WorldWideScience

Sample records for density plasma region

  1. On the diurnal variability in F2-region plasma density above the EISCAT Svalbard radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Two long runs of EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, in February 2001 and October 2002, have been analysed with respect to variability in the F2 region peak density and altitude. The diurnal variation in the F2 peak density exhibits one maximum around 12:00 MLT and another around 23:00 MLT, consistent with solar wind controlled transport of EUV ionized plasma across the polar cap from day to night. High density plasma patch material is drawn in through the cusp inflow region independent of IMF BY. There is no apparent IMF BY asymmetry on the intake of high density plasma, but the trajectory of its motion is strongly BY dependent. Comparison with the international reference ionosphere model (IRI2001 clearly demonstrates that the model does not take account of the cross-polar transport of F2-region plasma, and hence has limited applicability in polar cap regions.

  2. A robust method for handling low density regions in hybrid simulations for collisionless plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Takanobu, E-mail: amano@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Higashimori, Katsuaki; Shirakawa, Keisuke

    2014-10-15

    A robust method to handle vacuum and near vacuum regions in hybrid simulations for space and astrophysical plasmas is presented. The conventional hybrid simulation model dealing with kinetic ions and a massless charge-neutralizing electron fluid is known to be susceptible to numerical instability due to divergence of the whistler-mode wave dispersion, as well as division-by-density operation in regions of low density. Consequently, a pure vacuum region is not allowed to exist in the simulation domain unless some ad hoc technique is used. To resolve this difficulty, an alternative way to introduce finite electron inertia effect is proposed. Contrary to the conventional method, the proposed one introduces a correction to the electric field rather than the magnetic field. It is shown that the generalized Ohm's law correctly reduces to Laplace's equation in a vacuum which therefore does not involve any numerical problems. In addition, a variable ion-to-electron mass ratio is introduced to reduce the phase velocity of high frequency whistler waves at low density regions so that the stability condition is always satisfied. It is demonstrated that the proposed model is able to handle near vacuum regions generated as a result of nonlinear self-consistent development of the system, as well as pure vacuum regions set up at the initial condition, without losing the advantages of the standard hybrid code.

  3. A Robust Method for Handling Low Density Regions in Hybrid Simulations for Collisionless Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, Takanobu; Shirakawa, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    A robust method to handle vacuum and near vacuum regions in hybrid simulations for space and astrophysical plasmas is presented. The conventional hybrid simulation model dealing with kinetic ions and a massless charge-neutralizing electron fluid is known to be susceptible to numerical instability due to divergence of the whistler-mode wave dispersion, as well as division-by-density operation in regions of low density. Consequently, a pure vacuum region is not allowed to exist in the simulation domain unless some ad hoc technique is used. To resolve this difficulty, an alternative way to introduce finite electron inertia effect is proposed. Contrary to the conventional method, the proposed one introduces a correction to the electric field rather than the magnetic field. It is shown that the generalized Ohm's law correctly reduces to Laplace's equation in a vacuum which therefore does not involve any numerical problems. In addition, a variable ion-to-electron mass ratio is introduced to reduce the phase velocit...

  4. Observations of high-plasma density region in the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during early activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Paulsson, J. J. P.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Odelstad, E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Koenders, C.; Eriksson, A. I.; Miloch, W. J.

    2016-11-01

    In 2014 September, as Rosetta transitioned to close bound orbits at 30 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Rosetta Plasma Consortium Langmuir probe (RPC-LAP) data showed large systematic fluctuations in both the spacecraft potential and the collected currents. We analyse the potential bias sweeps from RPC-LAP, from which we extract three sets of parameters: (1) knee potential, that we relate to the spacecraft potential, (2) the ion attraction current, which is composed of the photoelectron emission current from the probe as well as contributions from local ions, secondary emission, and low-energy electrons, and (3) an electron current whose variation is, in turn, an estimate of the electron density variation. We study the evolution of these parameters between 4 and 3.2 au in heliocentric and cometocentric frames. We find on September 9 a transition into a high-density plasma region characterized by increased knee potential fluctuations and plasma currents to the probe. In conjunction with previous studies, the early cometary plasma can be seen as composed of two regions: an outer region characterized by solar wind plasma, and small quantities of pick-up ions, and an inner region with enhanced plasma densities. This conclusion is in agreement with other RPC instruments such as RPC-MAG, RPC-IES and RPC-ICA, and numerical simulations.

  5. Stochastic Acceleration of Electrons by the Right-Hand Extraordinary Mode in the High Density Plasma Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; ZHENG Hui-Nan; WANG Shui

    2005-01-01

    @@ The resonant acceleration of electrons by the superluminous R-X mode is evaluated in the high density plasma region of Earth, specifically around the geostationary orbit. The corresponding resonant frequency range together with the harmonic N required for producing a significant acceleration is studied in detail. It is found that the stochastic acceleration is basically controlled by the harmonic N and a dimensionless parameter α = |Ωe2|/ωp2e (where |Ωe| and ωpe are the electron gyrofrequency and plasma frequency respectively). For α = 0.1 (around the geostationary orbit), there are not gyroresonances occurring between electrons and right-hand extraordinarymode electromagnetic waves until higher harmonics N ≥ 4; while for α = 0.5, the gyroresonance begins at N = 2.Substantial acceleration of electrons by the right-hand extraordinary mode is possible for those higher harmonic(N > 1) resonances over a wide range of wave normal angles θ. This indicates that higher harmonic resonance can play an important role on the electron acceleration in the high density plasma region (α< 1).

  6. Comparison of the orientation of small-scale electron density irregularities and F region plasma flow direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Tereshchenko

    Full Text Available Results are shown from an experimental campaign where satellite scintillation was observed at three sites at high latitudes and, simultaneously, the F region plasma flow was measured by the nearby EISCAT incoherent scatter radar. The anisotropy parameters of field-aligned irregularities are determined from amplitude scintillation using a method based on the variance of the relative logarithmic amplitude. The orientation of the anisotropy in a plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field is compared with the direction of F region plasma flow. The results indicate that in most cases a good agreement between the two directions is obtained.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities

  7. Negative Plasma Densities Raise Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-26

    Nearly all the matter encountered on Earth is either a solid, liquid, or gas. Yet plasma-the fourth state of matter-comprises more than 99 percent of the visible universe. Understanding the physical characteristics of plasmas is important to many areas of scientific research, such as the development of fusion as a clean, renewable energy source. Lawrence Livermore scientists study the physics of plasmas in their pursuit to create fusion energy, because plasmas are an integral part of that process. When deuterium and tritium are heated to the extreme temperatures needed to achieve and sustain a fusion reaction (about 100 million degrees), the electrons in these light atoms become separated from the nuclei. This process of separation is called ionization, and the resulting collection of negatively charged free electrons and positively charged nuclei is known as a plasma. Although plasmas and gases have many similar properties, plasmas differ from gases in that they are good conductors of electricity and can generate magnetic fields. For the past decade, x-ray laser interferometry has been used in the laboratory for measuring a plasma's index of refraction to determine plasma density. (The index of refraction for a given material is defined as the wavelength of light in a vacuum divided by the wavelength of light traveling through the material.) Until now, plasma physicists expected to find an index of refraction less than one. Researchers from Livermore and Colorado State University recently conducted experiments on aluminum plasmas at the Laboratory's COMET laser facility and observed results in which the index of refraction was greater than one. This surprising result implied a negative electron density. Livermore physicist Joseph Nilsen and his colleagues from Livermore and the University of Notre Dame have performed sophisticated calculations to explain this phenomenon. Previously, researchers believed that only free electrons contributed to the index

  8. Equatorial F-region plasma density estimation with incoherent scatter radar using a transverse-mode differential-phase method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhaomei

    This dissertation presents a novel data acquisition and analysis method for the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar to measure high-precision drifts and ionospheric density simultaneously at F-region heights. Since high-precision drift measurements favor radar return signals with the narrowest possible frequency spectra, Jicamarca drifts observations are conducted using the linear-polarized transverse radar beams. Transverse-beam returns are collected using an orthogonal pair of linear-polarized antennas, and the average power as well as phase difference of the antenna outputs are fitted to appropriate data models developed based on the incoherent scatter theory and the magneto-ionic theory. The crude differential-phase model when B⃗o is characterized in terms of straight line fields is applied to the January 2000 data. The most complete differential-phase model, which takes into account the misaligned angle between the dipole axes and geomagnetic northeast and southeast directions, as well as the radar beam width and variation of magnetic fields, is applied to the January 2000 data and June 2002 data. We present and compare the inversion results obtained with different versions of the data models and conclude that the geometrical details have only a minor impact on the inversion. We also find that the differential-phase method works better for the 15-min integrated January 2000 data than 5-min integrated June 2002 data since the former has the bigger densities, larger SNR of the backscattered signals, and more usable phase data. Our inversion results show reasonable agreement with the ionosonde data. The full correlation method is formulated and applied to the June 2002 data. Compared to the differential-phase method, this method is different in the sense that it utilizes the real and imaginary parts of the cross-correlation of orthogonal antenna outputs at the high altitudes where SNR is low and the off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix of measurement

  9. Carrier Density and Plasma Frequency of Aluminum Nanofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao DU; Jun GONG; Chao SUN; Rongfang HUANG; Lishi WEN; W.Y.Cheung; S.P.Wong

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the prerequisite and mode of electromagnetic response of Al nanofilms to electromagnetic wave field was suggested.Reflectance, transmittance in infrared region and carrier density of the films was measured. With the carrier density of the films, the dependence of their plasma frequencies on the film thickness was obtained. On the other hand, the dependence of absorptance on the frequency of electromagnetic wave field was set up by using the measured reflectance and transmittance,which provided plasma frequency-film thickness relation as well. Similarity of both plasma frequency-film thickness relations proved plasma resonance as a mode of electromagnetic response in Al nanofilms.

  10. Plasma flow in peripheral region of detached plasma in linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    A plasma flow structure is investigated using a Mach probe under detached plasma condition in a linear plasma device NAGDIS-II. A reverse flow along the magnetic field is observed in a steady-state at far-peripheral region of the plasma column in the upstream side from the recombination front. These experimental results indicate that plasma near the recombination front should strongly diffuse across the magnetic field, and it should be transported along the magnetic field in the reverse flow direction. Furthermore, bursty plasma density fluctuations associated with intermittent convective plasma transport are observed in the far-peripheral region of the plasma column in both upstream and downstream sides from the recombination front. Such a nondiffusive transport can contribute to the intermittent reverse plasma flow, and the experimental results indicate that intermittent transports are frequently produced near the recombination front.

  11. Giant electromagnetic vortex and MeV monoenergetic electrons generated by short laser pulses in underdense plasma near quarter critical density region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fuji, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    Very efficient generation of monoenergetic, about 1MeV , electrons from underdense plasma with its electron density close to the critical, when irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse, is found via two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The stimulated Raman scattering of a laser pulse with frequency omega300 keV .

  12. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  13. Plasma probe characteristics in low density hydrogen pulsed plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Zotovich, A I; Zyryanov, S M; Lopaev, D V; Bijkerk, F

    2014-01-01

    Probe theories are only applicable in the regime where the probe's perturbation of the plasma can be neglected. However, it is not always possible to know, a priori, that a particular probe theory can be successfully applied, especially in low density plasmas. This is especially difficult in the case of transient, low density plasmas. Here, we applied probe diagnostics in combination with a 2D particle-in-cell model, to an experiment with a pulsed low density hydrogen plasma. The calculations took into account the full chamber geometry, including the plasma probe as an electrode in the chamber. It was found that the simulations reproduce the time evolution of the probe IV characteristics with good accuracy. The disagreement between the simulated and probe measured plasma density is attributed to the limited applicability of probe theory to measurements of low density pulsed plasmas. Indeed, in the case studied here, probe measurements would lead to a large overestimate of the plasma density. In contrast, the ...

  14. Energy Density in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马忠彪; 苗洪; 高崇寿

    2003-01-01

    We study the energy density in quark-gluon plasma. At the very high temperature, the quark matter is a hot and dense matter in the colour deconfinement condition, and quarks can coalescent diquarks. Energy density of this system is worked out and compared with the energy density in the other two kinds of situations. Possible energy density is about eo ≈ 2.4 GeV/fm3 according to our estimation for quark matter including diquarks,

  15. The density limit in JET diverted plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.J.; Clement, S.; Gottardi, N.; Gowers, C.; Harbour, P.; Loarte, A.; Horton, L.; Lingertat, J.; Lowry, C.G.; Saibene, G.; Stamp, M.; Stork, D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Monk, R. [Royal Holloway Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1994-07-01

    In JET limiter plasmas the density limit is associated with radiated power fractions of 100% and, in plasmas with carbon limiters, it is invariably disruptive. However, in discharges with solid beryllium limiters the limit is identified with the formation of a MARFE and disruptions are less frequent. In addition, the improved conditioning of the vessel arising from the use of beryllium has significantly improved the density limit scaling, so that the maximum density rises with the square root of the input power. In diverted plasmas several confinement regimes exist, making the characterization of the density limit more complex. While the density limit in L-mode plasmas is generally disruptive, the limit in ELMy and ELM-free H-modes generally prompts a return to the L-mode and a disruption is not inevitable. The density limit does rise with the increasing power, but the L-to-H transition complicates the analysis. Nevertheless, at low plasma currents (<2 MA), densities significantly above the Greenwald limit can be achieved, while at higher currents power handling limitations have constrained the range of density which can be achieved. (authors). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique / B. Rauschenbach ... - In: Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research. B. 113. 1996. S. 266-269

  17. Mixing in plasma and low density jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, S.; Strykowski, P. J.; Pfender, E.

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the mechanisms which produce the large entrainment measured near the exit of thermal plasma torches. A research facility was constructed to examine low density jet behavior under similar dimensionless conditions as those produced by thermal plasma spray torches; the Reynolds number based on jet diameter and average properties was 1000, and the ratio of jet to ambient density was 0.07. This very low density jet produced organized vortex structures which were partially responsible for the rapid entrainment of external air. The formation of these organized structures could be disrupted by introducing turbulence, but the rapid entrainment process was not significantly affected. The structure of the jet produced by a commercial plasma torch was examined and compared to the low density research jet. At low gas flow rates the plasma jet also displayed the formation of coherent vortex structures, the passage frequency of which compared favorably with that measured in the low density research jet. At higher gas flow rates the shear layer of the plasma jet rapidly broke down producing relatively small scale turbulence. Visualizations of the hot plasma core were compared against measurements of the torch voltage fluctuations caused by arc instabilities. At low flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations were quite low and the plume was very steady. At higher flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations increased and produced “surging” and “whipping” in the hot potential core. It is believed that this low frequency unsteadiness is partially responsible for the rapid entrainment measured in plasma torches.

  18. Perturbing microwave beams by plasma density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köhn Alf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of microwaves across a turbulent plasma density layer is investigated with full-wave simulations. To properly represent a fusion edge-plasma, drift-wave turbulence is considered based on the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Scattering and broadening of a microwave beam whose amplitude distribution is of Gaussian shape is studied in detail as a function of certain turbulence properties. Parameters leading to the strongest deterioration of the microwave beam are identified and implications for existing experiments are given.

  19. An ensemble average method to estimate absolute TEC using radio beacon-based differential phase measurements: Applicability to regions of large latitudinal gradients in plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Bagiya, Mala S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Acharya, Y. B.; Yamamoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    A GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) system for total electron content (TEC) measurements using 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites (LEOS) is fabricated in house and made operational at Ahmedabad (23.04°N, 72.54°E geographic, dip latitude 17°N) since May 2013. This system receives the 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from high-inclination LEOS. The first few days of observations are presented in this work to bring out the efficacy of an ensemble average method to convert the relative TECs to absolute TECs. This method is a modified version of the differential Doppler-based method proposed by de Mendonca (1962) and suitable even for ionospheric regions with large spatial gradients. Comparison of TECs derived from a collocated GPS receiver shows that the absolute TECs estimated by this method are reliable estimates over regions with large spatial gradient. This method is useful even when only one receiving station is available. The differences between these observations are discussed to bring out the importance of the spatial differences between the ionospheric pierce points of these satellites. A few examples of the latitudinal variation of TEC during different local times using GRBR measurements are also presented, which demonstrates the potential of radio beacon measurements in capturing the large-scale plasma transport processes in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  20. Density threshold for plasma detachment in gas target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Mori, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Park, J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The simulated gas target divertor experiment has been performed to investigate the fundamental physics of plasma detachment in the linear plasma device, TPD-I, which has a high heat flux and high density plasma in steady state. The existence of a density threshold for plasma detachment was observed in our experiment. It is found that the electron-ion temperature relaxation process is a key to determine the density dependence of the plasma detachment. (orig.).

  1. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, T.; Gunell, H.

    1997-08-01

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson`s equation. 12 refs, 19 figs.

  2. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  3. Altitude dependence of plasma density in the auroral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We study the altitude dependence of plasma depletions above the auroral region in the 5000–30 000 km altitude range using five years of Polar spacecraft potential data. We find that besides a general decrease of plasma density with altitude, there frequently exist additional density depletions at 2–4 RE radial distance, where RE is the Earth radius. The position of the depletions tends to move to higher altitude when the ionospheric footpoint is sunlit as compared to darkness. Apart from these cavities at 2–4 RE radial distance, separate cavities above 4 RE occur in the midnight sector for all Kp and also in the morning sector for high Kp. In the evening sector our data remain inconclusive in this respect. This holds for the ILAT range 68–74. These additional depletions may be substorm-related. Our study shows that auroral phenomena modify the plasma density in the auroral region in such a way that a nontrivial and interesting altitude variation results, which reflects the nature of the auroral acceleration processes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  4. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  5. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  6. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  7. Plasma density perturbation caused by probes at low gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Natalia; Godyak, Valery

    2017-09-01

    An analysis of plasma parameter perturbations caused by a spherical probe immersed into a spherical plasma is presented for arbitrary collisionality and arbitrary ratios of probe to plasma dimensions. The plasma was modeled by the fluid plasma equations with ion inertia and nonlinear ion friction force that dominate plasma transport at low gas pressures. Significant depletion of the plasma density around the probe surface has been found. The area of plasma depletion coincides with the sensing area of different kinds of magnetic and microwave probes and will therefore lead to errors in data inferred from measurements with such probes.

  8. Wave Localization and Density Bunching in Pair Ion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2008-01-01

    By investigating the nonlinear propagation of high intensity electromagnetic (EM) waves in a pair ion plasma, whose symmetry is broken via contamination by a small fraction of high mass immobile ions, it is shown that this new and interesting state of (laboratory created) matter is capable of supporting structures that strongly localize and bunch the EM radiation with density excess in the region of localization. Testing of this prediction in controlled laboratory experiments can lend credence, inter alia, to conjectures on structure formation (via the same mechanism) in the MEV era of the early universe.

  9. A control approach for plasma density in tokamak machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncagni, Luca, E-mail: luca.boncagni@enea.it [EURATOM – ENEA Fusion Association, Frascati Research Center, Division of Fusion Physics, Rome, Frascati (Italy); Pucci, Daniele; Piesco, F.; Zarfati, Emanuele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica, Automatica e Gestionale ' ' Antonio Ruberti' ' , Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Mazzitelli, G. [EURATOM – ENEA Fusion Association, Frascati Research Center, Division of Fusion Physics, Rome, Frascati (Italy); Monaco, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica, Automatica e Gestionale ' ' Antonio Ruberti' ' , Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We show a control approach for line plasma density in tokamak. •We show a control approach for pressure in a tokamak chamber. •We show experimental results using one valve. -- Abstract: In tokamak machines, chamber pre-fill is crucial to attain plasma breakdown, while plasma density control is instrumental for several tasks such as machine protection and achievement of desired plasma performances. This paper sets the principles of a new control strategy for attaining both chamber pre-fill and plasma density regulation. Assuming that the actuation mean is a piezoelectric valve driven by a varying voltage, the proposed control laws ensure convergence to reference values of chamber pressure during pre-fill, and of plasma density during plasma discharge. Experimental results at FTU are presented to discuss weaknesses and strengths of the proposed control strategy. The whole system has been implemented by using the MARTe framework [1].

  10. Construction of Larger Area Density-Uniform Plasma with Collisional Inductively Coupled Plasma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LIU Wandong; BAI Xiaoyan; CHEN Zhipeng; WANG Huihui; LI LUO Chen; JI Liangliang; HU Bei

    2007-01-01

    The plasma density and electron temperature of a multi-source plasma system composed of several collisional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cells were measured by a double-probe. The discharges of the ICP cells were shown to be independent of each other. Furthermore, the total plasma density at simultaneous multi-cell discharge was observed to be approximately equal to the summation of the plasma density when the cells discharge separately. Based on the linear summation phenomenon, it was shown that a larger area plasma with a uniform density and temperature profile could be constructed with multi-collisional ICP cells.

  11. Large density amplification measured on jets ejected from a magnetized plasma gun

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Gunsu S.; You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Observation of a large density amplification in the collimating plasma jet ejected from a coplanar coaxial plasma gun is reported. The jet velocity is ~30 km s^-1 and the electron density increases from ~10^20 to 10^(22–23) m^-3. In previous spheromak experiments, electron density of the order 10^(19–21) m^-3 had been measured in the flux conserver region, but no density measurement had been reported for the source gun region. The coplanar geometry of our electrodes permits direct observation...

  12. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, L. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-IPP Association, Garching (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the W7-AS stellarator. (author)

  13. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, Louis [EURATOM-IPP Association, Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. (author)

  14. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Höll, A

    2006-01-01

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  15. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  16. Waves in relativistic electron beam in low-density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, I.; Sheinman (Chernenco, J.

    2016-11-01

    Waves in electron beam in low-density plasma are analyzed. The analysis is based on complete electrodynamics consideration. Dependencies of dispersion laws from system parameters are investigated. It is shown that when relativistic electron beam is passed through low-density plasma surface waves of two types may exist. The first type is a high frequency wave on a boundary between the beam and neutralization area and the second type wave is on the boundary between neutralization area and stationary plasma.

  17. Workshop on extremely high energy density plasmas and their diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Shozo (ed.)

    2001-09-01

    Compiled are the papers presented at the workshop on 'Extremely High Energy Density Plasmas and Their Diagnostics' held at National Institute for Fusion Science. The papers cover physics and applications of extremely high-energy density plasmas such as dense z-pinch, plasma focus, and intense pulsed charged beams. Separate abstracts were presented for 7 of the papers in this report. The remaining 25 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (author)

  18. Collimation of fast electrons in critical density plasma channel

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is generated through the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with a uniform critical density plasma in experiments and 2D PIC simulations. In the experiment, the uniform critical density plasma is created by ionizing an ultra-low density foam target. The spacial distribution of the fast electron is observed by Imaging Plate. 2D PIC simulation and post process analysis reveal magnetic collimation of energetic e...

  19. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1982-12-21

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described. (MOW)

  20. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  1. Analysis of plasma distribution near the extraction region in surface produced negative ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, A; Hatayama, A

    2014-02-01

    In study of a negative ion source, it is important to understand the plasma characteristics near the extraction region. A recent experiment in the NIFS-R&D ion source has suggested that a "double ion plasma layer" which is a region consisting of hydrogen positive and negative ions exists near the plasma grid (PG). Density distribution of plasma near the extraction region is studied analytically. It is shown that the density distribution depends on an amount of the surface produced negative ions and the double ion plasma layer is formed near the PG surface for the case of strong surface production.

  2. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  3. Computational Simulation of High Energy Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    the imploding liner. The PFS depends on a lithium barrier foil slowing the advance of deuterium up the coaxial gun to the corner. There the plasma ...the coaxial gun section, and Figure 4 shows the physical state of the plasma just prior to pinch. Figure 5 shows neutron yield reaching 1014 in this...details the channel geometry between the center cylinder and coaxial gas gun . The deuterium injection starts when the pressure of the deuterium gas in

  4. Proton Stopping Power of Different Density Profile Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Andreev, Alexander A; Schnürer, Matthias; Morales, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first one, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of an ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  5. PROTON STOPPING POWER OF DIFFERENT DENSITY PROFILE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first instance, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of a ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as a function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  6. Quantum Phenomena in High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, Margaret [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Kapteyn, Henry [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-05-10

    The possibility of implementing efficient (phase matched) HHG upconversion of deep- UV lasers in multiply-ionized plasmas, with potentially unprecedented conversion efficiency is a fascinating prospect. HHG results from the extreme nonlinear response of matter to intense laser light:high harmonics are radiated as a result of a quantum coherent electron recollision process that occurs during laser field ionization of an atom. Under current support from this grant in work published in Science in 2015, we discovered a new regime of bright HHG in highly-ionized plasmas driven by intense UV lasers, that generates bright harmonics to photon energies >280eV

  7. The use of the power density for identifying reconnection regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrin, M.; Andersson, L.; Vaivads, A.; Pitkänen, T.; Gunell, H.

    2015-10-01

    In the vicinity of magnetic reconnection, magnetic energy is transferred into kinetic energy. A reconnection region hence corresponds to a load, and it should manifest itself as large and positive values of the power density, E·J ≫ 0, where E is the electric field and J the current density. In this article we analyze Cluster plasma sheet data from 2001-2004 to investigate the use of the power density for identifying possible magnetic reconnection events from large sets of observed data. From theoretical arguments we show that an event with E·J≳20 pW/m3 in the Earth's magnetotail observed by the Cluster instruments (X potential reconnection regions, but selected events must be reviewed separately to confirm any possible reconnection signatures by looking for other signatures such as Hall electric and magnetic fields and reconnection jets. The power density can be computed from multispacecraft data, and we argue that the power density can be used as a tool for identifying possible reconnection events from large sets of data, e.g., from the Cluster and the Magnetospheric Multiscale missions.

  8. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  9. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  10. Charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 吕保维; O.Havnes

    1997-01-01

    The charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma, which is derived from the longitudinal dielectric permittivity of the dusty plasma, has been studied by kinetic theory. The results show that the P value, which describes the relative charge density on the dust in the plasma, and the charging frequency of a dust particle Ωc, which describes the ratio of charge changing of the dust particles, determine the character of the charge density fluctuation of low frequency. For a dusty plasma of P<<1, when the charging frequency Ωc is much smaller than the dusty plasma frequency wd, there is a strong charge density fluctuation which is of character of dust acoustic eigen wave. For a dusty plasma of P>>1, when the frequency Ωc, is much larger than wd there are weaker fluctuations with a wide spectrum. The results have been applied to the ionosphere and the range of radius and density of dust particles is found, where a strong charge density fluctuation of low frequency should exist.

  11. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 1021 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  12. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio, E-mail: komori@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than {approx} 1 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is {approx} 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  13. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control

    CERN Document Server

    Gueroult, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Plasma densification through magnetic compression has been suggested for time-resolved control of the wave properties in plasma-based accelerators. Using particle in cell simulations with real mass ratio, the practicality of large magnetic compression on timescales shorter than the ion gyro-period is investigated. For compression times shorter than the transit time of a compressional Alfven wave across the plasma slab, results show the formation of two counter-propagating shock waves, leading to a highly non-uniform plasma density profile. Furthermore, the plasma slab displays large hydromagnetic like oscillations after the driving field has reached steady state. Peak compression is obtained when the two shocks collide in the mid-plane. At this instant, very large plasma heating is observed, and plasma $\\beta$ is estimated to be about $1$. Although these results point out a densification mechanism quite different and more complex than initially envisioned, these features could possibly be advantageous in part...

  14. Evolution of the SOL plasma background at density shoulder formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Isa, Federico Antonio; Carralero, Daniel; Lunt, Tilmann; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-12-15

    One of the main problems of our age is the ever increasing demand of energy. This prompts the search for new energy sources which should have the advantages of being nearly inexhaustible and usable to produce a predictable amount of energy. A possible solution is to build a reactor based on nuclear fusion. ITER will be the first divertor Tokamak to reach fusion break even and it will pave the way to a commercial use of fusion to produce sustainable and clean energy. One of the biggest obstacles to the construction of a commercial fusion reactor is represented by the heat and particle flux toward the main chamber plasma facing components and the divertor targets. A fusion reactor will likely experience power loads and erosion on the verge of the technical limits of available plasma facing materials. To predict properly the distribution of those fluxes between the divertor and the main chamber, a better understanding of the physics in the open field lines region (called Scrape-off layer or SOL) is required. This thesis, being developed in partnership with the Max-Planck-institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Garching bei Muenchen, DE), is framed in this context. In the SOL of L-mode (low confinement) discharges, qualitatively two kinds of density profiles can be distinguished. The first one is characterized by a strong density gradient in the vicinity of the separatrix, followed by a flat region towards the far SOL. The second profile lacks such a strong gradient and displays an almost linear decay in the whole SOL. The latter kind of density profile is characterized by stronger fluxes toward the first wall with respect to the first kind. This my be a threat for the ITER unlike the divertor targets which are made of tungsten, the first wall will be made beryllium which can suffer damage from sputtering. This work is focused on understanding the physics behind the transition between those two profiles, the so-called density shoulder formation. After the shoulder formation it is

  15. High density plasma production in a multicusp plasma generator with RF antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuo; Hanada, Masaya; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Masanobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1992-10-01

    A high density plasma was produced by radio-frequency in a multicusp plasma generator. The generator is a cylindrical chamber of 200 mm in inner diameter and 270 mm in length with 1-3 turn copper tube antenna. By injecting a 2 MHz, 20 kW RF into the multicusp plasma generator, hydrogen plasma of an ion saturation current density of 120 mA/cm{sup 2} and a hydrogen plasma of a density of 6.0 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} was produced at a pressure of 0.6 Pa in the generator. The ion saturation current density was uniform over the central area of 100 mm in diameter. Coating the antenna with an insulator, we proved that the efficiency of the plasma production was improved. (author).

  16. High density plasma production in a multicusp plasma generator with RF antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuo; Hanada, Masaya; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Masanobu (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment)

    1992-10-01

    A high density plasma was produced by radio-frequency in a multicusp plasma generator. The generator is a cylindrical chamber of 200 mm in inner diameter and 270 mm in length with 1-3 turn copper tube antenna. By injecting a 2 MHz, 20 kW RF into the multicusp plasma generator, hydrogen plasma of an ion saturation current density of 120 mA/cm[sup 2] and a hydrogen plasma of a density of 6.0 x 10[sup 11] cm[sup -3] was produced at a pressure of 0.6 Pa in the generator. The ion saturation current density was uniform over the central area of 100 mm in diameter. Coating the antenna with an insulator, we proved that the efficiency of the plasma production was improved. (author).

  17. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  18. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3).

  19. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A. [ENEA CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F. [CISAS ' G.Colombo,' Universita degli studi di Padova, Via Venezia 15, 35131 Padova (Italy); Accatino, L. [ACC Antenna and MW tech, Via Trieste 16/B, 10098 Rivoli (Italy); Pavarin, D. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale (DII), Universita degli Studi di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); Selmo, A. [RESIA, Studio Progettazione e Realizzazione di Apparati Elettronici, via Roma 17, 37041 Albaredo d' Adige (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  20. Analysis of plasma equilibrium based on orbit-driven current density profile in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K., E-mail: nakamura@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Alam, M.M. [IGSES, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Jiang, Y.Z. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Kurihara, K.; Kawamata, Y.; Sueoka, M.; Takechi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Hasegawa, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Araki, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nagata, T. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • High energy particle guiding center orbit is calculated as a contour plot of conserved variable. • Current density profile is analyzed based on the orbit-driven current. • Plasma equilibrium is reconstructed by considering the hollow current profile. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven (ECCD) steady-state plasma on QUEST (B{sub t} = 0.25 T, R = 0.68 m, a = 0.40 m), plasma current seems to flow in the open magnetic surface outside of the closed magnetic surface in the low-field region according to plasma current fitting (PCF) method. We consider that the current in the open magnetic surface is due to orbit-driven current by high-energy particles in RF-driven plasma. So based on the analysis of current density profile based on the orbit-driven current, plasma equilibrium is to be calculated. We calculated high energy particles guiding center orbits as a contour plot of conserved variable in Hamiltonian formulation and considered particles initial position with different levels of energy and pitch angles that satisfy resonance condition. Then the profile of orbit-driven current is estimated by multiplying the particle density on the resonance surface and the velocity on the orbits. This analysis shows negative current near the magnetic axis and hollow current profile is expected even if pressure driven current is considered. Considering the hollow current profile shifted toward the low-field region, the equilibrium is fitted by J-EFIT coded by MATLAB.

  1. Partial Reflection D-region Electron Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The differential absorption technique of measuring electron densities as a function of height in the D region is discussed. In the basic experiment, pulses of medium or high frequency, usually at a fixed frequency (2 to MHz), are radiated upwards with known wave polarizatin (usually linear or circular) from a transmitter at ground level. Partial reflections, from ionospheric scatterers at heights below the E region, are received at the ground, and are resolved into two characteristic components, the ordinary (0) and extraordinary (E) modes whose amplitude ration A(x)/A(o) is then measured as a function of height, h. The heights of these are determined by delay times, the group retardation being minimal in the undisturbed D-region. The electronic system can be very simple. Power splitters and quadrature networks to separate the A(x) and A(o) components are commercially available at low prices and an A-D converter, height-gate system, and microcomputer allows the real-time calculation of mean amplitudes. The ratio of the coefficients of reflection of the two modes, as they originate at each reflection height is then calculable.

  2. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  3. The LC resonance probe for determining local plasma density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boris, D R; Fernsler, R F; Walton, S G, E-mail: david.boris.ctr@nrl.navy.mi [Naval Research Laboratory, Charge Particle Physics Branch-Code 6752, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    We present a novel plasma diagnostic for measuring local plasma density in reactive-gas plasmas, and depositing plasmas. The diagnostic uses a network analyzer to measure the LC resonance (LCR) frequency of a parallel plate capacitor with inductive leads. The location of the LCR ({omega}{sub R}) in frequency space is then used as a measure of the plasma dielectric constant bold varepsilon{sub p} between the plates. By properly constructing the LCR probe, {omega}{sub R} can be tuned such that {omega}{sub R} >> {omega}{sub ce}, where {omega}{sub ce} is the electron-cyclotron frequency. Thus, the probe can be used in plasmas with varying degrees of magnetization while avoiding complications introduced to bold varepsilon{sub p} when {omega} is comparable to {omega}{sub ce}. Density measurements from the LCR probe are compared with Langmuir probe measurements in an electron-beam generated plasma in which density varied from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. An axial magnetic field, typically used to confine the electron beam, was varied between 0 to 300 G. The LCR probe showed good agreement with a Langmuir probe across the entire range of magnetic fields.

  4. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B. [Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bruhwiler, David L. [RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); RadiaBeam Technologies LLC (United States); Smith, Jonathan [Tech-X UK Ltd, Daresbury, Cheshire WA4 4FS (United Kingdom); Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G. [Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Hidding, Bernhard [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical “plasma torch” distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  5. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Smith, Jonathan; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G.; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical "plasma torch" distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  6. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  7. Plasma-density evolution in compact polyacetal capillary discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasel, F.G.; Rocca, J.J.; Cortazar, O.D.; Szapiro, B.T. (Electrical Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)); Lee, R.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-05-01

    We have measured the temporal evolution of the electron density of plasmas produced in polyacetal capillaries with diameters between 0.5 and 1.5 mm excited by 110-ns full-width-at-half-maximum discharge pulses with currents between 13 and 42 kA. The electron density was determined from Stark-broadened line profiles of the 4[ital f]-3[ital d] O VI transition taking into account opacity effects. The electron density was found to increase continuously during the rise of the current pulse, and to decrease near the end of the current pulse, when a drop in plasma temperature causes the degree of ionization of the plasma to decrease. The peak plasma density in a 1-mm capillary excited by a 24-kA pulse was measured to be 5[times]10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3]. The plasma density was observed to increase linearly with discharge energy from 7.5[times]10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3] for a 5-J discharge to 5[times]10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] for a 30-J discharge in a 1.5-mm-diam. capillary.

  8. The Density of Coronal Plasma in Active Stellar Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, P; Peres, G; Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J.; Peres, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution X-ray spectra of a sample of 22 active stars observed with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on {\\em Chandra} in order to investigate their coronal plasma density. Densities where investigated using the lines of the He-like ions O VII, Mg XI, and Si XIII. While Si XIII lines in all stars of the sample are compatible with the low-density limit, Mg XI lines betray the presence of high plasma densities ($> 10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$) for most of the sources with higher X-ray luminosity ($> 10^{30}$ erg/s); stars with higher $L_X$ and $L_X/L_{bol}$ tend to have higher densities at high temperatures. Ratios of O VII lines yield much lower densities of a few $10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$, indicating that the ``hot'' and ``cool'' plasma resides in physically different structures. Our findings imply remarkably compact coronal structures, especially for the hotter plasma emitting the Mg XI lines characterized by coronal surface filling factor, $f_{MgXI}$, ranging from $10^{-4}$ to $10^{-...

  9. Radio Scintillation due to Discontinuities in the Interstellar Plasma Density

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, H; Lambert, Hendrik; Rickett, Barney

    1999-01-01

    We develop the theory of interstellar scintillation as caused by an irregular plasma having a power-law spatial density spectrum with a spectral exponent of 4 corresponding to a medium with abrupt changes in its density. An ``outer scale'' is included in the model representing the typical scale over which the density of the medium remains uniform. Such a spectrum could be used to model plasma shock fronts in supernova remnants or other plasma discontinuities. We investigate and develop equations for the decorrelation bandwidth of diffractive scintillations and the refractive scintillation index and compare our results with pulsar measurements. We consider both a medium concentrated in a thin layer and an extended irregular medium. We conclude that the discontinuity model gives satisfactory agreement for many diffractive measurements, in particular the VLBI meaurements of the structure function exponent between 5/3 and 2. However, it gives less satisfactory agreement for the refractive scintillation index than...

  10. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, Jorge J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  11. Strongly Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Magnetized High-Energy-Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P.-Y.; Haberberger, D.; Hu, S. X.; Ivancic, S.; Nilson, P. M.; Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection in a magnetized high-energy-density plasma is characterized by measuring the dynamics of the plasma density and magnetic field between two counter-propagating and colliding plasma flows. The density and magnetic field were profiled using the 4 ω angular filter refractometry and fast proton deflectometry diagnostics, respectively. The plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the OMEGA EP Laser System. The two plumes are magnetized by an externally controlled magnetic field with an x-type null point geometry with B = 0 at the midplane and B = 8 T at the targets. The interaction region is pre-filled with a low-density background plasma. The counterflowing super-Alfvénic plasma plumes sweep up and compress the magnetic field and the background plasma into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing for the first detailed observation of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The measurements are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and NLUF Grant DE-SC0008655.

  12. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-01

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, ˜1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called "bucket jumping" where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  13. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  14. Temperature and Density Structure of a Recurring Active Region Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Mulay, Sargam M; Mason, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT and Hinode/EIS. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity and filling factor obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations. A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet-spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The plasma along the line-of-sight in the jet-spire and jet-footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK. We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII ($\\lambda$186/$\\lambda$195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6x$10^{10}$ $cm^{-3}$) and the footpoint (1.1x$10^{11}$ $cm^{-3}$). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km/s. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. There is no in...

  15. Unstable density distribution associated with equatorial plasma bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherani, E. A.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S.; Lakhina, G. S.; de Meneses, F. Carlos

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a simulation study of equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) in the evening time ionosphere. The fluid simulation is performed with a high grid resolution, enabling us to probe the steepened updrafting density structures inside EPB. Inside the density depletion that eventually evolves as EPB, both density and updraft are functions of space from which the density as implicit function of updraft velocity or the density distribution function is constructed. In the present study, this distribution function and the corresponding probability distribution function are found to evolve from Maxwellian to non-Maxwellian as the initial small depletion grows to EPB. This non-Maxwellian distribution is of a gentle-bump type, in confirmation with the recently reported distribution within EPB from space-borne measurements that offer favorable condition for small scale kinetic instabilities.

  16. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma densification through magnetic compression has been suggested for time-resolved control of the wave properties in plasma-based accelerators [P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 255003 (2012)]. Using particle in cell simulations with real mass ratio, the practicality of large magnetic compression on timescales shorter than the ion gyro-period is investigated. For compression times shorter than the transit time of a compressional Alfven wave across the plasma slab, results show the formation of two counter-propagating shock waves, leading to a highly non-uniform plasma density profile. Furthermore, the plasma slab displays large hydromagnetic like oscillations after the driving field has reached steady state. Peak compression is obtained when the two shocks collide in the mid-plane. At this instant, very large plasma heating is observed, and the plasma β is estimated to be about 1. Although these results point out a densification mechanism quite different and more complex than initially envisioned, these features still might be advantageous in particle accelerators.

  17. Estimation of Plasma Density by Surface Plasmons for Surface-Wave Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; LAN Chao-Hui; CHEN Wei; LUO Zhi-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ An estimation method of plasma density based on surface plasmons theory for surface-wave plasmas is proposed. The number of standing-wave is obtained directly from the discharge image, and the propagation constant is calculated with the trim size of the apparatus in this method, then plasma density can be determined with the value of 9.1 × 1017 m-3. Plasma density is measured using a Langmuir probe, the value is 8.1 × 1017 m-3 which is very close to the predicted value of surface plasmons theory. Numerical simulation is used to check the number of standing-wave by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method also. All results are compatible both of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement.

  18. The size--density relation of extragalactic HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, L K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the size--density relation in extragalactic HII regions, with the aim of understanding the role of dust and different physical conditions in the ionized medium. First, we compiled several observational data sets for Galactic and extragalactic HII regions and confirm that extragalactic HII regions follow the same size (D)--density (n) relation as Galactic ones. Motivated by the inability of static models to explain this, we then modelled the evolution of the size--density relation of HII regions by considering their star formation history, the effects of dust, and pressure-driven expansion. The results are compared with our sample data whose size and density span roughly six orders of magnitude. We find that the extragalactic size--density relation does not result from an evolutionary sequence of HII regions but rather reflects a sequence with different initial gas densities (``density hierarchy''). Moreover, the size of many HII regions is limited by dust absorption of ionizing photons, rather ...

  19. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  20. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamically stable plasma with supercritical current density at the axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdakov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marks Avenue, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Postupaev, V. V., E-mail: V.V.Postupaev@inp.nsk.su; Sudnikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, an analysis of magnetic perturbations in the GOL-3 experiment is given. In GOL-3, plasma is collectively heated in a multiple-mirror trap by a high-power electron beam. During the beam injection, the beam-plasma interaction maintains a high-level microturbulence. This provides an unusual radial profile of the net current (that consists of the beam current, current of the preliminary discharge, and the return current). The plasma core carries supercritical current density with the safety factor well below unity, but as a whole, the plasma is stable with q(a) ≈ 4. The net plasma current is counter-directed to the beam current; helicities of the magnetic field in the core and at the edge are of different signs. This forms a system with a strong magnetic shear that stabilizes the plasma core in good confinement regimes. We have found that the most pronounced magnetic perturbation is the well-known n = 1, m = 1 mode for both stable and disruptive regimes.

  2. Self-sustained focusing of high-density streaming plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, A.; Dobrovolskiy, A.; Goncharov, A.; Gushenets, V.; Litovko, I.; Naiko, I.; Oks, E.

    2017-01-01

    We describe our observations of the transport through an electrostatic plasma lens of a wide-aperture, high-current, low energy, metal-ion plasma flow produced by a cathodic arc discharge. The lens input aperture was 80 mm, the length of the lens was 140 mm, and there were three electrostatic ring electrodes located in a magnetic field formed by permanent magnets. The lens outer electrodes were grounded and the central electrode was biased up to -3 kV. The plasma was a copper plasma with directed (streaming) ion energy 20-40 eV, and the equivalent ion current was up to several amperes depending on the potential applied to the central lens electrode. We find that when the central lens electrode is electrically floating, the current density of the plasma flow at the lens focus increases by up to 40%-50%, a result that is in good agreement with a theoretical treatment based on plasma-optical principles of magnetic insulation of electrons and equipotentialization along magnetic field lines. When the central lens electrode is biased negatively, an on-axis stream of energetic electrons is formed, which can also provide a mechanism for focusing of the plasma flow. Optical emission spectra under these conditions show an increase in intensity of lines corresponding to both copper atoms and singly charged copper ions, indicating the presence of fast electrons within the lens volume. These energetic electrons, as well as accumulating on-axis and providing ion focusing, can also assist in reducing the microdroplet component in the dense, low-temperature, metal plasma.

  3. Comet plasma densities deduced from refraction of occulted radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.S. (Commonwealth Department of Science, Ionospheric Prediction Service, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia); Nelson, G.J. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Div. of Radiophysics, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia)

    1979-04-01

    Observations of the occultation of radio sources by comet plasma tails are used to derive the electron density and density gradients in the tails. Occultations of source Culgoora-1 0300+16 by Comet Kohoutek and of Culgoora-1 2313-14 by Comet West were measured by radioheliograph at 80 MHz. After corrections for ionospheric refraction, a 2 arcmin anomaly was observed in the declination of 0300+16, attributed to refraction by the tail of Comet Kohoutek, while none was observed for Comet West. The maximum electron density in the tail of Comet Kohoutek is calculated to be 2 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, while that of Comet West is 5 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, with density gradients of about 0.05 per cu cm per km. The direction of refraction observed suggests that the tail of Kohoutek is either highly asymmetric about its axis or has the form of a hollow, cylindrical plasma sheath. The high electron densities observed in Kohoutek may indicate the presence of undetected ion species or a low ionization loss rate.

  4. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Density bunching effects in a laser-driven, near-critical density plasma for ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettlinger, Oliver; Sahai, Aakash; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Dover, Nicholas; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We present work investigating the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with near-critical density gas targets exhibiting pre-plasma scale lengths of several laser wavelengths. Analytical and computational modelling suggest that the interaction dynamics in a low-Z plasma is a direct result of induced density bunching up to the critical surface. In fact, these bunches can themselves become overcritical and experience significant radiation pressure, accelerating ions to higher energies compared to an ``idealised'' plasma slab target. This work will be used to help explain the observation of ion energies exceeding those predicted by radiation pressure driven hole-boring in recent experiments using the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  6. Control of ion density distribution by magnetic traps for plasma electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, Oleg; Romanov, Maxim [Plasma Laboratory, National Aerospace University ' KhAI,' Kharkov 61070 (Ukraine); Fang Jinghua [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ostrikov, Kostya [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-10-01

    The effect of a magnetic field of two magnetic coils on the ion current density distribution in the setup for low-temperature plasma deposition is investigated. The substrate of 400 mm diameter is placed at a distance of 325 mm from the plasma duct exit, with the two magnetic coils mounted symmetrically under the substrate at a distance of 140 mm relative to the substrate centre. A planar probe is used to measure the ion current density distribution along the plasma flux cross-sections at distances of 150, 230, and 325 mm from the plasma duct exit. It is shown that the magnetic field strongly affects the ion current density distribution. Transparent plastic films are used to investigate qualitatively the ion density distribution profiles and the effect of the magnetic field. A theoretical model is developed to describe the interaction of the ion fluxes with the negative space charge regions associated with the magnetic trapping of the plasma electrons. Theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements, and a reasonable agreement is demonstrated.

  7. Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering in Low-Density Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Lihua; CHANG Tieqiang; LIU Zhanjun; ZHENG Chunyang

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering(SRS)in a low-density plasma slab is investigated by particle-in-cell(PIC)simulations.The backward stimulated Raman scattering(B-SRS)dominates initially and erodes the head of the pump wave,while the forward stimulated Raman scattering (F-SRS)subsequently develops and is located at the rear part of the slab.Two-stage electron acceleration may be more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.The B-SRS plasma wave with low phase velocities can accelerate the background electrons which may be further boosted to higher energies by the F-SRS plasma wave with high phase velocities.The simulations show that the peaks of the main components in both the frequency and wave number spectra occur at the positions estimated from the phase-matching conditions.

  8. Holographic quark-gluon plasmas at finite quark density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigazzi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze), Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Cotrone, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino (Italy); Mas, J. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tarrio, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Universiteit Utrecht, 3584 CE, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mayerson, D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Gravity solutions holographically dual to strongly coupled quark-gluon plasmas with non-zero quark density are reviewed. They are motivated by the urgency of finding novel tools to explore the phase diagram of QCD-like theories at finite chemical potential. After presenting the solutions and their regime of validity, some of their physical properties are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Modifications of plasma density profile and thrust by neutral injection in a helicon plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takao, Yoshinori; Ando, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Argon propellant is introduced from the upstream and downstream sides of a high power helicon plasma thruster. The plasma density profile and the imparted thrust are measured for various upstream and downstream argon flow rates, where the total gas flow rate of 70 sccm and the resultant vacuum chamber pressure of 0.2 mTorr are maintained. It is observed that the imparted thrust increases with an increase in the downstream gas flow rate; simultaneously an upstream-peaking profile of the plasma density observed for the upstream gas injection becomes uniform for the downstream gas injection. The difference in the thrust between the upstream and downstream gas injections is enhanced by increasing the rf power. The observed density profiles are qualitatively consistent with theoretical predictions taking a neutral depletion effect into account.

  10. Non-steady interaction of plasma with aircraft in its near wake region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Tao-Ping; Luo Qing

    2007-01-01

    Non-steady interactions between plasmas and aircraft in its near wake region are investigated in detail. Under the non-static limit, a set of equations that describe these interactions are obtained. The results of the numerical simulation show that the cavitons of transverse plasmas are excited and density cavitons appear when the envelope of plasma becomes sufficiently intensive. This is very important for detecting the moving body that has a 'stealth' characteristic.

  11. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  12. High Energy-Density Plasma Dynamics in Plasma-Filled Rod-Pinch Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    at about 30 eV at the time of maximum energy density, and that the time-averaged ionization is about +17, similar to MHD model predictions [2... MHD model predictions [2]. The plasma mass distribution is inferred from x-ray distribution measurements. The time-dependent mass distribution is used...Previous modeling [2] assumed the tungsten plasma had a time-dependent Gaussian radial profile and a fixed length of 3.5 mm, consistent with time

  13. Boundary location of Mars nightside ionospheric plasma in term of the electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morooka, Michiko W.; Andersson, Laila; Ergun, Bob; Fowler, Christopher; Woodson, Adam; Weber, Tristan; Delory, Greg; Andrews, David; Edberg, Niklas; Eriksson, Anders; Michell, David; Connerney, Jack; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Halekas, Jasper

    2015-11-01

    Photo-ionized Mars atmosphere is forming an ionosphere and shielding the solar wind with creating barriers of bow shock. Inside the bow shock ionospheric plasma interact with solar wind plasma and result different boundaries. A question is how far the ionospheric plasma can stand off the solar wind.On the dayside, in-situ data set from Mars magnetosphere missions often observed the sharp gradient of the thermal plasma flux and ion composition change as well as the drop off of the magnetic fluctuation simultaneously as a outer boundary of the ionospheric plasma and an obstacle to the solar wind. Several models have constructed the shape of the boundary based on the statistical observations [e.g., Trotignon et al., 2006; Edberg et al., 2008].On the nightside, plasma instrument onboard Phobos 2 observed the particles and magnetic field characteristics similar to the dayside. However, the number of data is still too few to understand the general location of boundaries. We will present the characteristics of the nightside magnetospheric boundary region in term of the electron density. MAVEN Langmuir probe measurement (LPW) can estimate the electron density using the spacecraft environment. As MAVEN pass from the bow shock and sheath region into the magnetosphere the electron density often show a sharp gradient (the density jumps two orders of magnitudes in a few seconds). Comparing this to the data from particle instrument, the sharp electron density gradient was often associated with the transition of the characteristic energy of ions.Several hundreds of boundaries crossing by MAVEN allow us to investigate the statistical view of the boundary. We searched for a large electron density gradient as an indicator of the plasma boundary to identify the location of the ionospheric/solar wind plasma boundary. The results show that the many of the nightside boundaries locates close to the tail region of Mars forming elliptical shape of boundary. We will provide the empirical

  14. Interaction of electromagnetic and plasma waves in warm motional plasma: Density and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed-Mohassel, P.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic-electrostatic coupling instability excited in the two-dimensional planar-layered plasma medium with median temperature (warm motional plasma beam) is investigated by applying the initial fluctuation propagating along the planar surfaces. The dielectric tensor, obtained by the Maxwell-fluid model, is used to find the dispersion relation (DR) and different excited modes in the system. Interacting modes are investigated, in detail, by focusing on the effect of temperature on the plasma beam instability aroused by coupling the thermal excited modes (thermal-extraordinary and electron plasma modes) in the systems with various amounts of beam density. The numerical analysis of the obtained DR shows that even though the temperature effect of the plasma beam has an important role on the suppression of streaming instabilities, it does not have a considerable effect on the behavior of the coupling instability in the fluid limitation.

  15. Cluster observations of near-Earth magnetospheric lobe plasma densities – a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Svenes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster-mission has enabled a study of the near-Earth magnetospheric lobes throughout the waning part of solar cycle 23. During the first seven years of the mission the satellites crossed this region of space regularly from about July to October. We have obtained new and more accurate plasma densities in this region based on spacecraft potential measurements from the EFW-instrument. The plasma density measurements are found by converting the potential measurements using a functional relationship between these two parameters. Our observations have shown that throughout this period a full two thirds of the measurements were contained in the range 0.007–0.092 cm−3 irrespective of solar wind conditions or geomagnetic activity. In fact, the most probable density encountered was 0.047 cm−3, staying roughly constant throughout the entire observation period. The plasma population in this region seems to reflect an equilibrium situation in which the density is independent of the solar wind condition or geomagnetic activity. However, the high density tail of the population (ne>0.2 cm−3 seemed to decrease with the waning solar cycle. This points to a source region influenced by the diminishing solar UV/EUV-intensity. Noting that the quiet time polar wind has just such a development and that it is magnetically coupled to the lobes, it seems likely to assume that this is a prominent source for the lobe plasma.

  16. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2012-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. The expansion of a collisionless plasma into a plasma of lower density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perego, M.; Gunzburger, M. D. [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Howell, P. D.; Ockendon, J. R.; Allen, J. E. [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, Oxford University, 24-29 St Giles, OX1 3LB Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper considers the asymptotic and numerical solution of a simple model for the expansion of a collisionless plasma into a plasma of lower density. The dependence on the density ratio of qualitative and quantitative features of solutions of the well-known cold-ion model is explored. In the cold-ion limit, we find that a singularity develops in the ion density in finite time unless the density ratio is zero or close to unity. The classical cold-ion model may cease to be valid when such a singularity occurs and we then regularize the model by the finite ion-temperature Vlasov-Poisson system. Numerical evidence suggests the emergence of a multi-modal velocity distribution.

  18. High-Density Plasma Reactors: Simulations for Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The development of improved and more efficient plasma reactors is a costly process for the semiconductor industry. Until five years ago, the Industry made most of its advancements through a trial and error approach. More recently, the role of computational modeling in the design process has increased. Both conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques like Navier-Stokes solvers as well as particle simulation methods are used to model plasma reactor flowfields. However, since high-density plasma reactors generally operate at low gas pressures on the order of 1 to 10 mTorr, a particle simulation may be necessary because of the failure of CFD techniques to model rarefaction effects. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is the most widely accepted and employed particle simulation tool and has previously been used to investigate plasma reactor flowfields. A plasma DSMC code is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center with its foundation as the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO. The present investigation is a follow up of a neutral flow investigation of the effects of process parameters as well as reactor design on etch rate and etch rate uniformity. The previous work concentrated on silicon etch of a chlorine flow in a configuration typical of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) or helical resonator type reactors. The effects of the plasma on the dissociation chemistry were modeled by making assumptions about the electron temperature and number density. The electrons or ions themselves were not simulated.The present work extends these results by simulating the charged species.The electromagnetic fields are calculated such that power deposition is modeled self-consistently. Electron impact reactions are modeled along with mechanisms for charge exchange. An bipolar diffusion assumption is made whereby electrons remain tied to the ions. However, the velocities of tile electrons are allowed to be modified during collisions

  19. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  20. Waves guided by density ducts in magnetoplasma in the nonresonant region of the whistler frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es’kin, V. A.; Zaboronkova, T. M.; Kudrin, A. V., E-mail: kud@rf.unn.ru; Ostafiychuk, O. M. [Lobachevskii State University of Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Guidance of azimuthally symmetric waves by cylindrical density ducts in magnetoplasma in the nonresonant region of the whistler frequency range is investigated. It is demonstrated that eigenmodes existing at the studied frequencies in ducts with enhanced plasma density allow simplified description that makes analysis of the features of their guided propagation much easier. The results of calculation of the dispersion characteristics and field structure of the whistler modes supported by such ducts are presented.

  1. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  2. Effect of plasma torus density variations on the morphology and brightness of the Io footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, A. P.; Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Crary, F.

    2014-05-01

    We develop a 2-D-layered model of the Io plasma torus to study the apparent "shutoff" of the Io footprint in 2007, when it disappeared beneath a region of diffuse emissions, roughly coincident with a massive eruption of Tvashtar Paterae. First, we investigate the effects of Io's location in the plasma torus and validate our model results against Hubble UV observations of the Io footprint. We are able to qualitatively reproduce variations in the morphology of the footprint due to Io's changing latitudinal location with respect to the center of the plasma torus, capturing the bright leading spot and the dimmer tail. Then, we consider the effects of an increase in the local plasma density on the brightness and morphology of the Io footprint. Our results show a correlation between a local density increase in the plasma torus and the dimming of the Io footprint as observed in 2007. In particular, we find that a local density enhancement at Io of fivefold compared to the nominal value is sufficient to produce the observed shutoff of the footprint.

  3. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  4. Density distribution of a dust cloud in three-dimensional complex plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumkin, V. N.; Zhukhovitskii, D. I.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Fortov, V. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Huber, P.; Morfill, G. E.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method of determination of the dust particle spatial distribution in dust clouds that form in three-dimensional (3D) complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. The method utilizes the data obtained during the 3D scanning of a cloud, and it provides reasonably good accuracy. Based on this method, we investigate the particle density in a dust cloud realized in gas discharge plasma in the PK-3 Plus setup onboard the International Space Station. We find that the treated dust clouds are both anisotropic and inhomogeneous. One can isolate two regimes in which a stationary dust cloud can be observed. At low pressures, the particle density decreases monotonically with the increase of the distance from the discharge center; at higher pressures, the density distribution has a shallow minimum. Regardless of the regime, we detect a cusp of the distribution at the void boundary and a slowly varying density at larger distances (in the foot region). A theoretical interpretation of the obtained results is developed that leads to reasonable estimates of the densities for both the cusp and the foot. The modified ionization equation of state, which allows for violation of the local quasineutrality in the cusp region, predicts the spatial distributions of ion and electron densities to be measured in future experiments.

  5. A Multiple Z-Pinch Configuration for the Generation of High-Density, Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, Alfonso G.

    2015-11-01

    The z-pinch is arguably the most straightforward and economical approach for the generation and confinement of hot plasmas, with a long history of theoretical investigations and experimental developments. While most of the past studies were focused on countering the natural tendency of z-pinches to develop instabilities, this study attempts to take advantage of those unstable regimes to form a quasi-stable plasma, with higher density and temperature, possibly of interest for a fusion reactor concept. For this purpose, a configuration with four z-pinch discharges, with axis parallel to each other and symmetrically positioned, is considered. Electrodes for the generation of the discharges and magnetic coils are arranged to favor the formation of concave discharge patterns. The mutual attraction from the co-streaming discharge currents enhances this pattern, leading to bent plasma streams, all nearing towards the axis. This configuration is intended to excite and sustain a ``kink'' unstable mode for each z-pinch, eventually producing either plasmoid structures, detached from each discharge, or sustained kink patterns: both these cases appear to lead to plasmas merging in the central region. The feasibility of this approach in creating a higher density, hotter, meta-stable plasma regime is investigated computationally, addressing both the kink excitation phase and the dynamics of the converging plasma columns.

  6. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: d.dorranian@gmail.com [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M., E-mail: m.aslaninejad@ipm.ir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  7. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golian, Y.; Aslaninejad, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-01-01

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  8. A unified model of density limit in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zanca, P; Escande, D F; Pucella, G; Tudisco, O

    2016-01-01

    A limit for the edge density, ruled by radiation losses from light impurities, is established by a minimal cylindrical magneto-thermal equilibrium model. For ohmic tokamak and reversed field pinch the limit scales linearly with the plasma current, as the empirical Greenwald limit. The auxiliary heating adds a further dependence, scaling with the 0.4 power, in agreement with L-mode tokamak experiments. For a purely externally heated configuration the limit takes on a Sudo-like form, depending mainly on the input power, and is compatible with recent Stellarator scalings.

  9. Acoustic instability in the neutral precursor region of collisionless shocks propagating into partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies about collisionless shocks in partially ionized plasmas showed that some of neutral particles leak into the shock upstream region from the downstream region. In this paper, we perform a linear analysis and show that acoustic waves are unstable in the neutral precursor region. The acoustic instability amplifies fluctuations of magnetic field and density in the upstream region. The fluctuations are indispensable for the diffusive shock acceleration and could be important for the downstream turbulence.

  10. Topside Ionosphere Plasma Bubbles Seen in He+ Density: Results and Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, Larisa; Filippov, Sergey

    He (+) density depletions, considered as fossil equatorial plasma bubble signatures, were involved in this study. They are usually detected in the topside ionosphere (approx. 1000 km) deeply inside the plasmasphere (L=1.3-3). a) The question about an opportunity to detect the topside plasma bubbles of equatorial origin in their separate plasma component (He (+) ) is investigated. There are the indications [Sidorova, ASR, 2004, 2007; Sidorova and Filippov, JASTP, 2012] that there is genetic connection between the He (+) density depletions and the equatorial plasma bubbles. For validation of this idea the characteristic times of the main photochemical and electro-dynamical processes, in which the plasma bubbles and their minor ion component (He (+) ) are involved, have been calculated and compared. The model estimations, obtained in SAMIS3 (3D model of equatorial spread F) and kindly presented by J. Huba (USA), are also used for the investigation. It was revealed that the plasma bubbles, reaching the “ceiling” heights, can exist within 2-3 days and that there is principal opportunity to observe them in the separate plasma component (He (+) ). (b) The longitudinal statistics of the He (+) density depletions (P), calculated for all seasons and both hemispheres (20-50(°) INVLAT), were obtained. It was revealed that the most of the P plots have “wave-like” structure with well-defining four peaks. The peaks are the most pronounced in the NH during March equinox/December solstice and in the SH during March equinox/June solstice. Similar wave number 4 longitudinal structure has recently been found in the low-latitude ionosphere density distribution [Immel et al., GRL, 2006; England et al., GRL, 2006; Jin et al., JGR, 2008]. It is assumed that the longitudinal plasma density variations appear due to the modulated vertical Е×В drift. It is supposed that solar thermal tides excited in the troposphere induce zonal perturbation electric fields, which are added to the

  11. Computational lipidology: predicting lipoprotein density profiles in human blood plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hübner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring cholesterol levels is strongly recommended to identify patients at risk for myocardial infarction. However, clinical markers beyond "bad" and "good" cholesterol are needed to precisely predict individual lipid disorders. Our work contributes to this aim by bringing together experiment and theory. We developed a novel computer-based model of the human plasma lipoprotein metabolism in order to simulate the blood lipid levels in high resolution. Instead of focusing on a few conventionally used predefined lipoprotein density classes (LDL, HDL, we consider the entire protein and lipid composition spectrum of individual lipoprotein complexes. Subsequently, their distribution over density (which equals the lipoprotein profile is calculated. As our main results, we (i successfully reproduced clinically measured lipoprotein profiles of healthy subjects; (ii assigned lipoproteins to narrow density classes, named high-resolution density sub-fractions (hrDS, revealing heterogeneous lipoprotein distributions within the major lipoprotein classes; and (iii present model-based predictions of changes in the lipoprotein distribution elicited by disorders in underlying molecular processes. In its present state, the model offers a platform for many future applications aimed at understanding the reasons for inter-individual variability, identifying new sub-fractions of potential clinical relevance and a patient-oriented diagnosis of the potential molecular causes for individual dyslipidemia.

  12. A simple and straightforward expression for curling probe electron density diagnosis in reactive plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hotta, Masaya; Nakamura, Keiji

    2017-04-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy (APRS) refers to the family of plasma diagnostic methods which utilize the ability of plasmas to resonate at frequencies close to the plasma frequency. APRS operates by exciting the plasma with a weak RF signal by means of a small electric probe. The response of the plasma is recorded by a network analyzer (NA). A mathematical model is applied to derive characteristics like the electron density and the electron temperature. The curling probe is a promising realization of APRS. The curling probe is well-qualified for the local measurement of the electron density in reactive plasmas. This spiral probe resonates in plasma at a larger density dependent frequency than the plasma frequency. This manuscript represents a simple and straightforward expression relating this resonance frequency to the electron density of the plasma. A good agreement is observed between the proposed expression and the results obtained from previous studies and numerical simulations.

  13. Initial energy density of quark-gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in the central rapidity region of highly relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Such an interest stems from the possibility of creating hadron matter of high energy density which may exceed the critical energy density for a phase transition between ordinary confined matter and the unconfined quark-gluon plasma. The experimental searches and identification of the quark-gluon plasma may provide a new insight into the question of quark confinement. The estimate of the initial energy density is quite uncertain. The initial energy density is nonetheless an important physical quantity. It is one of the factors which determines whether the produced matter can undergo phase transition or not. The energy density has been estimated previously by using the color neutralization model of Brodsky et al. However, the color neutralization model gives a central rapidity multiplicity in heavy-ion collision too low by a factor of two. For this reason, we wish to obtain a better estimate of the energy density (in the central rapidity region). As is well known, a simple Glauber-type multiple collision model can reproduce the total multiplicity and multiplicity plateau near the central rapidity region to within 30%. The simple multiple collision model has an approximate validity as a gross description of the reaction process. We shall adopt a semiempirical approach. Using the multiple collision model and the thickness function of Glauber, we obtain analytical functional form for all the quantities in question. A single parameter, r/sub rms/, is adjusted to fit the experimental central rapidity multiplicity data. The semi-empirical results provide a useful tool to extrapolate to the unknown central rapidity region of heavy-ion collisions.

  14. High Current, High Density Arc Plasma as a New Source for WiPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Roger; Endrizzi, Doug; Myers, Rachel; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Lab (WiPAL) has installed a new array of nineteen plasma sources (plasma guns) on its 3 m diameter, spherical vacuum vessel. Each gun is a cylindrical, molybdenum, washer-stabilized, arc plasma source. During discharge, the guns are maintained at 1.2 kA across 100 V for 10 ms by the gun power supply establishing a high density plasma. Each plasma source is fired independently allowing for adjustable plasma parameters, with densities varying between 1018 -1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 5-15 eV. Measurements were characterized using a 16 tip Langmuir probe. The plasma source will be used as a background plasma for the magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), and as the plasma source for a magnetic mirror experiment. Temperature, density, and confinement results will be presented. This work is supported by the DoE and the NSF.

  15. Fluid and gyrokinetic modelling of particle transport in plasmas with hollow density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Nordman, H.; Strand, P.

    2016-11-01

    Hollow density profiles occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by ITG/TE mode turbulence in regions of hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description, and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT , and magnetic shear are investigated. It is found that β in particular has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region, both nonlinear GENE and EDWM show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change of direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln . This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas.

  16. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Laser-Plasma Interactions Near the Quarter-Critical Density in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, H.; Maximov, A. V.; Yan, R.; Ren, C.; Li, J.; Myatt, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in the plasma region near quarter-critical density for the parameters typical for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. The laser-plasma instabilities of two-plasmon decay (TPD), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering have been identified in the time evolution of different electric- and magnetic-field components. A good agreement between the simulation results and the theories of TPD and SRS has been observed. In the nonlinear saturation regime, the field intensities and the fast-electron distributions are compared for plane-wave and speckled laser beams. The effects of collisions are studied. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Doppler Spectrometry for Ultrafast Temporal Mapping of Density Dynamics in Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S.; Lad, Amit D.; Ahmed, Saima; Narayanan, V.; Pasley, J.; Rajeev, P. P.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2010-09-01

    We present high resolution measurements of the ultrafast temporal dynamics of the critical surface in moderately overdense, hot plasma by using two-color, pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Our measurements clearly capture the initial inward motion of the plasma inside the critical surface of the pump laser which is followed by outward expansion. The measured instantaneous velocity and acceleration profiles are very well reproduced by a hybrid simulation that uses a 1D electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation for the initial evolution and a hydrodynamics simulation for the later times. The combination of high temporal resolution and dynamic range in our measurements clearly provides quantitative unraveling of the dynamics in this important region, enabling this as a powerful technique to obtain ultrafast snapshots of plasma density and temperature profiles for providing benchmarks for simulations.

  18. Laser Plasmas : Density oscillations in laser produced plasma decelerated by external magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Rai; M Shukla; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the dynamics as well as the stability of laser produced plasma expanding across the magnetic field. Observation of some high frequency fluctuations superimposed on ion saturation current along with structuring in the pin hole images of x-ray emitting plasma plume indicate the presence of instability in the plasma. Two type of slope in the variation of x-ray emission with laser intensity in the absence and presence of magnetic field shows appearance of different threshold intensity of laser corresponding to each magnetic field at which this instability or density fluctuation sets on. This instability has been identified as a large Larmor radius instability instead of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability.

  19. Temperature and density structure of a recurring active region jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Zanna, Giulio Del; Mason, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present a study of a recurring jet observed on October 31, 2011 by the Atmosphereic Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. We discuss the physical parameters of the jet that are obtained using imaging and spectroscopic observations, such as density, differential emission measure, peak temperature, velocity, and filling factor. Methods: A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed at the region of the jet spire and the footpoint using EIS observations and also by combining AIA and XRT observations. The resulting EIS DEM curves were compared to those obtained with AIA-XRT. The DEM curves were used to create synthetic spectra with the CHIANTI atomic database. The predicted total count rates for each AIA channel were compared with the observed count rates. The effects of varying elemental abundances and the temperature range for the DEM inversion were investigated. Spectroscopic diagnostics were used to obtain an electron number density distribution for the jet spire and the jet footpoint. Results: The plasma along the line of sight in the jet spire and jet footpoint was found to be peak at 2.0 MK (log T [K] = 6.3). We calculated electron densities using the Fe XII (λ186/λ195) line ratio in the region of the spire (Ne = 7.6 × 1010 cm-3) and the footpoint (1.1 × 1011 cm-3). The plane-of-sky velocity of the jet is found to be 524 km s-1. The resulting EIS DEM values are in good agreement with those obtained from AIA-XRT. The synthetic spectra contributing to each AIA channel confirms the multi-thermal nature of the AIA channels in both regions. There is no indication of high temperatures, such as emission from Fe XVII (λ254.87) (log T [K] = 6.75) seen in the jet spire. In the case of the jet footpoint, synthetic spectra predict weak contributions from Ca XVII (λ192.85) and Fe XVII (λ254.87). With further investigation, we confirmed

  20. Patterned Platinum Etching Studies in an Argon High Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprat, Sébastien; Chaker, Mohamed; Margot, Joëlle; Pépin, Henri; Tan, Liang; Smy, Tom

    1998-10-01

    A high-density surface-wave Ar plasma operated in the low pressure regime is used to study pure physical etching characteristics of platinum thin films. The platinum samples are RF biased so as to obtain a maximum DC self-bias voltage of 150 V. The sputter-etching characteristics are investigated as a function of the magnetic field intensity, the self-bias voltage and the gas pressure. At 1 mtorr, the etch rate is found to be a unique linear function of both the self-bias voltage and the ion density, independently of the magnetic field intensity value. However, even though the ion density increases, the etch rate is found to decrease with increasing pressure. In the low pressure regime, etch rates as high as 2000 A/min are obtained with a good selectivity over resist. Without any optimization of the etching process, we were able to etch 0.5 micron Pt trenches, 0.6 micron thick yielding fence-free profiles and sidewall angles (75º) that already meets the present industrial requirements of NVRAM technology.

  1. Density scaling relation in Orion A: effects of region selection

    CERN Document Server

    Stanchev, O I; Donkov, S

    2016-01-01

    Recently Stanchev et al. (2015) proposed a technique to derive density scaling relations in a star-forming region from analysis of the probability distribution function of column density. We address the possible dependence of the outcome on the selection of probe zones, applying the method to Planck dust-opacity data on Orion A. The derived steep scaling relation of mean density with index -1.6 in the molecular cloud (so called `Central filament') points to its self-gravitating nature. The result is reproduced also for large parts of the clouds' vicinity which indicates major role of gravity in the energy balance of the entire star-forming region.

  2. Discharge dynamics and plasma density recovery by on/off switches of additional gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang, E-mail: lhc@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Deuk-Chul [Plasma Technology Research Center, Nation Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, SeungJu; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Measurement of the plasma density is investigated to study plasma dynamics by adding reactive gas (O{sub 2}) or rare gas (He) in Ar plasmas. When the O{sub 2} or He gas is added, plasma density is suddenly decreased, while the plasma density recovers slowly with gas off. It is found that the recovery time is strongly dependent on the gas flow rate, and it can be explained by effect of gas residence time. When the He gas is off in the Ar plasma, the plasma density is overshot compared to the case of the O{sub 2} gas pulsing due to enhanced ionizations by metastable atoms. Analysis and calculation for correlation between the plasma density dynamics and the gas pulsing are also presented in detail.

  3. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  4. Magneto hydrodynamics simulations of pulsed high density plasmas in electromagnetic guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2011-10-01

    Electromagnetic guns are a class of devices which uses the Lorentz force to accelerate bulk plasma/conducting solids to velocities ~ km/s. This idea has been widely used in electromagnetic rail guns and in space propulsion systems. The electrically conducting region is typically a pulsed high density thermal plasma which interacts with the bounding solid surface resulting in ablation and materials chemical degradation. We perform a numerical modeling study of the plasma in an electromagnetic gun to understand the discharge physics and in particular study the plasma-surface interactions. The resistive Magneto hydrodynamics (MHD) equations which include the mass, momentum and energy equations for a conducting fluid along with the Maxwell's equations is used for this study. These equations constitute a stiff system with strong coupling between fluid dynamics and electromagnetics. The equations are solved on an unstructured mesh using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. Details of important species in the plasma and the particle and energy flux distribution at the solid boundaries are presented and the consequent plasma-surface interactions under varying operating conditions are discussed.

  5. Measurement of Plasma Density Produced in Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Active Aerodynamic Control with Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHANG Yi; XU Yan-Ji; LIN Bin; LI Yu-Tong; ZHU Jun-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an interferometer to investigate the changes of the refractive index caused by dielectric barrier discharge plasma.The electronic density of the plasma produced is measured and analyzed tentatively.The results show that density of the plasma increases linearly with exciting voltages.

  6. Is the Accuracy of Density Functional Theory for Atomization Energies and Densities in Bonding Regions Correlated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Pak, Michael V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-05-04

    The development of approximate exchange-correlation functionals is critical for modern density functional theory. A recent analysis of atomic systems suggested that some modern functionals are straying from the path toward the exact functional because electron densities are becoming less accurate while energies are becoming more accurate since the year 2000. To investigate this trend for more chemically relevant systems, the electron densities in the bonding regions and the atomization energies are analyzed for a series of diatomic molecules with 90 different functionals. For hybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals developed since the year 2000, the errors in densities and atomization energies are decoupled; the accuracy of the energies remains relatively consistent while the accuracy of the densities varies significantly. Such decoupling is not observed for generalized gradient and meta-generalized gradient approximation functionals. Analysis of electron densities in bonding regions is found to be important for the evaluation of functionals for chemical systems.

  7. Self-injection by trapping of plasma electrons oscillating in rising density gradient at the vacuum-plasma interface

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Muggli, Patric

    2014-01-01

    We model the trapping of plasma $e^-$ within the density structures excited by a propagating energy source ($\\beta_{S}\\simeq1$) in a rising plasma density gradient. Rising density gradient leads to spatially contiguous coupled up-chirped plasmons ($d{\\omega^2_{pe}(x)}/{dx}>0$). Therefore phase mixing between plasmons can lead to trapping until the plasmon field is high enough such that $e^-$ trajectories returning towards a longer wavelength see a trapping potential. Rising plasma density gradients are ubiquitous for confining the plasma within sources at the vacuum-plasma interfaces. Therefore trapping of plasma-$e^-$ in a rising ramp is important for acceleration diagnostics and to understand the energy dissipation from the excited plasmon train \\cite{LTE-2013}. Down-ramp in density \\cite{density-transition-2001} has been used for plasma-$e^-$ trapping within the first bucket behind the driver. Here, in rising density gradient the trapping does not occur in the first plasmon bucket but in subsequent plasmon...

  8. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  9. Collisional damping of helicon waves in a high density hydrogen linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan F.; Blackwell, Boyd D.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation and damping of helicon waves along the length (50 cm) of a helicon-produced 20 kW hydrogen plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 1–2 × 1019 m‑3, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 1–6 eV, H2 8 mTorr) operated in a magnetic mirror configuration (antenna region: 50–200 G and mirror region: 800 G). Experimental results show the presence of traveling helicon waves (4–8 G and {λz}∼ 10–15 cm) propagating away from the antenna region which become collisionally absorbed within 40–50 cm. We describe the use of the WKB method to calculate wave damping and provide an expression to assess its validity based on experimental measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with experiment and indicate that for conditions where Coulomb collisions are dominant classical collisionality is sufficient to explain the observed wave damping along the length of the plasma column. Based on these results, we provide an expression for the scaling of helicon wave damping relevant to high density discharges and discuss the location of surfaces for plasma-material interaction studies in helicon based linear plasma devices.

  10. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  11. Effect of density changes on tokamak plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2015-01-01

    A change of the particle density (by gas puff, pellets or impurity seeding) during the plasma discharge in tokamak produces a radial current and implicitly a torque and rotation that can modify the state of confinement. After ionization the newly born ions will evolve toward the periodic neoclassical orbits (trapped or circulating) but the first part of their excursion, which precedes the periodicity, is an effective radial current. It is short, spatially finite and unique for each new ion, but multiplied by the rate of ionization and it can produce a substantial total radial current. The associated torque induces rotation which modify the transport processes. We derive the magnitude of the radial current induced by ionization by three methods: the analysis of a simple physical picture, a numerical model and the neoclassical drift-kinetic treatment. The results of the three approaches are in agreement and show that the current can indeed be substantial. Many well known experimental observations can be reconsi...

  12. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  13. Chirp mitigation of plasma-accelerated beams using a modulated plasma density

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Dornmair, I; Assmann, R; Behrens, C; Floettmann, K; Grebenyuk, J; Gross, M; Jalas, S; Kirchen, M; Mehrling, T; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Osterhoff, J; Schmidt, B; Wacker, V; Maier, A R

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-based accelerators offer the possibility to drive future compact light sources and high-energy physics applications. Achieving good beam quality, especially a small beam energy spread, is still one of the major challenges. For stable transport, the beam is located in the focusing region of the wakefield which covers only the slope of the accelerating field. This, however, imprints a longitudinal energy correlation (chirp) along the bunch. Here, we propose an alternating focusing scheme in the plasma to mitigate the development of this chirp and thus maintain a small energy spread.

  14. High density plasmas and new diagnostics: An overview (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celona, L., E-mail: celona@lns.infn.it; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    One of the limiting factors for the full understanding of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) fundamental mechanisms consists of few types of diagnostic tools so far available for such compact machines. Microwave-to-plasma coupling optimisation, new methods of density overboost provided by plasma wave generation, and magnetostatic field tailoring for generating a proper electron energy distribution function, suitable for optimal ion beams formation, require diagnostic tools spanning across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwave interferometry to X-ray spectroscopy; these methods are going to be implemented including high resolution and spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy made by quasi-optical methods (pin-hole cameras). The ion confinement optimisation also requires a complete control of cold electrons displacement, which can be performed by optical emission spectroscopy. Several diagnostic tools have been recently developed at INFN-LNS, including “volume-integrated” X-ray spectroscopy in low energy domain (2-30 keV, by using silicon drift detectors) or high energy regime (>30 keV, by using high purity germanium detectors). For the direct detection of the spatially resolved spectral distribution of X-rays produced by the electronic motion, a “pin-hole camera” has been developed also taking profit from previous experiences in the ECRIS field. The paper will give an overview of INFN-LNS strategy in terms of new microwave-to-plasma coupling schemes and advanced diagnostics supporting the design of new ion sources and for optimizing the performances of the existing ones, with the goal of a microwave-absorption oriented design of future machines.

  15. High density plasmas and new diagnostics: An overview (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D

    2016-02-01

    One of the limiting factors for the full understanding of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) fundamental mechanisms consists of few types of diagnostic tools so far available for such compact machines. Microwave-to-plasma coupling optimisation, new methods of density overboost provided by plasma wave generation, and magnetostatic field tailoring for generating a proper electron energy distribution function, suitable for optimal ion beams formation, require diagnostic tools spanning across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwave interferometry to X-ray spectroscopy; these methods are going to be implemented including high resolution and spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy made by quasi-optical methods (pin-hole cameras). The ion confinement optimisation also requires a complete control of cold electrons displacement, which can be performed by optical emission spectroscopy. Several diagnostic tools have been recently developed at INFN-LNS, including "volume-integrated" X-ray spectroscopy in low energy domain (2-30 keV, by using silicon drift detectors) or high energy regime (>30 keV, by using high purity germanium detectors). For the direct detection of the spatially resolved spectral distribution of X-rays produced by the electronic motion, a "pin-hole camera" has been developed also taking profit from previous experiences in the ECRIS field. The paper will give an overview of INFN-LNS strategy in terms of new microwave-to-plasma coupling schemes and advanced diagnostics supporting the design of new ion sources and for optimizing the performances of the existing ones, with the goal of a microwave-absorption oriented design of future machines.

  16. A unified model of density limit in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, P.; Sattin, F.; Escande, D. F.; Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we identify by analytical and numerical means the conditions for the existence of a magnetic and thermal equilibrium of a cylindrical plasma, in the presence of Ohmic and/or additional power sources, heat conduction and radiation losses by light impurities. The boundary defining the solutions’ space having realistic temperature profile with small edge value takes mathematically the form of a density limit (DL). Compared to previous similar analyses the present work benefits from dealing with a more accurate set of equations. This refinement is elementary, but decisive, since it discloses a tenuous dependence of the DL on the thermal transport for configurations with an applied electric field. Thanks to this property, the DL scaling law is recovered almost identical for two largely different devices such as the ohmic tokamak and the reversed field pinch. In particular, they have in common a Greenwald scaling, linearly depending on the plasma current, quantitatively consistent with experimental results. In the tokamak case the DL dependence on any additional heating approximately follows a 0.5 power law, which is compatible with L-mode experiments. For a purely externally heated configuration, taken as a cylindrical approximation of the stellarator, the DL dependence on transport is found stronger. By adopting suitable transport models, DL takes on a Sudo-like form, in fair agreement with LHD experiments. Overall, the model provides a good zeroth-order quantitative description of the DL, applicable to widely different configurations.

  17. Plasma density control with ergodic divertor on Tore Supra; Controle de la densite du plasma en presence du divertor ergodique dans le tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin, B

    1998-04-30

    Plasma density control on the tokamak Tore Supra is important for the optimization of every experimental scenario dealing with the improvement of plasma performances. Specific conditions are required both in the plasma bulk and at the edge. Within the framework of the present study, a magnetic configuration is used in the e plasma edge of Tore Supra: the ergodic divertor configuration. A magnetic perturbation which is resonant with the permanent field destroys the plasma confinement locally, opening the field lines onto the material components. They aim of the study is the characterization of the edge density in every relevant scenario for Tore Supra. The first part of this work is dedicated to density and temperature measurements by a series of fixed Langmuir probes located at the very edge of the plasma. Thanks to them, density regimes have been put in evidence during experiments where the volume averaged density , an usual control parameter of the plasma, was varied. The analysis of heat and particle transport through the plasma edge region explains the mechanisms leading to those regimes. The essential factor in our analysis is the dependence of the electron conductivity and ionization depth on temperature. While heat conduction governs the heat transport, the edge density varies linearly according to . Below a critical temperature, reached when the ion flux amplification at constant power density is large enough, a parallel temperature gradient appears leading to a density gradient in the opposite direction in order to maintain the pressure constant along the field lines. A high recycling regime is obtained and the edge density varies like {sup 3}. The pressure conservation is no more satisfied during the detachment of the plasma, which is characterized by a high neutral density at low temperatures leading to a ion momentum loss by friction against the neutrals. The edge density drops in those conditions. These regimes are similar

  18. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  19. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in EUV induced plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    We measured for the first time the electron density in an Extreme Ultra-Violet induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Good agreement is found between the measured electron density at the end of the EUV pulse and a theoretical prediction. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  20. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Sonu Sen; Meenu Asthana Varshney; Dinesh Varshney

    2014-01-01

    In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have num...

  1. Detection of F-region electron density irregularities using incoherent-scatter radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudivada, Krishna Prasad

    Incoherent-scatter radar data from Poker Flat, Alaska has been used to determine size distributions of electron density structures in the evening time sector of the auroral zone. At high latitudes ionospheric plasma typically moves east-west with speeds of several hundred meters per second. Density irregularities that rapidly move through the radar beam are therefore observed as time-varying power fluctuations. The new phased array radar used for this study has been operated with several antenna directions with successive pulses transmitted in each direction. It is therefore possible to observe plasma Doppler velocities in multiple directions and determine the vector direction of the plasma motion. This near-simultaneous observation of the plasma velocity in conjunction with the electron density height profile data enable a new technique to determine the scale sizes of electron density fluctuations that move horizontally through the radar beam. The study focuses on the collision-less F-region ionosphere where the plasma drift is approximately constant with altitude. The experimental technique limits the range of scale sizes that may be studied to relatively large-scale sizes (i.e. greater than few tens of km). Results show that during magnetically disturbed conditions (Kp ≥ 4) when westward plasma velocities are relatively high (500-1000 m/s) the scale sizes of irregularities (often called plasma blobs) are in the range of 100-300 km and predominantly originate from the polar cap and are transported over long distances (˜1000 km) due to the long chemical recombination times (30-90 minutes). Some irregularities are caused by local auroral particle precipitation and have been identified with associated electron temperature enhancements. For cases of low magnetic activity (Kp ≤ 1), when the radar is located in a region of low plasma velocities (100-500 m/s) well south of the auroral oval (essentially a mid-latitude type ionosphere), the density distribution is

  2. Ionospheric disturbances during the magnetic storm of 15 July 2000: Role of the fountain effect and plasma bubbles for the formation of large equatorial plasma density depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Hyosub; Paxton, Larry J.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the role of the fountain effect and plasma bubbles for the formation of the large equatorial plasma depletions during the geomagnetic storm of 15 July 2000. The large equatorial plasma depletions are detected in the Atlantic sector on the night of the 15th by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 and the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1). The observations show discontinuous drop of the plasma density at the walls of the depletions, flat plasma density inside the depletions, and persistence or growth of the depletions over night. These properties are not consistent with the trough morphology induced by the fountain effect. The coincident ionospheric observations of DMSP F15 and ROCSAT-1 demonstrate that the large depletions are created in the longitude regions where plasma bubbles are present. The occurrence of the large depletions after sunset, elongation in the north-south direction, formation of steep walls, and colocation with plasma bubbles at lower altitudes or earlier times suggest that the large depletions are closely associated with plasma bubbles.

  3. Density distribution of a dust cloud in three-dimensional complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Naumkin, V N; Molotkov, V I; Lipaev, A M; Fortov, V E; Thomas, H M; Huber, P; Morfill, G E

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method of determination of the dust particle spatial distribution in dust clouds that form in three-dimensional (3D) complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. The method utilizes the data obtained during the 3D scanning of a cloud and provides a reasonably good accuracy. Based on this method, we investigate the particle density in a dust cloud realized in gas discharge plasma in the PK-3 Plus setup onboard the International Space Station. We find that the treated dust clouds are both anisotropic and inhomogeneous. One can isolate two regimes, in which a stationary dust cloud can be observed. At low pressures, the particle density decreases monotonically with the increase of the distance from the discharge center; at higher pressures, the density distribution has a shallow minimum. Regardless of the regime, we detect a cusp of the distribution at the void boundary and a slowly varying density at larger distances (in the foot region). A theoretical interpretation of obtained results is d...

  4. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-12-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions (one of them recurrent) inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with other available differently defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in Active Regions NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. The quantity 1/4π{B}n\\cdot{B}p is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear to the difference between the potential (Bp) and the non-potential magnetic field (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density shows clear changes before the powerful solar flares in Active Region NOAA 11158, which is consistent with the change in magnetic fields in the flaring lower atmosphere.

  5. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-01-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with the possible different defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in active region NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. It is noticed that the quantity 1/4pi Bn.Bp is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear on the difference between the potential magnetic field (Bp) and non-potential one (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density changes obviously before the powerful solar flares in the active region NOAA 11158, it is consistent with the change of magnetic fields in the lower atmosphere with flares.

  6. Experimental and Computational Studies of High Energy Density Plasma Streams Ablated from Fine Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John B. [Cornell University; Seyler, Charles [Cornell University

    2014-03-30

    Experimental and computational studies of high energy density plasma streams ablated from fine wires. Laboratory of Plasma Studies, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University. Principal Investigators: Dr. John B. Greenly and Dr. Charles E. Seyler. This report summarizes progress during the final year of this project to study the physics of high energy density (HED) plasma streams of 10^17-10^20/cm3 density and high velocity (~100-500 km/s). Such streams are produced from 5-250 micrometer diameter wires heated and ionized by a 1 MA, 250 ns current pulse on the COBRA pulsed power facility at Cornell University. Plasma is ablated from the wires and is driven away to high velocity by unbalanced JxB force. A wire, or an array of wires, can persist as an essentially stationary, continuous source of this streaming plasma for >200 ns, even with driving magnetic fields of many Tesla and peak current densities in the plasma of many MA/cm2. At the heart of the ablation stream generation is the continuous transport of mass from the relatively cold, near-solid-density wire "core" into current-carrying plasma within 1 mm of the wire, followed by the magnetic acceleration of that plasma and its trapped flux to form a directed stream. In the first two years of this program, an advancing understanding of ablation physics led to the discovery of several novel wire ablation experimental regimes. In the final year, one of these new HED plasma regimes has been studied in quantitative detail. This regime studies highly reproducible magnetic reconnection in strongly radiating plasma with supersonic and superalfvenic flow, and shock structures in the outflow. The key discovery is that very heavy wires, e.g. 250 micrometer diameter Al or 150 micrometer Cu, behave in a qualitatively different way than the lighter wires typically used in wire-array Z-pinches. Such wires can be configured to produce a static magnetic X-point null geometry that stores magnetic and

  7. Plasma density characterization at SPARC-LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, F., E-mail: francesco.filippi@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Zigler, A. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC-LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. - Highlights: • Stark broadening of Hydrogen lines has been measured to determine plasma density. • Plasma density diagnostic tool for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. • Plasma density in tapered laser triggered ablative capillary discharge was measured. • Results of plasma density measurements in ablative capillaries are shown.

  8. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  9. Detonability of white dwarf plasma: turbulence models at low densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, D.; Plewa, T.

    2017-06-01

    We study the conditions required to produce self-sustained detonations in turbulent, carbon-oxygen degenerate plasma at low densities. We perform a series of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of turbulence driven with various degrees of compressibility. The average conditions in the simulations are representative of models of merging binary white dwarfs. We find that material with very short ignition times is abundant in case turbulence is driven compressively. This material forms contiguous structures that persist over many ignition times, and that we identify as prospective detonation kernels. Detailed analysis of prospective kernels reveals that these objects are centrally condensed and their shape is characterized by low curvature, supportive of self-sustained detonations. The key characteristic of the newly proposed detonation mechanism is thus high degree of compressibility of turbulent drive. The simulated detonation kernels have sizes notably smaller than the spatial resolution of any white dwarf merger simulation performed to date. The resolution required to resolve kernels is 0.1 km. Our results indicate a high probability of detonations in such well-resolved simulations of carbon-oxygen white dwarf mergers. These simulations will likely produce detonations in systems of lower total mass, thus broadening the population of white dwarf binaries capable of producing Type Ia supernovae. Consequently, we expect a downward revision of the lower limit of the total merger mass that is capable of producing a prompt detonation. We review application of the new detonation mechanism to various explosion scenarios of single, Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs.

  10. Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the Earth's plasma sheet. In total we have studied 151 ECRs within 660 h of plasma sheet data from the summer and fall of 2001 when Cluster was close to apogee at an altitude of about 15–20 RE. Cluster offers appropriate conditions for the investigation of energy conversion by the evaluation of the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J the current density. From the sign of the power density, we have identified more than three times as many Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs as Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. We also note that the CLRs appear to be stronger. To our knowledge, these are the first in situ observations confirming the general notion of the plasma sheet, on the average, behaving as a load. At the same time the plasma sheet appears to be highly structured, with energy conversion occurring in both directions between the fields and the particles. From our data we also find that the CLRs appear to be located closer to the neutral sheet, while CGRs prefer locations towards the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL. For both CLRs and CGRs, E and J in the GSM y (cross-tail direction dominate the total power density, even though the z contribution occasionally can be significant. The prevalence of the y-direction seems to be weaker for the CGRs, possibly related to a higher fluctuation level near the PSBL.

  11. Diagnosis of Unmagnetized Plasma Electron Number Density and Electron-neutral Collision Frequency by Using Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Zhongcai; Shi Jiaming; Xu Bo

    2005-01-01

    The plasma diagnostic method using the transmission attenuation of microwaves at double frequencies (PDMUTAMDF) indicates that the frequency and the electron-neutral collision frequency of the plasma can be deduced by utilizing the transmission attenuation of microwaves at two neighboring frequencies in a non-magnetized plasma. Then the electron density can be obtained from the plasma frequency. The PDMUTAMDF is a simple method to diagnose the plasma indirectly. In this paper, the interaction of electromagnetic waves and the plasma is analyzed. Then, based on the attenuation and the phase shift of a microwave in the plasma, the principle of the PDMUTAMDF is presented. With the diagnostic method, the spatially mean electron density and electron collision frequency of the plasma can be obtained. This method is suitable for the elementary diagnosis of the atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  12. High precision measurement of fuel density profiles in nuclear fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, J.; von Hellermann, M.; Konig, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for deducing fuel density profiles of nuclear fusion plasmas in realtime during an experiment. A Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network is used to create a mapping between plasma radiation spectra and indirectly deduced hydrogen isotope densities. By combining diffe

  13. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  14. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  15. Vertical and longitudinal electron density structures of equatorial E- and F-regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Brahmanandam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available From global soundings of ionospheric electron density made with FORMOSAT 3/COSMIC satellites for September 2006–August 2009, day-night variations in vertical and longitudinal structures of the electron densities in equatorial E- and F-regions for different seasons are investigated for the first time. The results reveal that the wavenumber-3 and wavenumber-4 patterns dominated the nighttime (22:00–04:00 LT F-region longitudinal structures in solstice and in equinox seasons, respectively. In daytime (08:00–18:00 LT F-region, the wavenumber-4 patterns governed the longitudinal structures in the September equinox and December solstice, and wavenumber-3 in March equinox and June solstice respectively. A comparison of the daytime and nighttime longitudinal electron density structures indicates that they are approximately 180° out of phase with each other. It is believed that this out of phase relation is very likely the result of the opposite phase relation between daytime and nighttime nonmigrating diurnal tidal winds that modulate background E-region dynamo electric field at different places, leading to the day-night change in the locations of the equatorial plasma fountains that are responsible for the formation of the F-region longitudinal structures. Further, a good consistency between the locations of the density structures in the same seasons of the different years for both daytime and nighttime epochs has been noticed indicating that the source mechanism for these structures could be the same.

  16. Modeling of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional etch profiles in high density plasma reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sukharev, V. [LSI Logic Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In order to model the plasma etching process from plasma generation to etch profile evolution, processes from the macroscopic reactor scale to the microscopic feature scale must be simulated. An integrated monte Carlo feature Profile Model (MCFPM) has been developed to examine the time evolution of etch profiles in high density plasma systems. By integrating the MCFPM with the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM), the authors are able to self-consistently determine the etch profiles for specific regions on the wafer in specific reactor geometry with specified parameters for power, chemistry, gas flow, etc. The latest improvements of the model include the effects of incoming particle angle and energy on reaction and reflection based on the results of molecular dynamics simulations. Increase the specular reflection of high energy particles leads to more vertical sidewalls and corner clearing but can also cause deformation of the bottom of the profile surface. For Chlorine etching of 2D and 3D profiles in polysilicon, the model results will be compared to experimental results in an inductively couple etching reactor. The changes due to radial location as well as sub wafer and superwafer topography be examined.

  17. Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Solid Density Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Forest, F J; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Renaudin, P; Landen, O L

    2003-05-19

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  18. Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

    2003-08-23

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  19. Modulating toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with plasma density

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Shikui; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high-$n$ edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high-$n$ modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high-$n$ modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in recent EAST experiments.

  20. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D; Demoulin, P; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Green, L M; Steed, K; Carlyle, J

    2013-01-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EIS instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359 arcsec x 485 arcsec. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the AR age, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP b...

  1. The High Density Region of QCD from an Effective Model

    CERN Document Server

    De Pietri, R; Seiler, E; Stamatescu, I O

    2007-01-01

    We study the high density region of QCD within an effective model obtained in the frame of the hopping parameter expansion and choosing Polyakov-type loops as the main dynamical variables representing the fermionic matter. This model still shows the so-called sign problem, a difficulty peculiar to non-zero chemical potential, but it permits the development of algorithms which ensure a good overlap of the simulated Monte Carlo ensemble with the true one. We review the main features of the model and present results concerning the dependence of various observables on the chemical potential and on the temperature, in particular of the charge density and the Polykov loop susceptibility, which may be used to characterize the various phases expected at high baryonic density. In this way, we obtain information about the phase structure of the model and the corresponding phase transitions and cross over regions, which can be considered as hints about the behaviour of non-zero density QCD.

  2. Correlation between density fluctuations and plasma gradients at the edge of the TORE SUPRA tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devynck, P.; Garbet, X.; Laviron, C.; Payan, J.; Haas, J. de; Clairet, F.; Talvard, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Gervais, F.; Gresillon, D.; Hennequin, P.; Quemeneur, A.; Truc, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1993-12-31

    The ALTAIR diagnostic uses scattering on the plasma electrons with the help of an IR laser beam to obtain information on the density fluctuations. This diagnostic can simultaneously record fluctuations from two independent wave numbers. Two experiments are carried out: study of the density fluctuations during strong plasma heating that combined both low hybrid waves and ion cyclotron heating; density fluctuations associated to the tokamak gas-feed modulation. 6 figs., 5 refs.

  3. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...

  4. Plasma compression in magnetic reconnection regions in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Provornikova, Elena; Lukin, Vyacheslav S

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that particles bouncing between magnetized flows converging in a reconnection region can be accelerated by the first order Fermi mechanism. Analytical considerations of this mechanism have shown that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within the reconnection region similarly to the case of diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration in reconnection regions in producing hard energy spectra of particles in the solar corona, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites. In particular, we aim to determine the conditions for the strong compressions to form. Using a two-dimensional resistive MHD numerical model we consider a set of magnetic field configurations where magnetic reconnection can occur including a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, and two merging flux ropes. Plasma parameters are taken to be characteristic of t...

  5. Double layer formation in the expanding region of an inductively coupled electronegative plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Plihon, N; Chabert, P

    2015-01-01

    Double-layers (DLs) were observed in the expanding region of an inductively coupled plasma with $\\text{Ar}/\\text{SF}\\_6$ gas mixtures. No DL was observed in pure argon or $\\text{SF}\\_6$ fractions below few percent. They exist over a wide range of power and pressure although they are only stable for a small window of electronegativity (typically between 8\\% and 13\\% of $\\text{SF}\\_6$ at 1mTorr), becoming unstable at higher electronegativity. They seem to be formed at the boundary between the source tube and the diffusion chamber and act as an internal boundary (the amplitude being roughly 1.5$\\frac{kT\\_e}{e}$)between a high electron density, high electron temperature, low electronegativity plasma upstream (in the source), and a low electron density, low electron temperature, high electronegativity plasma downstream.

  6. Droplet-free high-density metal ion source for plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Keiji [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: nakamura@solan.chubu.ac.jp; Yoshinaga, Hiroaki [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Yukimura, Ken [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    This paper reports on plasma parameters and ion composition of droplet-free Zr ion source for plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Zirconium (Zr) ions were obtained by ionizing sputtered Zr atoms in inductively-coupled argon discharge. The characteristics of plasma density, plasma potential and electron temperature were typical ones of such a inductive discharge, and the plasma parameters were not significantly influenced by mixing the sputtered Zr atoms into the plasma. Actually, the main ionic component was still Ar{sup +} ions, and the ion density ratio of [Zr{sup +}]/[Ar{sup +}] was as low as {approx}8%. Increase in sputtering rate of the Zr source will be necessary to improve the ion density ratio.

  7. Density Dependence of Particle Transport in ECH Plasmas of the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V. I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.A.; Velasco, J.L.; Reynolds, J.M.; Ferreira, J.A.; Tafalla, D.; Castejon, F.; Salas, A.

    2009-05-21

    We present the experimental dependence of particle transport on average density in electron cyclotron heated (ECH) hydrogen plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The results are based on: (I) electron density and temperature data from Thomson Scattering and reflectometry diagnostics; (II) a transport model that reproduces the particle density profiles in steady state; and (III) Eirene, a code for neutrals transport that calculates the particle source in the plasma from the particle confinement time and the appropriate geometry of the machine/plasma. After estimating an effective particle diffusivity and the particle confinement time, a threshold density separating qualitatively and quantitatively different plasma transport regimes is found. The poor confinement times found below the threshold are coincident with the presence of ECH-induced fast electron losses and a positive radial electric field all over the plasma. (Author) 40 refs.

  8. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  9. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  10. SOL plasma measurements during high density and long duration current drive on TRIAM-1M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Takeharu; Kawasaki, Shoji; Jotaki, Eriko; Makino, Ken-ichi; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-02-01

    In the superconducting, strong magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-1M, for the purpose of maintaining high density plasma for long time, the current drive experiment using 8.2 GHz lower hybrid wave has been carried out. For maintaining high density plasma for long time, it is indispensable to control gas puff and recycling from wall, as these are closely related to the structure and characteristics of boundary plasma including scrape-off layer (SOL). In this study, in the high density, long time current drive using 8.2 GHz lower hybrid wave, the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma were measured by using double probe, and the z-direction distribution and the toroidal magnetic field dependence of the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma were examined and compared with OH discharge. Also the dependence of the electron density of SOL plasma on the phase difference in a adjoining waveguide tubes was examined. The experimental setup and the double probe theory are explained. The experimental results of the change with time lapse, the z-direction distribution and the magnetic field dependence of the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edens, Aaron D.

    2008-09-01

    A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

  12. The influence of plasma density decreasement by pre-pulse on the laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Gong Dong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the laser wakefield acceleration, the generation of electron beam is very sensitive to the plasma density. Not only the laser-wakefield interaction, but also the electron trapping and acceleration would be effected by the plasma density. However, the plasma density could be changed in the experiment by different reasons, which will result in the mismatch of parameters arranged initially. Forward Raman scattering spectrum demonstrated that the interaction density was decreased obviously in the experiment, which was verified by the pre-pulse conditions and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It was demonstrated that the plasma density was very important on the self-evolutions and energy coupling of laser pulse and wakefield, and eventually the energy spectrum of electron beam.

  13. Manipulation of laser-generated energetic proton spectra in near critical density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Charlotte A. J.; Dover, Nicholas P.; Pogorelsky, Igor; Streeter, Matthew J. V.; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations that demonstrate the production of quasi-monoenergetic proton bunches from the interaction of a CO2 laser pulse train with a near-critical density hydrogen plasma. The multi-pulse structure of the laser leads to a steepening of the plasma density gradient, which the simulations show is necessary for the formation of narrow-energy spread proton bunches. Laser interactions with a long, front surface, scale-length (>> c/ωp ) plasma, with linear density gradient, were observed to generate proton beams with a higher maximum energy, but a much broader spectrum compared to step-like density profiles. In the step-like cases, a peak in the proton energy spectra was formed and seen to scale linearly with the ratio of laser intensity to plasma density.

  14. SOME COLLISION PROCESSES IN PLASMAS WITH HIGHER TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KazuoTakayanagi

    1990-01-01

    Some collision processes important in hot and dense plasmas are discussed.Recent calculation of secondary electron velocity distribution in ionizing collision between an electron and a multiply-charged ion is reported.

  15. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. I. Argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffard, John B., E-mail: jboffard@wisc.edu; Lin, Chun C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Culver, Cody [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold [Varian Semiconductor Equipment, Applied Materials Inc., Gloucester, MA 01939 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from excited atomic states are ubiquitous in material processing plasmas. The highly energetic photons can induce surface damage by driving surface reactions, disordering surface regions, and affecting bonds in the bulk material. In argon plasmas, the VUV emissions are due to the decay of the 1s{sub 4} and 1s{sub 2} principal resonance levels with emission wavelengths of 104.8 and 106.7 nm, respectively. The authors have measured the number densities of atoms in the two resonance levels using both white light optical absorption spectroscopy and radiation-trapping induced changes in the 3p{sup 5}4p→3p{sup 5}4s branching fractions measured via visible/near-infrared optical emission spectroscopy in an argon inductively coupled plasma as a function of both pressure and power. An emission model that takes into account radiation trapping was used to calculate the VUV emission rate. The model results were compared to experimental measurements made with a National Institute of Standards and Technology-calibrated VUV photodiode. The photodiode and model results are in generally good accord and reveal a strong dependence on the neutral gas temperature.

  16. Mapping the X-Ray Emission Region in a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Lifschitz, A.; Lambert, G.; Faure, J.; Lundh, O.; Benveniste, E.; Ben-Ismail, A.; Arantchuk, L.; Marciniak, A.; Stordeur, A.; Brijesh, P.; Rousse, A.; Specka, A.; Malka, V.

    2011-11-01

    The x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators can be a powerful tool to understand the physics of relativistic laser-plasma interaction. It is shown here that the mapping of betatron x-ray radiation can be obtained from the x-ray beam profile when an aperture mask is positioned just beyond the end of the emission region. The influence of the plasma density on the position and the longitudinal profile of the x-ray emission is investigated and compared to particle-in-cell simulations. The measurement of the x-ray emission position and length provides insight on the dynamics of the interaction, including the electron self-injection region, possible multiple injection, and the role of the electron beam driven wakefield.

  17. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A. [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Cortázar, O. D., E-mail: dcortazar@essbilbao.org [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, ETSII, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  18. Modelling the influence of temperature anisotropies on poloidal asymmetries of density in the core of rotating plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilato, R.; Maj, O.; Angioni, C.

    2014-07-01

    A consistent set of equations is derived to model poloidal density asymmetries induced by temperature anisotropies in tokamak rotating plasmas. The model can be applied to compute poloidal density asymmetry of highly charged impurities due to additional plasma heating.

  19. Ion Density Distribution in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊芳; 赵文锋; 吴先球; 樊双莉; 符斯列

    2004-01-01

    The ion density distribution in the reaction chamber was diagnosed by a Langmuir probe. The rules of the ion density distribution were obtained under the pressures of 9 Pa, 13 Pa,27 Pa and 53 Pa in the reaction chamber, different radio-frequency powers and different positions.The result indicates that the ion density decreases as the pressure increases, and increases as the power decreases. The ion density of axial position z = 0 achieves 5.8×10 10 on the center of coil under the power of 200 w and pressure of 9 Pa in the reaction chamber.

  20. Chemical release experiments to induce F region ionospheric plasma irregularities at the magnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Peter Jared

    1994-01-01

    The largest-scale plasma instability that occurs naturally in the Earth's ionosphere is a turbulent upwelling of the equatorial F region known as equatorial spread-F (ESF). During an ESF event, high plasma density magnetic fluxtubes at the bottomside of the F region are thought to change places with lower plasma density flux-tubes from below in a Rayleigh-Taylor type (heavy fluid over light fluid) instability. This interchange creates a large-scale (10's of km) density perturbation locally, which rapidly penetrates through to the topside of the F region, creating a plume of cascading smaller-scale (meter to centimeter scale) irregularities from the sharp density gradients at the edges of the rising plasma 'bubble'. In a theoretical test of this overall scenario for ESF, a linear instability growth rate is derived following the magnetic fluxtube formalism of Haerendel. Using realistic atmospheric and ionospheric density model inputs, growth rates are calculated for a range of geophysical conditions. Time/altitude domains having positive growth rates are found to coincide with observed time/altitude patterns of ESF occurrence, thus supporting the fluxtube model. The physics also are tested experimentally by the deliberate creation of plasma bubbles in ambient ionospheres that the fluxtube model predicts are susceptible to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Two such artificial seed perturbations were generated during the 1990 NASA/Boston University CRRES-at-Kwajalein campaign, when clouds of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were released by sounding rockets to initiate plasma recombinations near the bottomside of the equatorial ionosphere. Multiple diagnostics (incoherent scatter radar, high frequency radar, optics, and satellite polarimeters at several sites) were used to monitor the prelaunch status of the ionosphere and the electron depleted regions that resulted from the chemical releases. Small ESF plumes were observed to form in the region of the artificial perturbation

  1. Ionospheric plasma density structures associated with magnetopause motion: a case study using the Cluster spacecraft and the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pitout

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available On 5 January 2003, the footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, then orbiting in the dayside magnetosphere near the magnetopause, was in the close vicinity of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR in the dayside afternoon sector. This configuration made possible the study of the magnetopause motion and its direct consequences on the ionospheric plasma at high latitude. Cluster observed multiple magnetopause crossings despite its high latitude, while on the ground the magnetic activity was very low, whereas the ionospheric plasma sounded by the ESR exhibited poleward moving plasma density structures. In this paper, we compare the satellite and radar data, in order to show that the plasma density structures are directly related to the magnetopause motion and its associated pulsed ionospheric flow. We propose that the variations in electric field make the convection velocity vary enough to alter the electron population by accelerating the chemistry in the F-region and act as a source of electron depletion. The magnetopause motion is in this case, a source of plasma density structures in the polar dayside ionosphere.

  2. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... to the least relative influence of weight and stress loading because of migration of calcium to weight and stress-bearing areas. Since the effect of this migration could mask local osteoporotic bone loss, shoulder BMD measurement is likely to minimize false indicators of healthy bone in women with high BMI...

  3. The density and velocity of plasma bullets propagating along one dielectric tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei Ji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study shows that the propagation of plasma bullets along one dielectric tube is strongly affected by many discharge parameters, such as the waveform of applied voltage (AC or pulsed DC, peak voltage, He flow rate, and the frequency of AC voltage. Analysis indicates that the density and velocity of plasma bullets are mainly determined by the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. These discharge parameters may significantly influence the distribution of plasma potential along the tube, thus control the electric field at the front of plasma bullets and their propagation. An increase in the pulsed DC voltage with its rise time of <40-50 ns can lead to an obvious improvement in the electric field at the front of plasma bullets, resulting in generation of a plasma in the high density gas and a fast propagation of plasma bullets. He flowing through the tube can contribute to the surface diffusion of charged species, and greatly increase the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. During the propagation of plasma bullets, their density is decreased due to the surface recombination of charged species, such as electrons and ions.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing in low density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.; Doreswamy, C. V.

    1996-01-01

    An unavoidable step in the process of space exploration is to use high-power, very large spacecraft launched into Earth orbit. Obviously, the spacecraft will need powerful energy sources. Previous experience has shown that electrical discharges occur on the surfaces of a high-voltage array, and these discharges (arcs) are undesirable in many respects. Moreover, any high voltage conductor will interact with the surrounding plasma, and that interaction may result in electrical discharges between the conductor and plasma (or between two conductors with different potentials, for example, during docking and extravehicular activity). One very important aspect is the generation of electromagnetic radiation by arcing. To prevent the negative influence of electromagnetic noise on the operation of spacecraft systems, it seems necessary to determine the spectra and absolute levels of the radiation, and to determine limitations on the solar array bias voltage that depend on the parameters of LEO plasma and the technical requirements of the spacecraft equipment. This report describes the results of an experimental study and computer simulation of the electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing on spacecraft surfaces. A large set of high quality data was obtained during the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE, flight STS-62) and ground test. These data include the amplitudes of current, pulse forms, duration of each arc, and spectra of plasma waves. A theoretical explanation of the observed features is presented in this report too. The elaborated model allows us to determine the parameters of the electromagnetic noise for different frequency ranges, distances from the arcing site, and distinct kinds of plasma waves.

  5. Effects of beam velocity and density on an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Yong-tao; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The wakefield and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas are investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The effects of beam velocity and density on the wake and stopping power are discussed. In the presence of magnetic field, it is found that beside the longitudinal conversed V-shaped wakes, the strong whistler wave are observed when low-density and low-velocity pulses moving in plasmas. The corresponding stopping powers are enhanced due to the drag of these whistler waves. As beam velocities increase, the whistler waves disappear, and only are conversed V-shape wakes observed. The corresponding stopping powers are reduced compared with these in isotropic plasmas. When high-density pulses transport in the magnetized plasmas, the whistler waves are greatly inhibited for low-velocity pulses and disappear for high-velocity pulses. Additionally, the magnetic field reduces the stopping powers for all high-density cases.

  6. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, M; Li, Y T; Yuan, D W; Chen, M; Mulser, P; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Yu, L L; Zheng, X L; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven collisonless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strongly time-oscillating electric field accompanying laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma...

  7. Upgrade of plasma density feedback control system in HT-7 tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Da-Zheng; LUO Jia-Rong; LI Gang; JI Zhen-Shan; WANG Feng

    2004-01-01

    The HT-7 is a superconducting tokamak in China used to make researches on the controlled nuclear fusion as a national project for the fusion research. The plasma density feedback control subsystem is the one of the subsystems of the distributed control system in HT-7 tokamak (HT7DCS). The main function of the subsystem is to control the plasma density on real-time. For this reason, the real-time capability and good stability are the most significant factors, which will influence the control results. Since the former plasma density feedback control system (FPDFCS) based on Windows operation system could not fulfill such requirements well, a new subsystem has to be developed. The paper describes the upgrade of the plasma density feedback control system (UPDFCS), based on the dual operation system (Windows and Linux), in detail.

  8. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (˜1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 1015 W/cm2. The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 1021 cm-3 with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting ne and Te profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light.

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of high energy density plasmas with picosecond temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K L

    2005-09-20

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of the electron density in a plasma can be obtained by passing multiple beams at different field angles simultaneously through a plasma and performing a tomographic reconstruction of the measured field-dependent phase profiles. In this letter, a relatively simple experimental setup is proposed and simulations are carried out to verify the technique. The plasma distribution is modeled as a discreet number of phase screens and a Zernike polynomial representation of the phase screens is used to reconstruct the plasma profile. Using a subpicosecond laser, the complete three-dimensional electron density of the plasma can be obtained with a time resolution limited only by the transit time of the probe through the plasma.

  10. Plasma Density Measurements in Cable Gun Experiments with a Sensitive He-Ne Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; HE An; JIANG Wei; XU Min; WU Shoudong; LI Ye

    2007-01-01

    A time-resolved sensitive He-Ne laser interferometer without complicated active stabilization was built up and applied to low-density plasma measurements. A precision of about 0.2° in phase measurements was achieved with a minimum line-integrated plasma density as low as 8.3×l013 cm-2. With this interferometer, the characteristics of the plasma generated by a cable plasma gun was investigated systematically. The reproducibility, spatial and temporal distributions and the averaged injection velocity of the plasma are presented. In addition, the interaction of the plasma flow with a conductor was studied by placing a metal plate in the downstream of the cable gun.

  11. Plasma density characterization at SPARC_LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC_LAB is presented.

  12. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, H. J., E-mail: hjquevedo@utexas.edu; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  13. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, H. J.; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-01-01

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  14. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano-city, Nagano (Japan); Sawada, K. [Shinshu University, Nagano-city, Nagano (Japan); Tanaka, Y. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma-cho, Kanzawa-city, Ishikawa (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Insitute for Fusion Science, Toki-city, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  15. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J.; Bland, S. N.; Threadgold, J.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of ne ˜ 1013/cm3 and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed.

  16. The energy density of a Landau damped plasma wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, R. W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper some theories about the energy of a Landau damped plasma wave are discussed and new initial conditions are proposed. Analysis of a wave packet, rather than an infinite wave, gives a clear picture of the energy transport from field to particles. Initial conditions are found which excite

  17. Thermographic determination of the sheath heat transmission coefficient in a high density plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; Pasquet, R.; Zielinski, J. J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device, to determine the sheath heat transmission coefficients in a high recycling regime under various conditions of density (1–20 × 1020 m−3) and plasma composition (H2, Ar, N2) relevant for the

  18. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2–4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating poten...

  19. Thermographic determination of the sheath heat transmission coefficient in a high density plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; Pasquet, R.; Zielinski, J. J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device, to determine the sheath heat transmission coefficients in a high recycling regime under various conditions of density (1–20 × 1020 m−3) and plasma composition (H2, Ar, N2) relevant for the

  20. High density plasma gun generates plasmas at 190 kilometers per second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, P. N.

    1971-01-01

    Gun has thin metal foil disc which positions or localizes gas to be ionized during electrical discharge cycle, overcoming major limiting factor in obtaining such plasmas. Expanding plasma front travels at 190 km/sec, compared to plasmas of 50 to 60 km/sec previously achieved.

  1. Transition regions in solar system and astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is presented of basic particle and field characteristics of plasmas observed within the solar system, especially near transition regions, and their parameter ranges are compared with those inferred for stellar winds and the interstellar medium. Parameter ranges for solar system and astrophysical plasmas are found to have considerable overlap. In addition, astrophysics provides unique, global perspectives of large-scale systems, whereas solar-system space physics provides for direct quantitative testing of physical processes. Astrophysics and solar-system space physics studies thus have complementary and synergistic roles.

  2. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  3. Development of density measurement method of negative ion in plasmas using laser Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yukihiko; Saiho, Hiroatsu; Uchino, Kiichiro; Muraoka, Katsunori

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of negative ion density in plasmas have been an important subject for many years. We have proposed a new method to measure the negative ion density in plasmas using laser Thomson scattering (LTS), and successfully measured O^- ion density in an radio frequency inductively coupled plasma [1]. In order to ensure the reliability of this technique and to estimate the accuracy, we have measured O^- ion density in the same experimental conditions using the second (SHG) and third harmonics (THG) of a Nd:YAG laser as different laser sources. The LTS spectra measured at pure argon plasma (500 W, 20 mTorr) fitted in a straight line well in both SHG and THG cases. As for the plasma at 500 W in 20 mTorr with Ar/O_2=95%/5%, a clear bump in LTS spectra, which is caused by photo-detached electrons, was observed below 0.9 eV for the SHG case and 2 eV for the case, as predicted by a difference between the electron affinity of O^- ion and the laser photon energy. The electron temperatures, the electron densities and the O^- ion densities, which were obtained from the spectral shape and intensity of both LTS spectra, were in agreement each other within an experimental error. [1] M. Noguchi, K. Ariga, T. Hirao, P. Suanpoot, Y. Yamagata, K. Uchino, K. Muraoka, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 11 (2002) 57.

  4. Determination of self generated magnetic field and the plasma density using Cotton Mouton polarimetry with two color probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi A.S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Self generated magnetic fields (SGMF in laser produced plasmas are conventionally determined by measuring the Faraday rotation angle of a linearly polarized laser probe beam passing through the plasma along with the interferogram for obtaining plasma density. In this paper, we propose a new method to obtain the plasma density and the SGMF distribution from two simultaneous measurements of Cotton Mouton polarimetry of two linearly polarized probe beams of different colors that pass through plasma in a direction normal to the planar target. It is shown that this technique allows us to determine the distribution of SGMF and the plasma density without doing interferometry of laser produced plasmas.

  5. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  6. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  7. Theory of density fluctuations in strongly radiative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. E.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.

    2016-03-01

    Derivation of the dynamic structure factor, an important parameter linking experimental and theoretical work in dense plasmas, is possible starting from hydrodynamic equations. Here we obtain, by modifying the governing hydrodynamic equations, a new form of the dynamic structure factor which includes radiative terms. The inclusion of such terms has an effect on the structure factor at high temperatures, which suggests that its effect must be taken into consideration in such regimes.

  8. High-density operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Caneses, J.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Parish, C. M.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Donovan, D.; Piotrowicz, P. A.; Martin, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity RF plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with ion and electron heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration with the goal of delivering a plasma heat flux of 10 MW/m2 at a target. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz RF power at levels of >100 kW. A 30 kW ion cyclotron antenna has recently been installed, and microwaves at 28 GHz ( 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). High plasma densities near the target have been produced in D ( 5 x1019/m3) , and electron temperatures range from 3 to >10 eV, depending on the source parameters. IR camera images of the target plate indicate plasma heat depositions >10 MW/m2 for some operating conditions. Details of the experimental results of the operational domain with respect to Te and ne as well as results from initial plasma material interaction tests will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  9. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  10. Demonstration of resonant backward Raman amplification in high-density gas-jet plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. H.; Zhou, K. N.; Zheng, X. M.; Wei, X. F.; Zhu, Q. H.; Su, J. Q.; Xie, N.; Jiao, Z. H.; Peng, H.; Wang, X. D.; Sun, L.; Li, Q.; Huang, Z.; Zuo, Y. L.

    2016-10-01

    Backward Raman amplification was observed in a 0.7 mm-long high-density gas jet plasma. The 800 nm 30 fs seed pulse was amplified by a factor  ∼28, with an output energy of 2.8 mJ. The output spectra showed that the waveband around 800 nm was significantly amplified. The experimental result demonstrated that the resonant Raman amplification can be realized in high-density plasma against strong plasma instability.

  11. Spaced-Resolved Electron Density of Aluminum Plasma Produced by Frequency-Tripled Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Boqian; Han Shensheng; Zhang Jiyan; Zheng Zhijian; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiaming; Li Jun; Wang Yan

    2005-01-01

    By using the space-resolved spectrograph, the K-shell emission from laser-produced plasma was investigated. Electron density profiles along the normal direction of the target surface in aluminum laser-plasmas were obtained by two different diagnostic methods and compared with the profiles from the theoretical simulation of hydrodynamics code MULTI1D. The results corroborate the feasibility to obtain the electron density above the critical surface by the diagnostic method based on the Stark-broadened wings in the intermediately coupled plasmas.

  12. Observations of plasma density structures in association with the passage of traveling convection vortices and the occurrence of large plasma jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Valladares

    Full Text Available We report important results of the first campaign specially designed to observe the formation and the initial convection of polar cap patches. The principal instrumentation used in the experiments comprised the EISCAT, the Sondrestrom, and the Super DARN network of radars. The experiment was conducted on February 18, 1996 and was complemented with additional sensors such as the Greenland chain of magnetometers and the WIND and IMP-8 satellites. Two different types of events were seen on this day, and in both events the Sondrestrom radar registered the formation and evolution of large-scale density structures. The first event consisted of the passage of traveling convection vortices (TCV. The other event occurred in association with the development of large plasma jets (LPJ embedded in the sunward convection part of the dusk cell. TCVs were measured, principally, with the magnetometers located in Greenland, but were also confirmed by the line-of-sight velocities from the Sondrestrom and SuperDARN radars. We found that when the magnetic perturbations associated with the TCVs were larger than 100 nT, then a section of the high-latitude plasma density was eroded by a factor of 2. We suggest that the number density reduction was caused by an enhancement in the O+ recombination due to an elevated Ti, which was produced by the much higher frictional heating inside the vortex. The large plasma jets had a considerable (>1000 km longitudinal extension and were 200-300 km in width. They were seen principally with the Sondrestrom, and SuperDARN radars. Enhanced ion temperature (Ti was also observed by the Sondrestrom and EISCAT radars. These channels of high Ti were exactly collocated with the LPJs and some of them with regions of eroded plasma number density. We suggest that the LPJs bring less dense plasma from later local times. However, the recent time history of the plasma flow is important to define the

  13. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  14. A Catalytic Sensor for Measurement of Radical Density in CO2 Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic sensor for the measurement of radical density in weakly ionized CO2 plasmas, created in a low-pressure electrodeless discharge, is presented. The CO2 plasma was created in a 4 cm wide borosilicate glass tube inside a copper coil connected to a radio frequency generator operating at 27.12 MHz with a nominal power of 250 W. The dissociation fraction of the CO2 molecules was measured in the early afterglow at pressures ranging from 10 Pa to 100 Pa, and at distances of up to 35 cm along the gas stream from the glowing plasma. The radical density peaked (2 × 1020 m–3 at 80 Pa. The density quickly decreased with increasing distance from the glowing plasma despite a rather large drift velocity. The dissociation fraction showed similar behavior, except that the maximum was obtained at somewhat lower pressure. The results were explained by rather intense surface recombination of radicals.

  15. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, v_{HB}, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of CO_{2} laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the v_{HB} falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of v_{HB}, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  16. Enhanced toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with increased plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-01

    Toroidal flow alone is generally thought to have an important influence on tokamak edge pedestal stability, even though theoretical analysis often predicts merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on the edge localized modes (ELMs) in experimental parameter regimes. For the first time, we find from two-fluid MHD calculations that such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the edge plasma density. Our finding resolves a long-standing mystery whether or how toroidal rotation can indeed have an effective influence on ELMs, and explains why the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation are more favorably achieved in higher collisionality regime in recent experiments. The finding suggests a new control scheme on modulating toroidal flow stabilization of ELMs with plasma density, along with a new additional constraint on the optimal level of plasma density for the desired edge plasma conditions.

  17. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Uhm, Han S.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 1018 cm-3 within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3×1018 cm-3 occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  18. Improved confinement in high-density H-modes via modification of the plasma boundary with lower hybrid wavesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J. L.; Reinke, M. L.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Brunner, D.; Churchill, R. M.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Faust, I.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Xu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid Range of Frequency (LHRF) waves into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has led to enhanced global energy confinement by increasing pedestal temperature and pressure gradients, decreasing the separatrix density, modifying the pedestal radial electric field and rotation, and decreasing edge turbulence. These experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as an actuator to increase energy confinement via modification of boundary quantities. H98-factor increases of up to ˜35% (e.g., H98 from 0.75 to 1.0) are seen when moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot ˜ 0.15) are applied to H-modes of densities n ¯ e ˜ 3 × 1020 m-3, corresponding to values ˜0.5 of the Greenwald density. However, the magnitude of the improvement is reduced if the confinement quality of the target H-mode plasma is already good (i.e., H98target ˜ 1). Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that they do not penetrate to the core. The LHRF power appears to be deposited in plasma boundary region, with a large fraction of the injected power increment appearing promptly on the outer divertor target. There is no evidence that the LH waves are driving current in these plasmas. The LHRF-actuated improvements are well correlated with suppressed pedestal density fluctuations in the 100-300 kHz range. There is also a correlation between the improved confinement and a drop in separatrix density, a correlation that is consistent with previous H-mode results with no LHRF.

  19. Heat Transport Simulation for Atmospheric-Pressure High-Density Microgap Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2006-02-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cw high-density plasma can be produced in a microgap between two knife-edge electrodes by microwave excitation. A possible application of such a plasma is as an excimer light source and for this purpose the gas temperature in the plasma is a particularly important parameter. In this paper we report a fluid dynamic simulation of heat transport in the microgap plasma and compare the results with previously studied experimental gas temperature characteristics (e.g., dependence on the microwave power and the forced gas flow rate). The simulation explains reasonably well the experimental results when the effect of local gas density change on the gas heating process is taken into consideration. Discussion is given that the existence of thermally driven convection in the microgap plasma indicated in a preliminary report is incorrect.

  20. Modeling of plasma density in the earth's dayside inner magnetosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domrachev, VV; Chugunin, DV

    2002-01-01

    The results of comparison of the model profiles of density, obtained by means of the CDPDM model, with the experimental data of the ISEE-1 satellite for the years 1977-1983 are presented. The hypothesis on the validity of the mirror mapping of the convection boundary relative to the dawn-dusk

  1. Improving the uniformity of RF-plasma density by a humped variable-gap spiral antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xu; Li Lin-Sen; Liu Feng; Zhou Qian-Hong; Liang Rong-Qing

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a humped spiral antenna of top inductively coupled plasma with variable gap.Comparing with planar spiral antennas,it investigates the performance of humped spiral antennae in the calculated electromagnetic configurations and experimental results.It finds that the humped antenna has the improved uniformity of plasma density in the radial direction and the decreased electron temperature in the top inductively coupled plasma.By experimental and theoretical analyses,the plasma performance in the case of humped antennae is considered to be the combined results of the uniform electromagnetic configurations and the depressed capacitively coupling effect.

  2. "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores Heated by Single Nanoflares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Will Thomas; Cargill, Peter; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    We use hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code, to investigate the properties expected of "hot" (i.e. between 106.7 and 107.2 K) non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions. Here we focus on single nanoflares and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between 1 MK and 10 MK. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  3. Persistent Longitudinal Variations of Plasma Density and DC Electric Fields in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Observed with Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Liebrecht, C.; Bromund, K.; Roddy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous measurements using in situ probes on consecutive orbits of the C/N0FS satellite reveal that the plasma density is persistently organized by longitude, in both day and night conditions and at all locations within the satellite orbit, defined by its perigee and apogee of 401 km and 867 km, respectively, and its inclination of 13 degrees. Typical variations are a factor of 2 or 3 compared to mean values. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts in the low latitude ionosphere also reveal that their amplitudes are also strongly organized by longitude in a similar fashion. The drift variations with longitude are particularly pronounced in the meridional component perpendicular to the magnetic field although they are also present in the zonal component as well. The longitudes of the peak meridional drift and density values are significantly out of phase with respect to each other. Time constants for the plasma accumulation at higher altitudes with respect to the vertical drift velocity must be taken into account in order to properly interpret the detailed comparisons of the phase relationship of the plasma density and plasma velocity variations. Although for a given period corresponding to that of several days, typically one longitude region dominates the structuring of the plasma density and plasma drift data, there is also evidence for variations organized about multiple longitudes at the same time. Statistical averages will be shown that suggest a tidal "wave 4" structuring is present in both the plasma drift and plasma density data. We interpret the apparent association of the modulation of the E x B drifts with longitude as well as that of the ambient plasma density as a manifestation of tidal forces at work in the low latitude upper atmosphere. The observations demonstrate how the high duty cycle of the C/NOFS observations and its unique orbit expose fundamental processes at work in the low latitude

  4. Plasma Density and Radio Echoes in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W.

    1995-01-01

    This project provided a opportunity to study a variety of interesting topics related to radio sounding in the magnetosphere. The results of this study are reported in two papers which have been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research and Radio Science, and various aspects of this study were also reported at meetings of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) at Baltimore, Maryland and the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI) at Boulder, Colorado. The major results of this study were also summarized during a one-day symposium on this topic sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center in December 1994. The purpose of the study was to examine the density structure of the plasmasphere and determine the relevant mechanisms for producing radio echoes which can be detected by a radio sounder in the magnetosphere. Under this study we have examined density irregularities, biteouts, and outliers of the plasmasphere, studied focusing, specular reflection, ducting, and scattering by the density structures expected to occur in the magnetosphere, and predicted the echoes which can be detected by a magnetospheric radio sounder.

  5. Measurements of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) and Electron Density/Temperature Profiles in Plasmas Produced by the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    We will present results of simultaneous measurements of LPI-driven light scattering and density/temperature profiles in CH plasmas produced by the Nike krypton fluoride laser (λ = 248 nm). The primary diagnostics for the LPI measurement are time-resolved spectrometers with absolute intensity calibration in spectral ranges relevant to the optical detection of stimulated Raman scattering or two plasmon decay. The spectrometers are capable of monitoring signal intensity relative to thermal background radiation from plasma providing a useful way to analyze LPI initiation. For further understanding of LPI processes, the recently implemented grid image refractometer (Nike-GIR)a is used to measure the coronal plasma profiles. In this experiment, Nike-GIR is equipped with a 5th harmonic probe laser (λ = 213 nm) in attempt to probe into a high density region over the previous peak density with λ = 263 nm probe light ( 4 ×1021 cm-3). The LPI behaviors will be discussed with the measured data sets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  6. Sub-Auroral Ion Drifts as a Source of Mid-Latitude Plasma Density Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during space storms. At midlatitudes, such space weather events are caused mainly by subauroral electric field structures (SAID/SAPS) [1, 2]. SAID/SAPS -related shear flows and plasma density troughs point to interchange and Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities as a possible source of plasma irregularities. A model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on the two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. A numerical code in C language to solve the derived nonlinear equations for analysis of interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere was developed. This code was used to analyze competition between interchange and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities in the equatorial region [3]. The high-resolution simulations with continuous density and velocity profiles will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the in situ Defence Military Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite low-resolution data [2] during UHF/GPS L-band subauroral scintillation events. [1] Mishin, E. (2013), Interaction of substorm injections with the subauroral geospace: 1. Multispacecraft observations of SAID, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 118, 5782-5796, doi:10.1002/jgra.50548. [2] Mishin, E., and N. Blaunstein (2008), Irregularities within subauroral polarization stream-related troughs and GPS radio interference at midlatitudes. In: T. Fuller-Rowell et al. (eds), AGU Geophysical Monograph 181, MidLatitude Ionospheric Dynamics and Disturbances, pp. 291-295, doi:10.1029/181GM26, Washington, DC, USA. [3] V. Sotnikov, T. Kim, E. Mishin, T. Genoni, D. Rose, I. Paraschiv, Development of a Flow Velocity Shear Instability in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 15 - 19 December, 2014.

  7. Relativistic self-focusing of intense laser beam in thermal collisionless quantum plasma with ramped density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, S.; Yazdani, E.; Rezaee, S.; Anvari, A.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Propagation of a Gaussian x-ray laser beam has been analyzed in collisionless thermal quantum plasma with considering a ramped density profile. In this density profile due to the increase in the plasma density, an earlier and stronger self-focusing effect is noticed where the beam width oscillates with higher frequency and less amplitude. Moreover, the effect of the density profile slope and the initial plasma density on the laser propagation has been studied. It is found that, by increasing the initial density and the ramp slope, the laser beam focuses faster with less oscillation amplitude, smaller laser spot size and more oscillations. Furthermore, a comparison is made among the laser self-focusing in thermal quantum plasma, cold quantum plasma and classical plasma. It is realized that the laser self-focusing in the quantum plasma becomes stronger in comparison with the classical regime.

  8. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have numerical appreciation of the results the propagation equation for plasma is solved using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the initial plane wave front of the beam, using boundary conditions. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma and significantly adds self-focusing in plasma. This causes the laser beam to become more focused by reduction of diffraction effect, which is an important phenomenon in inertial confinement fusion and also for the understanding of self-focusing of laser pulses. Numerical computations are presented and discussed in the form of graphs for typical parameters of laser-plasma interaction.

  9. Performance of water and hybrid stabilized electric arcs: the impact of dependence of radiation losses and plasma density on pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeništa, J.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    2006-10-01

    Processes in the worldwide unique type of thermal plasma generator with water vortex stabilization and combined stabilization of arc by argon flow and water vortex have been numerically studied. Two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical model assumes laminar and compressible plasma flow in the state of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation domain includes the arc discharge area between the near-cathode region and the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch. Radiation losses from the arc are calculated by the partial characteristics method for atmospheric pressure water and argon-water discharges. Thermal, electrical and fluid-dynamic characteristics of such arcs have been studied for the range of currents 150÷600 A under the assumption that radiation losses and plasma density depend linearly on pressure. It was proved that, taking this dependence into account, plasma velocity decrease while power losses from the arc by radiation and radial conduction increase with current. Outlet plasma temperature as well as electric potential drop remain practically unchanged.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of electron temperature and density by a line pair method in the RFP plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shimizu, S.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, T.

    2009-11-01

    A line-pair-method has been applied for a simultaneous measurement of the electron temperature and density in ATRAS RFP plasma. Three helium spectrum lines (668nm, 706nm, 728nm) were measured during the discharge at the same time and the electron temperature and density is estimated by using a Collision-Radiation model. To get the signal of the helium impunity line from the RFP discharge, the RFP plasma in the hydrogen gas with a few mixed helium gas was formed. In the typical ATRAS RFP discharge of the plasma current of 60kA, the electron temperature was approximately 50-150 eV and the electron density is the order of 10^18 m-3. During the discharge, the change of the temperature and density are mutually related and this correlation was the almost reverse phase. The periodically change of the temperature and density were also observed. This change synchronizes with a periodically increase of the averaged toroidal magnetic field, which is caused by the toroidal rotation of the increase of the toroidal magnetic field. This rotation, which is deeply related with dynamo effect, makes the plasma energy lose and particles also diffuse toward the plasma edge. As a result, the recycling of the particle and energy are occurred at the same time.

  11. Hole boring velocity measurements in near critical density plasmas by a CO2 laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of plasma dynamics during the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with an above critical density plasma is important for understanding absorption, transport and particle acceleration mechanisms. An important process that affects these mechanisms is hole boring occurring at the critical density because of the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. Yet, no systematic measurements of the hole boring velocity's (vhb) dependence on laser intensity (I) have been made. In this talk, we present experimental results of vhb in near critical density plasmas produced by CO2 laser as a function of I in the range of 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. A novel four frame Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a 1 ps, 532 nm probe laser pulse was developed to record the evolution of the plasma density profile and the motion of the near critical density layer. Using this diagnostic, we observed the motion of the steepened plasma profile due to the incident, time-structured CO2 laser pulse. Experimental results show the hole boring velocity increases from 0.004c to 0.007c as the laser intensity is increased from 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-92-ER40727, NSF grant PHY-0936266 at UCLA.

  12. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2012-10-01

    ExperimentsfootnotetextJ. Oh, et al, GO5.4, APS DPP (2010).^,footnotetextJ. L. Weaver, et al, GO5.3, APS DPP (2010). using Nike KrF laser observed LPI signatures from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜1x10^15 W/cm^2. Knowing spatial profiles of temperature (Te) and density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (0 Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR)footnotetextR. S. Craxton, et al, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4419 (1993). is being deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. The GIR will resolve Te and ne in space taking a 2D snapshot of probe laser (λ= 263 nm, δt = 10 psec) beamlets (50μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera will simultaneously monitor light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay (TDP) instabilities. The experimental study of effects of the plasma profiles on the LPI initiation will be presented.

  13. Ionic Wind Phenomenon and Charge Carrier Mobility in Very High Density Argon Corona Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.

    2014-04-01

    Wind ions phenomenon has been observed in the high density argon corona discharge plasma. Corona discharge plasma was produced by point to plane electrodes and high voltage DC. Light emission from the recombination process was observed visually. The light emission proper follow the electric field lines that occur between point and plane electrodes. By using saturation current, the mobilities of non-thermal electrons and ions have been obtained in argon gas and liquid with variation of density from 2,5 1021 to 2 1022 cm-3. In the case of ions, we found that the behaviour of the apparent mobility inversely proportional to the density or follow the Langevin variation law. For non-thermal electron, mobility decreases and approximately follows a variation of Langevin type until the density <= 0,25 the critical density of argon.

  14. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorici, F.; Malferrari, L.; Montanari, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  15. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odorici, F., E-mail: fabrizio.odorici@bo.infn.it; Malferrari, L.; Montanari, A. [INFN—Bologna, Viale B. Pichat, 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Rizzoli, R. [INFN—Bologna, Viale B. Pichat, 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); CNR–Istituto per la Microelettronica ed i Microsistemi, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L. [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to “screen” the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  16. Effects of the fluorine plasma treatment on low-density drain AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Wang; Xiaoxiao, Wei; Yunlong, He; Xuefeng, Zheng; Xiaohua, Ma; Jincheng, Zhang; Yue, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Low-density drain high-electron mobility transistors (LDD-HEMTs) with different F- plasma treatment were investigated by simulations and experiments. The LDD region was performed by introducing negatively charged fluorine ions, which modified the surface field distribution on the drain side of the HEMT, and the enhancement of breakdown voltage were achieved. With the increased fluorine plasma treatment power and LDD region length, the breakdown voltage can be maximumly improved by 70%, and no severe reductions on output current and transconductance were observed. To confirm the temperature stability of the devices, annealing experiments were carried out at 400 °C for 2 min in ambient N2. Moreover, the gate leakage current and breakdown voltage before and after annealing were compared and analyzed, respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61334002, 61106106, 61474091) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. K5051325004, K5051325002).

  17. Plasma behaviour at high beta and high density in the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Chapman, B. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ahn, J. W. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Almagri, A. F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Italy; Bower, D L [University of California, Los Angeles; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Craig, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Foust, Charles R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Pellet fuelling of improved confinement Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) plasmas has resulted in high density and high plasma beta. The density in improved confinement discharges has been increased fourfold, and a record plasma beta (beta(tot) = 26%) for the improved confinement reversed-field pinch (RFP) has been achieved. At higher beta, a new regime for instabilities is accessed in which local interchange and global tearing instabilities are calculated to be linearly unstable, but experimentally, no severe effect, e. g., a disruption, is observed. The tearing instability, normally driven by the current gradient, is driven by the pressure gradient in this case, and there are indications of increased energy transport ( as compared with low-density improved confinement). Pellet fuelling is also compared with enhanced edge fuelling of standard confinement RFP discharges for the purpose of searching for a density limit in MST. In standard-confinement discharges, pellet fuelling peaks the density profile where edge fuelling cannot, but transport appears unchanged. For a limited range of plasma current, MST discharges with edge fuelling are constrained to a maximum density corresponding to the Greenwald limit. This limit is surpassed in pellet-fuelled improved confinement discharges.

  18. Neoclassical flows in deuterium-helium plasma density pedestals

    CERN Document Server

    Buller, Stefan; Newton, Sarah; Omotani, John

    2016-01-01

    In tokamak transport barriers, the radial scale of profile variations can be comparable to a typical ion orbit width, which makes the coupling of the distribution function across flux surfaces important in the collisional dynamics. We use the radially global steady-state neoclassical {\\delta}f code Perfect to calculate poloidal and toroidal flows, and radial fluxes, in the pedestal. In particular, we have studied the changes in these quantities as the plasma composition is changed from a deuterium bulk species with a helium impurity to a helium bulk with a deuterium impurity, under specific profile similarity assumptions. The poloidally resolved radial fluxes are not divergence-free in isolation in the presence of sharp radial profile variations, which leads to the appearance of poloidal return-flows. These flows exhibit a complex radial-poloidal structure that extends several orbit widths into the core and is sensitive to abrupt radial changes in the ion temperature gradient. We find that a sizable neoclassi...

  19. Strong self-focusing of a cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magneto-plasma under plasma density ramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti, E-mail: nitikant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, G. T. Road, Phagwara, Punjab 144411 (India)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of plasma density ramp on self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam considering ponderomotive nonlinearity is analyzed using WKB and paraxial approximation. It is noticed that cosh-Gaussian laser beam focused earlier than Gaussian beam. The focusing and de-focusing nature of the cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter, intensity parameter, magnetic field, and relative density parameter has been studied and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter “b” plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam as for b=2.12, strong self-focusing is seen. Further, it is observed that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For b=2.12, with the increase in the value of magnetic field self-focusing effect, in case of extraordinary mode, becomes very strong under plasma density ramp. Present study may be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers. Moreover, plasma density ramp plays a vital role to enhance the self-focusing effect.

  20. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Sorbello, Gino; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Isernia, Tommaso; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 1011-1013 cm-3 and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called "frequency sweep" method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  1. Bright gamma-rays from betatron resonance acceleration in near critical density plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, B; Wu, D; Liu, J; Chen, C E; Yan, X Q; He, X T

    2013-01-01

    We show that electron betatron resonance acceleration by an ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulse in a near critical density plasma works as a high-brightness gamma-ray source. Compared with laser plasma X-ray sources in under-dense plasma, near critical density plasma provides three benefits for electron radiation: more radiation electrons, larger transverse amplitude, and higher betatron oscillation frequency. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that, by using a 7.4J laser pulse, 8.3mJ radiation with critical photon energy 1MeV is emitted. The critical photon energy $E_c$ increases with the incident laser energy %faster than a linear relation. $W_I$ as $E_c \\propto W_I^{1.5}$, and the corresponding photon number is proportional to $W_I$. A simple analytical synchrotron-like radiation model is built, which can explain the simulation results.

  2. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy); Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Gammino, Santo [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, Gino [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Isernia, Tommaso [University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called “frequency sweep” method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  3. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in H-mode on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jernigan, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased non-linearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was {le} 3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density {approximately} 1.5 {times} Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flattop. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks.

  4. Plasma Equilibrium in a Magnetic Field with Stochastic Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Krommes and Allan H. Reiman

    2009-04-23

    The nature of plasma equilibrium in a magnetic field with stochastic regions is examined. It is shown that the magnetic differential equation that determines the equilibrium Pfirsch-Schluter currents can be cast in a form similar to various nonlinear equations for a turbulent plasma, allowing application of the mathematical methods of statistical turbulence theory. An analytically tractable model, previously studied in the context of resonance-broadening theory, is applied with particular attention paid to the periodicity constraints required in toroidal configurations. It is shown that even a very weak radial diffusion of the magnetic field lines can have a significant effect on the equilibrium in the neighborhood of the rational surfaces, strongly modifying the near-resonant Pfirsch-Schluter currents. Implications for the numerical calculation of 3D equilibria are discussed

  5. A study of increasing radical density and etch rate using remote plasma generator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Kyunghyun; Cho, Sung-Won; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-09-01

    To improve radical density without changing electron temperature, remote plasma generator (RPG) is applied. Multistep dissociation of the polyatomic molecule was performed using RPG system. RPG is installed to inductively coupled type processing reactor; electrons, positive ions, radicals and polyatomic molecule generated in RPG and they diffused to processing reactor. The processing reactor dissociates the polyatomic molecules with inductively coupled power. The polyatomic molecules are dissociated by the processing reactor that is operated by inductively coupled power. Therefore, the multistep dissociation system generates more radicals than single-step system. The RPG was composed with two cylinder type inductively coupled plasma (ICP) using 400 kHz RF power and nitrogen gas. The processing reactor composed with two turn antenna with 13.56 MHz RF power. Plasma density, electron temperature and radical density were measured with electrical probe and optical methods.

  6. CH spectroscopy for carbon chemical erosion analysis in high density low temperature hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The CH A-X molecular band is measured upon seeding the hydrogen plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI [electron temperature T-e=0.1-2.5 eV and electron density n(e)=(0.5-5) X 10(20) m(-3)] with methane. Calculated inverse photon efficiencies for these conditions range from 3 up to >10(6

  7. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  8. Optical Probing of CO2 Laser-Plasma Interactions at Near Critical Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao

    The interaction of a high-power laser beam with plasma has been explored extensively in the context of laser-driven fusion, plasma-based acceleration of ions and electrons and high energy-density physics. One of the fundamental processes common to all these studies is the penetration of intense light into a dense matter through the hole boring effect and self-induced transparency. Light with a given wavelength lambda will be reflected once the electron density equals the critical electron plasma density nc = 1.1x 1021cm -3 /[lambda(mum)]2. The radiation pressure exerted on the critical density layer is characterized by the ponderomotive force of a focused laser pulse which scales with a laser intensity, I as Ilambda2 Wmum2/cm 2. At Ilambda2 ˜1017 Wmum2/cm2 and above, it becomes possible for the laser pulse not only to steepen the plasma profile but to push the overcritical plasma with ne > nc creating a cavity or a hole in the target. The phenomenon of hole boring, whereby a laser pulse propagates through a reduced density cavity to reach and push the critical density layer, is of importance in fast-ignition fusion because it may allow the laser pulse to deliver its energy closer to the compressed fuel where it can be converted into fast electrons that are needed to ignite a small portion of the fuel. The layer of plasma pushed by the radiation pressure can reflect and accelerate ions via the so called Hole Boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration mechanism. Also the density pile- up in combination with the strong electron heating at the critical density layer can facilitate the formation of a collisionless shock. This shock wave acceleration can produce high energy ion beams with a narrow energy spread. Numerous experiments have been carried out to study dynamics of laser plasma interaction indirectly using solid state targets that are opaque for 1?m laser. However, by using a longer wavelength CO2 laser, lambda = 10.6mum, the critical plasma density is decreased

  9. Comparison of apoprotein B of low density lipoproteins of human interstitial fluid and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J L; Pflug, J; Reichl, D

    1984-08-15

    Virtually all apoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins of the peripheral interstitial fluid of subjects with primary lymphoedema float in the ultracentrifugal field in the density interval 1.019-1.063 g/ml; in this respect they are similar to plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL). 2. Virtually all apo-B-containing lipoproteins of interstitial fluid migrate in the electrophoretic field with pre-beta mobility; in this respect they are similar to plasma very-low-density lipoproteins. 3. The apoB of lipoproteins of interstitial fluid does not differ in terms of Mr from apoB-100 of human plasma [Kane, Hardman & Paulus (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 2465-2469] as determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 4. Both apoB of interstitial fluid and plasma are heterogenous in terms of their charge as determined by isoelectric focusing of their complexes with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P40. ApoB of plasma LDL focuses between pH5.9 and 6.65, and that of interstitial fluid LDL between pH 5.9 and 6.1. Thus the overall charge of apoB of interstitial fluid is more negative than that of its plasma LDL counterpart.

  10. Microwave techniques for electron density measurements in low pressure RF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheltukhin, Viktor; Gafarov, Ildar; Shemakhin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Results of the experimental studying of RF plasma jet at low pressure in the range of 10 - 300 Pa is presented. The electron density distribution both in inductive and in capacitive coupled RF discharges was measured at 1.76 MHz and 13.56 MHz consequently. We used three independent microwave diagnostic techniques such as free space (the ``two-frequency'' and ``on the cut-off signal'') and a resonator. It is found that the electron density in the RF plasma jets is by 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in the decaying plasma jet, and by 1-2 orders of magnitude less than in the RF plasma torch. Thus the RF plasma jet is similar to the additional discharge between the electrodes or the coil and the vacuum chamber walls. As a consequence, the formation of the positive charge sheath near the specimen placed in plasma stream is observed. It is found that the maximum of ionization degree as well as more uniform electron density distribution across the stream is observed in the range of the gas flow rate Gg = 0 . 06 - 0 . 12 g/s and the discharge power Pd = 0 . 5 - 2 . 5 kW. The work was funded by RFBR, according to the research projects No. 16-31-60081 mol_a_dk.

  11. Effect of Radial Density Configuration on Wave Field and Energy Flow in Axially Uniform Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lei; Li, Qingchong; Zhang, Huijie; Li, Yinghong; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Bailing; Zhuang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the radial density configuration in terms of width, edge gradient and volume gradient on the wave field and energy flow in an axially uniform helicon plasma is studied in detail. A three-parameter function is employed to describe the density, covering uniform, parabolic, linear and Gaussian profiles. It finds that the fraction of power deposition near the plasma edge increases with density width and edge gradient, and decays in exponential and “bump-on-tail” profiles, respectively, away from the surface. The existence of a positive second-order derivative in the volume density configuration promotes the power deposition near the plasma core, which to our best knowledge has not been pointed out before. The transverse structures of wave field and current density remain almost the same during the variation of density width and gradient, confirming the robustness of the m=1 mode observed previously. However, the structure of the electric wave field changes significantly from a uniform density configuration, for which the coupling between the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) mode and the helicon mode is very strong, to non-uniform ones. The energy flow in the cross section of helicon plasma is presented for the first time, and behaves sensitive to the density width and edge gradient but insensitive to the volume gradient. Interestingly, the radial distribution of power deposition resembles the radial profile of the axial component of current density, suggesting the control of the power deposition profile in the experiment by particularly designing the antenna geometry to excite a required axial current distribution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405271)

  12. Plasma Efficiency and Losses for pulsed Xe Excimer DBDs at high Power Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravia, Mark; Meisser, Michael; Heering, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    The UV water disinfection for example needs efficient lamps with high power densities. Xe2^* dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with phosphor coating can be used due to plasma efficiencies up to 60 % at pulsed electrical power densities of 0.04 W/cm^2 [1]. The power density can be increased by pressure or (operation) frequency. However, the plasma efficiency declines with frequency. We present measurements of the radiant flux for pulsed DBDs made of fused silica as function of pressure and frequency. By calculation of optical losses the plasma efficiency is estimated to be 52 % at 0.07 W/cm^2 but decreases to 34 % at 0.8 W/cm^2. The maximum frequency is pressure dependent and limited due to change-over from homogeneous into filamented mode. In comparison we measured the gas gap voltage and internal plasma current of a pulsed planar DBD for general lighting [2]. This comparison makes it possible to explain the frequency dependence of plasma efficiency and radiant flux. Due to the high frequency the remaining charge density is increased and the discharge becomes a glow discharge. For that reason the typical peak current during ignition drops and explains the declined efficiency by glow phase losses. [4pt] [1] Beleznai, S., et al., JPhysD, 41 (2008) [0pt] [2] Paravia, M., et al., GEC, Dallas, 2008

  13. Dynamics of the spatial electron density distribution of EUV-induced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temporal evolution of the electron density distribution in a low pressure pulsed plasma induced by high energy extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy (MCRS). In principle, MCRS only provides space averaged information about the electron density. However, we demonstrate here the possibility to obtain spatial information by combining multiple resonant modes. It is shown that EUV-induced plasmas, albeit being a rather exotic plasma, can be explained by known plasma physical laws and processes. Two stages of plasma behaviour are observed: first the electron density distribution contracts, after which it expands. It is shown that the contraction is due to cooling of the electrons. The moment when the density distribution starts to expand is related to the inertia of the ions. After tens of microseconds, the electrons reached the wall of the cavity. The speed of this expansion is dependent on the gas pressure and can be divided into two regimes. It is shown that the acoustic dominated regime the expansion speed is independent of the gas pressure and that in the diffusion dominated regime the expansion depends reciprocal on the gas pressure.

  14. Effects of the current boundary conditions at the plasma-gun gap on density in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Roman; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) was a toroidal magnetic-confinement device without toroidal magnetic-field coils or a central transformer but which generated core-plasma currents by dynamo processes driven by coaxial plasma-gun injection into a flux-conserving vessel. Record electron temperatures in a spheromak (Te˜500eV) were achieved, and final results of the SSPX program were reported in [1]. Plasma density, which depended strongly on wall conditions, was an important parameter in SSPX. It was observed that density rises with Igun and that confinement improved as the density was lowered. Shortly after the last experiments, a new feature was added to the Corsica code's solver used to reconstruct SSPX equilibria. Motivated by n=0 fields observed in NIMROD simulations of SSPX, an insulating boundary condition was implemented at the plasma-gun gap. Using this option we will perform new reconstructions of SSPX equilibria and look for correlations between the location of the separatrix (which moves up the gun wall and onto the insulating gap as Igun increases) and plasma density and magnetic-flux amplification [2].[4pt] [1] H. S. McLean, APS, DPP, Dallas, TX, 2008.[0pt] [2] E. B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).

  15. Scattering of diffracting beams of electron cyclotron waves by random density fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hannes; Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    The physics and first results of the new WKBeam code for electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas are presented. This code is developed on the basis of a kinetic radiative transfer model which is general enough to account for the effects of diffraction and density fluctuations on the beam. Our preliminary numerical results show a significant broadening of the power deposition profile in ITER due to scattering from random density fluctuations at the plasma edge, while such scattering effects are found to be negligible in medium-size tokamaks like ASDEX upgrade.

  16. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  17. Simulating x-ray Thomson scattering signals from high-density, millimetre-scale plasmas at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, D. A., E-mail: david.chapman@awe.co.uk [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kraus, D.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Nilsen, J.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. C.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States); Guymer, T. M. [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Redmer, R. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

    2014-08-15

    We have developed a model for analysing x-ray Thomson scattering data from high-density, millimetre-scale inhomogeneous plasmas created during ultra-high pressure implosions at the National Ignition Facility in a spherically convergent geometry. The density weighting of the scattered signal and attenuation of the incident and scattered x-rays throughout the target are included using radial profiles of the density, opacity, ionization state, and temperature provided by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. These simulations show that the scattered signal is strongly weighted toward the bulk of the shocked plasma and the Fermi degenerate material near the ablation front. We show that the scattered signal provides a good representation of the temperature of this highly nonuniform bulk plasma and can be determined to an accuracy of ca. 15% using typical data analysis techniques with simple 0D calculations. On the other hand, the mean ionization of the carbon in the bulk is underestimated. We suggest that this discrepancy is due to the convolution of scattering profiles from different regions of the target. Subsequently, we discuss modifications to the current platform to minimise the impact of inhomogeneities, as well as opacity, and also to enable probing of conditions more strongly weighted toward the compressed core.

  18. Generation of neutral and high-density electron–positron pair plasmas in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, G.; Poder, K.; Cole, J. M.; Schumaker, W.; Di Piazza, A.; Reville, B.; Dzelzainis, T.; Doria, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Grittani, G.; Kar, S.; Keitel, C. H.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Shukla, N.; Silva, L. O.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Vargas, M.; Vieira, J.; Zepf, M.

    2015-01-01

    Electron–positron pair plasmas represent a unique state of matter, whereby there exists an intrinsic and complete symmetry between negatively charged (matter) and positively charged (antimatter) particles. These plasmas play a fundamental role in the dynamics of ultra-massive astrophysical objects and are believed to be associated with the emission of ultra-bright gamma-ray bursts. Despite extensive theoretical modelling, our knowledge of this state of matter is still speculative, owing to the extreme difficulty in recreating neutral matter–antimatter plasmas in the laboratory. Here we show that, by using a compact laser-driven setup, ion-free electron–positron plasmas with unique characteristics can be produced. Their charge neutrality (same amount of matter and antimatter), high-density and small divergence finally open up the possibility of studying electron–positron plasmas in controlled laboratory experiments. PMID:25903920

  19. The rapid nitriding of Al alloys with the controlling of plasma power density and pretreatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Moon, Kyoung Il [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Seung; Choi, Yoon [A-Tech System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The properties of AlN make this material very attractive for optical, electronic, and tribological application. Also, if the AlN could be formed on the Al surface to enhance its surface properties, Al could be applied for the lightening of machine parts. However, a dense oxide film exists on the surface of Al, which prevents the formation of the Al nitride even during plasma nitriding and plasma coating process. In this study, plasma nitriding has been tried to form an AlN layer on Al after the surface activation processes. During the plasma nitriding, the density of the nitrogen ions was amplified by means of controlling the power of the Al substrates. The film thickness, microstructural features and the mechanical properties such as hardness and wear properties of the AlN layer were examined as a function of the process parameters of pretreatment and plasma nitriding

  20. Density bump formation in a collisionless electrostatic shock wave in a laser-ablated plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Garasev, M A; Kocharovsky, V V; Malkov, Yu A; Murzanev, A A; Nechaev, A A; Stepanov, A N

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of a density bump at the front of a collisionless electrostatic shock wave have been observed experimentally during the ablation of an aluminium foil by a femtosecond laser pulse. We have performed numerical simulations of the dynamics of this phenomena developing alongside the generation of a package of ion-acoustic waves, exposed to a continual flow of energetic electrons, in a collisionless plasma. We present the physical interpretation of the observed effects and show that the bump consists of transit particles, namely, the accelerated ions from the dense plasma layer, and the ions from the diluted background plasma, formed by a nanosecond laser prepulse during the ablation.

  1. Electronically swept millimeter-wave interferometer for spatially resolved measurement of plasma electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Oliver, David

    2006-12-01

    We report the development and initial implementation of what we believe to be a new rapid- spatial-scan millimeter-wave interferometer for plasma density measurements. The fast scan is effected by electronic frequency sweeping of a wideband (180-280 GHz) backward-wave oscillator whose output is focused onto a fixed blazed diffraction grating. The system, which augments the rotating-grating scanned multiview H-1 heliac interferometer, can sweep the plasma cross section in a period of less than 1 ms with a beam diameter in the plasma of 20 mm and phase noise of the order of 0.01 rad.

  2. Generation of a neutral, high-density electron-positron plasma in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarri, G; Cole, J; Schumaker, W; Di Piazza, A; Reville, B; Doria, D; Dromey, B; Gizzi, L; Green, A; Grittani, G; Kar, S; Keitel, C H; Krushelnick, K; Kushel, S; Mangles, S; Najmudin, Z; Thomas, A G R; Vargas, M; Zepf, M

    2013-01-01

    We report on the laser-driven generation of purely neutral, relativistic electron-positron pair plasmas. The overall charge neutrality, high average Lorentz factor ($\\gamma_{e/p} \\approx 15$), small divergence ($\\theta_{e/p} \\approx 10 - 20$ mrad), and high density ($n_{e/p}\\simeq 10^{15}$cm$^{-3}$) of these plasmas open the pathway for the experimental study of the dynamics of this exotic state of matter, in regimes that are of relevance to electron-positron astrophysical plasmas.

  3. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Fuentes, Marcelo [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CONICET-UBA, CC. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We study a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode, we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy-to-understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of –2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in terms of the plasma cooling time, increases with strand length. We discuss the implications of our results for the problem of heating and evolution of active region coronal plasmas.

  4. Nonlinear wave structures in collisional plasma of auroral E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volosevich

    Full Text Available Studies of the auroral plasma with small-scale inhomogenieties producing the VHF-radar reflections (radar aurora when observed in conditions of the saturated Farley-Buneman instability within the auroral E region, show strong nonlinear interactions and density fluctuations of 5–15%. Such nonlinearity and high fluctation amplitudes are inconsistent with the limitations of the weak turbulence theory, and thus a theory for arbitrary amplitudes is needed. To this end, a nonlinear theory is described for electrostatic MHD moving plasma structures of arbitrary amplitude for conditions throughout the altitude range of the collisional auroral E region. The equations are derived, from electron and ion motion self-consistent with the electric field, for the general case of the one-dimensional problem. They take into account nonlinearity, electron and ion inertia, diffusion, deviation from quasi-neutrality, and dynamical ion viscosity. The importance of the ion viscosity for dispersion is stressed, while deviation from the quasi-neutrality can be important only at rather low plasma densities, not typical for the auroral E region. In a small amplitude limit these equations have classical nonlinear solutions of the type of "electrostatic shock wave" or of knoidal waves. In a particular case these knoidal waves degrade to a dissipative soliton. A two-dimensional case of a quasi-neutral plasma is considered in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by way of the Poisson brackets, but neglecting the nonlinearity and ion inertia. It is shown that in these conditions an effective saturation can be achieved at the stationary turbulence level of order of 10%.

  5. The Construction of Plasma Density Feedback Control System on J-TEXT Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xin; Chen, Zhipeng; Ba, Weigang; Shu, Shuangbao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-02-01

    The plasma density feedback control system (PDFCS) has been established on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) for meeting the need for an accurate plasma density in physical experiments. It consists of a density measurement subsystem, a feedback control subsystem and a gas puffing subsystem. According to the characteristic of the gas puffing system, a voltage amplitude control mode has been applied in the feedback control strategy, which is accomplished by the proportion, integral and differential (PID) controller. In this system, the quantity calibration of gas injection, adjusted responding to the change of the density signal, has been carried out. Some experimental results are shown and discussed. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program (Nos. 2014GB103001 and 2013GB106001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11305070 and 11105028)

  6. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  7. Beam Matching to a Plasma Wake Field Accelerator Using a Ramped Density Profile at the Plasma Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Kenneth; Clayton, Chris; Decker, Franz Josef; Deng, Suzhi; Hogan, Mark; Huang Cheng Kun; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon K; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Krejcik, Patrick; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of plasma wake field accelerators (PWFA) is stable propagation of the drive beam. In the under dense regime, the drive beam creates an ion channel which acts on the beam as a strong thick focusing lens. The ion channel causes the beam to undergo multiple betatron oscillations along the length of the plasma. There are several advantages if the beam size can be matched to a constant radius. First, simulations have shown that instabilities such as hosing are reduced when the beam is matched. Second, synchrotron radiation losses are minimized when the beam is matched. Third, an initially matched beam will propagate with no significant change in beam size in spite of large energy loss or gain. Coupling to the plasma with a matched radius can be difficult in some cases. This paper shows how an appropriate density ramp at the plasma entrance can be useful for achieving a matched beam. Additionally, the density ramp is helpful in bringing a misaligned trailing beam onto the drive beam axis. A plas...

  8. Understanding the core density profile in TCV H-mode plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wágner, Dávid; Pitzschke, Andreas; Sauter, Olivier; Weisen, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Results from a database analysis of H-mode electron density profiles on the Tokamak \\`a Configuration Variable (TCV) in stationary conditions show that the logarithmic electron density gradient increases with collisionality. By contrast, usual observations of H-modes showed that the electron density profiles tend to flatten with increasing collisionality. In this work it is reinforced that the role of collisionality alone, depending on the parameter regime, can be rather weak and in these, dominantly electron heated TCV cases, the electron density gradient is tailored by the underlying turbulence regime, which is mostly determined by the ratio of the electron to ion temperature and that of their gradients. Additionally, mostly in ohmic plasmas, the Ware-pinch can significantly contribute to the density peaking. Qualitative agreement between the predicted density peaking by quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations and the experimental results is found. Quantitative comparison would necessitate ion temperature meas...

  9. Particle Densities of the Atmospheric-Pressure Argon Plasmas Generated by the Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Li; Wang, Yunuan; Xiu, Xianwu; Wang, Chao; Song, Yuzhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure argon plasmas have received increasing attention due to their high potential in many industrial and biomedical applications. In this paper, a 1-D fluid model is used for studying the particle density characteristics of the argon plasmas generated by the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges. The temporal evolutions of the axial particle density distributions are illustrated, and the influences of changing the main discharge conditions on the averaged particle densities are researched by independently varying the various discharge conditions. The calculation results show that the electron density and the ion density reach two peaks near the momentary cathodes during the rising and the falling edges of the pulsed voltage. Compared with the charged particle densities, the densities of the resonance state atom Arr and the metastable state atom Arm have more uniform axial distributions, reach higher maximums and decay more slowly. During the platform of the pulsed voltage and the time interval between the pulses, the densities of the excited state atom Ar* are far lower than those of the Arr or the Arm. The averaged particle densities of the different considered particles increase with the increases of the amplitude and the frequency of the pulsed voltage. Narrowing the discharge gap and increasing the relative dielectric constant of the dielectric also contribute to the increase of the averaged particle densities. The effects of reducing the discharge gap distance on the neutral particle densities are more significant than the influences on the charged particle densities. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (No. ZR2015AQ008), and Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of China (No. J15LJ04)

  10. Upstream Density for Plasma Detachment with Conventional and Lithium Vapor-Box Divertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, Rj; Schwartz, Ja

    2016-10-01

    Fusion power plants are likely to require detachment of the divertor plasma from material targets. The lithium vapor box divertor is designed to achieve this, while limiting the flux of lithium vapor to the main plasma. We develop a simple model of near-detachment to evaluate the required upstream plasma density, for both conventional and lithium vapor-box divertors, based on particle and dynamic pressure balance between up- and down-stream, at near-detachment conditions. A remarkable general result is found, not just for lithium-induced detachment, that the upstream density divided by the Greenwald-limit density scales as (P 5 / 8 /B 3 / 8) Tdet1 / 2 / (ɛcool + γTdet) , with no explicit size scaling. Tdet is the temperature just before strong pressure loss, 1/2 of the ionization potential of the dominant recycling species, ɛcool is the average plasma energy lost per injected hydrogenic and impurity atom, and γ is the sheath heat transmission factor. A recent 1-D calculation agrees well with this scaling. The implication is that the plasma exhaust problem cannot be solved by increasing R. Instead significant innovation, such as the lithium vapor box divertor, will be required. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  12. Ionized sputter deposition using an extremely high plasma density pulsed magnetron discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macak, Karol [Department of Physics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping, (Sweden); Kouznetsov, Vladimir [Department of Physics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping, (Sweden); Schneider, Jochen [Department of Physics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping, (Sweden); Helmersson, Ulf [Department of Physics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping, (Sweden); Petrov, Ivan [Materials Science Department and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Time resolved plasma probe measurements of a novel high power density pulsed plasma discharge are presented. Extreme peak power densities in the pulse (on the order of several kW cm{sup -2}) result in a very dense plasma with substrate ionic flux densities of up to 1 A cm{sup -2} at source-to-substrate distances of several cm and at a pressure of 0.13 Pa (1 mTorr). The pulse duration was {approx}100 {mu}s with a pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz. The plasma consists of metallic and inert gas ions, as determined from time resolved Langmuir probe measurements and in situ optical emission spectroscopy data. It was found that the plasma composition at the beginning of the pulse was dominated by Ar ions. As time elapsed metal ions were detected and finally dominated the ion composition. The effect of the process parameters on the temporal development of the ionic fluxes is discussed. The ionized portion of the sputtered metal flux was found to have an average velocity of 2500 m s{sup -1} at 6 cm distance from the source, which conforms to the collisional cascade sputtering theory. The degree of ionization of the sputtered metal flux at a pressure of 0.13 Pa was found to be 40%{+-}20% by comparing the total flux of deposited atoms with the charge measured for the metal ions in the pulse. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  13. Electrostatic Fluxes and Plasma Rotation in the Edge Region of EXTRAP-T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serianni, G.; Antoni, V.; Bergsåker, H.; Brunsell, P.; Drake, J. R.; Spolaore, M.; Sätherblom, H. E.; Vianello, N.

    2001-10-01

    The EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch has undergone a significant reconstruction into the new T2R device. This paper reports the first measurements performed with Langmuir probes in the edge region of EXTRAP-T2R. The radial profiles of plasma parameters like electron density and temperature, plasma potential, electrical fields and electrostatic turbulence-driven particle flux are presented. These profiles are interpreted in a momentum balance model where finite Larmor radius losses occur over a distance of about two Larmor radii from the limiter position. The double shear layer of the E×B drift velocity is discussed in terms of the Biglari-Diamond-Terry theory of turbulence decorrelation.

  14. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D. R., E-mail: dmikkelsen@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Reinke, M. L. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Podpaly, Y. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); AAAS S and T Fellow placed in the Directorate for Engineering, NSF, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States); Ma, Y. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Peaked density profiles in low-collisionality AUG and JET H-mode plasmas are probably caused by a turbulently driven particle pinch, and Alcator C-Mod experiments confirmed that collisionality is a critical parameter. Density peaking in reactors could produce a number of important effects, some beneficial, such as enhanced fusion power and transport of fuel ions from the edge to the core, while others are undesirable, such as lower beta limits, reduced radiation from the plasma edge, and consequently higher divertor heat loads. Fundamental understanding of the pinch will enable planning to optimize these impacts. We show that density peaking is predicted by nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations based on measured profile data from low collisionality H-mode plasma in Alcator C-Mod. Multiple ion species are included to determine whether hydrogenic density peaking has an isotope dependence or is influenced by typical levels of low-Z impurities, and whether impurity density peaking depends on the species. We find that the deuterium density profile is slightly more peaked than that of hydrogen, and that experimentally relevant levels of boron have no appreciable effect on hydrogenic density peaking. The ratio of density at r/a = 0.44 to that at r/a = 0.74 is 1.2 for the majority D and minority H ions (and for electrons), and increases with impurity Z: 1.1 for helium, 1.15 for boron, 1.3 for neon, 1.4 for argon, and 1.5 for molybdenum. The ion temperature profile is varied to match better the predicted heat flux with the experimental transport analysis, but the resulting factor of two change in heat transport has only a weak effect on the predicted density peaking.

  15. Preferential association of apolipoprotein E Leiden with very low density lipoproteins of human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazio, S.; Horie, Y.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Havekes, L.M.; Rall Jr., S.C.

    1993-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E Leiden is a rare variant of human apoE characterized by defective receptor binding and associated with dominant transmission of type III hyperlipoproteinemia. In heterozygotes, apoE Leiden is present in higher concentrations in both total plasma and very low density

  16. Deep anisotropic dry etching of silicon microstructures by high-density plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis deals with the dry etching of deep anisotropic microstructures in monocrystalline silicon by high-density plasmas. High aspect ratio trenches are necessary in the fabrication of sensitive inertial devices such as accellerometers and gyroscopes. The etching of silicon in fluorine-based

  17. Photons from a Chemically Equilibrating Quark-Gluon Plasma at Finite Baryon Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ze-Jun; LONG Jia-Li; MA Yu-Gang; MA Guo-Liang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study hard photon production in a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma at finite baryon density based on the Jüttner distribution of partons of the system. We find that the photon yield is a strongly increasing function of the initial quark chemical potential.

  18. Carbon transport and escape fraction in a high density plasma beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Swaaij, G. A.; Bystrov, K.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Zaharia, T.; van der Vegt, L. B.; De Temmerman, G.; W. J. Goedheer,

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon injection experiments on molybdenum targets facing high-density plasmas in Pilot-PSI were simulated with the 3D Monte Carlo impurity transport and PSI code ERO. Impurity transport and calculation of redeposition profiles were decoupled by calculating carbon redistribution matrices with E

  19. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Weng, S. M.; Li, Y. T.; Yuan, D. W.; Chen, M.; Mulser, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zheng, X. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strong time-oscillating electric field accompanying the laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma.

  20. Self-Focusing of Hermite-Cosh-Gaussian Laser Beams in Plasma under Density Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor Ahmad Wani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-focusing of Hermite-Cosh-Gaussian (HChG laser beam in plasma under density transition has been discussed here. The field distribution in the medium is expressed in terms of beam-width parameters and decentered parameter. The differential equations for the beam-width parameters are established by a parabolic wave equation approach under paraxial approximation. To overcome the defocusing, localized upward plasma density ramp is considered, so that the laser beam is focused on a small spot size. Plasma density ramp plays an important role in reducing the defocusing effect and maintaining the focal spot size up to several Rayleigh lengths. To discuss the nature of self-focusing, the behaviour of beam-width parameters with dimensionless distance of propagation for various values of decentered parameters is examined by numerical estimates. The results are presented graphically and the effect of plasma density ramp and decentered parameter on self-focusing of the beams has been discussed.

  1. Energy Density in Aligned Nanowire Arrays Irradiated with Relativistic Intensities: Path to Terabar Pressure Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Shylaptsev, V.; Wang, S.; Rockwood, A.; Wang, Y.; Keiss, D.; Capeluto, M.; Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Tommasini, R.; London, R.; Park, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-high-energy-density (UHED) plasmas, characterized by energy densities >1 x 108 J cm-3 and pressures greater than a gigabar are encountered in the center of stars and in inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world's largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultra-high contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto aligned nanowire array targets. Here we report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high aspect ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 x 1019 W cm-2, we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several μm, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic 3D particle-in-cell-simulations validated by these measurements predict that irradiation of nanostructures at increased intensity will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 x 1010 J cm-3, equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar. This work was supported by the Fusion Energy Program, Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  2. Surface hardening utilizing high-density plasma nitriding on stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lleonart-Davila, G; Gaudier, J; Rivera, R; Leal, D; Gonzalez-Lizardo, A; Leal-Quiros, E [Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00918 (Puerto Rico)

    2008-10-15

    By using a plasma nitriding procedure at the PUPR Mirror Cusp Plasma machine, surface hardness is increased in 302/304-type stainless steel samples by exposing them to high-ion-density plasma at high vacuum. This method successfully dopes the surface of the material with strengthening nitrogen ions, without the use of chemical procedures that sacrifice the resistance to corrosion of the given material. A 500 V negative bias is placed on the sample exposed to the nitrogen plasma, where high-energy ions are therefore attracted and immersed into the metallic matrix microns into the surface of the stainless steel. This potential maintains a constant surface temperature at approximately 800 deg. C. The plasma parameters including ion density and plasma temperature were diagnosed using single Langmuir probes. The stainless steel samples were then tested using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Vickers micro-hardness testing to determine the increment in the surface harness of the material. The SEM showed a significant presence of nitrogen imbedded in the grains of the stainless steel surface.

  3. Size and density evolution of a single microparticle embedded in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaz, Oguz Han; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    This article presents two measurement techniques to determine the diameter of a single dust particle during plasma operation. Using long-distance microscopy (LDM), the particle is imaged from outside the plasma chamber. In combination with phase-resolved resonance measurements, the development of volume-averaged particle mass density is measured over several hours. The measurements show a significant decrease of mass density for polymethyl methacrylate particles due to a plasma etching process on the surface. This is explained by a core-shell model and is supported by a surface roughness effect seen in the LDM images, an out-of-focus imaging of the angular Mie scattering pattern and ex-situ laser scattering microscopy measurements.

  4. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs.

  5. New Microwave Diagnostic Theory for Measurement of Electron Density in Atmospheric Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu; HU Xi-Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present the phase shift of an electromagnetic wave passing through an atmospheric plasma layer. In this kind of plasma, the phase shift depends not only on the line average electron density and layer width, but also on the electron-neutral collision frequency. Since the collision frequency is close to or even larger than the incident microwave frequency, a one-dimensional code for the numerical solution of the wave equation with full time and space variables is established to give the phase shift. When the width and the pressure (hence the electron-neutral collision frequency) are known, the measurement of phase shift will uniquely determine the line average electrons density in an atmospheric plasma.

  6. DEMETER Observations of Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated ELF Electric Field and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Middle and Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    The DEMETER spacecraft frequently encounters structured plasma and electric field irregularities associated with equatorial spread-F. However, during severe geonagnetic storms, the spacecraft detects broader regions of density structures that extend to higher latitudes, in some instances to the sub-auroral regions. In addition to the electric field irregularities, ELF magnetic field irregularities are sometimes observed. for example, on the walls of the density structures, and appear related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves. The mid-latitude irregularities are compared with those of equatorial spread-F as well as wit11 intense irregularities associated with the trough region observed at sub-auroral latitudes.

  7. Control of sizes and densities of nano catalysts for nanotube synthesis by plasma breaking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.S.; Umeda, K.; Uchino, K.; Nakashima, H.; Muraoka, K

    2004-03-15

    Sizes and densities of nano catalysts for carbon nanotube synthesis, formed by the plasma breaking method of thin Fe films deposited using pulse laser deposition (PLD) were controlled by the changes of operating parameters. At the best optimum condition, nano catalysts with a density of 1.9x10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and a diameter of about 15 nm were obtained. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesized on these catalysts were shown to have almost the same size and density as those of the catalysts.

  8. Three-dimensional MHD modeling of vertical kink oscillations in an active region plasma curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Parisi, M.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Observations on 2011 August 9 of an X 6.9-class flare in active region (AR) 11263 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), were followed by a rare detection of vertical kink oscillations in a large-scale coronal active region plasma curtain in extreme UV coronal lines with periods in the range 8.8-14.9 min. Aims: Our aim is to study the generation and propagation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in the plasma curtain taking the realistic 3D magnetic and the density structure of the curtain into account. We also aim to test and improve coronal seismology for a more accurate determination of the magnetic field than with the standard method. Methods: We use the observed morphological and dynamical conditions, as well as plasma properties of the coronal curtain, to initialize a 3D MHD model of the observed vertical and transverse oscillations. To accomplish this, we implemented the impulsively excited velocity pulse mimicking the flare-generated nonlinear fast magnetosonic propagating disturbance interacting obliquely with the curtain. The model is simplified by utilizing an initial dipole magnetic field, isothermal energy equation, and gravitationally stratified density guided by observational parameters. Results: Using the 3D MHD model, we are able to reproduce the details of the vertical oscillations and study the process of their excitation by a nonlinear fast magnetosonic pulse, propagation, and damping, finding agreement with the observations. Conclusions: We estimate the accuracy of simplified slab-based coronal seismology by comparing the determined magnetic field strength to actual values from the 3D MHD modeling results, and demonstrate the importance of taking more realistic magnetic geometry and density for improving coronal seismology into account. A movie associated to Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Dst prediction for a period of high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, H.; Sakurai, T.

    We examine geomagnetic effects for high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds and their relationship to solar sources. It is well known that Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field plays an important role for estimation of Dst from solar wind parameters (Burton et al.1975). However, magnetic clouds frequently carry high-density plasmas, which are interpreted as the remnants of filament. In order to clarify their geomagnetic effects, we try to estimate Dst by adopting different methods introducing effects of solar wind parameters. In our estimation the most important point is laid on the sense of Dst variation rather than its magnitude. The most suitable estimation is obtained by setting up a threshold for plasma density, in which for a case of plasma density greater than 20 /cc the Fenrich and Luhmann (1998)'s formula should be used, while in the other cases the Burton's formula are adopted. In both estimations the O'Brien and McPherron (2000)'s ring current decay time is employed. Furthermore, we examine the solar origin corresponding to the magnetic clouds and then compared characteristic signatures of the magnetic cloud with those observed on the solar surface. As a result, we confirm that the magnetic structure of interplanetary flux rope is in good agreement with the structures of the magnetic neutral line near disappearing filaments and heliospheric current sheet (HCS). On the basis of these studies, we suggest that for the geomagnetic disturbance forecast, the effect of high-density plasmas carried with magnetic clouds should be taken into account of as well as that of interplanetary magnetic field.

  10. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  11. Feedback control of plasma density and heating power for steady state operation in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Shuji, E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Seki, Tetsuo; Saito, Kenji; Seki, Ryosuke; Nomura, Goro; Mutoh, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We upgraded a control system for steady state operation in LHD. • This system contains gas fueling system and ICRF power control system. • Automatic power boost system is also attached for stable operation. • As a result, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. - Abstract: For steady state operation, the feedback control of plasma density and heating power system was developed in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to achieve a record of the long pulse discharge, stable plasma density and heating power are needed. This system contains the radio frequency (RF) heating power control, interlocks, gas fueling, automatic RF phase control, ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna position control, and graphical user interface (GUI). Using the density control system, the electron density was controlled to the target density and using the RF heating power control system, the RF power injection could be stable. As a result of using this system, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Further, the ICRF hardware experienced no critical accidents during the 17th LHD experiment campaign in 2013.

  12. Relativistic plasma optics enabled by near-critical density nanostructured material

    CERN Document Server

    Bin, J H; Wang, H Y; Streeter, M J V; Kreuzer, C; Kiefer, D; Yeung, M; Cousens, S; Foster, P S; Dromey, B; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Zepf, M; Schreiber, J

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of a plasma due to the relativistic electron motion in an intense laser field are of fundamental importance for current research and the generation of brilliant laser-driven sources of particles and photons1-15. Yet, one of the most interesting regimes, where the frequency of the laser becomes resonant with the plasma, has remained experimentally hard to access. We overcome this limitation by utilizing ultrathin carbon nanotube foam16 (CNF) targets allowing the strong relativistic nonlinearities at near- critical density (NCD) to be exploited for the first time. We report on the experimental realization of relativistic plasma optics to spatio-temporally compress the laser pulse within a few micrometers of propagation, while maintaining about half its energy. We also apply the enhanced laser pulses to substantially improve the properties of an ion bunch accelerated from a secondary target. Our results provide first insights into the rich physics of NCD plasmas and the opportuni...

  13. Density limit of H-mode plasmas on JET-ILW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, A., E-mail: a.huber@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Brezinsek, S.; Sergienko, G. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Vries, P.C. de [ITER Organisation, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Aho-Mantila, L. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 02044 VTT (Finland); Arnoux, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bernert, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Beurskens, M.N.A. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Calabro, G. [ENEA, Via Enrico Ferri 46, I-0044 Frascati (Italy); Clever, M.; Esser, H.G. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Guillemaut, C. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Jachmich, S. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Järvinen, A. [Aalto University, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Linsmeier, Ch. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Matthews, G.F.; Meigs, A.G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-08-15

    High-density discharges on JET with ITER-like Wall (ILW) have been analysed with the aim of establishing a mechanism for the H-mode density limit (DL) and compared with experiments in the JET carbon material configuration. The density limit is up to 20% higher in the JET-ILW than in the JET-C machine. The observed H-mode density limit is found close to the Greenwald limit. It is sensitive to the main plasma shape and is almost independent of the heating power. It has been observed that the transition from H-mode to L-mode is not always an abrupt event but may exhibit a series of H–L–H transitions, the so-called “dithering H-mode”. It was observed that detachment, as well as the X-point MARFE itself, does not trigger the H–L transition and thus does not present a limit on the plasma density and that it is the plasma confinement which is ultimately responsible for the H-mode DL.

  14. The effect of longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-01-01

    3-, 2- and 1-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of longitudinal density gradient; (ii) avoiding use of co-moving simulation box; (iii) inclusion of ion motion; and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of ten-fold increasing density over 10 cm long Lithium vapor plasma, results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared to the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4 x 10^{10} V/m), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from initial 20.4 GeV), with an energy transfer efficiencies from leading to trailing bunch of 75 percent. In the uniform density case -2.5 x 10^{10} V/m wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with an energy transfer eff...

  15. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  16. High density ultrashort relativistic positron beam generation by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y. J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-11-01

    A mechanism of high energy and high density positron beam creation is proposed in ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction. Longitudinal electron self-injection into a strong laser field occurs in order to maintain the balance between the ponderomotive potential and the electrostatic potential. The injected electrons are trapped and form a regular layer structure. The radiation reaction and photon emission provide an additional force to confine the electrons in the laser pulse. The threshold density to initiate the longitudinal electron self-injection is obtained from analytical model and agrees with the kinetic simulations. The injected electrons generate γ-photons which counter-propagate into the laser pulse. Via the Breit-Wheeler process, well collimated positron bunches in the GeV range are generated of the order of the critical plasma density and the total charge is about nano-Coulomb. The above mechanisms are demonstrated by particle-in-cell simulations and single electron dynamics.

  17. E→H mode transition density and power in two types of inductively coupled plasma configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Du, Yin-chang; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhe; Liu, Yu; Xu, Liang; Wang, Pi; Cao, Jin-xiang, E-mail: jxcao@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-07-15

    E → H transition power and density were investigated at various argon pressures in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in a cylindrical interlaid chamber. The transition power versus the pressure shows a minimum transition power at 4 Pa (ν/ω=1) for argon. Then the transition density hardly changes at low pressures (ν/ω≪1), but it increases clearly when argon pressure exceeds an appropriate value. In addition, both the transition power and transition density are lower in the re-entrant configuration of ICP compared with that in the cylindrical configuration of ICP. The result may be caused from the decrease of stochastic heating in the re-entrant configuration of ICP. This work is useful to understand E → H mode transition and control the transition points in real plasma processes.

  18. Electron number density and temperature measurements in laser produced brass plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, A. A.; Mostafa, N. Y.; Abdel-Aal, M. S.; Shaban, H. A.

    2010-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used for brass plasma diagnostic using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated, including repetition rate, number of laser shots on sample, and laser energy. The plasma temperatures and the electron number densities were determined from the emission spectra of LIBS. Cu and Zn spectral lines were used for excitation temperature calculation using Saha-Boltzmann distribution as well as line pair ratio. It was found that, the excitation temperature calculated by using Saha-Boltzmann distribution and line pair ratio methods are not the same. The electron number density has been evaluated from the Stark broadening of Hα transition at 656.27 nm and the calculated electron number density is agreement with literature.

  19. Plasma density enhancement in atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharges by high-voltage nanosecond pulse in the pulse-on period: a PIC simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2010-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) plus Monte Carlo collision simulation is employed to investigate how a sustainable atmospheric pressure single dielectric-barrier discharge responds to a high-voltage nanosecond pulse (HVNP) further applied to the metal electrode. The results show that the HVNP can significantly increase the plasma density in the pulse-on period. The ion-induced secondary electrons can give rise to avalanche ionization in the positive sheath, which widens the discharge region and enhances the plasma density drastically. However, the plasma density stops increasing as the applied pulse lasts over certain time; therefore, lengthening the pulse duration alone cannot improve the discharge efficiency further. Physical reasons for these phenomena are then discussed.

  20. Experimental studies and modelling of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Livia

    2015-11-24

    establish an the radiation increases in this region. To account for these effects, an empirical non-coronal model was developed which takes the impurity residence time at the pedestal into account. The validity of this assumption was verified by modelling the evolution of the impurities and radiation for ASDEX Upgrade H-modes with nitrogen seeding by coupling the ASTRA transport code with STRAHL. The time-dependent simulations include impurity radiation due to nitrogen and tungsten and the transport effects induced at the edge by the ELMs. The modelling results have been validated against the experimental data. The modelled radiation profiles show a very good agreement with the measured ones over both radius and time. In particular, the strong enhancement of the nitrogen radiation caused by non-coronal effects through the ELM-induced transport is well reproduced. The radiation properties of tungsten are very weakly influenced by non-coronal effects due to the faster equilibration. W radiation, which is highly dependent on the f{sub ELM}, strongly increases when f{sub ELM} is decreased, due to the lack of sufficiently strong flush out of this impurity. This is in agreement with the experimental observations and indicates that maintaining high ELM frequency is essential for the stability and performance of the discharges. Analyses of the high density scenario with pellets indicate that several processes take place when pellets are injected into the plasma. In particular, due to their cooling effect, the temperature drops as soon as pellets are injected. This is compensated by an increase in density. These processes occur mainly at the edge and are propagated to the core via stiffness. This explains why the confinement stays approximately constant during the whole discharge. Both experiments and transport calculations reveal that the energy confinement time is independent of the density indicating that the currently used scaling is not valid in this regime. The results of this

  1. Experimental studies and modelling of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Livia

    2015-11-24

    establish an the radiation increases in this region. To account for these effects, an empirical non-coronal model was developed which takes the impurity residence time at the pedestal into account. The validity of this assumption was verified by modelling the evolution of the impurities and radiation for ASDEX Upgrade H-modes with nitrogen seeding by coupling the ASTRA transport code with STRAHL. The time-dependent simulations include impurity radiation due to nitrogen and tungsten and the transport effects induced at the edge by the ELMs. The modelling results have been validated against the experimental data. The modelled radiation profiles show a very good agreement with the measured ones over both radius and time. In particular, the strong enhancement of the nitrogen radiation caused by non-coronal effects through the ELM-induced transport is well reproduced. The radiation properties of tungsten are very weakly influenced by non-coronal effects due to the faster equilibration. W radiation, which is highly dependent on the f{sub ELM}, strongly increases when f{sub ELM} is decreased, due to the lack of sufficiently strong flush out of this impurity. This is in agreement with the experimental observations and indicates that maintaining high ELM frequency is essential for the stability and performance of the discharges. Analyses of the high density scenario with pellets indicate that several processes take place when pellets are injected into the plasma. In particular, due to their cooling effect, the temperature drops as soon as pellets are injected. This is compensated by an increase in density. These processes occur mainly at the edge and are propagated to the core via stiffness. This explains why the confinement stays approximately constant during the whole discharge. Both experiments and transport calculations reveal that the energy confinement time is independent of the density indicating that the currently used scaling is not valid in this regime. The results of this

  2. Density Distributions of H and H2 in Pulsed Microwave hydrogen Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Xu-Ru(段旭如); H.Lange; QIAN shang-Jie(钱尚介); N.Lang

    2003-01-01

    Temporal distribution of the H atom and Hz densities in a pulsed microwave hydrogen plasmas has been measured simultaneously by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). The measurement of the H-atom absolute density obtained by NO2 titration in a flow tube reactor shows that the density of H2 could be determined by the measured effective lifetime of the TALIF signal via the quenching equation. The H-atom density of about 1.5×1015cm-3 in both pulsed and stationary phases does not obviously change. It is found that the gas temperature volume effect plays an important role in governing the distributions of the H-atom density and it is mole fraction. The calculated gas temperature is in good consistent with the rotational temperature of H2measured by optical emission spectroscopy in pulsed phase.

  3. Existence of a virtual cathode close to a strongly electron emissive wall in low density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierno, S. P., E-mail: sp.tierno@upm.es; Donoso, J. M.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Conde, L. [Department of Applied Physics, E.T.S.I. Aeronáutica y del Espacio. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    The interaction between an electron emissive wall, electrically biased in a plasma, is revisited through a simple fluid model. We search for realistic conditions of the existence of a non-monotonic plasma potential profile with a virtual cathode as it is observed in several experiments. We mainly focus our attention on thermionic emission related to the operation of emissive probes for plasma diagnostics, although most conclusions also apply to other electron emission processes. An extended Bohm criterion is derived involving the ratio between the two different electron densities at the potential minimum and at the background plasma. The model allows a phase-diagram analysis, which confirms the existence of the non-monotonic potential profiles with a virtual cathode. This analysis shows that the formation of the potential well critically depends on the emitted electron current and on the velocity at the sheath edge of cold ions flowing from the bulk plasma. As a consequence, a threshold value of the governing parameter is required, in accordance to the physical nature of the electron emission process. The latter is a threshold wall temperature in the case of thermionic electrons. Experimental evidence supports our numerical calculations of this threshold temperature. Besides this, the potential well becomes deeper with increasing electron emission, retaining a fraction of the released current which limits the extent of the bulk plasma perturbation. This noninvasive property would explain the reliable measurements of plasma potential by using the floating potential method of emissive probes operating in the so-called strong emission regime.

  4. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  5. Observation of an Extremely Large-Density Heliospheric Plasma Sheet Compressed by an Interplanetary Shock at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Lepping, R. P.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Socker, Dennis; Wu, S. T.

    2017-08-01

    At 11:46 UT on 9 September 2011, the Wind spacecraft encountered an interplanetary (IP) fast-forward shock. The shock was followed almost immediately by a short-duration (˜ 35 minutes) extremely dense pulse (with a peak ˜ 94 cm-3). The pulse induced an extremely large positive impulse (SYM-H = 74 nT and Dst = 48 nT) on the ground. A close examination of other in situ parameters from Wind shows that the density pulse was associated with i) a spike in the plasma β (ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure), ii) multiple sign changes in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field (B_{φ}), iii) a depressed magnetic field magnitude, iv) a small radial component of the magnetic field, and v) a large (> 90°) change in the suprathermal (˜ 255 eV) electron pitch angle across the density pulse. We conclude that the density pulse is associated with the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS). The thickness of the HPS is estimated to be {˜} 8.2×105 km. The HPS density peak is about five times the value of a medium-sized density peak inside the HPS (˜ 18 cm-3) at 1 AU. Our global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation results (Wu et al. in J. Geophys. Res. 212, 1839, 2016) suggest that the extremely large density pulse may be the result of the compression of the HPS by an IP shock crossing or an interaction between an interplanetary shock and a corotating interaction region.

  6. Plasma interface of the EC waves to the LHD peripheral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, S., E-mail: kubo@lhd.nifs.ac.jp; Igami, H.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Shimozuma, T.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Makino, R.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M. [Grad. School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

    2015-12-10

    In order to realize an efficient ECRH and also to reduce stray radiation due to non-absorbed power during ECRH, it is necessary to excite a wave that is absorbed well near the electron cyclotron resonance. In the normal fusion magnetic field confinement machine and in the electron cyclotron frequency range, WKB approximation is valid almost all the way from antenna to the absorption region due to the large scale-length of the plasma density λ{sub n} and the magnetic shear τ{sub s} as compared with the local wavelength λ{sub 0}. In these situation, it is well known that the O/X mode propagates as O/X mode if τ{sub s} ≫ λ{sub 0}. Even in these situation, if τ{sub s} and λ{sub n} are comparable and |1/λ{sub O}−1/λ{sub X}|τ{sub s} ≪ 1, there still remains the question from where ”X” - or ”O” - mode become ”X” - or ”O” mode at the peripheral region. In order to simulate this situation, one dimensional full wave calculation code which solve electromagnetic wave equation under arbitrary magnetic field configuration and arbitrary density profile for a given polarization state are developed and incorporated in the upgraded ray tracing code LHDGauss. It is tried to find the density and shear scale lengths region where the mode mixing effect is not negligible.

  7. Three dimensional MHD Modeling of Vertical Kink Oscillations in an Active Region Plasma Curtain

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Srivastava, Abhishek K

    2015-01-01

    Observations on 2011 August 9 of an X6.9-class flare in active region (AR) 11263 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), were followed by a rare detection of vertical kink oscillations in a large-scale coronal active region plasma curtain in EUV coronal lines. The damped oscillations with periods in the range 8.8-14.9 min were detected and analyzed recently. Our aim is to study the generation and propagation of the MHD oscillations in the plasma curtain taking into account realistic 3D magnetic and density structure of the curtain. We also aim at testing and improving coronal seismology for more accurate determination of the magnetic field than with standard method. We use the observed morphological and dynamical conditions, as well as plasma properties of the coronal curtain based on Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis to initialize a 3D MHD model of its vertical and transverse oscillations by implementing the impulsively excited velocity pulse mimick...

  8. Dusty uch II regions: cloud pressures and density distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Kurtz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Discutimos brevemente el efecto de presi on ambiental y de los gradientes de densidad en las propiedades observadas de las regiones UCH ii con polvo y de la nueva clase de regiones Super-ultra-compactas. La absorci on del polvo puede reducir muy e cientemente el tama~no de las regiones fotoionizadas y los gradientes de densidad pueden modi car el ndice espectral de la emisi on. El efecto de los gradientes tambi en se observa en regiones H ii extragal acticas.

  9. Measuring atomic oxygen densities and electron properties in an Inductively Coupled Plasma for thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, David; Gibson, Andrew; Booth, Jean-Paul; Wagenaars, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Plasma Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition (PE-PLD) is an advanced way of depositing thin films of oxide materials by using a laser to ablate a target, and passing the resulting plasma plume through a background Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP), instead of a background gas as is done in traditional PLD. The main advantage of PE-PLD is the control of film stoichiometry via the direct control of the reactive oxygen species in the ICP instead of relying on a neutral gas background. The aim is to deposit zinc oxide films from a zinc metal target and an oxygen ICP. In this work, we characterise the range of compositions of the reactive oxygen species achievable in ICPs; in particular the atomic oxygen density. The density of atomic oxygen has been determined within two ICPs of two different geometries over a range of plasma powers and pressures with the use of Energy Resolved Actinometry (ERA). ERA is a robust diagnostic technique with determines both the dissociation degree and average electron energy by comparing the excitation ratios of two oxygen and one argon transition. Alongside this the electron densities have been determined with the use of a hairpin probe. This work received financial support from the EPSRC, and York-Paris CIRC.

  10. [Investigation on the electron density of a micro-plasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Zhao, Na; Liu, Wei-yuan; Liu, Zhi-qiang

    2010-07-01

    In the present paper, a micro-hollow cathode discharge setup was used to generate micro-plasma jet in flowing mixture of Ar and N2 at atmospheric pressure. The characteristics of the micro-plasma jet were investigated by means of optical method and electrical one. It has been found that breakdown occurs in the gas between the two electrodes when the input power of electric source is increased to a certain value. Plasma appears along the gas flow direction when the mixed gas flows from the aperture of the micro-hollow cathode, and the length of plasma reaches 4 mm. The discharge current is quasi-continuous, and the duration of discharge pulse is about 0.1 micros. Electron density was studied by using Einstein equation and Stark broadening of spectral lines from the emission spectrum respectively. It was found that the results of electron density calculated by the two methods are consistent with the order of 10(15) x cm(-3). It was also found that the electron density is almost independent of power. A qualitative explanation to the phenomenon is given based on the gas discharge theory.

  11. DC Thermal Plasma Design and Utilization for the Low Density Polyethylene to Diesel Oil Pyrolysis Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The exponential increase of plastic production produces 100 million tonnes of waste plastics annually which could be converted into hydrocarbon fuels in a thermal cracking process called pyrolysis. In this research work, a direct current (DC thermal plasma circuit is designed and used for conversion of low density polyethylene (LDPE into diesel oil in a laboratory scale pyrolysis reactor. The experimental setup uses a 270 W DC thermal plasma at operating temperatures in the range of 625 °C to 860 °C for a low density polyethylene (LDPE pyrolysis reaction at pressure = −0.95, temperature = 550 °C with τ = 30 min at a constant heating rate of 7.8 °C/min. The experimental setup consists of a vacuum pump, closed system vessel, direct current (DC plasma circuit, and a k-type thermocouple placed a few millimeters from the reactant sample. The hydrocarbon products are condensed to diesel oil and analyzed using flame ionization detector (FID gas chromatography. The analysis shows 87.5% diesel oil, 1,4-dichlorobenzene (Surr, benzene, ethylbenzene and traces of toluene and xylene. The direct current (DC thermal plasma achieves 56.9 wt. % of diesel range oil (DRO, 37.8 wt. % gaseous products and minimal tar production. The direct current (DC thermal plasma shows reliability, better temperature control, and high thermal performance as well as the ability to work for long operation periods.

  12. Effects of PhD examination stress on allopregnanolone and cortisol plasma levels and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Broekhoven, F. van; Span, P.N.; Backstrom, T.; Zitman, F.G.; Verkes, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) density in blood platelets and plasma allopregnanolone concentration in humans were determined following acute stress as represented by PhD examination. Fifteen healthy PhD students participated. Heart rate, blood pressure, plasma allopregnanolone, plasma cor

  13. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  14. Gap formation processes in a high-density plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, J. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.; Commisso, R. J.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Weber, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A gap opening process in plasma opening switches (POS) is examined with the aid of numerical simulations. In these simulations, a high density (ne=1014-5×1015 cm-3) uniform plasma initially bridges a small section of the coaxial transmission line of an inductive energy storage generator. A short section of vacuum transmission line connects the POS to a short circuit load. The results presented here extend previous simulations in the ne=1012-1013 cm-3 density regime. The simulations show that a two-dimensional (2-D) sheath forms in the plasma near a cathode. This sheath is positively charged, and electrostatic sheath potentials that are large compared to the anode-cathode voltage develop. Initially, the 2-D sheath is located at the generator edge of the plasma. As ions are accelerated out of the sheath, it retains its original 2-D structure, but migrates axially toward the load creating a magnetically insulated gap in its wake. When the sheath reaches the load edge of the POS, the POS stops conducting current and the load current increases rapidly. At the end of the conduction phase a gap exists in the POS whose size is determined by the radial dimensions of the 2-D sheath. Simulations at various plasma densities and current levels show that the radial size of the gap scales roughly as B/ne, where B is the magnetic field. The results of this work are discussed in the context of long-conduction-time POS physics, but exhibit the same physical gap formation mechanisms as earlier lower density simulations more relevant to short-conduction-time POS.

  15. Measurement and modeling of neutral, radical, and ion densities in H2-N2-Ar plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, M.; Jacob, W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Kersten, H.

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of absolute ion and neutral species densities in an inductively coupled H2-N2-Ar plasma was carried out. Additionally, the radical and ion densities were calculated using a zero-dimensional rate equation model. The H2-N2-Ar plasma was studied at a pressure of 1.5 Pa and an rf power of 200 W. The N2 partial pressure fraction was varied between fN2=0 % and 56% by a simultaneous reduction of the H2 partial pressure fraction. The Ar partial pressure fraction was held constant at about 1%. NH3 was found to be produced almost exclusively on the surfaces of the chamber wall. NH3 contributes up to 12% to the background gas. To calculate the radical densities with the rate equation model, it is necessary to know the corresponding wall loss times twrad of the radicals. twrad was determined by the temporal decay of radical densities in the afterglow with ionization threshold mass spectrometry during pulsed operation and based on these experimental data the absolute densities of the radical species were calculated and compared to measurement results. Ion densities were determined using a plasma monitor (mass and energy resolved mass spectrometer). H3+ is the dominant ion in the range of 0.0 ≤fN2reasonably well. The ion chemistry, i.e., the production and loss processes of the ions and radicals, is discussed in detail. The main features, i.e., the qualitative abundance of the ion species and the ion density dependence on the N2 partial pressure fraction, are well reproduced by the model.

  16. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  17. Density profile in shock wave fronts of partially ionized xenon plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Reinholz, H; Morozov, I; Mintsev, V; Zaparoghets, Y; Fortov, V; Wierling, A

    2003-01-01

    Results for the reflection coefficient of shock-compressed dense xenon plasmas at pressures of 1.6-20 GPa and temperatures around 30 000 K are interpreted. In addition to former experiments using laser beams with lambda = 1.06 mu m, measurements at lambda = 0.694 mu m have been performed recently. Reflectivities typical for metallic systems are found at high densities. Besides free carriers, the theoretical description also takes into account the influence of the neutral component of the plasma on the reflectivity. A consistent description of the measured reflectivities is achieved only if a finite width of the shock wave front is considered.

  18. Enzymatic Modification of Plasma Low Density Lipoproteins in Rabbits: A Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeque, Regine; Mullon, Claudy J. P.; Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.; Lees, Robert S.; Langer, Robert

    1993-04-01

    Phospholipase A_2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A_2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A_2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels.

  19. Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, Ariel [CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche (Argentina); Gonzalez, Jose [INVAP-CONICET and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche, Argentina. (Argentina); Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [CCHEN, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2012-01-15

    Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

  20. Photon production from quark gluon plasma at finite baryon density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Dutta; S V S Sastry; A K Mohanty; K Kumar; R K Choudhury

    2003-05-01

    The photon yield from a baryon-rich quark gluon plasma (QGP) at SPS energy has been estimated. In the QGP phase, rate of photon production is evaluated up to two-loop level. In the hadron phase, dominant contribution from , , mesons has been considered. The evolution of the plasma has been studied with appropriate equation of state in both QGP and hadron phase for a baryon-rich system. At SPS energy, the total photon yield is found to increase marginally in the presence of baryon density.

  1. Real-time control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynek, Alexander

    2010-07-20

    The tokamak concept currently is the most promising approach to future power generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion. The spatial distribution of the particle density in the toroidally confined fusion plasma is of particular importance. This thesis work therefore focuses on the question as to what extent the shape of the density profile can be actively controlled by a feedback loop in the fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade. There are basically two essential requirements for such feedback control of the density profile, which has been experimentally demonstrated within the scope of this thesis work: On the one hand, for this purpose the density profile must be continuously calculated under real-time constraints during a plasma discharge. The calculation of the density profile is based on the measurements of a sub-millimeter interferometer, which provides the line-integrated electron density along 5 chords through the plasma. Interferometric density measurements can suffer from counting errors by integer multiples of 2{pi} when detecting the phase difference between a probing and a reference beam. As such measurement errors have severe impact on the reconstructed density profile, one major part of this work consists in the development of new readout electronics for the interferometer, which allows for detection of such measurement errors in real-time with high reliability. A further part of this work is the design of a computer algorithm which reconstructs the spatial distribution of the plasma density from the line-integrated measurements. This algorithm has to be implemented on a computer which communicates the measured data to other computers in real-time, especially to the tokamak control system. On the other hand, a second fundamental requirement for the successful implementation of a feedback controller is the identification of at least one actuator which enables a modification of the density profile. Here, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has

  2. Measurement of D-region electron density by partial reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R. O.; Mott, D. L.; Gammill, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of electron density in the lower ionosphere were made at White Sands Missile Range throughout the STRATCOM VIII launch day using a partial-reflection sounder. Information regarding the sounder's antenna pattern was gained from the passage of the balloon over the array.

  3. Plasma Shape and Current Density Profile Control in Advanced Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenyu

    The need for new sources of energy is expected to become a critical problem within the next few decades. Nuclear fusion has sufficient energy density to potentially supply the world population with its increasing energy demands. The tokamak is a magnetic confinement device used to achieve controlled fusion reactions. Experimental fusion technology has now reached a level where tokamaks are able to produce about as much energy as is expended in heating the fusion fuel. The next step towards the realization of a nuclear fusion tokamak power plant is ITER, which will be capable of exploring advanced tokamak (AT) modes, characterized by a high fusion gain and plasma stability. The extreme requirements of the advanced modes motivates researchers to improve the modeling of the plasma response as well as the design of feedback controllers. This dissertation focuses on several magnetic and kinetic control problems, including the plasma current, position and shape control, and data-driven and first-principles-driven modeling and control of plasma current density profile and the normalized plasma pressure ratio betaN. The plasma is confined within the vacuum vessel by an external electromagnetic field, produced primarily by toroidal and poloidal field coils. The outermost closed plasma surface or plasma boundary is referred to as the shape of the plasma. A central characteristic of AT plasma regimes is an extreme elongated shape. The equilibrium among the electromagnetic forces acting on an elongated plasma is unstable. Moreover, the tokamak performance is improved if the plasma is located in close proximity to the torus wall, which guarantees an efficient use of available volume. As a consequence, feedback control of the plasma position and shape is necessary. In this dissertation, an Hinfinity-based, multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) controller for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is developed, which is used to control the plasma position, shape, and X

  4. Theoretical simulation of O+ and H+ densities in the Indian low latitude F-region and comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Singh

    Full Text Available The O+ and H+ ion density distributions in the Indian low latitude F-region, within ± 15° magnetic latitudes, are simulated using a time dependent model developed on the basis of solution of the plasma continuity equation. The simulated ion densities for solar minimum June and December solstices are then compared with ionosonde observations from the period 1959–1979 and measurements made by the Indian SROSS C2 satellite during 1995–1996 at an altitude of ~ 500 km. The simulated O+ density has a minimum around pre-sunrise hours and a maximum during noontime. H+ density is higher at nighttime and lower during the day. The simulations reproduced the well-known equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA observed in electron density at the peak of the F2-region in the Indian low latitude sector during solar minimum. In situ measurement of O+ density by the SROSS C2, however, showed a single peak of ionization around the equator.Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; modeling and forecasting

  5. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: Comparisons among average-atom density functional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Michael S.; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  6. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: comparisons among average-atom density functional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Michael S; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B; Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  7. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  8. Improving hot region prediction by parameter optimization of density clustering in PPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xiaolong

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposed an optimized algorithm which combines density clustering of parameter selection with feature-based classification for hot region prediction. First, all the residues are classified by SVM to remove non-hot spot residues, then density clustering of parameter selection is used to find hot regions. In the density clustering, this paper studies how to select input parameters. There are two parameters radius and density in density-based incremental clustering. We firstly fix density and enumerate radius to find a pair of parameters which leads to maximum number of clusters, and then we fix radius and enumerate density to find another pair of parameters which leads to maximum number of clusters. Experiment results show that the proposed method using both two pairs of parameters provides better prediction performance than the other method, and compare these two predictive results, the result by fixing radius and enumerating density have slightly higher prediction accuracy than that by fixing density and enumerating radius.

  9. Estimation of Neutral Density in Edge Plasma with Double Null Configuration in EAST%Estimation of Neutral Density in Edge Plasma with Double Null Configuration in EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌; 常加峰; 张炜; 李颖颖; 钱金平; 徐国盛; 丁斯晔; 高伟; 吴振伟; 陈颖杰; 黄娟; 刘晓菊; 臧庆

    2011-01-01

    In this work, population coefficients of hydrogen's n = 3 excited state from the hydrogen collisional-radiative (CR) model, from the data file of DEGAS 2, are used to calculate the photon emissivity coefficients (PECs) of hydrogen Balmer-α (n = 3 →n = 2) (Hα). The results are compared with the PECs from Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) database, and a good agreement is found. A magnetic surface-averaged neutral density profile of typical double-null (DN) plasma in EAST is obtained by using FRANTIC, the 1.5-D fluid transport code. It is found that the sum of integral Dα and Hα emission intensity calculated via the neutral density agrees with the measured results obtained by using the absolutely calibrated multi-channel poloidal photodiode array systems viewing the lower divertor at the last closed flux surface (LCFS). It is revealed that the typical magnetic surface-averaged neutral density at LCFS is about 3.5×10^16 m^-3 .

  10. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: miran.mozetic@ijs.si

    2009-08-15

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O{sub 2} molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  11. Plasma Retinol, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone and Zinc as Predictors of Bone Mineral Density Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawkia S. A. El-Sherbeny*, Effat A. A., Afifi**, Wafaa M. A. Saleh**, Asmaa, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conflicting results on the association between serum retinol level and bone mineral density (BMD have been published. Thyroid hormones are essential for skeletal development and have direct effect on bone formation and resorption. Bone has one of the highest concentrations of zinc of all tissues, and has been shown to release zinc during deficiency for soft tissue metabolism. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the relation between plasma levels of retinol, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH & zinc and BMD of Egyptian adolescents and adults. Method: The study was a part of a cross sectional national survey conducted by National Nutrition Institute. The sample was a multistage stratified random. Target individuals were classified into two age groups (10- 18 and 28- 59 years. Bone mineral density and plasma levels of retinol, TSH and zinc were determined. Results: Low and high plasma retinol levels were more prevalent among osteoporotic adolescent and adult males respectively than in normal subjects.. The reverse was observed in adult females. Bone mineral density correlated negatively with plasma retinol level in adult males and females and positively in adolescent males, while among females the association was significant (P = 0.030 and stronger. The highest deficiency of TSH was found among adult and adolescent osteoporotic males, followed by osteopenic adult males and adolescent females. Highly statistically significant difference (P < 0.001 existed between osteoporotic and normal adult males concerning TSH deficiency. The prevalence of zinc deficiency ranged from 5.7% to 9.5% for all target individuals. Plasma Zn levels were correlated negatively with bone mineral density in adult males and females. Conclusion: The results of this study reflects the controversy on the association of plasma retinol and BMD. However, the predominant finding revealed that both low and high plasna retinol levels compromise bone health

  12. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 1015 cm-3. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  13. Electric field enhancement at multiple densities in laser-irradiated nanotube plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U Chakravarty; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2012-09-01

    The electric field enhancement inside a nanotube irradiated by intense ultrashort laser pulse ($\\ll 1$ ps) is calculated. The hollowness of the nanotubes determines the field enhancement and the electron density at which such structures exhibit resonance. The electric field in a nanotube plasma is shown to be resonantly enhanced at multiple densities during the two phases of interaction: the ionization phase and the hydrodynamic expansion phase. It is further shown that by a proper choice of hollowness of the nanotubes, a continued occurrence of the resonance over a longer time can be achieved. These properties make nanotubes efficient absorbers of intense ultrashort laser pulses.

  14. Turbulence at the transition to the high density H-mode in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Baumel, S.

    2003-01-01

    Recently a new improved confinement regime was found in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator (Renner H. et al 1989 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 31 1579). The discovery of this high density high confinement mode (HDH-mode) was facilitated by the installation of divertor modules. In this paper...... of the fluctuation level associated with the transition from NC- to HDH-mode. Correlation calculations on a 20 mus timescale between magnetic and density fluctuations lead to the result that the fluctuations are correlated in NC- but not in HDH-mode. Finally, a comparative analysis between the enhanced D-alpha H...

  15. Neutral oxygen atom density in the MESOX air plasma solar furnace facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balat-Pichelin, Marianne; Vesel, Alenka

    2006-08-01

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms in the MESOX set-up, one device of the PROMES-CNRS solar facilities, was determined by a fiber-optics catalytic probe (FOCP). Plasma was created in a flowing air within a quartz tube with the outer diameter of 5 cm by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator with the output power up to 1000 W. The flow of air was varied between 4 and 20 l/h. The O-atom density was found to increase monotonously with the increasing discharge power, and it decreased with the increasing flow rate. The degree of dissociation of oxygen molecules in the plasma column depended largely on the flow rate. At the air flow of 4 l/h it was about 80% but it decreased to about 20% at the flow of 20 l/h.

  16. Neutral oxygen atom density in the MESOX air plasma solar furnace facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [CNRS-PROMES, Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR 8521, 7 rue du four solaire, F-66120 Font Romeu, Odeillo (France)], E-mail: balat@promes.cnrs.fr; Vesel, Alenka [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-08-21

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms in the MESOX set-up, one device of the PROMES-CNRS solar facilities, was determined by a fiber-optics catalytic probe (FOCP). Plasma was created in a flowing air within a quartz tube with the outer diameter of 5 cm by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator with the output power up to 1000 W. The flow of air was varied between 4 and 20 l/h. The O-atom density was found to increase monotonously with the increasing discharge power, and it decreased with the increasing flow rate. The degree of dissociation of oxygen molecules in the plasma column depended largely on the flow rate. At the air flow of 4 l/h it was about 80% but it decreased to about 20% at the flow of 20 l/h.

  17. Enhancing Understanding of High Energy Density Plasmas Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Masti, Robert; King, Jake

    2016-10-01

    This work seeks to understand possible stabilization mechanisms of the early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) experiments. Such mechanisms may include electron thermal conduction, viscosity, and large magnetic fields. Experiments have shown that the high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions require physics modelling that goes well beyond simple models such as ideal MHD. The plan is to develop a multi-fluid extended-MHD model that includes kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity using codes that are easily available to the wider research community. Such an effort would provide the community with a well-benchmarked tool capable of advanced modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  18. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    the free electron density in USPL-created plasmas are limited in the number of space-time dimensions that can be measured simultaneously. One...profile, and c) parabolic density profile 2.1 Cylindrical Geometry This geometry is a first -order approximation of that created in the...Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas by Anthony R Valenzuela Approved for public release; distribution is

  19. Behavior of a plasma in a high-density gas-embedded Z-pinch configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    The theoretical analysis of a high density Z-pinch (HDZP) begins with an examination of the steady state energy balance between ohmic heating and bremsstrahlung radiation losses for a plasma column in pressure equilibrium. The model is then expanded to include the time-varying internal energy and results in a quasi-equilibrium prescription for the load current through a constant radius plasma channel. This set of current waveforms is useful in the design of experimental systems. The behavior of a plasma for physically realizable conditions is first examined by allowing adiabatic changes in the column radius. A more complete model is then developed by incorporating inertial effects into the momentum equation, and the resultant global MHD computational model is compared with more sophisticated, and costly, one- and two-dimensional computer simulations. These comparisons demonstrate the advantages of the global MHD description over previously developed zero-dimensional models.

  20. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, B. (Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Unites States))

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  1. Laser-driven hole boring and gamma-ray emission in high-density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nerush, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    Ion acceleration in laser-produced dense plasmas is a key topic of many recent investigations thanks to its potential applications. Besides, at forthcoming laser intensities ($I \\gtrsim 10^{23} \\text{W}\\,\\text{cm}^{-2}$) interaction of laser pulses with plasmas can be accompanied by copious gamma-ray emission. Here we demonstrate the mutual influence of gamma-ray emission and ion acceleration during relativistic hole boring in high-density plasmas with ultra-intense laser pulses. If gamma-ray emission is abundant, laser pulse reflection and hole-boring velocity are lower and gamma-ray radiation pattern is narrower than in the case of low emission. Conservation of energy and momentum allows one to elucidate the effects of gamma-ray emission which are more pronounced at higher hole-boring velocities.

  2. Identification of the Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Scavenger Receptor CD36 in Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Aase; Levin, Klaus; Højlund, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophage CD36 scavenges oxidized low-density lipoprotein, leading to foam cell formation, and appears to be a key proatherogenic molecule. Increased expression of CD36 has been attributed to hyperglycemia and to defective macrophage insulin signaling in insulin resistance. Premature...... atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes. Here, we report the identification of a soluble form of CD36 (sCD36) in plasma and hypothesize that sCD36 would be elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. METHODS AND RESULTS: sCD36 in plasma...... was demonstrated by immunopurification and Western blotting. We established ELISA assays to determine sCD36 in plasma and measured sCD36 in obese type 2 diabetic patients, obese nondiabetic relatives, and obese and lean control subjects. sCD36 was markedly elevated in type 2 diabetic patients compared with both...

  3. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e. "sub-Larmor scales". Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  4. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma; Evaporacion de carbono usando los electrones de un plasma de alta densidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index). (Author)

  5. Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasma with high density and high radiation loss operation in JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, H.; Asakura, N.; Kubo, H.; Higashijima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rensink, M. E.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Takizuka, T.; Kamada, Y.; Miura, Y.; JT-60 Team

    2005-12-01

    Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasmas with high density and high radiation loss has been investigated in both reversed shear (RS) plasmas and high βp H-mode plasmas with a weak positive shear on JT-60U. In the RS plasmas, the operating regime is extended to high density above the Greenwald density (nGW) with high confinement (HHy2 > 1) and high radiation loss fraction (frad > 0.9) by tailoring the internal transport barriers (ITBs). With a small plasma-wall gap, the radiation loss in the main plasma (inside the magnetic separatrix) reaches 80% of the heating power due to metal impurity accumulation. However, high confinement of HHy2 = 1.2 is sustained even with such a large radiation loss in the main plasma. By neon seeding, the divertor radiation loss is enhanced from 20% to 40% of the total radiation loss. In the high βp H-mode plasmas, high confinement (HHy2 = 0.96) is maintained at high density ( \\bar{n}_{\\rme}/n_GW=0.92 ) with high radiation loss fraction (frad ~ 1) by utilizing high-field-side pellets and argon (Ar) injection. The high \\bar{n}_{\\rme}/n_GW is attributed to the formation of strong density ITB. Strong core-edge parameter linkage for confinement improvement is observed, where the pedestal pressure and the core plasma confinement increase together. The measured radiation profile including contributions from all impurities in the main plasma is peaked, and the central radiation is ascribed to the contribution from Ar accumulated inside the ITB. Impurity transport analyses indicate that the Ar density profile, twice as peaked as the electron density profile, which is the same level as that observed in the high βp H-mode plasma, can yield an acceptable radiation profile even with a peaked density profile in a fusion reactor.

  6. Alimentary lipemia: plasma high-density lipoproteins and apolipoproteins CII and CIII in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, M L; Barnhart, R L; Srivastava, L S; Perisutti, G; Allen, C; Hogg, E; Glueck, C J; Jackson, R L

    1983-02-01

    Three healthy male and three female inpatient volunteers consumed isocaloric diets for 4 wk. At weekly intervals, a fatty meal (100 g fat) was consumed by each fasting subject and blood drawn at 2 h intervals for 12 h. Of the four oral fat loads, two contained saturated fat (polyunsaturated/saturated fat ratio = 0.34) and two contained unsaturated fat (polyunsaturated/saturated fat = 2.21). The magnitude of alimentary lipemia, expressed as area under the plasma triglyceride curve, was 3- to 4-fold higher in males than females. Alimentary lipemia was inversely related to the subjects' fasting plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, HDL apolipoprotein (apo) CIII and directly related to plasma triglycerides. The P/S ratios of the daily diet or the fat meal did not significantly influence the plasma triglyceride curve. After fat intake, mean (+/- SEM) plasma total apoCII and CIII fell to 54 +/- 20% and 73 +/- 5% of base-line, respectively, at 12 h in five of six subjects. After oral fat, an initial fall and a subsequent rise in apoCII and CIII in HDL was associated with reciprocal changes in apoC concentrations in very low-density lipoproteins. We speculate from the data that 1) plasma HDL and their apoC concentrations are important determinants of chylomicron clearance and 2) transfer of apoCs from HDL to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the early phase of fat absorption does not result in the total recycling of apoCs from these lipoproteins to HDL during the late phase of alimentary lipemia.

  7. PLASMA RESISTIN LEVELS AND SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS IN RESISTIN GENE 5' FLANKING REGION IN PATIENTS WITH STROKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-jian Lin; Ying-dong Zhang; Qing-shan Guan; Qing Di; Jing-ping Shi; Wei-guo Liu

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyze the role of resistin in insulin resistance (IR) through investigating the variation of plasma resistin levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in resistin gene 5' flanking region in stroke patients.Methods In 103 atherothrombotic cerebral infarction (ACI) patients, 85 lacunar infarction (LI) patients, 70 intrac-erebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients, and 86 healthy controls, plasma resistin and insulin levels were measured by ELISA , SNPs in resistin gene 5' flanking region were detected by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The subjects' body height and weight, the body mass index, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), blood pressure, and the concentration of fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, creatinine, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipo-protein were also determined.Results QUICKI was significantly lower in the ACI and ICH patients (0.316±0.037 and 0.309±0.032, respectively) than that in the controls (0.342±0.043, P<0.001), while plasma resistin level was significantly higher in the ACI and ICH patients (6.36±3.79 and 7.15±4.27 ng/mL, respectively) than that in the controls (5.28±2.56ng/mL,P<0.05), but such difference was not observed in the LI patients compared with controls. There was a statistically negative correlation between plasma resistin level withQUICKI (r=-0.228,P<0.001). The distributions of allele and genotype frequencies ofresistin gene -420C>G and -537A>C SNPs were not significantly different among the different groups, and those SNPs were not correlated with other clinical and biochemical parameters. Conclusions Plasma resistin is associated with stroke by participating in the development of IR. The SNPs in resistin gene 5' flanking region has no impact on the plasma resistin level.

  8. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A L; Awe, T J; Brockington, S J E; Davis, J S; Adams, C S; Case, A; Cassibry, J T; Dunn, J P; Gilmore, M A; Lynn, A G; Messer, S J; Witherspoon, F D

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density \\approx 2 x 10^(16) cm^(-3), electron temperature \\approx 1.4 eV, velocity \\approx 30 km/s, M \\approx 14, ionization fraction \\approx 0.96, diameter \\approx 5 cm, and length \\approx 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is up to an order of magnitude less than the drop predicted by the ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  9. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Awe, T. J.; Davis, J. S.; Dunn, J. P. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Brockington, S. J. E.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Cassibry, J. T. [Propulsion Research Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Gilmore, M. A.; Lynn, A. G. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, electron temperature Almost-Equal-To 1.4 eV, velocity Almost-Equal-To 30 km/s, M Almost-Equal-To 14, ionization fraction Almost-Equal-To 0.96, diameter Almost-Equal-To 5 cm, and length Almost-Equal-To 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment, which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is at the very low end of the 8-160 times drop predicted by ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  10. A Multi-Parameter Optimization of Plasma Density for an Advanced Linear Collider*

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P; Hillenbrand, S

    2011-01-01

    Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments showed that an accelerating gradient as high as 50 GV/m can be driven and sustained over a meter-long plasma [1]. Based on this result, a straw man design for a future, multi-stage, PWFA-based electron/positron collider with an energy gain of ~ 25 GeV/stage has been generated [2]. However, the choice of plasma density remains open. On one hand, high density means large accelerating gradients and possibly a shorter collider. On the other it means that the accelerating structure dimensions become very small, on the order of the plasma wavelength. Operating at high gradient and with such small structure imposes very strong constraints on the particle bunches: small dimensions and spacing, large current or limited charge, etc. These constraints result is challenges in producing the bunches (compression, shaping for optimum loading, etc.) and could limit the achievable collider luminosity. We explore the global implications of operating at a lower accelerating...

  11. Genetic Loci Associated With Plasma Concentration of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein B Among 6382 White Women in Genome-Wide Analysis With Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chasman, Daniel I; Pare, Guillaume; Zee, Robert Y.L; Parker, Alex N; Cook, Nancy R; Buring, Julie E; Kwiatkowski, David J; Rose, Lynda M; Smith, Joshua D; Williams, Paul T; Rieder, Mark J; Rotter, Jerome I; Nickerson, Deborah A; Krauss, Ronald M; Miletich, Joseph P; Ridker, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    Genetic Loci Associated With Plasma Concentration of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein B Among 6382 White...

  12. Radial Density Profile in the SSX Plasma Wind Tunnel using a Double Langmuir Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, D. L.; Flanagan, K.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.

    2011-10-01

    We present preliminary results from a moveable double Langmuir probe in the present plasma wind tunnel configuration of SSX. The probe is designed to measure radial profiles of electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) across the midplane with a 1 cm resolution. Line-averaged densities from He-Ne interferometry show densities of 1 - 5 ×1015 cm-3 . In addition to mean values, we will also present electrostatic fluctuations and correlations with magnetic field measurements. The double Langmuir probe also measures local Te. Line-averaged measurements from VUV spectroscopy indicate Te ~ 10 eV . The Langmuir probe stalk diameter measures 6 . 5 mm and tip spacing is 1 . 1 mm . The SSX plasma wind tunnel has dimensions L ≅ 1 m and R = 0 . 08 m . Plasma flow speeds are v >= 50 km / s . The cylindrical copper boundary and probe surfaces are baked and cleaned in a He glow discharge to maintain excellent vacuum and surface conditions. Electrostatic measurements during merging will be presented if available. Work supported by US DOE and CMSO.

  13. Hybrid Kinetic-Fluid Electromagnetic Simulations of Imploding High Energy Density Plasmas for IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Genoni, Thomas; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert; Stygar, William; Leeper, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    A new simulation technique is being developed to study high current and moderate density-radius product (ρR) z-pinch plasmas relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). Fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the time evolution of up to 40-MA current (deuterium and DT) z-pinches, but with relatively low ρR, have yielded new insights into the mechanisms of neutron production. At fusion relevant conditions (ρR > 0.01 gm/cm2) , however, this technique requires a prohibitively large number of cells and particles. A new hybrid implicit technique has been developed that accurately describes high-density and magnetized imploding plasmas. The technique adapts a recently published algorithm, that enables accurate descriptions of highly magnetized particle orbits, to high density plasmas and also makes use of an improved kinetic particle remap technique. We will discuss the new technique, stable range of operation, and application to an IFE relevant z-pinch design at 60 MA. Work supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Probing near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Duesterer, S; Faeustlin, R R; Laarmann, T; Redlin, H [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bornath, T; Goede, S; Irsig, R; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Przystawik, A [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, Universitaetsplatz 3, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Av., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Foerster, E [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Fortmann, C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gregori, G; Mithen, J [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Lee, H J; Nagler, B [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Li, B [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Radcliffe, P, E-mail: sven.toleikis@desy.d [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-10-14

    X-ray scattering using highly brilliant x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) radiation provides new access to probe free-electron density, temperature and ionization in near-solid density plasmas. First experiments at the soft x-ray FEL FLASH at DESY, Hamburg, show the capabilities of this technique. The ultrashort FEL pulses in particular can probe equilibration phenomena occurring after excitation of the plasma using ultrashort optical laser pumping. We have investigated liquid hydrogen and find that the interaction of very intense soft x-ray FEL radiation alone heats the sample volume. As the plasma establishes, photons from the same pulse undergo scattering, thus probing the transient, warm dense matter state. We find a free-electron density of (2.6 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and an electron temperature of 14 {+-} 3.5 eV. In pump-probe experiments, using intense optical laser pulses to generate more extreme states of matter, this interaction of the probe pulse has to be considered in the interpretation of scattering data. In this paper, we present details of the experimental setup at FLASH and the diagnostic methods used to quantitatively analyse the data.

  15. Proteome of human plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein exhibits a link with coagulation and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashty Rahmatabady, Monireh; Motazacker, Mohammad M.; Levels, Johannes; de Vries, Marcel; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Peppelenbosch, Maikel; Rezaee, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Apart from transporting lipids through the body, the human plasma lipoproteins very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are also thought to serve as a modality for intra-organismal protein transfer, shipping proteins with important roles in inflammation and thrombosis fr

  16. RECONNECTION-DRIVEN DOUBLE LAYERS IN THE STRATIFIED PLASMA OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION: SUPPLY OF HOT PLASMA INTO THE CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nagendra [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel mechanism for the supply of hot plasma into the corona from the chromosphere is suggested here; the mechanism involves collisionless magnetic reconnection (CMR) in the transition region (TR) followed by double layer (DL) formation in the enhanced expansion of the chromospheric cold plasma mixed with CMR-heated hot electrons. It is well known that (i) the CMR produces energetic electrons and (ii) DLs naturally form in expanding dense plasmas containing a minor population of hot electrons. We apply these plasma physics facts to the dynamics of stratified plasma in the TR. In the TR where densities fall below ∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, all collisional mean-free paths, electron–ion, ion–neutral, and electron–neutral, become long enough to render plasma collisionless at kinetic scale lengths, making CMR and DL formation possible. The DLs accelerate the chromospheric cold ions to energies comparable to the energy of the hot electrons. When the upflowing energized ions neutralized by the escaping hot electrons thermalize, the resulting hot tenuous plasma supplies an energy flux ∼3 × 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} = 3 × 10{sup 2} J m{sup −2} s{sup −1} into the corona. The CMR–DL mechanism introduces sudden transitions in the TR as microstructures in both density and energy. The global transition in the TR could be a fractal structure containing such microscopic features. If not impossible, it is difficult to measure such microstructures, but it seems that the coronal heating begins in the nearly collisionless TR by CMR and DL formation.

  17. Plasma miRNA levels correlate with sensitivity to bone mineral density in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqiu; Wang, Zhe; Fu, Qin; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-01

    In our study, we detect the levels of three micro-RNAs (miRNAs; miR-21, miR-133a and miR-146a) in the plasma of 120 Chinese postmenopausal women who were divided into three groups (normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis) according to the T-scores. Downregulation of miR-21, as well as upregulation of miR-133a, was validated in the plasma of osteoporosis and osteopenia patients versus the normal group. The difference in expression regarding the miR-146a level in plasma among the three groups was not significant (p > 0.01). The circulating miRNA expression levels and bone mineral density (BMD) were examined during a multiple correlation analysis as a dependent variable after adjusting for age, weight and height. We have demonstrated that specific miRNAs species are significantly changed in the plasma of osteoporosis and osteopenia patients and correlated with the BMD. Our study suggested a potential use of miR-21 and miR-133a as sensitive and plasma biomarkers for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  18. Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas in the presence of an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Hu, S.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.; Betti, R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection has recently been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasmas. These experiments are interesting both for obtaining fundamental data on reconnection, and may also be relevant for inertial fusion, as this magnetic reconnection geometry, with multiple, colliding, magnetized plasma bubbles, occurs naturally inside ICF hohlraums. We present initial results of experiments conducted on the OMEGA EP facility on magnetic reconnection between colliding, magnetized blowoff plasmas. While in previous experiments the magnetic fields were self-generated in the plasma by the Biermann battery effect, in these experiments the seed magnetic field is generated by pulsing current through a pair of external foils using the MIFEDS current generator (Magneto-Inertial Fusion Electrical Discharge System) developed at LLE. Time-resolved images of the magnetic fields and plasma dynamics are obtained from proton radiography and x-ray self-emission, respectively. We present initial results of the experiments, including comparison to ``null'' experiments with zero MIFEDS magnetic field, and associated modeling using the radiation-hydro code DRACO and the particle-in-cell code PSC.

  19. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  20. Finite density QCD phase transition in the heavy quark region

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, H; Kanaya, K; Ohno, H; Ejiri, S; Nakagawa, Y; Hatsuda, T; Umeda, T

    2012-01-01

    We extend our previous study of the QCD phase structure in the heavy quark region to non-zero chemical potentials. To identify the critical point where the first order deconfining transition terminates, we study an effective potential defined by the probability distribution function of the plaquette and the Polyakov loop. The reweighting technique is shown to be powerful in evaluating the effective potential in a wide range of the plaquette and Polyakov loop expectation values. We adopt the cumulant expansion to overcome the sign problem in the calculation of complex phase of the quark determinant. We find that the method provides us with an intuitive and powerful way to study the phase structure. We estimate the location of the critical point at finite chemical potential in the heavy quark region.

  1. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casali L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the “European road map” such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  2. The variable rotation period of the inner region of Saturn's plasma disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D A; Persoon, A M; Kurth, W S; Groene, J B; Averkamp, T F; Dougherty, M K; Southwood, D J

    2007-04-20

    We show that the plasma and magnetic fields in the inner region of Saturn's plasma disk rotate in synchronism with the time-variable modulation period of Saturn's kilometric radio emission. This relation suggests that the radio modulation has its origins in the inner region of the plasma disk, most likely from a centrifugally driven convective instability and an associated plasma outflow that slowly slips in phase relative to Saturn's internal rotation. The slippage rate is determined by the electrodynamic coupling of the plasma disk to Saturn and by the drag force exerted by its interaction with the Enceladus neutral gas torus.

  3. On the formation of sharp gradients in electron density resulting from an ice-plasma feedback instabilities in the polar summer mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSEs) have commonly been attributed to scattering from (1) volume-filled electron density turbulence and (2) extremely sharp (meter-scale) gradients in electron density. In-situ sounding rockets have measured both extended regions of turbulence as well as electron density ledges. Unlike the turbulence theory, which has been extensively studied, a theory on the formation of sharp edges has yet to be explored. In this study, we reconsider the study of Gumbel et al. [2002] on the influences of ice particles on the ion chemistry and propose a theory of ice-plasma feedback instability in order to explain the origin of sharp electron density gradients. A one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of a multi-constituent weakly-ionized plasma has been developed to capture the physics of proton-hydrates (H+[H20]n), ice, and plasma interactions on a spatial grid of approximately 25 m. The simulation captures (1) the development of the proton-hydrate chain starting at n=4 via Thomson's model and Natanson's recombination scheme, (2) the formation of ice nucleation on large cluster proton-hydrates (n > 73), (3) the attachment of electrons (and ions) to ice particles, and resulting depletion of the plasma density, which significantly accelerates the proton-hydrate chain and ionic nucleation of new ice particles, (4) and the development of an ice-plasma feedback instability whereby the repeated process of developing new ice particles leads to capture of even more electrons and further depletion of existing regions of lower plasma density. Since this feedback instability process is faster than typical aerosol diffusion rates in this region, existing gradients steepen to produce electron density ledges. Although ionic nucleation is not feasible as the major mesospheric nucleation process, it can become efficient locally, near the coldest parts of the mesosphere because the proton-hydrate chain development is extremely sensitive to ambient

  4. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Koshelev, K N; Lopaev, D V; van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Osorio, E A; Bijkerk, F

    2016-01-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral amount of plasma in the cavity. However, in some regimes, the impact of the setup geometry, EUV spectrum, and EUV induced secondary emission should be taken into account. The influence of these parameters on the generated plasma and the measured electron density is discussed.

  5. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  6. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  7. A laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for obtaining neutral hydrogen densities in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.Z.; Yang, T.F.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The resonance fluorescence of neutral hydrogen illuminated by {ital H}{sub {alpha}} radiation has been used as a technique for the spatially and temporally resolved density measurements of neutral hydrogen in high temperature plasmas, such as in the tokamak and magnetic mirror plasma fusion devices. The fluorescence signal, usually very weak and buried in the background of stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission, is very difficult to extract and its measurements are inaccurate. This paper discusses the improvement of the signal extraction using two optical path laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. One optical path carries the fluorescence signal and the background (the stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission), whereas the other path carries only the background signal. By combining these two signals, a clean fluorescence signal can be isolated by subtracting out the background using a differential amplifier. The measurement is obtained instantaneously from these two signals which are taken simultaneously in one pulse rather than being extracted from two separate spectra taken in two sequential pulses (double pulses). This method, therefore, makes a significant improvement on the double pulse technique in terms of the accuracy of the measurement and the time resolution. Using this LIF technique the measurement of the neutral density profile in the exhaust of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion device is obtained and presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Numerical solutions of sheath structures around a moderate negative biased electron-emitting cylindrical probe in low-density isotropic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Alif

    2017-09-01

    The potential structures around a moderate negative biased electron-emitting cylindrical probe in low-density isotropic plasma are calculated in the collisionless sheath region. The formalisms, equations, and solutions for the entire electron emitting range (i.e., subcritical, critical, and supercritical) from the cylindrical emitter and collector surface are discussed. The plasma-electron and emitted-electron are assumed to have half Maxwellian velocity distributions at their respective sheath entering boundaries with cold plasma ions. Poisson's equation is solved numerically in the sheath region for the subcritical, critical, and supercritical emissions. The I-V characteristics for these three cases are presented in tabular form. The results show that we need very high emitted-electron current to solve Poisson's equation for the critical and spercritical emissions. Thus, the floating potential is far away in these scenarios. Also, the number density of emitted-and plasma-electron are comparable at the sheath edge so we cannot neglect the density of former in comparison with latter at the sheath edge.

  9. Regional differences in density-dependent mortality and reproduction in Finnish reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilpo Kojola

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Reindeer in the southern and central regions of reindeer husbandry in Finland feed on arboreal lichens or are given supplementary rations from midwinter whereas in the northern region reindeer use snow-covered forage throughout winter. Rates of mortality and reproduction were examined using data from population crashes of semi-domesticated reindeer that occurred in Northern Finland during 1960-1987. The mortality and reproductive rate were density-dependent in the southern region and the mortality was density-dependent in the central region. The density-dependence was most probably due to food competition in forest cutting areas where reindeer gather to feed on arboreal lichens from felled trees. In the northern region mortality was not density-dependent indicating that where reindeer feed on over-utilized winter range the effects of increased feeding competition are masked by very large changes in the availability of forage.

  10. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  11. Optimal Density Profile of the Plasma Layer Shielded by a Conducting Surface for the Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王舸; 曹金祥; 宋法伦

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Born approximation, we reduce the approximate analysis solution to the normal and oblique incident electromagnetic wave scattering from the weakly ionized plasma layer shielded by a conducting surface. The solution is closely related to the density profile of the plasma layer. Employing the self-consistent base function, we yield the optimal density profile for the nonuniform plasma layer with the frequencies of incident electromagnetic waves ranging from 4-10 GHz. Numerical studies illustrate the optimal density profile can "survive" wide ranges of the plasma parameters. Different from the validity condition for the Wenzell-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) approximation, the Born approximation is feasible even if the scale length is smaller than the wavelength.Therefore, the Born approximation is universal against the scattering problem from the weakly ionized plasma.

  12. Plasma and BIAS Modeling: Self-Consistent Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell with Low-Density Argon Plasma for TiC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Geiser

    2011-01-01

    processes. In this paper we present a new model taken into account a self-consistent electrostatic-particle in cell model with low density Argon plasma. The collision model are based of Monte Carlo simulations is discussed for DC sputtering in lower pressure regimes. In order to simulate transport phenomena within sputtering processes realistically, a spatial and temporal knowledge of the plasma density and electrostatic field configuration is needed. Due to relatively low plasma densities, continuum fluid equations are not applicable. We propose instead a Particle-in-cell (PIC method, which allows the study of plasma behavior by computing the trajectories of finite-size particles under the action of an external and self-consistent electric field defined in a grid of points.

  13. Laser-induced plasma electron number density: Stark broadening method versus the Saha-Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnab, Sarkar; Manjeet, Singh

    2017-02-01

    We report spectroscopic studies on plasma electron number density of laser-induced plasma produced by ns-Nd:YAG laser light pulses on an aluminum sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of different laser energy and the effect of different laser wavelengths were compared. The experimentally observed line profiles of neutral aluminum have been used to extract the excitation temperature using the Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density has been determined from the Stark broadened as well as using the Saha-Boltzmann equation (SBE). Each approach was also carried out by using the Al emission line and Mg emission lines. It was observed that the SBE method generated a little higher electron number density value than the Stark broadening method, but within the experimental uncertainty range. Comparisons of N e determined by the two methods show the presence of a linear relation which is independent of laser energy or laser wavelength. These results show the applicability of the SBE method for N e determination, especially when the system does not have any pure emission lines whose electron impact factor is known. Also use of Mg lines gives superior results than Al lines.

  14. Wavelet-based density estimation for noise reduction in plasma simulations using particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van yen, Romain Nguyen; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Chen, Guangye

    2010-04-01

    For given computational resources, the accuracy of plasma simulations using particles is mainly limited by the noise due to limited statistical sampling in the reconstruction of the particle distribution function. A method based on wavelet analysis is proposed and tested to reduce this noise. The method, known as wavelet-based density estimation (WBDE), was previously introduced in the statistical literature to estimate probability densities given a finite number of independent measurements. Its novel application to plasma simulations can be viewed as a natural extension of the finite size particles (FSP) approach, with the advantage of estimating more accurately distribution functions that have localized sharp features. The proposed method preserves the moments of the particle distribution function to a good level of accuracy, has no constraints on the dimensionality of the system, does not require an a priori selection of a global smoothing scale, and its able to adapt locally to the smoothness of the density based on the given discrete particle data. Moreover, the computational cost of the denoising stage is of the same order as one time step of a FSP simulation. The method is compared with a recently proposed proper orthogonal decomposition based method, and it is tested with three particle data sets involving different levels of collisionality and interaction with external and self-consistent fields.

  15. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  16. The O-X-B mode conversion scheme for ECRH of a high-density Tokamak plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. R.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1985-01-01

    A method to apply electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to a Tokamak plasma with central density higher than the critical density for cut-off of the ordinary mode (O-mode) has been investigated. This method involves two mode conversions, from an O-mode via an extraordinary mode (X-mode) int......A method to apply electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to a Tokamak plasma with central density higher than the critical density for cut-off of the ordinary mode (O-mode) has been investigated. This method involves two mode conversions, from an O-mode via an extraordinary mode (X...

  17. Extended dielectric relaxation scheme for fluid transport simulations of high density plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that the dielectric relaxation scheme (DRS) can efficiently overcome the limitation on the simulation time step for fluid transport simulations of high density plasma discharges. By imitating a realistic and physical shielding process of electric field perturbation, the DRS overcomes the dielectric limitation on time step. However, the electric field was obtained with assuming the drift-diffusion approximation. Although the drift-diffusion expressions are good approximations for both the electrons and ions at high pressure, the inertial term cannot be neglected in the ion momentum equation for low pressure. Therefore, in this work, we developed the extended DRS by introducing an effective electric field. To compare the extended DRS with the previous method, two-dimensional fluid simulations for inductively coupled plasma discharges were performed. This work was supported by the Industrial Strategic Technology Development Program (10041637, Development of Dry Etch System for 10 nm class SADP Process) funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE, Korea).

  18. Reduced entropic model for studies of multidimensional nonlocal transport in high-energy-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Sorbo, D.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Dubroca, B.; Guisset, S.; Touati, M.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Université de Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrodynamic simulations of high-energy-density plasmas require a detailed description of energy fluxes. For low and intermediate atomic number materials, the leading mechanism is the electron transport, which may be a nonlocal phenomenon requiring a kinetic modeling. In this paper, we present and test the results of a nonlocal model based on the first angular moments of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. This multidimensional model is closed thanks to an entropic relation (the Boltzman H-theorem). It provides a better description of the electron distribution function, thus enabling studies of small scale kinetic effects within the hydrodynamic framework. Examples of instabilities of electron plasma and ion-acoustic waves, driven by the heat flux, are presented and compared with the classical formula.

  19. Reduced entropic model for studies of multidimensional nonlocal transport in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, D.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Dubroca, B.; Guisset, S.; Touati, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of high-energy-density plasmas require a detailed description of energy fluxes. For low and intermediate atomic number materials, the leading mechanism is the electron transport, which may be a nonlocal phenomenon requiring a kinetic modeling. In this paper, we present and test the results of a nonlocal model based on the first angular moments of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. This multidimensional model is closed thanks to an entropic relation (the Boltzman H-theorem). It provides a better description of the electron distribution function, thus enabling studies of small scale kinetic effects within the hydrodynamic framework. Examples of instabilities of electron plasma and ion-acoustic waves, driven by the heat flux, are presented and compared with the classical formula.

  20. Effective noninvasive zygosity determination by maternal plasma target region sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently very few noninvasive molecular genetic approaches are available to determine zygosity for twin pregnancies in clinical laboratories. This study aimed to develop a novel method to determine zygosity by using maternal plasma target region sequencing. METHODS: We constructed a statistic model to calculate the possibility of each zygosity type using likelihood ratios ( Li and empirical dynamic thresholds targeting at 4,524 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs loci on 22 autosomes. Then two dizygotic (DZ twin pregnancies,two monozygotic (MZ twin pregnancies and two singletons were recruited to evaluate the performance of our novel method. Finally we estimated the sensitivity and specificity of the model in silico under different cell-free fetal DNA (cff-DNA concentration and sequence depth. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: We obtained 8.90 Gbp sequencing data on average for six clinical samples. Two samples were classified as DZ with L values of 1.891 and 1.554, higher than the dynamic DZ cut-off values of 1.162 and 1.172, respectively. Another two samples were judged as MZ with 0.763 and 0.784 of L values, lower than the MZ cut-off values of 0.903 and 0.918. And the rest two singleton samples were regarded as MZ twins, with L values of 0.639 and 0.757, lower than the MZ cut-off values of 0.921 and 0.799. In silico, the estimated sensitivity of our noninvasive zygosity determination was 99.90% under 10% total cff-DNA concentration with 2 Gbp sequence data. As the cff-DNA concentration increased to 15%, the specificity was as high as 97% with 3.50 Gbp sequence data, much higher than 80% with 10% cff-DNA concentration. SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents the feasibility to noninvasively determine zygosity of twin pregnancy using target region sequencing, and illustrates the sensitivity and specificity under various detecting condition. Our method can act as an alternative approach for zygosity determination of twin pregnancies in clinical

  1. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.

  2. Electron density in amplitude modulated microwave atmospheric plasma jet as determined from microwave interferometry and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnek, J.; Hnilica, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2017-01-01

    Time resolved electron density in an atmospheric pressure amplitude modulated microwave plasma jet is determined using the microwave interferometry method, refined by numerical modelling of the propagation of non-planar electromagnetic waves in the vicinity of a small diameter, dense collisional plasma filament. The results are compared to those from the Stark broadening of the {{\\text{H}}β} emission line. Both techniques show, both qualitatively and quantitatively, a similar temporal evolution of electron density during one modulation period.

  3. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  4. Opacity effects in a solid-density aluminium plasma created by photo-excitation with an X-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackstraw, D. S.; Vinko, S. M.; Ciricosta, O.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Chung, H.-K.; Brown, C. R. D.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Falcone, R. W.; Graves, C.; Hájková, V.; Higginbotham, A.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, H. J.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, C.; Ping, Y.; Scherz, A.; Schlotter, W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Vysin, L.; Wang, T.; Wu, B.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Nagler, B.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.; Wark, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    The intensities within the focal spots of the output of recently developed X-ray sources based on free-electron-laser (FEL) technology are so great that atoms within the focal region can potentially absorb several photons during the few tens of femtosecond X-ray pulse. Furthermore, the duration of the FEL X-ray pulse is comparable to the Auger decay times of inner-shell holes created by the X-rays themselves. We report here how such a scenario can lead to opacity broadening of the fluorescence radiation emitted by the hot, dense plasma, which is created as a result of the X-radiation focussed onto a solid target, and in particular present calculations of the broadening of the Kα emission in a solid-density aluminium target, produced when the FEL photon energy is tuned below the Al K-edge, but is resonant with the Kα transition.

  5. Kilohertz laser wakefield accelerator using near critical density plasmas and millijoule-level drive pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Andy

    2016-10-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators operating in the so-called bubble or blowout regime are typically driven by Joule-class femtosecond laser systems driving plasma waves in highly underdense plasmas (1017 -1019cm-3). While these accelerators are very promising for accelerating GeV scale, low emittance electron beams, the large energy requirements of the laser systems have so far limited them to repetition rates below 10 Hz. However, there are a variety of applications, such as ultrafast electron diffraction or high repetition rate gamma ray sources for materials characterization or medical radiography, which would benefit from lower energy (1-10 MeV) but higher repetition rate ( 1 kHz) sources of relativistic electrons. This talk will describe relativistic wakefield acceleration of electron bunches in the range 1-10 MeV, driven by a 1 kHz, 30 fs, 1-12 mJ laser system. Our results are made possible by the use of very high density cryogenic H2 and He gas jet targets yielding electron densities >1021cm-3 in thin 100 μm gas flows. At these high densities the critical power for relativistic self-focusing and the plasma wave phase velocity are greatly reduced, leading to pulse collapse and self-injection even with 1 mJ drive laser pulses. Applications of this source to ultrafast electron diffraction and gamma ray radiography will be discussed. This research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  6. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  7. Segmentation of Breast Regions in Mammogram Based on Density: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiza Saidin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is to review approaches for segmentation of breast regions in mammograms according to breast density. Studies based on density have been undertaken because of the relationship between breast cancer and density. Breast cancer usually occurs in the fibroglandular area of breast tissue, which appears bright on mammograms and describes as breast density. Most of the studies focused on the classification method for the glandular tissue detection. Others highlighted on the segmentation method of fibroglandular tissue, while few researchers performed segmentation of the anatomical regions based on density. There have also been works on the segmentation of other specific parts of breast regions such as either detection of nipple position, skin-air interface or pectoral muscle. The problem on evaluation performance of the segmentation result in relation to ground truth is also discussed in this paper.

  8. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density......We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity-density...

  9. Density Fluctuations in the Yukawa One Component Plasma: An accurate model for the dynamical structure factor

    CERN Document Server

    Mithen, James P; Crowley, Basil J B; Gregori, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate the equilibrium dynamics of a single component fluid with Yukawa interaction potential. We show that, for a wide range of densities and temperatures, the dynamics of the system are in striking agreement with a simple model of generalized hydrodynamics. Since the Yukawa potential can describe the ion-ion interactions in a plasma, the model has significant applicability for both analyzing and interpreting the results of x-ray scattering data from high power lasers and fourth generation light sources.

  10. Mode conversion of large-amplitude electromagnetic waves in relativistic critical density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesch, T.C.; Kull, H.J. [Aachen Univ., Institute of Theoretical Physics A, RWTH (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The propagation of linearly polarized large-amplitude electromagnetic waves in critical density plasmas is studied in the framework of the Akiezer-Polovin model. A new mechanism of mode conversion is presented. The well-known periodic solutions are generalized to quasiperiodic solutions taking into account additional electrostatic oscillations. Nearly periodic circle-like solutions are found to be stabilized by intrinsic mode coupling whereas for nearly periodic eight-like solutions an effective mode conversion mechanism is discovered. Finally, the modulation timescales are considered. (authors)

  11. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores. I. Single Nanoflares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, W. T.; Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    The properties that are expected of “hot” non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions are investigated using hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops code. Here we study a single nanoflare and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK, which is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium, and for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the “smoking gun” of nanoflare heating, lies between 106.6 and 107 K. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  12. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores I. Single Nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, W T; Bradshaw, S J

    2016-01-01

    The properties expected of "hot" non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions are investigated using hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code. Here we study a single nanoflare and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between $10^{6.6}$ and $10^7$ K. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  13. Simulation of the atomic and ionic densities in the ionization layer of a plasma arc with a binary cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, D; Marin, J A Sillero; Munoz-Serrano, E; Casado, E, E-mail: f92orhed@uco.e [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2009-04-21

    A physical model was developed to study the behaviour of the cathode material evaporated from a thoriated tungsten cathode of an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma arc. The densities of tungsten and thorium atoms and ions in the ionization layer were obtained, and the influence of the different physical processes on the evaporated cathode material was established. It was found that almost all of the neutral atoms evaporated from the cathode are ionized near the beginning of the ionization layer, i.e. near the boundary between the sheath and the ionization layer. Thorium ions are concentrated in a 4 {mu}m region near the beginning of this layer, while tungsten ions are found in a region of 9 {mu}m. The contribution of the electric force to the velocity of ions is the dominant contribution only near the beginning of the ionization layer. At a distance from the interface between the sheath and the ionization layer greater than 3.8 {mu}m in the case of thorium ions, and greater than 5 {mu}m in the case of tungsten ions, the contributions of the density gradient forces and the frictional forces are more important than the electric force contribution.

  14. Spin Magnetohydrodynamics. Energy density and vorticity evolution in electron-ion quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explain a magneto quantum hydrodynamics (MQHD) method for the study of the quantum evolution of a system of spinning fermions in an external electromagnetic field. The fundamental equations of microscopic quantum hydrodynamics (the momentum balance equation, the energy evolution equation and the magnetic moment density equation) were derived from the many-particle microscopic Schredinger equation with a Spin-spin and Coulomb modified Hamiltonian. It has been showed that in the absence of external electromagnetic field the system of particles are subject to the usual quantum force (Bohm potential) and spin-dependent addition (Spin stress). Using the developed approach, an extended vorticity evolution equation for the quantum spinning plasma has been derived. The effects of the new spin forces and Spin-spin interaction contributions on the motion of fermions, the evolution of the magnetic moment density, the energy dynamics and vorticity generation have been predicted. The explicated MQHD appr...

  15. Solitons at the critical density of negative ions in multicomponent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibohanbi Singh, K.H.; Das, G.C. (Manipur Univ., Dept. of Mathematics, Imphal (IN))

    1989-12-01

    The derivation of solitary waves in generalized multicomponent plasmas shows that the negative ion introduces a critical density at which the characteristics of the solitons are studied. The soliton's behavior deriving through the Korteweg-deVries (K-dV) equation at the critical density shows that the nonlinearity of the wave vanishes, due to which the mode of study is augmented through a modified K-dV equation. Employing a higher order equation involving quadratic and cubic nonlinearities, the transition of the K-dV equation to a modified K-dV equation along with the conservation of the Sagdeev potential, which is not affected by the negative ions, is studied in detail. The results are compared with experimental observations.

  16. 4{omega} Thomson scattering probe for high-density plasma characterization at Titan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Yang, S.; Henesian, M.; Weiland, T.; Price, D.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In preparation for the upcoming experiments on the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility, a new Thomson scattering system has been designed and implemented. This system allows electron temperature and density measurements in a high-density regime (n{sub e}>10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}). A 263 nm probe has been demonstrated to produce a total energy of 15 J at 4{omega}(263 nm) in a 1 ns square pulse with a focal spot size of 100 {mu}m. This probe has been used for imaging Thomson scattering of the ion feature. The goal of this study is to investigate the heating of a preformed plasma by a short-pulse heater beam.

  17. Exploring the electron density in plasmas induced by extreme ultraviolet radiation in argon

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Osorio, E A; Banine, V Y

    2015-01-01

    The new generation of lithography tools use high energy EUV radiation which ionizes the present background gas due to photoionization. To predict and understand the long term impact on the highly delicate mirrors It is essential to characterize these kinds of EUV-induced plasmas. We measured the electron density evolution in argon gas during and just after irradiation by a short pulse of EUV light at 13.5 nm by applying microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Dependencies on EUV pulse energy and gas pressure have been explored over a range relevant for industrial applications. Our experimental results show that the maximum reached electron density depends linearly on pulse energy. A quadratic dependence - caused by photoionization and subsequent electron impact ionization by free electrons - is found from experiments where the gas pressure is varied. This is demonstrated by our theoretical estimates presented in this manuscript as well.

  18. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Hu, Z.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Mehrling, T. J.; Kononenko, O.; Sheeran, B.; Osterhoff, J.

    2017-09-01

    Density down-ramp (DDR) injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (˜140 pC ), low normalized emittance (˜200 nm ) and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3%) in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (˜2.5 kA ).

  19. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ˜1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  20. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia, M. P., E-mail: mpvaldivia@pha.jhu.edu; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Klein, S. R. [Center for Laser Experimental Astrophysical Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States); Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-11-15

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25–29 J, 8–30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ∼1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Investigations of Laser Ablation Plasma Plume Density and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iratcabal, Jeremy; Bach, Bernhard; Beatty, Cuyler; Dutra, Eric; Darling, Timothy; Wiewior, Piotr; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Laser ablation of solid targets with laser intensities of the order of 108-1011 W/cm2 provides a rich platform for investigating the density and composition of coexisting molecular, atomic, and ion species in the resulting plasma plume. Experiments measuring the spatial- and temporal-evolution of laser ablation plumes have been performed to simultaneously characterize the multiple parameters related to the energy and momentum partitioning of the incident laser energy as the ablation process occurs. The temperature, density, and relative populations of different molecular, atomic, and ion species can be determined by the simultaneous measurement of optical and charged particle spectroscopy, fast imaging cameras, and optical interferometric diagnostics. Additionally, background gas pressure, density, and species were carefully varied. A comparison of density measurements obtained with multiple interferometric, spectroscopic, and fast imaging diagnostics for a carbon ablation plume expanding into vacuum and into background gases with different Reynolds numbers will be presented. Atomic, molecular, and ion species population evolution will be presented as measured with optical and charged particle spectroscopy. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE NNSA Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002075 and National Securities Technologies, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946/subcontract No. 165819.

  2. Neutral-depletion-induced asymmetric plasma density profile and momentum transport in a helicon thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takao, Yoshinori; Chiba, Aiki; Ando, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Axial momentum lost to a lateral wall of a helicon source is directly measured by using a pendulum force balance, where only the lateral wall is attached to the balance immersed in 60-cm-diam and 1.4-m-long vacuum tank (pumping speed of 300-400 L/s). When operating the source with highly ionized krypton and xenon, the strong density decay along the axis is observed inside the source tube, which seems to be due to the neutral depletion. Under such a condition, a non-negligible loss of the axial momentum to the lateral wall is detected. The presently detected loss of the axial momentum indicates the presence of the ions which are axially accelerated by the electric field in the plasma core and then lost to the lateral wall. Furthermore, the helicon thruster immersed in 1-m-diam and 2-m-long vacuum tank (pumping speed of 4000-5000 L/s) is operated at high rf power up to 5 kW in argon, to demonstrate the neutral-depletion-induced axially asymmetric density profile. Combination between the Langmuir probe and the optical diagnosis indicates that the neutral density at the axial center of the source is reduced to 20% of the initial neutral density. This work is partially supported by grant-in-aid for scientific research (16H04084 and 26247096) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  3. 3D plasma turbulence and neutral simulations using the Hermes model in BOUT + + : a study of linear devices and the tokamak edge and divertor region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Jarrod; Dudson, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport processes in the low temperature plasma at the boundary region of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) devices is crucial to the design and operation of future fusion reactor devices. It influences the divertor heat load, and probably the core confinement as well. The dominant source of this transport is turbulence, which serves to mix the high and low temperature regions of the plasma. The nature of this plasma turbulence is affected by not only the plasma parameters, but also the neutral species that also exist in these low temperature regions. The interaction of neutrals with the plasma turbulence is studied in linear device geometry (for its simplicity, yet similarity in plasma parameters), and the result is a strong interaction that impacts the local plasma and neutral densities, momenta and energies. The neutral gas is found to affect plasma edge turbulence primarily through momentum exchange, reducing the radial electric field and enhancing cross-field transport, with consequent implications for the SOL width and divertor heat loads. Therefore, turbulent plasma and fluid simulations have been performed in multiple tokamak geometries to more closely examine the effects of this interaction. These cases were chosen for the variety in configuration with ISTOK having a toroidal limiter (ie. no divertor), DIII-D having a standard divertor configuration, and MAST-U having a super-X divertor with extended outer divertor legs. Progress towards the characterization of neutral impact on detachment and edge behavior will be presented.

  4. Effect of Plasma Density on Proton Acceleration in a Rectangular Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hitendra K. Malik

    2004-01-01

    Analytical studies are made for the proton acceleration during its motion in the fields of the fundamental mode excited by a high-intensity microwave in a rectangular waveguide, when the proton is injected along the propagating direction of the mode. The trajectory of the proton is calculated and the expressions are obtained for the energy gain and acceleration gradient together with the effects of plasma density, microwave frequency and waveguide width. Energy gain of 181 keV is attained by a 50 keV proton in a 0.015m ×0.020 m evacuated waveguide when 0.5times 10[10] W/m2 microwave intensity is used. However, this gain increases to 1387 keV when the waveguide is filled with a plasma having a density of 1.0 × 10 19 m-3. Higher acceleration gradients are achieved when the proton is injected with a higher initial energy and also when the microwave intensity increases. The effects of the microwave frequency and width of the waveguide are found to decrease the acceleration gradient.

  5. Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas created by the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.

    2008-11-01

    In high-energy-density (HED) plasmas the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability plays an important role in the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interfaces, as well as material interfaces that experience the passage one or multiple oblique shocks. Despite the potentially important role of the KH instability few experiments have been carried out to explore its behavior in the high-energy-density regime. We report on the evolution of a supersonic shear flow that is generated by the release of a high velocity (>100 km/s) aluminum plasma onto a CRF foam (ρ = 0.1 g/cc) surface. In order to seed the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability various two-dimensional sinusoidal perturbations (λ = 100, 200, and 300 μm with peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20, and 30 μm respectively) have been machined into the foam surface. This experiment was performed using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  6. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  7. Continuous plasma outflows from the edge of a solar active region as a possible source of solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, Taro; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Bando, Takamasa; Deluca, Edward E; Lundquist, Loraine L; Tsuneta, Saku; Harra, Louise K; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Hara, Hirohisa; Matsuzaki, Keiichi; Shimojo, Masumi; Bookbinder, Jay A; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly E; Su, Yingna; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Nakatani, Ichiro

    2007-12-07

    The Sun continuously expels a huge amount of ionized material into interplanetary space as the solar wind. Despite its influence on the heliospheric environment, the origin of the solar wind has yet to be well identified. In this paper, we report Hinode X-ray Telescope observations of a solar active region. At the edge of the active region, located adjacent to a coronal hole, a pattern of continuous outflow of soft-x-ray-emitting plasmas was identified emanating along apparently open magnetic field lines and into the upper corona. Estimates of temperature and density for the outflowing plasmas suggest a mass loss rate that amounts to approximately 1/4 of the total mass loss rate of the solar wind. These outflows may be indicative of one of the solar wind sources at the Sun.

  8. Numerical Studies of Electron Acceleration Behind Self-Modulating Proton Beam in Plasma with a Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Petrenko, Alexey; Sosedkin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1e15 1/cm^3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project --- the proof-of-prin...

  9. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-01-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral

  10. Fabrication of internal diffraction gratings in planar fluoride glass using low-density plasma formation induced by a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung-Hak [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)], E-mail: shcho@kimm.re.kr; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Goo [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Ryul [Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jong Wook [Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2008-12-30

    The fabrication of internal diffraction gratings with photo-induced refractive index modification in planar fluoride plates was demonstrated using low-density plasma formation excited by a high-intensity femtosecond (130 fs) Ti:sapphire laser ({lambda}{sub p} = 790 nm). The refractive index modifications with diameters ranging from 350 nm to 5 {mu}m were photoinduced after plasma formation occurred upon irradiation with peak intensities of more than 1 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The graded refractive index profile was fabricated to be a symmetric around from the center of the point at which low-density plasma occurred. The maximum refractive index change ({delta}n) was estimated to be 1.3 x 10{sup -2}. The low-density plasma formation (n{sub c} < 1.79 x 10{sup 27} m{sup -3}]) causes the increase of the refractive index modification with fluoride glass.

  11. Maxwell-Schrodinger Equation for X-Ray Laser Propagation and Interferometry Measurement of Plasma Electron Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘承宜; 郭弘; 付喜泉; 胡巍; 喻松

    2001-01-01

    By starting with the Maxwell theory of x-ray laser propagation in collisionless plasmas, we study the phase difference of the probe and reference beams of x-ray laser interferometry in measuring the plasma electron density. The basic idea is to reduce the Maxwell equation to a Schrodinger-like equation. By using the quantum mechanical technique and introducing a novel picture, we obtain a modified relation between the phase and the electron density, where the phase corresponds to the interference of probe and reference light and the contribution of gradient of the electron density has been taken into account.

  12. Using regional bird density distribution models to evaluate protected area networks and inform conservation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Alexander; Jaime L. Stephens; Sam Veloz; Leo Salas; Josée S. Rousseau; C. John Ralph; Daniel A. Sarr

    2017-01-01

    As data about populations of indicator species become available, proactive strategies that improve representation of biological diversity within protected area networks should consider finer-scaled evaluations, especially in regions identified as important through course-scale analyses. We use density distribution models derived from a robust regional bird...

  13. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  14. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  15. Streptococcal Serum Opacity Factor Increases Hepatocyte Uptake of Human Plasma High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Baiba K.; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K.; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S.; Pownall, Henry J.

    2010-01-01

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM), that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ~400,000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. [3H]CE uptake by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was respectively 2.4 and 4.5 times faster than from control HDL. CERM-[3H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[3H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[3H]CE but not HDL-[3H]CE uptake thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful. PMID:20879789

  16. Theory and Modeling of Petawatt Laser Pulse Propagation in Low Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadwick, Bradley A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Kalmykov, S. Y. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-12-08

    Report describing accomplishments in all-optical control of self-injection in laser-plasma accelerators and in developing advanced numerical models of laser-plasma interactions. All-optical approaches to controlling electron self-injection and beam formation in laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) were explored. It was demonstrated that control over the laser pulse evolution is the key ingredient in the generation of low-background, low-phase-space-volume electron beams. To this end, preserving a smooth laser pulse envelope throughout the acceleration process can be achieved through tuning the phase and amplitude of the incident pulse. A negative frequency chirp compensates the frequency red-shift accumulated due to wake excitation, preventing evolution of the pulse into a relativistic optical shock. This reduces the ponderomotive force exerted on quiescent plasma electrons, suppressing expansion of the bubble and continuous injection of background electrons, thereby reducing the charge in the low-energy tail by an order of magnitude. Slowly raising the density in the pulse propagation direction locks electrons in the accelerating phase, boosting their energy, keeping continuous injection at a low level, tripling the brightness of the quasi-monoenergetic component. Additionally, propagating the negatively chirped pulse in a plasma channel suppresses diffraction of the pulse leading edge, further reducing continuous injection. As a side effect, oscillations of the pulse tail may be enhanced, leading to production of low-background, polychromatic electron beams. Such beams, consisting of quasi-monoenergetic components with controllable energy and energy separation, may be useful as drivers of polychromatic x-rays based on Thomson backscattering. These all-optical methods of electron beam quality control are critically important for the development of future compact, high-repetition-rate, GeV-scale LPA using 10 TW-class, ultra-high bandwidth pulses and mm-scale, dense

  17. Interaction of neutral atoms and plasma turbulence in the tokamak edge region

    OpenAIRE

    Wersal, Christoph; Ricci, Paolo; Jorge, Rogério; Morales, Jorge; Paruta, Paola; Riva, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    A novel first-principles self-consistent model that couples plasma and neutral atom physics suitable for the simulation of turbulent plasma behaviour in the tokamak edge region has been developed and implemented in the GBS code. While the plasma is modelled by the drift-reduced two fluid Braginskii equations, a kinetic model is used for the neutrals, valid in short and in long mean free path scenarios. The model includes ionization, charge-exchange, recombination, and elastic collisional proc...

  18. The imprint of crustal density heterogeneities on regional seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka, Agnieszka; Blom, Nienke; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Density heterogeneities are the source of mass transport in the Earth. However, the 3-D density structure remains poorly constrained because travel times of seismic waves are only weakly sensitive to density. Inspired by recent developments in seismic waveform tomography, we investigate whether the visibility of 3-D density heterogeneities may be improved by inverting not only travel times of specific seismic phases but complete seismograms.As a first step in this direction, we perform numerical experiments to estimate the effect of 3-D crustal density heterogeneities on regional seismic wave propagation. While a finite number of numerical experiments may not capture the full range of possible scenarios, our results still indicate that realistic crustal density variations may lead to travel-time shifts of up to ˜ 1 s and amplitude variations of several tens of percent over propagation distances of ˜ 1000 km. Both amplitude and travel-time variations increase with increasing epicentral distance and increasing medium complexity, i.e. decreasing correlation length of the heterogeneities. They are practically negligible when the correlation length of the heterogeneities is much larger than the wavelength. However, when the correlation length approaches the wavelength, density-induced waveform perturbations become prominent. Recent regional-scale full-waveform inversions that resolve structure at the scale of a wavelength already reach this regime.Our numerical experiments suggest that waveform perturbations induced by realistic crustal density variations can be observed in high-quality regional seismic data. While density-induced travel-time differences will often be small, amplitude variations exceeding ±10 % are comparable to those induced by 3-D velocity structure and attenuation. While these results certainly encourage more research on the development of 3-D density tomography, they also suggest that current full-waveform inversions that use amplitude

  19. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  20. Characterization of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.

    2011-10-01

    Previous experiments with Nike KrF laser (λ = 248 nm , Δν ~ 1 THz) observed LPI signatures near quarter critical density (nc / 4) in CH plasmas, however, detailed measurement of the temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles was missing. The current Nike LPI campaign will perform experimental determination of the plasma profiles. A side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) is the main diagnostic to resolve Te and ne in space taking 2D snapshots of probe laser (λ = 266 nm , Δt = 8 psec) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at laser peak time. Ray tracing of the beamlets through hydrodynamically simulated (FASTRAD3D) plasma profiles estimates the refractometer may access densities up to ~ 0 . 2nc . With the measured Te and ne profiles in the plasma corona, we will discuss analysis of light data radiated from the plasmas in spectral ranges relevant to two plasmon decay and convective Raman instabilities. Validity of the (Te ,ne) data will also be discussed for the thermal transport study. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR and performed at NRL.

  1. Measurement of Ar resonance and metastable level number densities in argon containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Hillebrand, Bastian; Spiekermeier, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The resonance 1s_4~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_1), ~1s_2~({\\hspace{0pt}}^1P_1) and metastable 1s_5~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_2), ~1s_3~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_0) level number densities of argon are determined by means of the branching fraction method in an inductively coupled plasma at 5 Pa and 10 Pa in argon with admixture of hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. The 1s_5~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_2) densities are compared to laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to evaluate the reliability of the branching fraction method and its limitations. The results are in good agreement and the use of a compact, low cost, low resolution spectrometer (Δλ = 1.3 nm) is sufficient to reliably determine the first four excited states of argon in argon-hydrogen and argon-oxygen mixtures. The addition of nitrogen results in unreliable densities, as the observed argon lines overlap with emission of the N_2(B^3\\Pi_g-A^3Σ_u^+) transition.

  2. [Study on the selective removal of plasma low-density lipoprotein and fibrinogen by degraded carrageenan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Haixia; Yin, Liang; Fang, Bo; Du, Longbing; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Jingling; You, Chao

    2010-08-01

    The selective removal of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and fibrinogen (Fib) by degraded carrageenan was studied by the present authors. Degraded carrageenan was prepared by acid with carrageenan as the main material. The effects of acid conditions on the molecular weight were investigated, and the proper reaction conditions were ascertained. The results of infrared spectrometry indicated that the degraded carrageenan is a heparin-like polysaccharide. Then the selective removal of LDL/Fibrinogen by degraded carrageenan was studied. When molecular weight was about 10,000, pH was 5.10 and the concentration of degraded carrageenan was 800 mg/L, the average reduction percentages were 60.0% for total cholesterol(TC), 79.4% for LDL and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and 93.8% for fibrinogen. There were no significant changes with relation to the level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and total protein (TP). So, degraded carrageenan was shown to be of good selectivity on plasma LDL/Fibrinogen apheresis.

  3. The role of G-density in switch region repeats for immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The boundaries of R-loops are well-documented at immunoglobulin heavy chain loci in mammalian B cells. Within primary B cells or B cell lines, the upstream boundaries of R-loops typically begin early in the repetitive portion of the switch regions. Most R-loops terminate within the switch repetitive zone, but the remainder can extend a few hundred base pairs further, where G-density on the non-template DNA strand gradually drops to the genome average. Whether the G-density determines how far the R-loops extend is an important question. We previously studied the role of G-clusters in initiating R-loop formation, but we did not examine the role of G-density in permitting the elongation of the R-loop, after it had initiated. Here, we vary the G-density of different portions of the switch region in a murine B cell line. We find that both class switch recombination (CSR) and R-loop formation decrease significantly when the overall G-density is reduced from 46% to 29%. Short 50 bp insertions with low G-density within switch regions do not appear to affect either CSR or R-loop elongation, whereas a longer (150 bp) insertion impairs both. These results demonstrate that G-density is an important determinant of the length over which mammalian genomic R-loops extend.

  4. Measurements of line-averaged electron density of pulsed plasmas using a He-Ne laser interferometer in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, D.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    In next step of fusion devices such as ITER, lifetime of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) is strongly affected by transient heat and particle loads during type I edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption. To clarify damage characteristics of the PFMs, transient heat and particle loads have been simulated by using a plasma gun device. We have performed simulation experiments by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The line-averaged electron density measured by a He-Ne interferometer is 2x10^21 m-3 in a drift tube. The plasma velocity measured by a time of flight technique and ion Doppler spectrometer was 70 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 100 eV for helium. Thus, the ion flux density is 1.4x10^26 m-2s-1. On the other hand, the MCPG is connected to a target chamber for material irradiation experiments. It is important to measure plasma parameters in front of target materials in the target chamber. In particular, a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material produced by the pulsed plasma irradiation has to be characterized in order to understand surface damage of PFMs under ELM-like plasma bombardment. In the conference, preliminary results of application of the He-Ne laser interferometer for the above experiment will be shown.

  5. Detectability of landscape effects on recolonization increases with regional population density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, Anna-Sara; Dalin, Peter; Björkman, Christer

    2015-07-01

    Variation in population size over time can influence our ability to identify landscape-moderated differences in community assembly. To date, however, most studies at the landscape scale only cover snapshots in time, thereby overlooking the temporal dynamics of populations and communities. In this paper, we present data that illustrate how temporal variation in population density at a regional scale can influence landscape-moderated variation in recolonization and population buildup in disturbed habitat patches. Four common insect species, two omnivores and two herbivores, were monitored over 8 years in 10 willow short-rotation coppice bio-energy stands with a four-year disturbance regime (coppice cycle). The population densities in these regularly disturbed stands were compared to densities in 17 undisturbed natural Salix cinerea (grey willow) stands in the same region. A time series approach was used, utilizing the natural variation between years to statistically model recolonization as a function of landscape composition under two different levels of regional density. Landscape composition, i.e. relative amount of forest vs. open agricultural habitats, largely determined the density of re-colonizing populations following willow coppicing in three of the four species. However, the impact of landscape composition was not detectable in years with low regional density. Our results illustrate that landscape-moderated recolonization can change over time and that considering the temporal dynamics of populations may be crucial when designing and evaluating studies at landscape level.

  6. Micro-texturing into DLC/diamond coated molds and dies via high density oxygen plasma etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunata Ersyzario Edo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD-diamond films have been widely utilized not only as a hard protective coating for molds and dies but also as a functional substrate for bio-MEMS/NEMS. Micro-texturing into these hard coated molds and dies provides a productive tool to duplicate the original mother micro-patterns onto various work materials and to construct any tailored micro-textures for sensors and actuators. In the present paper, the high density oxygen plasma etching method is utilized to make micro-line and micro-groove patterns onto the DLC and diamond coatings. Our developing oxygen plasma etching system is introduced together with characterization on the plasma state during etching. In this quantitative plasma diagnosis, both the population of activated species and the electron and ion densities are identified through the emissive light spectroscopy and the Langmuir probe method. In addition, the on-line monitoring of the plasmas helps to describe the etching process. DLC coated WC (Co specimen is first employed to describe the etching mechanism by the present method. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD diamond coated WC (Co is also employed to demonstrate the reliable capacity of the present high density oxygen plasma etching. This oxygen plasma etching performance is discussed by comparison of the etching rates.

  7. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  8. Electron Density Measurements in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Detached Divertor Region Using Stark Broadening of Deuterium Infrared Paschen Emission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Johnson, D W; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L

    2007-04-27

    Spatially resolved measurements of deuterium Balmer and Paschen line emission have been performed in the divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiment using a commercial 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer. While the Balmer emission lines, Balmer and Paschen continua in the ultraviolet and visible regions have been extensively used for tokamak divertor plasma temperature and density measurements, the diagnostic potential of infrared Paschen lines has been largely overlooked. We analyze Stark broadening of the lines corresponding to 2-n and 3-m transitions with principle quantum numbers n = 7-12 and m = 10-12 using recent Model Microfield Method calculations (C. Stehle and R. Hutcheon, Astron. Astrophys. Supl. Ser. 140, 93 (1999)). Densities in the range (5-50) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} are obtained in the recombining inner divertor plasma in 2-6 MW NBI H-mode discharges. The measured Paschen line profiles show good sensitivity to Stark effects, and low sensitivity to instrumental and Doppler broadening. The lines are situated in the near-infrared wavelength domain, where optical signal extraction schemes for harsh nuclear environments are practically realizable, and where a recombining divertor plasma is optically thin. These properties make them an attractive recombining divertor density diagnostic for a burning plasma experiment.

  9. Transient evolution of C-type shocks in dusty regions of varying density

    CERN Document Server

    Ashmore, I; Caselli, P; Falle, S A E G; Hartquist, T W

    2009-01-01

    Outflows of young stars drive shocks into dusty, molecular regions. Most models of such shocks assume that they are steady and propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real shocks often violate both of these assumptions and the media through which they propagate are inhomogeneous. We use the code employed previously to produce the first time-dependent simulations of fast-mode, oblique C-type shocks interacting with density perturbations. We include a self-consistent calculation of the thermal and ionisation balances and a fluid treatment of grains. We identify features that develop when a multifluid shock encounters a density inhomogeneity to investigate whether any part of the precursor region ever behaves in a quasi-steady fashion. If it does the shock may be modelled approximately without solving the time-dependent hydromagnetic equations. Simulations were made for initially steady oblique C-type shocks encountering density inhomogeneities. For a semi-finite inhomogeneity with a density larger than...

  10. Dileptons from a Chemically Equilibrating Quark-Gluon Plasma at Finite Baryon Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Na-Na; HE Ze-Jun; LONG Jia-Li; CAI Xiang-Zhou

    2008-01-01

    We perform a complete calculation for the delepton production from the processes q(q-) →l(l-), Compton-like (qg→ql(l-),(q-)g→ql(l-)), q(q-)→gl(l-), gluon fusion g(g-)→c(c-), annihilation q(q-)→c(c-) as well as multiple scattering of quarks in a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma system at finite baryon density. It is found that quark-antiquark annihilation,Compton-like, gluon fusion and multiple scattering of quarks give important contribution. Moreover, the increase of the quark phase life-time with increasing initial quark chemical potential makes the dilepton yield as an increasing function of the initial quark chemical potential.

  11. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Agliata, A; Barnak, D; Brent, G; Chang, P-Y; Folnsbee, L; Gates, G; Hasset, D; Lonobile, D; Magoon, J; Mastrosimone, D; Shoup, M J; Betti, R

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  12. High-density formation of Ta nanodot induced by remote hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Takeuchi, Daichi; Ohta, Akio; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Makihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the formation of Ta nanodots (NDs) on thermally grown SiO2/Si by exposing a thin metal layer to a remote H2 plasma (H2-RP) without external heating. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses show that a combination of a Ge (˜30.0 nm)/Ta (˜2.0 nm) bilayer stack with subsequent H2-RP exposure is effective for forming electrically isolated Ta NDs with an areal dot density as high as ˜1011 cm-2, where the Ge layer plays an important role as a barrier layer against the oxidation of the ultrathin Ta layer surface. The change in the chemical structure of the Ge/Ta bilayer stack on SiO2/Si upon Ta ND formation by H2-RP exposure is investigated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  13. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  14. Convergence of statistical moments of particle density time series in scrape-off layer plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Particle density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas, as measured by gas-puff imaging or Langmuir probes, are modeled as the realization of a stochastic process in which a superposition of pulses with a fixed shape, an exponential distribution of waiting times and amplitudes represents the radial motion of blob-like structures. With an analytic formulation of the process at hand, we derive expressions for the mean-squared error on estimators of sample mean and sample variance as a function of sample length, sampling frequency, and the parameters of the stochastic process. % Employing that the probability distribution function of a particularly relevant shot noise process is given by the gamma distribution, we derive estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis, and expressions for the mean-squared error on these estimators. Numerically generated synthetic time series are used to verify the proposed estimators, the sample length dependency of their mean-squared errors, and thei...

  15. Proton acceleration using doped Argon plasma density gradient interacting with relativistic CO2 -laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash; Ettlinger, Oliver; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We investigate proton and light-ion acceleration driven by the interaction of relativistic CO2 laser pulses with overdense Argon or other heavy-ion gas targets doped with lighter-ion species. Optically shaping the gas targets allows tuning of the pre-plasma scale-length from a few to several laser wavelengths, allowing the laser to efficiently drive a propagating snowplow through the bunching in the electron density. Preliminary PIC-based modeling shows that the lighter-ion species is accelerated even without any significant motion of the heavier ions which is a signature of the Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration mechanism. Some outlines of possible experiments at the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

  16. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  17. Preparation of silicon carbide nitride films on Si substrate by pulsed high-energy density plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of silicon carbide nitride (SiCN) were prepared on (111) oriented silicon substrates by pulsed high-energy density plasma (PHEDP). The evolution of the chemical bonding states between silicon, nitrogen and carbon was investigated as a function of discharge voltage using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With an increase in discharge voltage both the C1s and N 1s spectra shift to lower binding energy due to the formation of C-Si and N-Si bonds. The Si-C-N bonds were observed in the deconvolved C1s and N 1s spectra. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) results show that there were no crystals in the films. The thickness of the films was approximately 1-2 μm with scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  18. Nuclear science research with dynamic high energy density plasmas at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Grant, P. M.; Yeamans, C. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Cerjan, C. J.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Faye, S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear reaction measurements are performed at the National Ignition Facility in a high energy density plasma environment by adding target materials to the outside of the hohlraum thermo-mechanical package on an indirect-drive exploding pusher shot. Materials are activated with 14.1-MeV neutrons and the post-shot debris is collected via the Solid Radiochemistry diagnostic, which consists of metal discs fielded 50 cm from target chamber center. The discs are removed post-shot and analyzed via radiation counting and mass spectrometry. Results from a shot using Nd and Tm foils as targets are presented, which indicate enhanced collection of the debris in the line of sight of a given collector. The capsule performance was not diminished due to the extra material. This provides a platform for future measurements of nuclear reaction data through the use of experimental packages mounted external to the hohlraum.

  19. Plasma conditions for improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R F; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N; Rocca, J J; Hunter, J R; Marconi, M C

    2004-10-04

    We have directly probed the plasma conditions in which the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser is generated and propagates by measuring the near-field image and by utilizing picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser interferometry of the preformed Pd plasma gain medium. The electron density and gain region of the plasma have been determined experimentally and are found to be in good agreement with simulations. We observe a strong dependence of the laser pump-gain medium coupling on the laser pump parameters. The most efficient coupling of laser pump energy into the gain region occurs with the formation of lower density gradients in the pre-formed plasma and when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for mid-Z Ni-like schemes). This increases the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the commonly utilized case where the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). In contrast, the higher intensity heating pulses are observed to be absorbed at higher electron densities and in regions where steep density gradients limit the effective length of the gain medium.

  20. FEATURES OF MEDICAL AID FOR NEUROTRAUMA IN REGION WITH LOW POPULATION DENSITY

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Moguchaya; V. V. Shchedrenok; N. V. Anikeev; I. A. Simonova

    2011-01-01

    The system of medical aid for neurotrauma in the region with low population density in the case of the Komi Republic was studied. Neurosurgical care to the population of the republic last decade had an intense focus of development. Currently, neurosurgical service is based entirely in Syktyvkar, and is represented by three neurosurgical departments. Due to the low population density (2.3 people 1 km2), the centralization of specialized medical care and inadequate equipment of district and reg...

  1. Low-density Lipoprotein Improves Motility and Plasma Membrane Integrity of Cryopreserved Canine Epididymal Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Prapaiwan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa is an effective technique to conserve genetic potentials of superior dogs when it is not possible to collect ejaculated spermatozoa. Although hen egg yolk is commonly supplemented into the semen extender, active substances within the egg yolk which protect sperm against cryoinjury remain to be discovered. Among its compositions, low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been reported to have a cryoprotective property for sperm cryopreservation. However, the effects of LDL on dog epididymal spermatozoa during cryopreservation have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LDL on epididymal spermatozoa quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration of 12 dogs, caudal epididymides from individuals were separated from the testes and cut into a few pieces in a Tris-buffer. Spermatozoa recovered from each sample were examined at once for sperm quality and divided into six groups of extender: no LDL, 20% egg yolk, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 24% LDL, before cryopreservation. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, morphology, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that 4% LDL and 20% egg yolk yielded significantly higher sperm motility (57.69% and 52.69%, respectively, p<0.05 than other LDLs. In addition, 4% LDL yielded the significantly highest plasma membrane integrity (70.54%, p<0.05. In conclusion, the supplementation of 4% LDL in Tris-glucose extender could be applied for cryopreservation of canine epididymal spermatozoa.

  2. Target dependent femtosecond laser plasma implantation dynamics in enabling silica for high density erbium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrappan, Jayakrishnan; Murray, Matthew; Kakkar, Tarun; Petrik, Peter; Agocs, Emil; Zolnai, Zsolt; Steenson, D. P.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin

    2015-09-01

    Chemical dissimilarity of tellurium oxide with silica glass increases phase separation and crystallization tendency when mixed and melted for making a glass. We report a novel technique for incorporating an Er3+-doped tellurite glass composition into silica substrates through a femtosecond (fs) laser generated plasma assisted process. The engineered material consequently exhibits the spectroscopic properties of Er3+-ions, which are unachievable in pure silica and implies this as an ideal material for integrated photonics platforms. Formation of a well-defined metastable and homogeneous glass structure with Er3+-ions in a silica network, modified with tellurite has been characterized using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and structural analyses using HRTEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and laser excitation techniques, confirm that such fs-laser plasma implanted glasses may be engineered for significantly higher concentration of Er3+-ions without clustering, validated by the record high lifetime-density product 0.96 × 1019 s.cm-3. Characterization of planar optical layers and photoluminescence emission spectra were undertaken to determine their thickness, refractive indices and photoluminescence properties, as a function of Er3+ concentration via different target glasses. The increased Er3+ content in the target glass enhance the refractive index and photoluminescence intensity of the modified silica layer whilst the lifetime and thickness decrease.

  3. Picosecond Streaked K-Shell Spectroscopy of Near Solid-Density Aluminum Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Froula, D. H.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2016-10-01

    The thermal x-ray emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing a buried-aluminum layer was measured. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1 ω or 2 ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 ×1019W/Wcm2 cm2 . A streaked x-ray spectrometer recorded the Al Heα and lithium-like satellite lines with 2-ps temporal resolution and moderate resolving power (E/E ΔE 700). Time-integrated measurements over the same spectral range were used to correct the streaked data for variations in photocathode sensitivity. Line widths and intensity ratios from the streaked data were interpreted using a collisional radiative atomic model to provide the average plasma conditions in the buried layer as a function of time. It was observed that the resonance line tends toward lower photon energies at high electron densities. The measured shifts will be compared to predicted shifts from Stark-operator calculations at the inferred plasma conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the office of Fusion Energy Sciences Award Number DE-SC0012317, and the Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Grant Number DE-NA0002135.

  4. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-04-18

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL.

  5. Diagnosing the high density FRX-L Field Reversed Configuration plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Renneke, R. M.; Dorf, L. A.; Farrell, M. W.; Gray, T. K.; Hsu, S. C.; Lynn, A. G.; Ruden, E. L.

    2006-10-01

    The FRX-L plasma is a high pressure, high density, field reversed configuration (FRC), at n ˜1x10^16-1x10^17 cm-3, and hundreds of eV electron temperature. In order to study formation, equilibrium, transport, flow, and confinement issues, we have a suite of diagnostics. Standard plasma diagnostics include B-dot probes, magnetic flux loops, single and multi-channel visible spectroscopy, optical light tomography arrays, up to 8 filtered visible fibers (546 nm or 486 nm) and an 8-chord side-on HeNe interferometer. Recent diagnostic additions include AXUV bolometers, VUV spectroscopy using a methly salicylate fluorescer converter and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA), eight simultaneous axial views of visible spectra with a 0.3 meter spectrometer and Princeton Instruments PI-Max camera, two-foil end-on surface barrier diode soft x-ray measurements, a hard x-ray/neutron plastic scintillator/ PMT, and indium activation foils to detect time-integrated absolute DD neutron emission. We also discuss plans for a soft x-ray framing camera, using end-on optical access and consisting of a pinhole/fluorescer geometry coupled to a high resolution DiCam camera.

  6. An atomic and molecular fluid model for efficient edge-plasma transport simulations at high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, Thomas; Rensink, Marvin

    2016-10-01

    Transport simulations for the edge plasma of tokamaks and other magnetic fusion devices requires the coupling of plasma and recycling or injected neutral gas. There are various neutral models used for this purpose, e.g., atomic fluid model, a Monte Carlo particle models, transition/escape probability methods, and semi-analytic models. While the Monte Carlo method is generally viewed as the most accurate, it is time consuming, which becomes even more demanding for device simulations of high densities and size typical of fusion power plants because the neutral collisional mean-free path becomes very small. Here we examine the behavior of an extended fluid neutral model for hydrogen that includes both atoms and molecules, which easily includes nonlinear neutral-neutral collision effects. In addition to the strong charge-exchange between hydrogen atoms and ions, elastic scattering is included among all species. Comparisons are made with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo code. Work performed for U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Apolipoprotein E mediates enhanced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol clearance by low-dose streptococcal serum opacity factor via hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Corina; Tang, Daming; Gillard, Baiba K; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2011-08-01

    Recombinant streptococcal serum opacity factor (rSOF) mediates the in vitro disassembly of human plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) into lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, a neo-HDL that is cholesterol poor, and a cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) containing apoE. Given the occurrence of apoE on the CERM, we tested the hypothesis that rSOF injection into mice would reduce total plasma cholesterol clearance via apoE-dependent hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). rSOF (4 μg) injection into wild-type C57BL/6J mice formed neo-HDL, CERM, and lipid-free apoA-I, as observed in vitro, and reduced plasma total cholesterol (-43%, t(1/2)=44±18 minutes) whereas control saline injections had a negligible effect. Similar experiments with apoE(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) mice reduced plasma total cholesterol ≈0% and 20%, respectively. rSOF was potent; injection of 0.18 μg of rSOF produced 50% of maximum reduction of plasma cholesterol 3 hours postinjection, corresponding to a ≈0.5-mg human dose. Most cholesterol was cleared hepatically (>99%), with rSOF treatment increasing clearance by 65%. rSOF injection into mice formed a CERM that was cleared via hepatic LDLR that recognize apoE. This reaction could provide an alternative mechanism for reverse cholesterol transport.

  8. Broadband wide-angle absorption enhancement due to mode conversion in cold unmagnetized plasmas with periodic density variations

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the mode conversion and the associated resonant absorption of p-polarized electromagnetic waves into longitudinal plasma oscillations in cold, unmagnetized and stratified plasmas with periodic spatial density variations. We consider sinusoidal density configurations for which the frequency band where mode conversion occurs is well included within a transmission band of the one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal. We calculate the mode conversion coefficient, which measures the fraction of the electromagnetic wave energy absorbed into the plasma, and the spatial distribution of the magnetic field intensity for various values of the wave frequency and the incident angle using the invariant imbedding theory of mode conversion. We find that the absorption is greatly enhanced over a wide range of frequency and incident angle due to the interplay between the mode conversion and the photonic band structure. The enhancement occurs because for frequencies within a transmission band, the wave ref...

  9. Density Profiles in Molecular Cloud Cores Associated with High-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Pirogov, Lev E

    2009-01-01

    Radial density profiles for the sample of dense cores associated with high-mass star-forming regions from southern hemisphere have been derived using the data of observations in continuum at 250 GHz. Radial density profiles for the inner regions of 16 cores (at distances $\\la 0.2-0.8$ pc from the center) are close on average to the $\\rho\\propto r^{-\\alpha}$ dependence, where $\\alpha=1.6\\pm 0.3$. In the outer regions density drops steeper. An analysis with various hydrostatic models showed that the modified Bonnor-Ebert model, which describes turbulent sphere confined by external pressure, is preferable compared with the logotrope and polytrope models practically in all cases. With a help of the Bonnor-Ebert model, estimates of central density in a core, non-thermal velocity dispersion and core size are obtained. The comparison of central densities with the densities derived earlier from the CS modeling reveals differences in several cases. The reasons of such differences are probably connected with the presen...

  10. Alzheimer neuropathology in mentally retarded adults: statistical independence of regional amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, W; Popovitch, E; Schupf, N; Zigman, W B; Rabe, A; Sersen, E; Wisniewski, H M

    1993-01-01

    The densities of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP) were assessed quantitatively in the brains of 303 mentally retarded adults 23 to 90 years of age at the time of their deaths (mean = 59.5 years). Cases with Down's syndrome, hydrocephalus and metabolic disorders were excluded from the study. Examinations of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortex, as well as hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus were made in every case. NPs and/or NFTs were observed within the brains of 163 cases (53.8%). Detailed analyses indicated that NP density within all brain regions examined was positively related to age, with the largest age associated increases in density seen in frontal and temporal regions. In contrast, NFT density increased with age only within hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, but not neocortex. In addition, NP lesions within neocortex were more diffusely distributed across regions for older compared to younger cases, while no similar age-associated change in the topography of NFTs was observed. Finally, factor analyses of the combined NP and NFT data indicated that, while strong correlations existed across the various brain regions for measures of NP and NFT densities, considered separately, there was virtually no indication of regional associations between these two types of lesions. While these data, from cases with mental retardation, cannot be generalized directly to the nonretarded population, they provide strong evidence that models of Alzheimer pathogenesis must take into account the fact that regional densities of NPs and NFTs, and, therefore, the underlying processes associated with formation of these lesions, can be largely independent.

  11. The correlations of ions density with geomagnetic activity and solar dynamic pressure in cusp region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO JianGuang; SHI JianKui; ZHANG TieLong; LIU ZhenXing; A. FAZAKERLEY; H. R(E)ME; Ⅰ. DANDOURAS; E. LUCEK

    2007-01-01

    A statistical study of the properties of ions (O+, He+ and H+) measured by the Cluster-Ⅱ in cusp region as a function of the solar wind dynamic pressure and geomagnetic index Kp respectively was made during the summer and fall of 2001 -2003. The main results are that: (1) O+ ion density responds in a significant way to geomagnetic index Kp, and He+ ion density is not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp,both of them have a significant positive correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure; (2) H+ ion density is also observed to increase with solar wind dynamic pressure, and not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp.

  12. Using gravity data to estimate the density of surface rocks of Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y. T.; Horng-Yen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Surface rock density within terrain correction step is one of the important parameters for obtaining Bouguer anomaly map. In the past study, we obtain the Bouguer anomaly map considering the average density correction of a wide range of the study area. In this study, we will be the better estimate for the correction of the density of each observation point. A correction density that coincides with surface geology is in order to improve the accuracy of the cloth cover anomaly map. The main idea of estimating correction of the density using gravity data statistics are two method, g-H relationship and Nettleton density profile method, respectively. The common advantages of these methods are in the following: First, density estimating is calculated using existing gravity observations data, it may be avoided the trouble of directly measure the rock density. Second, after the establishment the measuring point s of absolute gravity value, latitude, longitude and elevation into the database, you can always apply its database of information and terrain data with the value to calculate the average rock density on any range. In addition, each measuring point and numerical data of each terrain mesh are independent, if found to be more accurate gravity or terrain data, simply update a document data alone, without having to rebuild the entire database. According the results of estimating density distribution map, the trends are broadly distributed close to Taiwan Geology Division. The average density of the backbone mountain region is about 2.5 to 2.6 g/cm^3, the average density of east Central Mountain Range and Hsuehshan Range are about 2.3 to 2.5 g/cm^3, compared with the western foothills of 2.1-2.3 g/cm^3, the western plains is from 1.8 to 2.0 g/cm^3.

  13. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison P.; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q.; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations,...

  14. The Infrared and Radio Flux Densities of Galactic H ii regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makai, Z.; Anderson, L. D.; Mascoop, J. L.; Johnstone, B.

    2017-09-01

    We derive infrared and radio flux densities of all ∼1000 known Galactic H ii regions in the Galactic longitude range 17\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 5population is uncertain. Compared to a sample of IR color indices from star-forming galaxies, H ii regions show higher {{log}}10({F}70μ {{m}}/{F}12μ {{m}}) ratios. We find a weak trend of decreasing infrared to ∼20 cm flux density ratios with increasing R gal, in agreement with previous extragalactic results, possibly indicating a decreased dust abundance in the outer Galaxy.

  15. FEATURES OF MEDICAL AID FOR NEUROTRAUMA IN REGION WITH LOW POPULATION DENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Moguchaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The system of medical aid for neurotrauma in the region with low population density in the case of the Komi Republic was studied. Neurosurgical care to the population of the republic last decade had an intense focus of development. Currently, neurosurgical service is based entirely in Syktyvkar, and is represented by three neurosurgical departments. Due to the low population density (2.3 people 1 km2, the centralization of specialized medical care and inadequate equipment of district and regional hospitals, special significance remote consultation, as well as adequate ways of evacuation with neurotrauma.

  16. Measurement of electron temperatures of Argon Plasmas in a High-Density Inductively-Coupled Remote Plasma System by Langmuir Probe and Optical-Emission Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, A.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Holleman, J.; Brunets, I.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2006-01-01

    We measured electron density and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in our reactor by a Langmuir probe. The EEDF of Ar plasma in the reactor could largely be described by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function, but it also contained a fraction (~10-3) of electrons which were much

  17. Calculations of the Ion Orbit Loss Region at the Plasma Edge of EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国将; 张晓东

    2012-01-01

    In divertor tokamak plasma, the energetic ion losses of edge plasma are considered to be responsible for the negative radial electric field. In the present paper, a guiding center approximation orbit equation is found by assuming the conservation of three integrals of motion, i.e. the total ion energy E, the magnetic moment # and toroidal angular momentum Pc, and it is used to calculate expediently the ion orbit loss region. The direct ion orbit losses in the initial velocity space near the plasma edge of EAST with SN (single null) divertor configuration are analyzed systematically. The ion loss regions are obtained by solving the guiding center approximation orbit equation of critical ions with the effect of the radial electric field taken into account. Under the influence of plasma current Ip, the type of ions, the toroidal field Bt and the changes of the loss regions are analyzed and calculated accordingly.

  18. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  19. Michelson interferometer with a CO/sub 2/ laser for measuring plasma densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmasov, V.S.; Kruglyakov, E.P.; Podyminogin, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    A classical Michelson inteferometer with a CO/sub 2/ laser has been developed for measuring plasma densities. Since there is no inherent laser--interferometer feedback, it is possible to achieve a time resolution tau approx. 30 nsec for the interferometer. This time resolution is governed by that of the detector. The detector is a Ge:Au photoresistance, cooled with liquid nitrogen. The range in which the interference signal (deltaJ) is a linear function of the electron density (n/sub e/) is found for small phase shifts. The linear relation n/sub e/1=3.4 x 10/sup 15/ J/J/sub 0/ is derived. Here J/sub 0/ is the signal amplitude at the interference maximum. This equation holds for phases from 0.2..pi.. to 0.7..pi... The interferometer and the single-mode CO/sub 2/ laser are described in detail. Measurements of n/sub e/ in the GOL-1 device are reported. The sensitivity of the interferometer is found to be n/sub e/1approx. =10/sup 12/ cm/sup -2/.

  20. Phase-mixing self-injection into plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a rising density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash Ajit

    We model the phase-mixing self-injection of electrons into plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a longitudinally rising density gradient. Self-injection is the process where some of the plasma electrons lose coherence with the wave due to non-linearities. The non-linearity is inherently and intentionally induced in the plasma oscillations due to the variation of the restoring force along the rising density gradient. These electrons then get trapped in and propagate with the accelerating phase of the plasma-wave. The electron oscillations driven by matched energy-sources are shown to get trapped in the wakefields similar in scaling to the phase-mixing of free oscillations. The onset of trapping is shown to scale with the gradient of rising density and the amplitude of oscillations. The planar longitudinal electron oscillations undergo trajectory crossing above a threshold amplitude or in a density inhomogeneity leading to phase-mixing and trapping of the oscillating electrons to a phase of the wave. In this thesis, we analyze the scaling of the phase-mixing based trapping of electron oscillations, independent of a threshold, in planar geometry driven by an electron beam in a rising density gradient. The cylindrical and spherical geometry electron oscillations undergo phase-mixing irrespective of the amplitude of oscillations. Here, driven radial electron oscillations in cylindrical geometry are shown to undergo phase-mixing leading to trapping of the plasma electrons in a longitudinally rising density gradient. We also present preliminary scaling results of phase-mixing based trapping of radially oscillating electrons in a rising density gradient.

  1. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases, low density lipoprotein oxidisability and soluble adhesion molecules after a glucose load in Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Jackie

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute hyperglycaemia is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in Type 2 diabetes which may be mediated through increased oxidative damage to plasma low density lipoprotein, and in vitro, high glucose concentrations promote proatherogenic adhesion molecule expression and matrix metalloproteinase expression. Methods We examined these atherogenic risk markers in 21 subjects with Type 2 diabetes and 20 controls during an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test. Plasma soluble adhesion molecule concentrations [E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1], plasma matrix metalloproteinases [MMP-3 and 9] and plasma LDL oxidisability were measured at 30 minute intervals. Results In the diabetes group, the concentrations of all plasma soluble adhesion molecules fell promptly [all p Conclusions A glucose load leads to a rapid fall in plasma soluble adhesion molecule concentrations in Type 2 diabetes and controls, perhaps reflecting reduced generation of soluble from membrane forms during enhanced leukocyte – endothelial adhesion or increased hepatic clearance, without changes in plasma matrix metalloproteinase concentrations or low density lipoprotein oxidisability. These in vivo findings are in contrast with in vitro data.

  2. Pathways of F region thermospheric mass density enhancement via soft electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Varney, R. H.; Lotko, W.; Brambles, O. J.; Wang, W.; Lei, J.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2015-07-01

    The efficiencies of pathways of thermospheric heating via soft electron precipitation in the dayside cusp region are investigated using the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere model (CMIT). Event-based data-model comparisons show that the CMIT model is capable of reproducing the thermospheric mass density variations measured by the CHAMP satellite during both quite and active periods. During the 24 August 2005 storm event (Kp = 6-) while intense Joule heating rate occurs in the polar cusp region, including soft electron precipitation is important for accurately modeling the F region thermospheric mass density distribution near the cusp region. During the 27 July 2007 event (Kp = 2-) while little Joule heating rate occurs in the polar cusp region, the controlled CMIT simulations suggest that the direct pathway through the energy exchange between soft electrons and thermospheric neutrals is the dominant process during this event, which only has a small effect on the neutral temperature and mass density at 400 km altitude. Comparisons between the two case studies show that the indirect pathway via increasing the F region Joule heating rate is a dominant process during the 24 August 2005 storm event, which is much more efficient than the direct heating process.

  3. Density functional calculations of large systems containing heavy elements by means of the regionalization algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiangqian; LI Lemin

    2004-01-01

    The regionalized computational method is extended to the non-relativistic, scalar and 2-component relativistic density functional calculation of large systems containing transition series or heavy main-group metal elements. A large system is divided into several regions which can be considered as relatively independent quantum mechanical subsystems. Taking into account the Coulomb and exchange-correlation potentials as well as the Pauli repulsion exerted by the other subsystems, the Kohn-Sham equation related to subsystem K can be written as: (FK+FKP)CK =SKCKεK K=A,B,C,…,where FK,CK,SK,εK are the Fock matrix, the matrix of combination coefficients of orbitals, the overlap matrix of basis sets and the energy eigenvalue matrix, respectively. The matrix FKP reflects the Pauli repulsion from the other subsystems.FK may be non-relativistic, scalar or 2-component relativistic Fock matrix determined by the theoretical method related to the density functional calculations. The other matrices are mated with FK. Solving the Kohn-Sham equation for every subsystem and combining the results from the subsystem calculations, the electronic structural information of the whole system is derived. The density functional calculation of several molecules containing transition metal Ni or heavy main-group metal Tl or Bi is performed by the afore-mentioned regionalization algorithm. The obtained results for each molecule are compared with those from the density functional calculation of that molecule in its entirety in order to check the feasibility of the regionalization algorithm. It is found that with sufficiently large regional basis set in the subsystem calculation the accuracy of the results calculated by the regionalization algorithm is essentially the same as that from the calculation of the molecule in its entirety. With proper smaller regional basis sets the accuracy of the results calculated with the regionalization algorithm can still match the actual accuracy of the

  4. Continuous Plasma density measurement in TJ-II infrared interferometer-Advanced signal processing based on FPGAs

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the behavioral simulation in an FPGA of a novel processing system for measuring line average electronic density in the TJ-II stellarator diagnostic, Infra-Red Two-Color Interferometer. Line average electronic density is proportional to phase difference between probing and reference signals of the interferometer, as the Appleton–Hartree cold plasma model states. The novelty of the approach is the development of a real time measuring system where research work has been carrie...

  5. Partial-reflection studies of D-region winter variability. [electron density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, B. W.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    D-region electron densities were measured from December, 1972, to July, 1973, at Urbana, Illinois (latitude 40.2N) using the partial-reflection technique. During the winter, electron densities at altitudes of 72, 76.5, and 81 km show cyclical changes with a period of about 5 days that are highly correlated between these altitudes, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the winter anomaly in D-region ionization applies throughout this height region. From January 13 to February 3, a pronounced wave-like variation occurred in the partial-reflection measurements, apparently associated with a major stratospheric warming that developed in that period. During the same time period, a traveling periodic variation is observed in the 10-mb height; it is highly correlated with the partial-reflection measurements. Electron density enhancements occur approximately at the same time as increases in the 10-mb height. Comparison of AL and A3 absorption measurements with electron density measurements below 82 km indicates that the winter anomaly in D-region ionization is divided into two types. Type 1, above about 82 km, extends horizontally for about 200 km while type 2, below about 82 km, extends for a horizontal scale of at least 1000 km.

  6. Head-Tail Galaxies: Beacons of High-Density Regions in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie Y; Stevens, Jamie B; Wotherspoon, Simon J

    2008-01-01

    Using radio data at 1.4 GHz from the ATCA we identify five head-tail (HT) galaxies in the central region of the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Physical parameters of the HT galaxies were determined along with substructure in the HRS to probe the relationship between environment and radio properties. Using a density enhancement technique applied to 582 spectroscopic measurements in the 2 degree x 2 degree region about A3125/A3128, we find all five HT galaxies reside in regions of extremely high density (>100 galaxies/Mpc^3). In fact, the environments surrounding HT galaxies are statistically denser than those environments surrounding non-HT galaxies and among the densest environments in a cluster. Additionally, the HT galaxies are found in regions of enhanced X-ray emission and we show that the enhanced density continues out to substructure groups of 10 members. We propose that it is the high densities that allow ram pressure to bend the HT galaxies as opposed to previously proposed mechanisms relyin...

  7. Measuring long wavelength plasma density fluctuations by CO2 laser scattering (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. E.

    1985-05-01

    Long wavelength density fluctuations can be observed by scattering even with a probe beam of much shorter wavelength provided the scattering angle is small enough. This paper is concerned with experiments in which the scattering angle is comparable with the probe beam divergence so the scattered and incident radiation never achieve spatial separation. Under these circumstances, the role of diffraction is preeminent and Fourier optics methods are used to describe the propagation of the beam, which is taken to be TEM00 mode Gaussian. Interaction between the probe beam and the plasma disturbance is described by refraction and no appeal is made to explicit scattering theory. Analysis of the effect of a monochromatic wave disturbance confined to a plane perpendicular to the probe beam (a plane grating in effect) reveals oscillations at the wave frequency induced on the probe with an intensity varying over the beam profile in a regular pattern symmetric about the beam axis. Detail of the pattern depends on the wavelength of the disturbance, its direction, and its axial position relative to a local beam waist. These oscillations are readily identified as due to radiation scattered by the plasma wave into diffraction orders, beating with the unperturbed part of the beam. Indeed, it can be shown1 that Fourier optics plus refraction produce almost the same result as conventional scattering theory,2 the small discrepancy being traceable to the neglect in the latter of incident beam wavefront curvature. The results of the two approaches coincide in the Fraunhofer limit. Computations of this sort have been confirmed by experiments using transducer-driven waves in air3 and by plasma experiments where the same regular patterns are observed from spontaneous plasma waves.4,5 Calculation suggests and experiments have demonstrated6 that additional information, such as the absolute direction of wave propagation, can be deduced from phase, measured with a multichannel detector array

  8. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between High-Density Pulsed Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interactions studies (plasma too cold and too “dirty.”) We have built and tested a new, gas -fed, non- ablative, rep-rated capillary plasma source for our...those encountered in space propulsion devices including Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT), Magneto-Plasma Dynamic (MPD) thrusters and capillary plasma...based thrusters . The ongoing research work brings together a team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) and the University of

  9. The Relationship of Plasma miR-29a and Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein with Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qing Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with a variety of vascular diseases. Previous studies showed that both miR-29a and oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL were vital in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between miR-29a and ox-LDL remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the association of miR-29a and ox-LDL and to test whether circulating miR-29a and ox-LDL levels could predict atherosclerosis. Methods: In 170 participants, plasma levels of miR-29a were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR while plasma ox-LDL levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kits. The relationship between miR-29a level and ox-LDL and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT was assessed using the Spearman correlation coefficient and multiple liner regression. Results: Compared with the normal cIMT group, the increased cIMT group had higher levels of ox-LDL (0.47 ± 0.08 vs 0.29 ± 0.06 ng/ml, p = 0.003 and miR-29a (32.93 ± 4.26 vs 26.37 ± 1.04, p p p Conclusion: Increased miR-29a and ox-LDL levels were associated with an early stage of atherosclerosis, and the combination of miR-29a and ox-LDL offered better predictive values for atherosclerosis than either alone.

  10. An assessment of Fe xx-Fe xxii emission lines in SDO/EVE data as diagnostics for high-density solar flare plasmas using EUVE stellar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F. P.; Milligan, R. O.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory obtains extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of the full-disc Sun at a spectral resolution of ˜1 Å and cadence of 10 s. Such a spectral resolution would normally be considered to be too low for the reliable determination of electron density (Ne) sensitive emission line intensity ratios, due to blending. However, previous work has shown that a limited number of Fe xxi features in the 90-160 Å wavelength region of EVE do provide useful Ne-diagnostics at relatively low flare densities (Ne ≃ 1011-1012 cm-3). Here, we investigate if additional highly ionized Fe line ratios in the EVE 90-160 Å range may be reliably employed as Ne-diagnostics. In particular, the potential for such diagnostics to provide density estimates for high Ne (˜1013 cm-3) flare plasmas is assessed. Our study employs EVE spectra for X-class flares, combined with observations of highly active late-type stars from the EUVE satellite plus experimental data for well-diagnosed tokamak plasmas, both of which are similar in wavelength coverage and spectral resolution to those from EVE. Several ratios are identified in EVE data, which yield consistent values of electron density, including Fe xx 113.35/121.85 and Fe xxii 114.41/135.79, with confidence in their reliability as Ne-diagnostics provided by the EUVE and tokamak results. These ratios also allow the determination of density in solar flare plasmas up to values of ˜1013 cm-3.

  11. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  12. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messiaen, A. M.; Ongena, J.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; van Wassenhove, G.; Durodie, F.; R. Jaspers,; Tokar, M. Z.; Vandenplas, P. E.; Van Oost, G.; Winter, J.; Wolf, G. H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Dumortier, P.; Euringer, H.; Finken, K.H.; Fuchs, G.; Giesen, B.; Koch, R.; Konen, L.; Konigs, C.; Koslowski, H. R.; KramerFlecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Schoon, N.; Telesca, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Stationary high energy confinement is observed on TEXTOR-94 for times limited only by the flux swing of the transformer using strong edge radiation cooling. Necessary tools are the feedback control of the radiated power and of the plasma energy content. At the highest densities obtained (up to 1.2

  13. Fibroblast cholesterol efflux to plasma from metabolic syndrome subjects is not defective despite low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin); A. Groen (Albert); G.M. Dallinga-Thie (Geesje); R. de Vries (Rindert); W. Sluiter (Wim); A. van Tol (Arie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We tested whether in metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux, an early step in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway, is maintained despite low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Design: In

  14. Persistent high levels of plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein after acute myocardial infarction predict stent restenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Naruko; M. Ueda; S. Ehara; A. Itoh; K. Haze; N. Shirai; Y. Ikura; M. Ohsawa; H. Itabe; Y. Kobayashi; H. Yamagishi; M. Yoshiyama; J. Yoshikawa; A.E. Becker

    2006-01-01

    Objective-Recently, elevated levels of plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) have been shown to relate to plaque instability in human atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated prospectively patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who underwent primary coronary stenting to eva

  15. Fenofibrate increases very low density lipoprotein triglyceride production despite reducing plasma triglyceride levels in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijland, S.; Pieterman, E.J.; Maas, A.C.E.; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Erk, M.J. van; Klinken, J.B. van; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Princen, H.M.G.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activator fenofibrate efficiently decreases plasma triglycerides (TG), which is generally attributed to enhanced very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG clearance and decreased VLDL-TG production. However, because data on the effect of feno

  16. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Öz, E; Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE)~\\cite{bib:awake} project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook~\\cite{bib:Hook} method and has been described in great detail in the work by W. Tendell Hill et. al.~\\cite{bib:densitymeter}. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of $1\\%$ for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prot...

  17. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  18. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  19. Feasibility Studies of the Two Filters Method in TJ-II for Electron Temperature Measurements in High Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiao, D.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Varandas, C.

    2009-07-01

    The TJ-II plasma soft X-ray emission was studied in order to establish an adequate setup for an electron temperature diagnostic suitable for high density, with spatial and temporal resolutions, based on the two-filters method. The preliminary experimental results reported were obtained with two diagnostics (an X-ray PHA based on a Ge detector and a tomography system) already installed in TJ-II stellarator. These results lead to the conclusion that the two-filters method was a suitable option for an electron temperature diagnostic for high-density plasmas in TJ-II. We present the design and fi rst results obtained with a prototype for the measurement of electron temperature in TJ-II plasmas heated with energetic neutral beams. This system consists in two AXUV20A detectors which measure the soft X-ray plasma emissivity trough beryllium filters of different thickness. From the two-filters technique it is possible to estimate the electron temperature. The analyses carried out allowed concluding which filter thicknesses are most suited for TJ-II plasmas, and enhanced the need of a computer code to simulate signals and plasma compositions. (Author) 7 refs.

  20. Surface cleaning and etching of 4H-SiC(0001) using high-density atmospheric pressure hydrogen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2011-04-01

    We propose low-damage and high-efficiency treatment of 4H-SiC(0001) surfaces using atmospheric pressure (AP) hydrogen plasma. Hydrogen radicals generated by the AP plasma was found to effectively remove damaged layers on SiC wafers and improve surface morphology by isotropic etching. Localized high-density AP plasma generated with a cylindrical rotary electrode provides a high etching rate of 1.6 microm/min and yields smooth morphology by eliminating surface corrugation and scratches introduced by wafer slicing and lapping procedures. However, high-rate etching with localized plasma was found to cause an inhomogeneous etching profile depending on the plasma density and re-growth of the poly-Si layer at the downstream due to the decomposition of the vaporized SiH(x) products. On the other hand, for the purpose of achieving moderate etching and ideal cleaning of SiC surfaces, we demonstrated the application of a novel porous carbon electrode to form delocalized and uniform AP plasma over 4 inches in diameter. We obtained a reasonably moderate etching rate of 0.1 microm/min and succeeded in fabricating damage-free SiC surfaces.

  1. Anthocyanins increase low-density lipoprotein and plasma cholesterol and do not reduce atherosclerosis in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, I. L. F.; Rasmussen, S.E.; Mortensen, Alicja;

    2005-01-01

    Anthocyanin-rich beverages have shown beneficial effects on coronary heart disease in epidemiological and intervention studies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of black currant anthocyanins on atherosclerosis. Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits (n = 61) were fed either...... a purified anthocyanin fraction front black currants, a black currant juice, probucol or control diet for 16 weeks. Purified anthocyanins significantly increased plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Intake of black currant juice had no effect on total plasma cholesterol......, but lowered very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol significantly. There were no significant effects of either purified anthocyanins or black currant juice on aortic cholesterol or development of atherosclerosis after 16 weeks. Probucol had no effect on plasma cholesterol but significantly lowered...

  2. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  3. A different way of looking at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Raoul

    2003-10-01

    The plasma-sheath boundary region has been the subject of study for eighty years, but there are aspects that are still not well understood. At low pressures it is clear that the structure is - plasma-transition layer-thin electron sheath -(thick)ion sheath, and at high pressures it is plasma-collisional sheath, without the need to introduce further structure. As the plasma becomes collisional, there is a question as to how long it is appropriate to speak in terms of the Bohm criterion. Furthermore if the sheath is many ion mean free paths long, the ions may be brought back into collisional equilibrium with the electric field, even though their speed exceeds the ion sound speed of the plasma from which they derive. We examine computationally this intermediate pressure region in terms of how to describe the ion motion, showing how the two limits go over from the one to the other. Most practical gas discharge plasmas are in such a transitional pressure region.

  4. Modeling fence location and density at a regional scale for use in wildlife management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Poor

    Full Text Available Barbed and woven wire fences, common structures across western North America, act as impediments to wildlife movements. In particular, fencing influences pronghorn (Antilocapra americana daily and seasonal movements, as well as modifying habitat selection. Because of fencing's impacts to pronghorn and other wildlife, it is a potentially important factor in both wildlife movement and habitat selection models. At this time, no geospatial fencing data is available at regional scales. Consequently, we constructed a regional fence model using a series of land tenure assumptions for the Hi-Line region of northern Montana--an area consisting of 13 counties over 103,400 km(2. Randomized 3.2 km long transects (n = 738 on both paved and unpaved roads were driven to collect information on habitat, fence densities and fence type. Using GIS, we constructed a fence location and a density model incorporating ownership, size, neighboring parcels, township boundaries and roads. Local knowledge of land ownership and land use assisted in improving the final models. We predict there is greater than 263,300 km of fencing in the Hi-Line region, with a maximum density of 6.8 km of fencing per km(2 and mean density of 2.4 km of fencing per km(2. Using field data to assess model accuracy, Cohen's Kappa was measured at 0.40. On-the-ground fence modification or removal could be prioritized by identifying high fence densities in critical wildlife areas such as pronghorn migratory pathways or sage grouse lekking habitat. Such novel fence data can assist wildlife and land managers to assess effects of anthropogenic features to wildlife at various scales; which in turn may help conserve declining grassland species and overall ecological functionality.

  5. Modeling fence location and density at a regional scale for use in wildlife management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, Erin E; Jakes, Andrew; Loucks, Colby; Suitor, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Barbed and woven wire fences, common structures across western North America, act as impediments to wildlife movements. In particular, fencing influences pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) daily and seasonal movements, as well as modifying habitat selection. Because of fencing's impacts to pronghorn and other wildlife, it is a potentially important factor in both wildlife movement and habitat selection models. At this time, no geospatial fencing data is available at regional scales. Consequently, we constructed a regional fence model using a series of land tenure assumptions for the Hi-Line region of northern Montana--an area consisting of 13 counties over 103,400 km(2). Randomized 3.2 km long transects (n = 738) on both paved and unpaved roads were driven to collect information on habitat, fence densities and fence type. Using GIS, we constructed a fence location and a density model incorporating ownership, size, neighboring parcels, township boundaries and roads. Local knowledge of land ownership and land use assisted in improving the final models. We predict there is greater than 263,300 km of fencing in the Hi-Line region, with a maximum density of 6.8 km of fencing per km(2) and mean density of 2.4 km of fencing per km(2). Using field data to assess model accuracy, Cohen's Kappa was measured at 0.40. On-the-ground fence modification or removal could be prioritized by identifying high fence densities in critical wildlife areas such as pronghorn migratory pathways or sage grouse lekking habitat. Such novel fence data can assist wildlife and land managers to assess effects of anthropogenic features to wildlife at various scales; which in turn may help conserve declining grassland species and overall ecological functionality.

  6. Dusty plasma sheath-like structure in the region of lunar terminator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popel, S. I.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997, Russia and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Atamaniuk, B. [Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw 00-716 (Poland)

    2015-12-15

    The main properties of the dusty plasma layer near the surface over the illuminated and dark parts of the Moon are described. They are used to realize dusty plasma behaviour and to determine electric fields over the terminator region. Possibility of the existence of a dusty plasma sheath-like structure in the region of lunar terminator is shown. The electric fields excited in the terminator region are demonstrated to be on the order of 300 V/m. These electric fields can result in rise of dust particles of the size of 2–3 μm up to an altitude of about 30 cm over the lunar surface that explains the effect of “horizon glow” observed at the terminator by Surveyor lunar lander.

  7. Ultrafine grained high density manganese zinc ferrite produced using polyol process assisted by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudisson, T.; Beji, Z.; Herbst, F.; Nowak, S. [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75205 Paris (France); Ammar, S., E-mail: ammarmer@univ-paris-diderot.fr [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75205 Paris (France); Valenzuela, R. [D2MC, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis of Mn–Zn ferrite (MZFO) nanoparticles (NPs) by the polyol process and their consolidation by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique at relatively low temperature and short time, namely 500 °C for 10 min. NPs were obtained as perfectly epitaxied aggregated nanoclusters forming a kind of spherical pseudo-single-crystals of about 40 nm in size. The results on NPs consolidation by SPS underlined the importance of this clustering on the grain growth mechanism. Grain growth proceeds by coalescing nanocrystalline aggregates into single grain of almost the same average size, thus leading to a high density ceramic. Due to magnetic exchange interactions between grains, the produced ceramic does not exhibit thermal relaxation whereas their precursor polyol-made NPs are superparamagnetic. - Highlights: • Textured Mn–Zn ferrite nano-aggregates were produced in polyol. • Dense ceramic was obtained by SPS starting from these particles at 500 °C for 10 min. • The grain growth was driven by coalescence leading to nanometer-sized grains. • The 300 K-magnetic properties of the ceramic are typical of a soft magnet. • Its magnetization is very close to that of bulk despite its ultrafine grain size.

  8. Machine learning applied to proton radiography of high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nicholas F. Y.; Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Levy, Matthew C.; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Proton radiography is a technique extensively used to resolve magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas, revealing a whole variety of interesting phenomena such as magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks found in astrophysical systems. Existing methods of analyzing proton radiographs give mostly qualitative results or specific quantitative parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and recent work showed that the line-integrated transverse magnetic field can be reconstructed in specific regimes where many simplifying assumptions were needed. Using artificial neural networks, we demonstrate for the first time 3D reconstruction of magnetic fields in the nonlinear regime, an improvement over existing methods, which reconstruct only in 2D and in the linear regime. A proof of concept is presented here, with mean reconstruction errors of less than 5% even after introducing noise. We demonstrate that over the long term, this approach is more computationally efficient compared to other techniques. We also highlight the need for proton tomography because (i) certain field structures cannot be reconstructed from a single radiograph and (ii) errors can be further reduced when reconstruction is performed on radiographs generated by proton beams fired in different directions.

  9. Specific interaction of postsynaptic densities with membrane rafts isolated from synaptic plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Yao, Wei-Dong; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    Postsynaptic membrane rafts are believed to play important roles in synaptic signaling, plasticity, and maintenance. We recently demonstrated the presence, at the electron microscopic level, of complexes consisting of membrane rafts and postsynaptic densities (PSDs) in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) prepared from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) ( Suzuki et al., 2011 , J Neurochem, 119, 64-77). To further explore these complexes, here we investigated the nature of the binding between purified SPM-DRMs and PSDs in vitro. In binding experiments, we used SPM-DRMs prepared after treating SPMs with n-octyl-β-d-glucoside, because at concentrations of 1.0% or higher it completely separates SPM-DRMs and PSDs, providing substantially PSD-free unique SPM-DRMs as well as DRM-free PSDs. PSD binding to PSD-free DRMs was identified by mass spectrometry, Western blotting, and electron microscopy. PSD proteins were not incorporated into SPMs, and significantly less PSD proteins were incorporated into DRMs prepared from liver membranes, providing in vitro evidence that binding of PSDs to DRMs is specific and suggestion of the presence of specific interacting molecules. These specific interactions may have important roles in synaptic development, function, and plasticity in vivo. In addition, the binding system we developed may be a good tool to search for binding molecules and binding mechanisms between PSDs and rafts.

  10. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium-tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Malekynia; S.S.Razavipour

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x =0 qualitatively.A high threshold energy flux density,i.e.,E* =4.3 x 1012 J/m2,has been reached.Recently,fast ignition by employing clean petawatt-picosecond laser pulses was performed.The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses.The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium-tritium fuel at solid-state density.The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated.Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition.In this paper,the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks,thermonuclear reaction,heat transfer,electron-ion equilibration,stopping power of alpha particles,bremsstrahlung,expansion,density dependence,and fluid dynamics.New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations,including thc dcnsity profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity.The density is only a function of x and independent of time.The ignition energy flux density,E*t,for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 1012 J/m2.Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x =0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent.

  11. The effect of the driving frequency on the confinement of beam electrons and plasma density in low pressure capacitive discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczek, S; Schulze, J; Schuengel, E; Brinkmann, R P; Derzsi, A; Korolov, I; Donkó, Z; Mussenbrock, T

    2014-01-01

    The effect of changing the driving frequency on the plasma density and the electron dynamics in a capacitive radio-frequency argon plasma operated at low pressures of a few Pa is investigated by Particle in Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions simulations and analytical modeling. In contrast to previous assumptions the plasma density does not follow a quadratic dependence on the driving frequency in this non-local collisionless regime. Instead, a step-like increase at a distinct driving frequency is observed. Based on the analytical power balance model, in combination with a detailed analysis of the electron kinetics, the density jump is found to be caused by an electron heating mode transition from the classical $\\alpha$-mode into a low density resonant heating mode characterized by the generation of two energetic electron beams at each electrode per sheath expansion phase. These electron beams propagate through the bulk without collisions and interact with the opposing sheath. In the low density mode, the second bea...

  12. Root density of cherry trees grafted on prunus mahaleb in a semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltineanu, Cristian; Septar, Leinar; Gavat, Corina; Chitu, Emil; Oprita, Alexandru; Moale, Cristina; Lamureanu, Gheorghe; Vrinceanu, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    Root density was investigated using the trench method in a cherry (Prunus avium grafted on Prunus mahaleb) orchard with clean cultivation in inter-rows and in-row. Trenches of 1 m width and 1.2 m depth were dug up between neighbouring trees. The objectives of the paper were to clarify the spatial distribution of root density of cherry trees under the soil and climate conditions of the region to expand knowledge of optimum planting distance and orchard management for a broad area of chernozems. Some soil physical properties were significantly worsened in inter-rows versus in-row, mainly due to soil compaction, and there were higher root density values in in-row versus inter-rows. Root density decreased more intensely with soil depth than with distance from trees. The pattern of root density suggests that the cherry tree density and fruit yield could be increased. However, other factors concerning orchard management and fruit yield should also be considered. The results obtained have a potential impact to improve irrigation and fertilizer application by various methods, considering the soil depth and distance from trees to wet soil, in accordance with root development.

  13. Whistler wave radiation from a pulsed loop antenna located in a cylindrical duct with enhanced plasma density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudrin, Alexander V.; Shkokova, Natalya M. [Department of Radiophysics, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Ave., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ferencz, Orsolya E. [MTA Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Csatkai E. u. 6–8, Sopron H-9400 (Hungary); Zaboronkova, Tatyana M. [Department of Radiophysics, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Ave., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Department of Nuclear Physics, R. E. Alekseev State Technical University of Nizhny Novgorod, 24 Minin St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Pulsed radiation from a loop antenna located in a cylindrical duct with enhanced plasma density is studied. The radiated energy and its distribution over the spatial and frequency spectra of the excited waves are derived and analyzed as functions of the antenna and duct parameters. Numerical results referring to the case where the frequency spectrum of the antenna current is concentrated in the whistler range are reported. It is shown that under ionospheric conditions, the presence of an artificial duct with enhanced density can lead to a significant increase in the energy radiated from a pulsed loop antenna compared with the case where the same source is immersed in the surrounding uniform magnetoplasma. The results obtained can be useful in planning active ionospheric experiments with pulsed electromagnetic sources operated in the presence of artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities that are capable of guiding whistler waves.

  14. Electron density measurements of a field-reversed configuration plasma using a novel compact ultrastable second-harmonic interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Harris, W. S.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Wessel, F. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A compact high-sensitivity second-harmonic interferometer for line-integrated electron density measurements on a large plasma machine is presented. The device is based on a fiber coupled near-infrared continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser and is remotely controlled. The performances of the instrument are tested on the Irvine field-reversed configuration machine, and a sensitivity of few 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} in measuring line integrated electron density is demonstrated with a time resolution of a few microseconds. The interferometer is self calibrated, has an impressive stability, and it does not require any further alignment after proper installation. These features make this device a real turn-key system suitable for electron density measurement in large plasma machines.

  15. A Guillemin type E pulse forming network as the driver for a pulsed, high density plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Priyavandna J; Anitha, V P; Sholapurwala, Z H; Saxena, Y C

    2014-06-01

    A Guillemin type E pulse forming network (PFN) has been designed, developed, and tested for its application in generating high density (~1 × 10(18) m(-3)) plasmas. In the present study, plasma thus generated is utilized to investigate the interaction of high power microwaves (HPMs) with plasma in an experimental architecture known as SYMPLE (System for Microwave PLasma Experiment). Plasma discharges of ~100 μs (max) duration are to be produced, by delivering energy of 5 kJ stored in a PFN to the plasma source, a washer gun. The output of the PFN, in terms of its rise time, flat top and amplitude, needs to be tailored, depending on the experimental requirements. An ignitron (NL8900) trigger generator (ITG) is developed in-house to control the PFN discharge through the gun. This ITG is also to be used in a circuit that synchronizes the HPM and plasma shots, to ensure that HPM-plasma interaction takes place during a temporal regime where appropriate parametric conditions are satisfied. Hence it is necessary to retain the jitter within ±2.5 μs. Further, requirement on plasma quiescence (~10%) necessitates maintaining the ripple within 5%. The developmental work of the PFN, keeping in view the above criteria and the test results, is presented in this paper. The parameters of the PFN have been analytically approximated and verified with PSPICE simulation. The test results presented include rise time ~5-8 μs, flat top variable in the range 20-100 μs, ripple within ~1.5%, and jitter within ±2.5 μs, producing quiescent (plasma discharge meeting the experimental requirements.

  16. Plasma dimethylglycine, nicotine exposure and risk of low bone mineral density and hip fracture: the Hordaland Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øyen, J; Svingen, G F T; Gjesdal, C G; Tell, G S; Ueland, P M; Lysne, V; Apalset, E M; Meyer, K; Vollset, S E; Nygård, O K

    2015-05-01

    In the large community-based Hordaland Health Study, low plasma dimethylglycine was associated with low bone mineral density in both middle-aged and elderly subjects and to an increased risk of subsequent hip fracture among the elderly. These associations seemed to be particularly strong among subjects exposed to nicotine. Dimethylglycine (DMG) is a product of the choline oxidation pathway and formed from betaine during the folate-independent remethylation of homocysteine (Hcy) to methionine. Elevated plasma DMG levels are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and inflammation, which in turn are related to osteoporosis. High plasma total Hcy and low plasma choline are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and hip fractures, but the role of plasma DMG in bone health is unknown. We studied the associations of plasma DMG with BMD among 5315 participants (46-49 and 71-74 years old) and with hip fracture among 3310 participants (71-74 years old) enrolled in the Hordaland Health Study. In age and sex-adjusted logistic regression models, subjects in the lowest versus highest DMG tertile were more likely to have low BMD (odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43-1.99). The association was stronger in participants exposed compared to those unexposed to nicotine (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.73-3.07 and OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.16-1.75, respectively, p interaction = 0.008). In the older cohort, Cox regression analyses adjusted for sex showed that low plasma DMG was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio [HR] 1.70, 95% CI 1.28-2.26). A trend toward an even higher risk was found among women exposed to nicotine (HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.40-8.28). Low plasma DMG was associated with low BMD and increased risk of hip fractures. A potential effect modification by nicotine exposure merits particular attention.

  17. Preferential adsorption of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in blood plasma/polymer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bantjes, A.; Breemhaar, W.; Beugeling, T.; Brinkman, E.; Ellens, D.J

    1985-01-01

    A few studies on the adsorption of plasma proteins to polymeric surfaces show that major plasma proteins: albumin (Alb), fibrinogen (Fb) and immunoglobulin (IgG) are adsorbed in much smaller quantities from plasma than from protein solutions (1,2). Present results show that this difference in adsorp

  18. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by

  19. Comparison of current density profiles based on particle orbit-driven current in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Md Mahbub, E-mail: m.alam@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Kazuo [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Xia, Fan [CFS, SWIP, P.O. Box 432, 610041 Chengdu (China); Mitarai, Osamu [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Araki, Kuniaki; Zushi, Hideki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Fujisawa, Akihide; Idei, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki; Nagata, Takahiro [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of QUEST. • Particle guiding center orbit calculation. • Orbit-driven current density profile. • Hollow current density. • Equilibrium condition for steady-state operation of QUEST. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven divertor plasma of QUEST, it has been observed that orbit-driven current flows in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces. To observe this phenomenon and the characteristics of the orbit-driven current, current density profiles have been calculated on two different equilibrium conditions. We calculated current density profiles from particle guiding center orbits both for the fundamental and the second harmonic resonances for the 8.2 GHz electron cyclotron current drive. From this calculation, hollow current density profiles have been obtained with significant characteristics on both conditions. Only positive current distribution has been observed in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces.

  20. Kinetic effect of high energy ions on the temperature profile in the boundary plasma region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N., E-mail: ezumi@nagano-nct.ac.jp [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Hayashi, Y.; Todoroki, K. [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Importance of ion dynamics in the boundary region has been discussed with experimental results of ion temperature (T{sub i}) measurements in linear plasma devices and its analytical model. Radial profiles of T{sub i} have been measured by using an ion sensitive probe in the linear devices CTP-HC and NAGDIS-II. The experiments indicate that T{sub i} is growing radially. Analytical ion-mean-energy profiles based on the ion Larmor motion are qualitatively consistent with the experimental T{sub i} profiles. These results clarify that the higher energy ions exist in the outside region of plasma flux tube.