a setup similar to the solar convection layer. When the Prandtl number is of order unity or less and the rotation rate of the system is small (the Ekman number is larger than O(10-2)), the structure of thermal convection is not governed by the Taylor-Proudman theorem; banana-type convection cells emerge which follow the spherical shell boundaries rather than the rotation axis. Due to the Coriolis effect, the velocity field associated with those types of convection cells accompanies the Reynolds stress which transports angular momentum from high-latitudes to the equatorial region horizontally, and equatorial prograde flows are produced. The surface and internal distributions of differential rotation realized in this regime are quite similar to those observed in the Sun with helioseismology. These results may suggest that we should apply larger values of the eddy diffusivities than those believed so far when we use a low resolution numerical model for thermal convection in the solar interior.

  16. Rotating optical tubes for vertical transport of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rsheed, Anwar; Lyras, Andreas; Aldossary, Omar M.; Lembessis, Vassilis E.

    2016-12-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation of the HOT induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely, the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an optical Archimedes' screw for atoms.

  17. Rotating Optical Tubes: An Archimedes' Screw for Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rsheed, Anwar Al; Aldossary, Omar M; Lembessis, Vassilis E

    2016-01-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an Optical Archimedes' Screw (OAS) for atoms.

  18. Off-Axis Neutrino Scattering in GRB Central Engines

    CERN Document Server

    George, N D; McGhee, J M; Miller, W A; George, Nathan D.; Kheyfets, Arkady; Ghee, John M. Mc; Miller, Warner A.

    2003-01-01

    The search for an understanding of an energy source great enough to explain the gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena has attracted much attention from the astrophysical community since its discovery. In this paper we extend the work of K. Asano and T. Fukuyama, and J. D. Salmonson and J. R. Wilson, and analyze the off-axis contributions to the energy-momentum deposition rate (MDR) from the neutrino anti-neutrino collisions above a rotating black hole/thin accretion disk system. Our calculations are performed by imaging the accretion disk at a specified observer using the full geodesic equations, and calculating the cumulative MDR from the scattering of all pairs of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos arriving at the observer. Our results shed light on the beaming efficiency of GRB models of this kind. Although we confirm Asano and Fukuyama's conjecture as to the constancy of the beaming for small angles away from the axis; nevertheless, we find the dominant contribution to the MDR comes from near the surface of the disk ...

  19. ANALYSIS OF METHOD FOR DETERMINING AZIMUTH OF PRINCIPAL AXIS OF INERTIA BASED ON DYNAMIC BALANCE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jun; GUAN Yingzi; QI Naiming

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic balance quality of a rotating object is an important factor to maintain the stability and accuracy for motion. The azimuth of the principal axis of inertia is a major sign of dynamic balance. A usual method is measuring moment of inertia matrix relative to some base coordinates on a rotary inertia machine so as to calculate the azimuth of principal axis of inertia. By using the measured unbalance results on the two trimmed planes on a vertical hard bearing double-plane dynamic balancing machine, the dimension and direction of couple unbalance can be found. An azimuth angle formula for the principal axis of inertia is derived and is solved by using unbalance quantities. The experiments indicate that method based on dynamic balancing measurement is proved rational and effective and has a fine precision.

  20. Active Blade Pitch Control for Straight Bladed Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine of New Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    As Development of small vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) for urban use is becoming an interesting topic both within industry and academia. However, there are few new designs of vertical axis turbines which are customized for building integration. These are getting importance because they operate...... at low rotational speed producing very less noise during operation, although these are less efficient than Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT). The efficiency of a VAWT has been significantly improved by H-Darrieus VAWT design based on double airfoil technology as demonstrated by the authors...... multiple stream tube method is used to determine the performance of the H-Darrieus VAWT. The power coefficient is compared with that of a fixed pitch and a variable pitch double airfoil blade VAWT. It is demonstrated that an improvement in power coefficient by 20% is achieved and the turbine could start...

  1. Film stability in a vertical rotating tube with a core-gas flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, G. S. R.; Lu, P. C.; Ostrach, S.

    1971-01-01

    The linear hydrodynamic stability of a thin-liquid layer flowing along the inside wall of a vertical tube rotating about its axis in the presence of a core-gas flow is examined. The stability problem is formulated under the conditions that the liquid film is thin, the density and viscosity ratios of gas to liquid are small and the relative (axial) pressure gradient in the gas is of the same order as gravity. The resulting eigenvalue problem is first solved by a perturbation method appropriate to axisymmetric long-wave disturbances. The damped nature (to within the thin-film and other approximations made) of the nonaxisymmetric and short-wave disturbances is noted. In view of the limitations on a truncated perturbation solution when the disturbance wavenumber is not small, an initial value method using digital computer is presented. Stability characteristics of neutral, growing, and damped modes are presented showing the influences of rotation, surface tension, and the core-gas flow. Energy balance in a neutral mode is also illustrated.

  2. Effect of rotation on ferro thermohaline convection

    CERN Document Server

    Sekar, R; Ramanathan, A

    2000-01-01

    The ferro thermohaline convection in a rotating medium heated from below and salted from above has been analysed. The solute is magnetic oxide, which modifies the magnetic field established as a perturbation. The effect of salinity has been included in magnetisation and in the density of the ferrofluid. The conditions for both stationary and oscillatory modes have been obtained using linear stability analysis and it has been found that stationary mode is favoured in comparison with oscillatory mode. The numerical and graphical results are presented. It has been observed that rotation stabilises the system.

  3. Rotational spacings in superdeformed bands of nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasman, R.R.; Farhan, A.

    1995-08-01

    An unexpected result of the experimental investigation of superdeformed rotational bands is the observation of near-identical dynamic moments of inertia in different nuclei. This phenomenon was also noted in normally deformed rotational bands. A priori, the BCS method is suspect at I = 0 for the treatment of superdeformed nuclear shapes because the single-particle level density near the nuclear surface is small. If it were large, there would be no superdeformed minimum. At high spin, pairing correlations are further weakened, and the BCS method becomes even worse.

  4. M/L, H-alpha Rotation Curves, and HI Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals: I. Data

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, N P; Herter, T; Giovanelli, R; Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Herter, Terry; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    A survey of 329 nearby galaxies (redshift z < 0.045) has been conducted to study the distribution of mass and light within spiral galaxies over a range of environments. The 18 observed clusters and groups span a range of richness, density, and X-ray temperature, and are supplemented by a set of 30 isolated field galaxies. Optical spectroscopy taken with the 200-inch Hale Telescope provides separately resolved H-alpha and [NII] major axis rotation curves for the complete set of galaxies, which are analyzed to yield velocity widths and profile shapes, extents and gradients. HI line profiles provide an independent velocity width measurement and a measure of HI gas mass and distribution. I-band images are used to deconvolve profiles into disk and bulge components, to determine global luminosities and ellipticities, and to check morphological classification. These data are combined to form a unified data set ideal for the study of the effects of environment upon galaxy evolution.

  5. Effect of core--mantle and tidal torques on Mercury's spin axis orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Peale, Stanton J; Hauck,, Steven A; Solomon, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    The rotational evolution of Mercury's mantle and its core under conservative and dissipative torques is important for understanding the planet's spin state. Dissipation results from tides and viscous, magnetic and topographic core--mantle interactions. The dissipative core--mantle torques take the system to an equilibrium state wherein both spins are fixed in the frame precessing with the orbit, and in which the mantle and core are differentially rotating. This equilibrium exhibits a mantle spin axis that is offset from the Cassini state by larger amounts for weaker core--mantle coupling for all three dissipative core--mantle coupling mechanisms, and the spin axis of the core is separated farther from that of the mantle, leading to larger differential rotation. The relatively strong core--mantle coupling necessary to bring the mantle spin axis to its observed position close to the Cassini state is not obtained by any of the three dissipative core--mantle coupling mechanisms. For a hydrostatic ellipsoidal core...

  6. Review of wind simulation methods for horizontal-axis wind turbine analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D. C.; Connell, J. R.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews three reports on simulation of winds for use in wind turbine fatigue analysis. The three reports are presumed to represent the state of the art. The Purdue and Sandia methods simulate correlated wind data at two points rotating as on the rotor of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The PNL method at present simulates only one point, which rotates either as on a horizontal-axis wind turbine blade or as on a vertical-axis wind turbine blade. The spectra of simulated data are presented from the Sandia and PNL models under comparable input conditions, and the energy calculated in the rotational spikes in the spectra by the two models is compared. Although agreement between the two methods is not impressive at this time, improvement of the Sandia and PNL methods is recommended as the best way to advance the state of the art. Physical deficiencies of the models are cited in the report and technical recommendations are made for improvement. The report also reviews two general methods for simulating single-point data, called the harmonic method and the white noise method. The harmonic method, which is the basis of all three specific methods reviewed, is recommended over the white noise method in simulating winds for wind turbine analysis.

  7. Microscopic Faraday rotation measurement system using pulsed magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Shigeki; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2009-09-01

    Microscopic Faraday rotation measurement system using a pulsed magnetic field has been constructed, which can be applied to micron sized diamagnetic and paramagnetic materials. A pulsed magnetic coil could generate a maximum magnetic flux density of about 12 T. The performance of the microscopic Faraday rotation apparatus was demonstrated by the measurement of the Verdet constant V of a polystyrene particle, after the calibration of the pulsed magnetic flux density using a glass plate as a standard material. Also, the magneto-optical rotation dispersion of some diamagnetic substances have been measured and analyzed with V=alambda(-2)+b. The values of a and b were compared to their magnetic susceptibilities.

  8. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  9. A rotating quantum vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenci, V.A. de; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-11-01

    It was investigated which mapping has to be used to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a non-Galilean coordinate transformation, the creation-annihilation operators of a massive scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state(a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. Polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view were analysed. 65 refs.

  10. MOTION ERROR ESTIMATION OF5-AXIS MACHINING CENTER USING DBB METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huawei; ZHANG Dawei; TIAN Yanling; ICHIRO Hagiwara

    2006-01-01

    In order to estimate the motion errors of 5-axis machine center, the double ball bar (DBB)method is adopted to realize the diagnosis procedure. The motion error sources of rotary axes in 5-axis machining center comprise of the alignment error of rotary axes and the angular error due to various factors, e.g. the inclination of rotary axes. From sensitive viewpoints, each motion error is possible to have a particular sensitive direction in which deviation of DBB error trace arises from only some specific error sources. The model of the DBB error trace is established according to the spatial geometry theory. Accordingly, the sensitive direction of each motion error source is made clear through numerical simulation, which is used as the reference patterns for rotational error estimation.The estimation method is proposed to easily estimate the motion error sources of rotary axes in quantitative manner. To verify the proposed DBB method for rotational error estimation, the experimental tests are carried out on a 5-axis machining center M-400 (MORISEIKI). The effect of the mismatch of the DBB is also studied to guarantee the estimation accuracy. From the experimental data, it is noted that the proposed estimation method for 5-axis machining center is feasible and effective.

  11. The Rotation of the halo of NGC 6822 from the radial velocities of carbon stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Graham P; Sibbons, Lisette F

    2016-01-01

    Using spectra taken with the AAOmega spectrograph, we measure the radial velocities of over 100 stars, many of which are intermediate age carbon stars, in the direction of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Kinematic analysis suggests that the carbon stars in the sample are associated with NGC 6822, and estimates of its radial velocity and galactic rotation are made from a star-by-star analysis of its carbon star population. We calculate a heliocentric radial velocity for NGC 6822 of $-51\\pm3$ \\kms\\ and show that the population rotates with a mean rotation speed of $11.2\\pm2.1$ \\kms\\ at a mean distance of 1.1 kpc from the galactic centre, about a rotation axis with a position angle of $26^\\circ\\pm13^\\circ$, as projected on the sky. This is close to the rotation axis of the HI gas disk and suggests that NGC 6822 is not a polar ring galaxy, but is dynamically closer to a late type galaxy. However, the rotation axis is not aligned with the minor axis of the AGB isodensity profiles and this remains a mystery.

  12. Effects of symmetrically alternative rotating flow on flocculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐继润; 张育新; 邢军; 孙永正; 徐海燕; 刘正宁; 康勇

    2003-01-01

    A symmetrically alternative rotating flow pattern was designed for flocculation process in order to produce large and dense flocs. The special effects of a symmetrically alternative rotating flow on the diameter and density of flocs were investigated. The results show that under the new fluid conditions, the primary particles on the outer part of the formed flocs may be cut down and the flocs contract at the end of the original rotating direction; then fluid changes its rotating direction, an opposite shearing is imposed to the flocs and makes some primary particles slide along the floc surface, leading to a denser floc; meanwhile, the broken and unflocculated particles on the trajectory may have opportunities to penetrate into or cohere to the flocs. Compared with the conventional rotating flow, the new-designed flow pattern can not only keep the floc size (even enlarge the floc diameter if a suitable flow is chosen) but also increase the floc density effectively.

  13. Electrovacuum Static Counter-Rotating Relativistic Dust Disks

    CERN Document Server

    González, G A

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study of the Counter-Rotating Model (CRM) for generic electrostatic (magnetostatic) axially symmetric thin disks without radial pressure is presented. We find a general constraint over the counter-rotating tangential velocities needed to cast the surface energy-momentum tensor of the disk as the superposition of two counter-rotating charged dust fluids. We then show that this constraint is satisfied if we take the two counter-rotating streams as circulating along electrogeodesics with equal and opposite tangential velocities. We also find explicit expressions for the energy densities, electrostatic (magnetostatic) charge densities and velocities of the counter-rotating fluids. Three specific examples are considered where we obtain some CRM well behaved based in simple solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations. The considered solutions are Reissner-Nordstrom in the electrostatic case, its magnetostatic counterpart and two solutions obtained from Taub-NUT and Kerr solutions.

  14. Determining the direction of a geometrical/optical reference axis in the coordinate system of a triaxial magnetometer sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz; Brauer, Peter; Merayo, José M.G.

    2002-01-01

    The reference coordinate axes of a magnetic vector field sensor are related to the instrument digital output vector (U) over bar by the calibration matrix C and the offset vector (O) over bar. In addition, this reference coordinate system must be related to (at least) two externally accessible...... optical or geometrical axes in order to be able to determine the precise orientation of the magnetic coordinate axes in an external reference system. Two methods for determining a reference axis in the sensor coordinates are discussed: (1) using a triaxial coil facility to measure the sensor orientation...... for two different positions, rotated about a fixed reference axis; (2) in the Earth's field the magnetometer sensor is rotated about a fixed axis into a number of (at least three) positions....

  15. Axis of Zodiacal light Near Tropic Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Nawar, S; Mikhail, J S; Morcos, A B; Ibrahim, Alhassan I

    2014-01-01

    The axis of zodiacal lights have been obtained in blue and yellow colors using photoelectric observations of zodiacal light. These observations have been carried out at Abu Simbel Site in Egypt, in October 1975. This site lies too near to the tropic of Cancer, at which the axis of the zodiacal light cone perpendiculars to the horizon. The results show that the plane of the zodiacal light is inclined to the normal by 1.59 degrees in blue color and 1.18 degrees in yellow color. This means that there is a slight variation in zodiacal light axis with wavelength, and the axis almost coincide with the ecliptic. The present results for blue color can be considered as the first one in the world near the tropic of Cancer.

  16. Counter-Rotatable Fan Gas Turbine Engine with Axial Flow Positive Displacement Worm Gas Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A counter-rotatable fan turbine engine includes a counter-rotatable fan section, a worm gas generator, and a low pressure turbine to power the counter-rotatable fan section. The low pressure turbine maybe counter-rotatable or have a single direction of rotation in which case it powers the counter-rotatable fan section through a gearbox. The gas generator has inner and outer bodies having offset inner and outer axes extending through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes and extending radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. A combustor section extends through at least a portion of the second section.

  17. Nonideal rotations in nuclear magnetic resonance: Estimation of coherence transfer leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerschow, Alexej [Materials Sciences Division, 11-D62, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemistry Department, D62 Hildebrand, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-07-15

    When spherical tensors are rotated by certain angles, coherence transfer selection rules may apply. For example, a {pi} rotation cleanly inverts the coherence order. A {pi}/2 rotation of a T{sub 0}{sup 1} tensor creates only T{sub {+-}}{sub 1}{sup 1} tensors. In this work estimations are given for the coherence transfer leakage under the action of rotations with small errors in the rotation angle or axis. Although the theory is stated with particular applications to NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in mind it is equally applicable wherever nonideal rotations of spherical tensors are considered (e.g., quantum computing and relaxation theory). In NMR it is useful for the estimation of coherence transfer leakage, especially in pulse sequences with many n{pi} pulses. The results are also applicable to spinors and half-integer representations of the rotation group. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Lagrangian velocity auto-correlations in statistically-steady rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Del Castello, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Lagrangian statistics of passive tracers in rotating turbulence is investigated by Particle Tracking Velocimetry. A confined and steadily-forced turbulent flow is subjected to five different rotation rates. The PDFs of the velocity components clearly reveal the anisotropy induced by background rotation. Although the statistical properties of the horizontal turbulent flow field are approximately isotropic, in agreement with previously reported results by van Bokhoven and coworkers [Phys. Fluids 21, 096601 (2009)], the velocity component parallel to the (vertical) rotation axis gets strongly reduced (compared to the horizontal ones) while the rotation is increased. The auto-correlation coefficients of all three components are progressively enhanced for increasing rotation rates, although the vertical one shows a tendency to decrease for slow rotation rates. The decorrelation is approximately exponential. Lagrangian data compare favourably with previously reported Eulerian data for horizontal velocity components...

  19. The effect of lower hybrid waves on JET plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, M. F. F.; Kirov, K.; Bernardo, J.; Brix, M.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hellsten, T.; Jonsson, T.; Mailloux, J.; Ongena, J.; Parra, F.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on observations of rotation in JET plasmas with lower hybrid current drive. Lower hybrid (LH) has a clear impact on rotation. The changes in core rotation can be either in the co- or counter-current directions. Experimental features that could determine the direction of rotation were investigated. Changes from co- to counter-rotation as the q-profile evolves from above unity to below unity suggests that magnetic shear could be important. However, LH can drive either co- or counter-rotation in discharges with similar magnetic shear and at the same plasma current. It is not clear if a slightly lower density is significant. A power scan at fixed density, shows a lower hybrid power threshold around 3 MW. For smaller LH powers, counter rotation increases with power, while for larger powers a trend towards co-rotation is found. The estimated counter-torque from the LH waves, would not explain the observed angular frequencies, neither would it explain the observation of co-rotation.

  20. Evaluation of Distal Femoral Rotational Alignment with Spiral CT Scan before Total Knee Arthroplasty (A Study in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluating the landmarks for rotation of the distal femur is a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Although the posterior femoral condyle axis is a good landmark for surgeons, the surgical transepicondylar axis may be a better option with the help of preoperative CT scanning. The purpose of this study was to ascertain relationships among the axes’ guiding distal femur rotational alignment in preoperative CT scans of Iranian patients who were candidates for total knee arthroplasty and the effects of age, gender, and knee alignment on these relationships. Methods: One hundred and eight cases who were admitted to two university hospitals for total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. The rotation of the distal femur was evaluated using single axial CT images through the femoral epicondyle. Four lines were drawn digitally in this view: anatomical and surgical transepicondylar axes, posterior condylar axis and the Whiteside anteroposterior line. The alignment of the extremity was evaluated in the standing alignment view. Then the angles were measured along these lines and their relationship was evaluated. Results: The mean angle between the anatomical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis and between the surgical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis were 5.9 ± 1.6 degrees and 1.6±1.7 degrees respectively. The mean angle between the Whiteside’s anteroposterior line and the line perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was 3.7±2.1 degrees. Significant differences existed between the two genders in these relationships. No significant correlation between the age of patients and angles of the distal femur was detected. The anatomical surgical transepicondylar axis was in 4.3 degrees external rotation in relation to the surgical transepicondylar axis. Conclusion: Preoperative CT scanning can help accurately determine rotational landmarks of the distal femur. If one of the reference axes cannot be

  1. Field-free long-lived alignment of molecules in extreme rotational states

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, A A; Milner, V

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new optical tool - a "two-dimensional optical centrifuge", capable of aligning molecules in extreme rotational states. Unlike the conventional centrifuge, which confines the molecules in the plane of their rotation, its two-dimensional version aligns the molecules along a well-defined axis, similarly to the effect of a single linearly polarized laser pulse, but at a much higher level of rotational excitation. The increased robustness of ultra-high rotational states with respect to collisions results in a longer life time of the created alignment in dense media, offering new possibilities for studying and utilizing aligned molecular ensembles under ambient conditions.

  2. GAROS, an aeroelastic code for coupled fixed-rotating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, M. [Aerodyn Energiestyseme GmbH, Rendsburg (Germany); Vollan, A. [Pilatus Flugzeugwerke, Stans (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    The GAROS (General Analysis of Rotating Structures) program system has been specially designed to calculate aeroelastic stability and dynamic response of horizontal axis wind energy converters. Nevertheless it is also suitable for the dynamic analysis of helicopter rotors and has been used in the analysis of car bodies taking account of rotating wheels. GAROS was developed over the last 17 years. In the following the mechanical and the aerodynamic model will be discussed in detail. A short overview of the solution methods for the equation of motion in time and frequency domain will ge given. After this one example for the FEM model of the rotor and tower will be discussed. (EG)

  3. Lift of a rotating circular cylinder in unsteady flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Stefan; Mandviwalla, Xerxes; Vita, Luca

    2012-01-01

    A cylinder rotating in steady current experiences a lift known as the Magnus effect. In the present study the effect of waves on the Magnus effect has been investigated. This situation is experienced with the novel floating offshore vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) concept called the DEEPWIND...... concept, which incorporates a rotating spar buoy and thereby utilizes seawater as a roller-bearing. The a priori assumption and the results suggest that the lift in waves, to a first approximation, may be represented by a formulation similar to the well-known Morison formulation. The force coefficients...

  4. Numerical simulation of VAWT on the effects of rotation cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shuda; Cao, Yang; Ren, Fuji

    2017-06-01

    Based on Finite Element Analysis Method, studying on Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) which is added rotating cylinder in front of its air foils, especially focusing on the analysis of NACA6 series air foils about variation of lift to drag ratio. Choosing the most suitable blades with rotary cylinder added on leading edge. Analysis indicates that the front rotating cylinders on the VAWT is benefit to lift rise and drag fall. The most suitable air foil whose design lift coefficient is 0.8, the blades relative thickness is 20%, and the optimistic tip speed ratio is about 7.

  5. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  6. Fractal Aggregation Under Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng-Min; WU Li-Li; LU Hang-Jun; LI Qiao-Wen; YE Gao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By means of the Monte Carlo simulation, a fractal growth model is introduced to describe diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) under rotation. Patterns which are different from the classical DLA model are observed and the fractal dimension of such clusters is calculated. It is found that the pattern of the clusters and their fractal dimension depend strongly on the rotation velocity of the diffusing particle. Our results indicate the transition from fractal to non-fractal behavior of growing cluster with increasing rotation velocity, i.e. for small enough angular velocity ω the fractal dimension decreases with increasing ω, but then, with increasing rotation velocity, the fractal dimension increases and the cluster becomes compact and tends to non-fractal.

  7. Fractal Aggregation Under Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUFeng-Min; WULi-Li; LUHang-Jun; LIQiao-Wen; YEGao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By means of the Monte Carlo simulation, a fractal growth model is introduced to describe diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) under rotation. Patterns which are different from the classical DLA model are observed and the fractal dimension of such clusters is calculated. It is found that the pattern of the clusters and their fractal dimension depend strongly on the rotation velocity of the diffusing particle. Our results indicate the transition from fractal to non-fractal behavior of growing cluster with increasing rotation velocity, i.e. for small enough angular velocity ω; thefractal dimension decreases with increasing ω;, but then, with increasing rotation velocity, the fractal dimension increases and the cluster becomes compact and tends to non-fractal.

  8. Solar rotation gravitational moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ajabshirizadeh

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Gravitational multipole moments of the Sun are still poorly known. Theoretically, the difficulty is mainly due to the differential rotation for which the velocity rate varies both on the surface and with the depth. From an observational point of view, the multipole moments cannot be directly measured. However, recent progresses have been made proving the existence of a strong radial differential rotation in a thin layer near the solar surface (the leptocline. Applying the theory of rotating stars, we will first compute values of J2 and J4 taking into account the radial gradient of rotation, then we will compare these values with the existing ones, giving a more complete review. We will explain some astrophysical outcomes, mainly on the relativistic Post Newtonian parameters. Finally we will conclude by indicating how space experiments (balloon SDS flights, Golf NG, Beppi-Colombo, Gaia... will be essential to unambiguously determine these parameters.

  9. UMAPRM: Uniformly sampling the medial axis

    KAUST Repository

    Yeh, Hsin-Yi Cindy

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Maintaining clearance, or distance from obstacles, is a vital component of successful motion planning algorithms. Maintaining high clearance often creates safer paths for robots. Contemporary sampling-based planning algorithms That utilize The medial axis, or The set of all points equidistant To Two or more obstacles, produce higher clearance paths. However, They are biased heavily Toward certain portions of The medial axis, sometimes ignoring parts critical To planning, e.g., specific Types of narrow passages. We introduce Uniform Medial Axis Probabilistic RoadMap (UMAPRM), a novel planning variant That generates samples uniformly on The medial axis of The free portion of Cspace. We Theoretically analyze The distribution generated by UMAPRM and show its uniformity. Our results show That UMAPRM\\'s distribution of samples along The medial axis is not only uniform but also preferable To other medial axis samplers in certain planning problems. We demonstrate That UMAPRM has negligible computational overhead over other sampling Techniques and can solve problems The others could not, e.g., a bug Trap. Finally, we demonstrate UMAPRM successfully generates higher clearance paths in The examples.

  10. Axis Offset Estimation of VLBI Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krásná, Hana; Nickola, Marisa; Böhm, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Axis offset models have to be applied for VLBI telescopes with pointing axes which do not intersect. In this work, we estimated the axis offsets for VLBI antennas in a global adjustment of suitable IVS 24-hour sessions (1984.0-2014.0) with the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS). In particular, we focused on the two radio telescopes of the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) in South Africa. For the older 26-m telescope we compared the estimated axis offset values before (6699.2 ± 0.5 mm) and after (6707.3 ± 0.8 mm) the bearing repair in 2010. A comparison with axis offset estimates from other geodetic techniques, such as GNSS or conventional local survey, was made. The estimated axis offset for the newer 15-m telescope (1495.0 ± 3.4 mm) agrees with the estimated value from the GPS survey in 2007. Furthermore, we assessed the influence of differences in the axis offsets on the estimated geodetic parameters, such as station coordinates or Earth Orientation Parameters.

  11. Sex differences in the HPA axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Nirupa; Workman, Joanna L; Lee, Tiffany T; Innala, Leyla; Viau, Victor

    2014-07-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major component of the systems that respond to stress, by coordinating the neuroendocrine and autonomic responses. Tightly controlled regulation of HPA responses is critical for maintaining mental and physical health, as hyper- and hypo-activity have been linked to disease states. A long history of research has revealed sex differences in numerous components of the HPA stress system and its responses, which may partially form the basis for sex disparities in disease development. Despite this, many studies use male subjects exclusively, while fewer reports involve females or provide direct sex comparisons. The purpose of this article is to present sex comparisons in the functional and molecular aspects of the HPA axis, through various phases of activity, including basal, acute stress, and chronic stress conditions. The HPA axis in females initiates more rapidly and produces a greater output of stress hormones. This review focuses on the interactions between the gonadal hormone system and the HPA axis as the key mediators of these sex differences, whereby androgens increase and estrogens decrease HPA activity in adulthood. In addition to the effects of gonadal hormones on the adult response, morphological impacts of hormone exposure during development are also involved in mediating sex differences. Additional systems impinging on the HPA axis that contribute to sex differences include the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine and serotonin. Diverse signals originating from the brain and periphery are integrated to determine the level of HPA axis activity, and these signals are, in many cases, sex-specific.

  12. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  13. Rotational spectrum of phenylglycinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Alcides; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-11-01

    Solid samples of phenylglycinol were vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through rotational spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion using two different techniques: chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and narrow band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. One conformer, bearing an O-H···N and an N-H···π intramolecular hydrogen bonds, could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically.

  14. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusz Janusz; Brzezinski Aleksander; Kosek Wieslaw; Nastula Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals wit...

  15. RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, D; Papadakis, I E; Hovatta, T; Pearson, T J; Liodakis, I; Panopoulou, G V; Angelakis, E; Baloković, M; Das, H; Khodade, P; Kiehlmann, S; King, O G; Kus, A; Kylafis, N; Mahabal, A; Marecki, A; Modi, D; Myserlis, I; Paleologou, E; Papamastorakis, I; Pazderska, B; Pazderski, E; Rajarshi, C; Ramaprakash, A; Readhead, A C S; Reig, P; Tassis, K; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane...

  16. On the flow between a rotating and a coaxial fixed disc - Numerical validation of the radial similarity hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L. A.; Pecheux, J.; Restivo, A. O.

    1991-06-01

    The rotating flow between coaxial disks in a radially confined geometry is studied by numerical integration of the full Navier-Stokes equations. The results indicate that both Batchelor's and Stewartson's flow structures can be observed near the axis of rotation, depending on what conditions are set at the peripheral boundary.

  17. Energy in density gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindric configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and in particular in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit ...

  18. Energy in density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  19. Multi-view autostereoscopic projection display using rotating screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldes, Osman; Akşit, Kaan; Urey, Hakan

    2013-11-18

    A new technique for multi-view autostereoscopic projection display is proposed, and demonstrated. The technique uses two mobile projectors, a rotating retro-reflective diffuser screen, and a head-tracking camera. As two dynamic viewing slits are created at the viewer's position, the slits can track the position of the eyes by rotating the screen. The display allows a viewer to move approximately 700 mm along the horizontal axis, and 500 mm along the vertical axis with an average crosstalk below 5 %. Two screen prototypes with different diffusers have been tried, and they provide luminance levels of 60 Cd/m2, and 160 Cd/m2 within the viewing field.

  20. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....