WorldWideScience

Sample records for density gas clumps

  1. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  2. Gas Density Fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: Clumping Factor and Velocity Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Arevalo, P; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analyzed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 8 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10-30 kpc within radii of 30-160 kpc from the cluster center and from 9 to 7 per cent on scales of ~20-30 kpc in an outer, 60-220 kpc annulus. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km/s on ~20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km/s on smaller scales ~7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the power spectrum of the density fluctuations is low...

  3. Simulating radially outward winds within a turbulent gas clump

    CERN Document Server

    Arreaga-Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    By using the particle-based code Gadget2, we follow the evolution of a gas clump, in which a gravitational collapse is initially induced. The particles representing the gas clump have initially a velocity according to a turbulent spectrum built in a Fourier space of 64$^3$ grid elements. In a very early stage of evolution of the clump, a set of gas particles representing the wind, suddenly move outwards from the clump's center. We consider only two kinds of winds, namely: one with spherical symmetry and a second one being a bipolar collimated jet. In order to assess the dynamical change in the clump due to interaction with the winds, we show iso-velocity and iso-density plots for all our simulations.

  4. Gas Clumping in Self-Consistent Reionisation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Finlator, K; Özel, F; Davé, R

    2012-01-01

    We use a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations including a self-consistent treatment for inhomogeneous reionisation to study the impact of galactic outflows and photoionisation heating on the volume-averaged recombination rate of the intergalactic medium (IGM). By incorporating an evolving ionising escape fraction and a treatment for self-shielding within Lyman limit systems, we have run the first simulations of "photon-starved" reionisation scenarios that simultaneously reproduce observations of the abundance of galaxies, the optical depth to electron scattering of cosmic microwave background photons \\tau, and the effective optical depth to Lyman\\alpha absorption at z=5. We confirm that an ionising background reduces the clumping factor C by more than 50% by smoothing moderately-overdense (\\Delta=1--100) regions. Meanwhile, outflows increase clumping only modestly. The clumping factor of ionised gas is much lower than the overall baryonic clumping factor because the most overdense gas is self-shield...

  5. Cold dust clumps in dynamically hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Hony, S; Panuzzo, P; Sauvage, M; Roman-Duval, J; Gordon, K D; Engelbracht, C; Israel, F P; Misselt, K; Okumura, K; Li, A; Bolatto, A; Skibba, R; Galliano, F; Matsuura, M; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Galametz, M; Hughes, A; Kawamura, A; Onishi, T; Paradis, D; Poglitsch, A; Reach, W T; Robitaille, T; Rubio, M; Tielens, A G G M

    2010-01-01

    We present clumps of dust emission from Herschel observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and their physical and statistical properties. We catalog cloud features seen in the dust emission from Herschel observations of the LMC, the Magellanic type irregular galaxy closest to the Milky Way, and compare these features with HI catalogs from the ATCA+Parkes HI survey. Using an automated cloud-finding algorithm, we identify clouds and clumps of dust emission and examine the cumulative mass distribution of the detected dust clouds. The mass of cold dust is determined from physical parameters that we derive by performing spectral energy distribution fits to 250, 350, and 500 micronm emission from SPIRE observations using DUSTY and GRASIL radiative transfer calculation with dust grain size distributions for graphite/silicate in low-metallicity extragalactic environments. The dust cloud mass spectrum follows a power law distribution with an exponent of gamma=-1.8 for clumps larger than 400 solar mass and is si...

  6. Spherically Symmetric Gravitational Collapse of a Clump of Solids in a Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Shariff, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been identified that create dense particle clumps in the solar nebula. The present work is concerned with the gravitational collapse of such clumps, idealized as being spherically symmetric. Calculations using the two-fluid model are performed (almost) up to the time when a central density singularity forms. The end result of the study is a parametrization for this time, in order that it may be compared with timescales for various disruptive effects to which clumps may be subject. An important effect is that as the clump compresses, it also compresses the gas due to drag. This increases gas pressure which retards particle collapse and leads to oscillation in the size and density of the clump. The ratio of gravitational force to gas pressure gives a two-phase Jeans parameter, $J_t$, which is the classical Jeans parameter with the sound speed replaced by an the wave speed in a coupled two-fluid medium. Its use makes the results insensitive to the initial density ratio of particles to gas...

  7. Stellar age spreads in clusters as imprints of cluster-parent clump densities

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, Genevieve; Grebel, Eva K

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that high-density clusters have stellar age distributions narrower than that of the Orion Nebula Cluster, indicating a possible trend of narrower age distributions for denser clusters. We show this effect to likely arise from star formation being faster in gas with a higher density. We model the star formation history of molecular clumps in equilibrium by associating a star formation efficiency (SFE) per free-fall time, \\eff, to their volume density profile. Our model predicts a steady decline of the star formation rate (SFR), which we quantify with its half-life time, namely, the time needed for the SFR to drop to half its initial value. Given the uncertainties affecting the SFE per free-fall time, we consider two distinct values: 0.1 and 0.01. For isothermal spheres, \\eff=0.1 leads to a half-life time of order the clump free-fall time, \\tff. Therefore, the age distributions of stars formed in high-density clumps have smaller full-widths at half-maximum than those of stars form...

  8. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch' , Emeric [CEA, IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Perret, Valentin; Amram, Philippe; Epinat, Benoit [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille), F-13388 Marseille (France); Dekel, Avishai [Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, Debra M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Teyssier, Romain [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  9. Far-Infrared Dust Temperatures and Column Densities of the MALT90 Molecular Clump Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Guzmán, Andrés E; Contreras, Yanett; Smith, Howard A; Jackson, James M; Hoq, Sadia; Rathborne, Jill M

    2015-01-01

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for $\\sim3000$ young high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey, derived from adjusting single temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 \\micron\\ from the Herschel/Hi-Gal and APEX/ATLASGAL surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are: $16.8\\pm0.2$ K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (Quiescent clumps), $18.6\\pm0.2$ K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an HII region (Protostellar clumps), and $23.7\\pm0.2$ and $28.1\\pm0.3$ K for clumps associated with HII and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions rang...

  10. Gas of 96 Planck Cold Clumps in the Second Quadrant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianwei; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-06-01

    Ninety-six Planck cold dust clumps in the second quadrant were mapped with 12CO (1-0), 13CO (1-0), and C18O (1-0) lines at the 13.7 m telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory. 12CO (1-0) and 13CO (1-0) emissions were detected for all 96 clumps, while C18O (1-0) emissions were detected in 81 of them. Fifteen clumps have more than one velocity component. In the 115 mapped velocity components, 225 cores were obtained. We found that 23.1% of the cores have non-Gaussian profiles. We acquired the V lsr, FWHM, and T A of the lines. Distances, T ex, velocity dispersions, {N}{{{H}}2}, and masses were also derived. Generally, turbulence may dominant the cores because {σ }{NT}/{σ }{Therm}\\gt 1 in almost all of the cores and Larson’s relationship is not apparent in our massive cores. Virial parameters are adopted to test the gravitational stability of cores and 51% of the cores are likely collapsing. The core mass function of the cores in the range 0-1 kpc suggests a low core-to-star conversional efficiency (0.62%). Only 14 of 225 cores (6.2%) have associated stellar objects at their centers, while the others are starless. The morphologies of clumps are mainly filamentary structures. Seven clumps may be located on an extension of the new spiral arm in the second quadrant while three are on the known outer arm.

  11. CLUMPING AND THE INTERPRETATION OF kpc-SCALE MAPS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: SMOOTH H I AND CLUMPY, VARIABLE H{sub 2} SURFACE DENSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observtory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lee, Cheoljong [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pety, Jerome [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2013-05-20

    Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large ({approx}kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds ({approx}pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a ''clumping factor'' that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and H I emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H{sub 2}/H I measured at {approx}kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. H I emission appears very smooth, with a clumping factor of only {approx}1.3. Based on the scarce and heterogeneous high-resolution data available, CO emission is far more clumped with a widely variable clumping factor, median {approx}7 for our heterogeneous data. Our measurements do not provide evidence for a universal mass-weighted surface density of molecular gas, but also cannot conclusively rule out such a scenario. We suggest that a more sophisticated treatment of molecular ISM structure, one informed by high spatial resolution CO maps, is needed to link cloud-scale models to kpc-scale observations of galaxies.

  12. Clusters of Small Clumps as an Explanation for The Peculiar Properties of Giant Clumps Detected in Gas-Rich, High-Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Behrendt, Manuel; Schartmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Giant clumps are a characteristic feature of observed high-redshift disk galaxies. We propose that these kpc-sized clumps have a complex substructure and are the result of many smaller clumps self-organizing themselves into clump clusters (CC). This is in contrast to the common understanding that these giant clumps are single homogeneous objects. Using a high resolution hydrodynamical simulation of an isolated, fragmented massive gas disk and mimicking the observations from Genzel et al. (2011) at $z \\sim 2$, we find remarkable agreement in many details. The CCs appear as single entities of sizes $R_{HWHM} \\simeq 0.9-1.4$ kpc and masses $\\sim 1.5-3 \\times 10^9 \\ M_{\\odot}$ representative of high-z observations. They are organized in a ring around the center of the galaxy. The origin of the observed clump's high intrinsic velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{intrinsic} \\simeq 50 - 100 \\ km \\ s^{-1}$ is fully explained by the internal irregular motions of their substructure in our simulation. No additional energy input...

  13. On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and X-ray Surveys IV: Characterizing Density and Pressure Clumping due to Infalling Substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Pfrommer, C; Sievers, J L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the outskirts of galaxy clusters at the virial radius (R200) and beyond is critical for an accurate determination of cluster masses and to ensure unbiased cosmological parameter estimates from cluster surveys. This problem has drawn renewed interest due to recent determinations of gas mass fractions beyond R200, which appear to be considerably larger than the cosmic mean, and because the clusters' total Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux receives a significant contribution from these regions. Here, we use a large suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the clumpiness of density and pressure and employ different variants of simulated physics, including radiative gas physics and thermal feedback by active galactic nuclei. We find that density and pressure clumping closely trace each other as a function of radius, but the bias on density remains on average R200/5, signaling the presence of gravitationally-driven "super-clumping". In contrast, the angular power spectrum of the dark matter (DM...

  14. Molecular Gas Clumps from the Destruction of Icy Bodies in the $\\beta$ Pictoris Debris Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Dent, W R F; Roberge, A; Augereau, J -C; Casassus, S; Corder, S; Greaves, J S; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Hales, A; Jackson, A P; Hughes, A Meredith; Lagrange, A -M; Matthews, B; Wilner, D

    2014-01-01

    Many stars are surrounded by disks of dusty debris formed in the collisions of asteroids, comets and dwarf planets. But is gas also released in such events? Observations at submm wavelengths of the archetypal debris disk around $\\beta$ Pictoris show that 0.3% of a Moon mass of carbon monoxide orbits in its debris belt. The gas distribution is highly asymmetric, with 30% found in a single clump 85AU from the star, in a plane closely aligned with the orbit of the inner planet, $\\beta$ Pic b. This gas clump delineates a region of enhanced collisions, either from a mean motion resonance with an unseen giant planet, or from the remnants of a collision of Mars-mass planets.

  15. Entropy Flattening, Gas Clumping and Turbulence in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco-Femiano, R

    2014-01-01

    Several physical processes and formation events are expected in cluster outskirts, a vast region up to now essentially not covered by observations. The recent Suzaku (X-ray) and Planck (Sunayev-Zeldovich effect) observations out to the virial radius have highlighted in these peripheral regions a rather sharp decline of the intracluster gas temperature, an entropy flattening in contrast with the theoretically expected power law increase, the break of the hydrostatic equilibrium even in some relaxed clusters, a derived gas mass fraction above the cosmic value measured from several CMB experiments, and a total X-ray mass lower than the weak lensing mass determinations. Here we present the analysis of four clusters (A1795, A2029, A2204 and A133) with the SuperModel that includes a nonthermal pressure component due to turbulence to sustain the hydrostatic equilibrium also in the cluster outskirts. In such way we obtain a correct determination of the total X-ray mass and of the gas mass fraction; this in turn allow...

  16. Dense Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud: Density and Temperature Derived from $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$) Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Yoji; Mizuno, Norikazu; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Sorai, Kazuo; Moribe, Nayuta; Torii, Kazufumi; Sakai, Takeshi; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Kohno, Kotaro; Kim, Sungeun; Rubio, Mónica; Fukui, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    In order to precisely determine temperature and density of molecular gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud, we made observations of optically thin $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$) transition by using the ASTE 10m telescope toward 9 peaks where $^{12}$CO($J=3-2$) clumps were previously detected with the same telescope. The molecular clumps include those in giant molecular cloud (GMC) Types I (with no signs of massive star formation), II (with HII regions only), and III (with HII regions and young star clusters). We detected $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$) emission toward all the peaks and found that their intensities are 3 -- 12 times lower than those of $^{12}$CO($J=3-2$). We determined the intensity ratios of $^{12}$CO($J=3-2$) to $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$), $R^{12/13}_{3-2}$, and $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$) to $^{13}$CO($J=1-0$), $R^{13}_{3-2/1-0}$, at 45$\\arcsec$ resolution. These ratios were used for radiative transfer calculations in order to estimate temperature and density of the clumps. The parameters of these clumps range kinetic temperature $T\\ma...

  17. Clumping and the Interpretation of kpc-Scale Maps of the Interstellar Medium: Smooth HI and Clumpy, Variable H2 Surface Density

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; Schruba, Andreas; Bolatto, Alberto; Hughes, Annie; Pety, Jerome; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large (~kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds (~pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a "clumping factor" that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and HI emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H2/HI measured at ~kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. HI emission appears very smooth, with a c...

  18. Dynamical cooling of galactic discs by molecular cloud collisions - origin of giant clumps in gas-rich galaxy discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Different from Milky Way-like galaxies, discs of gas-rich galaxies are clumpy. It is believed that the clumps form because of gravitational instability. However, a necessary condition for gravitational instability to develop is that the disc must dissipate its kinetic energy effectively, this energy dissipation (also called cooling) is not well understood. We propose that collisions (coagulation) between molecular clouds dissipate the kinetic energy of the discs, which leads to a dynamical cooling. The effectiveness of this dynamical cooling is quantified by the dissipation parameter D, which is the ratio between the free-fall time t_ff≈ 1/ √{G ρ _{disc}} and the cooling time determined by the cloud collision process tcool. This ratio is related to the ratio between the mean surface density of the disc Σdisc and the mean surface density of molecular clouds in the disc Σcloud. When D cloud), cloud collision cooling is inefficient, and fragmentation is suppressed. When D > 1/3 (which roughly corresponds to Σdisc > 1/3Σcloud), cloud-cloud collisions lead to a rapid cooling through which clumps form. On smaller scales, cloud-cloud collisions can drive molecular cloud turbulence. This dynamical cooling process can be taken into account in numerical simulations as a sub-grid model to simulate the global evolution of disc galaxies.

  19. Ethane C-C clumping in natural gas : a proxy for cracking processes ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clog, M. D.; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the second-most abundant alkane in most natural gas reservoirs, and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is arguably the simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on ∆13C2H6in natural gas: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that undergo thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; diffusive fractionation; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will control isotopic variations among natural ethanes, but we think it likely that addition of this new isotopic proxy will reveal new insights into the natural chemistry of ethane. We have developed a method to measure the abundance of 13C2H6 in natural samples, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. We define ∆13C2H6 as 1000 . ((13C2H6/12C2H6)measured/(13C2H6/12C2H6)stochastic -1). We studied several suites of natural gas samples and experimentally produced or modified ethane. Natural ethanes, including closely related samples from a single natural gas field, exhibit surprisingly large ranges in ∆13C2H6 (4 ‰ overall; up to 3 ‰ in one gas field). Such ranges cannot be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium at a range of different temperatures, or by diffusive fractionation. Kinetic isotope effects associated with 'cracking' reactions, and/or inheritance of non-equilibrium carbon isotope structures from source organics are more likely causes. We observe a correlation between ∆13C2H6 and the concentration of alkanes other than methane in several suites of natural gases, suggesting the causes of clumped isotope variations are tied to the controls on gas wetness. An experiment examining ethane residual to high

  20. Dense Molecular Gas in the First Galactic Quadrant: A New Distance Estimation Technique and the Molecular Cloud Clump Mass Function, Physical Properties, and Galactic Distribution from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy; Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    2015-01-01

    Large submillimeter and millimeter Galactic dust continuum surveys of the Milky Way, such as the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), Hi-GAL, ATLAS-GAL, and JCMT-JPS cumulatively have discovered 105 cores, clumps, and other structures in Galactic molecular clouds. Robust distance measurements to these structures are needed to enable the large range of quantitative astrophysics that these surveys promise, such as physical properties of clumps, the clump mass function, and the three-dimensional distribution of dense gas and star formation in the Milky Way. We have developed a technique for deriving distances to continuum-identified molecular cloud clumps employing kinematic distances and a suite of distance estimators for breaking kinematic distance ambiguities. Application to the BGPS has yielded 3,700 distance probability density functions (DPDFs) and 1,800 well-constrained distances (typical σdist ≈ 0.5 kpc). These have been used to determine sizes and masses of molecular cloud clumps, derive the clump mass function, and map the three-dimensional distribution of dense gas in the first Galactic quadrant. Among the interesting results are a mass function intermediate between molecular clouds and the stellar initial mass function and inter-arm star formation. Next, we plan to apply the technique to Hi-GAL, which covers the entire Galactic plane and whose submilllimeter maps provide for temperature and bolometric luminosity measurements of cloud structures.

  1. Clumps in the Outer Disk by Disk Instability: Why They are Initially Gas Giants and the Legacy of Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Aaron C; Mayer, Lucio; Durisen, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    We explore the initial conditions for fragments in the extended regions (r>50 AU) of gravitationally unstable disks. We combine analytic estimates for the fragmentation of spiral arms with 3D SPH simulations to show that initial fragment masses are in the gas giant regime. These initial fragments will have substantial angular momentum, and should form disks with radii of a few AU. We show that clumps will survive for multiple orbits before they undergo rapid collapse due to H2 dissociation and that it is possible to destroy bound clumps by transporting them into the inner disk. The consequences of disrupted clumps for planet formation, dust processing, and disk evolution are discussed. We find that it is possible to produce Earth-mass cores in the outer disk during the earliest phases of disk evolution.

  2. Dense gas in molecular cores associated with Planck Galactic cold clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Jinghua; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Tianwei; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hong-Li; Meng, Fanyi; Chen, Ping; Hu, Runjie; Wang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey of dense gas towards Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs). Observations in the J=1-0 transitions of HCO+ and HCN towards 621 molecular cores associated with PGCCs were performed using the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7-m telescope. Among them, 250 sources have detection, including 230 cores detected in HCO+ and 158 in HCN. Spectra of the J=1-0 transitions from CO, 13CO, and C18O at the centers of the 250 cores were extracted from previous mapping observations to construct a multi-line data set. The significantly low detection rate of asymmetric double-peaked profiles, together with the well consistence among central velocities of CO, HCO+, and HCN spectra, suggests that the CO-selected Planck cores are more quiescent compared to classical star-forming regions. The small difference between line widths of C18O and HCN indicates that the inner regions of CO-selected Planck cores are not more turbulent than the exterior. The velocity-integrated intensities and abundances of HCO+ are p...

  3. A Mapping Survey of Dense Clumps Associated with Embedded Clusters II : Can Clump-Clump Collisions Induce Stellar Clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    HIGUCHI, Aya E; SAITO, Masao; KAWABE, Ryohei

    2010-01-01

    We report the H13CO+(1-0) survey observations toward embedded clusters obtained using the Nobeyama 45m telescope, which were performed to follow up our previous study in the C18O survey with a dense gas tracer. Our aim is to address the evolution of cluster-forming clumps. We observed the same 14 clusters in C18O, which are located at distances from 0.3-2.1kpc with 27" resolution in H13CO+. We detected the 13 clumps in H13CO+ line emission and obtained the physical parameters of the clumps with radii of 0.24-0.75pc, masses of 100-1400Msun, and velocity widths in FWHM of 1.5-4.0kms^-1. The mean density is 3.9x10^4cm^-3 and the equivalent Jeans length is 0.13pc at 20K. We classified the H13CO+ clumps into three types, Type A, B, and C according to the relative locations of the H13CO+ clumps and the clusters. Our classification represents an evolutionary trend of cluster-forming clumps because dense clumps are expected to be converted into stellar constituents, or dispersed by stellar activities. We found a simi...

  4. Dense Gas in Molecular Cores Associated with Planck Galactic Cold Clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinghua; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Tianwei; Zeng Li, Jin; Liu, Hong-Li; Meng, Fanyi; Chen, Ping; Hu, Runjie; Wang, Ke

    2016-03-01

    We present the first survey of dense gas toward Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs). Observations in the J = 1-0 transitions of HCO+ and HCN toward 621 molecular cores associated with PGCCs were performed using the Purple Mountain Observatory’s 13.7 m telescope. Among them, 250 sources were detected, including 230 cores detected in HCO+ and 158 in HCN. Spectra of the J = 1-0 transitions from 12CO, 13CO, and C18O at the centers of the 250 cores were extracted from previous mapping observations to construct a multi-line data set. The significantly low detection rate of asymmetric double-peaked profiles, together with the good consistency among central velocities of CO, HCO+, and HCN spectra, suggests that the CO-selected Planck cores are more quiescent than classical star-forming regions. The small difference between line widths of C18O and HCN indicates that the inner regions of CO-selected Planck cores are no more turbulent than the exterior. The velocity-integrated intensities and abundances of HCO+ are positively correlated with those of HCN, suggesting that these two species are well coupled and chemically connected. The detected abundances of both HCO+ and HCN are significantly lower than values in other low- to high-mass star-forming regions. The low abundances may be due to beam dilution. On the basis of an inspection of the parameters given in the PGCC catalog, we suggest that there may be about 1000 PGCC objects that have a sufficient reservoir of dense gas to form stars.

  5. Methods and limitations of 'clumped' CO2 isotope (Delta47) analysis by gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, K W; Eiler, J M; Affek, H P; Guo, W; Bonifacie, M; Yeung, L Y; Thiagarajan, N; Passey, B; Tripati, A; Daëron, M; Came, R

    2009-09-01

    The geochemistry of multiply substituted isotopologues ('clumped-isotope' geochemistry) examines the abundances in natural materials of molecules, formula units or moieties that contain more than one rare isotope (e.g. (13)C(18)O(16)O, (18)O(18)O, (15)N(2), (13)C(18)O(16)O(2) (2-)). Such species form the basis of carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry and undergo distinctive fractionations during a variety of natural processes, but initial reports have provided few details of their analysis. In this study, we present detailed data and arguments regarding the theoretical and practical limits of precision, methods of standardization, instrument linearity and related issues for clumped-isotope analysis by dual-inlet gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We demonstrate long-term stability and subtenth per mil precision in 47/44 ratios for counting systems consisting of a Faraday cup registered through a 10(12) ohm resistor on three Thermo-Finnigan 253 IRMS systems. Based on the analyses of heated CO(2) gases, which have a stochastic distribution of isotopes among possible isotopologues, we document and correct for (1) isotopic exchange among analyte CO(2) molecules and (2) subtle nonlinearity in the relationship between actual and measured 47/44 ratios. External precisions of approximately 0.01 per thousand are routinely achieved for measurements of the mass-47 anomaly (a measure mostly of the abundance anomaly of (13)C-(18)O bonds) and follow counting statistics. The present technical limit to precision intrinsic to our methods and instrumentation is approximately 5 parts per million (ppm), whereas precisions of measurements of heterogeneous natural materials are more typically approximately 10 ppm (both 1 s.e.). These correspond to errors in carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry of +/-1.2 degrees C and +/-2.4 degrees C, respectively.

  6. The Small Magellanic Cloud Investigation of Dust and Gas Evolution (SMIDGE): The Dust Extinction Curve from Red Clump Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchulova Merica-Jones, Petia; Sandstrom, Karin M.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2017-10-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of red clump stars taken as part of the Small Magellanic Cloud Investigation of Dust and Gas Evolution (SMIDGE) program to measure the average dust extinction curve in a ∼200 pc × 100 pc region in the southwest bar of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The rich information provided by our eight-band ultraviolet through near-infrared photometry allows us to model the color–magnitude diagram of the red clump accounting for the extinction curve shape, a log-normal distribution of A V , and the depth of the stellar distribution along the line of sight. We measure an extinction curve with {R}475 ={A}475/({A}475{--}{A}814)=2.65+/- 0.11. This measurement is significantly larger than the equivalent values of published Milky Way (MW) R V = 3.1 ({R}475=1.83) and SMC Bar R V = 2.74 ({R}475=1.86) extinction curves. Similar extinction curve offsets in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been interpreted as the effect of large dust grains. We demonstrate that the line-of-sight depth of the SMC (and LMC) introduces an apparent “gray” contribution to the extinction curve inferred from the morphology of the red clump. We show that no gray dust component is needed to explain extinction curve measurements when FWHM depth of 10 ± 2 kpc in the stellar distribution of the SMC (5 ± 1 kpc for the LMC) is considered, which agrees with recent studies of Magellanic Cloud stellar structure. The results of our work demonstrate the power of broadband HST imaging for simultaneously constraining dust and galactic structure outside the MW.

  7. Molecular environments of 51 Planck cold clumps in Orion complex

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Huawei

    2012-01-01

    A mapping survey towards 51 Planck cold clumps projected on Orion complex was performed with J=1-0 lines of $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO at the 13.7 m telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory. The mean column densities of the Planck gas clumps range from 0.5 to 9.5$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$, with an average value of (2.9$\\pm$1.9)$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$. While the mean excitation temperatures of these clumps range from 7.4 to 21.1 K, with an average value of 12.1$\\pm$3.0 K. The averaged three-dimensional velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{3D}$ in these molecular clumps is 0.66$\\pm$0.24 km s$^{-1}$. Most of the clumps have $\\sigma_{NT}$ larger than or comparable with $\\sigma_{Therm}$. The H$_{2}$ column density of the molecular clumps calculated from molecular lines correlates with the aperture flux at 857 GHz of the dust emission. Through analyzing the distributions of the physical parameters, we suggest turbulent flows can shape the clump structure and dominate their density distribution in large scale, but not affect ...

  8. Gas emissions in Planck cold dust clumps---A Survey of the J=1-0 Transitions of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuefang; Meng, Fanyi; Li, Di; Qin, Sheng-Li; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2012-01-01

    A survey toward 674 Planck cold clumps of the Early Cold Core Catalogue (ECC) in the J=1-0 transitions of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O has been carried out using the PMO 13.7 m telescope. 673 clumps were detected with the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO, and 68% of the samples have C$^{18}$O emission. Additional velocity components were also identified.A close consistency of the three line peak velocities was revealed for the first time. Kinematic distances are given out for all the velocity components and half of the clumps are located within 0.5 and 1.5 kpc. Excitation temperatures range from 4 to 27 K, slightly larger than those of $T_d$. Line width analysis shows that the majority of ECC clumps are low mass clumps. Column densities N$_{H_{2}}$ span from 10$^{20}$ to 4.5$\\times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ with an average value of (4.4$\\pm$3.6)$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$. N$_{H_{2}}$ cumulative fraction distribution deviates from the lognormal distribution, which is attributed to optical depth. The average abundance rati...

  9. High-resolution simulations of clump-clump collisions using SPH with particle splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsionas, S.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2007-06-01

    We investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the phenomenology of star formation triggered by low-velocity collisions between low-mass molecular clumps. The simulations are performed using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code which satisfies the Jeans condition by invoking on-the-fly particle splitting. Clumps are modelled as stable truncated (non-singular) isothermal, i.e. Bonnor-Ebert, spheres. Collisions are characterized by M0 (clump mass), b (offset parameter, i.e. ratio of impact parameter to clump radius) and (Mach number, i.e. ratio of collision velocity to effective post-shock sound speed). The gas subscribes to a barotropic equation of state, which is intended to capture (i) the scaling of pre-collision internal velocity dispersion with clump mass, (ii) post-shock radiative cooling and (iii) adiabatic heating in optically thick protostellar fragments. The efficiency of star formation is found to vary between 10 and 30 per cent in the different collisions studied and it appears to increase with decreasing M0, and/or decreasing b, and/or increasing . For b compressed layers which fragment into filaments. Protostellar objects then condense out of the filaments and accrete from them. The resulting accretion rates are high, , for the first . The densities in the filaments, , are sufficient that they could be mapped in NH3 or CS line radiation, in nearby star formation regions.

  10. Non-thermal X-rays and interstellar gas toward the \\gamma-ray supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946: Evidence for X-ray enhancement around CO and HI clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, H; Torii, K; Fukuda, T; Yoshiike, S; Sato, J; Horachi, H; Kuwahara, T; Hayakawa, T; Matsumoto, H; Inoue, T; Yamazaki, R; Inutsuka, S; Kawamura, A; Yamamoto, H; Okuda, T; Mizuno, N; Onishi, T; Mizuno, A; Fukui, Y

    2013-01-01

    RX J1713.7-3946 is the most remarkable very-high-energy \\gamma-ray supernova remnant which emits synchrotron X-rays without thermal features. We made a comparative study of CO, HI and X-rays in order to better understand the relationship between the X-rays, and molecular and atomic gas. The results indicate that the X-rays are enhanced around the CO and HI clumps on a pc scale but decrease inside the clumps on a 0.1 pc scale. Magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the shock interaction with molecular and atomic gas indicate that the interaction between the shock waves and the clumps excite turbulence which amplifies the magnetic field around the clumps. We suggest that the amplified magnetic field around the CO and HI clumps enhances the synchrotron X-rays and possibly the acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons.

  11. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic; Renaud, Florent; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Elmegreen, Debra M; Teyssier, Romain; Amram, Philippe; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Epinat, Benoit; Gabor, Jared M; Juneau, Stephanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Floch', Emeric Le

    2013-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (<50Myr), like molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (~300Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7pc resolution AMR simulations of high-redshift disks including photo-ionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback (Renaud et al. 2013, and Perret et al., this astro-ph issue). Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by ti...

  12. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  13. Molecular Emission in Dense Massive Clumps from the Star-Forming Regions S231-S235

    CERN Document Server

    Ladeyschikov, D A; Tsivilev, A P; Sobolev, A M

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with observations of star-forming regions S231-S235 in 'quasi-thermal' lines of ammonia (NH$_3$), cyanoacetylene (HC$_3$N) and maser lines of methanol (CH$_3$OH) and water vapor (H$_2$O). S231-S235 regions is situated in the giant molecular cloud G174+2.5. We selected all massive molecular clumps in G174+2.5 using archive CO data. For the each clump we determined mass, size and CO column density. After that we performed observations of these clumps. We report about first detections of NH$_3$ and HC$_3$N lines toward the molecular clumps WB89 673 and WB89 668. This means that high-density gas is present there. Physical parameters of molecular gas in the clumps were estimated using the data on ammonia emission. We found that the gas temperature and the hydrogen number density are in the ranges 16-30 K and 2.8-7.2$\\times10^3$ cm$^{-3}$, respectively. The shock-tracing line of CH$_3$OH molecule at 36.2 GHz is newly detected toward WB89 673.

  14. A Universal Density Structure for Circumgalactic Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jonathan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new method to constrain the physical conditions in the cool (˜104 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) from measurements of ionic column densities by assuming that the cool CGM spans a large range of gas densities and that small high-density clouds are hierarchically embedded in large low-density clouds. The new method combines the information available from different sightlines during the photoionization modeling, thus yielding tighter constraints on CGM properties compared to traditional methods that model each sightline individually. Applying this new technique to the COS Halos survey of low-redshift ˜L* galaxies, we find that we can reproduce all observed ion columns in all 44 galaxies in the sample, from the low ions to {{O}} {{VI}}, with a single universal density structure for the cool CGM. The gas densities span the range 50≲ ρ /{\\bar{ρ }}b≲ 5× {10}5 ({\\bar{ρ }}b is the cosmic mean), while the physical size of individual clouds scales as ˜ρ -1, from ≈35 kpc for the low-density {{O}} {{VI}} clouds to ≈6 pc for the highest-density low-ion clouds. The deduced cloud sizes are too small for this density structure to be driven by self-gravity; thus, its physical origin is unclear. The implied cool CGM mass within the virial radius is (1.3 ± 0.4) × 1010 {M}⊙ (˜1% of the halo mass), distributed rather uniformly over the 4 decades in density. The mean cool gas density profile scales as {R}-1.0+/- 0.3, where R is the distance from the galaxy center. We construct a 3D model of the cool CGM based on our results, which we argue provides a benchmark for the CGM structure in hydrodynamic simulations. Our results can be tested by measuring the coherence scales of different ions.

  15. Star Formation Laws in Both Galactic Massive Clumps and External Galaxies: Extensive Study with Dust Coninuum, HCN (4-3), and CS (7-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Yoo, Hyunju; Liu, Sheng-yuan; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Qin, Sheng-Li; Zhang, Qizhou; Wu, Yuefang; Wang, Ke; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Juvela, Mika; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; Mardones, Diego; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Cunningham, Maria R.; Li, Di; Lo, Nadia; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Schnee, Scott

    2016-10-01

    We observed 146 Galactic clumps in HCN (4-3) and CS (7-6) with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. A tight linear relationship between star formation rate and gas mass traced by dust continuum emission was found for both Galactic clumps and the high redshift (z > 1) star forming galaxies (SFGs), indicating a constant gas depletion time of ˜100 Myr for molecular gas in both Galactic clumps and high z SFGs. However, low z galaxies do not follow this relation and seem to have a longer global gas depletion time. The correlations between total infrared luminosities (L TIR) and molecular line luminosities ({L}{mol}\\prime ) of HCN (4-3) and CS (7-6) are tight and sublinear extending down to clumps with L TIR ˜ 103 L ⊙. These correlations become linear when extended to external galaxies. A bimodal behavior in the L TIR-{L}{mol}\\prime correlations was found for clumps with different dust temperature, luminosity-to-mass ratio, and σ line/σ vir. Such bimodal behavior may be due to evolutionary effects. The slopes of L TIR-L‧mol correlations become more shallow as clumps evolve. We compared our results with lower J transition lines in Wu et al. (2010). The correlations between clump masses and line luminosities are close to linear for low effective excitation density tracers but become sublinear for high effective excitation density tracers for clumps with L TIR larger than L TIR ˜ 104.5 L ⊙. High effective excitation density tracers cannot linearly trace the total clump masses, leading to a sublinear correlations for both M clump-L‧mol and L TIR-L‧mol relations.

  16. Planck early results. XXII. The submillimetre properties of a sample of Galactic cold clumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    distributions. Herschel data reveal a wealth of substructure within the Planck cold clumps. In all cases (except two sources harbouring young stellar objects), the substructures are found to be colder, with temperatures as low as 7K. Molecular line observations provide gas column densities which are consistent...

  17. The segregation of starless and protostellar clumps in the Hi-GAL ℓ = 224° region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, L.; Cunningham, M.; Elia, D.; Jones, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars form in dense, dusty structures, which are embedded in larger clumps of molecular clouds often showing a clear filamentary structure on large scales (≳1 pc). The origin (e.g., turbulence or gravitational instabilities) and evolution of these filaments, as well as their relation to clump and core formation, are not yet fully understood. A large sample of both starless and protostellar clumps can now be found in the Herschel Infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) key project, which also provides striking images of the filamentary structure of the parent molecular clouds. Recent results indicate that populations of clumps on and off filaments may differ. Aims: One of the best-studied regions in the Hi-GAL survey can be observed toward the ℓ = 224° field. Here, a filamentary region has been studied and it has been found that protostellar clumps are mostly located along the main filament, whereas starless clumps are detected off this filament and are instead found on secondary, less prominent filaments. We want to investigate this segregation effect and how it may affect the clumps properties. Methods: We mapped the 12CO (1-0) line and its main three isotopologues toward the two most prominent filaments observed toward the ℓ = 224° field using the Mopra radio telescope, in order to set observational constraints on the dynamics of these structures and the associated starless and protostellar clumps. Results: Compared to the starless clumps, the protostellar clumps are more luminous, more turbulent and lie in regions where the filamentary ambient gas shows larger linewidths. We see evidence of gas flowing along the main filament, but we do not find any signs of accretion flow from the filament onto the Hi-GAL clumps. We analyze the radial column density profile of the filaments and their gravitational stability. Conclusions: The more massive and highly fragmented main filament appears to be thermally supercritical and gravitationally bound

  18. Metal-enriched, sub-kiloparsec gas clumps in the circumgalactic medium of a faint z = 2.5 galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Crighton, Neil H M; Simcoe, Robert A; Cooksey, Kathy L; Murphy, Michael T; Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J Xavier; Shanks, Tom

    2014-01-01

    We report the serendipitous detection of a 0.2 L$^*$, Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitting galaxy at redshift 2.5 at an impact parameter of 50 kpc from a brightbackground QSO sightline. A high-resolution spectrum of the QSO reveals a partial Lyman-limit absorption system ($N_\\mathrm{HI}=10^{16.94\\pm0.10}$ cm$^{-2}$) with many associated metal absorption lines at the same redshift as the foreground galaxy. Using photoionization models that carefully treat measurement errors and marginalise over uncertainties in the shape and normalisation of the ionizing radiation spectrum, we precisely measure the total hydrogen column density $N_\\mathrm{H}=10^{19.4\\pm0.3}$ cm$^{-2}$, and show that all the absorbing clouds are highly enriched, with $Z=0.1$-$0.6~Z_\\odot$. These high metallicities and the system's large velocity width ($436$ km$\\,$s$^{-1}$) suggest the gas is produced by an outflowing wind. Using an expanding shell model we estimate a mass outflow rate of $\\sim5~M_\\odot\\,$yr$^{-1}$. Our photoionization model yields extremel...

  19. DYNAMO-HST survey: clumps in nearby massive turbulent discs and the effects of clump clustering on kiloparsec scale measurements of clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Obreschkow, Danail; Wisnioski, Emily; Bassett, Robert; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present ˜100 pc resolution Hubble Space Telescope Hα images of 10 galaxies from the DYnamics of Newly-Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey of low-z turbulent disc galaxies, and use these to undertake the first detailed systematic study of the effects of resolution and clump clustering on observations of clumps in turbulent discs. In the DYNAMO-HST sample, we measure clump diameters spanning the range dclump ˜ 100-800 pc, and individual clump star formation rates as high as ˜5 M⊙ yr-1. DYNAMO clumps have very high SFR surface densities, ΣSFR ˜ 1 - 15 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, ˜100 × higher than in H II regions of nearby spirals. Indeed, SFR surface density provides a simple dividing line between massive star-forming clumps and local star-forming regions, where massive star-forming clumps have ΣSFR > 0.5 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. When degraded to match the observations of galaxies in z ˜ 1-3 surveys, DYNAMO galaxies are similar in morphology and measured clump properties to clumpy galaxies observed in the high-z Universe. Emission peaks in the simulated high-redshift maps typically correspond to multiple clumps in full resolution images. This clustering of clumps systematically increases the apparent size and SFR of clumps in 1 kpc resolution maps, and decreases the measured SFR surface density of clumps by as much as a factor of 20×. From these results we can infer that clump clustering is likely to strongly affect the measured properties of clumps in high-z galaxies, which commonly have kiloparsec scale resolution.

  20. HCN hyperfine ratio analysis of massive molecular clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schap, W. J.; Barnes, P. J.; Ordoñez, A.; Ginsburg, A.; Yonekura, Y.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report a new analysis protocol for HCN hyperfine data, based on the PYSPECKIT package, and results of using this new protocol to analyse a sample area of seven massive molecular clumps from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) survey, in order to derive maps of column density for this species. There is a strong correlation between the HCN integrated intensity, IHCN, and previously reported I_HCO+ in the clumps, but I_N_{2H+} is not well correlated with either of these other two 'dense gas tracers'. The four fitted parameters from PYSPECKIT in this region fall in the range of VLSR = 8-10 km s-1, σV = 1.2-2.2 km s-1, Tex = 4-15 K, and τ = 0.2-2.5. These parameters allow us to derive a column density map of these clouds, without limiting assumptions about the excitation or opacity. A more traditional (linear) method of converting IHCN to total mass column gives much lower clump masses than our results based on the hyperfine analysis. This is primarily due to areas in the sample region of low I, low Tex, and high τ. We conclude that there may be more dense gas in these massive clumps not engaged in massive star formation than previously recognized. If this result holds for other clouds in the CHaMP sample, it would have dramatic consequences for the calibration of the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation laws, including a large increase in the gas depletion time-scale in such regions.

  1. Giant Clumps in Simulated High-z Galaxies: Properties, Evolution and Dependence on Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelker, Nir; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Guo, Yicheng; Primack, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations at redshifts z=6-1. Our sample consists of 34 galaxies, of halo masses 10^{11}-10^{12}M_s at z=2, run with and without radiation pressure (RP) feedback from young stars. While RP has little effect on the sizes and global stability of discs, it reduces the amount of star-forming gas by a factor of ~2, leading to a decrease in stellar mass by a similar factor by z~2. Both samples undergo violent disc instability (VDI) and form giant clumps of masses 10^7-10^9M_s at a similar rate, though RP significantly reduces the number of long-lived clumps. When RP is (not) included, clumps with circular velocity <40(20)km/s, baryonic surface density <200(100)M_s/pc^2 and baryonic mass <10^{8.2}(10^{7.3})M_s are short-lived, disrupted in a few free-fall times. The more massive and dense clumps survive and migrate toward the disc centre over a few disc orbital times. In the RP simulations, the distribution of clump mass...

  2. Deep HeII and CIV Spectroscopy of a Giant Lyman alpha Nebula: Dense Compact Gas Clumps in the Circumgalactic Medium of a z~2 Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Battaia, Fabrizio Arrigoni; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery by Cantalupo et al. (2014) of the largest (~500 kpc) and luminous Ly-alpha nebula associated with the quasar UM287 (z=2.279) poses a great challenge to our current understanding of the astrophysics of the halos hosting massive z~2 galaxies. Either an enormous reservoir of cool gas is required $M\\simeq10^{12}$ $M_{\\odot}$, exceeding the expected baryonic mass available, or one must invoke extreme gas clumping factors not present in high-resolution cosmological simulations. However, observations of Ly-alpha emission alone cannot distinguish between these two scenarios. We have obtained the deepest ever spectroscopic integrations in the HeII and CIV lines with the goal of detecting extended line emission, but detect neither line to a 3$\\sigma$ limiting SB $\\simeq10^{-18}$ erg/s/cm$^2$/arcsec$^2$. We construct models of the expected emission spectrum in the highly probable scenario that the nebula is powered by photoionization from the central hyper-luminous quasar. The non-detection of HeII ...

  3. Red Clump Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Léo

    2016-09-01

    Low-mass stars in their core-helium-burning stage define the sharpest feature present in the color-magnitude diagrams of nearby galaxy systems: the red clump (RC). This feature has given rise to a series of methods aimed at measuring the distributions of stellar distances and extinctions, especially in the Magellanic Clouds and Milky Way Bulge. Because the RC is easily recognizable within the data of large spectroscopic and asteroseismic surveys, it is a useful probe of stellar densities, kinematics, and chemical abundances across the Milky Way disk; it can be applied up to larger distances than that allowed by dwarfs; and it has better accuracy than is possible with other kinds of giants. Here, we discuss the reasons for the RC narrowness in several sets of observational data, its fine structure, and the presence of systematic changes in the RC properties as regards age, metallicity, and the observed passband. These factors set the limits on the validity and accuracy of several RC methods defined in the literature.

  4. Giant clumps in simulated high- z Galaxies: properties, evolution and dependence on feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Guo, Yicheng; Primack, Joel

    2017-01-01

    We study the evolution and properties of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies using adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations at redshifts z ˜ 6-1. Our sample consists of 34 galaxies, of halo masses 1011-1012 M⊙ at z = 2, run with and without radiation pressure (RP) feedback from young stars. While RP has little effect on the sizes and global stability of discs, it reduces the amount of star-forming gas by a factor of ˜2, leading to a similar decrease in stellar mass by z ˜ 2. Both samples undergo extended periods of violent disc instability continuously forming giant clumps of masses 107-109 M⊙ at a similar rate, though RP significantly reduces the number of long-lived clumps (LLCs). When RP is (not) included, clumps with circular velocity ≲ 40 (20) km s- 1, baryonic surface density ≲ 200 (100)M⊙ pc- 2 and baryonic mass ≲ 108.2 (107.3) M⊙ are short-lived, disrupted in a few free-fall times. More massive and dense clumps survive and migrate towards the disc centre over a few disc orbital times. In the RP simulations, the distribution of clump masses and star formation rates (SFRs) normalized to their host disc is similar at all redshifts, exhibiting a truncated power law with a slope slightly shallower than -2. The specific SFR (sSFR) of the LLCs declines with age as they migrate towards the disc centre, producing gradients in mass, stellar age, gas fraction, sSFR and metallicity that distinguish them from the short-lived clumps which tend to populate the outer disc. Ex situ mergers comprise ˜37 per cent of the mass in clumps and ˜29 per cent of the SFR. They are more massive and with older stellar ages than the in situ clumps, especially near the disc edge. Roughly half the galaxies at redshifts z = 4-1 are clumpy, with ˜3-30 per cent of their SFR and ˜0.1-3 per cent of their stellar mass in clumps.

  5. Stagnation and Infall of Dense Clumps in the Stellar Wind of τ Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howk, J. Christopher; Cassinelli, Joseph P.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.

    2000-05-01

    Observations of the B0.2 V star τ Scorpii have revealed unusual stellar wind characteristics: redshifted absorption in the far-ultraviolet O VI resonance doublet up to ~+250 km s-1 and extremely hard X-ray emission implying gas at temperatures in excess of 107 K. We describe a phenomenological model to explain these properties. We assume the wind of τ Sco consists of two components: ambient gas in which denser clumps are embedded. The clumps are optically thick in the UV resonance lines primarily responsible for accelerating the ambient wind. The reduced acceleration causes the clumps to slow and even infall, all the while being confined by the ram pressure of the outflowing ambient wind. We calculate detailed trajectories of the clumps in the ambient stellar wind, accounting for a line radiation driving force and the momentum deposited by the ambient wind in the form of drag. We show that these clumps will fall back toward the star with velocities of several hundred km s-1 for a broad range of initial conditions. The velocities of the clumps relative to the ambient stellar wind can approach 2000 km s-1, producing X-ray-emitting plasmas with temperatures in excess of (1-6)×107 K in bow shocks at their leading edge. The infalling material explains the peculiar redshifted absorption wings seen in the O VI doublet. Of order 103 clumps with individual masses mc~1019-1020 g are needed to explain the observed X-ray luminosity and also to explain the strength of the O VI absorption lines. These values correspond to a mass-loss rate in clumps of Mc~10-9 to 10-8 Msolar yr-1, a small fraction of the total mass-loss rate (M~3×10-8 Msolar yr-1). We discuss the position of τ Sco in the H-R diagram, concluding that τ Sco is in a crucial position on the main sequence. Hotter stars near the spectral type of τ Sco have too powerful winds for clumps to fall back to the stars, and cooler stars have too low mass-loss rates to produce observable effects. The model developed here

  6. Astrochemical Properties of Planck Cold Clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Liu, Tie; Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyễn Lu’o’ng, Quang; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Thompson, Mark A.; Fuller, Gary; Wu, Yuefang; Li, Di; Di Francesco, James; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wang, Ke; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Juvela, Mika; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Cunningham, Maria; Saito, Masao; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; He, Jinhua; Sakai, Takeshi; Kim, Jungha; JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We observed 13 Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N2H+ distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC3N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N2H+ emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN13C, N2D+, and cyclic-C3H2 toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N2D+ is 50%. Furthermore, we observed the NH3 emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most targets are cold (≲20 K). In two of the starless clumps we observed, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N2H+ core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N2D+. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the chemical evolution factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.

  7. High-resolution ALMA Observations of SDP.81. II. Molecular Clump Properties of a Lensed Submillimeter Galaxy at z=3.042

    CERN Document Server

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iono, Daisuke; Matsuda, Yuichi; Hayashi, Masao; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved properties of molecular gas and dust in a gravitationally-lensed submillimeter galaxy H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) at $z=3.042$ revealed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We identified 14 molecular clumps in the CO(5-4) line data, all with a spatial scale of $\\sim$50-300 pc in the source plane. The surface density of molecular gas ($\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$) and star-formation rate ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$) of the clumps are more than three orders of magnitude higher than those found in local spiral galaxies. The clumps are placed in the `burst' sequence in the $\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$-$\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ plane, suggesting that $z \\sim 3$ molecular clumps follow the star-formation law derived for local starburst galaxies. With our gravitational lens model, the positions in the source plane are derived for the molecular clumps, dust clumps, and stellar components identified in the {\\sl Hubble Space Telescope} image. The molecular and dust clumps coexist in a similar re...

  8. Subparsec clumping in the nearby molecular cloud MBM 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, M.W.; Wilson, R.W.; Bania, T.M. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, NJ (USA) Boston Univ., MA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    At a distance of 65 pc, the molecular cloud MBM 12 is the nearest molecular complex known. Results of extensive molecular and preliminary atomic spectral mapping of the MBM 12 complex are reported. The total H2 mass of the cloud is estimated to be about 30 solar masses. Although there are over 50 distinct emission clumps and the (C-13)O (J = 1-0) maps show structure within the MBM 12 complex down to the resolution limit of about 6500 AU. The large line widths may reflect either the evaporation of the clumps by the ambient hot gas or the presence of an ensemble of blended emission clumps that are smaller than the resolution limit. Preliminary results show H I envelopes about the molecular cores with column densities consistent with that expected for atomic to molecular transition regions. The kinematics of the MBM 12 complex imply kinetic energies of about 10 to the 45th ergs. This energy is typical of that produced by a bipolar flow from a young stellar object. 30 refs.

  9. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTS OF 51 PLANCK COLD CLUMPS IN THE ORION COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2012-09-15

    A mapping survey of 51 Planck cold clumps projected on the Orion complex was performed with J = 1-0 lines of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO with the 13.7 m telescope at the Purple Mountain Observatory. The mean column densities of the Planck gas clumps range from 0.5 to 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, with an average value of (2.9 {+-} 1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The mean excitation temperatures of these clumps range from 7.4 to 21.1 K, with an average value of 12.1 {+-} 3.0 K and the average three-dimensional velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub 3D} in these molecular clumps is 0.66 {+-} 0.24 km s{sup -1}. Most of the clumps have {sigma}{sub NT} larger than or comparable to {sigma}{sub Therm}. The H{sub 2} column density of the molecular clumps calculated from molecular lines correlates with the aperture flux at 857 GHz of the dust emission. By analyzing the distributions of the physical parameters, we suggest that turbulent flows can shape the clump structure and dominate their density distribution on large scales, but not function on small scales due to local fluctuations. Eighty-two dense cores are identified in the molecular clumps. The dense cores have an average radius and local thermal equilibrium (LTE) mass of 0.34 {+-} 0.14 pc and 38{sup +5}{sub -30} M{sub Sun }, respectively. The structures of low column density cores are more affected by turbulence, while the structures of high column density cores are more affected by other factors, especially by gravity. The correlation of velocity dispersion versus core size is very weak for the dense cores. The dense cores are found to be most likely gravitationally bounded rather than pressure confined. The relationship between M{sub vir} and M{sub LTE} can be well fitted with a power law. The core mass function here is much flatter than the stellar initial mass function. The lognormal behavior of the core mass distribution is most likely determined by internal turbulence.

  10. DYNAMO-HST Survey: Clumps in Nearby Massive Turbulent Disks and the Effects of Clump Clustering on Kiloparsec Scale Measurements of Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David B; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G; Obreschkow, Danail; Wisnioski, Emily; Bassett, Robert; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present $\\sim$100 pc resolution Hubble Space Telescope H$\\alpha$ images of 10 galaxies from the DYnamics of Newly-Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey of low-$z$ turbulent disk galaxies, and use these to undertake the first detailed systematic study of the effects of resolution and clump clustering on observations of clumps in turbulent disks. In the DYNAMO-{\\em HST} sample we measure clump diameters spanning the range $d_{clump} \\sim 100-800$~pc, and individual clump star formation rates as high as $\\sim5$~M$_{\\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$. DYNAMO clumps have very high SFR surface densities, $\\Sigma_{SFR}\\sim 15$~M$_{\\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$~kpc$^{-2}$, $\\sim100\\times$ higher than in H{\\sc ii} regions of nearby spirals. Indeed, SFR surface density provides a simple dividing line between massive star forming clumps and local star forming regions, where massive star forming clumps have $\\Sigma_{SFR}> 0.5$~M$_{\\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$~kpc$^{-2}$. When degraded to match the observations of galaxies in $z\\sim 1-3$ surveys, DYNAMO ...

  11. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 10$^{7}$~K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  12. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  13. Characterization of Density Profile of Cylindrical Pulsed Gas Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Quan-Zhi; LI Yu-Tong; ZhANG Jie; ZHENG Jun; LI Han-Ming; PENG Xiao-Yu; LI Kun

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigated the characteristics of argon and helium gas jets produced by a cylindrical nozzle under pressures from I to 6 Mpa using a femtosecond laser interferometry. A radial parabolic distribution and an axial exponential distribution of the gas jet density profiles are identified. The results show that the density increases linearly with the backing pressure.

  14. The global chemical properties of high-mass star forming clumps at different evolutionary stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; He, Yu-Xin; Li, Da-Lei; Tang, Xin-Di; Ji, Wei-Guang; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    A total of 197 relatively isolated high-mass star-forming clumps were selected from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey data and their global chemical evolution investigated using four molecular lines, N2H+ (1--0), HCO+ (1--0), HCN (1-0), and HNC (1-0). The results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios I(HCO+)/I(HNC), I(HCN)/I(HNC), I(N2H+)/I(HCO+), and I(N2H+)/ I(HCN) are promising tracers for evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps. The global averaged column densities and abundances of N2H+, HCO+, HCN, and HNC increase as clumps evolve. The global averaged abundance ratios X(HCN)/X(HNC) could be used to trace evolution of high-mass star forming clumps, X(HCO+)/X(HNC) is more suitable for distinguishing high-mass star-forming clumps in prestellar (stage A) from those in protostellar (stage B) and HII/PDR region (stage C). These results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios between HCN (1-0), HNC (1-0), HCO+ (1--0) and N2H+ (1--0) are more suitable for tracing the evolution of high-mass star forming clumps. We also studied the chemical properties of the target high-mass star-forming clumps in each spiral arm of the Galaxy, and got results very different from those above. This is probably due to the relatively small sample in each spiral arm. For high-mass star-forming clumps in Sagittarius arm and Norma-Outer arm, comparing two groups located on one arm with different Galactocentric distances, the clumps near the Galactic Center appear to be younger than those far from the Galactic center, which may be due to more dense gas concentrated near the Galactic Center, and hence more massive stars being formed there.

  15. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XI. TEMPERATURES AND SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALACTIC CLUMPS BASED ON 350 μM OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merello, Manuel; Evans II, Neal J. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [European Southern Observatory, ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-95748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Bally, John [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M., E-mail: manuel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 μm from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with three additional maps covering star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.″5 beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33″ beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 μm maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 ± 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with good determination of color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH{sub 3} observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than 2 substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substructures seen at 350 μm compared to the mass of their parental clump is ∼0.19, and the surface densities of these substructures are, on average, 2.2 times those seen in the clumps identified at 1.1 mm. For a well-characterized sample, 88 structures (31%) exceed a surface density of 0.2 g cm{sup −2}, and 18 (6%) exceed 1.0 g cm{sup −2}, thresholds for massive star formation suggested by theorists.

  16. The new method for the residual gas density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Krasnov, A A; Malyshev, O B; Nas'mov, V P; Pyata, E I; Shaftan, T V

    2001-01-01

    A new method of measurement for residual gas density in the vacuum chambers in presence of synchrotron radiation (SR) is described. The method is based on using a photomultiplier tube for the detection of the SR-stimulated residual gas luminescence, which is proportional to the residual gas density and SR intensity. The design of the experimental setup and results of the measurements of densities of residual gases (H sub 2 , CO sub 2 , CO, N sub 2 , Ar and O sub 2) are submitted.

  17. The gas density around SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Decourchelle, A

    2007-01-01

    The density of the ambient medium where the supernova remnant evolves is a relevant parameter for its hydrodynamical evolution, for the mechanism of particle acceleration, and for the emission at TeV energies. Using XMM-Newton X-ray observations, we present a study of the ambient medium density of the historical supernova remnant SN 1006. We modelled the post-shock thermal emission to constrain the ambient medium density. Our study is focused on the North-West and the South-East rims of the remnant, where the thermal emission dominates. We used a plane-parallel shock plasma model plus another component for the ejecta that are not negligible in the regions of our study. The importance of the synchrotron component is also studied. In order to improve statistics, we combined several observations of the remnant. The density found in the South-East rim is low, roughly 0.05 cm-3, and seems to be representative of the rest of the remnant. However, in the North-West rim (close to the bright optical filament), the den...

  18. Gas Density and the Volume Schmidt Law for Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Abramova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The thickness of the equilibrium isothermal gaseous layers and their volume densities \\rho_{gas}(R) in the disc midplane are calculated for 7 spiral galaxies (including our Galaxy) in the frame of self-consistent axisymmetric model. Local velocity dispersions of stellar discs were assumed to be close to marginal values necessary for the discs to be in a stable equilibrium state. Under this condition the stellar discs of at least 5 of 7 galaxies reveal a flaring. Their volume densities decrease with R faster than \\rho_{gas}, and, as a result, the gas dominates by the density at the disc periphery. Comparison of the azimuthally averaged star formation rate SFR with the gas density shows that there is no universal Schmidt law SFR \\rho_{gas}^n, common to all galaxies. Nevertheless, SFR in different galaxies reveals better correlation with the volume gas density than with the column one. Parameter n in the Schmidt law SFR \\rho_{gas}^n, formally calculated by the least square method, lies within 0.8-2.4 range and i...

  19. High-resolution simulations of clump-clump collisions using SPH with Particle Splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Kitsionas, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the phenomenology of star formation triggered by low-velocity collisions between low-mass molecular clumps. The simulations are performed using an SPH code which satisfies the Jeans condition by invoking On-the-Fly Particle Splitting. Clumps are modelled as stable truncated (non-singular) isothermal, i.e. Bonnor-Ebert, spheres. Collisions are characterised by M_0 (clump mass), b (offset parameter, i.e. ratio of impact parameter to clump radius), and M (Mach Number, i.e. ratio of collision velocity to effective post-shock sound speed). The gas subscribes to a barotropic equation of state, which is intended to capture (i) the scaling of pre-collision internal velocity dispersion with clump mass, (ii) post-shock radiative cooling, and (iii) adiabatic heating in optically thick protostellar fragments. The efficiency of star formation is found to vary between 10% and 30% in the different collisions studied and it appears to increase with decreasing M_0, and/or dec...

  20. Kinetic temperature of massive star forming molecular clumps measured with formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.; Zheng, X. W.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Yeh, C. C.; König, C.; Yuan, Y.; He, Y. X.; Li, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. For a general understanding of the physics involved in the star formation process, measurements of physical parameters such as temperature and density are indispensable. The chemical and physical properties of dense clumps of molecular clouds are strongly affected by the kinetic temperature. Therefore, this parameter is essential for a better understanding of the interstellar medium. Formaldehyde, a molecule which traces the entire dense molecular gas, appears to be the most reliable tracer to directly measure the gas kinetic temperature. Aims: We aim to determine the kinetic temperature with spectral lines from formaldehyde and to compare the results with those obtained from ammonia lines for a large number of massive clumps. Methods: Three 218 GHz transitions (JKAKC = 303-202, 322-221, and 321-220) of para-H2CO were observed with the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) toward 30 massive clumps of the Galactic disk at various stages of high-mass star formation. Using the RADEX non-LTE model, we derive the gas kinetic temperature modeling the measured para-H2CO 322-221/303-202 and 321-220/303-202 ratios. Results: The gas kinetic temperatures derived from the para-H2CO (321-220/303-202) line ratios range from 30 to 61 K with an average of 46 ± 9 K. A comparison of kinetic temperature derived from para-H2CO, NH3, and the dust emission indicates that in many cases para-H2CO traces a similar kinetic temperature to the NH3 (2, 2)/(1, 1) transitions and the dust associated with the HII regions. Distinctly higher temperatures are probed by para-H2CO in the clumps associated with outflows/shocks. Kinetic temperatures obtained from para-H2CO trace turbulence to a higher degree than NH3 (2, 2)/(1, 1) in the massive clumps. The non-thermal velocity dispersions of para-H2CO lines are positively correlated with the gas kinetic temperature. The massive clumps are significantly influenced by supersonic non-thermal motions. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only

  1. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  2. Kinetic temperature of massive star forming molecular clumps measured with formaldehyde

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, X D; Menten, K M; Zheng, X W; Esimbek, J; Zhou, J J; Yeh, C C; König, C; Yuan, Y; He, Y X; Li, D L

    2016-01-01

    For a general understanding of the physics involved in the star formation process, measurements of physical parameters such as temperature and density are indispensable. The chemical and physical properties of dense clumps of molecular clouds are strongly affected by the kinetic temperature. Therefore, this parameter is essential for a better understanding of the interstellar medium. Formaldehyde, a molecule which traces the entire dense molecular gas, appears to be the most reliable tracer to directly measure the gas kinetic temperature.We aim to determine the kinetic temperature with spectral lines from formaldehyde and to compare the results with those obtained from ammonia lines for a large number of massive clumps.Three 218 GHz transitions (JKAKC=303-202, 322-221, and 321-220) of para-H2CO were observed with the 15m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) toward 30 massive clumps of the Galactic disk at various stages of high-mass star formation. Using the RADEX non-LTE model, we derive the gas kinetic temp...

  3. Observations of density fluctuations in an elongated Bose gas: ideal gas and quasicondensate regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, J; Trebbia, J-B; Schumm, T; Aspect, A; Westbrook, C I; Bouchoule, I

    2006-04-07

    We report in situ measurements of density fluctuations in a quasi-one-dimensional 87Rb Bose gas at thermal equilibrium in an elongated harmonic trap. We observe an excess of fluctuations compared to the shot-noise level expected for uncorrelated atoms. At low atomic density, the measured excess is in good agreement with the expected "bunching" for an ideal Bose gas. At high density, the measured fluctuations are strongly reduced compared to the ideal gas case. We attribute this reduction to repulsive interatomic interactions. The data are compared with a calculation for an interacting Bose gas in the quasicondensate regime.

  4. Density threshold for plasma detachment in gas target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Mori, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Park, J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The simulated gas target divertor experiment has been performed to investigate the fundamental physics of plasma detachment in the linear plasma device, TPD-I, which has a high heat flux and high density plasma in steady state. The existence of a density threshold for plasma detachment was observed in our experiment. It is found that the electron-ion temperature relaxation process is a key to determine the density dependence of the plasma detachment. (orig.).

  5. Thermodynamics of the low density excluded volume hadron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Zalewski, Kacper

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the influence of the excluded volume of hadrons on macroscopic variables and thermal parameters of the hadron gas at finite temperature and chemical potential in the low density approximation. Based solely on elementary thermodynamics we show that when the excluded volume grows at constant temperature, pressure, and number of particles, the overall volume increases just as much as the excluded volume, while the entropy and energy remain unchanged. The growth of the chemical potentials is equal to the work needed to create the respective excluded volumes. Consequently, the bulk density functions of a gas with excluded volume are expressed by the corresponding variables in a system of point particles with the shifted chemical potentials. Our results are fully consistent with the previous findings obtained upon applications of more advanced methods of statistical physics. A validity limit for the low density approximation is derived and discussed in the context of the hadron gas created in heavy ion c...

  6. Density and metallicity of the Milky Way circumgalactic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitsky, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    The halo of the Milky Way circumgalactic gas extends up to the virial radius of the Galaxy, ˜250 kpc. The halo properties may be deduced from X-ray spectroscopic observations and from studies of the ram-pressure stripping of satellite dwarf galaxies. The former method is more precise, but its results depend crucially on the assumed metallicity of the circumgalactic gas; the latter one does not need these assumptions. Here, the information from both approaches is combined to constrain observationally the gas metallicity and density as functions of the galactocentric distance. It is demonstrated that the two kinds of data could be reconciled if the metallicity decreased to Z ˜ 0.1 Z⊙ in the outer parts of the extended halo. The corresponding gas density profile is rather flat, falling as r-(0.45-0.75) at large galactocentric distances r.

  7. Density and metallicity of the Milky-Way circumgalactic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Troitsky, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The halo of the Milky-Way circumgalactic gas extends up to the virial radius of the Galaxy, ~250 kpc. The halo properties may be deduced from X-ray spectroscopic observations and from studies of the ram-pressure stripping of satellite dwarf galaxies. The former method is more precise but its results depend crucially on the assumed metallicity of the circumgalactic gas; the latter one does not need these assumptions. Here, the information from both approaches is combined to constrain observationally the gas metallicity and density as functions of the galactocentric distance. It is demonstrated that the metallicity decreases in the outer parts of the extended halo.

  8. Star Cluster Formation from Turbulent Clumps. I. The Fast Formation Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Juan P.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the formation and early evolution of star clusters, assuming that they form from a turbulent starless clump of a given mass bounded inside a parent self-gravitating molecular cloud characterized by a particular mass surface density. As a first step, we assume instantaneous star cluster formation and gas expulsion. We draw our initial conditions from observed properties of starless clumps. We follow the early evolution of the clusters up to 20 Myr, investigating the effects of different star formation efficiencies, primordial binary fractions and eccentricities, and primordial mass segregation levels. We investigate clumps with initial masses of {M}{cl}=3000 {M}ȯ embedded in ambient cloud environments with mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{cloud}=0.1 and 1 {{g}} {{cm}}-2. We show that these models of fast star cluster formation result, in the fiducial case, in clusters that expand rapidly, even considering only the bound members. Clusters formed from higher {{{Σ }}}{cloud} environments tend to expand more quickly and thus are soon larger than clusters born from lower {{{Σ }}}{cloud} conditions. To form a young cluster of a given age, stellar mass, and mass surface density, these models need to assume a parent molecular clump that is many times denser, which is unrealistic compared to observed systems. We also show that, in these models, the initial binary properties are only slightly modified by interactions, meaning that the binary properties, e.g., at 20 Myr, are very similar to those at birth. With this study, we set up the foundation for future work, where we will investigate more realistic models of star formation compared to this instantaneous, baseline case.

  9. LPWA using supersonic gas jet with tailored density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, O.; Bohlen, S.; Dale, J.; D'Arcy, R.; Dinter, M.; Erbe, J. H.; Indorf, G.; di Lucchio, L.; Goldberg, L.; Gruse, J. N.; Karstensen, S.; Libov, V.; Ludwig, K.; Martinez de La Ossa, A.; Marutzky, F.; Niroula, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Quast, M.; Schaper, L.; Schwinkendorf, J.-P.; Streeter, M.; Tauscher, G.; Weichert, S.; Palmer, C.; Horbatiuk, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven plasma wakefield accelerators have been explored as a potential compact, reproducible source of relativistic electron bunches, utilising an electric field of many GV/m. Control over injection of electrons into the wakefield is of crucial importance in producing stable, mono-energetic electron bunches. Density tailoring of the target, to control the acceleration process, can also be used to improve the quality of the bunch. By using gas jets to provide tailored targets it is possible to provide good access for plasma diagnostics while also producing sharp density gradients for density down-ramp injection. OpenFOAM hydrodynamic simulations were used to investigate the possibility of producing tailored density targets in a supersonic gas jet. Particle-in-cell simulations of the resulting density profiles modelled the effect of the tailored density on the properties of the accelerated electron bunch. Here, we present the simulation results together with preliminary experimental measurements of electron and x-ray properties from LPWA experiments using gas jet targets and a 25 TW, 25 fs Ti:Sa laser system at DESY.

  10. The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars. III. 12CO Maps and Physical Properties of Dense Clump Envelopes and Their Embedding GMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Hernandez, Audra K.; O'Dougherty, Stefan N.; Schap, William J., III; Muller, Erik

    2016-11-01

    We report the second complete molecular line data release from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP), a large-scale, unbiased, uniform mapping survey at sub-parsec resolution, of millimeter-wave line emission from 303 massive, dense molecular clumps in the Milky Way. This release is for all 12CO J = 1 \\to 0 emission associated with the dense gas, the first from Phase II of the survey, which includes 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. The observed clump emission traced by both 12CO and HCO+ (from Phase I) shows very similar morphology, indicating that, for dense molecular clouds and complexes of all sizes, parsec-scale clumps contain Ξ ˜ 75% of the mass, while only 25% of the mass lies in extended (≳10 pc) or “low density” components in these same areas. The mass fraction of all gas above a density of 109 m-3 is {ξ }9 ≳ 50%. This suggests that parsec-scale clumps may be the basic building blocks of the molecular interstellar medium, rather than the standard GMC concept. Using 12CO emission, we derive physical properties of these clumps in their entirety, and compare them to properties from HCO+, tracing their denser interiors. We compare the standard X-factor converting {I}{12{CO}} to {N}{{{H}}2} with alternative conversions, and show that only the latter give whole-clump properties that are physically consistent with those of their interiors. We infer that the clump population is systematically closer to virial equilibrium than when considering only their interiors, with perhaps half being long-lived (10s of Myr), pressure-confined entities that only terminally engage in vigorous massive star formation, supporting other evidence along these lines that was previously published.

  11. ATLASGAL --- towards a complete sample of massive star forming clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, J S; Csengeri, T; Wyrowski, F; Schuller, F; Hoare, M G; Lumsden, S L; Mottram, J C; Thompson, M A; Menten, K M; Walmsley, C M; Bronfman, L; Pfalzner, S; König, C; Wienen, M

    2014-01-01

    By matching infrared-selected, massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact HII regions in the RMS survey to massive clumps found in the submillimetre ATLASGAL survey, we have identified ~1000 embedded young massive stars between 280\\degr < $\\ell$ < 350\\degr and 10degr < $\\ell$ < 60\\degr with |b|<1.5degr. Combined with an existing sample of radio-selected methanol masers and compact HII regions, the result is a catalogue of ~1700 massive stars embedded within ~1300 clumps located across the inner Galaxy, containing three observationally distinct subsamples, methanol-maser, MYSO and HII-region associations, covering the most important tracers of massive star formation, thought to represent key stages of evolution. We find that massive star formation is strongly correlated with the regions of highest column density in spherical, centrally condensed clumps. We find no significant differences between the three samples in clump structure or the relative location of the embedded stars, which sug...

  12. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we aim to characterize high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al., we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II or photodissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 41.2 per cent, 36.6 per cent, 30.6 per cent and 12.7 per cent, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H2 column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 2.6 × 10-3, 7.0 × 10-3, 6.5 × 10-3 and 5.5 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. These values indicate that infall candidates at later evolutionary stages are still accumulating material efficiently. It is interesting to find that both infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected show a clear trend of increasing mass from the pre-stellar to proto-stellar, and to the H II stages. The power indices of the clump mass function are 2.04 ± 0.16 and 2.17 ± 0.31 for the infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected, respectively, which agree well with the power index of the stellar initial mass function (2.35) and the cold Planck cores (2.0).

  13. Shockwave compression of Ar gas at several initial densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Garcia, Daniel B.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Lang, John M.; Aslam, Tariq D.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Gibson, Lloyd L.; Morris, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental data of the principal Hugoniot locus of variable density gas-phase noble and molecular gases are rare. The majority of shock Hugoniot data is either from shock tube experiments on low-pressure gases or from plate impact experiments on cryogenic, liquefied gases. In both cases, physics regarding shock compressibility, thresholds for the on-set of shock-driven ionization, and even dissociation chemistry are difficult to infer for gases at intermediate densities. We have developed an experimental target design for gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on noble gases at initial pressures between 200-1000 psi. Using optical velocimetry, we are able to directly determine both the shock and particle velocities of the gas on the principal Hugoniot locus, as well as clearly differentiate ionization thresholds. The target design also results in multiply shocking the gas in a quasi-isentropic fashion yielding off-Hugoniot compression data. We describe the results of a series of plate impact experiments on Ar with starting densities between 0.02-0.05 g/cm3 at room temperature. Furthermore, by coupling optical fibers to the targets, we have measured the time-resolved optical emission from the shocked gas using a spectrometer coupled to an optical streak camera to spectrally-resolve the emission, and with a 5-color optical pyrometer for temperature determination.

  14. Remarks on the clump theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    Further details are provided of a soon-to-be published dialog (Phys. Fluids 29 (July, 1986)) which discussed the role of the small scales in fluid clump theory. It is argued that the approximation of the clump lifetime which is compatible with exponentially rapid separation of adjacent orbits is inappropriate for the description of the dynamically important large scales. Various other remarks are made relating to the analytic treatment of strong drift-wave-like turbulence.

  15. A Universal Density Structure for Circum-Galactic Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Jonathan; Prochaska, J Xavier; Werk, Jessica K

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new method to constrain the physical conditions in the cool (~10^4 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) from measurements of ionic columns densities, under two main assumptions: that the cool CGM spans a large range of gas densities, and that small high-density clouds are hierarchically embedded in large low-density clouds. The new method combines (or `stacks') the information available from different sightlines during the photoionization modeling, thus yielding significantly tighter constraints on the CGM properties compared to traditional methods which model each sightline individually. Applying this new technique to the COS-Halos survey of low-redshift ~L* galaxies, we find that we can reproduce all observed ion columns in all 44 galaxies in the sample, from the low-ions to OVI, with a single universal density structure for the cool CGM. The gas densities span the range 50 < \\rho/\\rho_mean < 5x10^5 (\\rho_mean is the cosmic mean), while the physical size of individual clouds scales as ~\\rho^-1,...

  16. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  17. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  18. ATLASGAL --- properties of compact HII regions and their natal clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, J S; Moore, T J T; Purcell, C R; Hoare, M G; Schuller, F; Wyrowski, F; Csengeri, T; Menten, K M; Lumsden, S L; Kurtz, S; Walmsley, C M; Bronfman, L; Morgan, L K; Eden, D J; Russeil, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete sample of molecular clumps containing compact and ultra-compact (UC) HII regions between \\ell=10\\degr and 60\\degr\\ and $|b|<1\\degr, identified by combining the the ATLASGAL submm and CORNISH radio continuum surveys with visual examination of archival infrared data. Our sample is complete to optically thin, compact and UCHII regions driven by a zero age main sequence star of spectral type B0 or earlier embedded within a 1,000 Msun clump. In total we identify 213 compact and UCHII regions, associated with 170 clumps. Unambiguous kinematic distances are derived for these clumps and used to estimate their masses and physical sizes, as well as the Lyman continuum fluxes and sizes of their embedded HII regions. We find a clear lower envelope for the surface density of molecular clumps hosting massive star formation of 0.05 g cm^{-2}, which is consistent with a similar sample of clumps associated with 6.7 GHz masers. The mass of the most massive embedded stars is closely correlated with the ...

  19. Level density of a bose gas and extreme value statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtet, A; Leboeuf, P; Majumdar, Satya N

    2007-02-16

    We establish a connection between the level density of a gas of noninteracting bosons and the theory of extreme value statistics. Depending on the exponent that characterizes the growth of the underlying single-particle spectrum, we show that at a given excitation energy the limiting distribution function for the number of excited particles follows the three universal distribution laws of extreme value statistics, namely, the Gumbel, Weibull, and Fréchet distributions. Implications of this result, as well as general properties of the level density at different energies, are discussed.

  20. Density Functional Theory Studies of Magnetically Confined Fermi Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇俊; 马红孺

    2001-01-01

    A theory is developed for magnetically confined Fermi gas at a low temperature based on the density functional theory. The theory is illustrated by the numerical calculation of the density distributions of Fermi atoms 40K with parameters according to DeMarco and Jin's experiment [Science, 285(1999)1703]. Our results are in close agreement with the experiment. To check the theory, we also performed calculations using our theory at a high temperature, which compared very well to the results of the classical limit.

  1. On the Formation of Molecular Clumps in QSO Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, A.; Scannapieco, E.

    2016-12-01

    We study the origin of the cold molecular clumps in quasar outflows, recently detected in CO and HCN emission. We first describe the physical properties of such radiation-driven outflows and show that a transition from a momentum- to an energy-driven flow must occur at a radial distance of R≈ 0.25 {kpc}. During this transition, the shell of swept-up material fragments due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, but these clumps contain little mass and are likely to be rapidly ablated by the hot gas in which they are immersed. We then explore an alternative scenario in which clumps form from thermal instabilities at R≳ 1 {kpc}, possibly containing enough dust to catalyze molecule formation. We investigate this process with 3D two-fluid (gas+dust) numerical simulations of a kpc3 patch of the outflow, including atomic and dust cooling, thermal conduction, dust sputtering, and photoionization from the QSO radiation field. In all cases, dust grains are rapidly destroyed in ≈ {10}4 years; and while some cold clumps form at later times, they are present only as transient features, which disappear as cooling becomes more widespread. In fact, we only find a stable two-phase medium with dense clumps if we artificially enhance the QSO radiation field by a factor of 100. This result, together with the complete destruction of dust grains, renders the interpretation of molecular outflows a very challenging problem.

  2. The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars. III $^{12}$CO Maps and Physical Properties of Dense Clump Envelopes and their Embedding GMCs

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Peter J; O'Dougherty, Stefan N; Schap, William J; Muller, Erik

    2016-01-01

    We report the second complete molecular line data release from the {\\em Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars} (CHaMP), a large-scale, unbiased, uniform mapping survey at sub-parsec resolution, of mm-wave line emission from 303 massive, dense molecular clumps in the Milky Way. This release is for all $^{12}$CO $J$=1$\\rightarrow$0 emission associated with the dense gas, the first from Phase II of the survey, which includes $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O. The observed clump emission traced by both $^{12}$CO and HCO$^+$ (from Phase I) shows very similar morphology, indicating that, for dense molecular clouds and complexes of all sizes, parsec-scale clumps contain $\\Xi$ ~ 75% of the mass, while only 25% of the mass lies in extended (>~ 10 pc) or "low density" components in these same areas. The mass fraction of all gas above a density 10$^9$ m$^{-3}$ is $\\xi_9$ >~ 50%. This suggests that parsec-scale clumps may be the basic building blocks of the molecular ISM, rather than the standard GMC concept. Usin...

  3. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yu-Xin; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aim to characterise high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz (MALT90) survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al. (2015), we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII or photo-dissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII and PDR stages are 41.2%, 36.6%, 30.6% and 12.7%, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H$_{2}$ column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII and PDR stages are 2.6$\\times$10$^{-3}$, 7.0$\\times$10$^{-3}$, 6.5$\\times$10$^{-3}$ and 5.5$\\times$10$^{-3}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respe...

  4. Estimating the mass density of neutral gas at $z < 1$

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, P; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Pettini, Max

    1997-01-01

    We use the relationships between galactic HI mass and B-band luminosity determined by Rao & Briggs to recalculate the mass density of neutral gas at the present epoch based on more recent measures of the galaxy luminosity function than were available to those authors. We find $\\Omega_{gas}(z=0) value, suggesting that this quantity is now reasonably secure. We then show that, if the scaling between H I mass and B-band luminosity has remained approximately constant since $z = 1$, the evolution of the luminosity function found by the Canada-France redshift survey translates to an increase of obtained quite independently from consideration of the luminosity function of Mg II absorbers at $z = 0.65$. By combining these new estimates with data from damped \\lya systems at higher redshift, it is possible to assemble a rough sketch of the evolution of $Ømega_{gas}$ over the last 90% of the age of the universe. The consumption of H I gas with time is in broad agreement with models of chemical evolution which inclu...

  5. Measuring protoplanetary disk gas surface density profiles with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Jonathan P Williams Conor

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best (2014) to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, Mgas = 0.048 solar masse, and accretion disk characteristic size Rc = 213au and gradient gamma = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2--1 image and indicates an abundance ratio [13CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2--1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3-10 Jupiter masses at 150pc, ALMA observations with a resolutio...

  6. In-spiraling Clumps in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre

    2012-01-01

    Giant star-formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the BCD phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived....

  7. Constraining cloud parameters using high density gas tracers in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kazandjian, M V; Meijerink, R; Israel, F P; Coppola, C M; Rosenberg, M J F; Spaans, M

    2016-01-01

    Far-infrared molecular emission is an important tool used to understand the excitation mechanisms of the gas in the inter-stellar medium of star-forming galaxies. In the present work, we model the emission from rotational transitions with critical densities n >~ 10^4 cm-3. We include 4-3 ~ 30 in order to obtain significant emission from n > 10^4 cm-3 gas. Such Mach numbers are expected in star-forming galaxies, LIRGS, and ULIRGS. By fitting line ratios of HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and HCO+(1-0) for a sample of LIRGS and ULIRGS using mechanically heated PDRs, we constrain the Mach number of these galaxies to 29 < M < 77.

  8. Density excitations of a harmonically trapped ideal gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jai Carol Cruz; C N Kumar; K N Pathak; J Bosse

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic structure factor $S(\\mathbf{q}, )$ of a harmonically trapped Bose gas has been calculated well above the Bose–Einstein condensation temperature by treating the gas cloud as a canonical ensemble of non-interacting classical particles. The static structure factor is found to vanish $\\varpropto q^{2}$ in the long-wavelength limit. We also incorporate a relaxation mechanism phenomenologically by including a stochastic friction force to study $S(\\mathbf{q}, ).$ A significant temperature dependence of the density fluctuation spectra is found. The Debye–Waller factor has been calculated for the trapped thermal cloud as a function of q and the number $\\mathcal{N}$ of atoms. A substantial difference is found for small- and large-$\\mathcal{N}$ clouds.

  9. Brightest Cluster Galaxies and Core Gas Density in REXCESS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, Luke; Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Böhringer, Hans; Croston, Judith H.; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Voit, G. Mark; Arnaud, Monique; Pierini, Daniele

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the relationship between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host clusters using a sample of nearby galaxy clusters from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey. The sample was imaged with the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research in R band to investigate the mass of the old stellar population. Using a metric radius of 12 h -1 kpc, we found that the BCG luminosity depends weakly on overall cluster mass as L BCG vprop M 0.18±0.07 cl, consistent with previous work. We found that 90% of the BCGs are located within 0.035 r 500 of the peak of the X-ray emission, including all of the cool core (CC) clusters. We also found an unexpected correlation between the BCG metric luminosity and the core gas density for non-cool-core (non-CC) clusters, following a power law of ne vprop L 2.7±0.4 BCG (where ne is measured at 0.008 r 500). The correlation is not easily explained by star formation (which is weak in non-CC clusters) or overall cluster mass (which is not correlated with core gas density). The trend persists even when the BCG is not located near the peak of the X-ray emission, so proximity is not necessary. We suggest that, for non-CC clusters, this correlation implies that the same process that sets the central entropy of the cluster gas also determines the central stellar density of the BCG, and that this underlying physical process is likely to be mergers.

  10. Giant clumps in the FIRE simulations: a case study of a massive high-redshift galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Hopkins, Philip F.; Feldmann, Robert; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Murray, Norman

    2017-02-01

    The morphology of massive star-forming galaxies at high redshift is often dominated by giant clumps of mass ˜108-109 M⊙ and size ˜100-1000 pc. Previous studies have proposed that giant clumps might have an important role in the evolution of their host galaxy, particularly in building the central bulge. However, this depends on whether clumps live long enough to migrate from their original location in the disc or whether they get disrupted by their own stellar feedback before reaching the centre of the galaxy. We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) project which implement explicit treatments of stellar feedback and interstellar medium physics to study the properties of these clumps. We follow the evolution of giant clumps in a massive (M* ˜ 1010.8 M⊙ at z = 1), discy, gas-rich galaxy from redshift z ≳ 2 to z = 1. Even though the clumpy phase of this galaxy lasts over a gigayear, individual gas clumps are short-lived, with mean lifetime of massive clumps of ˜20 Myr. During that time, they turn between 0.1 per cent and 20 per cent of their gas into stars before being disrupted, similar to local giant molecular clouds. Clumps with M ≳ 107 M⊙ account for ˜20 per cent of the total star formation in the galaxy during the clumpy phase, producing ˜1010 M⊙ of stars. We do not find evidence for net inward migration of clumps within the galaxy. The number of giant clumps and their mass decrease at lower redshifts, following the decrease in the overall gas fraction and star formation rate.

  11. Plasma density perturbation caused by probes at low gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Natalia; Godyak, Valery

    2017-09-01

    An analysis of plasma parameter perturbations caused by a spherical probe immersed into a spherical plasma is presented for arbitrary collisionality and arbitrary ratios of probe to plasma dimensions. The plasma was modeled by the fluid plasma equations with ion inertia and nonlinear ion friction force that dominate plasma transport at low gas pressures. Significant depletion of the plasma density around the probe surface has been found. The area of plasma depletion coincides with the sensing area of different kinds of magnetic and microwave probes and will therefore lead to errors in data inferred from measurements with such probes.

  12. Superfluid density of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Yu, Zeng-Qiang; Ng, Tai Kai; Zhang, Shizhong; Pitaevskii, Lev; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the superfluid properties of a uniform, weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensed gas with spin-orbit coupling, realized recently in experiments. We find a finite normal fluid density ρn at zero temperature which turns out to be a function of the Raman coupling. In particular, the entire fluid becomes normal at the transition point from the zero momentum to the plane wave phase, even though the condensate fraction remains finite. We emphasize the crucial role played by the breaking of Galilean invariance and by the gapped branch of the elementary excitations whose contribution to various sum rules is discussed explicitly. Our predictions for the superfluid density are successfully compared with the available experimental results based on the measurement of the sound velocities.

  13. Long Range Potential Effects in Low Density Krypton Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formisano, F.; Barocchi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Formisano, F.; Barocchi, F.; Magli, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Sezione di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Benmore, C.J.; Egelstaff, P.A. [Physics Department, University of Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (CANADA); Bafile, U. [Istituto di Elettronica Quantistica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Panciatichi 56/30, I-50127 Firenze (Italy); Magli, R. [Dipartimento di Energetica S. Stecco, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via di S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Verkerk, P. [Interfacultair Reactor Instituut, Technische Universiteit Delft, 2629 JB Delft (The Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in low density {sup 86}Kr gas has been performed in order to measure the small-k behavior of the static structure factor S(k) . Three number densities between 1.52 and 2.42 nm{sup {minus}3} along the T=297 K isotherm have been studied. The small-k dependence of the Fourier transform c(k) of the direct correlation function c(r) has been derived. The experimental determination of the k{sup 3} term in the behavior of c(k) has led to a direct measurement of the London dispersion interaction in the pair potential of krypton. Also the contribution of the three-body potential in the asymptotic behavior of c(r) has been observed and related to the magnitude of the three-body interaction potential. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. A Study of the Relation between Star Formation and Molecular Clumps on Subparsec Scales in 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, O.; Meixner, M.; Indebetouw, R.; De Marchi, G.; Koekemoer, A.; Panagia, N.; Sabbi, E.

    2016-11-01

    We present 12CO and 13CO molecular gas data observed by ALMA, massive early-stage young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by applying color–magnitude cuts to Spitzer and Herschel photometry, and low-mass late-stage YSOs identified via {{H}}α excess. Using dendrograms, we derive properties for the molecular cloud structures. This is the first time a dendrogram analysis has been applied to extragalactic clouds. The majority of clumps have a virial parameter equal to unity or less. The size–linewidth relations of 12CO and 13CO show the clumps in this study have a larger linewidth for a given size (by factors of 3.8 and 2.5, respectively) in comparison to several, but not all, previous studies. The larger linewidths in 30 Doradus compared to typical Milky Way quiescent clumps are probably due to the former’s highly energetic environmental conditions. The slopes of the size–linewidth relations of 12CO, 0.65 ± 0.04, and 13CO, 0.97 ± 0.12, are on the higher end but consistent within 3σ of those of previous studies. Massive star formation occurs in clumps with high masses (>1.83 × 102 M ⊙), high linewidths (v > 1.18 km s‑1), and high mass densities (>6.67 × 102 M ⊙ pc‑2). The majority of embedded, massive YSOs are associated with a clump; however, the majority of more evolved, low-mass YSOs are not.

  15. Clumps and triggered star formation in ionised molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Walch, S; Bisbas, T G; Wunsch, R; Hubber, D A

    2013-01-01

    Infrared shells and bubbles are ubiquitous in the Galaxy and can generally be associated with HII regions formed around young, massive stars. In this paper, we use high-resolution 3D SPH simulations to explore the effect of a single O7 star emitting photons at 10^49 1/s and located at the centre of a molecular cloud with mass 10^4 M_sun and radius 6.4 pc; the internal structure of the cloud is characterised by its fractal dimension, D (with 2.0 <= D <= 2.8), and the variance of its (log-normal) density distribution, sigma_0^2 (with 0.36 <= sigma_0^2 <= 1.42). Our study focuses on the morphology of the swept-up cold gas and the distribution and statistics of the resulting star formation. If the fractal dimension is low, the border of the HII region is dominated by extended shell-like structures, and these break up into a small number of massive high-density clumps which then spawn star clusters; star formation occurs relatively quickly, and delivers somewhat higher stellar masses. Conversely, if th...

  16. Star Formation Triggered by Low-Mass Clump Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsionas, Spyridon; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    We investigate by means of high-resolution numerical simulations the phenomenology of star formation triggered by low-velocity collisions between low-mass molecular clumps. The simulations are performed using an SPH code which satisfies the Jeans condition by invoking On-the-Fly Particle Splitting (Kitsionas & Whitworth 2002). The efficiency of star formation appears to increase with increasing clump mass and/or decreasing impact parameter b and/or increasing clump velocity. For bcompressed layers which fragment into filaments that break up into cores. Protostellar objects then condense out of the cores and accrete from them. The resulting accretion rates are comparable to those of Class 0 objects. The densities in the filaments are sufficient that they could be mapped in ammonia or CS line radiation in nearby star formation regions. The phenomenology of star formation observed in our simulations compares rather well with the observed filamentary distribution of young stars in Taurus (Hartmann 2002).

  17. INFLUENCE OF THE GAS-DENSITY ON THE GAS ENTRAINMENT RATE AND GAS HOLD-UP IN LOOP-VENTURI REACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CRAMERS, PHMR; VANDIERENDONCK, LL; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a loop-venturi reactor were investigated using a downflow liquid jet ejector. Both the gas entrainment rate of the ejector and the gas hold-up in the main holding vessel were shown to be influenced by the gas density. The amount of volumetrically entrained gas as well as the gas

  18. INFLUENCE OF THE GAS-DENSITY ON THE GAS ENTRAINMENT RATE AND GAS HOLD-UP IN LOOP-VENTURI REACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CRAMERS, PHMR; VANDIERENDONCK, LL; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a loop-venturi reactor were investigated using a downflow liquid jet ejector. Both the gas entrainment rate of the ejector and the gas hold-up in the main holding vessel were shown to be influenced by the gas density. The amount of volumetrically entrained gas as well as the gas

  19. Binary Collision Density in a Non-Ideal Gas as a Function of Particle Density, Collision Diameter, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, binary collision density in a dense non-ideal gas with Lennard-Jones interactions is investigated. It is shown that the functional form of the dependence of collision density on particle density and collision diameter remains the same as that for an ideal gas. The temperature dependence of the collision density, however, has a very different form at low temperatures, where it decreases as temperature increases. But at higher temperatures the functional form becomes the same as that for an ideal gas.

  20. The ALMA View of Dense Molecular Gas in 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Indebetouw, Remy; Brogan, Crystal L.; Hunter, Todd R.; Leroy, Adam

    2017-01-01

    At a distance of 50 kpc, the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) hosts several sites of star formation including R136, a starburst region home to dozens of evolved O stars. The intense radiation from R136 creates an extreme environment for nearby star formation in such a low-metallicity, low mass galaxy. We have targeted a star-forming region ~15 pc away from R136 within 30 Doradus using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to map the molecular gas to study the sites of star formation. We are conducting a clump-by-clump analysis of the intensities and line ratios of dense gas (HCO+, HCN, CS, H13CO+, H13CN) and diffuse gas (CO, 13CO, C18O) tracers at sub-parsec resolution. We identify and characterize ~100 molecular clumps within the region. With the observed molecular species, we aim to determine the physical conditions of each clump (e.g. size, internal turbulence, molecular abundance). We compare the intensities and line ratios to non-LTE Radex model grids of the excitation temperature, molecular column density, and volume density of the H2 collider to determine the physical excitation conditions within the clumps. We compare these properties of each clump to both associated and embedded star formation properties to quantify the relative importance of internal feedback from the star formation itself versus external feedback processes from R136 and determine which process dominates in this region.

  1. On the Formation of Molecular Clumps in QSO Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We study the origin of the cold molecular clumps in quasar outflows, recently detected in CO and HCN emission. We first describe the physical properties of such radiation-driven outflows and show that a transition from a momentum- to an energy-driven flow must occur at a radial distance of R ~ 0.25 kpc. During this transition, the shell of swept up material fragments due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, but these clumps contain little mass and are likely to be rapidly ablated by the hot gas in which they are immersed. We then explore an alternative scenario in which clumps form from thermal instabilities at R >~ 1 kpc, possibly containing enough dust to catalyze molecule formation. We investigate this processes with 3D two-fluid (gas+dust) numerical simulations of a kpc^3 patch of the outflow, including atomic and dust cooling, thermal conduction, dust sputtering, and photoionization from the QSO radiation field. In all cases, dust grains are rapidly destroyed in ~10,000 years; and while some cold clumps for...

  2. Discharge dynamics and plasma density recovery by on/off switches of additional gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang, E-mail: lhc@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Deuk-Chul [Plasma Technology Research Center, Nation Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, SeungJu; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Measurement of the plasma density is investigated to study plasma dynamics by adding reactive gas (O{sub 2}) or rare gas (He) in Ar plasmas. When the O{sub 2} or He gas is added, plasma density is suddenly decreased, while the plasma density recovers slowly with gas off. It is found that the recovery time is strongly dependent on the gas flow rate, and it can be explained by effect of gas residence time. When the He gas is off in the Ar plasma, the plasma density is overshot compared to the case of the O{sub 2} gas pulsing due to enhanced ionizations by metastable atoms. Analysis and calculation for correlation between the plasma density dynamics and the gas pulsing are also presented in detail.

  3. Producing baryons from neutralinos in small H2 clumps over cosmological ages

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, Edmond

    2012-01-01

    Extreme scattering events in quasars suggest the existence of dark H2 clumps of mass $\\rm \\sim 10^{-3} sim M_\\odot$ and size $\\rm \\sim 10 AU$. Such H2 clumps are extremely dense compared to WIMPs clumps of the same mass obtained by N-body simulations. A WIMP clump seeded by an H2 clump experiences a first infall during which its density increases by $\\rm 10^6$ in $\\rm \\sim 1 Myr$. In this poster I begin to explore the phenomenology of mixed clumps made with H2 and WIMPs. Molecular clouds built with clumps are efficient machines to transform smooth distributions of WIMPs into concentrated networks. If WIMPs are neutralinos trapped in such moleular clouds, they may either enrich the baryon sector over cosmological ages, or remain mixed with cold H2 clouds until the clumps evaporate either by collision or by stellar UV heating. One of the main drawbacks of CDM profiles, their overly dense cores, is briefly revisited in this context.

  4. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  5. Implementing an Inexpensive and Accurate Introductory Gas Density Activity with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W. Patrick; Joseph, Christopher; Morey, Samantha; Santos Romo, Ana; Shope, Cullen; Strang, Jonathan; Yang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A simplified activity examined gas density while employing cost-efficient syringes in place of traditional glass bulbs. The exercise measured the density of methane, with very good accuracy and precision, in both first-year high school and AP chemistry settings. The participating students were tasked with finding the density of a gas. The…

  6. Giant clumps in the FIRE simulations: a case study of a massive high-redshift galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Oklopcic, Antonija; Feldmann, Robert; Keres, Dusan; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of massive star-forming galaxies at high redshift is often dominated by giant clumps of mass ~10^8-10^9 Msun and size ~100-1000 pc. Previous studies have proposed that giant clumps might have an important role in the evolution of their host galaxy, particularly in building the central bulge. However, this depends on whether clumps live long enough to migrate from their original location in the disc or whether they get disrupted by their own stellar feedback before reaching the centre of the galaxy. We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) project that implement explicit treatments of stellar feedback and ISM physics to study the properties of these clumps. We follow the evolution of giant clumps in a massive (stellar mass ~10^10.8 Msun at z=1), discy, gas-rich galaxy from redshift z>2 to z=1. Even though the clumpy phase of this galaxy lasts over a gigayear, individual gas clumps are short-lived, with mean lifetime of massive clumps of ~2...

  7. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburello, Valentina; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2014-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled SPH simulations of high-z galaxies. We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps is difficult, requiring disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have $V_{max} > 200$ km/s at $z \\sim 2$, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts. Clumps have typical masses $\\sim 10^7 M_{\\odot}$. Clumps with mass $\\sim 10^8 M_{\\odot}$ are rare, as they require clump-clump merging and sustained mass accretion for a few orbital times, while normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on the way o...

  8. Neutralino Clumps and Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Salati, P

    2007-01-01

    The halo of the Miky Way might contain numerous and dense substructures inside which the putative weakly interacting massive particles (suggested as the main constituent of the astronomical dark matter) would produce a stronger annihilation signal than in the smooth regions. The closer the nearest clump, the larger the positron and antiproton cosmic ray fluxes at the Earth. But the actual distribution of these substructures is not known. The predictions on the antimatter yields at the Earth are therefore affected by a kind of cosmic variance whose analysis is the subject of this contribution. The statistical tools to achieve that goal are presented and Monte Carlo simulations are compared to analytic results.

  9. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2015-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled simulations of high-z galaxies using the GASOLINE2 code, which includes a modern, numerically robust SPH implementation.We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps requires disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have Vmax > 200 km/s at z ˜ 2, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts.Less than 50 Myr after formation, clumps have stellar masses in the range 4 × 106 - 5 × 107 M⊙.Formation of clumps with mass exceeding ˜108 M⊙ is a rare occurrence, since it requires mergers between multiple massive clumps, as we verified by tracing back in time the particles belonging to such clumps. Such mergers happen after a few orbital times (˜200-300 Myr), but normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on shorter timescales.Clump sizes are in the range 100-500 pc. We argue that giant clumps identified in observations (˜109 M⊙ and 1 kpc in size) might either have a different origin, such as minor mergers and clumpy gas accretion, or their sizes and masses may be overestimated due to resolution issues.Using an analytical model, already developed to explain the fragmentation scale in gravitationally unstable 3D protoplanetary discs, we can predict fairly accurately the characteristic gaseous masses of clumps soon after fragmentation, when standard Toome analysis becomes invalid.Due to their modest size, clumps have little effect on bulge growth as they migrate to the center. In our unstable discs a small bulge can form irrespective of

  10. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING). III. The Dependence of Atomic and Molecular Gas Surface Densities on Galaxy Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Tony; Bolatto, Alberto D; Leroy, Adam K; Blitz, Leo; Rosolowsky, Erik; Bigiel, Frank; Fisher, David B; Ott, Jürgen; Rahman, Nurur; Vogel, Stuart N; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the correlation between CO and HI emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the HI column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee & Krumholz, which balances H_2 formation and dissociation. The observed HI column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe HI column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse HI component that did not contribute to H_2 shielding. We also find that the H_2 column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stella...

  11. Chemistry of dense clumps near moving Herbig-Haro objects

    CERN Document Server

    Christie, Helen; Williams, David; Girart, Josep-Miquel; Morata, Oscar; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19032.x

    2011-01-01

    Localised regions of enhanced emission from HCO+, NH3 and other species near Herbig-Haro objects (HHOs) have been interpreted as arising in a photochemistry stimulated by the HHO radiation on high density quiescent clumps in molecular clouds. Static models of this process have been successful in accounting for the variety of molecular species arising ahead of the jet; however recent observations show that the enhanced molecular emission is widespread along the jet as well as ahead. Hence, a realistic model must take into account the movement of the radiation field past the clump. It was previously unclear as to whether the short interaction time between the clump and the HHO in a moving source model would allow molecules such as HCO+ to reach high enough levels, and to survive for long enough to be observed. In this work we model a moving radiation source that approaches and passes a clump. The chemical picture is qualitatively unchanged by the addition of the moving source, strengthening the idea that enhanc...

  12. Chemistry of dense clumps near moving Herbig-Haro objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Williams, D. A.; Girart, J. M.; Morata, O.

    2011-09-01

    Localized regions of enhanced emission from HCO+, NH3 and other species near Herbig-Haro objects (HHOs) have been interpreted as arising in a photochemistry stimulated by the HHO radiation on high-density quiescent clumps in molecular clouds. Static models of this process have been successful in accounting for the variety of molecular species arising ahead of the jet; however, recent observations show that the enhanced molecular emission is widespread along the jet as well as ahead. Hence, a realistic model must take into account the movement of the radiation field past the clump. It was previously unclear as to whether the short interaction time between the clump and the HHO in a moving source model would allow molecules such as HCO+ to reach high enough levels, and to survive for long enough to be observed. In this work we model a moving radiation source that approaches and passes a clump. The chemical picture is qualitatively unchanged by the addition of the moving source, strengthening the idea that enhancements are due to evaporation of molecules from dust grains. In addition, in the case of several molecules, the enhanced emission regions are longer lived. Some photochemically induced species, including methanol, are expected to maintain high abundances for ˜104 yr.

  13. Brightest Cluster Galaxies and Core Gas Density in REXCESS Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Haarsma, D B; Donahue, M; Bruch, S; Boehringer, H; Croston, J H; Pratt, G W; Voit, G M; Arnaud, M; Pierini, D

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host clusters using a sample of nearby galaxy clusters from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS). The sample was imaged with the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) in R band to investigate the mass of the old stellar population. Using a metric radius of 12h^-1 kpc, we find that the BCG luminosity depends weakly on overall cluster mass as L_BCG \\propto M_cl^0.18+-0.07, consistent with previous work. We found that 90% of the BCGs are located within 0.035 R_500 of the peak of the X-ray emission, including all of the cool core (CC) clusters. We also found an unexpected correlation between the BCG metric luminosity and the core gas density for non-cool core (non-CC) clusters, following a power law of n_e \\propto L_BCG^2.7+-0.4 (where n_e is measured at 0.008 R_500). The correlation is not easily explained by star formation (which is weak in non-CC clusters) or overall cluster mass (wh...

  14. A Deuteration Survey of the Clump Population in the Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrici, Andrew Scott; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent maps of dust continuum emission from entire molecular clouds at submillimeter wavelengths have made it possible to survey and study the chemistry of entire core and clump populations within a single cloud. One very strong chemical process in star-forming regions is the fractionation of deuterium in molecules, which results in an increase in the deuterium ratio many orders of magnitude over the ISM [D]/[H] ratio and provides a chemical probe of cold, dense regions. We present a survey of DCO+ 3-2 and N2D+ 3-2 toward the clump population in the high-mass, star-forming Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud identified from 1.1 mm continuum imaging by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. The peak 1.1 mm continuum positions of 52 clumps in the range 188°≤ l ≤194° were observed with the 10m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We find that DCO+ emission is detected toward 90% of the clumps with a median deuterium ratio of 0.01 while N2D+ emission is detected toward only 25% of the clumps. The DCO+ fractionation anti-correlates with gas kinetic temperature and linewidth, a measure of the amount of turbulence within the clumps. We compare the deuteration ratios of with physical properties of the clumps and their evolutionary stage.

  15. A desert of gas giant planets beyond tens of au

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Direct imaging observations constrain the fraction of stars orbited by gas giant planets with separations greater than 10 au to about 0.01 only. This is widely believed to indicate that massive protoplanetary discs rarely fragment on planetary mass objects. I use numerical simulations of gas clumps embedded in massive gas discs to show that these observations are consistent with $\\sim 0.2 - 10$ planetary mass clumps per star being born in young gravitationally unstable discs. A trio of processes -- rapid clump migration, tidal disruption and runaway gas accretion -- destroys or transforms all of the simulated clumps into other objects, resulting in a desert of gas giants beyond separation of approximately 10 au. The cooling rate of the disc controls which of the three processes is dominant. For cooling rates faster than a few local dynamical times, clumps always grow rapidly and become massive brown dwarfs or low mass stars. For longer cooling times, post-collapse (high density) planets migrate inward to $\\si...

  16. Kinetic isotope effects in the OH and Cl reactions of the clumped methane species 13CH3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Magnus

    Methane is an potent greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide of the anthropogenic greenhouse gases in its influence on Earth’s radiative budget. Although less abundant in the atmosphere, methane’s global warming potential is about twentyeight times that of carbon dioxide. Sources of methane...... at significantly different temperatures, therefore, the clumped isotope signatures of methane can be used to identify the process by which the gas was formed. Clumped isotopes can thus be a helpful tool in refining the budget of atmospheric methane. However, the isotopic composition of the atmospheric methane pool....... As is proven in the current research project, the clumped isotopes are removed by oxidation mechanisms at a slower rate. The residual methane pool is therefore enriched in clumped isotopes compared to the methane from the sources. In order to construct a top-down budget of methane, the clumped kinetic effect...

  17. Effects of Mean Flow Profiles on Instability of a Low-Density Gas Jet Injected into a High-Density Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantam, Nanda Kishore

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the mean flow profiles on the instability characteristics in the near-injector region of low-density gas jets injected into high-density ambient gas mediums. To achieve this, a linear temporal stability analysis and a spatio-temporal stability analysis of a low-density round gas jet injected vertically upwards into a high-density ambient gas were performed by assuming three different sets of mean velocity and density profiles. The flow was assumed to be isothermal and locally parallel. Viscous and diffusive effects were ignored. The mean flow parameters were represented as the sum of the mean value and a small normal-mode fluctuation. A second order differential equation governing the pressure disturbance amplitude was derived from the basic conservation equations. The first set of mean velocity and density profiles assumed were those used by Monkewitz and Sohn for investigating absolute instability in hot jets. The second set of velocity and density profiles assumed for this study were the ones used by Lawson. And the third set of mean profiles included a parabolic velocity profile and a hyperbolic tangent density profile. The effects of the inhomogeneous shear layer and the Froude number (signifying the effects of gravity) on the temporal and spatio-temporal results for each set of mean profiles were delineated. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. A unified model for the maximum mass scales of molecular clouds, stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina-Campos, Marta; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2017-08-01

    We present a simple, self-consistent model to predict the maximum masses of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps as a function of the galactic environment. Recent works have proposed that these maximum masses are set by shearing motions and centrifugal forces, but we show that this idea is inconsistent with the low masses observed across an important range of local-Universe environments, such as low-surface density galaxies and galaxy outskirts. Instead, we propose that feedback from young stars can disrupt clouds before the global collapse of the shear-limited area is completed. We develop a shear-feedback hybrid model that depends on three observable quantities: the gas surface density, the epicylic frequency and the Toomre parameter. The model is tested in four galactic environments: the Milky Way, the Local Group galaxy M31, the spiral galaxy M83 and the high-redshift galaxy zC406690. We demonstrate that our model simultaneously reproduces the observed maximum masses of GMCs, clumps and clusters in each of these environments. We find that clouds and clusters in M31 and in the Milky Way are feedback-limited beyond radii of 8.4 and 4 kpc, respectively, whereas the masses in M83 and zC406690 are shear-limited at all radii. In zC406690, the maximum cluster masses decrease further due to their inspiral by dynamical friction. These results illustrate that the maximum masses change from being shear-limited to being feedback-limited as galaxies become less gas rich and evolve towards low shear. This explains why high-redshift clumps are more massive than GMCs in the local Universe.

  19. The Clump Mass Function of the Dense Clouds in the Carina Nebula Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Pekruhl, Stephanie; Schuller, Frederic; Menten, Karl

    2012-01-01

    We want to characterize the properties of the cold dust clumps in the Carina Nebula Complex (CNC), which shows a very high level of massive star feedback. We derive the Clump Mass Function (ClMF), explore the reliability of different clump extraction algorithms, and investigate the influence of the temperatures within the clouds on the resulting shape of the ClMF. We analyze a 1.25x1.25 deg^2 wide-field sub-mm map obtained with LABOCA (APEX), which provides the first spatially complete survey of the clouds in the CNC. We use the three clump-finding algorithms CLUMPFIND (CF), GAUSSCLUMPS (GC) and SExtractor (SE) to identify individual clumps and determine their total fluxes. In addition to assuming a common `typical' temperature for all clouds, we also employ an empirical relation between cloud column densities and temperature to determine an estimate of the individual clump temperatures, and use this to determine individual clump masses. While the ClMF based on the CF extraction is very well described by a po...

  20. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  1. Heating Cold Clumps by Jet-inflated Bubbles in Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hillel, Shlomi

    2014-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of dense-cool clumps embedded in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of cooling flow clusters of galaxies in response to multiple jet-activity cycles, and find that the main heating process of the clumps is mixing with the hot shocked jets' gas, the bubbles, while shocks have a limited role. We use the PLUTO hydrodynamical code in 2.5 dimensions, i.e., 3D with imposed axisymmetry, to follow the thermal evolution of the clumps. We find that the inflation process of hot bubbles, that appear as X-ray deficient cavities in observations, is accompanied by complicated induced vortices inside and around the bubbles. These vortices induce efficient mixing of the hot bubbles' gas with the ICM and cool clumps, resulting in a substantial increase of the temperature and entropy of the clumps. For the parameters used by us heating by shocks barely competes with radiative cooling, even after 25 consecutive shocks excited during 0.5 Gyr of simulation. Some clumps are shaped to filamentary structure that...

  2. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  3. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  4. Breakup of particle clumps on liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurupatham, S.; Hossain, M.; Dalal, B.; Fischer, I.; Singh, P.; Joseph, D.

    2011-11-01

    In this talk we describe the mechanism by which clumps of some powdered materials breakup and disperse on a liquid surface to form a monolayer of particles. We show that a clump breaks up because when particles on its outer periphery come in contact with the liquid surface they are pulled into the interface by the vertical component of capillary force overcoming the cohesive forces which keep them attached, and then these particles move away from the clump. In some cases, the clump itself is broken into smaller pieces and then these smaller pieces break apart by the aforementioned mechanism. The newly-adsorbed particles move away from the clump, and each other, because when particles are adsorbed on a liquid surface they cause a flow on the interface away from themselves. This flow may also cause particles newly-exposed on the outer periphery of the clump to break away. Since millimeter-sized clumps can breakup and spread on a liquid surface within a few seconds, their behavior appears to be similar to that of some liquid drops which can spontaneously disperse on solid surfaces.

  5. Estimating Savanna Clumping Index Using Hemispherical Photographs Integrated with High Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to herbaceous canopies and forests, savannas are grassland ecosystems with sparsely distributed individual trees, so the canopy is spatially heterogeneous and open, whereas the woody cover in savannas, e.g., tree cover, adversely affects ecosystem structures and functions. Studies have shown that the dynamics of canopy structure are related to available water, climate, and human activities in the form of porosity, leaf area index (LAI, and clumping index (CI. Therefore, it is important to identify the biophysical parameters of savanna ecosystems, and undertake practical actions for savanna conservation and management. The canopy openness presents a challenge for evaluating canopy LAI and other biophysical parameters, as most remotely sensed methods were developed for homogeneous and closed canopies. Clumping index is a key variable that can represent the clumping effect from spatial distribution patterns of components within a canopy. However, it is a difficult task to measure the clumping index of the moderate resolution savanna pixels directly using optical instruments, such as the Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies, LAI-2000 Canopy Analyzer, or digital hemispherical photography. This paper proposed a new method using hemispherical photographs combined with high resolution remote sensing images to estimate the clumping index of savanna canopies. The effects of single tree LAI, crown density, and herbaceous layer on the clumping index of savanna pixels were also evaluated. The proposed method effectively calculated the clumping index of moderate resolution pixels. The clumping indices of two study regions located in Ejina Banner and Weichang were compared with the clumping index product over China’s landmass.

  6. An extremely young massive clump forming by gravitational collapse in a primordial galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Zanella, A; Floc'h, E Le; Bournaud, F; Gobat, R; Valentino, F; Strazzullo, V; Cibinel, A; Onodera, M; Perret, V; Renaud, F; Vignali, C

    2015-01-01

    When the cosmic star formation history peaks (z ~ 2), galaxies vigorously fed by cosmic reservoirs are gas dominated and contain massive star-forming clumps, thought to form by violent gravitational instabilities in highly turbulent gas-rich disks. However, a clump formation event has not been witnessed yet, and it is debated whether clumps survive energetic feedback from young stars, thus migrating inwards to form galaxy bulges. Here we report spatially resolved spectroscopy of a bright off-nuclear emission line region in a galaxy at z = 1.987. Although this region dominates the star formation in the galaxy disk, its stellar continuum remains undetected in deep imaging, revealing an extremely young (age 10$^9$ M$_{\\odot}$ of gas. Gas consumption in this young clump is > 10 times faster than in the host galaxy, displaying high star formation efficiency during this phase, in agreement with our hydrodynamic simulations. The frequency of older clumps with similar masses coupled with our initial estimate of thei...

  7. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  8. Energy budget of forming clumps in numerical simulations of collapsing clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, Vianey; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Gómez, Gilberto C; Fall, S Michael; Mata-Chávez, M Dolores

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the physical properties and energy balance of density enhancements in two SPH simulations of the formation, evolution, and collapse of giant molecular clouds. In the simulations, no feedback is included, and so all motions are due either to the initial, decaying turbulence, or to gravitational contraction. We define the clumps as connected regions above a series of density thresholds.The resulting full set of clumps follow the generalized energy-equipartition relation $\\sigma_{v}/R^{1/2} \\propto \\Sigma^{1/2}$, where $\\sigma_{v}$ is the velocity dispersion, $R$ is the "radius", and $\\Sigma$ is the column density. We interpret this as a natural consequence of gravitational contraction at all scales, rather than virial equilibrium. However, clumps sub-samples selected by means of different criteria exhibit different scalings with size. Clumps selected by column density ranges follow Larson-like relations and clumps defined at lower density thresholds tend to show a larger scatter around equipartition....

  9. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  10. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  11. Clump stars in the Solar Neighbourhood

    OpenAIRE

    Girardi, Leo

    1999-01-01

    Hipparcos data has allowed the identification of a large number of clump stars in the Solar Neighbourhood. We discuss our present knowledge about their distributions of masses, ages, colours, magnitudes, and metallicities. We point out that the age distribution of clump stars is ``biased'' towards intermediate-ages. Therefore, the metallicity information they contain is different from that provided by the local G dwarfs. Since accurate abundance determinations are about to become available, t...

  12. Herschel Reveals Massive Cold Clumps in NGC 7538

    CERN Document Server

    Fallscheer, C; Di Francesco, J; Martin, P G; Hennemann, M; Hill, T; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Motte, F; Men'shchikov, A; Andre, Ph; Ward-Thompson, D; Griffin, M; Kirk, J; Konyves, V; Rygl, K L J; Sauvage, M; Schneider, N; Anderson, L D; Benedettini, M; Bernard, J -P; Bontemps, S; Ginsburg, A; Molinari, S; Polychroni, D; Rivera-Ingraham, A; Roussel, H; Testi, L; White, G; Williams, J P; Wilson, C D; Wong, M; Zavagno, A

    2013-01-01

    We present the first overview of the Herschel observations of the nearby high-mass star-forming region NGC 7538, taken as part of the Herschel imaging study of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS) Key Programme. These PACS and SPIRE maps cover an approximate area of one square degree at five submillimeter and far-infrared wavebands. We have identified 780 dense sources and classified 224 of those. With the intention of investigating the existence of cold massive starless or class 0-like clumps that would have the potential to form intermediate- to high-mass stars, we further isolate 13 clumps as the most likely candidates for followup studies. These 13 clumps have masses in excess of 40 M_sun and temperatures below 15 K. They range in size from 0.4 pc to 2.5 pc and have densities between 3x10^3 cm^-3 to 4x10^4 cm^-3. Spectral energy distributions are then used to characterize their energetics and evolutionary state through a luminosity-mass diagram. NGC 7538 has a highly filamentary structure, previously unseen i...

  13. Local kinetic-energy density of the Airy gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.; Kollár, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Airy gas model is used to derive an expression for the local kinetic energy in the linear potential approximation. The expression contains an explicit Laplacian term 2/5((h) over bar(2)/2m)del(mu)(2)(r) that, according to jellium surface calculations, must be a universal feature of any accura...

  14. Probing the clumping structure of Giant Molecular Clouds through the spectrum, polarisation and morphology of X-ray Reflection Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Margherita; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a method for probing global properties of clump populations in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) in the case where these act as X-ray reflection nebulae (XRNe), based on the study of the clumping's overall effect on the reflected X-ray signal, in particular on the Fe K-alpha line's shoulder. We consider the particular case of Sgr B2, one of the brightest and most massive XRN in our Galaxy. We parametrise the gas distribution inside the cloud using a simple clumping model, with the slope of the clump mass function (alpha), the minimum clump mass (m_{min}), the fraction of the cloud's mass contained in clumps (f_{DGMF}), and the mass-size relation of individual clumps as free parameters, and investigate how these affect the reflected X-ray spectrum. In the case of very dense clumps, similar to those presently observed in Sgr B2, these occupy a small volume of the cloud and present a small projected area to the incoming X-ray radiation. We find that these contribute negligibly to the scattered X-rays. Clu...

  15. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Heyer, M; Urquhart, J S; Csengeri, T; Wienen, M; Leurini, S; Menten, K; Wyrowski, F

    2016-01-01

    Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. A sample of 24 micron-based Class~I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f*, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 m...

  16. The structure of molecular clumps around high-mass young stellar objects

    CERN Document Server

    Fontani, F; Caselli, P; Olmi, L

    2002-01-01

    We have used the IRAM 30-m and FCRAO 14-m telescopes to observe the molecular clumps associated with 12 ultracompact (UC) HII regions in the J=6-5, 8-7 and 13-12 rotational transitions of methyl-acetylene (CH3C2H). Under the assumption of LTE and optically thin emission, we have derived temperature estimates ranging from 30 to 56 K. We estimate that the clumps have diameters of 0.2-1.6 pc, H_2 densities of 10^5-10^6 {cm^{-3}}, and masses of 10^2-2 10^4 M_\\odot. We compare these values with those obtained by other authors from different molecular tracers and find that the H_2 density and the temperature inside the clumps vary respectively like n_{H_2} ~ R^{-2.6} and T ~ R^{-0.5}, with R distance from the centre. We also find that the virial masses of the clumps are ~3 times less than those derived from the CH3C2H column densities: we show that a plausible explanation is that magnetic fields play an important role to stabilise the clumps, which are on the verge of gravitational collapse. Finally, we show that t...

  17. Molecular gas temperature and density in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. F.; Jaffe, D. T.; Bash, F. N.; Israel, F. P.; Maloney, P. R.; Baas, F.

    1993-01-01

    We combine beam-matched CO-13, CO-12 J = 3 yields 2 and J = 2 yields 1 line data to infer the molecular gas excitation conditions in the central 500 to 1600 pc diameters of a small sample of infrared-bright external galaxies: NGC253, IC342, M 83, Maffei 2, and NGC6946. Additional observations of the J = 1 yields 0 lines of C-18O and CO-13 set limits on the opacity of the CO-13 J = 1 yields 0 line averaged over the central kiloparsec of these spiral galaxies.

  18. Design of a high density cold gas attitude control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah E.; Lewis, Mark J.; Akin, David L.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of the experimental results of a nitrous oxide cold gas thruster with the predicted performance from a numerical simulation of nozzle operations is discussed. Tests were conducted in a vacuum chamber to verify analytical predictions of both nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Preliminary results indicate an Isp for N2O of 61, and an Isp of 69 for N2. Based on the results of this research, parameters are presented for a nitrous oxide-based reaction control system for a small spacecraft currently under development.

  19. Density and viscosity behavior of a North Sea crude oil, natural gas liquid, and their mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, KAG; Cisneros, Sergio; Kvamme, B

    2005-01-01

    to accurately model the saturation pressures, densities, and viscosities of petroleum systems ranging from natural gases to heavy crude oils. The applicability of this overall modeling technique to reproduce measured bubble points, densities, and viscosities of a North Sea crude oil, a natural gas liquid...

  20. The Density Variance--Mach Number Relation in Supersonic Turbulence: I. Isothermal, magnetised gas

    CERN Document Server

    Molina, F Z; Federrath, C; Klessen, R S

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that supersonic, magnetised turbulence plays a fundamental role for star formation in molecular clouds. It produces the initial dense gas seeds out of which new stars can form. However, the exact relation between gas compression, turbulent Mach number, and magnetic field strength is still poorly understood. Here, we introduce and test an analytical prediction for the relation between the density variance and the root-mean-square Mach number in supersonic, isothermal, magnetised turbulent flows. We approximate the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium as a superposition of shock waves. We obtain the density contrast considering the momentum continuity equation for a single magnetised shock and extrapolate this result to the entire cloud. Depending on the field geometry, we then make three different assumptions based on observational and theoretical constraints: B independent of density, B proportional to the root square of the density and B proportional to the density....

  1. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  2. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  3. FellWalker - a Clump Identification Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the FellWalker algorithm, a watershed algorithm that segments a 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional array of data values into a set of disjoint clumps of emission, each containing a single significant peak. Pixels below a nominated constant data level are assumed to be background pixels and are not assigned to any clump. FellWalker is thus equivalent in purpose to the CLUMPFIND algorithm. However, unlike CLUMPFIND, which segments the array on the basis of a set of evenly-spaced contours and thus uses only a small fraction of the available data values, the FellWalker algorithm is based on a gradient-tracing scheme which uses all available data values. Comparisons of CLUMPFIND and FellWalker using a crowded field of artificial Gaussian clumps, all of equal peak value and width, suggest that the results produced by FellWalker are less dependent on specific parameter settings than are those of CLUMPFIND.

  4. Density and impurity profile behaviours in HL-2A tokamak with different gas fuelling methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Zheng-Ying; Zhou Yan; Li Wei; Feng Bei-Bin; Sun Ping; Dong Chun-Feng; Liu Yi; Hong Wen-Yu; Yang Qing-Wei; Ding Xuan-Tong; Duan Xu-Ru

    2009-01-01

    The electron density profile peaking and the impurity accumulation in the HL-2A tokamak plasma are observed when three kinds of fuelling methods are separately used at different fuelling particle locations.The density profile becomes more peaked when the line-averaged electron density approaches the Greenwald density limit nG and,consequently,impurity accumulation is often observed.A linear increase regime in the density range ne<0.6nG and a saturation regime in ne>0.6nG are obtained.There is no significant difference in achieved density peaking factor fne between the supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) and gas puffing into the plasma main chamber.However,the achieved fne is relatively low,in particular,in the case of density below 0.7nG,when the working gas is puffed into the divertor chamber.A discharge with a density as high as 1.2nG,i.e.ne=1.2nG,can be achieved by SMBI just after siliconization as a wall conditioning.The metallic impurities,such as iron and chromium,also increase remarkably when the impurity accumulation happens.The mechanism behind the density peaking and impurity accumulation is studied by investigating both the density peaking factor versus the effective collisionality and the radiation peaking versus density peaking.

  5. Modeling AGN Feedback in Cool-Core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven AGN feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the SMBH. When the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t_{TI}/t_{ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km/s. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall towards the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, s...

  6. Energy Budget of Forming Clumps in Numerical Simulations of Collapsing Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Vianey; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Gómez, Gilberto C.; Fall, S. Michael; Mata-Chávez, M. Dolores

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the physical properties and energy balance of density enhancements in two SPH simulations of the formation, evolution, and collapse of giant molecular clouds. In the simulations, no feedback is included, so all motions are due either to the initial decaying turbulence or to gravitational contraction. We define clumps as connected regions above a series of density thresholds. The resulting full set of clumps follows the generalized energy equipartition relation, {σ }v/{R}1/2\\propto {{{Σ }}}1/2, where {σ }v is the velocity dispersion, R is the “radius,” and Σ is the column density. We interpret this as a natural consequence of gravitational contraction at all scales rather than virial equilibrium. Nevertheless, clumps with low Σ tend to show a large scatter around equipartition. In more than half of the cases, this scatter is dominated by external turbulent compressions that assemble the clumps rather than by small-scale random motions that would disperse them. The other half does actually disperse. Moreover, clump sub-samples selected by means of different criteria exhibit different scalings. Sub-samples with narrow Σ ranges follow Larson-like relations, although characterized by their respective values of Σ. Finally, we find that (i) clumps lying in filaments tend to appear sub-virial, (ii) high-density cores (n≥slant {10}5 cm3) that exhibit moderate kinetic energy excesses often contain sink (“stellar”) particles and the excess disappears when the stellar mass is taken into account in the energy balance, and (iii) cores with kinetic energy excess but no stellar particles are truly in a state of dispersal.

  7. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy. II. Characterisation of different evolutionary stages and their SiO emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, M.; Bontemps, S.; Wienen, M.; Beuther, H.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Schuller, F.; Zavagno, A.; Sanna, C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The processes leading to the birth of high-mass stars are poorly understood. The key first step to reveal their formation processes is characterising the clumps and cores from which they form. Aims: We define a representative sample of massive clumps in different evolutionary stages selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL), from which we aim to establish a census of molecular tracers of their evolution. As a first step, we study the shock tracer, SiO, mainly associated with shocks from jets probing accretion processes. In low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), outflow and jet activity decreases with time during the star formation processes. Recently, a similar scenario was suggested for massive clumps based on SiO observations. Here we analyse observations of the SiO (2-1) and (5-4) lines in a statistically significant sample to constrain the change of SiO abundance and the excitation conditions as a function of evolutionary stage of massive star-forming clumps. Methods: We performed an unbiased spectral line survey covering the 3-mm atmospheric window between 84-117 GHz with the IRAM 30 m telescope of a sample of 430 sources of the ATLASGAL survey, covering various evolutionary stages of massive clumps. A smaller sample of 128 clumps has been observed in the SiO (5-4) transition with the APEX telescope to complement the (2-1) line and probe the excitation conditions of the emitting gas. We derived detection rates to assess the star formation activity of the sample, and we estimated the column density and abundance using both an LTE approximation and non-LTE calculations for a smaller subsample, where both transitions have been observed. Results: We characterise the physical properties of the selected sources, which greatly supersedes the largest samples studied so far, and show that they are representative of different evolutionary stages. We report a high detection rate of >75% of the SiO (2-1) line and a >90% detection

  8. Investigation of heavy current discharges with high initial gas density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budin, A.; Bogomaz, A.; Kolikov, V.; Kuprin, A.; Leontiev, V.; Rutberg, P.; Shirokov, N. [Institute of Problems of Electrophysics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Dvortsovayanab., 18, St. Petersburg, 191065 (Russia)

    1996-05-01

    Piezoelectric pressure transducers, with noise immunity and time resolution of 0,5 {mu}s were used to measure pulse pressures of 430 MPa along the axis of an electrical discharge channel. Initial concentration of He was 2,7{center_dot}10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}, dI/dt=6{center_dot}10{sup 11}A/s, and I{sub max}=560kA. Shock waves with amplitudes exceeding the pressure along the axis, were detected by a pressure transducer on the wall of the discharge chamber. Typical shock velocities were 2{center_dot}4km/s. Average pressure measurements along the discharge axis at different radii were used to estimate the current density distribution along the canal radius. The presence of the shock waves, promoting the additional hydrogen heating in the discharge chamber, has been registered during the discharge in hydrogen for I{sub max}{approximately}1MA and an initial concentration of 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  10. Human respiration at rest in rapid compression and at high pressures and gas densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, R.; Lambertsen, C. J.; Strauss, R.; Clark, J. M.; Puglia, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The ventilation (V), end-tidal PCO2 (PACO2), and CO2 elimination rate were determined in men at rest breathing CO2-free gas over the pressure range 1-50 ATA and the gas density range 0.4-25 g/l, during slow and rapid compressions, at stable elevated ambient pressures and during slow decompressions. Progressive increase in pulmonary gas flow resistance due to elevation of ambient pressure and inspired gas density to the He-O2 equivalent of 5000 feet of seawater was found to produce a complex pattern of change in PACO2. It was found that as both ambient pressure and pulmonary gas flow resistance were progressively raised, PACO2 at first increased, went through a maximum, and then declined towards values near the 1 ATA level. It is concluded that this pattern of PACO2 change results from the interaction on ventilation of the increase in pulmonary resistance due to the elevation of gas density with the increase in respiratory drive postulated as due to generalized central nervous system excitation associated with exposure to high hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that a similar interaction exists between increased gas flow resistance and the increase in respiratory drive related to nitrogen partial pressure and the resulting narcosis.

  11. FRAGMENTATION OF MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND FORMATION OF A PROTOCLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Lu, Xing [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wang, Ke; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2015-05-10

    Sufficiently massive clumps of molecular gas collapse under self-gravity and fragment to spawn a cluster of stars that have a range of masses. We investigate observationally the early stages of formation of a stellar cluster in a massive filamentary infrared dark cloud, G28.34+0.06 P1, in the 1.3 mm continuum and spectral line emission using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. Sensitive continuum data reveal further fragmentation in five dusty cores at a resolution of several 10{sup 3} AU. Spectral line emission from C{sup 18}O, CH{sub 3}OH, {sup 13}CS, H{sub 2}CO, and N{sub 2}D{sup +} is detected for the first time toward these dense cores. We found that three cores are chemically more evolved as compared with the other two; interestingly, though, all of them are associated with collimated outflows as suggested by evidence from the CO, SiO, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}CO, and SO emission. The parsec-scale kinematics in exhibit velocity gradients along the filament, consistent with accretion flows toward the clumps and cores. The moderate luminosity and the chemical signatures indicate that the five cores harbor low- to intermediate-mass protostars that likely become massive ones at the end of the accretion. Despite the fact that the mass limit reached by the dust continuum sensitivity is 30 times lower than the thermal Jeans mass, there is a lack of a distributed low-mass protostellar population in the clump. Our observations indicate that in a protocluster, low-mass stars form at a later stage after the birth of more massive protostars.

  12. Generalized Density-Corrected Model for Gas Diffusivity in Variably Saturated Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    Accurate predictions of the soil-gas diffusivity (Dp/Do, where Dp is the soil-gas diffusion coefficient and Do is the diffusion coefficient in free air) from easily measureable parameters like air-filled porosity (ε) and soil total porosity (φ) are valuable when predicting soil aeration...... and the emission of greenhouse gases and gaseous-phase contaminants from soils. Soil type (texture) and soil density (compaction) are two key factors controlling gas diffusivity in soils. We extended a recently presented density-corrected Dp(ε)/Do model by letting both model parameters (α and β) be interdependent...... and also functions of φ. The extension was based on literature measurements on Dutch and Danish soils ranging from sand to peat. The parameter α showed a promising linear relation to total porosity, while β also varied with α following a weak linear relation. The thus generalized density-corrected (GDC...

  13. Robust Cross-correlation-based Measurement of Clump Sizes in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kamran; Obreschkow, Danail; Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Bassett, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Stars form in molecular complexes that are visible as giant clouds (˜ {10}5-6 {M}⊙ ) in nearby galaxies and as giant clumps (˜ {10}8-9 {M}⊙ ) in galaxies at redshifts z≈ 1-3. Theoretical inferences on the origin and evolution of these complexes often require robust measurements of their characteristic size, which is hard to measure at limited resolution and often ill-defined due to overlap and quasi-fractal substructure. We show that maximum and luminosity-weighted sizes of clumps seen in star formation maps (e.g., Hα) can be recovered statistically using the two-point correlation function (2PCF) if an approximate stellar surface density map is taken as the normalizing random field. After clarifying the link between Gaussian clumps and the 2PCF analytically, we design a method for measuring the diameters of Gaussian clumps with realistic quasi-fractal substructure. This method is tested using mock images of clumpy disk galaxies at different spatial resolutions and perturbed by Gaussian white noise. We find that the 2PCF can recover the input clump scale at ˜ 20 % accuracy, as long as this scale is larger than the spatial resolution. We apply this method to the local spiral galaxy NGC 5194, as well as to three clumpy turbulent galaxies from the DYNAMO-HST sample. In both cases, our statistical measurements of Hα clump size agree with previous measurements and with the estimated Jeans lengths. However, the new measurements are free from subjective choices when fitting individual clumps.

  14. Scaling Relations of Star-Forming Regions: from kpc-size clumps to HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Wisnioski, Emily; Blake, Chris; Poole, Gregory B; Green, Andrew W; Wyder, Ted; Martin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    We present the properties of 8 star-forming regions, or 'clumps,' in 3 galaxies at z~1.3 from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, which are resolved with the OSIRIS integral field spectrograph. Within turbulent discs, \\sigma~90 km/s, clumps are measured with average sizes of 1.5 kpc and average Jeans masses of 4.2 x 10^9 \\Msolar, in total accounting for 20-30 per cent of the stellar mass of the discs. These findings lend observational support to models that predict larger clumps will form as a result of higher disc velocity dispersions driven-up by cosmological gas accretion. As a consequence of the changes in global environment, it may be predicted that star-forming regions at high redshift should not resemble star-forming regions locally. Yet despite the increased sizes and dispersions, clumps and HII regions are found to follow tight scaling relations over the range z=0-2 for size, velocity dispersion, luminosity, and mass when comparing >2000 HII regions locally and 30 clumps at z>1 (\\sigma \\propto r^{0.42+/-...

  15. Analysis of homogeneity of 2D electron gas at decreasing of electron density

    OpenAIRE

    Sherstobitov, A. A.; Minkov, G. M.; Germanenko, A. V.; Rut, O. E.; Soldatov, I. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the gate voltage dependence of capacitance of a system gate - 2D electron gas (C-Vg). The abrupt drop of capacitance at decreasing concentration was found. The possible reasons of this drop, namely inhomogeneity of electron density distribution and serial resistance of 2D electron gas are discussed. Simultaneous analysis of gate voltage dependences of capacitance and resistance has shown that in heavily doped 2D systems the main role in the drop of capacitance at decreasing con...

  16. Radial Surface Density Profiles of Gas and Dust in the Debris Disk Around 49 Ceti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Lieman-Sifry, Jesse; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Daley, Cail M.; Roberge, Aki; Kospal, Agnes; Moor, Attila; Kamp, Inga; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present approximately 0".4 resolution images of CO(3-2) and associated continuum emission from the gas-bearing debris disk around the nearby A star 49 Ceti, observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We analyze the ALMA visibilities in tandem with the broadband spectral energy distribution to measure the radial surface density profiles of dust and gas emission from the system. The dust surface density decreases with radius between approximately 100 and 310 au, with a marginally significant enhancement of surface density at a radius of approximately 110 au. The SED requires an inner disk of small grains in addition to the outer disk of larger grains resolved by ALMA. The gas disk exhibits a surface density profile that increases with radius, contrary to most previous spatially resolved observations of circumstellar gas disks. While approximately 80% of the CO flux is well described by an axisymmetric power-law disk in Keplerian rotation about the central star, residuals at approximately 20% of the peak flux exhibit a departure from axisymmetry suggestive of spiral arms or a warp in the gas disk. The radial extent of the gas disk (approx. 220 au) is smaller than that of the dust disk (approx. 300 au), consistent with recent observations of other gasbearing debris disks. While there are so far only three broad debris disks with well characterized radial dust profiles at millimeter wavelengths, 49 Ceti's disk shows a markedly different structure from two radially resolved gas-poor debris disks, implying that the physical processes generating and sculpting the gas and dust are fundamentally different.

  17. Performance of one-body reduced density-matrix functionals for the homogeneous electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathiotakis, N. N.; Helbig, N.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2007-05-01

    The subject of this study is the exchange-correlation-energy functional of reduced density-matrix functional theory. Approximations of this functional are tested by applying them to the homogeneous electron gas. We find that two approximations recently proposed by Gritsenko , [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 204102 (2005)] yield considerably better correlation energies and momentum distributions than previously known functionals. We introduce modifications to these functionals, which, by construction, reproduce the exact correlation energy of the homogeneous electron gas.

  18. Dwarf Galaxy Dark Matter Density Profiles Inferred from Stellar and Gas Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Joshua J; Fabricius, Maximilian H; Bosch, Remco C E van den; Barentine, John C; Bender, Ralf; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J; Murphy, Jeremy D; Swaters, R A; Thomas, Jens; van de Ven, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    We present new constraints on the density profiles of dark matter (DM) halos in seven nearby dwarf galaxies from measurements of their integrated stellar light and gas kinematics. The gas kinematics of low mass galaxies frequently suggest that they contain constant density DM cores, while N-body simulations instead predict a cuspy profile. We present a data set of high resolution integral field spectroscopy on seven galaxies and measure the stellar and gas kinematics simultaneously. Using Jeans modeling on our full sample, we examine whether gas kinematics in general produce shallower density profiles than are derived from the stars. Although 2/7 galaxies show some localized differences in their rotation curves between the two tracers, estimates of the central logarithmic slope of the DM density profile, gamma, are generally robust. The mean and standard deviation of the logarithmic slope for the population are gamma=0.67+/-0.10 when measured in the stars and gamma=0.58+/-0.24 when measured in the gas. We als...

  19. Pressure - Density Isotherms of HELIUM-3 Gas Below 1.3 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, James Allen

    The second virial coefficient of He('3) gas and the absolute temperature of the gas were determined at five different temperatures below 1.3 K. The technique used involved measuring pressure and density simultaneously at different points along on isotherm and using the virial equation to determine the temperature and the second virial coefficient. The results are in good agreement with empirical calculations of the second virial coefficient which are based on measurements made at higher temperatures. The measurements of temperature, while only known to within (+OR-)1.5 mK, confirm the widespread belief that the T(,62) temperature scale is in error by several mK. Pressure and density were measured in-situ, using superconducting microwave cavities. These eliminate many sources of error which have in the past made measurements inaccurate below 1.5 K. The density and pressure could be related to changes in the resonant frequencies of the cavities. The frequency of one cavity, which contained the He('3) gas was proportional to the dielectric constant of the gas. The Clausius-Mossotti relationship was used to determine the density as a function of the dielectric constant. The pressure was measured using a reentrant cavity with a flexible diaphragm forming one end wall. The pressure of the gas flexed this diaphragm, changing the frequency of the cavity. A room temperature mercury manometer was used to provide a frequency vs. pressure calibration of this cavity.

  20. High Gas Surface Densities yet Low UV Attenuation in z $\\sim$ 1 Disc Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nordon, Raanan

    2016-01-01

    The gas in galaxies is both the fuel for star formation and a medium that attenuates the light of the young stars. We study the relations between UV attenuation, spectral slope, star formation rates, and molecular gas surface densities in a sample of 28 z$\\sim$1 and a reference sample of 32 z$\\sim$0 galaxies that are detected in CO, far-infrared, and rest frame UV. The samples are dominated by disc-like galaxies close to the main SFR--mass relation. We find that the location of the z$\\sim$1 galaxies on the IRX-$\\beta$ plane is correlated with their gas-depletion time-scale $\\tau_{dep}$ and can predict $\\tau_{dep}$ with a standard deviation of 0.16 dex. We use IRX-$\\beta$ to estimate the mean total gas column densities at the locations of star formation in the galaxies, and compare them to the mean molecular gas surface densities as measured from CO. We confirm previous results regarding high $N_H/A_V$ in z$\\sim$1 galaxies. We estimate an increase in the gas filling factor by a factor of 4--6 from z$\\sim$0 to ...

  1. Communication: Simple and accurate uniform electron gas correlation energy for the full range of densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachiyo, Teepanis

    2016-07-01

    A simple correlation energy functional for the uniform electron gas is derived based on the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. It can reproduce the known correlation functional in the high-density limit, while in the mid-density range maintaining a good agreement with the near-exact correlation energy of the uniform electron gas to within 2 × 10-3 hartree. The correlation energy is a function of a density parameter rs and is of the form a * ln ( 1 + /b r s + /b rs 2 ) . The constants "a" and "b" are derived from the known correlation functional in the high-density limit. Comparisons to the Ceperley-Alder's near-exact Quantum Monte Carlo results and the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair correlation functional are also reported.

  2. Lyapunov Exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai Entropy for the Lorentz Gas at Low Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijeren, Henk; Dorfman, J. R.

    1995-05-01

    The Lyapunov exponents and the Kolmogorov-Sinai (KS) entropy for a two-dimensional Lorentz gas at low densities are defined for general nonequilibrium states and calculated with the use of a Lorentz-Boltzmann type equation. In equilibrium the density dependence of these quantities, predicted by Krylov, is recovered and explicit expressions are obtained. The relationship between KS entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and diffusion coefficients, developed by Gaspard and Nicolis, is generalized to a wide class of nonequilibrium states.

  3. Mixing process of a binary gas in a density stratified layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1997-09-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of natural convection on the mixing process by molecular diffusion in a vertical stratified layer of a binary fluid. There are many experimental and analytical studies on natural convection in the vertical fluid layer. However, there are few studies on natural convection with molecular diffusion in the vertical stratified layer of a binary gas. Experimental study has been performed on the combined phenomena of molecular diffusion and natural convection in a binary gas system to investigate the mixing process of the binary gas in a vertical slot consisting of one side heated and the other side cooled. The range of Rayleigh number based on the slot width was about 0 < Ra{sub d} < 7.5 x 10{sup 4}. The density change of the gas mixture and the temperature distribution in the slot was obtained and the mixing process when the heavier gas ingress into the vertical slot filled with the lighter gas from the bottom side of the slot was discussed. The experimental results showed that the mixing process due to molecular diffusion was affected significantly by the natural convection induced by the slightly temperature difference between both vertical walls even if a density difference by the binary gas is larger than that by the temperature difference. (author). 81 refs.

  4. Chemistry in Infrared Dark Cloud Clumps: a Molecular Line Survey at 3 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, J. M.; Foster, J. B.

    2011-05-01

    We have observed 37 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) containing a total of 159 clumps with the 22-meter ATNF Mopra Telescope in Australia using high-density molecular tracers at 3 mm. We carried out single-pointing observations in the broad-band mode and detected 10 different molecular lines. The detections rates are dominated by HNC (1-0) (98%), N2H+ (1-0) (97%), and HCO+ (1-0) (88%) lines, showing similar values when we divide the sample into active and quiescent clumps (based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS emission). However, we find differences of 30% in the detection rates for the H13CO+, HN13C, and HC3N lines. We also find that the N2H+ FWHMs of active clumps are broader than those of quiescent clumps, possibly due to ongoing star formation activity driving turbulence. Integrated intensity and abundance ratios of some molecular lines vary between quiescent and active clumps tracing chemical differences which arise from different evolutionary states.

  5. The gas density measurement of one long distance supersonic molecular beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Han, J. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Bai, L. X.; Zhou, J. X.

    2016-12-01

    The gas density of the supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is a crucial parameter for the fueling or diagnostic process in the tokamak experiments. Using the microphone, one improved method of gas density measurement is proposed, which can greatly improve the measurement capacity by about 3 orders of magnitude by studying the pulsed signal characteristic of the microphone when it is pushed by the SMB. The gas density of the SMB is measured within the axial range of 20-2000 mm, and the axial central density at 2000 mm is about 100 times less than that at 20 mm. It is also found that the radial density distribution follows the Gaussian function in both free expansion (where the SMB can expand freely without any influence from the vacuum chamber) and restricted expansion (where the expansion of the SMB is restricted inside the flight tube of the vacuum system). And the axial central density decreases with the axial distance, which follows the inverse square law in the free expansion, but it deviates from this law in the restricted expansion.

  6. Maximization of ICRF power by SOL density tailoring with local gas injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, P.; Goniche, M.; Bobkov, V.; Lerche, E.; Pinsker, R. I.; Pitts, R. A.; Zhang, W.; Colas, L.; Hosea, J.; Moriyama, S.; Wang, S.-J.; Wukitch, S.; Zhang, X.; Bilato, R.; Bufferand, H.; Guimarais, L.; Faugel, H.; Hanson, G. R.; Kocan, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petrzilka, V.; Shaw, A.; Stepanov, I.; Sips, A. C. C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; JET contributors, the; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the DIII-D Team; ITPA ‘Integrated Operation Scenarios' members, the; experts

    2016-04-01

    Experiments have been performed under the coordination of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on several tokamaks, including ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), JET and DIII-D, to characterize the increased Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna loading achieved by optimizing the position of gas injection relative to the RF antennas. On DIII-D, AUG and JET (with the ITER-Like Wall) a 50% increase in the antenna loading was observed when injecting deuterium in ELMy H-mode plasmas using mid-plane inlets close to the powered antennas instead of divertor injection and, with smaller improvement when using gas inlets located at the top of the machine. The gas injection rate required for such improvements (~0.7  ×  1022 el s-1 in AUG, ~1.0  ×  1022 el s-1 in JET) is compatible with the use of this technique to optimize ICRF heating during the development of plasma scenarios and no degradation of confinement was observed when using the mid-plane or top inlets compared with divertor valves. An increase in the scrape-off layer (SOL) density was measured when switching gas injection from divertor to outer mid-plane or top. On JET and DIII-D, the measured SOL density increase when using main chamber puffing is consistent with the antenna coupling resistance increase provided that the distance between the measurement lines of sight and the injection location is taken into account. Optimized gas injection was also found to be beneficial for reducing tungsten (W) sputtering at the AUG antenna limiters, and also to reduce slightly the W and nickel (Ni) content in JET plasmas. Modeling the specific effects of divertor/top/mid-plane injection on the outer mid-plane density was carried out using both the EDGE2D-EIRENE and EMC3-EIRENE plasma boundary code packages; simulations indeed indicate that outer mid-plane gas injection maximizes the density in the mid-plane close to the injection point with qualitative agreement with the AUG SOL density measurements

  7. A Galactic Molecular Cloud Clump Catalog from Hi-GAL Data: Method and Initial Results Comparison with BGPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2017-02-01

    As the precursors to stellar clusters, it is imperative that we understand the distribution and physical properties of dense molecular gas clouds and clumps. Such a study has been done with the ground-based Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Now the Herschel infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) allows us to do the same with higher-quality data and complete coverage of the Galactic plane. We have made a pilot study comparing dense molecular gas clumps identified in Hi-GAL and BGPS, using six 2° × 2° regions centered at Galactic longitudes of {\\ell }=11^\\circ , 30°, 41°, 50°, 202°, and 217°. We adopted the BGPS methodology for identifying clumps and estimating distances, leading to 6198 clumps being identified in our substudy, with 995 of those having well-constrained distances. These objects were evenly distributed with Galactic longitude, a consequence of Hi-GAL being source confusion limited. These clumps range in mass from 10‑2 to 105 M⊙ and have heliocentric distances of up to 16 kpc. When clumps found in both surveys are compared, we see that distances agree within 1 kpc and ratios of masses are of the order of unity. This serves as an external validation for BGPS and instills confidence as we move forward to cataloging the clumps from the entirety of Hi-GAL. In addition to the sources that were in common with BGPS, Hi-GAL found many additional sources, primarily due to the lack of atmospheric noise. We expect Hi-GAL to yield 2 × 105 clumps, with 20% having well-constrained distances, an order of magnitude above what was found in BGPS.

  8. DENSE CLUMPS AND CANDIDATES FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN W40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Fumitaka; Hara, Chihomi; Kawabe, Ryohei [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomohiro [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sugitani, Kouji, E-mail: ikura@u-gakugei.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan)

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of the {sup 12}CO (J = 3−2) and HCO{sup +} (J = 4−3) observations of the W40 H ii region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope (HPBW ≃ 22″) to search for molecular outflows and dense clumps. We found that the velocity field in the region is highly complex, consisting of at least four distinct velocity components at V{sub LSR} ≃ 3, 5, 7, and 10 km s{sup −1}. The ∼7 km s{sup −1} component represents the systemic velocity of cold gas surrounding the entire region, and causes heavy absorption in the {sup 12}CO spectra over the velocity range 6 ≲ V{sub LSR} ≲ 9 km s{sup −1}. The ∼5 and ∼10 km s{sup −1} components exhibit high {sup 12}CO temperature (≳40 K) and are found mostly around the H ii region, suggesting that these components are likely to be tracing dense gas interacting with the expanding shell around the H ii region. Based on the {sup 12}CO data, we identified 13 regions of high velocity gas, which we interpret as candidate outflow lobes. Using the HCO{sup +} data, we also identified six clumps and estimated their physical parameters. On the basis of the ASTE data and near-infrared images from 2MASS, we present an updated three-dimensional model of this region. In order to investigate molecular outflows in W40, the SiO (J = 1−0, v = 0) emission line and some other emission lines at 40 GHz were also observed with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, but they were not detected at the present sensitivity.

  9. Comparative impactology on Jupiter: Cataloging the clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael

    2010-09-01

    Seven months after HubbleA?s first servicing mission, the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 {SL9} captured worldwide attentionA?and the newly-installed WFPC2 captured 472 images of Jupiter in Program 5642. We will complete a census of each impact, including evolution, size, morphology, and color, now that the geometric and photometric calibration of WFPC2 has reached its best and final state. The data from Program 5642 prove their great value by still continuing to generate science publications, and we will upload deprojected {latitude-longitude mapped} data as High Level Science Products to further enhance the usability of this unique data set. The WFPC2 data are needed to understand recent observations of the 2009 impact on Jupiter, in which only 36 WFC3 and ACS images were obtained in Program 12003. In the isolated 2009 impact, the debris formed clumps that lasted at least until Jupiter was imaged again on 22 September {Program 11559}, two months after the impact. Clumps were observed in a subset of SL9 impact sites, but a complete survey of all the available WFPC2 impact site imaging data will enable us to measure clump formation, favored dynamical environments, frequency of occurrence, interactions with other Jovian atmospheric features, and rates of change in size and albedo. Based on the 2009 WFC3 and ACS data, we suggest that these clumps are lower stratospheric eddies that maintain aerosol concentrations against dissipation. We will search the proposed complete catalog of 1994 WFPC2 data to isolate the determining factors for the formation and evolution of these clumps, with the goal of finding out whether they are commonplace Jovian dynamical features simply traced by impact-generated aerosols, or unique features generated by the impacts themselves {either through impact-related thermochemical processes, or through differences in particle microphysics}. If the clumps mark commonplace but normally invisible eddies, they may play interesting roles in the

  10. Effect of ambient gas density for diesel spray; Diesel funmu ni taisuru fun`iki mitsudo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokohashi, M.; Suzuki, T.; Oshima, R. [Tohokugakuin University, Sendai (Japan); Ono, A. [Shinryo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Effect of ambient gas density for fuel spray are measured to investigate the Diesel spray behavior. The change of ambient gas density has been given by pressuring N2 gas and using a high density atmospheric pressure SF6 gas. The measurement are performed for the spray penetration and angle. As a result, the spray penetration is confirmed same tendency at the change of density by pressuring N2 and using SF6. Though spray angle is required modification with viscosity. 2 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Coexistence of density wave and superfluid order in a dipolar Fermi gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Zhigang; Block, Jens Kusk; Bruun, Georg M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the coexistence of superfluid and density wave (stripe) order in a quasi-two-dimensional gas of dipolar fermions aligned by an external field. Remarkably, the anisotropic nature of the dipolar interaction allows for such a coexistence in a large region of the zero temperature phase dia...

  12. Wall effects on density fluctuations in the GBL thermal lattice gas automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, A. G.; Sloot, P. M. A.

    2001-12-01

    We measure density fluctuations in a 19-bits thermal lattice gas automaton, in the presence of solid walls. The walls have a prominent effect on the dynamic structure factor. Fluctuating hydrodynamics predicts extra peaks in the spectrum. These extra features are indeed observed in the simulated dynamic structure factor.

  13. ALMA Observations of the IRDC Clump G34.43+00.24 MM3: DNC/HNC Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Hirota, Tomoya; Foster, Jonathan B.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    We have observed the clump G34.43+00.24 MM3 associated with an infrared dark cloud in DNC J = 3-2, HN13C J = 3-2, and N2H+ J = 3-2 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The N2H+ emission is found to be relatively weak near the hot core and the outflows, and its distribution is clearly anti-correlated with the CS emission. This result indicates that a young outflow is interacting with cold ambient gas. The HN13C emission is compact and mostly emanates from the hot core, whereas the DNC emission is extended around the hot core. Thus, the DNC and HN13C emission traces warm regions near the protostar differently. The DNC emission is stronger than the HN13C emission toward most parts of this clump. The DNC/HNC abundance ratio averaged within a 15\\prime\\prime × 15\\prime\\prime area around the phase center is higher than 0.06. This ratio is much higher than the value obtained by the previous single-dish observations of DNC and HN13C J = 1-0 (˜0.003). It seems likely that the DNC and HNC emission observed with the single-dish telescope traces lower density envelopes, while that observed with ALMA traces higher density and highly deuterated regions. We have compared the observational results with chemical-model results in order to investigate the behavior of DNC and HNC in the dense cores. Taking these results into account, we suggest that the low DNC/HNC ratio in the high-mass sources obtained by the single-dish observations are at least partly due to the low filling factor of the high density regions.

  14. Density-Corrected Models for Gas Diffusivity and Air Permeability in Unsaturated Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) and air permeability (ka) and their variations with air-filled porosity (e) in soil is critical for simulating subsurface migration and emission of climate gases and organic vapors. Gas diffusivity and air permeability measurements from Danish soil...... in subsurface soil. The data were regrouped into four categories based on compaction (total porosity F 0.4 m3 m-3) and soil texture (volume-based content of clay, silt, and organic matter 15%). The results suggested that soil compaction more than soil type was the major control on gas...... diffusivity and to some extent also on air permeability. We developed a density-corrected (D-C) Dp(e)/Do model as a generalized form of a previous model for Dp/ Do at -100 cm H2O of matric potential (Dp,100/Do). The D-C model performed well across soil types and density levels compared with existing models...

  15. Density functional theory screening of gas-treatment strategies for stabilization of high energy-density lithium metal anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Stephan L.; Morgan, Benjamin J.; Passerini, Stefano; Teobaldi, Gilberto

    2015-11-01

    To explore the potential of molecular gas treatment of freshly cut lithium foils in non-electrolyte-based passivation of high-energy-density Li anodes, density functional theory (DFT) has been used to study the decomposition of molecular gases on metallic lithium surfaces. By combining DFT geometry optimization and Molecular Dynamics, the effects of atmospheric (N2, O2, CO2) and hazardous (F2, SO2) gas decomposition on Li(bcc) (100), (110), and (111) surfaces on relative surface energies, work functions, and emerging electronic and elastic properties are investigated. The simulations suggest that exposure to different molecular gases can be used to induce and control reconstructions of the metal Li surface and substantial changes (up to over 1 eV) in the work function of the passivated system. Contrary to the other considered gases, which form metallic adlayers, SO2 treatment emerges as the most effective in creating an insulating passivation layer for dosages ≤1 mono-layer. The substantial Li → adsorbate charge transfer and adlayer relaxation produce marked elastic stiffening of the interface, with the smallest change shown by nitrogen-treated adlayers.

  16. The Milky Way Project and ATLASGAL: The distribution and physical properties of cold clumps near infrared bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Kendrew, S; Simpson, R; Csengeri, T; Wienen, M; Lintott, C J; Povich, M S; Beaumont, C; Schuller, F

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical study of the distribution and physical properties of cold dense material in and around the inner Galactic Plane near infrared bubbles as catalogued by the Milky Way Project citizen scientists. Using data from the ATLASGAL 870 um survey, we show that 48 +/- 2% of all cold clumps in the studied survey region (|l| <= 65 degrees, |b| <= 1 degree) are found in close proximity to a bubble, and 25 +/- 2% appear directly projected towards a bubble rim. A two-point correlation analysis confirms the strong correlation of massive cold clumps with expanding bubbles. It shows an overdensity of clumps along bubble rims that grows with increasing bubble size, which shows how interstellar medium material is reordered on large scales by bubble expansion around regions of massive star formation. The highest column density clumps appear resistent to the expansion, remaining overdense towards the bubbles' interior rather than being swept up by the expanding edge. Spectroscopic observations in ammon...

  17. Investigation of density-dependent gas advection of trichloroethylene: Experiment and a model validation exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, R. J.; Oostrom, M.; Simmons, C. S.; White, M. D.

    1995-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate whether vapor-density effects are significant in transporting volatile organic compounds (VOC's) with high vapor pressure and molecular mass through the subsurface. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was chosen for the investigation because it is a common VOC contaminant with high vapor pressure and molecular mass. For the investigation, a 2-m-long by 1-m-high by 7.5-cm-thick flow cell was constructed with a network of sampling ports. The flow cell was packed with sand, and a water table was established near the lower boundary. Liquid TCE was placed near the upper boundary of the flow cell in a chamber from which vapors could enter and migrate through the sand. TCE concentrations in the gas phase were measured by extracting 25-μl gas samples with an air-tight syringe and analyzing them with a gas chromatograph. The evolution of the TCE gas plume in the sand was investigated by examining plots of TCE concentrations over the domain for specific times and for particular locations as a function of time. To help in this analysis, a numerical model was developed that can predict the simultaneous movements of a gas, a nonaqueous liquid and water in porous media. The model also considers interphase mass transfer by employing the phase equilibrium assumption. The model was tested with one- and two-dimensional analytical solutions of fluid flow before it was used to simulate the experiment. Comparisons between experimental data and simulation results when vapor-density effects are considered were very good. When vapor-density effects were ignored, agreement was poor. These analyses suggest that vapor-density effects should be considered and that density-driven vapor advection may be an important mechanism for moving VOC's with high vapor pressures and molecular mass through the subsurface.

  18. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianlong, Gao; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, V. L., Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  19. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  20. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  1. Molecular Density Functional Theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. With this correction, molecular density functional theory gives, at a modest computational cost, quantita...

  2. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  3. Tidal deformability of dark matter clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, Raissa F P

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the tidal deformability of a clump of dark matter particles, modelled by the collisionless Boltzmann equation. We adopt a wave-mechanical approach to the problem, in which the dynamical equations are approximated by a set of Schr\\"{o}dinger-Poisson equations, within the limit that the effective de Broglie wavelength is comparable to the spatial variation scale of the particle distribution. We argue that such a treatment allows for a smaller number of coupled differential equations and more accessible perturbative analyses, while keeping the description within the dynamical timescale relatively accurate. Moreover, it provides an approximate mapping between perturbed boson star configurations and dynamical dark matter clumps. We present an analysis of the tidal deformability of a minimally-coupled boson star to illustrate this (approximate) correspondence.

  4. Non-parametric method for measuring gas inhomogeneities from X-ray observations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Andrea; Cui, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We present a non-parametric method to measure inhomogeneities in the intracluster medium (ICM) from X-ray observations of galaxy clusters. Analyzing mock Chandra X-ray observations of simulated clusters, we show that our new method enables the accurate recovery of the 3D gas density and gas clumping factor profiles out to large radii of galaxy clusters. We then apply this method to Chandra X-ray observations of Abell 1835 and present the first determination of the gas clumping factor from the X-ray cluster data. We find that the gas clumping factor in Abell 1835 increases with radius and reaches ~2-3 at r=R_{200}. This is in good agreement with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations, but it is significantly below the values inferred from recent Suzaku observations. We further show that the radially increasing gas clumping factor causes flattening of the derived entropy profile of the ICM and affects physical interpretation of the cluster gas structure, especially at the large cluster-centric radii. Our...

  5. Density-corrected models for gas diffusivity and air permeability in unsaturated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    . Also, a power-law ka model with exponent 1.5 (derived from analogy with a previous gas diffusivity model) used in combination with the D-C approach for ka,100 (reference point) seemed promising for ka(e) predictions, with good accuracy and minimum parameter requirements. Finally, the new D-C model......Accurate prediction of gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) and air permeability (ka) and their variations with air-filled porosity (e) in soil is critical for simulating subsurface migration and emission of climate gases and organic vapors. Gas diffusivity and air permeability measurements from Danish soil...... profile data (total of 150 undisturbed soil samples) were used to investigate soil type and density effects on the gas transport parameters and for model development. The measurements were within a given range of matric potentials (-10 to -500 cm H2O) typically representing natural field conditions...

  6. Probing Milky Way's hot gas halo density distribution using the dispersion measure of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Nugaev, Emin Ya; Zhezher, Yana V

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent studies indicates a significant amount of ionized gas in a form of the hot gas halo around the Milky Way. The halo extends over the region of 100 kpc and may be acountable for the missing baryon mass. In this paper we calculate the contribution of the proposed halo to the dispersion measure (DM) of the pulsars. The Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW), Maller & Bullock (MB) and Feldmann, Hooper & Gnedin (FHG) density distibutions are considered for the gas halo. The data set includes pulsars with the distance known independently from the DM, e.g. pulsars in globular clusters, LMC, SMC and pulsars with known parallax. The results exclude the NFW distribution for the hot gas, while the more realistic MB and FHG models are compatible with the observed dispersion measure.

  7. High density gas state at water/graphite interface studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chun-Lei; Li Zhao-Xia; Li Jing-Yuan; Xiu Peng; Hu Jun; Fang Hai-Ping

    2008-01-01

    In this paper molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the accumulation behaviour of N2 and H2 at water/graphite interface under ambient temperature and pressure. It finds that both N2 and H2 molecules can accumulate at the interface and form one of two states according to the ratio of gas molecules number to square of graphite surface from our simulation results: gas films (pancake-like) for a larger ratio and nanobubbles for a Smaller ratio. In addition, we discuss the stabilities of nanobubbles at different environment temperatures. Surprisingly, it is found that the density of both kinds of gas states can be greatly increased, even comparable with that of the liquid N2 and liquid H2. The present results are expected to be helpful for the understanding of the stable existence of gas film (pancake-like) and nanobubbles.

  8. Probing Milky Way's hot gas halo density distribution using the dispersion measure of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhezher, Ya. V.; Nugaev, E. Ya.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-03-01

    A number of recent studies indicates a significant amount of ionized gas in a form of the hot gas halo around the Milky Way. The halo extends over the region of 100 kpc and may be acountable for the missing baryon mass. In this paper we calculate the contribution of the proposed halo to the dispersion measure (DM) of the pulsars. The Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW), Maller and Bullock (MB), and Feldmann, Hooper, and Gnedin (FHG) density distibutions are considered for the gas halo. The data set includes pulsars with the distance known independently from the DM, e.g., pulsars in globular clusters, LMC, SMC and pulsars with known parallax. The results exclude the NFW distribution for the hot gas, while the more realisticMB and FHG models are compatible with the observed dispersion measure.

  9. Clumpy shocks and the clump mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, P C; Bonnell, Ian A.; Clark, Paul C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we examine whether clumpy, colliding, flows could be responsible for the clump mass functions that have been observed in several regions of embedded star formation, which have been shown to be described by a Salpeter type slope. The flows presented here, which comprise a population of initially identical clumps and the calculations are performed with and without the inclusion of self-gravity. When the shock region is at its densest, we find that the clump mass spectrum is always well modelled by a Salpeter type slope. This is true regardless of whether the self-gravity is included in the simulations or not. In the non-self-gravitating simulations, this slope is retained at lower Mach numbers (Mach 5 and 10) as the simulations progress past the densest phase. In the simulations which include self-gravity, we find that low Mach number runs yield a flatter mass function after the densest phase. This is simply a result of increased coagulation due to gravitational collapse of the flows. In the high...

  10. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized deq in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  11. Non-Boussinesq turbulent buoyant jet of a low-density gas leaks into high-density ambient

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we study the problem of low-density gas jet injected into high-density ambient numerically which is important in applications such as fuel injection and leaks. It is assumed that the local rate of entrainment is consisted of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The integral models of the mass, momentum and concentration fluxes are obtained and transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations using some similarity transformations. The resulting system is solved to determine the centerline quantities which are used to get the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet. Therefore, the centerline and mean quantities are used together with the governing equation to determine some important turbulent quantities such as, cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity- concentration correlation, turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity. Throughout this paper the developed model is verified by comparing the present results with experimental results and jet/plume theory from the literature. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Massive, Prestellar Clump Hosting no High-Mass Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, P.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Foster, J.; Guzmán, A.

    2015-12-01

    We observed a high-mass, prestellar clump in dust continuum with SMA (3.5″) and in NH3 line emission with JVLA (2″). We find no core with sufficient mass to form high-mass stars at the current evolutionary stage. In order to form high-mass stars, the embedded cores need to accrete a significant amount of mass over time which is consistent with some models of high-mass star formation. We also find that the gas in the cores is transonic or mildly supersonic. The embedded cores are sub-virialized, which is inconsistent with some models of high-mass star formation unless strong magnetic fields of ˜1 mG are present.

  13. The Gas Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Laue, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r200 and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or treating gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We report for the first time the high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside cluster

  14. The Gas Distribution in the Outer Regions of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present our analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We have exploited the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius, We stacked the density profiles to detect a signal beyond T200 and measured the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also computed the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compared our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict density profiles that are too steep, whereas runs including additional physics and/ or treating gas clumping agree better with the observed gas distribution. We report high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non cool-core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only small differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the ENZO simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside

  15. Kiloparsec-Scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies II. Structure and Dynamics of Filaments and Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Michael J; Van Loo, Sven

    2014-01-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating dense gas in a galactic disk, exploring scales ranging from 1 kpc down to $\\sim 0.1$~pc. Our primary goal is to understand how dense filaments form in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). These structures, often observed as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) in the Galactic plane, are thought to be the precursors to massive stars and star clusters, so their formation may be the rate limiting step controlling global star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Our study follows on from Van Loo et al. (2013, Paper I), which carried out simulations to 0.5~pc resolution and examined global aspects of the formation of dense gas clumps and the resulting star formation rate. Here, using our higher resolution, we examine the detailed structural, kinematic and dynamical properties of dense filaments and clumps, including mass surface density ($\\Sigma$) probability distribution functions, filament mass per unit length and its disper...

  16. Ammonia from cold high-mass clumps discovered in the inner Galactic disk by the ATLASGAL survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wienen, M; Schuller, F; Menten, K M; Walmsley, C M; Bronfman, L; Motte, F

    2012-01-01

    The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey: The Galaxy (ATLASGAL) is an unbiased continuum survey of the inner Galactic disk at 870 \\mu m. It covers +/- 60 deg in Galactic longitude and aims to find all massive clumps at various stages of high-mass star formation in the inner Galaxy, particularly the earliest evolutionary phases. We aim to determine properties such as the gas kinetic temperature and dynamics of new massive cold clumps found by ATLASGAL. Most importantly, we derived their kinematical distances from the measured line velocities. We observed the ammonia (J,K) = (1,1) to (3,3) inversion transitions toward 862 clumps of a flux-limited sample of submm clumps detected by ATLASGAL and extracted 13CO (1-0) spectra from the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS). We determined distances for a subsample located at the tangential points (71 sources) and for 277 clumps whose near/far distance ambiguity is resolved. Most ATLASGAL clumps are cold with rotational temperatures from 10-30 K. They have a wide range of NH3 linewi...

  17. Density functional theory study on water-gas-shift reaction over molybdenum disulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, X. R.; Wang, Shengguang; Hu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to investigate the adsorption of reaction intermediates appearing during water-gas-shift reaction at the sulfur covered MoS2 (1 0 0)surfaces, Mo-termination with 37.5% S coverage and S-termination with 50% S coverage using periodic slabs....... The pathway for water-gas-shift reaction on both terminations has been carefully studied where the most favorable reaction path precedes the redox mechanism, namely the reaction takes place as follows: CO + H2O --> CO + OH + H --> CO + O + 2H --> CO2 + H-2. The most likely reaction candidates for the formate...

  18. The initial conditions of stellar protocluster formation. II. A catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps embedded in IRDCs in the Galactic longitude range 15

    CERN Document Server

    Traficante, A; Peretto, N; Pineda, J E; Molinari, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in a 40 degrees wide region of the inner Galactic Plane (b10^4$ M_sun in mass and up to 10^5 L_sun in luminosity. The mass-radius distribution shows that almost 30% of the starless clumps identified in this survey could form high-mass stars, however these massive clumps are confined in only ~4% of the IRDCs. Assuming a minimum mass surface density threshold for the formation of high-mass stars, the comparison of the numbers of massive starless clumps and those already containing embedded sources suggests an upper limit lifetime for the starless phase of 10^5 years for clumps with a mass M>500 M_sun.

  19. Role of Gas Dynamical Friction in the Evolution of Embedded Stellar Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Indulekha

    2013-09-01

    Two puzzles associated with open clusters have attracted a lot of attention – their formation, with densities and velocity dispersions that are not too different from those of the star forming regions in the galaxy, given that the observed Star Formation Efficiencies (SFE) are low and, the mass segregation observed/inferred in some of them, at ages significantly less than the dynamical relaxation times in them. Gas dynamical friction has been considered before as a mechanism for contracting embedded stellar clusters, by dissipating their energy. This would locally raise the SFE which might then allow bound clusters to form. Noticing that dynamical friction is inherently capable of producing mass segregation, since here, the dissipation rate is proportional to the mass of the body experiencing the force, we explore further, some of the details and implications of such a scenario, vis-à-vis observations. Making analytical approximations, we obtain a boundary value for the density of a star forming clump of a given mass, such that, stellar clusters born in clumps which have densities higher than this, could emerge bound after gas loss. For a clump of given mass and density, we find a critical mass such that, sub-condensations with larger masses than this could suffer significant segregation within the clump.

  20. X-Ray surface brightness and gas density fluctuations in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A; Parrish, I; Sunyaev, R; Forman, W; Boehringer, H; Randall, S

    2011-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core ($650 \\times 650$ kpc) region of the Coma cluster observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra are analyzed using a 2D power spectrum approach. The resulting 2D spectra are converted to 3D power spectra of gas density fluctuations. The characteristic amplitude of the volume filling density fluctuations relative to the smooth underlying density distribution varies from 7-10% on scales of $\\sim$500 kpc down to $\\sim$5% at scales $\\sim$ 30 kpc. On smaller spatial scales, projection effects smear the density fluctuations by a large factor, precluding strong limits on the fluctuations in 3D. On the largest scales probed (hundreds of kpc), the dominant contributions to the observed fluctuations most likely arise from perturbations of the gravitational potential by the two most massive galaxies in Coma, NGC4874 and NGC4889, and the low entropy gas brought to the cluster by an infalling group. Other plausible sources of density fluctuations are discussed, including turbulence...

  1. Thermodynamic magnetization of two-dimensional electron gas measured over wide range of densities

    OpenAIRE

    Reznikov, M.; Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Teneh, N.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of dm/dn in Si MOSFET, where m is the magnetization of the two-dimensional electron gas and n is its density. We extended the density range of measurements from well in the metallic to deep in the insulating region. The paper discusses in detail the conditions under which this extension is justified, as well as the corrections one should make to extract dm/dn properly. At low temperatures, dm/dn was found to be strongly nonlinear already in weak magnetic fields, on a sc...

  2. Demonstration of resonant backward Raman amplification in high-density gas-jet plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. H.; Zhou, K. N.; Zheng, X. M.; Wei, X. F.; Zhu, Q. H.; Su, J. Q.; Xie, N.; Jiao, Z. H.; Peng, H.; Wang, X. D.; Sun, L.; Li, Q.; Huang, Z.; Zuo, Y. L.

    2016-10-01

    Backward Raman amplification was observed in a 0.7 mm-long high-density gas jet plasma. The 800 nm 30 fs seed pulse was amplified by a factor  ∼28, with an output energy of 2.8 mJ. The output spectra showed that the waveband around 800 nm was significantly amplified. The experimental result demonstrated that the resonant Raman amplification can be realized in high-density plasma against strong plasma instability.

  3. Density-functional theory of a lattice-gas model with vapour, liquid, and solid phases

    OpenAIRE

    Prestipino, S.; Giaquinta, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    We use the classical version of the density-functional theory in the weighted-density approximation to build up the entire phase diagram and the interface structure of a two-dimensional lattice-gas model which is known, from previous studies, to possess three stable phases -- solid, liquid, and vapour. Following the common practice, the attractive part of the potential is treated in a mean-field-like fashion, although with different prescriptions for the solid and the fluid phases. It turns o...

  4. Modulation of solar flare particles and track density profiles in gas-rich meteorite grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    A solution is presented to the problem concerning the time-averaged solar flare particle flux as a function of kinetic energy and distance from the sun for a given particle injection spectrum at the sun within the framework of standard diffusion-convection-adiabatic deceleration theory with the diffusion coefficient independent of distance from the sun. Results of the calculations which give best agreement with observations at 1 AU are presented and discussed, with particular reference to their implications for gas-rich meteorites. Normalization at the orbit of earth is achieved via observed track density versus depth profiles in lunar vug crystals. It is shown that if gas-rich meteorite grains were irradiated in the asteroid belt and if source and modulation parameters have changed little since irradiation, the track density should be 'harder' than the lunar vug profile by about 0.2-0.3 in the index. Quantitative estimation of solar flare particle exposure ages is discussed.

  5. Effect of gas density and ventilatory pattern of steady-state co uptake by the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, P A; Davis, J; Schroter, R C

    1975-09-01

    The steady-state uptake of carbon monoxide was measured in five normal subjects to study stratified inhomogeneity of gases in the pulmonary airways. An attempt was made to assess the effect of stratified inhomogeneity by varying the physical properties of the inspired gases and the depth and rate of ventilation by the subjects. Twelve different controlled patterns of breathing were followed by each subject on each of three gas mixtures (20% O2 with N2, He and SF6 plus 0.04% CO in each case). The experimental results show that CO uptake was significantly different when breathing the different density gases but that it was always greatest from the most dense gas SF6 and least from He. If the uptake of CO from the inspired gas across the alveolar membrane were controlled by simple molecular diffusion then as gas density decreases uptake would increase. As inspiratory flow rate was increased there was an almost linear increase in CO uptake for each gas mixture with a difference in uptake between the different-density gases which became most marked at the higher flow rates. Flow rate was increased in two ways: by maintaining tidal volume and altering breathing frequency or by maintaining frequency and altering tidal volume. The results for the two extremes, helium and SF6, indicated a difference between these methods of increasing flow rate. In the case of SF6, doubling the flow rate by increasing breathing frequency gave an uptake only marginally lower than doubling the depth of penetration. With helium, however, it was necessary to treble the frequency to obtain the increment of CO uptake achieved by doubling the depth of penetration. The experimental observations are explained by the use of a model based on Taylor dispersion in the conducting airways. The conclusion is that the results confirm the presence of significant stratified inhomogeneity in the airways of the lung.

  6. Molecular gas in the star-forming region IRAS 08589-4714

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaño, Hugo P.; Vásquez, J.; Cappa, C. E.; Gómez, M.; Duronea, N.; Rubio, M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We present an analysis of the region IRAS 08589-4714 with the aim of characterizing the molecular environment. Methods: We observed the 12CO(3 -2), 13CO(3 -2), C18O(3 -2), HCO+(3 -2), and HCN(3 -2) molecular lines in a region of 150''× 150'', centered on the IRAS source, to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the molecular gas linked to the IRAS source. Results: The molecular gas distribution reveals a molecular clump that is coincident with IRAS 08589-4714 and with a dust clump detected at 1.2 mm. The molecular clump is 0.45 pc in radius and its mass and H2 volume density are 310 M⊙ and 1.2 × 104 cm-3, respectively. Two overdensities were identified within the clump in HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) lines. A comparison of the LTE and virial masses suggests that the clump is collapsing in regions that harbor young stellar objects. An analysis of the molecular lines suggests that they are driving molecular outflows. Final reduced APEX data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A115

  7. Molecular gas in the star-forming region IRAS 08589-4714

    CERN Document Server

    Saldaño, Hugo P; Cappa, C E; Gómez, M; Duronea, N U; Rubio, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the region IRAS 08589-4714 with the aim of characterizing the molecular environment. We observed the CO(3-2), ^{13}CO(3-2), C^{18}O(3-2), HCO+(3-2), and HCN(3-2) molecular lines in a region of 150" x 150", centered on the IRAS source, to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the molecular gas linked to the IRAS source. The molecular gas distribution reveals a molecular clump that is coincident with IRAS 08589-4714 and with a dust clump detected at 1.2 mm. The molecular clump is 0.45 pc in radius and its mass and H_2 volume density are 310 Mo and 1.2 x 10^4 cm^{-3}, respectively. Two overdensities were identified within the clump in HCN and HCO lines. A comparison of the LTE and virial masses suggests that the clump is collapsing in regions that harbor young stellar objects. An analysis of the molecular lines suggests that they are driving molecular outflows.

  8. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Structure and Instability of Low-Density Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap Sriramachandra

    2004-01-01

    A low-density gas jet injected into a high-density ambient gas is known to exhibit self-excited global oscillations accompanied by large vortical structures interacting with the flow field. The primary objective of the proposed research is to study buoyancy effects on the origin and nature of the flow instability and structure in the near-field of low-density gas jets. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Linear stability analysis were the techniques employed to scale the buoyancy effects. The formation and evolution of vortices and scalar structure of the flow field are investigated in buoyant helium jets discharged from a vertical tube into quiescent air. Oscillations at identical frequency were observed throughout the flow field. The evolving flow structure is described by helium mole percentage contours during an oscillation cycle. Instantaneous, mean, and RMS concentration profiles are presented to describe interactions of the vortex with the jet flow. Oscillations in a narrow wake region near the jet exit are shown to spread through the jet core near the downstream location of the vortex formation. The effects of jet Richardson number on characteristics of vortex and flow field are investigated and discussed. The laminar, axisymmetric, unsteady jet flow of helium injected into air was simulated using CFD. Global oscillations were observed in the flow field. The computed oscillation frequency agreed qualitatively with the experimentally measured frequency. Contours of helium concentration, vorticity and velocity provided information about the evolution and propagation of vortices in the oscillating flow field. Buoyancy effects on the instability mode were evaluated by rainbow schlieren flow visualization and concentration measurements in the near-field of self-excited helium jets undergoing gravitational change in the microgravity environment of 2.2s drop tower at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center. The jet

  9. Fingerprinting the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite in geothermal systems using clumped isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John M.; Davies, Amelia; Faithfull, John; Holdsworth, Chris; Newton, Michael; Williamson, Sam; John, Cedric

    2017-04-01

    Geothermal energy production relies on maintaining open fractures within the rock through which fluids can flow, but precipitation of minerals in fractures can modify and reduce fluid flow. Most geothermal fluids are rich in dissolved material, and readily precipitate minerals such as calcite within fracture systems. Such mineral deposition can be a key limiting factor in viable geothermal energy production. We need to better understand the relationship between fluid temperatures, mineral precipitation, and fracture filling in such systems. Clumped isotopes offer a new way of characterising the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite. This technique is based on the thermodynamic relationship between carbonate mineral growth temperature and the abundance of chemical bonding ("clumping") between 13C and 18O isotopes (expressed as Δ47) within single carbonate ions (e.g. Eiler, 2007). In the gas phase, isotopic exchange between CO2 molecules and water is continuous and so CO2 gas will record the ambient fluid temperature. When the CO2 is trapped in a solid mineral phase, the isotope ratio is fixed. As a result, clumped isotopes will record the temperature of crystallisation, enabling the application of clumped isotope palaeothermometry to a range of geological problems. Samples from active geothermal fields (the Kawerau geothermal field, New Zealand (McNamara et al., 2017)) and analogues to basaltic geothermal systems in Western Scotland have been analysed with clumped isotopes. We present petrography, δ13C and δ18O, and clumped isotope data from these samples to show how clumped isotopes can fingerprint the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite in geothermal systems. Having this understanding of fracture filling conditions can lead to focused development of remediation measures. References Eiler, J. M., 2007. EPSL 262(3-4), 309-327. McNamara, D. D., Lister, A., Prior, D. J., 2016. JVGR 323, 38-52.

  10. Mid-Infrared Extinction Mapping of Infrared Dark Clouds II. The Structure of Massive Starless Cores and Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    (abridged) We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler & Tan (2009, Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 micron images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, Sigma, up to ~0.5g/cm^2 with 2" resolution. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage IRDC cores and their surrounding clumps, measuring Sigma_cl(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M_cl=60Msun. We find these objects have a mean radius of R_cl~0.1pc, mean Sigma_cl=0.3g/cm^2 and, if fit by a power law density profile rho_cl ~ r^{-k_{rho,cl}}, a mean value of k_{rho,cl}=1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, we find a mean core density power law index of k...

  11. Density functional theory of gas-liquid phase separation in dilute binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2016-06-22

    We examine statics and dynamics of phase-separated states of dilute binary mixtures using density functional theory. In our systems, the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas [Formula: see text] (the Gibbs energy of transfer) is considerably larger than the thermal energy [Formula: see text] for each solute particle and the attractive interaction among the solute particles is weaker than that among the solvent particles. In these conditions, the saturated vapor pressure increases by [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the solute density added in liquid. For [Formula: see text], phase separation is induced at low solute densities in liquid and the new phase remains in gaseous states, even when the liquid pressure is outside the coexistence curve of the solvent. This explains the widely observed formation of stable nanobubbles in ambient water with a dissolved gas. We calculate the density and stress profiles across planar and spherical interfaces, where the surface tension decreases with increasing interfacial solute adsorption. We realize stable solute-rich bubbles with radius about 30 nm, which minimize the free energy functional. We then study dynamics around such a bubble after a decompression of the surrounding liquid, where the bubble undergoes a damped oscillation. In addition, we present some exact and approximate expressions for the surface tension and the interfacial stress tensor.

  12. Density of states in a two-dimensional electron gas: Impurity bands and band tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.

    1988-03-01

    We calculate the density of states of a two-dimensional electron gas in the presence of charged impurities within Klauder's best multiple-scattering approach. The silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) system with impurities at the interface is studied in detail. The finite extension of the electron wave function into the bulk is included as well as various dependences of the density of states on the electron, the depletion, and the impurity densities. The transition from an impurity band at low impurity concentration to a band tail at high impurity concentration is found to take place at a certain impurity concentration. If the screening parameter of the electron gas is decreased, the impurity band shifts to lower energy. For low impurity density we find excited impurity bands. Our theory at least qualitatively explains conductivity and infrared-absorption experiments on impurity bands in sodium-doped MOS systems and deep band tails in the gap observed for high doping levels in these systems.

  13. Effect of acid density of HZSM-5 on the oligomerization of ethylene in FCC dry gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Ding; Shan Geng; Chunyi Li; Chaohe Yang; Guohui Wang

    2009-01-01

    The oligomerization of ethylene in FCC dry gas over HZSM-5 catalyst with different Si/Al2 ratios was studied. The effect of acid density of catalyst on the oligomerization of ethylene was discussed. By increasing the acid density of catalyst, ethylene conversion showed a linear increase, while the yields of olefins decreased when the acid density of catalyst exceeded 0.14 mmolNH3/g owing to a promotion of hydrogen transfer reaction. Through comparing the average distance between acid sites on catalyst with kinetic diameters of olefins, it was found that the dimerization of ethylene was not restrained by the sparse distribution of acid sites, while the hydrogen transfer reaction of C3 and C4 olefins was limited. On these bases, a conclusion is proposed that the dimerization of ethylene proceeded via Eley-Rideal mechanism, while the hydrogen transfer reaction of C3 and C4 olefins followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism.

  14. A high density two-dimensional electron gas in an oxide heterostructure on Si (001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Jin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the growth and characterization of layered heterostructures comprised of LaTiO3 and SrTiO3 epitaxially grown on Si (001. Magnetotransport measurements show that the sheet carrier densities of the heterostructures scale with the number of LaTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces, consistent with the presence of an interfacial 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG at each interface. Sheet carrier densities of 8.9 × 1014 cm−2 per interface are observed. Integration of such high density oxide 2DEGs on silicon provides a bridge between the exceptional properties and functionalities of oxide 2DEGs and microelectronic technologies.

  15. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Kaisin, Serafim S; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2014-01-01

    We use data for faint (M_B > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the FIGGS survey to study the correlation between the atomic gas density (Sigma_gas,atomic) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ~ 0.1 Z_sun. Understanding star formation in such molecule poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20% (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the HI distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and HI distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies we compute the Sigma_gas,atomic and Sigma_SFR averaged over the entire star forming disk of the galaxy. For these galaxies we find a nearly linear relation betw...

  16. Chemistry in Infrared Dark Cloud Clumps: a Molecular Line Survey at 3 mm

    CERN Document Server

    Sanhueza, Patricio; Foster, Jonathan B; Garay, Guido; Silva, Andrea; Finn, Susanna C

    2012-01-01

    We have observed 37 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), containing a total of 159 clumps, in high-density molecular tracers at 3 mm using the 22-meter ATNF Mopra Telescope located in Australia. After determining kinematic distances, we eliminated clumps that are not located in IRDCs and clumps with a separation between them of less than one Mopra beam. Our final sample consists of 92 IRDC clumps. The most commonly detected molecular lines are (detection rates higher than 8%): N2H+, HNC, HN13C, HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, C2H, HC3N, HNCO, and SiO. We investigate the behavior of the different molecular tracers and look for chemical variations as a function of an evolutionary sequence based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS emission. We find that the molecular tracers behave differently through the evolutionary sequence and some of them can be used to yield useful relative age information. The presence of HNC and N2H+ lines do not depend on the star formation activity. On the other hand, HC3N, HNCO, and SiO are predominantly detected i...

  17. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the coarser (content. Further, compaction effort was much significant

  18. Effects of stock density on the laying performance, blood parameter, corticosterone, litter quality, gas emission and bone mineral density of laying hens in floor pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H K; Park, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, C H

    2016-12-01

    The effects of stocking density on the performance, egg quality, leukocyte concentration, blood biochemistry, corticosterone levels, bone mineral density, and noxious gas emission of laying hens were investigated. Eight hundred 34-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments, each of which was replicated 4 times. Four stocking densities, including 5, 6, 7, and 10 birds/m(2), were compared. A commercial-type basal diet was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient recommendations for laying hens from the National Research Council. The diet was fed to the hens ad libitum for 8 wk. Results indicated that hen-day egg production, egg mass, and feed intake were less for (P floor and broken eggs and eggshell strength were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) stock density than other stock densities. There were no significant differences in the level of leukocytes among densities. However, heterophils and the H/L ratio were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) than in stock density of 6 or 7 birds/m(2) Serum corticosterone was greater (P < 0.01) 10 birds/m(2) than stock density than other stock densities. Litter moisture and gas emission (CO2 and NH3) were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) than stock density than 6 and 7 birds/m(2) stock density. Bone mineral content was not influenced by increasing stock density. However, bone mineral density was less (P < 0.05) for 10 m(2) stock density than other stock densities. These results indicate that increasing the density beyond 5 birds/m(2) elicits some negative effects on laying performance of Hy-Line brown laying hens. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  19. Simulations of gas puff effects on edge density and ICRF coupling in ASDEX upgrade using EMC3-Eirene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W., E-mail: wei.zhang@ipp.mpg.de [Applied Physics Department, University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Lunt, T.; Bobkov, V.; Coster, D.; Brida, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Applied Physics Department, University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Jacquet, P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    Simulations were carried out with the 3D plasma transport code EMC3-EIRENE, to study the deuterium gas (D{sub 2}) puff effects on edge density and the coupling of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) power in ASDEX Upgrade. Firstly we simulated an inter-ELM phase of an H-mode discharge with a moderate (1.2 × 10{sup 22} electrons/s) lower divertor gas puff. Then we changed the gas source positions to the mid-plane or top of machine while keeping other conditions the same. Cases with different mid-plane or top gas valves are investigated. Our simulations indicate that compared to lower divertor gas puffing, the mid-plane gas puff can enhance the local density in front of the antennas most effectively, while a rather global (toroidally uniform) but significantly smaller enhancement is found for top gas puffing. Our results show quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  20. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume, E-mail: g.jeanmairet@fkf.mpg.de; Levesque, Maximilien, E-mail: maximilien.levesque@ens.fr [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr [SIS2M, LIONS, CEA, Saclay (France); Borgis, Daniel [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Maison de la Simulation, USR 3441, CEA - CNRS - INRIA - Univ. Paris-Sud - Univ. de Versailles, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  1. DUST AND GAS IN THE DISK OF HL TAURI: SURFACE DENSITY, DUST SETTLING, AND DUST-TO-GAS RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinte, C.; Ménard, F. [UMI-FCA, CNRS/INSU, France (UMI 3386), and Dept. de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Dent, W. R. F.; Hales, A.; Hill, T.; Cortes, P.; Gregorio-Monsalvo, I. de, E-mail: christophe.pinte@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura 763-0355, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-01-01

    The recent ALMA observations of the disk surrounding HL Tau reveal a very complex dust spatial distribution. We present a radiative transfer model accounting for the observed gaps and bright rings as well as radial changes of the emissivity index. We find that the dust density is depleted by at least a factor of 10 in the main gaps compared to the surrounding rings. Ring masses range from 10–100 M{sub ⊕} in dust, and we find that each of the deepest gaps is consistent with the removal of up to 40 M{sub ⊕} of dust. If this material has accumulated into rocky bodies, these would be close to the point of runaway gas accretion. Our model indicates that the outermost ring is depleted in millimeter grains compared to the central rings. This suggests faster grain growth in the central regions and/or radial migration of the larger grains. The morphology of the gaps observed by ALMA—well separated and showing a high degree of contrast with the bright rings over all azimuths—indicates that the millimeter dust disk is geometrically thin (scale height ≈1 AU at 100 AU) and that a large amount of settling of large grains has already occurred. Assuming a standard dust settling model, we find that the observations are consistent with a turbulent viscosity coefficient of a few 10{sup −4}. We estimate the gas/dust ratio in this thin layer to be of the order of 5 if the initial ratio is 100. The HCO{sup +} and CO emission is consistent with gas in Keplerian motion around a 1.7 M{sub ⊙} star at radii from ≤10–120 AU.

  2. The viscosity and density of sour gas fluids at high temperatures and high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, B.R.; Marriott, R.A.; Blais, P.; Clark, P.D. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-01-15

    This poster session discussed an experiment designed to measure the viscosity and density of sour gas fluids at high temperatures and pressures. An option for disposing acid gases while enhancing the production of oil and gas fields is the re-injection of gases rich in hydrogen sulphide/carbon dioxide (H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2}) into reservoirs up to very high pressures, but issues with respect to corrosion, compression, pumping, and transport need addressing, and the reliable high-density/high-pressure data needed to arrive at an optimum process concept and the design of pumps, compressors, and transport lines had up to this point been lacking. The experimental set up involved the use of a Vibrating Tube Densimeter and a Cambridge Viscometer. Working with toxic gases at very high pressures and obtaining highly accurate data in a wide range of conditions were two of the challenges faced during the experiment. The experiment resulted in physical property measurement systems being recalibrated and a new daily calibration routine being adopted for accuracy. The densities and viscosities of pure CO{sub 2} and sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in a wide pressure and temperature range were determined. 1 tab., 9 figs.

  3. Speckle measurements of density and temperature profiles in a model gas circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, P. C.; Panousis, E.; Carstensen, J.; Doiron, C. B.; Färber, R.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle imaging was used to measure the density and temperature distribution in the arc zone of a model high voltage circuit breaker during the high current phase and under conditions simulating those present during current-zero crossings (current-zero-like arc); the arc was stabilized by a transonic, axial flow of synthetic air. A single probe beam was used; thus, accurate reconstruction was only possible for axially symmetric gas flows and arc channels. The displacement of speckles with respect to a reference image was converted to a line-of-sight integrated deflection angle, which was in turn converted into an axially symmetric refractive index distribution using a multistep process that made use of the inverse Radon transform. The Gladstone-Dale relation, which gives the index of refraction as a function of density, was extended to high temperatures by taking into account dissociation and ionization processes. The temperature and density were determined uniquely by assuming that the pressure distribution in the case of cold gas flow (in the absence of an arc) is not modified significantly by the arc. The electric conductivity distribution was calculated from the temperature profile and compared to measurements of the arc voltage and to previous results published in the literature for similar experimental conditions.

  4. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. I. The flocculent galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, M_max, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H2) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the flocculent galaxy M33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M_max is proportional to Sigma_gas^4.7, M_max is proportional Sigma_H2^1.3, and M_max is proportional to Sigma_SFR^1.0. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

  5. Equilibrium gas-liquid-solid contact angle from density-functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the equilibrium of a fluid in contact with a solid boundary through a density-functional theory. Depending on the conditions, the fluid can be in one phase, gas or liquid, or two phases, while the wall induces an external field acting on the fluid particles. We first examine the case of a liquid film in contact with the wall. We construct bifurcation diagrams for the film thickness as a function of the chemical potential. At a specific value of the chemical potential, two equally stable films, a thin one and a thick one, can coexist. As saturation is approached, the thickness of the thick film tends to infinity. This allows the construction of a liquid-gas interface that forms a well defined contact angle with the wall.

  6. Probing Planck Cold Clump Sightlines through HST STIS UV Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Cody; Meyer, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC) has provided a wealth of information about the cold, dusty ISM across the entire sky, identifying regions ranging from relatively diffuse cold clouds to pre-stellar cores in giant molecular clouds. This catalogue uses sub-millimeter emission arising from cold dust to determine the physical properties, morphology, and temperature of these regions. Combining this information with the diagnostic capabilities of UV absorption line spectroscopy allows us to better characterize the interstellar gas associated with these dusty regions. We have identified numerous target stars with STIS high-resolution UV spectra in the Hubble Space Telescope data archive whose sightlines lie in the sky vicinity of PGCC objects. By analyzing select interstellar absorption lines along these target sightlines, we can investigate several important cloud properties. Here we investigate the gas thermal pressure using C I fine structure excitation, and find a similar distribution to previous studies of the broader diffuse ISM. We also investigate the potential destruction of dust grains by shock processing by determining abundance ratios of heavily depleted elements to those that are typically lightly depleted.

  7. Supersonic beams at high particle densities: model description beyond the ideal gas approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Rademann, Klaus; Even, Uzi

    2010-10-28

    Supersonic molecular beams constitute a very powerful technique in modern chemical physics. They offer several unique features such as a directed, collision-free flow of particles, very high luminosity, and an unsurpassed strong adiabatic cooling during the jet expansion. While it is generally recognized that their maximum flow velocity depends on the molecular weight and the temperature of the working fluid in the stagnation reservoir, not a lot is known on the effects of elevated particle densities. Frequently, the characteristics of supersonic beams are treated in diverse approximations of an ideal gas expansion. In these simplified model descriptions, the real gas character of fluid systems is ignored, although particle associations are responsible for fundamental processes such as the formation of clusters, both in the reservoir at increased densities and during the jet expansion. In this contribution, the various assumptions of ideal gas treatments of supersonic beams and their shortcomings are reviewed. It is shown in detail that a straightforward thermodynamic approach considering the initial and final enthalpy is capable of characterizing the terminal mean beam velocity, even at the liquid-vapor phase boundary and the critical point. Fluid properties are obtained using the most accurate equations of state available at present. This procedure provides the opportunity to naturally include the dramatic effects of nonideal gas behavior for a large variety of fluid systems. Besides the prediction of the terminal flow velocity, thermodynamic models of isentropic jet expansions permit an estimate of the upper limit of the beam temperature and the amount of condensation in the beam. These descriptions can even be extended to include spinodal decomposition processes, thus providing a generally applicable tool for investigating the two-phase region of high supersaturations not easily accessible otherwise.

  8. Column Density Maps of the I-GALFA HI Survey: Evidence for Dark Gas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Steven J.; Koo, B.; Douglas, K. A.; Newton, J. H.; Peek, J. E.; Hughes, J. M.; Spraggs, M.; Park, G.; Kang, J.; Heiles, C. E.; Korpela, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    The gas in galactic disks, including our own, occurs in a wide range of temperatures and densities, most of which are unsuitable for star formation. Somehow, diffuse atomic clouds are collected into colder, denser molecular clouds that can collapse under their own gravity. The molecular condensation process is not directly observable, and the gas itself is often ``dark'' to standard probes like optically thin HI 21cm emission or the CO 2.6mm line. However, the presence of this dark gas can often be inferred from infrared dust emission in excess of what is expected for the observed HI and CO content. We have mapped apparent HI column densities in the Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array (I-GALFA) survey, which covers a 1600 square degree region at 4-arcminute resolution in the first Galactic quadrant. We compare these ``naive'' HI columns to others derived from Planck first-release CO and dust maps and NE2001 model dispersion measures to identify a number of areas with potentially significant dark gas. We discuss whether optically thick HI or CO-free H2 is more likely to dominate the dark column, and we consider the effects of possible biases on our results. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium, Western Kentucky University, and the Gatton Academy. I-GALFA (www.naic.edu igalfa) is a GALFA-HI survey observed with the 7-beam ALFA receiver on the 305-meter William E. Gordon Telescope. The Arecibo Observatory is a U.S. National Science Foundation facility operated under sequential cooperative agreements with Cornell University and SRI International, the latter in alliance with the Ana G. Mendez-Universidad Metropolitana and the Universities Space Research Association.

  9. Equilibrium gas-liquid-solid contact angle from density-functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Antonio; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the equilibrium of a fluid in contact with a solid boundary through a density-functional theory. Depending on the conditions, the fluid can be in one phase, gas or liquid, or two phases, while the wall induces an external field acting on the fluid particles. We first examine the case of a liquid film in contact with the wall. We construct bifurcation diagrams for the film thickness as a function of the chemical potential. At a specific value of the chemical potential, two equal...

  10. Gamma-Ray Effects of Dark Forces in Dark Matter Clumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Belotsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Existence of new gauge U(1 symmetry possessed by dark matter (DM particles implies the existence of a new Coulomb-like interaction, which leads to Sommerfeld-Gamow-Sakharov enhancement of dark matter annihilation at low relative velocities. We discuss a possibility to put constraints on such dark forces of dark matter from the observational data on the gamma radiation in our Galaxy. Gamma-rays are supposed to originate from annihilation of DM particles in the small scale clumps, in which annihilation rate is supposed to be enhanced, besides higher density, due to smaller relative velocities v of DM particles. For possible cross sections, mass of annihilating particles, masses of clumps, and the contribution of annihilating particles in the total DM density we constrain the strength of new dark long range forces from comparison of predicted gamma-ray signal with Fermi/LAT data on unidentified point-like gamma-ray sources (PGS as well as on diffuse γ-radiation. Both data on diffuse radiation and data on PGS put lower constraints on annihilation cross section at any dark interaction constant, where diffuse radiation provides stronger constraint at smaller clump mass. Density of annihilating DM particles is conventionally supposed to be defined by the frozen annihilation processes in early Universe.

  11. Ultrafast Spin Density Wave Transition in Chromium Governed by Thermalized Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Monney, C.; Carley, R.; Frietsch, B.; Bowlan, J.; Weinelt, M.; Wolf, M.

    2016-09-01

    The energy and momentum selectivity of time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is exploited to address the ultrafast dynamics of the antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) transition photoexcited in epitaxial thin films of chromium. We are able to quantitatively extract the evolution of the SDW order parameter Δ through the ultrafast phase transition and show that Δ is governed by the transient temperature of the thermalized electron gas, in a mean field description. The complete destruction of SDW order on a sub-100 fs time scale is observed, much faster than for conventional charge density wave materials. Our results reveal that equilibrium concepts for phase transitions such as the order parameter may be utilized even in the strongly nonadiabatic regime of ultrafast photoexcitation.

  12. The high density phase of the k-NN hard core lattice gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R.

    2016-07-01

    The k-NN hard core lattice gas model on a square lattice, in which the first k next nearest neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from being occupied by another particle, is the lattice version of the hard disc model in two dimensional continuum. It has been conjectured that the lattice model, like its continuum counterpart, will show multiple entropy-driven transitions with increasing density if the high density phase has columnar or striped order. Here, we determine the nature of the phase at full packing for k up to 820 302 . We show that there are only eighteen values of k, all less than k  =  4134, that show columnar order, while the others show solid-like sublattice order.

  13. Clumps and Axisymmetric Features in Debris Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2013-01-01

    This paper studied the structures of debris discs, focusing on the conditions that can form an axisymmetric-looking outer disc from systems with inner clumps. The main conclusion was that as long as the dominated dust grains are smaller than the blowout size, it is easy to form an axisymmetric-looking outer debris disc, which is part of a quasi-steady state of the whole system. This quasi-steady state is established through the balance between grain generations and a continuous out-going grain flow. Assuming there is an event that starts planetesimal collisions and the corresponding grain generations, this balance can be approached in a few thousand years. This result suggested that a quasi-steady-state picture could solve the possible mass budget problem of Vega's outer debris disc.

  14. Density functional theory of gas-liquid phase separation in dilute binary mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We examine statics and dynamics of phase-separated states of dilute binary mixtures using density functional theory. In our systems, the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas Δ {μ\\text{s}} (the Gibbs energy of transfer) is considerably larger than the thermal energy {{k}\\text{B}}T for each solute particle and the attractive interaction among the solute particles is weaker than that among the solvent particles. In these conditions, the saturated vapor pressure increases by {{k}\\text{B}}Tn2\\ell\\exp ≤ft(Δ {μ\\text{s}}/{{k}\\text{B}}T\\right) , where n2\\ell is the solute density added in liquid. For \\exp ≤ft(Δ {μ\\text{s}}/{{k}\\text{B}}T\\right)\\gg 1 , phase separation is induced at low solute densities in liquid and the new phase remains in gaseous states, even when the liquid pressure is outside the coexistence curve of the solvent. This explains the widely observed formation of stable nanobubbles in ambient water with a dissolved gas. We calculate the density and stress profiles across planar and spherical interfaces, where the surface tension decreases with increasing interfacial solute adsorption. We realize stable solute-rich bubbles with radius about 30 nm, which minimize the free energy functional. We then study dynamics around such a bubble after a decompression of the surrounding liquid, where the bubble undergoes a damped oscillation. In addition, we present some exact and approximate expressions for the surface tension and the interfacial stress tensor.

  15. ATLASGAL: Chemical evolution of star forming clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figura, Charles C.; Urquhart, James S.; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Although massive stars are few in number, they impact their host molecular clouds, clusters, and galaxies in profound ways, playing a vital role in regulating star formation in their host galaxy. Understanding the formation of these massive stars is critical to understanding this evolution, but their rapid early development causes them to reach the main sequence while still shrouded in their natal molecular cloud. Many studies have investigated these regions in a targeted manner, but a full understanding necessitates a broader view at all stages of formation across many star forming regions.We have used mid-infrared continuum surveys to guide selection of a statistically large sample of massive dust clumps from the 10,000 such clumps identified in the ATLASGAL Compact Source Catalogue (CSC), ensuring that all stages of the evolutionary process are included. A final sample of 600 fourth-quadrant sources within 1 degree of the Galactic plane were observed with the Mopra telescope with an 8 GHz bandwidth between 85.2 and 93.4 GHz.We present an overview of our results. We have identified over 30 molecular lines, seven of which with detected hyperfine structure, as well as several mm-radio recombination line transitions. Source velocities indicate that these regions trace the Crux-Scutum, Norma, and Carina Sagitarius arms. We have performed an analysis of linewidth and line intensity ratios, correlating these with star formation stages as identified by IR brightness at the 70 and 24 μm bands, and present several molecular pairs whose linewidth and intensity might serve as significant tracers of the evolutionary stage of star formation. We comment on the results of PCA analysis of the measured parameters for the overall population and the star formation stage subgroups with an eye toward characterising early stellar development through molecular line observations.

  16. Large Area Mapping at 850 Microns. IV. Analysis of the Clump Distribution in the Orion B South Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, D; Mitchell, G F; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Henry; Mitchell, George F.

    2006-01-01

    We present results from a survey of a 1300 arcmin^2 region of the Orion B South molecular cloud, including NGC 2024, NGC 2023, and the Horsehead Nebula (B33), obtained using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Submillimeter continuum observations at 450 microns and 850 microns are discussed. Using an automated algorithm, 57 discrete emission features (``clumps'') are identified in the 850 micron map. The physical conditions within these clumps are investigated under the assumption that the objects are in quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium. The best fit dust temperature for the clumps is found to be T_d = 18 +/- 4 K, with the exception of those associated with the few known far infrared sources residing in NGC 2024. The latter internally heated sources are found to be much warmer. In the region surrounding NGC 2023, the clump dust temperatures agree with clump gas temperatures determined from molecular line excitation measurements of the CO molecule. The bound...

  17. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XI. Temperatures and Substructure of Galactic Clumps Based on 350 micron Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Merello, Manuel; Shirley, Yancy L; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 microns from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with 3 additional maps covering star forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.5'' beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33'' beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 micron maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 +- 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with the best determined color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH3 observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than two substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substruct...

  18. A new technique to measure the neutralizer cell gas line density applied to a DIII-D neutral beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, D.N.; Hong, R.M.; Riggs, S.P.

    1995-10-01

    The DIII-D tokamak employs eight ion sources for plasma heating. In order to obtain the maximum neutralization of energetic ions (providing maximum neutral beam power) and reduce the heat load on beamline internal components caused by residual energetic ions, sufficient neutral gas must be injected into the beamline neutralizer cell. The neutral gas flow rate must be optimized, however, since excessive gas will increase power losses due to neutral beam scattering and reionization. It is important, therefore, to be able to determine the neutralizer cell gas line density. A new technique which uses the ion source suppressor grid current to obtain the neutralizer cell gas line density has been developed. The technique uses the fact that slow ions produced by beam-gas interactions in the neutralizer cell during beam extraction are attracted to the negative potential applied to the suppressor grid, inducing current flow in the grid. By removing the dependence on beam energy and beam current a normalized suppressor grid current function can be formed which is dependent only on the gas line density. With this technique it is possible to infer the gas line density on a shot by shot basis.

  19. A molecular line study towards massive extended green object clumps in the southern sky: chemical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Naiping

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular line study towards 31 extended green object (EGO) clumps in the southern sky using data from MALT90 (Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz). According to previous multiwavelength observations, we divide our sample into two groups: massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and HII regions. Our results seem to support that N2H+ and C2H emissions mainly come from the gas inside quiescent clumps. In addition, we also find that the [N2H+]/[H13CO+] and [C2H]/[H13CO+] relative abundance ratios decrease from MYSOs to HII regions. These results suggest depletion of N2H+ and C2H in the late stages of massive-star formation, probably caused by the formation of HII regions inside. N2H+ and C2H might be used as chemical clocks for massive-star formation by comparing with other molecules such as H13CO+ and HC3N.

  20. A mysterious dust clump in a disk around an evolved binary star system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M; Turner, J

    1998-09-10

    The discovery of planets in orbit around the pulsar PSR1257+12 shows that planets may form around post-main-sequence stars. Other evolved stars, such as HD44179 (an evolved star which is part of the binary system that has expelled the gas and dust that make the Red Rectangle nebula), possess gravitationally bound orbiting dust disks. It is possible that planets might form from gravitational collapse in such disks. Here we report high-angular-resolution observations at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths of the dusk disk associated with the Red Rectangle. We find a dust clump with an estimated mass near that of Jupiter in the outer region of the disk. The clump is larger than our Solar System, and far beyond where planet formation would normally be expected, so its nature is at present unclear.

  1. The clump mass function of the dense clouds in the Carina nebula complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekruhl, S.; Preibisch, T.; Schuller, F.; Menten, K.

    2013-02-01

    Context. The question how the initial conditions in a star-forming region affect the resulting mass function of the forming stars is one of the most fundamental open topics in star formation theory. Aims: We want to characterize the properties of the cold dust clumps in the Carina nebula complex, which is one of the most massive star forming regions in our Galaxy and shows a very high level of massive star feedback. We derive the clump mass function (ClMF), explore the reliability of different clump extraction algorithms, and investigate the influence of the temperatures within the clouds on the resulting shape of the ClMF. Methods: We analyze a 1.25° × 1.25° wide-field submillimeter map obtained with LABOCA at the APEX telescope, which provides the first spatially complete survey of the clouds in the Carina nebula complex. We use the three clump-finding algorithms CLUMPFIND, GAUSSCLUMPS and SExtractor to identify individual clumps and determine their total fluxes. In addition to assuming a common "typical" temperature for all clouds, we also employ an empirical relation between cloud column densities and temperature to determine an estimate of the individual clump temperatures, and use this to determine individual clump masses. Results: We find that the ClMFs resulting from the different extraction methods show considerable differences in their shape. While the ClMF based on the CLUMPFIND extraction is very well described by a power-law (for clump masses well above the completeness limit), the ClMFs based on the extractions with GAUSSCLUMPS and SExtractor are better represented by a log-normal distribution. We also find that the use of individual clump temperatures leads to a shallower ClMF slope than the (often used) assumption of a common temperature (e.g. 20 K) of all clumps. Conclusions: The power-law of dN/dM ∝ M-1.95 we find for the CLUMPFIND sample is in good agreement with ClMF slopes found in previous studies of the ClMFs of other regions. The

  2. The Carina Nebula and Gum 31 molecular complex: I. Molecular gas distribution, column densities and dust temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Rebolledo, David; Green, Anne; Braiding, Catherine; Molinari, Sergio; Wong, Graeme; Blackwell, Rebecca; Elia, Davide; Schisano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    We report high resolution observations of the $^{12}$CO$(1\\rightarrow0)$ and $^{13}$CO$(1\\rightarrow0)$ molecular lines in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the 22-m Mopra telescope as part of the The Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey. We cover 8 deg$^2$ from $l = 285^{\\circ}$ to 290$^{\\circ}$, and from $b = -1.5^{\\circ}$ to +0.5$^{\\circ}$. The molecular gas column density distributions from both tracers have a similar range of values. By fitting a grey-body function to the observed infrared spectral energy distribution from Herschel maps, we derive gas column densities and dust temperatures. The gas column density has values in the range from $6.3\\times\\ 10^{20}$ to $1.4\\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, while the dust temperature has values in the range from 17 to 43 K. The gas column density derived from the dust emission is approximately described by a log-normal function for a limited range of column densities. A high-column density tail is clearly evident for the gas column density dis...

  3. Clumps and streams in the local dark matter distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemand, J; Kuhlen, M; Madau, P; Zemp, M; Moore, B; Potter, D; Stadel, J

    2008-08-01

    In cold dark matter cosmological models, structures form and grow through the merging of smaller units. Numerical simulations have shown that such merging is incomplete; the inner cores of haloes survive and orbit as 'subhaloes' within their hosts. Here we report a simulation that resolves such substructure even in the very inner regions of the Galactic halo. We find hundreds of very concentrated dark matter clumps surviving near the solar circle, as well as numerous cold streams. The simulation also reveals the fractal nature of dark matter clustering: isolated haloes and subhaloes contain the same relative amount of substructure and both have cusped inner density profiles. The inner mass and phase-space densities of subhaloes match those of recently discovered faint, dark-matter-dominated dwarf satellite galaxies, and the overall amount of substructure can explain the anomalous flux ratios seen in strong gravitational lenses. Subhaloes boost gamma-ray production from dark matter annihilation by factors of 4 to 15 relative to smooth galactic models. Local cosmic ray production is also enhanced, typically by a factor of 1.4 but by a factor of more than 10 in one per cent of locations lying sufficiently close to a large subhalo. (These estimates assume that the gravitational effects of baryons on dark matter substructure are small.).

  4. Dispersed-phase structure of pressure-atomized sprays at various gas densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, L.-K.; Wu, P.-K.; Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The dispersed-phase structure of the dense-spray region of pressure-atomized sprays was studied for atomization breakup conditions, considering large-scale (9.5 mm initial diameter) water jets in still air at ambient pressures of 1, 2, and 4 atm., with both fully-developed turbulent pipe flow and nonturbulent slug flow at the jet exit. Drop sizes and velocities, and liquid volume fractions and fluxes, were measured using holography. Measurements were compared with predictions based on the locally-homogeneous flow approximation as well as recent correlations of drop sizes after primary breakup of turbulent and nonturbulent liquids. The dispersed-flow region beyond the liquid surface was relatively dilute (liquid volume fractions less than 0.1 percent), with significant separated-flow effects throughout, and evidence of near-limit secondary breakup and drop deformation near the liquid surface. Turbulent primary breakup predictions were satisfactory at atmospheric pressure, where the correlation was developed, but failed to predict observed trends of decreasing drop sizes with increasing gas density due to aerodynamic effects; in contrast, the laminar primary breakup predictions successfully treated the relatively small effects of gas density for this breakup mechanism. Effects of liquid turbulence at the jet exit were qualitatively similar to single-phase flows, yielding faster mixing rates with increased turbulence levels even though drop sizes tended to increase as well.

  5. Very high-density planets: a possible remnant of gas giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocquet, A; Grasset, O; Sotin, C

    2014-04-28

    Data extracted from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia (see http://exoplanet.eu) show the existence of planets that are more massive than iron cores that would have the same size. After meticulous verification of the data, we conclude that the mass of the smallest of these planets is actually not known. However, the three largest planets, Kepler-52b, Kepler-52c and Kepler-57b, which are between 30 and 100 times the mass of the Earth, have indeed density larger than an iron planet of the same size. This observation triggers this study that investigates under which conditions these planets could represent the naked cores of gas giants that would have lost their atmospheres during their migration towards the star. This study shows that for moderate viscosity values (10(25) Pa s or lower), large values of escape rate and associated unloading stress rate during the atmospheric loss process lead to the explosion of extremely massive planets. However, for moderate escape rate, the bulk viscosity and finite-strain incompressibility of the cores of giant planets can be large enough to retain a very high density during geological time scales. This would make those a new kind of planet, which would help in understanding the interior structure of the gas giants. However, this new family of exoplanets adds some degeneracy for characterizing terrestrial exoplanets.

  6. A Census of the High-Density Molecular Gas in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Naylor, B J; Aguirre, J E; Bock, J J; Earle, L; Glenn, J; Inami, H; Kamenetzky, J; Maloney, P R; Matsuhara, H; Nguyen, H T; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-pointing study of the molecular gas in the starburst nucleus of M82 based on 190 - 307 GHz spectra obtained with Z-Spec at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We measure intensities or upper-limits for 20 transitions, including several new detections of CS, HNC, C2H, H2CO and CH3CCH lines. We combine our measurements with previously-published measurements at other frequencies for HCN, HNC, CS, C34S, and HCO+ in a multi-species likelihood analysis constraining gas mass, density and temperature, and the species' relative abundances. We find some 1.7 - 2.7 x 10^8 M_sun of gas with n_H2 between 1 - 6 x 10^4 cm^-3 and T > 50 K. While the mass and temperature are comparable to values inferred from mid-J CO transitions, the thermal pressure is a factor of 10 - 20 greater. The molecular ISM is largely fragmented and is subject to UV irradiation from the star clusters. It is also likely subject to cosmic rays and mechanical energy input from the supernovae, and is warmer on average than the molec...

  7. MALT90 Kinematic Distances to Dense Molecular Clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, J. Scott; Jackson, James M.; Rathborne, J. M.; Foster, J. B.; Contreras, Y.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Stephens, Ian W.; Longmore, S. N.

    2017-10-01

    Using molecular-line data from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey (MALT90), we have estimated kinematic distances to 1905 molecular clumps identified in the ATLASGAL 870 μm continuum survey over the longitude range 295° < l < 350°. The clump velocities were determined using a flux-weighted average of the velocities obtained from Gaussian fits to the HCO+, HNC, and N2H+ (1–0) transitions. The near/far kinematic distance ambiguity was addressed by searching for the presence or absence of absorption or self-absorption features in 21 cm atomic hydrogen spectra from the Southern Galactic Plane Survey. Our algorithm provides an estimation of the reliability of the ambiguity resolution. The Galactic distribution of the clumps indicates positions where the clumps are bunched together, and these locations probably trace the locations of spiral arms. Several clumps fall at the predicted location of the far side of the Scutum–Centaurus arm. Moreover, a number of clumps with positive radial velocities are unambiguously located on the far side of the Milky Way at galactocentric radii beyond the solar circle. The measurement of these kinematic distances, in combination with continuum or molecular-line data, now enables the determination of fundamental parameters such as mass, size, and luminosity for each clump.

  8. Mycobacteria clumping increase their capacity to damage macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Brambilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps. Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of Mycobacterium abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least 5 rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 hours post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 hours post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 hours post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors.

  9. Quantitative characterization of clumping in Scots pine crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Sievänen, Risto

    2014-09-01

    Proper characterization of the clumped structure of forests is needed for calculation of the absorbed radiation and photosynthetic production by a canopy. This study examined the dependency of crown-level clumping on tree size and growth conditions in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and determined the ability of statistical canopy radiation models to quantify the degree of self-shading within crowns as a result of the clumping effect. Twelve 3-D Scots pine trees were generated using an application of the LIGNUM model, and the crown-level clumping as quantified by the crown silhouette to total needle area ratio (STAR(crown)) was calculated. The results were compared with those produced by the stochastic approach of modelling tree crowns as geometric shapes filled with a random medium. Crown clumping was independent of tree height, needle area and growth conditions. The results supported the capability of the stochastic approach in characterizing clumping in crowns given that the outer shell of the tree crown is well represented. Variation in the whole-stand clumping index is induced by differences in the spatial pattern of trees as a function of, for example, stand age rather than by changes in the degree of self-shading within individual crowns as they grow bigger.

  10. Mycobacteria Clumping Increase Their Capacity to Damage Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Cecilia; Llorens-Fons, Marta; Julián, Esther; Noguera-Ortega, Estela; Tomàs-Martínez, Cristina; Pérez-Trujillo, Miriam; Byrd, Thomas F.; Alcaide, Fernando; Luquin, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps). Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of M. abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least five rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 h post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 h post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 h post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors. PMID:27757105

  11. Effects of density stratification in driving zonal flow in gas giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.

    2011-12-01

    The banded structures at the surfaces of Jupiter and Saturn are associated with prograde and retrograde zonal flows. The depth of these jets remains however poorly known. Theoretical scenarios range from ``shallow models'', that assume that zonal flows are restricted to a very thin layer close to the surface; to ``deep models'' that suppose that the jets involve the whole molecular shell (typically 104 kms). The latter idea was supported by fully 3-D numerical simulations (e.g. Heimpel, 2005) using the Boussinesq approximation, meaning that the background properties (temperature, density, ...) are constant with radius (Christensen, 2002). While this approximation is suitable for liquid iron cores of planets, it is more questionable in the envelopes of gas giants, where density increases by several orders of magnitude (Guillot, 1999). The anelastic approximation provides a more realistic framework to simulate the dynamics of zonal flows as it allows compressibility effects, while filtering out fast acoustic waves (Lantz & Fan, 1999). Recent anelastic simulations suggest that including compressibility effects yields interesting differences to Boussinesq approaches (Jones, 2009; Showman et al., 2011). Here, we therefore adopt an anelastic formulation to simulate 3-D compressible flows in rapidly rotating shells. We have conducted a systematic parametric study on the effects of background density stratification and analysed the influences on both convective flows and zonal jets. Despite the strong dependence of convection on the density stratification (i.e. the typical lengthscale of convective flows decreases when compressibility increases), the comparison between Boussinesq and anelastic simulations reveals striking common features: the latitudinal extent, the amplitude and the number of zonal jets is found to be nearly independent of the density stratification, provided convection is strongly driven. Mass-weighted properties of the flow (and notably a mass

  12. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  13. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. II. The grand-design galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H_2), neutral gas (Sigma_HI) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the grand design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. We find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M_3rd, the median of the 5 most massive clusters, is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.4. There is no correlation with Sigma_gas, Sigma_H2, or Sigma_SFR. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.6, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_gas^0.5; there is no correlation with either Sigma_H_2 or Sigma_SFR. The results could hardly be more different than those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_g...

  14. Neutron and density logging responses to gas reservoir for well-balanced and under-balanced logging:Gas reservoirs of sandstone in a western China field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studying the response differences between neutron and density logging of gas reservoir for well-balanced and under-balanced logging will be of significance in evaluation of gas reservoir under the under-balanced condition and application of logging data. With Monte Carlo simulation technique,the paper obtains the relationship between neutron and density logging measurement and borehole di-ameter,porosity or gas saturation for well-balanced and under-balanced logging. The conclusions show that the response trend of under-balanced logging to gas reservoirs agrees with that of well-balanced logging with small borehole,and under-balanced logging data can be used usually as well-balanced logging data. When borehole diameter is large,under-balanced logging data should be corrected for the influences of borehole.

  15. 气体相对蒸气密度%Relative vapor density of gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于立友; 胡筱敏; 宋元宁

    2013-01-01

      为论证气体相对蒸气密度在工程实际中具有的重大应用价值,采用理论推导的方法,对气体相对蒸气密度的计算进行研究。研究结果表明:利用重大危险源辨识方法,采用《危险化学品安全技术全书(第二版)》判定结果“氧气球罐区构成危险化学品重大危险源”,而采用该研究方法则“未构成危险化学品重大危险源”。证实了《危险化学品安全技术全书》等相关技术书籍与实际计算数值存在不一致现象。该成果对不同状态下的气体相对蒸气密度研究具有理论价值,对压力球罐等重大危险源辨识具有参考价值。%  In order to demonstrate the application value of the relative vapor density of gas in engineering practice, this paper studied the relative vapor density of gas with the method of theoretical derivation. The results show that the area of oxygen spherical tank is a dangerous chemicals major hazards with the use of the major hazard identification methods, and the decision results in the hazardous chemical materials safety technology encyclopedia (Second Edition), but it is not a dangerous chemical major hazards adopting the methodology of this research. This paper confirms the non-conformance with the numerical value of hazardous chemical materials safety technology encyclopedia and other related technical books and the actual calculation results. This study has theoretical value in the study of gas with different conditions of the relative vapor density, and has reference value in identifying the major hazard of pressure spherical tank.

  16. X-raying clumped stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Feldmeier, A

    2008-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of stellar winds. X-rays originate from optically thin shock-heated plasma deep inside the wind and propagate outwards throughout absorbing cool material. Recent analyses of the line ratios from He-like ions in the X-ray spectra of O-stars highlighted problems with this general paradigm: the measured line ratios of highest ions are consistent with the location of the hottest X-ray emitting plasma very close to the base of the wind, perhaps indicating the presence of a corona, while measurements from lower ions conform with the wind-embedded shock model. Generally, to correctly model the emerging X-ray spectra, a detailed knowledge of the cool wind opacities based on stellar atmosphere models is prerequisite. A nearly grey stellar wind opacity for the X-rays is deduced from the analyses of high-resolution X-ray spectra. This indicates that the stellar winds are strongly clumped. Furthermore, the nearly symmetric shape of X-ray emission line profiles can be explained if t...

  17. X-rays, clumping and wind structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskinova, Lidia; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Ignace, Richard; Feldmeier, Achim

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission is ubiquitous among massive stars. In the last decade, X-ray observations revolutionized our perception of stellar winds but opened a Pandora's box of urgent problems. X-rays penetrating stellar winds suffer mainly continuum absorption, which greatly simplifies the radiative transfer treatment. The small and large scale structures in stellar winds must be accounted for to understand the X-ray emission from massive stars. The analysis of X-ray spectral lines can help to infer the parameters of wind clumping, which is prerequisite for obtaining empirically correct stellar mass-loss rates. The imprint of large scale structures, such as CIRs and equatorial disks, on the X-ray emission is predicted, and new observations are testing theoretical expectations. The X-ray emission from magnetic stars proves to be more diverse than anticipated from the direct application of the magnetically-confined wind model. Many outstanding questions about X-rays from massive stars will be answered when the models and the observations advance.

  18. A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Lacustrine Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunaga, B. A.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Cohen, A. S.; Liu, X.; Kaufman, D. S.; Eagle, R.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of past climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, many terrestrial proxies—tree rings, speleothems, leaf margin analyses, etc.—are influenced by the effects of both temperature and precipitation. Methods that can isolate the effects of temperature alone are needed, and clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful tool for determining terrestrial climates. Multiple studies have shown that the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed and may be a useful proxy for reconstructing temperatures on land. An in-depth survey of lacustrine carbonates, however, has not yet been published. Therefore we have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of modern lake samples' carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature and air temperature. Some of the sample types we have investigated include endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  19. Density fluctuation dynamics in a dissipative self-gravitating dilute gas revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, A. R.; García-Perciante, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of the behavior of density fluctuations in a dissipative self gravitating gas in the linear regime is revisited. A factorization for the dispersion relation given by approximate roots is proposed, which is analogous to the one introduced in the case without gravitational field. The threshold for the onset of a gravitational instability, namely Jeans wavenumber, is found to be unaltered by the presence of thermal and viscous dissipation. However, the behavior of damped modes does not correspond to the usual Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum when the gravitational field is taken into account. Additional to the usual central Rayleigh peak and Brillouin doublet, both corrected due to the presence of the field, non-Lorentizan terms are included in the structure factor. These terms are larger in the presence of the gravitational field and may lead in principle to relevant differences in the general properties of the spectrum. The possible mathematical origin of these modifications is briefly discussed.

  20. Infrared and density functional theory studies of formic acid hydrate clusters in noble gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of formic acid hydrate clusters (HCOOH)m(H2O)n have been measured in noble gas matrices (Ar and Kr). The concentration dependence of the spectra and the comparison with a previous experimental study on HCOOH(H2O) and HCOOH(H2O)2 [Geoge et al., Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60 (2004) 3225] led to the identification of large clusters. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) level were carried out to determine the anharmonic vibrational properties of the clusters, enabling a consistent assignment of the observed vibrational peaks to specific clusters.

  1. The transiting dust clumps in the evolved disc of the Sun-like UXor RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. We show that the distribution of light curve gradients is non-uniform for deep events, which we interpret as possible evidence for an asteroidal fragment-like clump structure. However, the clumps are very likely seen above a high optical depth midplane, so the disc's bulk clumpiness is not revealed. While circumstantial evidence suggests an asteroid belt is more plausible than a gas-rich transition disc, the evolutionary status remains uncertain. We suggest that the rarity of Sun-like stars showing disc-related variability may arise because (i) any accretion streams are transparent and/or (ii) turbulence above the inner rim is normally shadowed by a flared outer disc.

  2. Studying Relation Between Star Formation and Molecular Clumps on Subparsec Scales in 30 Doradus

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Omnarayani; Indebetouw, Remy; De Marchi, Guido; Koekemoer, Anton; Panagia, Nino; Sabbi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We present $\\mathrm{^{12}CO}$ and $\\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ molecular gas data observed by ALMA, massive early stage young stellar objects identified by applying color-magnitude cuts to \\textit{Spitzer} and \\textit{Herschel} photometry, and low-mass late stage young stellar objects identified via H$\\mathrm{\\alpha}$ excess. Using dendrograms, we derive properties for the molecular cloud structures. This is the first time a dendrogram analysis has been applied to extragalactic clouds. The majority of clumps have a virial parameter equal to unity or less. The size-linewidth relations of $\\mathrm{^{12}CO}$ and $\\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ show the clumps in this study have a larger linewidth for a given size (by factor of 3.8 and 2.5, respectively) in comparison to several, but not all, previous studies. The larger linewidths in 30 Doradus compared to typical Milky Way quiescent clumps are probably due to the highly energetic environmental conditions of 30 Doradus. The slope of the size-linewidth relations of $\\mathrm{^{12}CO}$, ...

  3. The transiting dust clumps in the evolved disc of the Sun-like UXor RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. We show that the distribution of light curve gradients is non-uniform for deep events, which we interpret as possible evidence for an asteroidal fragment-like clump structure. However, the clumps are very likely seen above a high optical depth midplane, so the disc’s bulk clumpiness is not revealed. While circumstantial evidence suggests an asteroid belt is more plausible than a gas-rich transition disc, the evolutionary status remains uncertain. We suggest that the rarity of Sun-like stars showing disc-related variability may arise because (i) any accretion streams are transparent and/or (ii) turbulence above the inner rim is normally shadowed by a flared outer disc. PMID:28280566

  4. Flaring of tidally compressed dark-matter clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Silk, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We explore the physics and observational consequences of tidal compression events (TCEs) of dark-matter clumps (DMCs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Our analytic calculations show that a DMC approaching a SMBH much closer than the tidal radius undergoes significant compression along the axis perpendicular to the orbital plane, shortly after pericenter passage. For DMCs composed of self-annihilating dark-matter particles, we find that the boosted DMC density and velocity dispersion lead to a flaring of the annihilation rate, most pronounced for a velocity- dependent annihilation cross section. If the end products of the annihilation are photons, this results in a gamma-ray flare, detectable (and possibly already detected) by the Fermi telescope for a range of model parameters. If the end products of dark-matter annihilation are relativistic electrons and positrons and the local magnetic field is large enough, TCEs of DMCs can lead to flares of synchrotron radiation. Finally, TCEs of DMCs lead to a burst ...

  5. The Intracluster Gas Fraction in X-ray Clusters Constraints on the Clustered Mass Density

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, A E

    1997-01-01

    The mean intracluster gas fraction of X-ray clusters within their hydrostatic regions is derived from recent observational compilations of David, Jones & Forman and White & Fabian. At radii encompassing a mean density 500 times the critical value, the individual sample bi-weight means are moderately ($2.4 by numerical simulations removes the discrepancy and results in a combined sample mean and standard error $\\fbargas(r_{500}) = (0.060 \\pm 0.003) assumption to maximize cluster gas content, this value constrains the universal ratio of total, clustered to baryonic mass $\\Omega_m/\\Omega_b \\le 23.1 physically plausible approach based on low D/H inferences from quasar absorption spectra and accounting for baryons within cluster galaxies yields an estimate $Ømega_m \\h^{2/3} = 0.28 \\pm 0.07$ with sources of systematic error involved in the derivation providing approximately $35%$ uncertainty. Additional effects which could provide consistency with the Einstein-deSitter case $Ømega_m \\se 1$ are presented, ...

  6. Effect of nodal positions, seasonal variations, shoot clump and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... from M/S Shidh Seeds Sales Corporation, Dehradun, India. After removal ... the responsive optimal media for observing their effect on shoot multiplication ..... shoots/ clump size in relation with shoot numbers and shoot length.

  7. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  8. Relationships between atmospheric positive electric charge densities and gas bubble concentrations in the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Klusek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of bubble density in the sea subsurface and positive ions in the lower atmosphere were performed in the Baltic Sea in the summer of 1999. Bubbles in two size ranges, around 27 and 100 µm, were measured acoustically. Airborne positive charge was measured with a Gerdien instrument. Observed concentrations of air ions varied from 60 cm-3 up to 600 cm-3.      The relative role of bubbles and wind speed on the positive air ion concentrations over the brackish water of the Baltic Sea is discussed. The parameters of a model of a log-log dependence between charge concentration and bubble density are calculated.      The correlation functions between time series of concentrations of positive charges over the sea and gas bubbles averaged over a depth range from 0.4 to 4 m and wind speed are presented. There was zero lag between the cross-correlation maxima of charge and bubbles, but there was a phase lag of one and a half hours between charge and wind speed.

  9. Density functional theory calculations of defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) are being developed in response to the Fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan. One of the options being pursued is U-Si fuels, such as the U3Si2 and U3Si5 compounds, which benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to the UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for U-Si fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap. The present study investigates point defect and fission gas properties in U3Si2, which is one of the main fuel candidates, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Based on a few assumption regarding entropy contributions, defect and fission diffusivities are predicted. Even though uranium silicides have been shown to amorphize easily at low temperature, we assume that U3Si2 remains crystalline under the conditions expected in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The temperature and dose where amorphization occurs has not yet been well established.

  10. Diffuse Atomic and Molecular Gas near IC443

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschauer, A; Wallerstein, George; Means, T

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of results on absorption from Ca II, Ca I, K I, and the molecules CH+, CH, C2, and CN that probes gas interacting with the supernova remnant IC443. The eleven directions sample material across the visible nebula and beyond its eastern edge. Most of the neutral material, including the diatomic molecules, is associated with the ambient cloud detected via H I and CO emission. Analysis of excitation and chemistry yields gas densities that are typical of diffuse molecular gas. The low density gas probed by Ca II extends over a large range in velocities, from -120 to +80 km/s in the most extreme cases. This gas is distributed among several velocity components, unlike the situation for the shocked molecular clumps, whose emission occurs over much the same range but as very broad features. The extent of the high-velocity absorption suggests a shock velocity of 100 km/s for the expanding nebula.

  11. Observing the gas temperature drop in the high-density nucleus of L 1544

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapsi, A.; Caselli, P.; Walmsley, M. C.; Tafalla, M.

    2007-07-01

    Context: The thermal structure of a starless core is crucial for our understanding of the physics in these objects and hence for our understanding of star formation. Theory predicts a gas temperature drop in the inner 5000 AU of the pre-stellar core L 1544, but there has been no observational proof of this. Aims: We performed VLA observations of the NH{3} (1, 1) and (2, 2) transitions towards L 1544 in order to measure the temperature gradient between the high density core nucleus and the surrounding core envelope. Our VLA observation for the first time provide measurements of gas temperature in a core with a resolution smaller than 1000 AU. We have also obtained high resolution Plateau de Bure observations of the 110 GHz 111-101 para-NH2D line in order to further constrain the physical parameters of the high density nucleus. Methods: We combine our interferometric NH{3} and NH2D observations with available single dish measurements in order to estimate the effects of flux loss from extended components upon our data. We have estimated the temperature gradient using a model of the source to fit our data in the u,v plane. As the NH{3}(1, 1) line is extremely optically thick, this also involved fitting a gradient in the NH{3} abundance. In this way, we also measure the [ NH2D] /[ NH{3}] abundance ratio in the inner nucleus. Results: We find that indeed the temperature decreases toward the core nucleus from 12 K down to 5.5 K resulting in an increase of a factor of 50% in the estimated density of the core from the dust continuum if compared with the estimates done with constant temperature of 8.75 K. Current models of the thermal equilibrium can describe consistently the observed temperature and density in this object, simultaneously fitting our temperature profile and the continuum emission. We also found a remarkably high abundance of deuterated ammonia with respect to the ammonia abundance (50% ± 20%), which proves the persistence of nitrogen bearing molecules at

  12. Diagrammatic expansion for positive density-response spectra: Application to the electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uimonen, A.-M.; Stefanucci, G.; Pavlyukh, Y.; van Leeuwen, R.

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B 90, 115134 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.115134] we put forward a diagrammatic expansion for the self-energy which guarantees the positivity of the spectral function. In this work we extend the theory to the density-response function. We write the generic diagram for the density-response spectrum as the sum of "partitions." In a partition the original diagram is evaluated using time-ordered Green's functions on the left half of the diagram, antitime-ordered Green's functions on the right half of the diagram, and lesser or greater Green's function gluing the two halves. As there exists more than one way to cut a diagram in two halves, to every diagram corresponds more than one partition. We recognize that the most convenient diagrammatic objects for constructing a theory of positive spectra are the half-diagrams. Diagrammatic approximations obtained by summing the squares of half-diagrams do indeed correspond to a combination of partitions which, by construction, yield a positive spectrum. We develop the theory using bare Green's functions and subsequently extend it to dressed Green's functions. We further prove a connection between the positivity of the spectral function and the analytic properties of the polarizability. The general theory is illustrated with several examples and then applied to solve the long-standing problem of including vertex corrections without altering the positivity of the spectrum. In fact already the first-order vertex diagram, relevant to the study of gradient expansion, Friedel oscillations, etc., leads to spectra which are negative in certain frequency domain. We find that the simplest approximation to cure this deficiency is given by the sum of the zeroth-order bubble diagram, the first-order vertex diagram, and a partition of the second-order ladder diagram. We evaluate this approximation in the three-dimensional homogeneous electron gas and show the positivity of the spectrum for all frequencies and

  13. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Klassen, Mikhail; Kirk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ~ 2-4 pc and densities of n ~ 400-1000 cm^-3. Many molecular clouds have Alfven Mach numbers near unity, a regime insufficiently explored by numerical simulations. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyze the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DisPerSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that in our trans-Alfvenic clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic fi...

  14. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kirk, Helen

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ∼ 2-4 pc and densities of n ∼ 400-1000 cm-3 with Alfvén Mach numbers near unity. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyse the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DISPERSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that our simulated clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic field depends on the virial parameter. Sub-virial clumps undergo strong gravitational collapse and magnetic field lines are dragged with the accretion flow. We see evidence of filament-aligned flow and accretion flow on to the filament in the sub-virial cloud. Magnetic fields oriented more parallel in the sub-virial cloud and more perpendicular in the denser, marginally bound cloud. Radiative feedback from a 16 M⊙ star forming in a cluster in one of our simulation's ultimately results in the destruction of the main filament, the formation of an H II region, and the sweeping up of magnetic fields within an expanding shell at the edges of the H II region.

  15. Photoevaporation of Disks and Clumps by Nearby Massive Stars: Application to Disk Destruction in the Orion Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Doug; Hollenbach, David; Bally, John

    1998-05-01

    We present a model for the photoevaporation of circumstellar disks or dense clumps of gas by an external source of ultraviolet radiation. Our model includes the thermal and dynamic effects of 6-13.6 eV far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons and Lyman continuum EUV photons incident upon disks or clumps idealized as spheres of radius rd and enclosed mass M*. For sufficiently large values of rd/M*, the radiation field evaporates the surface gas and dust. Analytical and numerical approximations to the resulting flows are presented; the model depends on rd, M*, the flux of FUV and EUV photons, and the column density of neutral gas heated by FUV photons to high temperatures. Application of this model shows that the circumstellar disks (rd ~ 1014-1015 cm) in the Orion Nebula (``proplyds'') are rapidly destroyed by the external UV radiation field. Close (d Gas evaporated from the cold disk moves subsonically through a relatively thin photodissociation region (PDR) dominated by FUV photons and heated to ~1000 K. As the distance from θ1 Ori C increases, the Lyman continuum flux declines, the PDR thickens, and the IF moves away from the disk surface. At d ~ 3 × 1017 cm, the thickness of the PDR becomes comparable to the disk radius. Between 3 × 1017 cm gas moves subsonically through a stationary D-type IF. The IF is moved away from the disk surface to a standoff distance rIF >~ 2.5rd. In this regime, the mass-loss rate is determined by the incident FUV photon flux and not the ionizing flux. However, at very large distances, d >~ 1018 cm, the FUV photon flux drops to values that cannot maintain the disk surface temperature at ~103 K. As the PDR temperature drops, the pressure of the FUV-powered flow declines with increasing distance from θ1 Ori C, and again the EUV ionizing photons can penetrate close to the disk surface and dominate the evaporation rate. Radio, Hα, and [O III] observations of externally illuminated young stellar objects in the Trapezium region are used to

  16. The Application of Methane Clumped Isotope Measurements to Determine the Source of Large Methane Seeps in Alaskan Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural methane emissions from the Arctic present an important potential feedback to global warming. Arctic methane emissions may come from either active microbial sources or from deep fossil reservoirs released by the thawing of permafrost and melting of glaciers. It is often difficult to distinguish between and quantify contributions from these methane sources based on stable isotope data. Analyses of methane clumped isotopes (isotopologues with two or more rare isotopes such as 13CH3D) can complement traditional stable isotope-based classifications of methane sources. This is because clumped isotope abundances (for isotopically equilibrated systems) are a function of temperature and can be used to identify pathways of methane generation. Additionally, distinctive effects of mixing on clumped isotope abundances make this analysis valuable for determining the origins of mixed gasses. We find large variability in clumped isotope compositions of methane from seeps in several lakes, including thermokarst lakes, across Alaska. At Lake Sukok in northern Alaska we observe the emission of dominantly thermogenic methane, with a formation temperature of at least 100° C. At several other lakes we find evidence for mixing between thermogenic methane and biogenic methane that forms in low-temperature isotopic equilibrium. For example, at Eyak Lake in southeastern Alaska, analysis of three methane samples results in a distinctive isotopic mixing line between a high-temperature end-member that formed between 100-170° C, and a biogenic end-member that formed in isotopic equilibrium between 0-20° C. In this respect, biogenic methane in these lakes resembles observations from marine gas seeps, oil degradation, and sub-surface aquifers. Interestingly, at Goldstream Lake in interior Alaska, methane with strongly depleted clumped-isotope abundances, indicative of disequilibrium gas formation, is found, similar to observations from methanogen culture experiments.

  17. Measuring Gap Fraction, Element Clumping Index and LAI in Sierra Forest Stands Using a Full-Waveform Ground-Based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.; Crystal L. Schaaf; Yao, Tian; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Zhuosen; Schull, Mitchell A.; Roman, Miguel O.; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Olofsson, Pontus; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Jupp, David L. B.; Lovell, Jenny L.; Culvenor, Darius S.; Newnham, Glenn J.

    2012-01-01

    The Echidna Validation Instrument (EVI), a ground-based, near-infrared (1064 nm) scanning lidar, provides gap fraction measurements, element clumping index measurements, effective leaf area index (LAIe) and leaf area index (LAI) measurements that are statistically similar to those from hemispherical photos. In this research, a new method integrating the range dimension is presented for retrieving element clumping index using a unique series of images of gap probability (Pgap) with range from EVI. From these images, we identified connected gap components and found the approximate physical, rather than angular, size of connected gap component. We conducted trials at 30 plots within six conifer stands of varying height and stocking densities in the Sierra National Forest, CA, in August 2008. The element clumping index measurements retrieved from EVI Pgap image series for the hinge angle region are highly consistent (R2=0.866) with those of hemispherical photos. Furthermore, the information contained in connected gap component size profiles does account for the difference between our method and gap-size distribution theory based method, suggesting a new perspective to measure element clumping index with EVI Pgap image series and also a potential advantage of three dimensional Lidar data for element clumping index retrieval. Therefore further exploration is required for better characterization of clumped condition from EVI Pgap image series.

  18. Homeostatic maintenance of ponderosa pine gas exchange in response to stand density changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Nate G; Adams, Henry D; Bailey, John D; Hess, Marcey; Kolb, Thomas E

    2006-06-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of gas exchange optimizes carbon gain per water loss. Homeostasis is regulated by short-term physiological and long-term structural mechanisms, both of which may respond to changes in resource availability associated with competition. Therefore, stand density regulation via silvicultural manipulations may facilitate growth and survival through mechanisms operating at both short and long timescales. We investigated the responses of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) to stand basal area manipulations in Arizona, USA. Stand basal area was manipulated to seven replicated levels in 1962 and was maintained for four decades by decadal thinning. We measured basal area increment (BAI) to assess the response and sustainability of wood growth, carbon isotope discrimination (A) inferred from annual rings to assess the response of crown gas exchange, and ratios of leaf area to sapwood area (A(l):A(s)) to assess longer term structural acclimation. Basal area treatments increased soil water potential (r2 = 0.99) but did not affect photosynthetic capacity. BAI increased within two years of thinning, and the 40-year mean BAI was negatively correlated with stand basal area (r2 = 0.98). delta was negatively correlated with stand basal area for years 5 through 12 after thinning (r2 = 0.90). However, delta was relatively invariant with basal area for the period 13-40 years after initial thinning despite maintenance of treatment basal areas via repeated decadal thinnings. Independent gas exchange measurements verified that the ratio of photosynthesis to stomatal conductance was invariant with basal area, but absolute values of both were elevated at lower basal areas. A(l):A(s) was negatively correlated with basal area (r2 = 0.93). We hypothesize that increased A(l):A(s) is a homeostatic response to increased water availability that maximizes water-use efficiency and whole-tree carbon uptake. Elevated A(l):A(s) of trees at low basal areas was associated with greater

  19. Effects of bronchomotor tone and gas density on time dependence of forced expiratory vital capacity maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, E; Milic-Emili, J; Marazzini, L

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown that in normal subjects and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients the maximal expiratory flows and FEV1 are significantly higher if the FVC maneuver is preceded by a rapid inspiration without an end-inspiratory pause (maneuver 1) compared with a slow inspiration with an end-inspiratory pause of approximately 5 s (maneuver 2). This time dependency of FVC was attributed primarily to loss of lung recoil (stress relaxation) during breath-holding at TLC, in association with time constant inequality within the lungs, and changes in bronchomotor tone. To examine the role of bronchomotor tone on time dependency of FVC, 11 COPD and 10 asthmatic patients performed FVC maneuvers 1 and 2 before and after administration of a bronchodilator drug (salbutamol). In addition, using the same approach, the effects of changing airway resistance per se were assessed in another group of 10 COPD patients and 10 normal subjects, while breathing air and after equilibration with 80% helium in oxygen. Main findings were: peak expiratory flow (PEF), FEV1, and maximal midexpiratory flow rate (MMF) were significantly larger with maneuver 1 than 2; after salbutamol administration and during helium-oxygen breathing, all indices increased significantly with both maneuvers but the relative differences between maneuvers 1 and 2 were unchanged. We conclude that time dependency of maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves, as indexed by PEF, FEV1, and MMF, is largely independent of bronchomotor tone and gas density, and probably reflects mainly stress relaxation of the respiratory tissues. The relevance of time dependency of FVC maneuver in the assessment of bronchodilator response and density dependence is discussed.

  20. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kimball

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzed in CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as Δ47 values. We analyzed Δ47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp. and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured Δ47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between Δ47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between Δ47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct Δ47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset

  1. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near-constant temperature, salinity, and pH and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate-related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzed in CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as Δ47 values. We analyzed Δ47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and high-Mg calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured Δ47 values were compared to in situ temperatures, and the relationship between Δ47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than high-Mg calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationships between Δ47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate clumped isotope calibration data as they show that distinct Δ47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset

  2. The Coronae of Moderate-Mass Giants in the Hertzsprung Gap and the Clump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Simon, Theodore; Stern, Robert A.; Drake, Stephen A.; Wood, Brian E.; Brown, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    and Si III) of 31 Com and upsilon(sup 3) Psc have blueshifted cores. Blue-asymmetric peaks in the solar Mg a lines are thought to indicate dynamical heating in the chromosphere. Observations of the H(sub I) Ly(alpha) feature of 31 Com taken 9 months apart reveal striking profile changes, reminiscent of those noted previously in the Ly(alpha) blue peak of the Capella G0 star. We used the far-ultraviolet diagnostics, in combination with ROSAT X-ray photometry and EUVE high-excitation line strengths, to constrain physical models of the stellar outer atmospheres. Quasi-static magnetic loops can simulate the empirical coronal emission measures of the giant stars, but the inferred pressures for sensible loop lengths conflict with direct measurements of subcoronal densities. Furthermore, the high rate of emission at approx. 10(exp 5) K cannot be explained by thermal conduction down the legs of hot quasi-static loops. On the other hand, the possible existence of elongated (l - R(sub *) emission structures on the gap giants leads to a speculative scenario to explain the X-ray deficiency. It is based on the increased importance of the dynamical filling phase ("explosive evaporation") of the loop life cycle; conductive cooling, yielding TZ emissions at the footpoints, when the heating is interrupted; and the possibility for transitions between " hot " and " cool " energy balance solutions owing to dynamical suspension and centrifugal trapping of the cooling gas. The long loops might represent a vestigial global " magnetosphere " inherited from the main-sequence phase, which ultimately is disrupted near approx. G0 by the deepening convective envelope and growth of a more solar-like dynamo. Coronal emissions might be boosted temporarily as the X-ray deficiency is removed but soon would be quenched by wind braking previously inhibited by the magnetospheric "dead zone."

  3. Effects of stock density on the laying performance, blood parameter, corticosterone, litter quality, gas emission and bone mineral density of laying hens in floor pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. K.; Park, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stocking density on the performance, egg quality, leukocyte concentration, blood biochemistry, corticosterone levels, bone mineral density, and noxious gas emission of laying hens were investigated. Eight hundred 34-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments, each of which was replicated 4 times. Four stocking densities, including 5, 6, 7, and 10 birds/m2, were compared. A commercial-type basal diet was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient recommendations for laying hens from the National Research Council. The diet was fed to the hens ad libitum for 8 wk. Results indicated that hen-day egg production, egg mass, and feed intake were less for (P laying performance of Hy-Line brown laying hens. PMID:27578881

  4. Effects of Soil Bulk Density on Gas Transport Parameters and Pore-Network Properties across a Sandy Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Chamindu, T K K Deepagoda

    2015-01-01

    The gas diffusion coefficient, air permeability, and their interrelations with air-filled porosity are crucial for characterization of diffusive and convective transport of gases in soils. Variations in soil bulk density can affect water retention, air-filled pore space, pore tortuosity...

  5. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Kettenis; L.G. Suttorp

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  6. Effect of preionization, fluorine concentration, and current density on the discharge uniformity in F2 excimer laser gas mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathew, D.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.; Peters, P.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The discharge homogeneity in F2-based excimer laser gas mixtures and its dependence on various key parameters, such as the degree of preionization, preionization delay time, F2 concentration and current density, is investigated in a small x-ray preionized discharge chamber. The spatial and temporal

  7. Effect of preionization, fluorine concentration, and current density on the discharge uniformity in F2 excimer laser gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, D.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Peters, P. J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The discharge homogeneity in F2-based excimer laser gas mixtures and its dependence on various key parameters, such as the degree of preionization, preionization delay time, F2 concentration and current density, is investigated in a small x-ray preionized discharge chamber. The spatial and temporal evolution of the discharges is monitored by taking photographs of the discharge fluorescence with a fast intensified CCD camera. It is found that a preionization electron density of about 107 cm-3 bar-1 is sufficient to initiate a streamer-free homogeneous discharge in gas mixtures of helium and fluorine with multiatmospheric gas pressure. The accompanying optimum time delay between the application of the x-ray pulse and voltage across the discharge electrodes is determined to be about 20 ns. It is shown that in spite of these optimum initial conditions, a homogeneous glow discharge eventually transforms into an inhomogeneous discharge containing numerous filaments. Our experiments show that the higher the initial F2 concentration, the initial current density or the pump power density, the shorter the time interval over which the discharge stays homogeneous. By a quantitative characterization and defining a detailed measure of the observed discharge inhomogeneity we find that halogen depletion, as suggested from the theory, is responsible for the temporal instability of discharges in such laser gas mixtures, as the experimental results are in good agreement with the theory on the halogen depletion instability mechanism.

  8. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  9. Stealing the Gas: Giant Impacts and the Large Diversity in Exoplanet Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Inamdar, Niraj K

    2015-01-01

    Although current sensitivity limits are such that true Solar System analogs remain challenging to detect, numerous planetary systems have been discovered that are very different from our own Solar System. The majority of systems harbor a new class of planets, bodies that are typically several times more massive than the Earth but that orbit their host stars well inside the orbit of Mercury. These planets frequently show evidence for large Hydrogen and Helium envelopes containing several percent of the planet's mass and display a large diversity in mean densities. Here we show that this wide range can be achieved by one or two late giant impacts, which are frequently needed to achieve long-term orbital stability in multiple planet systems once the gas disk has disappeared. We demonstrate using hydrodynamical simulations that a single collision between similarly sized exoplanets can easily reduce the envelope-to-core-mass ratio by a factor of two and show that this leads to a corresponding increase in the obser...

  10. Ly$\\alpha$ emission from Green Peas: the role of circumgalactic gas density, covering, and kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal; Erb, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of the Ly$\\alpha$ emission and interstellar absorption lines in a sample of ten star-forming galaxies at z~0.2. Selected on the basis of high equivalent width optical emission lines, the sample, dubbed "Green Peas," make some of the best analogs for young galaxies in an early Universe. We detect Ly$\\alpha$ emission in all ten galaxies, and 9/10 show double-peaked line profiles suggestive of low H I column density. We measure Ly$\\alpha$/H$\\alpha$ flux ratios of 0.5-5.6, implying that 5% to 60% of Ly$\\alpha$ photons escape the galaxies. These data confirm previous findings that low-ionization metal absorption (LIS) lines are weaker when Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction and equivalent width are higher. However, contrary to previously favored interpretations of this trend, increased Ly$\\alpha$ output cannot be the result of a varying H I covering: the Lyman absorption lines (Ly$\\beta$ and higher) show a covering fraction near unity for gas with N...

  11. Noble gas adsorption in two-dimensional zeolites: a combined experimental and density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengen; Zhong, Jianqiang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; Lu, Deyu

    Zeolites are important industrial catalysts with porous three-dimensional structures. The catalytically active sites are located inside the pores, thus rendering them inaccessible for surface science measurements. We synthesized a two-dimensional (2D) zeolite model system, consisting of an (alumino)silicate bilayer weakly bound to a Ru (0001) surface. The 2D zeolite is suitable for surface science studies; it allows a detailed characterization of the atomic structure of the active site and interrogation of the model system during the catalytic reaction. As an initial step, we use Ar adsorption to obtain a better understanding of the atomic structure of the 2D zeolite. In addition, atomic level studies of rare gas adsorption and separation by zeolite are important for its potential application in nuclear waste sequestration. Experimental studies found that Ar atoms can be trapped inside the 2D-zeolite, raising an interesting question on whether Ar atoms are trapped inside the hexagonal prism nano-cages or at the interface between the (alumino)silicate bilayer and Ru(0001), or both. DFT calculations using van der Waals density functionals were carried out to determine the preferred Ar adsorption sites and the corresponding adsorption energies. This research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, which is a U.S. DOE Office of Science Facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-SC0012704.

  12. Metal based gas diffusion layers for enhanced fuel cell performance at high current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nabeel; Van Steen, Eric; Tanaka, Shiro; Levecque, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer strongly influences the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A major drawback of current carbon fiber based GDLs is the non-controlled variation in porosity resulting in a random micro-structure. Moreover, when subjected to compression these materials show significant reduction in porosity and permeability leading to water management problems and mass transfer losses within the fuel cell. This study investigated the use of uniform perforated metal sheets as GDLs in conjunction with microchannel flowfields. A metal sheet design with a pitch of 110 μm and a hole diameter of 60 μm in combination with an MPL showed superior performance in the high current density region compared to a commercially available carbon paper based GDL in a single cell environment. Fuel cell testing with different oxidants (air, heliox and oxygen) indicate that the metal sheet offers both superior diffusion and reduced flooding in comparison to the carbon based GDL. The presence of the MPL has been found to be critical to the functionality of the metal sheet suggesting that the MPL design may represent an important optimisation parameter for further improvements in performance.

  13. X-ray gas mass fraction in the Shapley Supercluster and its implication on the cosmological baryon-density parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Nobuyoshi; Suto, Yasushi

    1993-04-01

    We estimated the X-ray gas mass of the clusters in the Shapley Supercluster by improving a previous estimate based on the extrapolation from the Coma data. Our estimate of the X-ray gas mass in the Shapley Supercluster, which depends on h50 and beta (a power-law index characterizing the gas density profile around a cluster), turned out to be a factor of 2-4 times smaller than the previous value. We then considered its implication on the baryon density parameter in the universe. Our estimates from the the Shapley Supercluster region are consistent with the predicted range according to the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis model if the universe is open for h50 = 2.0, or if the universe is flat (Omega(0) = 1.0), but with a substantial fraction of (non-baryonic) dark matter existing in intercluster space for h50 = 1.0.

  14. A Variable-Density Absorption Event in NGC 3227 mapped with Suzaku and Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Beuchert, T; Krauß, F; Miniutti, G; Longinotti, A L; Guainazzi, M; de La Calle, I; Malkan, M; Elvis, M; Miyaji, T; Hiriart, D; López, J M; Agudo, I; Dauser, T; Garcia, J; Kreikenbohm, A; Kadler, M; Wilms, J

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the circumnuclear gas accreting onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies remains a topic of much debate. As the innermost regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are spatially unresolved, X-ray spectroscopy, and in particular line-of-sight absorption variability, is a key diagnostic to map out the distribution of gas. Observations of variable X-ray absorption in multiple Seyferts and over a wide range of timescales indicate the presence of clumps/clouds of gas within the circumnuclear material. Eclipse events by clumps transiting the line of sight allow us to explore the properties of the clumps over a wide range of radial distances from the optical/UV Broad Line Region (BLR) to beyond the dust sublimation radius. Time-resolved absorption events have been extremely rare so far, but suggest a range of density profiles across Seyferts. We resolve a weeks-long absorption event in the Seyfert NGC 3227. We examine six Suzaku and twelve Swift observations from a 2008 campaign spanning 5 w...

  15. Scaling of stomatal size and density optimizes allocation of leaf epidermal space for gas exchange in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo Jan; Price, Charles A.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C.; Franks, Peter J.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2015-04-01

    Stomata on plant leaves are key traits in the regulation of terrestrial fluxes of water and carbon. The basic morphology of stomata consists of a diffusion pore and two guard cells that regulate the exchange of CO2 and water vapour between the leaf interior and the atmosphere. This morphology is common to nearly all land plants, yet stomatal size (defined as the area of the guard cell pair) and stomatal density (the number of stomata per unit area) range over three orders of magnitude across species. Evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is driven by selection pressure on the anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax), which determines the operational range of leaf gas exchange. Despite the importance of stomata traits for regulating leaf gas exchange, a quantitative understanding of the relation between adaptation of gsmax and the underlying co-evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is still lacking. Here we develop a theoretical framework for a scaling relationship between stomatal sizes and densities within the constraints set by the allocation of epidermal space and stomatal gas exchange. Our theory predicts an optimal scaling relationship that maximizes gsmax and minimizes epidermal space allocation to stomata. We test whether stomatal sizes and densities reflect this optimal scaling with a global compilation of stomatal trait data on 923 species reflecting most major clades. Our results show optimal scaling between stomatal sizes and densities across all species in the compiled data set. Our results also show optimal stomatal scaling across angiosperm species, but not across gymnosperm and fern species. We propose that the evolutionary flexibility of angiosperms to adjust stomatal sizes underlies their optimal allocation of leaf epidermal space to gas exchange.

  16. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  17. Gas Sensing Analysis of Ag-Decorated Graphene for Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition Products Based on the Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Huang, Rong; Gui, Yingang; Zeng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Detection of decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the best ways to diagnose early latent insulation faults in gas-insulated equipment, and the occurrence of sudden accidents can be avoided effectively by finding early latent faults. Recently, functionalized graphene, a kind of gas sensing material, has been reported to show good application prospects in the gas sensor field. Therefore, calculations were performed to analyze the gas sensing properties of intrinsic graphene (Int-graphene) and functionalized graphene-based material, Ag-decorated graphene (Ag-graphene), for decomposition products of SF6, including SO2F2, SOF2, and SO2, based on density functional theory (DFT). We thoroughly investigated a series of parameters presenting gas-sensing properties of adsorbing process about gas molecule (SO2F2, SOF2, SO2) and double gas molecules (2SO2F2, 2SOF2, 2SO2) on Ag-graphene, including adsorption energy, net charge transfer, electronic state density, and the highest and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The results showed that the Ag atom significantly enhances the electrochemical reactivity of graphene, reflected in the change of conductivity during the adsorption process. SO2F2 and SO2 gas molecules on Ag-graphene presented chemisorption, and the adsorption strength was SO2F2 > SO2, while SOF2 absorption on Ag-graphene was physical adsorption. Thus, we concluded that Ag-graphene showed good selectivity and high sensitivity to SO2F2. The results can provide a helpful guide in exploring Ag-graphene material in experiments for monitoring the insulation status of SF6-insulated equipment based on detecting decomposition products of SF6. PMID:27809269

  18. Gas Sensing Analysis of Ag-Decorated Graphene for Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition Products Based on the Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 is one of the best ways to diagnose early latent insulation faults in gas-insulated equipment, and the occurrence of sudden accidents can be avoided effectively by finding early latent faults. Recently, functionalized graphene, a kind of gas sensing material, has been reported to show good application prospects in the gas sensor field. Therefore, calculations were performed to analyze the gas sensing properties of intrinsic graphene (Int-graphene and functionalized graphene-based material, Ag-decorated graphene (Ag-graphene, for decomposition products of SF6, including SO2F2, SOF2, and SO2, based on density functional theory (DFT. We thoroughly investigated a series of parameters presenting gas-sensing properties of adsorbing process about gas molecule (SO2F2, SOF2, SO2 and double gas molecules (2SO2F2, 2SOF2, 2SO2 on Ag-graphene, including adsorption energy, net charge transfer, electronic state density, and the highest and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The results showed that the Ag atom significantly enhances the electrochemical reactivity of graphene, reflected in the change of conductivity during the adsorption process. SO2F2 and SO2 gas molecules on Ag-graphene presented chemisorption, and the adsorption strength was SO2F2 > SO2, while SOF2 absorption on Ag-graphene was physical adsorption. Thus, we concluded that Ag-graphene showed good selectivity and high sensitivity to SO2F2. The results can provide a helpful guide in exploring Ag-graphene material in experiments for monitoring the insulation status of SF6-insulated equipment based on detecting decomposition products of SF6.

  19. Gas Sensing Analysis of Ag-Decorated Graphene for Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition Products Based on the Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Huang, Rong; Gui, Yingang; Zeng, Hong

    2016-11-01

    Detection of decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride (SF₆) is one of the best ways to diagnose early latent insulation faults in gas-insulated equipment, and the occurrence of sudden accidents can be avoided effectively by finding early latent faults. Recently, functionalized graphene, a kind of gas sensing material, has been reported to show good application prospects in the gas sensor field. Therefore, calculations were performed to analyze the gas sensing properties of intrinsic graphene (Int-graphene) and functionalized graphene-based material, Ag-decorated graphene (Ag-graphene), for decomposition products of SF₆, including SO₂F₂, SOF₂, and SO₂, based on density functional theory (DFT). We thoroughly investigated a series of parameters presenting gas-sensing properties of adsorbing process about gas molecule (SO₂F₂, SOF₂, SO₂) and double gas molecules (2SO₂F₂, 2SOF₂, 2SO₂) on Ag-graphene, including adsorption energy, net charge transfer, electronic state density, and the highest and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The results showed that the Ag atom significantly enhances the electrochemical reactivity of graphene, reflected in the change of conductivity during the adsorption process. SO₂F₂ and SO₂ gas molecules on Ag-graphene presented chemisorption, and the adsorption strength was SO₂F₂ > SO₂, while SOF₂ absorption on Ag-graphene was physical adsorption. Thus, we concluded that Ag-graphene showed good selectivity and high sensitivity to SO₂F₂. The results can provide a helpful guide in exploring Ag-graphene material in experiments for monitoring the insulation status of SF₆-insulated equipment based on detecting decomposition products of SF₆.

  20. Clumping in the Cassini Division and C Ring: Constraints from Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in Saturn's rings are engaged in a constant tug-of-war between interparticle gravitational and adhesive forces that lead to clumping, on the one hand, and Keplerian shear that inhibits accretion on the other. Depending on the surface mass density of the rings and the local orbital velocity, ephemeral clumps or self-gravity wakes can form, giving the rings granularity on the scale of the most-unstable length scale against gravitational collapse. The A ring and many regions of the B ring are dominated by self-gravity wakes with a typical radial wavelength of ~50-100 m. A characteristic of self-gravity wakes is that they can effectively shadow the relatively empty spaces in between them, depending on viewing geometry. This leads to geometry-dependent measurements of optical depth in occultations of the rings. The C ring and Cassini Division have significantly lower surface mass densities than the A and B ring such that in most of these regions the most-unstable wavelength is comparable to the size of the ring particles (~1 m) so that self-gravity wake formation is not expected nor have its characteristics in various measurements been observed. Here we present measurements of the optical depth of the C ring and Cassini Division with the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) showing variations with viewing geometry in the "ramp" regions and the Cassini Division "triple band". These variations are characteristic of self-gravity wakes. We place limits on clumping in other regions of the C ring and Cassini Division.

  1. Propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gorakh Nath

    2010-01-01

    Non-similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic flow behind strong cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas,which has a variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocity.The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas.The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained,and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law.The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assumed to obey exponential laws.The shock wave moves with variable velocity.The effects of variation of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture,and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables in the region behind the shock are investigated at given times.Also,a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  2. Theoretical studies on new potential high energy density compounds (HEDCs) adamantyl nitrates from gas to solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XiaoJuan; ZHU WeiHua; GONG XueDong; XIAO HeMing

    2008-01-01

    A series of adamantyl nitrates have been theoretically studied from gas to solid to search for new po-tential high energy density compounds (HEDCs). The heats of formation (HOFs) for the 26 title com-pounds were calculated by designing isodesmic reactions at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. It was found that the HOFs of the 26 isomers with the same number of -ONO2 groups (n) are not correlated well with the corresponding substituted positions. According to the obtained heats of detonation (Q), detonation velocities (D), and detonation pressures (P) using the Kamlet-Jacobs equations, it was found that when n=7~8, the adamantyl nitrates meet the criterion as an HEDC. The calculations on bond dissociation energies of O-N (EO-N) showed that the adamantyl nitrates with gemi -ONO2always have the worst stability among the isomers, and all the adamantyl nitrates with gemi -ONO2 have similar stability. Due to the complexity of their structures, values of Eo-, do not decrease with the increase of the substituent number n obviously, and the stability of adamantyl nitrates is not determined by only one structural parameter. Considering the stability requirement, only 1,2,4,6,8,9,10-adamantyl heptanitrate is recom-mended as a feasible HEDC. Molecular packing searching for 1,2,4,6,8,9,10-adamantyl heptanitrate among 7 most possible space groups (P21/c, P-1, P212121, P21, Pbca, C2/c, and Pna21) using Compass and Dreiding force fields showed that this compound tends to crystallize in P21/c. Ab initio periodic calculations on the electronic structure of the predicted packing showed that the O-NO2 bond is the trigger bond during thermolysis, which agrees with the result derived from the study of dissociation energies of O-N bonds.

  3. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  4. Propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a gravitating or non-gravitating dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a dusty gas with or without self-gravitational effects is investigated in the case of isothermal and adiabatic flows. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas. The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained, and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. Non-similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of variations of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the presence of self-gravitational field on the flow variables are investigated at given times. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effects surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable differences are found in the distribution of flow variables. An increase in time also, increases the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that the consideration of isothermal flow increases the shock strength, and removes the singularity in the density distribution. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in self-gravitating dusty gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, star formation and shocks in stellar explosion, nuclear explosion, in industry, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry of vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating media. The obtained solutions are applicable for

  5. SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES IN M81. II. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE GAS RESPONSE TO STELLAR SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Lee, Wing-Kit; Taam, Ronald E.; Feng, Chien-Chang; Lin, Lien-Hsuan, E-mail: hhwang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-02-20

    The gas response to the underlying stellar spirals is explored for M81 using unmagnetized hydrodynamic simulations. Constrained within the uncertainty of observations, 18 simulations are carried out to study the effects of self-gravity and to cover the parameter space comprising three different sound speeds and three different arm strengths. The results are confronted with the data observed at wavelengths of 8 μm and 21 cm. In the outer disk, the ring-like structure observed in the 8 μm image is consistent with the response of cold neutral medium with an effective sound speed 7 km s{sup –1}. For the inner disk, the presence of spiral shocks can be understood as a result of 4:1 resonances associated with the warm neutral medium with an effective sound speed 19 km s{sup –1}. Simulations with a single effective sound speed alone cannot simultaneously explain the structures in the outer and inner disks. Instead this justifies the coexistence of cold and warm neutral media in M81. The anomalously high streaming motions observed in the northeast arm and the outward shifted turning points in the iso-velocity contours seen along the southwest arm are interpreted as signatures of interactions with companion galaxies. The level of simulated streaming motions narrows down the uncertainty of the observed arm strength toward larger amplitudes.

  6. NO density and gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges by Mid-IR QCLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Stancu, Gabi-Daniel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a key species for many processes: in combustion, in human skin physiology... Recently, NO-ground state absolute density measurements produced by atmospheric pressure NRP discharges were carried out in air as a function of the discharge parameters, using Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. These measurements were space averaged and performed in the post-discharge region in a large gas volume. Here we present radial profiles of NO density and temperature measured directly in the discharge for different configurations. Small plasma volume and species densities, high temperature and EM noise environment make the absorption diagnostic challenging. For this purpose the QCLAS sensitivity was improved using a two-detector system. We conducted lateral absorbance measurements with a spatial resolution of 300 μm for two absorption features at 1900.076 and 1900.517 cm-1. The radial temperature and NO density distributions were obtained from the Abel inverted lateral measurements. Time averaged NO densities of about 1.E16 cm-3 and gas temperature of about 1000K were obtained in the center of the discharge. PLASMAFLAME Project (Grant No ANR-11-BS09-0025).

  7. Adsorption of SF6 decomposed gas on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces with oxygen defect: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Chen, Qinchuan; Tang, Ju; Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Jinbin

    2014-04-23

    The detection of partial discharge by analyzing the components of SF6 gas in gas-insulated switchgears is important to the diagnosis and assessment of the operational state of power equipment. A gas sensor based on anatase TiO2 is used to detect decomposed gases in SF6. In this paper, first-principle density functional theory calculations are adopted to analyze the adsorption of SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2, the primary decomposition by-products of SF6 under partial discharge, on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces. Simulation results show that the perfect anatase (001) surface has a stronger interaction with the three gases than that of anatase (101), and both surfaces are more sensitive and selective to SO2 than to SOF2 and SO2F2. The selection of a defect surface to SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2 differs from that of a perfect surface. This theoretical result is corroborated by the sensing experiment using a TiO2 nanotube array (TNTA) gas sensor. The calculated values are analyzed to explain the results of the Pt-doped TNTA gas sensor sensing experiment. The results imply that the deposited Pt nanoparticles on the surface increase the active sites of the surface and the gas molecules may decompose upon adsorption on the active sites.

  8. 3D radiation hydrodynamics: Interacting photo-evaporating clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J.; Mellema, G.

    2003-07-01

    We present the results of a new radiation hydrodynamics code called Maartje. This code describes the evolution of a flow in three spatial dimensions using an adaptive mesh, and contains a combination of a ray tracer and an atomic physics module to describe the effects of ionizing radiation. The code is parallelized using a custom threadpool library. We present an application in which we follow the ionization of two dense spherical clumps which are exposed to an ionizing radiation field from a 50 000 K black body. We study various configurations in which one of the clumps shields the other from the ionizing photons. We find that relatively long-lived filamentary structures with narrow tails are formed. This raises the possibility that cometary knots (such as are found in the Helix Nebula) may be the result of the interaction of an ionizing radiation field with an ensemble of clumps, as opposed to the identification of a single knot with a single clump. Movies are available at http://www.edpsciences.org

  9. Investigating the origin of discrepancies in clumped isotope calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, R.

    2015-12-01

    The abundance of 13C-18O 'clumps' in calcite or aragonite of corals skeletons are a potentially valuable tool for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. However, corals are known to exhibit significant "vital effects" (i.e., non-equilibrium mineral compositions) in δ18O, which complicates its application in paleoclimate studies, and may also exhibit clumped isotope disequilibrium. Here we determined mass 47 anomalies (Δ47) in CO2 derived from cultured shallow water and live-collected deep-sea coral. In a species of cultured surface water coral, we find disequilibrium Δ47 and δ18O values that are consistent with a pH effect driving disequilibrium isotopic signatures. We go on to show that culturing specimens at elevated CO2 conditions drives changes in both Δ47 and δ18O that follows the same relationship defined for pH effects in inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments. This suggests that dissolved inorganic carbon speciation at the site of calcification and therefore fluid pH can effect the clumped isotope composition of biogenic minerals. In two different live-collected deep-sea coral taxa, we find distinct clumped isotope signatures and Δ47-temperature calibration relationships.

  10. Conditional eddies, or clumps, in ion-beam-generated turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Helene; Pecseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    with a relatively long lifetime in terms of the average bounce period is observed. Particles bouncing in the potential well associated with these `eddies' will necessarily remain correlated for times determined by the eddy lifetime. The results thus provide evidence for clump formation in plasmas...

  11. Natures of a clump-origin bulge: a pseudobulge-like but old metal-rich bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    Bulges in spiral galaxies have been supposed to be classified into two types: classical bulges or pseudobulges. Classical bulges are thought to form by galactic merger with bursty star formation, whereas pseudobulges are suggested to form by secular evolution due to spiral arms and a barred structure funneling gas into the galactic centre. Noguchi (1998, 1999) suggested another bulge formation scenario, `clump-origin bulge'. He demonstrated using a numerical simulation that a galactic disc suffers dynamical instability to form clumpy structures in the early stage of disc formation since the premature disc is expected to be highly gas-rich, then the clumps are sucked into the galactic centre by dynamical friction and merge into a single bulge at the centre. This bulge formation scenario expected happen only at the high-redshift is different from the galactic merger and the secular evolution. Therefore, clump-origin bulges may have their own unique properties. We perform a high-resolution N-body/smoothed partic...

  12. Computational modeling of Krypton gas puffs with tailored mass density profiles on Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Lamppa, D. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Jones, B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jobe, M.; Strizic, T.; Reneker, J.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Large diameter multi-shell gas puffs rapidly imploded by high current (∼20 MA, ∼100 ns) on the Z generator of Sandia National Laboratories are able to produce high-intensity Krypton K-shell emission at ∼13 keV. Efficiently radiating at these high photon energies is a significant challenge which requires the careful design and optimization of the gas distribution. To facilitate this, we hydrodynamically model the gas flow out of the nozzle and then model its implosion using a 3-dimensional resistive, radiative MHD code (GORGON). This approach enables us to iterate between modeling the implosion and gas flow from the nozzle to optimize radiative output from this combined system. Guided by our implosion calculations, we have designed gas profiles that help mitigate disruption from Magneto-Rayleigh–Taylor implosion instabilities, while preserving sufficient kinetic energy to thermalize to the high temperatures required for K-shell emission.

  13. Combinatorial effects on clumped isotopes and their significance in biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of isotopes within a collection of molecules records their physical and chemical histories. Clumped-isotope analysis interrogates these arrangements, i.e., how often rare isotopes are bound together, which in many cases can be explained by equilibrium and/or kinetic isotope fractionation. However, purely combinatorial effects, rooted in the statistics of pairing atoms in a closed system, are also relevant, and not well understood. Here, I show that combinatorial isotope effects are most important when two identical atoms are neighbors on the same molecule (e.g., O2, N2, and D-D clumping in CH4). When the two halves of an atom pair are either assembled with different isotopic preferences or drawn from different reservoirs, combinatorial effects cause depletions in clumped-isotope abundance that are most likely between zero and -1‰, although they could potentially be -10‰ or larger for D-D pairs. These depletions are of similar magnitude, but of opposite sign, to low-temperature equilibrium clumped-isotope effects for many small molecules. Enzymatic isotope-pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect, although it is not limited to biological reactions. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to a bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects related to the abundance of the rare isotope. Heteronuclear moeties (e.g., Csbnd O and Csbnd H), are insensitive to direct combinatorial influences, but secondary combinatorial influences are evident. In general, both combinatorial and chemical-kinetic factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of kinetically controlled reactions. I apply this analytical framework to isotope-pairing reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling that may be influenced by combinatorial

  14. A new equation of state for better liquid density prediction of natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Princess C.

    Equations of state formulations, modifications and applications have remained active research areas since the success of van der Waal's equation in 1873. The need for better reservoir fluid modeling and characterization is of great importance to petroleum engineers who deal with thermodynamic related properties of petroleum fluids at every stage of the petroleum "life span" from its drilling, to production through the wellbore, to transportation, metering and storage. Equations of state methods are far less expensive (in terms of material cost and time) than laboratory or experimental forages and the results are interestingly not too far removed from the limits of acceptable accuracy. In most cases, the degree of accuracy obtained, by using various EOS's, though not appreciable, have been acceptable when considering the gain in time. The possibility of obtaining an equation of state which though simple in form and in use, could have the potential of further narrowing the present existing bias between experimentally determined and popular EOS estimated results spurred the interest that resulted in this study. This research study had as its chief objective, to develop a new equation of state that would more efficiently capture the thermodynamic properties of gas condensate fluids, especially the liquid phase density, which is the major weakness of other established and popular cubic equations of state. The set objective was satisfied by a new semi analytical cubic three parameter equation of state, derived by the modification of the attraction term contribution to pressure of the van der Waal EOS without compromising either structural simplicity or accuracy of estimating other vapor liquid equilibria properties. The application of new EOS to single and multi-component light hydrocarbon fluids recorded far lower error values than does the popular two parameter, Peng-Robinson's (PR) and three parameter Patel-Teja's (PT) equations of state. Furthermore, this research

  15. Theoretical studies on new potential high energy density compounds (HEDCs) adamantyl nitrates from gas to solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A series of adamantyl nitrates have been theoretically studied from gas to solid to search for new po-tential high energy density compounds (HEDCs). The heats of formation (HOFs) for the 26 title com-pounds were calculated by designing isodesmic reactions at the B3LYP/6-31G level. It was found that the HOFs of the 26 isomers with the same number of —ONO2 groups (n) are not correlated well with the corresponding substituted positions. According to the obtained heats of detonation (Q),detonation velocities (D),and detonation pressures (P) using the Kamlet-Jacobs equations,it was found that when n=7~8,the adamantyl nitrates meet the criterion as an HEDC. The calculations on bond dissociation energies of O—N (EO—N) showed that the adamantyl nitrates with gemi —ONO2 always have the worst stability among the isomers,and all the adamantyl nitrates with gemi —ONO2 have similar stability. Due to the complexity of their structures,values of EO—N do not decrease with the increase of the substituent number n obviously,and the stability of adamantyl nitrates is not determined by only one structural parameter. Considering the stability requirement,only 1,2,4,6,8,9,10-adamantyl heptanitrate is recom-mended as a feasible HEDC. Molecular packing searching for 1,2,4,6,8,9,10-adamantyl heptanitrate among 7 most possible space groups (P21/c,P-1,P212121,P21,Pbca,C2/c,and Pna21) using Compass and Dreiding force fields showed that this compound tends to crystallize in P21/c. Ab initio periodic calculations on the electronic structure of the predicted packing showed that the O—NO2 bond is the trigger bond during thermolysis,which agrees with the result derived from the study of dissociation energies of O—N bonds.

  16. The Interstellar Extinction Toward the Milky Way Bulge with Planetary Nebulae, Red Clump, and RR Lyrae stars

    CERN Document Server

    Nataf, David M

    2016-01-01

    I review the literature covering the issue of interstellar extinction toward the Milky Way bulge, with emphasis placed on findings from planetary nebulae, RR Lyrae, and red clump stars. I also report on observations from HI gas and globular clusters. I show that there has been substantial progress in this field in recent decades, most particularly from red clump stars. The spatial coverage of extinction maps has increased by a factor $\\sim 100 \\times$ in the past twenty years, and the total-to-selective extinction ratios reported have shifted by $\\sim$20-25\\%, indicative of the improved accuracy and separately, of a steeper-than-standard extinction curve. Problems remain in modelling differential extinction, explaining anomalies involving the planetary nebulae, and understanding the difference between bulge extinction coefficients and "standard" literature values.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  18. On the Stellar Masses of Giant Clumps in Distant Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel; Cava, Antonio; Mayer, Lucio; Tamburello, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    We analyze stellar masses of clumps drawn from a compilation of star-forming galaxies at 1.1 galaxies, we examine the effects of spatial resolution and sensitivity on the inferred stellar masses. Large differences are found, with median stellar masses ranging from ∼ {10}9 {M}ȯ for clumps in the often-referenced field galaxies to ∼ {10}7 {M}ȯ for fainter clumps selected in deep-field or lensed galaxies. We argue that the clump masses, observed in non-lensed galaxies with a limited spatial resolution of ∼1 kpc, are artificially increased due to the clustering of clumps of smaller mass. Furthermore, we show that the sensitivity threshold used for the clump selection affects the inferred masses even more strongly than resolution, biasing clumps at the low-mass end. Both improved spatial resolution and sensitivity appear to shift the clump stellar mass distribution to lower masses, qualitatively in agreement with clump masses found in recent high-resolution simulations of disk fragmentation. We discuss the nature of the most massive clumps, and we conclude that it is currently not possible to properly establish a meaningful clump stellar mass distribution from observations and to infer the existence and value of a characteristic clump mass scale.

  19. A Simple Model for the Relationship Between Star Formation and Surface Density

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, C L

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the star formation rate per unit area and the surface density of the ISM (the local Kennicutt-Schmitt law) using a simplified model of the ISM and a simple estimate of the star formation rate based on the mass of gas in bound clumps, the local dynamical timescales of the clumps, and an efficiency parameter of around 5 per cent. Despite the simplicity of the approach, we are able to reproduce the observed linear relation between star formation rate and surface density of dense (molecular) gas. We use a simple model for the dependence of H_2 fraction on total surface density to argue why neither total surface density nor the HI surface density are good local indicators of star formation rate. We also investigate the dependence of the star formation rate on the depth of the spiral potential. Our model indicates that the mean star formation rate does not depend significantly on the strength of the spiral potential, but that a stronger spiral potential, for a given mean surf...

  20. Entropy generation in a channel resembling gas turbine cooling passage: Effect of rotation number and density ratio on entropy generation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Basha; M Al-Qahtani; B S Yilbas

    2009-06-01

    Flow into a passage resembling a gas turbine blade cooling passage is considered and entropy generation rate in the passage is examined for unique rotation number and density ratios. In the simulations, leading and trailing walls of the passage are assumed to be at constant temperature. A control volume approach is introduced to discretize the governing equations of flow, heat transfer, and entropy generation. Reynolds stress turbulence model is accommodated in the simulation to account for the turbulence. The study is extended to include two rotational speeds and three density ratios. The passage aspect ratio is kept 10:1. It is found that volumetric entropy generation rate attains high values at passage inlet due to attainment of high temperature gradient in this region. Increasing rotation number and density ratio enhances volumetric entropy generation rate in the passage.

  1. Experimental conditions affect the outcome of Plasmodium falciparum platelet-mediated clumping assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe J Alexandra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-mediated clumping of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE is a parasite adhesion phenotype that has been associated with severe malaria in some, but not all, field isolate studies. A variety of experimental conditions have been used to study clumping in vitro, with substantial differences in parasitaemia (Pt, haematocrit (Ht, and time of reaction between studies. It is unknown whether these experimental variables affect the outcome of parasite clumping assays. Methods The effects of Pt (1, 4 and 12%, Ht (2, 5 and 10% and time (15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h on the clumping of P. falciparum clone HB3 were examined. The effects of platelet freshness and parasite maturity were also studied. Results At low Ht (2%, the Pt of the culture has a large effect on clumping, with significantly higher clumping occurring at 12% Pt (mean 47% of IE in clumps compared to 4% Pt (mean 26% IE in clumps or 1% Pt (mean 7% IE in clumps (ANOVA, p = 0.0004. Similarly, at low Pt (1%, the Ht of the culture has a large effect on clumping, with significantly higher clumping occurring at 10% Ht (mean 62% IE in clumps compared to 5% Ht (mean 25% IE in clumps or 2% Ht (mean 10% IE in clumps (ANOVA, p = 0.0004. Combinations of high Ht and high Pt were impractical because of the difficulty assessing clumping in densely packed IE and the rapid formation of enormous clumps that could not be counted accurately. There was no significant difference in clumping when fresh platelets were used compared to platelets stored at 4°C for 10 days. Clumping was a property of mature pigmented-trophozoites and schizonts but not ring stage parasites. Conclusion The Pt and Ht at which in vitro clumping assays are set up have a profound effect on the outcome. All previous field isolate studies on clumping and malaria severity suffer from potential problems in experimental design and methodology. Future studies of clumping should use standardized conditions and

  2. Temporal clumping of prey and coexistence of unequal interferers: experiments on social forager groups of brown trout feeding on invertebrate drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Mikael; Skov, Christian; Koed, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    Environmental fluctuations have been proposed to enhance the coexistence of competing phenotypes. Evaluations are here presented on the effects of prey density and short-term temporal clumping of prey availability on the relative foraging success of unequal interferers in social forager groups...... of juvenile brown trout Salmo trutta feeding on drifting invertebrate prey (frozen chironomids). Groups of three trout with established linear dominance hierarchies (dominant, intermediate and subordinate) were subjected to three different total numbers of prey, combined with three different levels...... of temporal clumping of prey arrival, resulting in nine treatment combinations. Higher total number of prey increased the consumption for all dominance ranks, while higher temporal clumping decreased the consumption for the dominant individuals and increased the consumption for the subordinate individuals...

  3. The Role of Clustering of Sub-Clumps in Bright Elliptical Galaxy Formation from a Low-Spin Seed Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, D

    2001-01-01

    We reveal the role of clustering of sub-clumps, which is expected in the cold dark matter (CDM) universe, in forming a bright elliptical galaxy (BEG) from a low-spin seed galaxy. This can be done by comparing the evolution of a low-spin seed galaxy including small-scale density fluctuations expected in the CDM universe (Model 1) with that of a completely uniform one (Model 2), using numerical experiments. We show that Model 2 cannot reproduce the properties of BEGs and forms a disk which is too compact and too bright due to the conservation of the initial-small angular momentum. In Model 1 clustering of the sub-clumps caused by initial small-scale density fluctuations leads to angular momentum transfer from the baryon component to the dark matter and consequently a nearly spherical system supported by random motions is formed. Moreover the collisionless property of the stars formed in the sub-clumps prevents the dissipative contraction of the system, leading to a large measured half-light radius. As a result,...

  4. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy III. Dust Continuum Characterization of an Evolutionary Sample

    CERN Document Server

    König, C; Csengeri, T; Leurini, S; Wyrowski, F; Giannetti, A; Wienen, M; Pillai, T; Kauffmann, J; Menten, K M; Schuller, F

    2016-01-01

    The ATLASGAL survey provides an ideal basis for detailed studies of large numbers of massive star forming clumps covering the whole range of evolutionary stages. The ATLASGAL Top100 is a sample of clumps selected from their infrared and radio properties to be representative for the whole range of evolutionary stages. The ATLASGAL Top100 sources are the focus of a number of detailed follow-up studies that will be presented in a series of papers. In the present work we use the dust continuum emission to constrain the physical properties of this sample and identify trends as a function of source evolution. We determine flux densities from mid-infrared to submm wavelength (8-870 micron) images and use these values to fit their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and determine their dust temperature and flux. Combining these with recent distances from the literature including maser parallax measurements we determine clump masses, luminosities and column densities. We find trends for increasing temperature, lumino...

  5. Predicting 13C-18O clumped isotope fractionation in dissolved inorganic carbon and rapidly precipitated carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P. S.; Tripati, A. K.; Schauble, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of multiply substituted isotopologues in carbonates forms the basis for clumped isotope thermometry. It is important to understand how clumping may be affected by environmental factors under both equilibrium and disequilbrium conditions. "Clumping" of heavy isotopes into bonds with each other in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species is of particular interest because natural carbonates that precipitate too rapidly to reach internal isotopic exchange equilibrium may instead inherit the clumping signature of DIC in the parent solution. DIC speciation is dependent on pH, suggesting that clumping signatures inherited by rapidly precipitated carbonate minerals could also be affected by pH. To better understand these disequilibrium clumped isotope signatures (and their effects on inferred temperatures of formation), we have developed theoretical models of the individual DIC species, composite DIC solutions, and bulk carbonate minerals. We used 4 different techniques for modelling the hydration of DIC: gas phase, implicit solvation, explicit solvation (ion with 3 water molecules) and supermolecular clusters (ion plus 21 to 32 water molecules with geometries generated by molecular dynamics). For each solvation technique, we performed sensitivity testing by combining different levels of theory (7 ab initio/hybrid methods, each with 5 different sizes of basis sets) to understand the limits of each technique. We looked at the degree of convergence with the most complex (and accurate) models in order to select the most reliable and efficient modelling methods. Overall, our models predict a difference between Δ47 ( HCO3-) and Δ47 (CO32-) > .025‰, enough to potentially perturb inferred formation temperatures by ≥ 5°C. This difference is fairly consistent at most levels of theory we tested. The models also predict that a carbonate mineral precipitating very rapidly (i.e., forming under isotopic disequilibrium conditions) in a DIC solution of low to

  6. The ESO UVES Advanced Data Products Quasar Sample - II. Cosmological Evolution of the Neutral Gas Mass Density

    CERN Document Server

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Popping, Attila; Milliard, Bruno; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Frank, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Quasar foreground damped absorbers, associated with HI-rich galaxies allow to estimate the neutral gas mass over cosmic time, which is a possible indicator of gas consumption as star formation proceeds. The DLAs and sub-DLAs are believed to contain a large fraction of neutral gas mass in the Universe. In Paper I of the series, we present the results of a search for DLAs and sub-DLAs in the ESO-UVES Advanced Data Products dataset of 250 quasars. Here we use an unbiased sub-sample of sub-DLAs from this dataset. We build a subset of 122 quasars ranging from 1.5 density and the line density are derived for sub-DLAs and compared with the LLSs and DLAs measurements from the literature. The results indicate that these three classes of absorbers are ...

  7. High-Density Fiber Optical Sensor and Instrumentation for Gas Turbine Operation Condition Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbine operation control is normally based on thermocouple-measured exhaust temperatures. Due to radiation shielding and bulky package, it is difficult to provide high spatial resolution for measuring can-to-can combustion temperature profile at the exhaust duct. This paper has demonstrated that wavelength-division-multiplexing-based fiber Bragg grating sensors could provide high spatial resolution steady and dynamic temperature measurements. A robust sensor package can be designed with either circumferential sensing cable or radial sensing rake for quasi-distributing multiple fiber sensors in the gas turbine environment. The field validations have demonstrated that quasi-distributed fiber sensors have not only demonstrated its temperature measurement accuracy compared to existing thermocouple sensors but also shown its unique dynamic response amplitude and power spectra that could be utilized for gas turbine transient operation condition monitoring and diagnostics.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Density Waves in a Galactic Disk System of Stars and Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuqingLOU; ZuhuiFAN

    1997-01-01

    We study galactic magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) density waves in a composite system consisting of a stellar disk and a magnetized thermal gaseous disk.Perturbations in the two disks are conpled through gravitational interaction.In the tight-winding regime,Dispersion relations for MHD density wvaes are derived under two different approximations for the stellar disk.This investigation clarifies the interrelation between spiral structures in the stellar disk and spiral synchrotron radio structures in the magnetized thermal gaseous disk.

  9. The effects of clumping on wind line variability

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, D; Fullerton, A W

    2007-01-01

    We review the effects of clumping on the profiles of resonance doublets. By allowing the ratio of the doublet oscillator strenghts to be a free parameter, we demonstrate that doublet profiles contain more information than is normally utilized. In clumped (or porous) winds, this ratio can lies between unity and the ratio of the f-values, and can change as a function of velocity and time, depending on the fraction of the stellar disk that is covered by material moving at a particular velocity at a given moment. Using these insights, we present the results of SEI modeling of a sample of B supergiants, zeta Pup and a time series for a star whose terminal velocity is low enough to make the components of its Si IV 1400 doublet independent. These results are interpreted within the framework of the Oskinova et al. (2007) model, and demonstrate how the doublet profiles can be used to extract information about wind structure.

  10. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. II. Rare-gas plasmas and Ar-molecular gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffard, John B., E-mail: jboffard@wisc.edu; Lin, Chun C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Culver, Cody [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold [Applied Materials Inc., Gloucester, Massachusetts 01939 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions from excited plasma species can play a variety of roles in processing plasmas, including damaging the surface properties of materials used in semiconductor processing. Depending on their wavelength, VUV photons can easily transmit thin upper dielectric layers and affect the electrical characteristics of the devices. Despite their importance, measuring VUV fluxes is complicated by the fact that few materials transmit at VUV wavelengths, and both detectors and windows are easily damaged by plasma exposure. The authors have previously reported on measuring VUV fluxes in pure argon plasmas by monitoring the concentrations of Ar(3p{sup 5}4s) resonance atoms that produce the VUV emissions using noninvasive optical emission spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared wavelength range [Boffard et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 021304 (2014)]. Here, the authors extend this technique to other rare-gases (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and argon-molecular gas plasmas (Ar/H{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, and Ar/N{sub 2}). Results of a model for VUV emissions that couples radiation trapping and the measured rare-gas resonance level densities are compared to measurements made with both a calibrated VUV photodiode and a sodium salicylate fluorescence detection scheme. In these more complicated gas mixtures, VUV emissions from a variety of sources beyond the principal resonance levels of the rare gases are found to contribute to the total VUV flux.

  11. Adsorption of binary gas mixtures in heterogeneous carbon predicted by density functional theory: on the formation of adsorption azeotropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, James A; Pan, Huanhua; Balbuena, Perla B

    2010-09-07

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) was used to predict the adsorption of nine different binary gas mixtures in a heterogeneous BPL activated carbon with a known pore size distribution (PSD) and in single, homogeneous, slit-shaped carbon pores of different sizes. By comparing the heterogeneous results with those obtained from the ideal adsorbed solution theory and with those obtained in the homogeneous carbon, it was determined that adsorption nonideality and adsorption azeotropes are caused by the coupled effects of differences in the molecular size of the components in a gas mixture and only slight differences in the pore sizes of a heterogeneous adsorbent. For many binary gas mixtures, selectivity was found to be a strong function of pore size. As the width of a homogeneous pore increases slightly, the selectivity for two different sized adsorbates may change from being greater than unity to less than unity. This change in selectivity can be accompanied by the formation of an adsorption azeotrope when this same binary mixture is adsorbed in a heterogeneous adsorbent with a PSD, like in BPL activated carbon. These results also showed that the selectivity exhibited by a heterogeneous adsorbent can be dominated by a small number of pores that are very selective toward one of the components in the gas mixture, leading to adsorption azeotrope formation in extreme cases.

  12. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, James E; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2006-11-07

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO2 sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF GAS-DENSITY AND LIQUID PROPERTIES ON BUBBLE BREAKUP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILKINSON, PM; VANSCHAYK, A; SPRONKEN, JPM; VANDIERENDONCK, LL

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of a literature review of bubble breakup experiments, it is demonstrated that both liquid viscosity and surface tension have an influence on bubble stability and, thus, bubble breakup, for small as well as large bubbles. Possible influences of the gas properties on bubble breakup have u

  14. Superconducting properties of 3D low-density TI-bipolaron gas

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhno, V.D.

    2015-01-01

    Consideration is given to thermodynamical properties of a three-dimensional Bose-condensate of translation-invariant bipolarons (TI-bipolarons). The critical temperature of transition, energy, heat capacity and the transition heat of TI-bipolaron gas are calculated. The results obtained are used to explain experiments on high-temperature superconductors.

  15. Supernova matter at subnuclear densities as a resonant Fermi gas: enhancement of neutrino rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, A; Pethick, C J; Schwenk, A

    2014-08-22

    At low energies nucleon-nucleon interactions are resonant and therefore supernova matter at subnuclear densities has many similarities to atomic gases with interactions dominated by a Feshbach resonance. We calculate the rates of neutrino processes involving nucleon-nucleon collisions and show that these are enhanced in mixtures of neutrons and protons at subnuclear densities due to the large scattering lengths. As a result, the rate for neutrino pair bremsstrahlung and absorption is significantly larger below 10(13) g cm(-3) compared to rates used in supernova simulations.

  16. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  17. First Density Correction to the Transport Coefficients for a Square Well Gas: Temperature Dependence and Bound State Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Gregory Ellis

    The temperature dependence of transport properties of a moderately dense square well gas is studied in order to understand the effects of attractive forces (particularly bound states). The quantum cluster expansions of the Green -Kubo time correlation functions for the thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficients are given, and exact expressions to zeroth (Boltzmann level) and first order in the density are obtained. Specializing to Boltzmann statistics and the classical square well potential allows calculations of the kinetic potential parts of the first density correction; the important contributions to the remaining triple collision parts are discussed. Good agreement with molecular dynamics results is found; quantitative difference from real fluids are observed, however. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. A brief description of the ultility and limitations of the hard sphere model is given for comparison. The dynamics structure factor is calculated for a dense fluid of hard spheres and compared with recent neutron scattering data for Krypton.

  18. Clumped Isotopes in Bahamian Dolomites: A Rosetta Stone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S.; Swart, P. K.; Arienzo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Low temperature dolomite formation continues to be an enigmatic process. However, with the advent of the clumped isotope technique, there is an opportunity to determine the temperature of formation as well as the δ18O of the fluid (δ18Ow) from which it formed. By using samples with a well constrained geologic and thermal history, we have attempted to accurately develop a technique for the application of clumped isotopes to varying dolomite systems. Samples for this study were taken from two cores, one from the island of San Salvador and one on Great Bahama Bank (known as Clino), located on the eastern and western edges respectively of the Bahamian Archipelago. Both cores penetrate through Pleistocene to Miocene aged carbonates. The San Salvador core has a 110m section of pure, near stoichiometric dolomite, while the Clino core is of a mixed carbonate composition with varying abundances (0% - 50%) of calcian dolomite (42-46 mol % MgCO3). The water temperature profile of the Bahamas can be assumed over time due to the stable geology and no influence of higher temperature waters. Because of its location and the present burial depth, the largest influence on dolomite formation has been changes in sea level. As the dolomites from San Salvador are 100% dolomite, the Δ47 was determined directly. The Clino dolomites however were only partially dolomitized and so were treated with buffered acetic acid to remove non-dolomite carbonates. This was carried out in stages, using X-ray diffraction to determine composition, followed by the measurement of Δ47 after each leaching episode. Because the dolomite formation temperature and δ18Ow can be constrained, it becomes possible to evaluate the applicability of the multitude of clumped isotope correction schemes that have been applied to various dolomite samples. Also tested were several different equations which link temperature to the δ18O of the dolomite allowing the δ18O of the water to be calculated. This is a necessary

  19. High Density Molecular Gas in the IR-bright Galaxy System VV114

    CERN Document Server

    Iono, D; Yun, M S; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Sakamoto, K

    2004-01-01

    New high resolution CO(3-2) interferometric map of the IR-bright interacting galaxy system VV114 observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) reveal a substantial amount of warm and dense gas in the IR-bright but optically obscured galaxy, VV114E, and the overlap region connecting the two nuclei. A 1.8 x 1.4 kpc concentration of CO(3-2) emitting gas with a total mass of 4 x 10^9 Msun coincides with the peaks of NIR, MIR, and radio continuum emission found previously by others, identifying the dense fuel for the AGN and/or the starburst activity there. Extensive CO(2-1) emission is also detected, revealing detailed distribution and kinematics that are consistent with the earlier CO(1-0) results. The widely distributed molecular gas traced in CO(2-1) and the distributed discrete peaks of CO(3-2) emission suggest that a spatially extended intense starbursts may contribute significantly to its large IR luminosity. These new observations further support the notion that VV114 is approaching its final stage of merger...

  20. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G T; Romero, S A; Santos, A D

    2010-03-01

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  1. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, G. T.; Romero, S. A.; Santos, A. D. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  2. ROLE OF EJECTA CLUMPING AND BACK-REACTION OF ACCELERATED COSMIC RAYS IN THE EVOLUTION OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, S.; Bocchino, F.; Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo ' G. S. Vaiana' , Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy); Petruk, O. [Institute for Applied Problems in Mechanics and Mathematics, Naukova Street, 3-b Lviv 79060 (Ukraine); Pumo, M. L., E-mail: orlando@astropa.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2012-04-20

    We investigate the role played by initial clumping of ejecta and by efficient acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs) in determining the density structure of the post-shock region of a Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) through detailed three-dimensional MHD modeling. Our model describes the expansion of an SNR through a magnetized interstellar medium, including the initial clumping of ejecta and the effects on shock dynamics due to back-reaction of accelerated CRs. The model predictions are compared to the observations of SN 1006. We found that the back-reaction of accelerated CRs alone cannot reproduce the observed separation between the forward shock and the contact discontinuity unless the energy losses through CR acceleration and escape are very large and independent of the obliquity angle. On the contrary, the clumping of ejecta can naturally reproduce the observed small separation and the occurrence of protrusions observed in SN 1006, even without the need of accelerated CRs. We conclude that forward shock-contact discontinuity separation is a probe of the ejecta structure at the time of explosion rather than a probe of the efficiency of CR acceleration in young SNRs.

  3. Role of ejecta clumping and back-reaction of accelerated cosmic rays in the evolution of Type Ia supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Miceli, M; Petruk, O; Pumo, M L

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the role played by initial clumping of ejecta and by efficient acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs) in determining the density structure of the post-shock region of a Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) through detailed 3D MHD modeling. Our model describes the expansion of a SNR through a magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), including the initial clumping of ejecta and the effects on shock dynamics due to back-reaction of accelerated CRs. The model predictions are compared to the observations of SN 1006. We found that the back-reaction of accelerated CRs alone cannot reproduce the observed separation between the forward shock (FS) and the contact discontinuity (CD) unless the energy losses through CR acceleration and escape are very large and independent of the obliquity angle. On the contrary, the clumping of ejecta can naturally reproduce the observed small separation and the occurrence of protrusions observed in SN 1006, even without the need of accelerated CRs. We conclude that FS-CD separation i...

  4. Low Density Nanocellular Polymers Based on PMMA Produced by Gas Dissolution Foaming: Fabrication and Cellular Structure Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Martín-de León

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the processing conditions needed to produce low density nanocellular polymers based on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA with relative densities between 0.45 and 0.25, cell sizes between 200 and 250 nm and cell densities higher than 1014 cells/cm3. To produce these nanocellular polymers, the foaming parameters of the gas dissolution foaming technique using CO2 as blowing agent have been optimized. Taking into account previous works, the amount of CO2 uptake was maintained constant (31% by weight for all the materials. Foaming parameters were modified between 40 °C and 110 °C for the foaming temperature and from 1 to 5 min for the foaming time. Foaming temperatures in the range of 80 to 100 °C and foaming times of 2 min allow for production of nanocellular polymers with relative densities as low as 0.25. Cellular structure has been studied in-depth to obtain the processing-cellular structure relationship. In addition, it has been proved that the glass transition temperature depends on the cellular structure. This effect is associated with a confinement of the polymer in the cell walls, and is one of the key reasons for the improved properties of nanocellular polymers.

  5. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  6. Transport at low electron density in the two-dimensional electron gas of silicon MOSFETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Richard

    1998-01-01

    his thesis contains the result of an experimental study on the transport properties of high quality Si MOSFETs at low temperatures. A metalinsulator transition is found at a critical electron density. The electrons in the inversion layer of a silicon MOSFET are trapped in a potential well at the Si-

  7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Indianapolis using a High-Density Surface Tower Network and an Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Davis, K. J.; Richardson, S.; Deng, A.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Wu, K.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Turnbull, J. C.; Iraci, L. T.; Hillyard, P. W.; Podolske, J. R.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) was designed to develop and evaluate methods of detection and attribution of greenhouse gas fluxes from urban environments. Determination of greenhouse gas fluxes and uncertainty bounds is essential for the evaluation of the effectiveness of mitigation strategies. Indianapolis is intended to serve as a test bed for these methods; the results will inform efforts at measuring emissions from urban centers worldwide, including megacities. The generally accepted method for determining urban greenhouse gas emissions is inventories, which are compiled from records of land use and human activity. Atmospheric methods, in which towers are instrumented with sensors to measure greenhouse gas mole fractions and these data are used in an inversion model, have the potential to provide independent determination of emissions. The current INFLUX observation network includes twelve in-situ tower-based, continuous measurements of CO2. A subset of five towers additionally measure CH4, and a different subset measure CO. The subset measuring CO also include weekly flask samples of a wide variety of trace gases including 14CO2. Here we discuss the observed urban spatial and temporal patterns in greenhouse gas mole fraction in Indianapolis, with the critical result being the detectability of city emissions with this high-density network. We also present the first atmospheric inversion results for both CO2 and CH4, compare these results to inventories, and discuss the effects of critical assumptions in the inversion framework. The construction of unbiased atmospheric modeling systems and well-defined prior errors remains an important step in atmospheric emissions monitoring over urban areas. In order to minimize transport model errors, we developed a WRF-Chem FDDA modeling system ingesting surface and profile measurements of horizontal mean wind, temperature, and moisture. We demonstrate the impact of the meteorological data assimilation system on

  8. Polarization variability arising from clumps in the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Kang Li; Joseph P. Cassinelli; John C. Brown; Richard Ignace

    2009-01-01

    Polarimetric and photometric variability of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as caused by clumps in the winds is revisited. In our model, which is improved from Li et al., radial ex-pansion of the thickness is accounted for, but we retain dependence on theβ velocity law and stellar occultation effects. We again search for parameters that can yield results con-sistent with observations in regards to the mean polarization P, the ratio R = σ'p/σphot of polarimetric to photometric variability and the volume filling factor fv. Clump gener-ation and spatial distribution are randomized by the Monte Carlo method so as to produce clumps which are, in the mean, distributed uniformly in space and have time intervals that obey a Gaussian distribution. The generated clumps move radially outward with a velocity law determined by aβ index, and the angular size of clumps is assumed to be fixed. By fitting the observed σp/σphot and the volume filling factor fv, clump velocity law index β (~2) and clump ejection rate N (~1) are inferred, and are found to be well constrained. In addition, the subpeak features of broad emission lines seem to support the clump ejection rate. Meanwhile, the fraction of total mass loss rate that is contained in clumps is obtained by fitting observed polarization. We conclude that this picture of the clumps' properties produces a valuable diagnostic of WR wind structure.

  9. Magnetogasdynamic shock wave generated by a moving piston in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of perfect gas with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field, and with or without axisymmetric rotational effects, is investigated. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The ambient medium is assumed to have radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The fluid velocities, the initial density and the initial magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obey power laws. Solutions are obtained, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. The effects of variation of the initial density and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of electron density in hypersonic rarefied gas flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuhuai; Jiang, Jianzheng [State Key Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-12-09

    The electron density distribution around a vehicle employed in the RAM-C II flight test is calculated with the DSMC method. To resolve the mole fraction of electrons which is several orders lower than those of the primary species in the free stream, an algorithm named as trace species separation (TSS) is utilized. The TSS algorithm solves the primary and trace species separately, which is similar to the DSMC overlay techniques; however it generates new simulated molecules of trace species, such as ions and electrons in each cell, basing on the ionization and recombination rates directly, which differs from the DSMC overlay techniques based on probabilistic models. The electron density distributions computed by TSS agree well with the flight data measured in the RAM-C II test along a decent trajectory at three altitudes 81km, 76km, and 71km.

  11. Structural transitions and hysteresis in clump- and stripe-forming systems under dynamic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Danielle; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Reichhardt, Charles

    2016-11-28

    Using numerical simulations, we study the dynamical evolution of particles interacting via competing long-range repulsion and short-range attraction in two dimensions. The particles are compressed using a time-dependent quasi-one dimensional trough potential that controls the local density, causing the system to undergo a series of structural phase transitions from a low density clump lattice to stripes, voids, and a high density uniform state. The compression proceeds via slow elastic motion that is interrupted with avalanche-like bursts of activity as the system collapses to progressively higher densities via plastic rearrangements. The plastic events vary in magnitude from small rearrangements of particles, including the formation of quadrupole-like defects, to large-scale vorticity and structural phase transitions. In the dense uniform phase, the system compresses through row reduction transitions mediated by a disorder-order process. We characterize the rearrangement events by measuring changes in the potential energy, the fraction of sixfold coordinated particles, the local density, and the velocity distribution. At high confinements, we find power law scaling of the velocity distribution during row reduction transitions. We observe hysteresis under a reversal of the compression when relatively few plastic rearrangements occur. The decompressing system exhibits distinct phase morphologies, and the phase transitions occur at lower compression forces as the system expands compared to when it is compressed.

  12. Measurement of viscosity, density, and gas solubility of refrigerant blends in selected synthetic lubricants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

    1995-05-15

    The lubricants tested in this project were chosen based on the results of liquid/liquid miscibility tests. EMKARATE RL32S and Emery 2968A were selected. The Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) viscosity reduction and gas fractionation of each was measured with three different refrigerant blends: (1) R-404A; (2) R-507; and (3) R-407C. In addition, the four single refrigerants that make up the blends, HFC-32, HFC-125, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a, were also measured. Lubricants found to have the lowest liquid/liquid miscibilities had nearly equal viscosity reduction profiles as did the more miscible lubricants. Analytical methodology consisted of maintaining equally both the composition of the head space vapor above the lubricant/refrigerant mixture, and the composition of the liquid blend refrigerant. Blends with large temperature glides were re-evaluated in order to test the concept of head space quality and a vented piston hydraulic cylinder assembly was developed to perform this task. Fluid property data, above critical temperature and pressure conditions, is presented for the two lubricants with HFC-32, HFC-125, HFC-143a refrigerants. This research shows that the lubricant EMKARATE RL32S, which had the lowest (poorest) liquid/liquid miscibilities with the selected refrigerants, also had nearly equal viscosity reduction profiles to the more miscible Emery 2968A lubricant. The analytical methodology consisted of maintaining the composition of the refrigerant gas above the lubricant to be equal in composition to that of the pure liquid refrigerant blend being introduced into the lubricant. Refrigerant blends with large temperature glides were re-evaluated in order to validate the concept of the importance of the composition of the gas over the lubricant. To do perform this task, a special vented piston hydraulic cylinder assembly was developed. Fluid property data is also presented for HFC-32, HFC-125, and HFC-143a above the critical temperature and pressure of each.

  13. Floquet instability of a large density ratio liquid-gas coaxial jet with periodic fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen; HU Guo-hui; ZHOU Zhe-wei

    2008-01-01

    By numerical simulation of basic flow, this paper extends Floquet stability analysis of interfacial flow with periodic fluctuation into large density ratio range. Sta- bility of a liquid aluminum jet in a coaxial nitrogen stream with velocity fluctuation is investigated by Chebyshev collocation method and the Floquet theory. Parametric reso- nance of the jet and the influences of different physical parameters on the instability are discussed. The results show qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  14. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-02-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  15. Gravitational vortices and clump formation in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  16. The Physical Origins of The Morphology-Density Relation: Evidence for Gas Stripping from the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wel, Arjen; Holden, Bradford P; Skibba, Ramin A; Hans-Walter-Rix,

    2010-01-01

    We provide a physical interpretation and explanation of the morphology-density relation for galaxies, drawing on stellar masses, star-formation rates, axis ratios and group halo masses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We first re-cast the classical morphology-density relation in more quantitative terms, using low-star formation rate (quiescence) as a proxy for early-type morphology and dark matter halo mass from a group catalog as a proxy for environmental density: for galaxies of a given stellar mass the quiescent fraction is found to increase with increasing dark matter halo mass. Our novel result is that - at a given stellar mass - quiescent galaxies are significantly flatter in dense environments, implying a higher fraction of disk galaxies. Supposing that the denser environments differ simply by a higher incidence of quiescent disk galaxies that are structurally similar to star-forming disk galaxies of similar mass, explains simultaneously and quantitatively these quiescence-environment and shap...

  17. Optical depth estimates and effective critical densities of dense gas tracers in the inner parts of nearby galaxy discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Donaire, M. J.; Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Cormier, D.; Gallagher, M.; Usero, A.; Bolatto, A.; Colombo, D.; García-Burillo, S.; Hughes, A.; Kramer, C.; Krumholz, M. R.; Meier, D. S.; Murphy, E.; Pety, J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Schinnerer, E.; Schruba, A.; Tomičić, N.; Zschaechner, L.

    2017-04-01

    High critical density molecular lines like HCN (1-0) or HCO+ (1-0) represent our best tool to study currently star-forming, dense molecular gas at extragalactic distances. The optical depth of these lines is a key ingredient to estimate the effective density required to excite emission. However, constraints on this quantity are even scarcer in the literature than measurements of the high-density tracers themselves. Here, we combine new observations of HCN, HCO+ and HNC (1-0) and their optically thin isotopologues H13CN, H13CO+ and HN13C (1-0) to measure isotopologue line ratios. We use IRAM 30-m observations from the large programme EMPIRE and new Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array observations, which together target six nearby star-forming galaxies. Using spectral stacking techniques, we calculate or place strong upper limits on the HCN/H13CN, HCO+/H13CO+ and HNC/HN13C line ratios in the inner parts of these galaxies. Under simple assumptions, we use these to estimate the optical depths of HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) to be τ ∼ 2-11 in the active, inner regions of our targets. The critical densities are consequently lowered to values between 5 and 20 × 105 cm-3, 1 and 3 × 105 cm-3 and 9 × 104 cm-3 for HCN, HCO+ and HNC, respectively. We study the impact of having different beam-filling factors, η, on these estimates and find that the effective critical densities decrease by a factor of η _{12}/η _{13} τ_{12}. A comparison to existing work in NGC 5194 and NGC 253 shows the HCN/H13CN and HCO+/H13CO+ ratios in agreement with our measurements within the uncertainties. The same is true for studies in other environments such as the Galactic Centre or nuclear regions of active galactic nucleus dominated nearby galaxies.

  18. Planck 2015 results. XXVIII. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic cold clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC), an all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold clump candidates detected by Planck. This catalogue is the full version of the Early Cold Core (ECC) catalogue, which was made available in 2011 with the Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and which contained 915 high signal-to-noise sources. It is based on the Planck 48-month mission data that are currently being released to the astronomical community. The PGCC catalogue is an observational catalogue consisting exclusively of Galactic cold sources. The three highest Planck bands (857, 454, and 353 GHz) have been combined with IRAS data at 3 THz to perform a multi-frequency detection of sources colder than their local environment. After rejection of possible extragalactic contaminants, the PGCC catalogue contains 13188 Galactic sources spread across the whole sky, i.e., from the Galactic plane to high latitudes, following the spatial distribution of the main molecular cloud complexes. The median temperature of PGCC sources lies between 13 and 14.5 K, depending on the quality of the flux density measurements, with a temperature ranging from 5.8 to 20 K after removing the sources with the top 1% highest temperature estimates. Using seven independent methods, reliable distance estimates have been obtained for 5574 sources, which allows us to derive their physical properties such as their mass, physical size, mean density, and luminosity.The PGCC sources are located mainly in the solar neighbourhood, but also up to a distance of 10.5 kpc in the direction of the Galactic centre, and range from low-mass cores to large molecular clouds. Because of this diversity and because the PGCC catalogue contains sources in very different environments, the catalogue is useful for investigating the evolution from molecular clouds to cores. Finally, it also includes 54 additional sources located in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  19. A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE TOTAL GAS COLUMN DENSITY IN ORION KL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plume, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Space Imaging Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Bergin, E. A.; Wang, S.; Crockett, N. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Caux, E. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Comito, C.; Schilke, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Goldsmith, P. F., E-mail: plume@ras.ucalgary.ca [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The large number of high-J lines of C{sup 18}O available via the Herschel Space Observatory provide an unprecedented ability to model the total CO column density in hot cores. Using the emission from all the observed lines (up to J = 15-14), we sum the column densities in each individual level to obtain the total column after correcting for the population in the unobserved states. With additional knowledge of source size, V{sub LSR}, and line width, and both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE modeling, we have determined the total C{sup 18}O column densities in the Extended Ridge, Outflow/Plateau, Compact Ridge, and Hot Core components of Orion KL to be 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, respectively. We also find that the C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratio varies from 1.7 in the Outflow/Plateau, 2.3 in the Extended Ridge, 3.0 in the Hot Core, and to 4.1 in the Compact Ridge. This is in agreement with models in which regions with higher ultraviolet radiation fields selectively dissociate C{sup 17}O, although care must be taken when interpreting these numbers due to the size of the uncertainties in the C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratio.

  20. The measurement of electron number density in helium micro hollow gas discharge using asymmetric He I lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The electron number density N e in helium micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) is measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The structure of MHGD is a gold-alumina-gold sandwich with 250 μm alumina thickness and 100 μm diameter hole. The electron temperature T e and gas temperature T g in the discharge is determined using the relative intensity of He I lines and {{\\text{N}}2}+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σ\\text{u}+- {{X}2}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) R branch lines in the frame of BP technique, respectively. The simple procedure based on spectral line broadening theory was developed in MATLAB to generate synthetic neutral line asymmetric profiles. The synthetic profiles were compared with an experimental He I 447.1 nm and He I 492.2 nm line to obtain N e from the centre of a micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) source in helium. The N e results were compared with N e values obtained from the forbidden-to-allowed (F/A) intensity ratio technique. The comparison confirmed higher N e determined using a F/A ratio due to large uncertainty of the method. Applying the fitting formula for a He I 492.2 nm line derived from computer simulation (CS) gives the same N e values as the one determined using the MATLAB procedure in this study. The dependence of N e on gas pressure and electric current is investigated as well.

  1. Tuning the conductivity threshold and carrier density of two-dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces through interface engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Harsan Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG formed at the perovskite oxides heterostructures is of great interest because of its potential applications in oxides electronics and nanoscale multifunctional devices. A canonical example is the 2DEG at the interface between a polar oxide LaAlO3 (LAO and non-polar SrTiO3 (STO. Here, the LAO polar oxide can be regarded as the modulating or doping layer and is expected to define the electronic properties of 2DEG at the LAO/STO interface. However, to practically implement the 2DEG in electronics and device design, desired properties such as tunable 2D carrier density are necessary. Here, we report the tuning of conductivity threshold, carrier density and electronic properties of 2DEG in LAO/STO heterostructures by insertion of a La0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (LSTO layer of varying thicknesses, and thus modulating the amount of polarization of the oxide over layers. Our experimental result shows an enhancement of carrier density up to a value of about five times higher than that observed at the LAO/STO interface. A complete thickness dependent metal-insulator phase diagram is obtained by varying the thickness of LAO and LSTO providing an estimate for the critical thickness needed for the metallic phase. The observations are discussed in terms of electronic reconstruction induced by polar oxides.

  2. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  3. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  4. Ionized gas outflows and global kinematics of low-z luminous star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, S.; Colina, L.; Bellocchi, E.; Maiolino, R.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2014-08-01

    We study the kinematic properties of the ionised gas outflows and ambient interstellar medium (ISM) in a large and representative sample of local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) (58 systems, 75 galaxies) at galactic and sub-galactic (i.e., star-forming clumps) scales, thanks to integral field spectroscopy (IFS)-based high signal-to-noise integrated spectra. The velocity dispersion of the ionized ISM in U/LIRGs (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 70 km s-1) is larger than in lower luminosity local star-forming galaxies (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 25 km s-1). While for isolated disc LIRGs star formation appears to sustain turbulence, gravitational energy release associated with interactions and mergers plays an important role in driving σ in the U/LIRG range. We find that σ has a dependency on the star formation rate density (ΣSFR), which is weaker than expected if it were driven by the energy released by the starburst. The relatively small role of star formation (SF) driving the σ in U/LIRGs is reinforced by the lack of an increase in σ associated with high luminosity SF clumps. We also find that the impact of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in ULIRGs is strong, increasing on average σ by a factor 1.5. Low-z U/LIRGs cover a range of velocity dispersion (σ ~ 30 to 100 km s-1) and star formation rate density (ΣSFR ~ 0.1 to 20 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2) similar to those of high-z SFGs. Moreover, the observed weak dependency of σ on ΣSFR for local U/LIRGs (σ ∝ ΣSFR+0.06) is in very good agreement with that measured in some high-z samples. The presence of ionized gas outflows in U/LIRGs seems universal based on the detection of a broad, usually blueshifted, Hα line. The observed dependency of the maximum velocity of the outflow (Vmax) on the star formation rate (SFR) is of the type Vmax(non - AGN) ∝ SFR(LIR)+ 0.24. We find that AGNs in U/LIRGs are able to generate faster (~×2) and more massive (~× 1.4) ionized gas outflows than pure starbursts. The derived ionized mass

  5. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Wang, David T.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Ono, Shuhei

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE). The deviation from this relationship is 0.3‰ ± 1.2‰ and 3.5‰ ± 0.7‰ for OH and Cl oxidation, respectively. This is consistent with model calculations performed using quantum chemistry and transition state theory. The OH and Cl reactions enrich the residual methane in the clumped isotopologue in open system reactions. In a closed system, however, this effect is overtaken by the large D/H isotope effect, which causes the residual methane to become anti-clumped relative to the initial methane. Based on these results, we demonstrate that oxidation of methane by OH, the predominant oxidant for tropospheric methane, will only have a minor (∼0.3‰) impact on the clumped isotope signature (Δ13CH3D, measured as a deviation from a stochastic distribution of isotopes) of tropospheric methane. This paper shows that Δ13CH3D will provide constraints on methane source strengths, and predicts that Δ12CH2D2 can provide information on methane sink strengths.

  6. MALT90: tracing the chemistry and kinematics of molecular clumps within the central molecular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Y.; Rathborne, J.; Jackson, J.; Foster, J.; Longmore, S.; MALT90 Team

    2014-05-01

    The MALT90 survey targets more than 2000 high-mass star-forming clumps in the Galactic plane obtaining small maps around each of them, in 16 molecular lines at 90 GHz. By observing several thousand high-mass star forming clumps MALT90 aims to characterize their global chemical and physical evolution. Here we summarize the survey parameters and show examples of the MALT90 data toward three clumps in the central molecular zone.

  7. MHD simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse clouds by thermal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wareing, C J; Falle, S A E G; Van Loo, S

    2016-01-01

    We have used the AMR hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform 3D MHD simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from beta=0.1 to beta=1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (beta=infinity), where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (beta=0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic a...

  8. Discovery of Infalling Motion with Rotation of the Cluster-forming Clump S235AB and Its Implication to the Clump Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of infalling motion with the rotation of S235AB, a massive cluster-forming clump (˜ 1× {10}3 {M}⊙ ) in the S235 region. Our C18O observations with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory have revealed an elliptical shape of the clump. A position-velocity diagram taken along its major axis exhibits two well-defined peaks symmetrically located, with respect to the clump center. This is similar to that found for a dynamically infalling envelope with rotation around a single protostar, modeled by N. Ohashi et al., indicating that the cluster-forming clump is also collapsing by the self-gravity toward the clump center. With analogue to Ohashi et al.'s model, we made a simple model of an infalling, rotating clump to fit the observed data. Based on the inferred model parameters, as well as results of earlier observations and simulations in the literature, we discuss the structures of the clump such as the relation among the global mass infall rate (˜ 1× {10}-3 {M}⊙ yr-1), formation of a compact core (with a mass and size of ˜4 {M}⊙ and ≲ 0.1 pc) at the center, and a massive star (˜11 {M}⊙ ) forming in the core.

  9. Discovery of Infalling Motion with Rotation of the Cluster-Forming Clump S235AB and Its Implication to the Clump Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of infalling motion with rotation of S235AB the massive cluster-forming clump (~10^3 Mo) in the S235 region. Our C18O observations with the 45m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory have revealed the elliptical shape of the clump. Position-velocity (PV) diagram taken along its major axis exhibits two well-defined peaks symmetrically located with respect to the clump center, which is similar to that found for a dynamically infalling envelope with rotation around a single protostar modeled by N. Ohashi and his collaborators, indicating that the cluster-forming clump is also collapsing by the self-gravity toward the clump center. With analogue to Ohashi's model, we made a simple model of an infalling, rotating clump to fit the observed data. Based on the inferred model parameters as well as results of earlier observations and simulations in the literature, we discuss structures of the clump such as the relation among the global mass infall rate (~10^-3 Mo/yr), formation of a compact...

  10. Behavior of a plasma in a high-density gas-embedded Z-pinch configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    The theoretical analysis of a high density Z-pinch (HDZP) begins with an examination of the steady state energy balance between ohmic heating and bremsstrahlung radiation losses for a plasma column in pressure equilibrium. The model is then expanded to include the time-varying internal energy and results in a quasi-equilibrium prescription for the load current through a constant radius plasma channel. This set of current waveforms is useful in the design of experimental systems. The behavior of a plasma for physically realizable conditions is first examined by allowing adiabatic changes in the column radius. A more complete model is then developed by incorporating inertial effects into the momentum equation, and the resultant global MHD computational model is compared with more sophisticated, and costly, one- and two-dimensional computer simulations. These comparisons demonstrate the advantages of the global MHD description over previously developed zero-dimensional models.

  11. Aggregated clumps of lithistid sponges: a singular, reef-like bathyal habitat with relevant paleontological connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Maldonado

    Full Text Available The advent of deep-sea exploration using video cameras has uncovered extensive sponge aggregations in virtually all oceans. Yet, a distinct type is herein reported from the Mediterranean: a monospecific reef-like formation built by the lithistid demosponge Leiodermatium pfeifferae. Erect, plate-like individuals (up to 80 cm form bulky clumps, making up to 1.8 m high mounds (1.14 m on average on the bottom, at a 760 m-deep seamount named SSS. The siliceous skeletal frameworks of the lithistids persist after sponge death, serving as a complex 3D substratum where new lithistids recruit, along with a varied fauna of other sessile and vagile organisms. The intricate aggregation of lithistid mounds functions as a "reef" formation, architecturally different from the archetypal "demosponge gardens" with disaggregating siliceous skeletons. Leiodermatium pfeifferae also occurred at two additional, close seamounts (EBJ and EBS, but, unlike at SSS, the isolated individuals never formed accretive clumps. The general oceanographic variables (temperature, salinity, dissolved nutrients, chlorophyll, and oxygen revealed only minimal between-seamount differences, which cannot explain why sponge abundance at SSS is about two orders of magnitude higher than at EBJ or EBS. Large areas of the dense SSS aggregation were damaged, with detached and broken sponges and a few tangled fishing lines. Satellite vessel monitoring revealed low fishing activity around these seamounts. In contrast, international plans for gas and oil extraction at those locations raise serious concerns over the need for protecting urgently this unique, vulnerable habitat to avoid further alteration. Modern lithistids are a relict fauna from Jurassic and Cretaceous reefs and the roots of the very genus Leiodermatium can be traced back to those fossil formations. Therefore, understanding the causes behind the discovered lithistid aggregation is critical not only to its preservation, but also to

  12. High density plasma reactive ion etching of Ru thin films using non-corrosive gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Su Min; Garay, Adrian Adalberto; Lee, Wan In; Chung, Chee Won, E-mail: cwchung@inha.ac.kr

    2015-07-31

    Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICPRIE) of Ru thin films patterned with TiN hard masks was investigated using a CH{sub 3}OH/Ar gas mixture. As the CH{sub 3}OH concentration in CH{sub 3}OH/Ar increased, the etch rates of Ru thin films and TiN hard masks decreased. However, the etch selectivity of Ru films on TiN hard masks increased and the etch slope of Ru film improved at 25% CH{sub 3}OH/Ar. With increasing ICP radiofrequency power and direct current bias voltage and decreasing process pressure, the etch rates of Ru films increased, and the etch profiles were enhanced without redeposition on the sidewall. Optical emission spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma and surface chemistry. Based on these results, Ru thin films were oxidized to RuO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 3} compounds that were removed by sputtering of ions and the etching of Ru thin films followed a physical sputtering with the assistance of chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Etching of Ru films in CH{sub 3}OH/Ar was investigated. • High selectivity and etch profile with high degree of anisotropy were obtained. • XPS analysis was examined to identify the etch chemistry. • During etching Ru was oxidized to RuO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 3} can be easily sputtered off.

  13. How well do static electronic dipole polarizabilities from gas-phase experiments compare with density functional and MP2 computations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakkar, Ajit J., E-mail: ajit@unb.ca; Wu, Taozhe [Department of Chemistry, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2015-10-14

    Static electronic dipole polarizabilities for 135 molecules are calculated using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and six density functionals recently recommended for polarizabilities. Comparison is made with the best gas-phase experimental data. The lowest mean absolute percent deviations from the best experimental values for all 135 molecules are 3.03% and 3.08% for the LC-τHCTH and M11 functionals, respectively. Excluding the eight extreme outliers for which the experimental values are almost certainly in error, the mean absolute percent deviation for the remaining 127 molecules drops to 2.42% and 2.48% for the LC-τHCTH and M11 functionals, respectively. Detailed comparison enables us to identify 32 molecules for which the discrepancy between the calculated and experimental values warrants further investigation.

  14. Correlation between Cohesive Energy Density, Fractional Free Volume, and Gas Transport Properties of Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport properties of the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA materials to He, N2, O2, and CO2 are correlated with two polymer molecular structure parameters, that is, cohesive energy density (CED and fractional free volume (FFV, determined by the group contribution method. In our preceding paper, the attempt was made to approximate EVA permeability using a linear function of 1/FFV as predicted by the free volume theory. However, the deviations from this relationship appeared to be significant. In this paper, it is shown that permeation of gas molecules is controlled not only by free volume but also by the polymer cohesive energy. Moreover, the behavior of CO2 was found to differ significantly from that of other gases. In this instance, the correlation is much better when diffusivity instead of permeability is taken into account in a modified transport model.

  15. Density functional theory study of ATA, BTAH, and BTAOH as copper corrosion inhibitors: adsorption onto Cu(111) from gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Anton; Peljhan, Sebastijan

    2010-09-21

    A low-coverage gas-phase adsorption of three corrosion inhibitors-3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA), benzotriazole (BTAH), and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (BTAOH)-on perfect Cu(111) surface has been studied and characterized using density functional theory calculations. We find that the molecules in neutral form chemisorb weakly to the perfect surface in an upright geometry. The strength of the chemisorption increases in the order BTAH BTA· with the adsorption energies of -1.65, -2.22, and -2.78 eV, respectively. This order is compatible with the trend of experimentally observed corrosion inhibition effectiveness on copper in near-neutral chloride solutions. Although the calculations are performed at the metal/vacuum interface, they provide enough insight to rationalize why in some experiments the BTAH was observed to be adsorbed with an upright geometry and in the others with parallel geometry.

  16. Directional Lya Equivalent Boosting I: Spherically Symmetric Distributions of Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Gronke, Max

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the directional dependence of the escape fraction of Lyman-$\\alpha$ (Ly$\\alpha$) and non-ionising UV-continuum photons from a multiphase medium, and investigate whether there exist directional enhancements in the Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent width (EW). Our multiphase medium consists of spherically symmetric distributions of cold, dusty clumps embedded within a hot dust-free medium. We focus on three models from the analysis presented by Laursen et al. (2013). We find that for a Ly$\\alpha$ and UV-continuum point source, it is possible to find an EW boost $b(\\theta,\\phi) > 5 \\bar{b}$ in a few per cent of sight lines, where $\\bar{b}$ denotes the boost averaged over all photons. For spatially extended sources this directional dependence vanishes quickly when the size of the UV emitting region exceeds the mean distance between cold dusty clumps. Our analysis suggests that directional EW boosting can occur, and that this is mostly driven by reduced escape fractions of UV photons (which gives rise to UV-contin...

  17. Structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud using red clump stars

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, Smitha

    2010-01-01

    The structural parameters of the disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are estimated.We used the red clump stars from the VI photometric data of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE III) survey and from the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS) for the estimation of inclination and position angle of line of nodes of the LMC disk. The dereddened peak I magnitude of the red clump stars in each subregion is used to obtain the relative distances and hence the z coordinate. The RA and Dec of each sub-region is converted into x & y cartesian coordinates. A weighted least square plane fitting method is applied to this x,y,z data to estimate the structural parameters of the LMC disk. We find an inclination of i =23.0 plus or minus 0.8 and PAlon = 163.7 plus or minus 1.5 for the LMC disk using the OGLE III data and an inclination of i=37.4 plus or minus 2.3 and PAlon= 141.2 plus or minus 3.7 for the LMC disk using the MCPS data. Extra-planar features which are in front as well as behind the f...

  18. Highly variable young massive stars in ATLASGAL clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, M S N; Lucas, P W; Thompson, M A

    2016-01-01

    High-amplitude variability in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is usually associated with episodic accretion events. It has not been observed so far in massive YSOs. Here, the high-amplitude variable star sample of ContrerasPe\\~{n}a et al.(2016) has been used to search for highly-variable($\\Delta$K$\\ge$1\\,mag) sources coinciding with dense clumps mapped using the 850\\mum continuum emission by the ATLASGAL survey. 18 variable sources are centred on the sub-mm clump peaks, and coincide ($$2 mag, significantly higher compared to the mean variability of the entire VVV sample. The light curves of these objects sampled between 2010-2015 display rising, declining, or quasi-periodic behaviour but no clear periodicity. Light-curve analysis using Plavchan method show that the most prominent phased signals have periods of a few hundred days. The nature and time-scale of variations found in 6.7 Ghz methanol maser emission (MME) in massive stars are similar to that of the VYSO light curves. We argue that the origin of the obs...

  19. Ejection of gaseous clumps from gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of gaseous clumps formed via gravitational fragmentation in young protostellar disks, focusing on the fragments that are ejected from the disk via many-body gravitational interaction. Numerical hydrodynamics simulations were employed to study the evolution of young protostellar disks formed from the collapse of rotating pre-stellar cores with mass in the 1.1-1.6 M_sun range. Protostellar disks formed in our models undergo gravitational fragmentation driven by continuing mass loading from parental collapsing cores. A few fragments can be ejected from the disk during the early evolution, but the low-mass fragments (< 15~M_Jup) disperse creating spectacular bow-type structures while passing through the disk and collapsing core. The least massive fragment that survived the ejection (21 M_Jup) straddles the planetary-mass limit, while the most massive ejected fragments (145 M_Jup) can break up into several pieces, leading to the ejection of wide separation binary clumps in the brown-...

  20. Direct observation of many-body charge density oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessi, Paolo; Silkin, Vyacheslav M.; Nechaev, Ilya A.; Bathon, Thomas; El-Kareh, Lydia; Chulkov, Evgueni V.; Echenique, Pedro M.; Bode, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Quantum interference is a striking manifestation of one of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics: the particle-wave duality. A spectacular visualization of this effect is the standing wave pattern produced by elastic scattering of surface electrons around defects, which corresponds to a modulation of the electronic local density of states and can be imaged using a scanning tunnelling microscope. To date, quantum-interference measurements were mainly interpreted in terms of interfering electrons or holes of the underlying band-structure description. Here, by imaging energy-dependent standing-wave patterns at noble metal surfaces, we reveal, in addition to the conventional surface-state band, the existence of an `anomalous' energy band with a well-defined dispersion. Its origin is explained by the presence of a satellite in the structure of the many-body spectral function, which is related to the acoustic surface plasmon. Visualizing the corresponding charge oscillations provides thus direct access to many-body interactions at the atomic scale.

  1. The structure and kinematics of dense gas in NGC 2068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Smith, S. L.; Richer, J. S.; Buckle, J. V.; Smith, R. J.; Greaves, J. S.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out a survey of the NGC 2068 region in the Orion B molecular cloud using HARP on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, in the 13CO and C18O (J = 3-2) and H13CO+ (J = 4-3) lines. We used 13CO to map the outflows in the region, and matched them with previously defined Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array cores. We decomposed the C18O and H13CO+ into Gaussian clumps, finding 26 and eight clumps, respectively. The average deconvolved radii of these clumps are 6200 ± 2000 and 3600 ± 900 au for C18O and H13CO+, respectively. We have also calculated virial and gas masses for these clumps, and hence determined how bound they are. We find that the C18O clumps are more bound than the H13CO+ clumps (average gas mass to virial mass ratio of 4.9 compared to 1.4). We measure clump internal velocity dispersions of 0.28 ± 0.02 and 0.27 ± 0.04 km s-1 for C18O and H13CO+, respectively, although the H13CO+ values are heavily weighted by a majority of the clumps being protostellar, and hence having intrinsically greater linewidths. We suggest that the starless clumps correspond to local turbulence minima, and we find that our clumps are consistent with formation by gravoturbulent fragmentation. We also calculate interclump velocity dispersions of 0.39 ± 0.05 and 0.28 ± 0.08 km s-1 for C18O and H13CO+, respectively. The velocity dispersions (both internal and external) for our clumps match results from numerical simulations of decaying turbulence in a molecular cloud. However, there is still insufficient evidence to conclusively determine the type of turbulence and time-scale of star formation, due to the small size of our sample.

  2. The Space Density of Extended Ultraviolet (XUV) Disks in the Local Universe and Implications for Gas Accretion on to Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lemonias, Jenna J; Thilker, David; Wyder, Ted K; Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Treyer, Marie A; Bianchi, Luciana; Heckman, Timothy M; Madore, Barry F; Rich, R Michael

    2011-01-01

    We present results of the first unbiased search for extended UV (XUV)-disk galaxies undertaken to determine the space density of such galaxies. Our sample contains 561 local (0.001 1.5 x 10^4 s) and SDSS DR7 footprints. We explore modifications to the standard classification scheme for our sample that includes both disk- and bulge-dominated galaxies. Visual classification of each galaxy in the sample reveals an XUV-disk frequency of up to 20% for the most nearby portion of our sample. On average over the entire sample (out to z=0.05) the frequency ranges from a hard limit of 4% to 14%. The GALEX imaging allows us to detect XUV-disks beyond 100 Mpc. The XUV regions around XUV-disk galaxies are consistently bluer than the main bodies. We find a surprisingly high frequency of XUV emission around luminous red (NUV-r > 5) and green valley (3 1.5-4.2 x 10^-3 Mpc^-3. Using the XUV emission as an indicator of recent gas accretion, we estimate that the cold gas accretion rate onto these galaxies is > 1.7-4.6 x 10^-3...

  3. Unsteady isothermal flow behind a magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a self-gravitating gas with exponentially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2014-06-01

    The propagation of spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in an ideal gas with or without gravitational effects in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field is investigated. Non-similarity solutions are obtained for isothermal flow between the shock and the piston. The numerical solutions are obtained using the Runge-Kutta method of the fourth order. The density of the gas is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. The shock wave moves with variable velocity, and the total energy of the wave is non-constant and varies with time. The effects of variation of the Alfven-Mach number, gravitational parameter and time are obtained. It is investigated that the presence of gravitational field reduces the effect of the magnetic field. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and, therefore, the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in conducting perfect gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating medium with or without magnetic field. The obtained solutions are applicable for arbitrary values of time.

  4. Gas-phase formaldehyde adsorption isotherm studies on activated carbon: correlations of adsorption capacity to surface functional group density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ellison M; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E; Ramirez, David

    2011-08-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) adsorption isotherms were developed for the first time on three activated carbons representing one activated carbon fiber (ACF) cloth, one all-purpose granular activated carbon (GAC), and one GAC commercially promoted for gas-phase HCHO removal. The three activated carbons were evaluated for HCHO removal in the low-ppm(v) range and for water vapor adsorption from relative pressures of 0.1-0.9 at 26 °C where, according to the IUPAC isotherm classification system, the adsorption isotherms observed exhibited Type V behavior. A Type V adsorption isotherm model recently proposed by Qi and LeVan (Q-L) was selected to model the observed adsorption behavior because it reduces to a finite, nonzero limit at low partial pressures and it describes the entire range of adsorption considered in this study. The Q-L model was applied to a polar organic adsorbate to fit HCHO adsorption isotherms for the three activated carbons. The physical and chemical characteristics of the activated carbon surfaces were characterized using nitrogen adsorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Boehm titrations. At low concentrations, HCHO adsorption capacity was most strongly related to the density of basic surface functional groups (SFGs), while water vapor adsorption was most strongly influenced by the density of acidic SFGs.

  5. The structure and kinematics of dense gas in NGC 2068

    CERN Document Server

    Walker-Smith, S L; Buckle, J V; Smith, R J; Greaves, J S; Bonnell, I A

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out a survey of the NGC 2068 region in the Orion B molecular cloud using HARP on the JCMT, in the 13CO and C18O (J = 3-2) and H13CO+ (J = 4-3) lines. We used 13CO to map the outflows in the region, and matched them with previously defined SCUBA cores. We decomposed the C18O and H13CO+ into Gaussian clumps, finding 26 and 8 clumps respectively. The average deconvolved radii of these clumps is 6200 +/- 2000 AU and 3600 +/- 900 AU for C18O and H13CO+ respectively. We have also calculated virial and gas masses for these clumps, and hence determined how bound they are. We find that the C18O clumps are more bound than the H13CO+ clumps (average gas mass to virial mass ratio of 4.9 compared to 1.4). We measure clump internal velocity dispersions of 0.28 +/- 0.02 kms-1 and 0.27 +/- 0.04 kms-1 for C18O and H13CO+ respectively, although the H13CO+ values are heavily weighted by a majority of the clumps being protostellar, and hence having intrinsically greater linewidths. We suggest that the starless cl...

  6. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  7. Molecular Line Emission Towards High-Mass Clumps: The MALT90 Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Whitaker, J. S.; Jackson, J. M.; Foster, J. B.; Contreras, Y.; Stephens, I. W.; Guzmán, A. E.; Longmore, S. N.; Sanhueza, P.; Schuller, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey aims to characterise the physical and chemical evolution of high-mass clumps. Recently completed, it mapped 90 GHz line emission towards 3 246 high-mass clumps identified from the ATLASGAL 870 μm Galactic plane survey. By utilising the broad frequency coverage of the Mopra telescope's spectrometer, maps in 16 different emission lines were simultaneously obtained. Here, we describe the first catalogue of the detected line emission, generated by Gaussian profile fitting to spectra extracted towards each clumps' 870 μm dust continuum peak. Synthetic spectra show that the catalogue has a completeness of > 95%, a probability of a false-positive detection of < 0.3%, and a relative uncertainty in the measured quantities of < 20% over the range of detection criteria. The detection rates are highest for the (1-0) transitions of HCO+, HNC, N2H+, and HCN (~77-89%). Almost all clumps (~95%) are detected in at least one of the molecular transitions, just over half of the clumps (~53%) are detected in four or more of the transitions, while only one clump is detected in 13 transitions. We find several striking trends in the ensemble of properties for the different molecular transitions when plotted as a function of the clumps' evolutionary state as estimated from Spitzer mid-IR images, including (1) HNC is relatively brighter in colder, less evolved clumps than those that show active star formation, (2) N2H+ is relatively brighter in the earlier stages, (3) that the observed optical depth decreases as the clumps evolve, and (4) the optically thickest HCO+ emission shows a `blue-red asymmetry' indicating overall collapse that monotonically decreases as the clumps evolve. This catalogue represents the largest compiled database of line emission towards high-mass clumps and is a valuable data set for detailed studies of these objects.

  8. Limiting Short-term Noise versus Optical Density in a Direct Absorption Spectrometer for Trace Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, D.

    2016-12-01

    Field-deployable trace gas monitors are important for understanding a multitude of atmospheric processes: from forest photosynthesis and respiration [1], to fugitive methane emissions [2] and satellite measurement validation [3]. Consequently, a detailed knowledge of the performance limitations of these instruments is essential in order to establish reliable datasets. We present the short-term ( >1 Hz) performance of a long-pass direct absorption spectrometer as a function of the optical density of the absorption transition being probed. In particular, we identify fluctuations in the laser intensity as limiting the optical density uncertainty to 4x10-6/√Hz for weak transitions, and noise in the laser drive current as limiting the fractional noise in the optical density to 4x10-5/√Hz for deep transitions. We provide numerical and analytical predictions for both effects, as well as using the understanding of this phenomena to estimate how noise on neighboring strong and weak transitions couple to each other. All measurements were performed using the Aerodyne Research TILDAS Monitor, but are general to any instrument that uses direct absorption spectroscopy as a detection method. Wehr, R., et al. "Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration." Nature 534.7609 (2016): 680-683. Conley, S., et al. "Methane emissions from the 2015 Aliso Canyon blowout in Los Angeles, CA." Science 351.6279 (2016): 1317-1320. Emmons, L. K., et al. "Validation of Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO retrievals with aircraft in situ profiles." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 109.D3 (2004).

  9. First Results for the Solar Neighborhood of the Asiago Red Clump Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, M; Saguner, T; Freeman, K; Pasetto, S; Montalban, J; Grebel, E K

    2011-01-01

    The Asiago Red Clump Spectroscopic Survey (ARCS) is an ongoing survey that provides atmospheric parameters, distances and space velocities of a well selected sample of Red Clump stars distributed along the celestial equator. We used the ARCS catalog for a preliminary investigation of the Galactic disk in the Solar Neighborhood, in particular we focused on detection and characterization of moving groups.

  10. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  11. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  12. Pseudothrombocytopenia due to Platelet Clumping: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Platelet clumping is a common laboratory phenomenon that complicates or precludes reporting of platelet count. It is often, but not always, a phenomenon commonly caused by the anticoagulant EDTA. Herein, we discuss a case of a 14-year-old girl who was found to have platelet clumping and discuss the work-up she underwent to investigate her pseudothrombocytopenia.

  13. Pseudothrombocytopenia due to Platelet Clumping: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geok Chin Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet clumping is a common laboratory phenomenon that complicates or precludes reporting of platelet count. It is often, but not always, a phenomenon commonly caused by the anticoagulant EDTA. Herein, we discuss a case of a 14-year-old girl who was found to have platelet clumping and discuss the work-up she underwent to investigate her pseudothrombocytopenia.

  14. Oxygen-Dependent Morphogenesis of Modern Clumped Photosynthetic Mats and Implications for the Archean Stromatolite Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm R. Walter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Some modern filamentous oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria form macroscopic tufts, laminated cones and ridges that are very similar to some Archean and Proterozoic stromatolites. However, it remains unclear whether microbes that constructed Archean clumps, tufts, cones and ridges also produced oxygen. Here, we address this question by examining the physiology of cyanobacterial clumps, aggregates ~0.5 mm in diameter that initiate the growth of modern mm- and cm-scale cones. Clumps contain more particulate organic carbon in the form of denser, bowed and bent cyanobacterial filaments, abandoned sheaths and non-cyanobacterial cells relative to the surrounding areas. Increasing concentrations of oxygen in the solution enhance the bending of filaments and the persistence of clumps by reducing the lateral migration of filaments away from clumps. Clumped mats in oxic media also release less glycolate, a soluble photorespiration product, and retain a larger pool of carbon in the mat. Clumping thus benefits filamentous mat builders whose incorporation of inorganic carbon is sensitive to oxygen. The morphogenetic sequence of mm-scale clumps, reticulate ridges and conical stromatolites from the 2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation likely records similar O2-dependent behaviors, preserving currently the oldest morphological signature of oxygenated environments on Early Earth.

  15. A MALT90 study of the chemical properties of massive clumps and filaments of infrared dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, O.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) provide a useful testbed in which to investigate the genuine initial conditions and early stages of massive-star formation. Aims: We attempt to characterise the chemical properties of a sample of 35 massive clumps of IRDCs through multi-molecular line observations. We also search for possible evolutionary trends among the derived chemical parameters. Methods: The clumps are studied using the MALT90 (Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz) line survey data obtained with the Mopra 22 m telescope. The survey covers 16 different transitions near 90 GHz. The spectral-line data are used in concert with our previous LABOCA (Large APEX BOlometer CAmera) 870 μm dust emission data. Results: Eleven MALT90 transitions are detected towards the clumps at least at the 3σ level. Most of the detected species (SiO, C2H, HNCO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, HC3N, and N2H+) show spatially extended emission towards many of the sources. Most of the fractional abundances of the molecules with respect to H2 are found to be comparable to those determined in other recent similar studies of IRDC clumps. We found that the abundances of SiO, HNCO, and HCO+ are higher in IR-bright clumps than in IR-dark sources, reflecting a possible evolutionary trend. A hint of this trend is also seen for HNC and HC3N. An opposite trend is seen for the C2H and N2H+ abundances. Moreover, a positive correlation is found between the abundances of HCO+ and HNC, and between those of HNC and HCN. The HCN and HNC abundances also appear to increase as a function of the N2H+ abundance. The HNC/HCN and N2H+/HNC abundance ratios are derived to be near unity on average, while that of HC3N/HCN is ~10%. The N2H+/HNC ratio appears to increase as the clump evolves, while the HNC/HCO+ ratio shows the opposite behaviour. Conclusions: The detected SiO emission is probably caused by shocks driven by outflows in most cases, although shocks resulting from the cloud formation process could also play a role

  16. Clumped Isotope Composition of Cold-Water Corals: A Role for Vital Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, P.; Guo, W.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements on a set of cold-water corals (mainly Desmophyllum dianthus) have suggested that their clumped isotope composition could serve as a promising proxy for reconstructing paleocean temperatures. Such measurements have also offered support for certain isotope models of coral calcification. However, there are differences in the clumped isotope compositions between warm-water and cold-water corals, suggesting that different kinds of corals could have differences in their biocalcification processes. In order to understand the systematics of clumped isotope variations in cold-water corals more fully, we present clumped isotope data from a range of cold-water coral species from the tropical Atlantic and the Southern Ocean.Our samples were either collected live or recently dead (14C ages biocalcification may not apply equally well to all corals. Clumped isotope vital effects may be present in certain cold-water corals as they are in warm-water corals, complicating the use of this paleoclimate proxy.

  17. Magnetically-regulated fragmentation of a massive, dense and turbulent clump

    CERN Document Server

    Fontani, F; Giannetti, A; Beltrán, M T; Sánchez-Monge, Á; Testi, L; Brand, J; Caselli, P; Cesaroni, R; Dodson, R; Longmore, S; Rioja, M; Tan, J C; Walmsley, C M

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars, multiple stellar systems and clusters are born from the gravitational collapse of massive dense gaseous clumps, and the way these systems form strongly depends on how the parent clump fragments into cores during collapse. Numerical simulations show that magnetic fields may be the key ingredient in regulating fragmentation. Here we present ALMA observations at ~0.25'' resolution of the thermal dust continuum emission at ~278 GHz towards a turbulent, dense, and massive clump, IRAS 16061-5048c1, in a very early evolutionary stage. The ALMA image shows that the clump has fragmented into many cores along a filamentary structure. We find that the number, the total mass and the spatial distribution of the fragments are consistent with fragmentation dominated by a strong magnetic field. Our observations support the theoretical prediction that the magnetic field plays a dominant role in the fragmentation process of massive turbulent clump.

  18. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role.

  19. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  20. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy. III. Dust continuum characterization of an evolutionary sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Giannetti, A.; Wienen, M.; Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Menten, K. M.; Schuller, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Massive-star formation and the processes involved are still poorly understood. The ATLASGAL survey provides an ideal basis for detailed studies of large numbers of massive-star forming clumps covering the whole range of evolutionary stages. The ATLASGAL Top100 is a sample of clumps selected by their infrared and radio properties to be representative for the whole range of evolutionary stages. Aims: The ATLASGAL Top100 sources are the focus of a number of detailed follow-up studies that will be presented in a series of papers. In the present work we use the dust continuum emission to constrain the physical properties of this sample and identify trends as a function of source evolution. Methods: We determine flux densities from mid-infrared to submillimeter wavelength (8-870 μm) images and use these values to fit their spectral energy distributions and determine their dust temperature and flux. Combining these with recent distances from the literature including maser parallax measurements we determine clump masses, luminosities and column densities. Results: We define four distinct source classes from the available continuum data and arrange these into an evolutionary sequence. This begins with sources found to be dark at 70 μm, followed by 24 μm weak sources with an embedded 70 μm source, continues through mid-infrared bright sources and ends with infrared bright sources associated with radio emission (i.e., H ii regions). We find trends for increasing temperature, luminosity, and column density with the proposed evolution sequence, confirming that this sample is representative of different evolutionary stages of massive star formation. Our sources span temperatures from approximately 11 to 41 K, with bolometric luminosities in the range 57 L⊙-3.8 × 106L⊙. The highest masses reach 4.3 × 104M⊙ and peak column densities up to 1.1 × 1024 cm-1, and therefore have the potential to form the most massive O-type stars. We show that at least 93 sources

  1. Red Clump Stars from LAMOST II: the outer disc of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jun-Chen; Liu, Chao; Deng, Li-Cai

    2017-08-01

    We present stellar density maps of the Galactic outer disc with red clump stars from LAMOST data. These samples are separated into younger (mean age ∼ 2.7 Gyr) and older (mean age ∼ 4.6 Gyr) populations so that they can trace the variation of structures with ages in the range of Galactocentric radius R from 9 to 13.5 kpc. We show that scale heights for both of the two populations increase with R and display radial gradients of 48±6 and 40±4 pc kpc{}-1 for the older and younger populations, respectively. It is evident that flaring occurs in the thin disc populations with a wide range of ages. Moreover, the intensity of flaring does not seem to be significantly related to the age of the thin disc populations. On the other hand, scale lengths of the radial surface density profiles are 4.7±0.5 kpc for the younger population and 3.4±0.2 kpc for the older population, meaning that the younger disc population is more radially extended than the older one. Although the fraction of the younger population mildly increases from 28% at R ∼ 9 to about 35% at R ∼ 13 kpc, the older population is prominent with a fraction of no less than 65% in the outer disc.

  2. Nitric oxide density distributions in the effluent of an RF argon APPJ: effect of gas flow rate and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseni, S.; Zhang, S.; van Gessel, A. F. H.; Hofmann, S.; van Ham, B. T. J.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The effluent of an RF argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet, the so-called kinpen, is investigated with focus on the nitric-oxide (NO) distribution for laminar and turbulent flow regimes. An additional dry air gas curtain is applied around the plasma effluent to prevent interaction with the ambient humid air. By means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the absolute spatially resolved NO density is measured as well as the rotational temperature and the air concentration. While in the laminar case, the transport of NO is attributed to thermal diffusion; in the turbulent case, turbulent mixing is responsible for air diffusion. Additionally, measurements with a molecular beam mass-spectrometer (MBMS) absolutely calibrated for NO are performed and compared with the LIF measurements. Discrepancies are explained by the contribution of the N{{O}2} and {{N}2}O to the MBMS NO signal. Finally, the effect of a conductive substrate in front of the plasma jet on the spatial distribution of NO and air diffusion is also investigated.

  3. Transfer-matrix study of a hard-square lattice gas with two kinds of particles and density anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago J; Stilck, Jürgen F

    2015-09-01

    Using transfer matrix and finite-size scaling methods, we study the thermodynamic behavior of a lattice gas with two kinds of particles on the square lattice. Only excluded volume interactions are considered, so that the model is athermal. Large particles exclude the site they occupy and its four first neighbors, while small particles exclude only their site. Two thermodynamic phases are found: a disordered phase where large particles occupy both sublattices with the same probability and an ordered phase where one of the two sublattices is preferentially occupied by them. The transition between these phases is continuous at small concentrations of the small particles and discontinuous at larger concentrations, both transitions are separated by a tricritical point. Estimates of the central charge suggest that the critical line is in the Ising universality class, while the tricritical point has tricritical Ising (Blume-Emery-Griffiths) exponents. The isobaric curves of the total density as functions of the fugacity of small or large particles display a minimum in the disordered phase.

  4. Enhanced diesel fuel fraction from waste high-density polyethylene and heavy gas oil pyrolysis using factorial design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppert, Ney; da Silva, Alexsandro Araujo; da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina

    2015-02-01

    Factorial Design Methodology (FDM) was developed to enhance diesel fuel fraction (C9-C23) from waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and Heavy Gas Oil (HGO) through co-pyrolysis. FDM was used for optimization of the following reaction parameters: temperature, catalyst and HDPE amounts. The HGO amount was constant (2.00 g) in all experiments. The model optimum conditions were determined to be temperature of 550 °C, HDPE = 0.20 g and no FCC catalyst. Under such conditions, 94% of pyrolytic oil was recovered, of which diesel fuel fraction was 93% (87% diesel fuel fraction yield), no residue was produced and 6% of noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction was obtained. Seeking to reduce the cost due to high process temperatures, the impact of using higher catalyst content (25%) with a lower temperature (500 °C) was investigated. Under these conditions, 88% of pyrolytic oil was recovered (diesel fuel fraction yield was also 87%) as well as 12% of the noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction. No waste was produced in these conditions, being an environmentally friendly approach for recycling the waste plastic. This paper demonstrated the usefulness of using FDM to predict and to optimize diesel fuel fraction yield with a great reduction in the number of experiments.

  5. Prediction of gas-phase thermodynamic properties for polychlorinated naphthalenes using G3X model chemistry and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Lv, Guowen

    2010-01-01

    The standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) have been predicted using G3X model chemistry, density functional theory (DFT), and second-order Muller-Plesset (MP2) theory. Two isodesmic reactions are used for better prediction of formation enthalpies. The first (IR1) employs chlorobenzene as a reference species and the second (IR2) employs polychlorinated benzenes as reference species. Among congeners, PCNs with simultaneous Cl-substitutions at positions 1 and 8 or 4 and 5 are the least stable, where the strong repulsion between Cl-atoms leads to non-planar structures for a few PCNs. The potential energy curves for ring-wagging motions in 1,8- or 4,5-PCNs are also extremely flat in the vicinity of equilibrium conformations, leading to extremely low harmonic frequencies for the ring-wagging modes. The contributions of these ring-wagging modes to entropy, heat capacity, and thermal corrections have been calculated using the numerically evaluated energy levels. The PCN isomer patterns are discussed based on the calculated Gibbs free energies.

  6. ALMA Observations of the IRDC Clump G34.43+00.24 MM3: DNC/HNC Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Sakai, Takeshi; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Hirota, Tomoya; Foster, Jonathan B; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the clump G34.43+00.24 MM3 associated with an infrared dark cloud in DNC $J$=3--2, HN$^{13}$C $J$=3--2, and N$_2$H$^+$ $J$=3--2 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The N$_2$H$^+$ emission is found to be relatively weak near the hot core and the outflows, and its distribution is clearly anti-correlated with the CS emission. This result indicates that a young outflow is interacting with cold ambient gas. The HN$^{13}$C emission is compact and mostly emanates from the hot core, whereas the DNC emission is extended around the hot core. Thus, the DNC and HN$^{13}$C emission traces warm regions near the protostar differently. The DNC emission is stronger than the HN$^{13}$C emission toward most parts of this clump. The DNC/HNC abundance ratio averaged within a $15^{\\prime\\prime} \\times 15^{\\prime\\prime}$ area around the phase center is higher than 0.06. This ratio is much higher than the value obtained by the previous single-dish observations of DNC and HN$^{13}$C $J$=1--0...

  7. Winds, Clumps, and Interacting Cosmic Rays in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Gallagher, J S; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2013-01-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07/yr. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and \\gamma-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are...

  8. The segregation of starless and protostellar clumps in the Hi-GAL l=224deg region

    CERN Document Server

    Olmi, L; Elia, D; Jones, P

    2016-01-01

    Stars form in dense, dusty structures, which are embedded in larger clumps of molecular clouds often showing a clear filamentary structure on large scales (> 1pc). One of the best-studied regions in the Hi-GAL survey can be observed toward the l=224deg field. Here, a filamentary region has been studied and it has been found that protostellar clumps are mostly located along the main filament, whereas starless clumps are detected off this filament and are instead found on secondary, less prominent filaments. We want to investigate this segregation effect and how it may affect the clumps properties. We mapped the 12CO(1-0) line and its main three isotopologues toward the two most prominent filaments observed toward the l=224deg field using the Mopra radio telescope, in order to set observational constraints on the dynamics of these structures and the associated starless and protostellar clumps. Compared to the starless clumps, the protostellar clumps are more luminous, more turbulent and lie in regions where the...

  9. Quasi-Low-Dimensional Electron Gas with One Populated Band as a Testing Ground for Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory of Mesoscopic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Vladimir U

    2017-06-09

    We find an exact analytical solution to the exchange-only time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) problem for a significant class of quasi-low-dimensional (QLD) materials: QLD electron gas with only one band filled in the direction perpendicular to the layer or wire. The theory yields the TD exchange potential as an explicit nonlocal operator of the TD spin density. The dressed interband (image states) excitation spectra of quasi-two-dimensional electron gas are obtained, while the comparison with the Kohn-Sham transitions provides insights into the qualitative and quantitative role of the many-body interactions. Important cancellations between the Hartree f_{H} and the exchange f_{x} kernels of TDDFT are found in the low-density regime, elucidating the interrelations between the Kohn-Sham and the many-body dynamics in mesoscopic systems.

  10. Quasi-Low-Dimensional Electron Gas with One Populated Band as a Testing Ground for Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory of Mesoscopic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Vladimir U.

    2017-06-01

    We find an exact analytical solution to the exchange-only time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) problem for a significant class of quasi-low-dimensional (QLD) materials: QLD electron gas with only one band filled in the direction perpendicular to the layer or wire. The theory yields the TD exchange potential as an explicit nonlocal operator of the TD spin density. The dressed interband (image states) excitation spectra of quasi-two-dimensional electron gas are obtained, while the comparison with the Kohn-Sham transitions provides insights into the qualitative and quantitative role of the many-body interactions. Important cancellations between the Hartree fH and the exchange fx kernels of TDDFT are found in the low-density regime, elucidating the interrelations between the Kohn-Sham and the many-body dynamics in mesoscopic systems.

  11. Modeling of a DC glow discharge in a neon-xenon gas mixture at low pressure and with metastable atom densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchikhi, A.

    2017-09-01

    The physical properties of Ne-Xe DC glow discharges at low pressure are reported for a gap length of 1 cm for the first time in the literature. The model deals specifically with the first three moments of Boltzmann’s equation and includes the radiation processes and metastable atom densities. The spatio-temporal distributions of the electron and neon and xenon ion densities, the neon and xenon metastable atom densities, the electric potential and the electric field as well as the mean electron energy are presented at 1.5 Torr and 250 V. The current-voltage characteristic is shown at 3 Torr, and it is compared with previous work for pure neon gas. The model is validated theoretically and experimentally in the case of pure gas.

  12. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kononenko, O., E-mail: olena.kononenko@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Lopes, N.C.; Cole, J.M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S.P.D.; Najmudin, Z. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ UK (United Kingdom); Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Poder, K. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ UK (United Kingdom); Rusby, D.; Symes, D.R. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Warwick, J. [Queens University Belfast, North Ireland (United Kingdom); Wood, J.C. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ UK (United Kingdom); Palmer, C.A.J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  13. Vertical velocities from proper motions of red clump giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Corredoira, M.; Abedi, H.; Garzón, F.; Figueras, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We derive the vertical velocities of disk stars in the range of Galactocentric radii of R = 5 - 16 kpc within 2 kpc in height from the Galactic plane. This kinematic information is connected to dynamical aspects in the formation and evolution of the Milky Way, such as the passage of satellites and vertical resonance and determines whether the warp is a long-lived or a transient feature. Methods: We used the PPMXL survey, which contains the USNO-B1 proper motions catalog cross-correlated with the astrometry and near-infrared photometry of the 2MASS point source catalog. To improve the accuracy of the proper motions, the systematic shifts from zero were calculated by using the average proper motions of quasars in this PPMXL survey, and we applied the corresponding correction to the proper motions of the whole survey, which reduces the systematic error. From the color-magnitude diagram K versus (J - K) we selected the standard candles corresponding to red clump giants and used the information of their proper motions to build a map of the vertical motions of our Galaxy. We derived the kinematics of the warp both analytically and through a particle simulation to fit these data. Complementarily, we also carried out the same analysis with red clump giants spectroscopically selected with APOGEE data, and we predict the improvements in accuracy that will be reached with future Gaia data. Results: A simple model of warp with the height of the disk zw(R,φ) = γ(R - R⊙)sin(φ - φw) fits the vertical motions if dot {γ }/γ = -34±17 Gyr-1; the contribution to dot {γ } comes from the southern warp and is negligible in the north. If we assume this 2σ detection to be real, the period of this oscillation is shorter than 0.43 Gyr at 68.3% C.L. and shorter than 4.64 Gyr at 95.4% C.L., which excludes with high confidence the slow variations (periods longer than 5 Gyr) that correspond to long-lived features. Our particle simulation also indicates a probable abrupt decrease

  14. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  15. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate δ18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; δ18Ofluid = 15% VSMOW), the Nafun Group generally experienced lower temperature, fluid buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 69°C; δ18Ofluid = 1% VSMOW) and the Ara Group

  16. On the peculiar red clump morphology in the open clusters NGC 752 and NGC 7789

    OpenAIRE

    Girardi, L.; Mermilliod, J. -C.; Carraro, G.

    2000-01-01

    The red clump stars in the open cluster NGC 752 present a peculiar distribution in the colour-magnitude diagran (CMD): the clump is observed to present a faint extension, slightly to the blue of the main concentration of clump stars. We point out that a similar structure is present in the CMD of NGC 7789, and discuss their possible origins. This feature may be understood as the result of having, at the same time, stars of low-mass which undergo the helium-flash, and those just massive enough ...

  17. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XIV. Physical Properties of Massive Starless and Star Forming Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Svoboda, Brian E; Battersby, Cara; Rosolowsky, Erik W; Ginsburg, Adam G; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P; Pestalozzi, Michele R; Dunham, Miranda K; Evans, Neal J; Bally, John; Glenn, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We sort $4683$ molecular clouds between $10^\\circ1$ dex) progressions when sorted by star formation indicator. The median starless clump candidate is marginally sub-virial ($\\alpha \\sim 0.7$) with $>75\\%$ of clumps with known distance being gravitationally bound ($\\alpha 10^3$ M$_\\odot$) starless clumps to be $0.37 \\pm 0.08 \\ {\\rm Myr} \\ (M/10^3 \\ {\\rm M}_\\odot)^{-1}$; the majority ($M<450$ M$_\\odot$) have phase-lifetimes longer than their average free-fall time.

  18. High density semiconductor nanodots by direct laser fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghizadeh, Anahita; Yang, Haeyeon

    2016-03-01

    We report a direct method of fabricating high density nanodots on the GaAs(001) surfaces using laser irradiations on the surface. Surface images indicate that the large clumps are not accompanied with the formation of nanodots even though its density is higher than the critical density above which detrimental large clumps begin to show up in the conventional Stranski-Krastanov growth technique. Atomic force microscopy is used to image the GaAs(001) surfaces that are irradiated by high power laser pulses interferentially. The analysis suggests that high density quantum dots be fabricated directly on semiconductor surfaces.

  19. A desert of gas giant planets beyond tens of au: from feast to famine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    It is argued that frequency of gravitational fragmentation of young massive discs around FGK stars may be much higher than commonly believed. Numerical simulations presented here show that survival of gas giant planets at large separations from their host stars is very model dependent. Low-mass clumps in slowly cooling discs are found to accrete gas very slowly and migrate inward very rapidly in the well-known type I regime (no gap open). They are either tidally disrupted or survive as planets inwards of about 10 au. In this regime, probability of clump survival at large separations is extremely low, perhaps as low as 0.001, requiring up to a dozen clumps per star early on to explain the observed population. In contrast, initially massive clumps or low-mass clumps born in rapidly cooling discs accrete gas rapidly. Opening deep gaps in the disc, they migrate in the much slower type II regime and are more likely to survive beyond tens of au. The frequency of disc fragmentation in this case is at the per cent level if the clump growth saturates at brown dwarf masses but may be close to 100 per cent if clumps evolve into low stellar mass companions. Taking these theoretical uncertainties into account, current observations limit the number of planet mass clumps hatched by young massive discs around FGK stars to between 0.01 and ∼10. A deeper theoretical understanding of such discs is needed to narrow this uncertainty down.

  20. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in mergers of galaxy nuclei - II. Black hole sinking in star-forming nuclear discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2015-11-01

    Mergers of gas-rich galaxies are key events in the hierarchical built-up of cosmic structures, and can lead to the formation of massive black hole binaries. By means of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations we consider the late stages of a gas-rich major merger, detailing the dynamics of two circumnuclear discs, and of the hosted massive black holes during their pairing phase. During the merger gas clumps with masses of a fraction of the black hole mass form because of fragmentation. Such high-density gas is very effective in forming stars, and the most massive clumps can substantially perturb the black hole orbits. After ˜10 Myr from the start of the merger a gravitationally bound black hole binary forms at a separation of a few parsecs, and soon after, the separation falls below our resolution limit of 0.39 pc. At the time of binary formation the original discs are almost completely disrupted because of SNa feedback, while on pc scales the residual gas settles in a circumbinary disc with mass ˜ 105 M⊙. We also test that binary dynamics is robust against the details of the SNa feedback employed in the simulations, while gas dynamics is not. We finally highlight the importance of the SNa time-scale on our results.

  1. The analysis of realistic Stellar Gaia mock catalogues. I. Red Clump Stars as tracers of the central bar

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Gomez, Merce; Antoja, Teresa; Abedi, Hoda; Aguilar, Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this first paper we simulate the population of disc Red Clump stars to be observed by Gaia. We generate a set of test particles and we evolve it in a 3D barred Milky Way like galactic potential. We assign physical properties of the Red Clump trace population and a realistic 3D interstellar extinction model. We add Gaia observational constraints and an error model according to the pre-commissioning scientific performance assessments. We present and analyse two mock catalogues, offered to the community, that are an excellent test bed for testing tools being developed for the future scientific exploitation of Gaia data. The first catalogue contains stars up to Gaia G 20, while the second is the subset containing Gaia radial velocity data with a maximum error of sigmaVr=10 kms. Here we present first attempts to characterise the density structure of the Galactic bar in the Gaia space of observables. The Gaia large errors in parallax and the high interstellar extinction in the inner parts of the Galactic disc pr...

  2. Extreme Gas Properties in the Central 10 Parsecs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Güsten, R.; Requena Torres, M. A.; Lang, C. C.; Morris, M.; Butterfield, N.; Ludovici, D.; Schmitz, S.; Ott, J.

    2014-01-01

    Gas in the central parsecs of our Galaxy is subject to a harsh environment, including the close proximity of a supermassive black hole and a massive nuclear star cluster. By characterizing the molecular gas conditions in this region, it is possible not only to quantify the effect the black hole and star cluster have on nearby gas, we can also help to infer the future evolution of the central parsec by determining whether this gas will form stars, accrete, or escape entirely. We present a combination of results from the APEX, VLA, and GBT telescopes which place new limits on the large densities, temperatures, and turbulent line widths found in the molecular gas in the Circumnuclear disk (CND) and the central 10 parsecs. Using data from the APEX telescope, we find that the majority of gas in the CND is not stable against tidal disruption, and all but one clump studied are likely transient. We additionally find that reprocessed dust radiation from the central cluster appears to be contributing to radiative excitation of HCN in the CND, which may lower the gas densities inferred using this molecule. We also use VLA and GBT data to identify a new 400 K gas component in several clouds in the central 10 parsecs, and evaluate the supermassive black hole and central star cluster as potential heating sources for this gas. Finally, we will present a new study of the distribution of gas temperatures and turbulence in the central 10 parsecs, and a search for trends in these properties as a function of distance from the nucleus. Together, these studies place new constraints on the most extreme conditions found in Galactic center molecular gas, and the processes which are responsible.

  3. Effects of London dispersion correction in density functional theory on the structures of organic molecules in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Steinmetz, Marc

    2013-10-14

    A benchmark set of 25 rotational constants measured in the gas phase for nine molecules (termed ROT25) was compiled from available experimental data. The medium-sized molecules with 18-35 atoms cover common (bio)organic structure motifs including hydrogen bonding and flexible side chains. They were each considered in a single conformation. The experimental B0 values were back-corrected to reference equilibrium rotational constants (Be) by computation of the vibrational corrections ΔBvib. Various density functional theory (DFT) methods and Hartree-Fock with and without dispersion corrections as well as MP2 type methods and semi-empirical quantum chemical approaches are investigated. The ROT25 benchmark tests their ability to describe covalent bond lengths, longer inter-atomic distances, and the relative orientation of functional groups (intramolecular non-covalent interactions). In general, dispersion corrections to DFT and HF increase Be values (shrink molecular size) significantly by about 0.5-1.5% thereby in general improving agreement with the reference data. Regarding DFT methods, the overall accuracy of the optimized structures roughly follows the 'Jacobs ladder' classification scheme, i.e., it decreases in the series double-hybrid > (meta)hybrid > (meta)GGA > LDA. With B2PLYP-D3, SCS-MP2, B3LYP-D3/NL, or PW6B95-D3 methods and extended QZVP (def2-TZVP) AO basis sets, Be values, accurate to about 0.3-0.6 (0.5-1)% on average, can be computed routinely. The accuracy of B2PLYP-D3/QZVP with a mean deviation of only 3 MHz and a standard deviation of 0.24% is exceptional and we recommend this method when highly accurate structures are required or for problematic conformer assignments. The correlation effects for three inter-atomic distance regimes (covalent, medium-range, long) and the performance of minimal basis set (semi-empirical) methods are discussed.

  4. The Virial Balance of Clumps and Cores in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, S; Kim, J; Burkert, A; Shadmehri, M; Dib, Sami; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Kim, Jongsoo; Burkert, Andreas; Shadmehri, Mohsen

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) We study the virial balance of clumps and cores (CCs) in a set of 3D simulations of driven, MHD, isothermal molecular clouds (MCs). The simulations represent a range of magnetic field strengths in MCs from subcritical to non-magnetic regimes. We identify CCs at different threshold levels. For each object, we calculate the terms that enter the virial theorem in its Eulerian form as well as quantities commonly used in observational and theoretical work to indicate the state of gravitational binding: the Jeans number J_c, the mass-to magnetic flux ratio mu_c, the virial parameter alpha_c. Our results suggest that a) CCs are dynamical out-of-equilibrium structures.b) The surface energy terms are of the same order than their respective volume terms c) CCs can be either in the process of being compressed by the velocity field and have tau_k>0 or dispersed tau_k0 are gravitationally bound.d) There is no 1-to-1 correspondence between the state of the gravitational binding as described by the energy balance...

  5. Nucleosynthesis and Clump Formation in a Core Collapse Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kifonidis, K; Janka, H T; Müller, E

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional simulations were performed for the first five minutes of the evolution of a core collapse supernova explosion in a 15 solar mass blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after core bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a light-bulb approximation for the neutrinos, and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout a significant fraction of the stellar helium core by the concerted action of convective and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Fast moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to 4000 km/s are observed. This offers a natural explanation for the amount of mixing required in light curve and spectral synthesis studies of Type Ib explosions. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates, that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced because of a strong deceleration of the clumps during their...

  6. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  7. Kinematics of Tycho-2 Red Giant Clump Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bobylev, V V; Bajkova, A T; Gontcharov, G A; 10.1134/S1063773709120044

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Ogorodnikov-Milne model, we analyze the proper motions of 95 633 red giant clump (RGC) stars from the Tycho-2 Catalogue. The following Oort constants have been found: A = 15.9+-0.2 km/s/kpc and B = -12.0+-0.2 km/s/kpc. Using 3632 RGC stars with known proper motions, radial velocities, and photometric distances, we show that, apart from the star centroid velocity components relative to the Sun, only the model parameters that describe the stellar motions in the XY plane differ significantly from zero. We have studied the contraction (a negative K-effect) of the system of RGC stars as a function of their heliocentric distance and elevation above the Galactic plane. For a sample of distant (500--1000 pc) RGC stars located near the Galactic plane (|Z|=200 pc), these effects are less pronounced, Kd = -1.7+-0.5 km/s and lxy = 4.9+-0.6 degrees. Using RGC stars, we have found a rotation around the Galactic X axis directed toward the Galactic center with an angular velocity of -2.5+-0.3 km/s/kpc, which we ...

  8. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy, II: Characterisation of different evolutionary stages and their SiO emission

    CERN Document Server

    Csengeri, T; Wyrowski, F; Urquhart, J S; Menten, K M; Walmsley, M; Bontemps, S; Wienen, M; Beuther, H; Motte, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Schilke, P; Schuller, F; Zavagno, A; Sanna, C

    2015-01-01

    The processes leading to the birth of high-mass stars are poorly understood. We characterise here a sample of 430 massive clumps from the ATLASGAL survey, which are representative of different evolutionary stages. To establish a census of molecular tracers of their evolution we performed an unbiased spectral line survey covering the 3-mm atmospheric window between 84-117 GHz with the IRAM 30m. A smaller sample of 128 clumps has been observed in the SiO (5-4) transition with the APEX telescope to complement the SiO (2-1) line and probe the excitation conditions of the emitting gas, which is the main focus of the current study. We report a high detection rate of >75% of the SiO (2-1) line and a >90% detection rate from the dedicated follow-ups in the (5-4) transition. The SiO (2-1) line with broad line profiles and high detection rates, is a powerful probe of star formation activity, while the ubiquitous detection of SiO in all evolutionary stages suggests a continuous star formation process in massive clumps. ...

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Reionization II: Recombinations, Clumping Factors, and the Photon Budget for Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    So, Geoffrey C; Reynolds, Daniel R; Harkness, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    In this first of several application papers, we investigate the mechanics of reionization from stellar sources in high-z galaxies, the utility of various clumping factors on estimating the recombination time in the IGM, and the photon budget required to achieve reionization. We test the accuracy of the static and time-dependent models of Madau et al. as predictors of reionization completion/maintenance. We simulate a WMAP7 LCDM cosmological model in a 20 Mpc comoving cube with 800^3 uniform fluid cells and dark matter particles. By tuning our star formation to approximately match the observed star formation rate density and luminosity function, we created a fully coupled radiation-hydro realization of H reionization which begins to ionize at z~10 and completes at z~5.8. We find that roughly 2 ionizing photons per H atom are required to convert the neutral IGM to a highly ionized state, which supports the "photon starved" scenario discussed by Bolton & Haehnelt. The events during reionization that lead to ...

  10. X-ray variation statistics and wind clumping in Vela X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Fürst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn; Hanke, Manfred; Rothschild, Richard E; Kretschmar, Peter; Schulz, Norbert S; Huenemoerder, David P; Klochkov, Dmitry; Staubert, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the structure of the wind in the neutron star X-ray binary system Vela X-1 by analyzing its flaring behavior. Vela X-1 shows constant flaring, with some flares reaching fluxes of more than 3.0 Crab between 20-60 keV for several 100 seconds, while the average flux is around 250 mCrab. We analyzed all archival INTEGRAL data, calculating the brightness distribution in the 20-60 keV band, which, as we show, closely follows a log-normal distribution. Orbital resolved analysis shows that the structure is strongly variable, explainable by shocks and a fluctuating accretion wake. Analysis of RXTE ASM data suggests a strong orbital change of N_H. Accreted clump masses derived from the INTEGRAL data are on the order of 5 x 10^19 -10^21 g. We show that the lightcurve can be described with a model of multiplicative random numbers. In the course of the simulation we calculate the power spectral density of the system in the 20-100 keV energy band and show that it follows a red-noise power law. We suggest tha...

  11. Clumped fluoride-hydroxyl defects in forsterite: Implications for the upper-mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépisson, Céline; Blanchard, Marc; Bureau, Hélène; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Withers, Anthony C.; Khodja, Hicham; Surblé, Suzy; Raepsaet, Caroline; Béneut, Keevin; Leroy, Clémence; Giura, Paola; Balan, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of fluorine incorporation in H-bearing forsterite were investigated through a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Forsterite samples were synthesized in a piston cylinder press at 2 and 4 GPa, in hydrous conditions, with or without fluorine. High fluorine solubilities of 1715 and 1308 ppm F were measured by particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) in forsterite samples synthesized at 2 and 4 GPa, respectively. In addition, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory were performed in order to investigate the coupled incorporation mechanisms of fluorine and water in forsterite. Our results demonstrate the close association of fluoride, hydroxyl groups and Si vacancies. Comparison of experimental and theoretical infrared absorption spectra enables assignment of the nine OH stretching bands (3500-3700 cm-1) observed in F-rich synthetic forsterite to clumped fluoride-hydroxyl defects in the forsterite crystal structure. Noteworthily, similar bands were previously recorded on some natural olivine with Mg/(Mg+Fe) molar ratio down to 0.86. Fluorine and water cycles are therefore strongly coupled through the nominally anhydrous minerals and the mantle fluorine budget can be entirely accommodated by these mineral phases.

  12. WINDS, CLUMPS, AND INTERACTING COSMIC RAYS IN M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III, E-mail: yoasthull@wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via Type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07 yr{sup -1}. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and {gamma}-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are compared to the observed radio and {gamma}-ray spectra of M82. {chi}{sup 2} tests are used with radio and {gamma}-ray observations and a range of model predictions to find the best-fit parameters. The best-fit model yields constraints on key parameters in the starburst zone of M82, including a magnetic field strength of {approx}250 {mu}G and a wind advection speed in the range of 300-700 km s{sup -1}. We find that M82 is a good electron calorimeter but not an ideal cosmic-ray proton calorimeter and discuss the implications of our results for the astrophysics of the far-infrared-radio correlation in starburst galaxies.

  13. Dynamic density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions: theoretical development and application in the study of phase separation in gas-liquid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkinides, E S; Monson, P A

    2015-03-07

    Building on recent developments in dynamic density functional theory, we have developed a version of the theory that includes hydrodynamic interactions. This is achieved by combining the continuity and momentum equations eliminating velocity fields, so the resulting model equation contains only terms related to the fluid density and its time and spatial derivatives. The new model satisfies simultaneously continuity and momentum equations under the assumptions of constant dynamic or kinematic viscosity and small velocities and/or density gradients. We present applications of the theory to spinodal decomposition of subcritical temperatures for one-dimensional and three-dimensional density perturbations for both a van der Waals fluid and for a lattice gas model in mean field theory. In the latter case, the theory provides a hydrodynamic extension to the recently studied dynamic mean field theory. We find that the theory correctly describes the transition from diffusive phase separation at short times to hydrodynamic behaviour at long times.

  14. Thermal instability explanation of similar density limits in gas fueled, DIII-D H-mode shots with different operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, W. M.; Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A. W.

    2002-03-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, F. Batty, C. Baxi et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] examined the effect of different operating conditions ("open" and "closed" divertor geometry, active pumping, fueling location) on the maximum achievable density in gas fueled H-mode (high confinement mode) discharges. Several phenomena observed at these higher densities (≈0.8 the Greenwald density)—degradation in energy confinement, detachment of the core plasma from the divertor plate, multifaceted asymmetric radiation from edge formation—are found to be correlated with the predicted onset of various thermal instabilities in the plasma edge or divertor regions. The similarity of the maximum achievable densities under the different operating conditions can be related to a similarity of edge thermal instability characteristics.

  15. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Li, Zhi-Yun; /Virginia U., Astron. Dept.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication

  16. Isolation of dihydrocurcuminoids from cell clumps and their distribution in various parts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomoko; Imai, Shinsuke; Sawada, Hiroshi; Seto, Haruo

    2009-05-01

    In addition to well-known curcuminoids, three colored metabolites were isolated from cultured cell clumps that had been induced from buds on turmeric rhizomes. The isolated compounds were identified as dihydro derivatives of curcuminoids, dihydrocurcumin (dihydroCurc), dihydrodesmethoxycurcumin-a (dihydroDMC-a), and dihydrobisdesmethoxycurcumin (dihydroBDMC). The cell clumps did not contain dihydroDMC-b, an isomer of dihydroDMC-a. A comparison of the distribution profiles of curcuminoids and dihydrocurcuminoids in the cell clumps with those in the rhizomes, leaves, and roots revealed the following differences: Unlike rhizomes, the cell clumps, leaves, and roots contained dihydrocurcuminoids as the major colored constituents. Whereas dimethoxy compounds, curcumin and dihydrocurcumin, respectively, were most abundant in the rhizomes and leaves, one of the monomethoxy derivatives, dihydroDMC-a, was found most abundantly in the cell clumps and roots. While both dihydroDMC-a and b were detected in the rhizomes, dihydroDMC-b was not detectable in the cell clumps, leaves, or roots. The occurrence of only one of the two possible isomers of dihydroDMC suggests biosynthetic formation of dihydrocurcuminoids in turmeric.

  17. High Mass Star Formation. III. The Functional Form of the Submillimeter Clump Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, M A; Reid, Michael A.; Wilson, Christine D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the mass function of cold, dusty clumps in 11 low- and high-mass star-forming regions. Using a homogeneous fitting technique, we analyze the shape of each region's clump mass function and examine the commonalities among them. We find that the submillimeter continuum clump mass function in low-mass star-forming regions is typically best fit by a lognormal distribution, while that in high-mass star-forming regions is better fit by a double power law. A single power law clump mass distribution is ruled out in all cases. Fitting all of the regions with a double power law, we find the mean power law exponent at the high-mass end of each mass function is alpha_high = -2.4+/-0.1, consistent with the Salpeter result of alpha = -2.35. We find no region-to-region trend in alpha_high with the mass scale of the clumps in a given region, as characterized by their median mass. Similarly, non non-parametric tests show that the shape of the clump mass function does not change much from region to region, despit...

  18. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G. [California Institute of Technology Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Novak, Giles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 633 Clark Street Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Vaillancourt, John E. [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Machida, Masahiro N. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kataoka, Akimasa [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tomisaka, Kohji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Department of Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Perth (Australia); Dowell, C. Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-506, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Leeuw, Lerothodi [SETI Institute, 515 North Whisman Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  19. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe, Greife [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  20. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  1. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  2. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in mergers of galaxy nuclei - II. Black hole sinking in star-forming nuclear discs

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, Alessandro; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mergers of gas-rich galaxies are key events in the hierarchical built-up of cosmic structures, and can lead to the formation of massive black hole binaries. By means of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations we consider the late stages of a gas-rich major merger, detailing the dynamics of two circumnuclear discs, and of the hosted massive black holes during their pairing phase. During the merger gas clumps with masses of a fraction of the black hole mass form because of fragmentation. Such high-density gas is very effective in forming stars, and the most massive clumps can substantially perturb the black hole orbits. After $\\sim 10$ Myr from the start of the merger a gravitationally bound black hole binary forms at a separation of a few parsecs, and soon after, the separation falls below our resolution limit of $0.39$ pc. At the time of binary formation the original discs are almost completely disrupted because of SNa feedback, while on pc scales the residual gas settles in a circumbinary disc with mass $...

  3. On the shape of the mass-function of dense clumps in the Hi-GAL fields. II. Using Bayesian inference to study the clump mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Olmi, L; Elia, D; Molinari, S; Pestalozzi, M; Pezzuto, S; Schisano, E; Testi, L; Thompson, M

    2013-01-01

    Context. Stars form in dense, dusty clumps of molecular clouds, but little is known about their origin, their evolution and their detailed physical properties. In particular, the relationship between the mass distribution of these clumps (also known as the "clump mass function", or CMF) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF), is still poorly understood. Aims. In order to better understand how the CMF evolve toward the IMF, and to discern the "true" shape of the CMF, large samples of bona-fide pre- and proto-stellar clumps are required. Two such datasets obtained from the Herschel infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) have been described in paper I. Robust statistical methods are needed in order to infer the parameters describing the models used to fit the CMF, and to compare the competing models themselves. Methods. In this paper we apply Bayesian inference to the analysis of the CMF of the two regions discussed in Paper I. First, we determine the Bayesian posterior probability distribution for each of...

  4. Variations in the Galactic star formation rate and density thresholds for star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, S N; Testi, L; Purcell, C R; Walsh, A J; Bressert, E; Pestalozzi, M; Molinari, S; Ott, J; Cortese, L; Battersby, C; Murray, N; Lee, E; Kruijssen, D

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of gas into stars is a fundamental process in astrophysics and cosmology. Stars are known to form from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps in interstellar molecular clouds, and it has been proposed that the resulting star formation rate is proportional to either the amount of mass above a threshold gas surface density, or the gas volume density. These star-formation prescriptions appear to hold in nearby molecular clouds in our Milky Way Galaxy's disk as well as in distant galaxies where the star formation rates are often much larger. The inner 500 pc of our Galaxy, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), contains the largest concentration of dense, high-surface density molecular gas in the Milky Way, providing an environment where the validity of star-formation prescriptions can be tested. Here we show that by several measures, the current star formation rate in the CMZ is an order-of-magnitude lower than the rates predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. In particular, the region 1...

  5. Applying clumped isotopes of O2 to atmospheric and biogeochemical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    I will describe recent measurements of isotopic "clumps" in diatomic molecules, e.g., 18O18O in O2, which are being utilized to constrain atmospheric circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales and biogeochemical cycling in the oceans. While our understanding of these tracers is still evolving, several features of their geochemistry are apparent: (1) the proportional abundance of these isotopic "clumps" is governed by traditional chemical effects as well as combinatorial effects unique to clumped isotopes, and (2) when isotopic exchange reactions are disfavoured, chemical-kinetic and/or reservoir effects, rather than thermodynamic equilibrium, determine their clumped-isotope composition. Combinatorial clumped-isotope signatures imparted during photosynthesis are being developed as endmember signatures of gross primary productivity in the oceans. In addition, clumped-isotope measurements of O2 in the atmosphere (i.e., Δ36 values) suggest that isotopic clumping in O2 is continuously being altered by ozone photochemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere. Yet, the contrast in isotope-exchange rates between the stratosphere (where exchange is fast) and the troposphere (where exchange is slow) results in a gradient in Δ36 values with altitude, wherein stratospheric intrusions are detectable as elevated Δ36 values. Moreover, global chemical-transport model simulations suggest that ozone photochemistry in the troposphere re-orders the O2 reservoir in the troposphere on annual timescales. The Δ36 value at the surface is therefore sensitive to the tropospheric residence time of O2 with respect to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Consequently, Δ36 values at the surface likely respond to changes in the strength of the global overturning circulation.

  6. Density of states of the one-dimensional electron gas: Impurity levels, impurity bands, and the band tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.

    1994-06-01

    The density of states of cylindrical quantum wires is calculated in the presence of charged impurities located in the center of the wire. A multiple-scattering approach (Klauder's fifth approximation), which represents a self-consistent t-matrix approximation, is used. For small impurity densities and in the weak screening limit the ground-state impurity band and four excited-state impurity bands are obtained within our approach. We find good agreement between the numerically obtained spectral densities with the corresponding analytical spectral densities calculated with the single-impurity wave functions. The merging of impurity bands is studied. For large impurity densities we obtain a band tail. We present an analytical expression for the disorder-induced renormalized band-edge energy in the band-tail regime.

  7. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reach, W.R.; Pound, M.W.; Wilner, D.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Lee, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have surveyed high-latitude molecular clouds (MBM 12, 7, 55, 40) in spectral lines that are believed to be dense-gas' tracers due to the high H[sub 2] volume density required for collisional excitation. An extensive CS (2-1) line map of MBM 12 revealed emission that is not confined to clumps. Less than 20% of the integrated line emission from the cloud originates in clearly identified clumps with size between 0.2 pc and 0.02 pc in the integrated line map. The bulk of the emission originates from a relatively smooth horseshoe' structure about 0.1 pc wide and 1 pc long. The CS (2-1) map correlates with the published Bell Labs [sup 13] CO map, with significant [sup 13] CO emission even where the CS emission is undetectable. Within the central core, the C[sup 18]O(1-0) and CS(2-1) lines are positively correlated with significant scatter. There is some indication of higher CS/[sup 13]CO in the cores than the horseshoe'. The observed correlations suggest that both the diffuse CS and [sup 13]CO originate from either numerous, unresolved clumps, or the diffuse parts of the cloud. High-spatial-resolution observations of HCO[sup +] from MBM 12 obtained with the BIMA Hat Creek array demonstrated that the main core emission is primarily on spatial scales greater than 0.004 pc. It appears that the authors have resolved most of the spatial structure of the dense-gas' tracers and have found that the emission is primarily diffuse. To understand the excitation mechanism of the CS rotational levels, a multitransitional study of the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 lines is being performed. The CS excitation may be governed by electron collisions in regions with H[sub 2] column densities an order of magnitude lower than the critical density' of [approx gt] 2 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup -3]. If electron collisions are populating the CS levels, then the CS and [sup 13]CO lines can both be produced in the outer parts of the cloud, explaining their positive correlation

  8. Structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud from the Near Infrared magnitudes of Red Clump stars

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, Smitha

    2013-01-01

    The structural parameters, like the inclination, i and the position angle of the line of nodes (PA_lon) of the disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are estimated using the JH photometric data of red clump stars from the Infrared Survey Facility - Magellanic Cloud Point Source Catalog (IRSF-MCPSC). The observed LMC region is divided into several sub-regions and stars in each region are cross identified with the optically identified red clump stars to obtain the near infrared magnitudes. The peak values of H magnitude and (J-H) colour of the observed red clump distribution are obtained by fitting a profile to the distributions and also by taking the average value of magnitude and colour of the red clump stars in the bin with largest number. Then the dereddened peak H0 magnitude of the red clump stars in each sub-region is obtained. The RA, Dec and relative distance from the center of each sub-region are converted into x, y & z Cartesian coordinates. A weighted least square plane fitting method is applie...

  9. Infall through the evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Wyrowski, F; Menten, K M; Wiesemeyer, H; Csengeri, T; Heyminck, S; Klein, B; König, C; Urquhart, J S

    2016-01-01

    With the GREAT receiver at the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), nine massive molecular clumps have been observed in the ammonia $3_{2+}- 2_{2-}$ line at 1.8~THz in a search for signatures of infall. The sources were selected from the ATLASGAL submillimeter dust continuum survey of our Galaxy. Clumps with high masses covering a range of evolutionary stages based on their infrared properties were chosen. The ammonia line was detected in all sources, leading to five new detections and one confirmation of a previous detection of redshifted absorption in front of their strong THz continuum as a probe of infall in the clumps. These detections include two clumps embedded in infrared dark clouds. The measured velocity shifts of the absorptions compared to optically thin \\CSEO\\ (3--2) emission are 0.3--2.8~km/s, corresponding to fractions of 3\\%\\ to 30\\% of the free-fall velocities of the clumps. The ammonia infall signature is compared with complementary data of different transitions of HCN, ...

  10. X-ray Emission Line Profiles from Wind Clump Bow Shocks in Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ignace, R; Cassinelli, J P

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two component flow structure of wind and clumps using two "beta" velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the...

  11. ALMA spectroscopic survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: CO luminosity functions and the evolution of the cosmic density of molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Decarli, Roberto; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Ivison, R J; Popping, Gergö; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo; Assef, Roberto; Bauer, Franz; Bell, Eric F; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C; Cox, Pierre; Dickinson, Mark; Elbaz, David; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Ibar, Edo; Infante, Leopoldo; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Fevre, Olivier Le; Magnelli, Benjamin; Neri, Roberto; Oesch, Pascal; Ota, Kazuaki; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; Sheth, Kartik; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul; Wagg, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \\sim 2$ to $z \\sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This tre...

  12. Development of a multichannel dispersion interferometer for measurements of the plasma density distribution after massive gas injection and during the runaway electron phase in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lvovskiy, Andrey

    2015-07-14

    The tokamak performance is limited both by technological and physical reasons. The crossing of operational limits often leads to a global loss of plasma confinement called disruption. Strong heat and electromagnetic loads are produced during the disruption. The applicability of massive injection of impurities for mitigation of thermal and electromagnetic stresses has been shown at many machines. The third issue of disruption is the generation of runaway electrons. A runaway electron beam with energy about 10 MeV and carried current up to 70% of initial plasma current could cause a serious damage in case of localized impact to the wall. It is theoretically predicted that significant increase of electron density could suppress the generation of runaway electron via collision mechanism. However, the consistent proof of this statement has never been done. The use of massive noble gas injection for the suppression of runaway electron generation is investigated in the present work. A reliable measurement of the electron density during disruption characterized by fast and significant change of plasma parameters is crucially important for that purpose. To solve this issue a multi-channel dispersion-interferometer has been developed on TEXTOR. This is a unique diagnostics allowing reliable measurement of line plasma density during disruption and post-disruption stage with high time resolution. The generation of runaway electrons has been investigated in deliberately induced disruption. The successful suppression of runaway electron generation has been found in the case of sufficient gas amount injection with proper timing not later than beginning of current quench. The critical density threshold has been found to be up to one order of magnitude below the theoretically predicted. The possible reasons are discussed in detail. The minimum of critical density threshold dependence on Z impurity number has been found. The different amount of electrons delivered into the plasma

  13. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions: II. Verifying Dust Surface Density, Dust Temperature & Gas Mass Measurements with Modified Blackbody Fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Koepferl, Christine M; Dale, James E

    2016-01-01

    We use a large data-set of realistic synthetic observations (PaperI) to assess how observational techniques affect the measurement of physical properties of star-forming regions. In this paper (PaperII), we explore the reliability of the measured total gas mass, dust surface density and dust temperature maps derived from modified blackbody fitting of synthetic Herschel observations. We found from our pixel-by-pixel analysis of the measured dust surface density and dust temperature a worrisome error spread especially close to star-formation sites and low-density regions, where for those "contaminated" pixels the surface densities can be under/overestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. In light of this, we recommend to treat the pixel-based results from this technique with caution in regions with active star formation. In regions of high background typical in the inner Galactic plane, we are not able to recover reliable surface density maps of individual synthetic regions, since low-mass regions are lost...

  14. From bare interactions, low-energy constants, and unitary gas to nuclear density functionals without free parameters: Application to neutron matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Denis; Boulet, Antoine; Grasso, Marcella; Yang, C.-J.

    2017-05-01

    We further progress along the line of Ref. [D. Lacroix, Phys. Rev. A 94, 043614 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.043614] where a functional for Fermi systems with anomalously large s -wave scattering length as was proposed that has no free parameters. The functional is designed to correctly reproduce the unitary limit in Fermi gases together with the leading-order contributions in the s - and p -wave channels at low density. The functional is shown to be predictive up to densities ˜0.01 fm-3 that is much higher densities compared to the Lee-Yang functional, valid for ρ bare interaction are strongly renormalized by medium effects. As a consequence, some of the scales at play around saturation are dominated by the unitary gas properties and not directly by low-energy constants. For instance, we show that the scale in the s -wave channel around saturation is proportional to the so-called Bertsch parameter ξ0 and becomes independent of as. We also point out that these scales are of the same order of magnitude than those empirically obtained in the Skyrme energy density functional. We finally propose a slight modification of the functional such that it becomes accurate up to the saturation density ρ ≃0.16 fm-3.

  15. A Deep-Sea Coral Clumped Isotope Record From Southern Ocean Intermediate Water Spanning the Most Recent Glacial Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, S.; Eiler, J. M.; Adkins, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Movement of intermediate waters plays an important role in global heat and carbon transport in the ocean and changes in their distribution are closely tied to glacial-interglacial climate change. Ocean temperature is necessarily linked to circulation because density is a function of temperature and salinity. In the modern ocean, stratification is dominated by differences in temperature, but this may not have been the case in the past. Coupled radiocarbon and U/Th dates on deep-sea Desmophyllum dianthus corals allow for the reconstruction of past intermediate water circulation rates. The addition of temperature measurements further aids in understanding of the mechanisms driving the observed signals, since there are different boundary conditions for resetting these two properties at the surface. In the modern Southern Ocean, temperature and radiocarbon are broadly correlated. At the surface there are meridional gradients of these properties, with colder, more radiocarbon-depleted water closer to the Antarctic continent. We present a high-resolution time series of clumped isotope temperature measurements on 30 corals spanning the Last Glacial Maximum through the end of the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR). These samples have previously been U/Th and radiocarbon dated. Corals were collected south of Tasmania from depths of between ~1450 - 1900 m, with 70% between 1500 and 1700 m. Uranium and thorium measurements were made by MC-ICP-MS on a ThermoFinnigan Neptune, radiocarbon was measured by AMS at the KCCAMS Laboratory at UC Irvine, and clumped isotope temperatures were measured on a MAT 253 attached to an automated carbonate preparation line. Preliminary results show constant temperature between ~20 - 18 ka, a gradual rise of ~6 ºC through Heinrich Stadial 1 (~18 - 15 ka), an abrupt drop of ~7 ºC directly preceeding the start of the Bølling at 14.7 ka, and another slight rise of ~4 ºC through the ACR (14.7 - 12.8 ka). The addition of clumped isotope temperatures to

  16. Dynamic density and spin responses of a superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Path integral formulation and pair fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lianyi

    2016-10-01

    We present a standard field theoretical derivation of the dynamic density and spin linear response functions of a dilute superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover in both three and two dimensions. The derivation of the response functions is based on the elegant functional path integral approach which allows us to calculate the density-density and spin-spin correlation functions by introducing the external sources for the density and the spin density. Since the generating functional cannot be evaluated exactly, we consider two gapless approximations which ensure a gapless collective mode (Goldstone mode) in the superfluid state: the BCS-Leggett mean-field theory and the Gaussian-pair-fluctuation (GPF) theory. In the mean-field theory, our results of the response functions agree with the known results from the random phase approximation. We further consider the pair fluctuation effects and establish a theoretical framework for the dynamic responses within the GPF theory. We show that the GPF response theory naturally recovers three kinds of famous diagrammatic contributions: the Self-Energy contribution, the Aslamazov-Lakin contribution, and the Maki-Thompson contribution. We also show that unlike the equilibrium state, in evaluating the response functions, the linear (first-order) terms in the external sources as well as the induced order parameter perturbations should be treated carefully. In the superfluid state, there is an additional order parameter contribution which ensures that in the static and long wavelength limit, the density response function recovers the result of the compressibility (compressibility sum rule). We expect that the f-sum rule is manifested by the full number equation which includes the contribution from the Gaussian pair fluctuations. The dynamic density and spin response functions in the normal phase (above the superfluid critical temperature) are also derived within the Nozières-Schmitt-Rink (NSR) theory.

  17. Density functional theory study of 1:1 glycine–water complexes in the gas phase and in solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of 1:1 glycine-water complexes involving all possible glycine conformers. The complex geometries are fully optimized for the first time both in the gas phase and in solution using three DFT methods (B3LYP, PBE1PBE, X3LYP) and the MP2 method. We calculate the G3 energies and use them as the reference data to gauge hydrogen bond strength in the gas phase. The solvent effects are treated via the integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). Altogether, we locate fifty-two unique nonionized (N) structures and six zwitterionic (Z) structures in the gas phase, and fifty-five N structures and thirteen Z structures in solution. Both correlation and solvation are shown to be important in geometry determination. We found that in the gas phase, a water molecule binds more strongly to the carboxylic acid group of glycine than to its amine group, whereas in solution phase the reverse is true. The most stable Z structure is isoenergetic with the most stable N structure.

  18. [Effects of increased planting density with reduced nitrogen fertilizer application on rice yield, N use efficiency and greenhouse gas emission in Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang-cheng; Zhang, Zhen-ping; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Ai-xing; Zhang, Wei-jian

    2016-02-01

    The traditional rice growing practice has to change to save resource and protect environment, and it' s necessary to develop new technology in rice cultivation. Therefore, a two-year field experiment of Japonica rice (Liaoxing 1) was conducted in Northeast China in 2012 and 2013 to investigate the integrated effects of dense planting with less basal nitrogen (N) and unchanged top-dressing N (IR) on rice yield, N use efficiency (NUE) and greenhouse gas emissions. Compared with traditional practice (CK), we increased the rice seedling density by 33.3% and reduced the basal N rate by 20%. The results showed that the average N agronomy efficiency and partial factor productivity were improved by 49.6% (Pefficiency. Generally, proper dense planting with less basal N applicatior could be a good approach for the trade-off between rice yield, NUE and greenhouse gas emission.

  19. From slant column densities to trace gas profiles: Post processing data from the new MAX-DOAS network in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, M. M.; Stremme, W.; Rivera, C. I.; Arellano, E. J.; Grutter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The new MAX-DOAS network in Mexico City provides results of O4, HCHO and NO2 slant column densities (SCD). Here, we present a new numerical code developed to retrieve gas profiles of NO2 and HCHO using radiative transfer simulations. We present first results of such profiles from the MAX-DOAS station located at UNAM campus. The code works in two steps: First, the O4 slant column density information is used to retrieve an aerosol profile. As an a-priori aerosol profile, we use averaged ceilometer data measured at UNAM and scaled to the total optical depth provided by the Aeronet data base. In the second step, the retrieved aerosol profile information is used together with the trace gas (HCHO or NO2) SCDs to retrieve the trace gas profiles. The inversion is based on a gauss-newton iteration scheme and uses constrained least square fitting with either optimal estimation or Tihkonov regularization. For the latter, the regulation matrix is currently constructed from the discrete first derivative operator. The forward model uses the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. The inputs to VLIDORT are calculated using temperature and pressure information from daily radiosounde measurements and aerosol single scattering optical depths and asymmetry factors from the Aeronet data base for Mexico City. For the gas absorption cross sections we use the same values as were used for the SCD calculation from the recorded spectra using QDOAS. Besides demonstrating the functionality of the algorithm showing profile retrievals of simulated SCDs with added random noise, we present HCHO and NO2 profiles retrieved from SCDs calculated from the MAX-DOAS measurements at UNAM campus at selected days.

  20. Monitoring of density in tokamaks: pumping and gas injection; Controle de la densite dans les tokamaks: pompage et injection de matiere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dejarnac, R

    2002-11-01

    In thermonuclear fusion devices, controlling the Deuterium-Tritium fuel density and exhausting the Helium ashes is a crucial point. This is achieved by fuelling the discharges by different methods (gas puffing and pellet injection are the most commonly used) and by implementing pumping devices at the plasma periphery. These two issues are treated in this work, both from an experimental and a modelling point of view, using the neutral transport code EIRENE as main tool for our studies. As far as pumping is concerned, we have modelled the outboard pump limiter of the Tore Supra tokamak with the EIRENE code to which we coupled a plasma module specially developed to simulate the neutrals and the plasma in a coherent way. This allowed to validate the code against experimental data. As far as plasma fuelling is concerned, we present here an original method: the supersonic pulsed gas injection (SPGI). This intermediate method between conventional gas puff (GP) and pellet injection was designed and tested at Tore Supra. It consists of injecting very dense and short gas puffs at high speed into the plasma. Experimentally, SPGI was found to have a better fuelling efficiency than GP and to lead to a strong plasma cooling. The mechanisms responsible for this improved efficiency are analysed by modelling, using the EIRENE code to determine the ionisation source and a 1 D transport model to reproduce the plasma density response. At last, an extrapolation of the present injector is presented, discussing the possibility to obtain a radial drift of the injected matter as observed in the case of high field side pellet injection. (author)

  1. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in Adaptive Mesh Refinement codes Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Valdivia, Valeska

    2014-01-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims. Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods. We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results. We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the ...

  2. Equilibrium clumped-isotope effects in doubly substituted isotopologues of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael A.; Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with a new intramolecular potential energy surface to quantify the equilibrium enrichment of doubly substituted ethane isotopologues due to clumped-isotope effects. Ethane represents the simplest molecule to simultaneously exhibit 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects, and the analysis of corresponding signatures may provide useful geochemical and biogeochemical proxies of formation temperatures or reaction pathways. Utilizing path-integral statistical mechanics, we predict equilibrium fractionation factors that fully incorporate nuclear quantum effects, such as anharmonicity and rotational-vibrational coupling which are typically neglected by the widely used Urey model. The magnitude of the calculated fractionation factors for the doubly substituted ethane isotopologues indicates that isotopic clumping can be observed if rare-isotope substitutions are separated by up to three chemical bonds, but the diminishing strength of these effects suggests that enrichment at further separations will be negligible. The Urey model systematically underestimates enrichment due to 13C-D and D-D clumped-isotope effects in ethane, leading to small relative errors in the apparent equilibrium temperature, ranging from 5 K at 273.15 K to 30 K at 873.15 K. We additionally note that the rotameric dependence of isotopologue enrichment must be carefully considered when using the Urey model, whereas the path-integral calculations automatically account for such effects due to configurational sampling. These findings are of direct relevance to future clumped-isotope studies of ethane, as well as studies of 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects in other hydrocarbons.

  3. Effects of foliage clumping on the estimation of global terrestrial gross primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing M.; Mo, Gang; Pisek, Jan; Liu, Jane; Deng, Feng; Ishizawa, Misa; Chan, Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Sunlit and shaded leaf separation proposed by Norman (1982) is an effective way to upscale from leaf to canopy in modeling vegetation photosynthesis. The Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) makes use of this methodology, and has been shown to be reliable in modeling the gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from CO2flux and tree ring measurements. In this study, we use BEPS to investigate the effect of canopy architecture on the global distribution of GPP. For this purpose, we use not only leaf area index (LAI) but also the first ever global map of the foliage clumping index derived from the multiangle satellite sensor POLDER at 6 km resolution. The clumping index, which characterizes the degree of the deviation of 3-dimensional leaf spatial distributions from the random case, is used to separate sunlit and shaded LAI values for a given LAI. Our model results show that global GPP in 2003 was 132 ± 22 Pg C. Relative to this baseline case, our results also show: (1) global GPP is overestimated by 12% when accurate LAI is available but clumping is ignored, and (2) global GPP is underestimated by 9% when the effective LAI is available and clumping is ignored. The clumping effects in both cases are statistically significant (p < 0.001). The effective LAI is often derived from remote sensing by inverting the measured canopy gap fraction to LAI without considering the clumping. Global GPP would therefore be generally underestimated when remotely sensed LAI (actually effective LAI by our definition) is used. This is due to the underestimation of the shaded LAI and therefore the contribution of shaded leaves to GPP. We found that shaded leaves contribute 50%, 38%, 37%, 39%, 26%, 29% and 21% to the total GPP for broadleaf evergreen forest, broadleaf deciduous forest, evergreen conifer forest, deciduous conifer forest, shrub, C4 vegetation, and other vegetation, respectively. The global average of this ratio is 35%.

  4. Dense, Parsec-Scale Clumps near the Great Annihilator

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges-Kluck, E J; Harris, A I; Lamb, J W; Hodges, M W

    2009-01-01

    We report on Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations toward the Einstein source 1E 1740.7-2942, a LMXB commonly known as the "Great Annihilator." The Great Annihilator is known to be near a small, bright molecular cloud on the sky in a region largely devoid of emission in 12-CO surveys of the Galactic Center. The region is of interest because it is interior to the dust lanes which may be the shock zones where atomic gas from HI nuclear disk is converted into molecular gas. We find that the region is populated with a number of dense (n ~ 10^5 cm^-3) regions of excited gas with small filling factors, and estimate that up to 1-3 x 10^5 solar masses of gas can be seen in our maps. The detection suggests that a significant amount of mass is transported from the shock zones to the GC star-forming regions in the form of small, dense bundles.

  5. The role of gas dynamical friction in the evolution of embedded stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Indulekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Two puzzles associated with open clusters have attracted a lot of attention -- their formation, with densities and velocity dispersions that are not too different from those of the star forming regions in the Galaxy, given that the observed Star Formation Efficiencies (SFE) are low and, the mass segregation observed / inferred in some of them, at ages significantly less than the dynamical relaxation times in them. Gas dynamical friction has been considered before as a mechanism for contracting embedded stellar clusters, by dissipating their energy. This would locally raise the SFE which might then allow bound clusters to form. Noticing that dynamical friction is inherently capable of producing mass segregation, since here, the dissipation rate is proportional to the mass of the body experiencing the force, we explore further, some of the details and implications of such a scenario, vis-a-vis observations. Making analytical approximations, we obtain a boundary value for the density of a star forming clump of g...

  6. High contrast Kr gas jet K alpha x-ray source for high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugland, N L; Neumayer, P; Döppner, T; Chung, H-K; Constantin, C G; Girard, F; Glenzer, S H; Kemp, A; Niemann, C

    2008-10-01

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K alpha source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility using strongly clustering Kr gas jet targets. The contrast ratio (K alpha to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultrashort pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10(-5). Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K alpha and K beta x rays are emitted from a roughly 1x2 mm(2) emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e., mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K alpha to K beta. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K alpha source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  7. Numerical simulation study on density dependence of plasma detachment in simulated gas divertor experiments of the TPD-I device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Mori, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Suzuki, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    It is one of the most critical requirements to reduce the heat load to the divertor plate in the next generation fusion devices such as ITER, intended to have a long pulse or a steady state operation. Dynamic gas target divertor as well as high recycling divertor is one of the most important candidates for ITER. Recently a detached plasma has been observed in experimental fusion devices. Knowledge of the basic physics of the plasma detachment is required for any application of the gas target and high recycling divertor to the next generation experimental reactors. Linear plasma divertor simulators with high heat flux plasmas are used to investigate the plasma detachment because its good accessibility for comprehensive measurements and simple geometry leads a deeper understanding of the plasma detachment by comparing between simulation predictions and the experimental results. (orig.)

  8. DYNAMICAL SIMULATION OF A QUANTUM HARMONIC-OSCILLATOR IN A NOBLE-GAS BATH BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density-matrix evolution method [Berendsen and Mavri, J. Phys. Chem. 97, 13464 (1993)] coupled to a classical molecular dynamics simulation was applied to study a quantum harmonic oscillator immersed in a bath of Lennard-Jones particles. Eigenfunctions of the three, lowest levels of the unperturbe

  9. DYNAMICAL SIMULATION OF A QUANTUM HARMONIC-OSCILLATOR IN A NOBLE-GAS BATH BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density-matrix evolution method [Berendsen and Mavri, J. Phys. Chem. 97, 13464 (1993)] coupled to a classical molecular dynamics simulation was applied to study a quantum harmonic oscillator immersed in a bath of Lennard-Jones particles. Eigenfunctions of the three, lowest levels of the unperturbe

  10. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: qualitative treatment and cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A A; Lau, E T; Nagai, D; Gaspari, M; Allen, S W; Nelson, K; Parrish, I J

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the ICM using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: $(\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho)^2 = \\eta_1^2 (V_{1,k}/c_s)^2$, where $\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho$ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wave number $k$, $V_{1,k}^2=V_k^2/3$ is the mean square component of the velocity field, $c_s$ is the sound speed, and $\\eta_1$ is a dimensionless constant of order unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find $\\eta_1\\approx 1 \\pm 0.3$. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proporti...

  11. ALMA Observations of the IRDC Clump G34.43+00.24 MM3: 278 GHz Class I Methanol Masers

    CERN Document Server

    Yanagida, Takahiro; Hirota, Tomoya; Sakai, Nami; Foster, Jonathan B; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have observed a molecular clump (MM3) associated with the infrared dark cloud G34.43+00.24 in the CH3OH J_K=9_{-1}--8_0 E, 5_0-4_0 E, and 5_{-1}-4_{-1} E lines at sub-arcsecond resolution by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. By comparing the CH3OH J_K=9_{-1}-8_0 E emission with the CH3OH 5_0-4_0 E and 5_{-1}-4_{-1} E emission, we have found that the CH3OH J_K=9_{-1}-8_0 E emission is masing. We have clearly shown that the CH3OH J_K=9_{-1}-8_0 masers arise from the post shocked gas in the interacting regions between the outflows and ambient dense gas. Toward the strongest peak of the CH3OH maser emission, SiO J=6-5 emission is very weak. This indicates that the CH3OH maser emission traces relatively old shocks or weak shocks.

  12. A Self-Similar Flow behind a Magnetogasdynamic Shock Wave Generated by a Moving Piston in a Gravitating Gas with Variable Density: Isothermal Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of a cylindrical (or spherical shock wave in an ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field and with or without self-gravitational effects is investigated. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The initial density and the initial magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying power laws. Solutions are obtained, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity. The shock wave moves with variable velocity, and the total energy of the wave is nonconstant. The effects of variation of the piston velocity exponent (i.e., variation of the initial density exponent, the initial magnetic field exponent, the gravitational parameter, and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow field are obtained. It is investigated that the self-gravitation reduces the effects of the magnetic field. A comparison is also made between gravitating and nongravitating cases.

  13. Numerical studies of independent control of electron density and gas temperature via nonlinear coupling in dual-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Nie, Q. Y.; Wang, Z. B.; Gao, X. T.; Kong, F. R.; Sun, Y. F.; Jiang, B. H.

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) provide a promising technology of generating non-equilibrium cold plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases. For both application-focused and fundamental studies, it is important to explore the strategy and the mechanism for enabling effective independent tuning of key plasma parameters in a DBD system. In this paper, we report numerical studies of effects of dual-frequency excitation on atmospheric DBDs, and modulation as well as separate tuning mechanism, with emphasis on dual-frequency coupling to the key plasma parameters and discharge evolution. With an appropriately applied low frequency to the original high frequency, the numerical calculation demonstrates that a strong nonlinear coupling between two frequencies governs the process of ionization and energy deposition into plasma, and thus raises the electron density significantly (e.g., three times in this case) in comparisons with a single frequency driven DBD system. Nevertheless, the gas temperature, which is mainly determined by the high frequency discharge, barely changes. This method then enables a possible approach of controlling both averaged electron density and gas temperature independently.

  14. Density of atoms in Ar*(3p54s) states and gas temperatures in an argon surfatron plasma measured by tunable laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, S.; Sadeghi, N.; Carbone, E. A. D.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2013-04-01

    This study presents the absolute argon 1 s (in Paschens's notation) densities and the gas temperature, Tg, obtained in a surfatron plasma in the pressure range 0.65recorded with two tunable diode lasers. Tg is deduced from the absorption line shapes when scanning the laser wavelengths. The line profile, which is a Doppler broadening dominated Gaussian at gas pressures of p 10 mbar, for which the pressure broadening can no more be neglected. Tg is in the range of 480-750 K, increasing with pressure and decreasing with the distance from the microwave launcher. Taking into account the line of sight effects of the absorption measurements, a good agreement is found with our previous measurements by Rayleigh scattering of Tg at the tube center. In the studied pressure range, the Ar(4 s) atom densities are in the order of 1016-1018 m-3, increasing towards the end of the plasma column, decreasing with the pressure. In the low pressure side, a broad minimum is found around 10Radiative Model.

  15. Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kipp, Marlin E.

    2005-10-01

    While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.

  16. Reinforcing the link between the double red clump and the X-shaped bulge of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O A; Debattista, Victor P; Alonso-García, J; Valenti, E; Minniti, D

    2015-01-01

    The finding of a double red clump in the luminosity function of the Milky Way bulge has been interpreted as evidence for an X-shaped structure. Recently, an alternative explanation has been suggested, where the double red clump is an effect of multiple stellar populations in a classical spheroid. In this letter we provide an observational assessment of this scenario and show that it is not consistent with the behaviour of the red clump across different lines of sight, particularly at high distances from the Galactic plane. Instead, we confirm that the shape of the red clump magnitude distribution closely follows the distance distribution expected for an X-shaped bulge at critical Galactic latitudes. We also emphasize some key observational properties of the bulge red clump that should not be neglected in the search for alternative scenarios.

  17. The Hi-GAL compact source catalogue - I. The physical properties of the clumps in the inner Galaxy (-71.0° < ℓ < 67.0°)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Davide; Molinari, S.; Schisano, E.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Merello, M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Moore, T. J. T.; Russeil, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Paladini, R.; Strafella, F.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J. P.; Di Giorgio, A.; Eden, D. J.; Fukui, Y.; Plume, R.; Bally, J.; Martin, P. G.; Ragan, S. E.; Jaffa, S. E.; Motte, F.; Olmi, L.; Schneider, N.; Testi, L.; Wyrowski, F.; Zavagno, A.; Calzoletti, L.; Faustini, F.; Natoli, P.; Palmeirim, P.; Piacentini, F.; Piazzo, L.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Polychroni, D.; Baldeschi, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Cesaroni, R.; García-Lario, P.; Hoare, M. G.; Huang, M.; Joncas, G.; Liu, S. J.; Maiolo, B. M. T.; Marsh, K. A.; Maruccia, Y.; Mège, P.; Peretto, N.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Schilke, P.; Thompson, M. A.; Traficante, A.; Umana, G.; Veneziani, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Arab, H.; Bandieramonte, M.; Becciani, U.; Brescia, M.; Buemi, C.; Bufano, F.; Butora, R.; Cavuoti, S.; Costa, A.; Fiorellino, E.; Hajnal, A.; Hayakawa, T.; Kacsuk, P.; Leto, P.; Li Causi, G.; Marchili, N.; Martinavarro-Armengol, S.; Mercurio, A.; Molinaro, M.; Riccio, G.; Sano, H.; Sciacca, E.; Tachihara, K.; Torii, K.; Trigilio, C.; Vitello, F.; Yamamoto, H.

    2017-10-01

    Hi-GAL (Herschel InfraRed Galactic Plane Survey) is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 μm. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogues presented in Molinari et al., covering the portion of Galactic plane -71.0° number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterize different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in protostellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to protostellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between 'on-arm' and 'interarm' positions.

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for Dust Grain Evolution in Perseus Star-forming Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan; Johnstone, D; Sadavoy, S; Hatchell, J; Mottram, J C; Kirk, H; Buckle, J; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Mowat, C; Pezzuto, S; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Rumble, D; Schneider-Bontemps, N; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2016-01-01

    The dust emissivity spectral index, $\\beta$, is a critical parameter for deriving the mass and temperature of star-forming structures, and consequently their gravitational stability. The $\\beta$ value is dependent on various dust grain properties, such as size, porosity, and surface composition, and is expected to vary as dust grains evolve. Here we present $\\beta$, dust temperature, and optical depth maps of the star-forming clumps in the Perseus Molecular Cloud determined from fitting SEDs to combined Herschel and JCMT observations in the 160 $\\mu$m, 250 $\\mu$m, 350 $\\mu$m, 500 $\\mu$m, and 850 $\\mu$m bands. Most of the derived $\\beta$, and dust temperature values fall within the ranges of 1.0 - 2.7 and 8 - 20 K, respectively. In Perseus, we find the $\\beta$ distribution differs significantly from clump to clump, indicative of grain growth. Furthermore, we also see significant, localized $\\beta$ variations within individual clumps and find low $\\beta$ regions correlate with local temperature peaks, hinting a...

  19. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using Enzo-based MHD simulations with accreting sink particles and effective resolution $2048^3$. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of $\\sim 1,600$ solar masses, along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized "core" that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which di...

  20. On the peculiar red clump morphology in the open clusters NGC 752 and NGC 7789

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, L; Carraro, G

    2000-01-01

    The red clump stars in the open cluster NGC 752 present a peculiar distribution in the colour-magnitude diagran (CMD): the clump is observed to present a faint extension, slightly to the blue of the main concentration of clump stars. We point out that a similar structure is present in the CMD of NGC 7789, and discuss their possible origins. This feature may be understood as the result of having, at the same time, stars of low-mass which undergo the helium-flash, and those just massive enough for avoiding it. The ages of both clusters are compatible with this interpretation. Similar features can be produced in theoretical models which assume a non-negligible mass spread for clump stars, of about 0.2 Mo. However, one can probably exclude that the observed effect is due to the natural mass range of core helium burning stars found in single isochrones, although present models do not present the level of detail necessary to completely explore this possibility. Also the possibility of a large age spread among clust...

  1. Unexpectedly high genetic variation in large unisexual clumps of the subdioecious plant Honckenya peploides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Vilas, Julia; Philipp, Marianne; Retuerto, Rubén

    2010-01-01

    Honckenya peploides is a subdioecious dune plant that reproduces both sexually and by clonal growth. In northwest Spain this species was found to exhibit an extreme spatial segregation of the sexes, and our objective was to investigate genetic variation in unisexual clumps. Genetic variation was ...

  2. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianghong; Nellas, Ricky B.; Byrn, Matthew W.; Russell, Matthew H.; Bible, Amber N.; Alexandre, Gladys; Shen, Tongye

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell-cell or cell-surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell-cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense.

  3. MLAOS: a multi-point linear array of optical sensors for coniferous foliage clumping index measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yonghua; Fu, Lizhe; Han, Wenchao; Zhu, Yeqing; Wang, Jindi

    2014-05-23

    The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI) by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS), which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8-10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy.

  4. MLAOS: A Multi-Point Linear Array of Optical Sensors for Coniferous Foliage Clumping Index Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Qu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS, which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8–10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy.

  5. Effects of probiotic supplementation in different energy and nutrient density diets on performance, egg quality, excreta microflora, excreta noxious gas emission, and serum cholesterol concentrations in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z F; Kim, I H

    2013-10-01

    This 6-wk study was conducted to determine the effects of probiotic (Enterococcus faecium DSM 7134) supplementation of different energy and nutrient density diets on performance, egg quality, excreta microflora, excreta noxious gas emission, and serum cholesterol concentrations in laying hens. A total of 432 Hy-Line brown layers (40 wk old) were allotted into 4 dietary treatments with 2 levels of probiotic supplementation (0 or 0.01%) and 2 levels of energy (2,700 or 2,800 kcal ME/kg) and nutrient density. Weekly feed intake, egg quality, and daily egg production were determined. Eighteen layers per treatment (2 layers/replication) were bled to determine serum cholesterol concentrations at wk 3 and 6. Excreta microbial shedding of Lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella and noxious gas emission were determined at the end of the experiment. Hens fed the high-energy and high-nutrient-density diets had less (P hens fed the diets supplemented with the probiotic had greater (P hens fed the diets without the probiotic. Dietary supplementation of the probiotic increased (P = 0.01) excreta Lactobacillus counts and decreased (P = 0.02) Escherichia coli counts compared with hens fed the diets without the probiotic. The excreta ammonia emission was decreased (P = 0.02) in hens fed the probiotic diets compared with hens fed the diets without the probiotic. Serum total cholesterol concentration was decreased (P hens with the probiotic at wk 3 and 6. Layers fed the probiotic-incorporated diets had greater (P hens fed the nonsupplemented diets at wk 6. Interactive effects (P hens.

  6. A novel method of carbon dioxide clumped isotope analysis with tunable infra-red laser direct absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Ivan; Kluge, Tobias; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    Precise clumped isotopes analysis of carbon dioxide opens up new horizons of atmospheric and biogeochemical research. Recent advances in laser and spectroscopic techniques provides us necessary instrumentation to access extremely low sub-permill variations of multiply-substituted isotopologues. We present an advanced analysis method of carbon dioxide clumped isotopes using direct absorption spectroscopy. Our assessments predict the ultimate precision of the new method on the sub-permill level comparable to state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the most auspicious intrinsic properties of this method we highlight genuine Δ16O13C18O and Δ16O13C18O measurements without isobaric interference, measurement cycle duration of several minutes versus hours for mass spectrometric analysis, reduced sample size of ˜ 10 μmol and high flexibility, allowing us to perform in-situ measurements. The pilot version of the instrument is being developed in an international collaboration framework between Heidelberg University, Germany and Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris, France. It employs two continuous interband quantum cascade lasers tuned at 4.439 μm and 4.329 μm to measure doubly ( 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O) and singly ( 16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, 16O12C17O, 16O12C18O) substituted isotopologues, respectively. Two identical Herriot cells are filled with dry pure CO2 sample and reference gas at working pressure of 1 - 10 mbar. Cells provide optical path lengths of ˜ 17 m for the laser tuned at doubly substituted isotopologues lines and use a single pass for the laser tuned at the stronger lines of singly substituted isotopologues. Light outside of the gas cells is coupled into optical fiber to avoid absorption by ambient air CO2. Simulations predict sub-permill precision at working pressure of 1 mbar and room temperature stabilised at the ±10 mK level. Our prime target is to apply the proposed method for continuous in-situ analysis of CO2. We are foreseeing potential

  7. Stability and structure of rare-gas ionic clusters using density functional methods: A study of helium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianturco, F.A.; De Lara-Castells, M.P. [Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    1996-10-05

    Several modelings of exchange and correlation forces which can be carried out using density functional theory (DFT) methods have been analyzed to study their efficiency and reliability when evaluating possible competing structures of helium ionic clusters of increasing size. This study examines He{sub n}{sup +} systems with n from 1 to 7 and compares the present calculations with earlier evaluations that used more conventional, and more computationally intensive, methods with configuration interaction (CI) approaches. The present results indicate that it is indeed possible to strike a fruitful balance between reduction of computational times and quality of the ensuing structural information. 62 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  8. Anomalous spreading of a density front from an infinite continuous source in a concentration-dependent lattice gas automaton diffusion model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuentz, M

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice gas automaton (LGA) is used for simulating concentration-dependent diffusion in a microscopically random heterogeneous structure. The heterogeneous medium is initialized at a low density rho sub 0 and then submitted to a steep concentration gradient by continuous injection of particles at a concentration rho sub 1 >rho sub 0 from a one-dimensional source to model spreading of a density front. Whereas the nonlinear diffusion equation generally used to describe concentration-dependent diffusion processes predicts a scaling law of the type phi = xt sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 in one dimension, the spreading process is shown to deviate from the expected t sup 1 sup / sup 2 scaling. The time exponent is found to be larger than 1/2, i.e. diffusion of the density front is enhanced with respect to standard Fickian diffusion. It is also established that the anomalous time exponent decreases as time elapses: anomalous spreading is thus not a timescaling process. We demonstrate that occurrence of a...

  9. Emission considering self-absorption of OH to simultaneously obtain the OH density and gas temperature: validation, non-equilibrium effects and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanjun; Nayak, Gaurav; Oinuma, Gaku; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of absolute densities of ubiquitous OH radicals and gas temperatures in water containing plasmas has recently drawn a lot of attention. In this paper, we extend the self-absorption model introduced in Du et al 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 04LT02 with a description of the excited state by a superposition of two Boltzmann distributions to take the non-thermal rotational distribution of the excited state into account. This technique is applied to a diffuse He + H2O RF discharge and it is shown that in addition to the determination of the ground state OH density and rotational temperature, the properties of the excited state OH(A) can also be simultaneously determined. A model of the steady-state distribution of the hot and cold group density of OH(A) is able to describe the dependence of the rotational population distributions of the excited state as a function of the water concentration. The method is also applied to a filamentary Ar + H2O DBD. While the non-homogeneous nature of the DBD leads to complications, the production of OH(A) by multiple production mechanisms leading to a complex nascent rotational population distribution causes the fitting procedure of the emission spectrum (with self-absorption) to break down.

  10. Carbonate clumped isotope constraints on Silurian ocean temperature and seawater δ18O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Renata C.; Finnegan, Seth; Fike, David A.; Eiler, John M.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2014-09-01

    Much of what we know about the history of Earth's climate derives from the chemistry of carbonate minerals in the sedimentary record. The oxygen isotopic compositions (δ18O) of calcitic marine fossils and cements have been widely used as a proxy for past seawater temperatures, but application of this proxy to deep geologic time is complicated by diagenetic alteration and uncertainties in the δ18O of seawater in the past. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry provides an independent estimate of the temperature of the water from which a calcite phase precipitated, and allows direct calculation of the δ18O of the water. The clumped isotope composition of calcites is also highly sensitive to recrystallization and can help diagnose different modes of diagenetic alteration, enabling evaluation of preservation states and identification of the most pristine materials from within a sample set-critical information for assessing the quality of paleoproxy data generated from carbonates. We measured the clumped isotope composition of a large suite of calcitic fossils (primarily brachiopods and corals), sedimentary grains, and cements from Silurian (ca. 433 Ma) stratigraphic sections on the island of Gotland, Sweden. Substantial variability in clumped isotope temperatures suggests differential preservation with alteration largely tied to rock-buffered diagenesis, complicating the generation of a stratigraphically resolved climate history through these sections. Despite the generally high preservation quality of samples from these sections, micro-scale observations of calcite fabric and trace metal composition using electron backscatter diffraction and electron microprobe analysis suggest that only a subset of relatively pristine samples retain primary clumped isotope signatures. These samples indicate that Silurian tropical oceans were likely warm (33 ± 7 °C) and similar in oxygen isotopic composition to that estimated for a "modern" ice-free world (δ18OVSMOW of -1.1 ± 1

  11. Influence of the gas diffusion layer on PEM fuel cell power density and cost; Einfluesse der Gasdiffusionslage auf Leistungsdichte und Kosten der PEM-Brennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerg, Kleemann

    2012-07-01

    Cost and power density form critical key criteria for the application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the automotive power train. A broad commercialization of this technology requires its cost to be lowered to a competitive level. Two major levers in this direction have been emphasized in the course of this study: The application of cheaper materials along with the optimization of areal power density of the fuel cell stack to minimize material consumption. In this regard, the gas diffusion layer takes on an important role. On the one hand, the implementation of lower cost and easy processable roll-good materials offers significant cost reduction potential. With even more relevance for the cost of the fuel cell power train, it was shown that the properties of the gas diffusion layer substantially determine the maximum areal power density of the fuel cell stack. At the beginning of this study, especially the lower cost roll-good materials showed significant drawbacks under this aspect that could not be explained by existing material data. The objective of this study was hence to generate a broader understanding of the influence of the gas diffusion layer on power density and thus cost and, on this basis, to optimize power density with the lower cost roll-goods. In a first step, it was shown that mechanical behaviour and compression state of the roll-good materials in the cell differ significantly from that of the non-rollable reference material. The development of a continuum-mechanical structural model for the gas diffusion layer material and the determination of structural material properties in specialized setups allowed the quantification of differences in mechanical behaviour by means of a finite element simulation. For the roll-good materials, an extremely low compression in the region under the flowfield channels was calculated, the compression of the flowfield landings could not be sufficiently transported into the channel zone by those materials. In a

  12. Effect of boundary conditions on the neutral gas temperatures and densities in the ITER divertor and pump duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Juliano, D. R.

    1992-12-01

    The DEGAS neutral atom transport code was used to simulate hel