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Sample records for density fusion devices

  1. Use of high current density superconducting coils in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1979-11-01

    Superconducting magnets will play an important role in fusion research in years to come. The magnets which are currently proposed for fusion research use the concept of cryostability to insure stable operation of the superconducting coils. This paper proposes the use of adiabatically stable high current density superconducting coils in some types of fusion devices. The advantages of this approach are much lower system cold mass, enhanced cryogenic safety, increased access to the plasma and lower cost

  2. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  3. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  4. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  5. Methods to enhance blanket power density in low-power fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Wessol, D.E.; Abdou, M.A.

    1982-06-01

    The overall objective of this task is to investigate the extent to which the power density in the FED breeder blanket test modules can be enhanced by artificial means. Assuming a viable approach can be developed, it will allow testing of advanced reactor blanket modules on INTOR at representative conditions. The tentative approach adopted for this task consists of three parts. First, the requirements for augmented heating of the test module are outlined for different applications of interest. Second, methods are identified which have potential for augmenting the heating power in a test module, and this list of methods is narrowed to those which appear to be most useful. Finally, these methods are examined in more detail to determine the practical benefits of employing each

  6. Fusion engineering device design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  7. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  8. Fusion engineering device design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  9. Beam dancer fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    To accomplish fusion of two or more fusion fuel elements numerous minute spots of energy or laser light are directed to a micro target area, there to be moved or danced about by a precision mechanical controlling apparatus at the source of the laser light or electromagnetic energy beams, so that merging and coinciding patterns of light or energy beams can occur around the area of the fuel atoms or ions. The projecting of these merging patterns may be considered as target searching techniques to locate responsive clusters of fuel elements and to compress such elements into a condition in which fusion may occur. Computerized programming may be used

  10. Toroidal nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yutaka; Kasahara, Tatsuo; Takizawa, Teruhiro.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To design a device so as to be formed into a large-size and to arrange ports, through which neutral particles enter, in inclined fashion. Structure: Toroidal coils are wound about vacuum vessels which are divided into plural number. In the outer periphery of the vacuum vessels, ports are disposed inclined in the peripheral direction of the vacuum vessels and communicated with the vacuum vessels, and wall surfaces opposed to the ports of the toroidal coils adjacent at least the inclined sides of the ports are inclined substantially simularly to the port wall surfaces. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Plasma Surface interaction in Controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The subjects presented in the 9th conference on plasma surface interaction in controlled fusion devices were: the modifications of power scrape-off-length and power deposition during various configurations in Tore Supra plasmas; the effects observed in ergodic divertor experiments in Tore-Supra; the diffuse connexion induced by the ergodic divertor and the topology of the heat load patterns on the plasma facing components in Tore-Supra; the study of the influence of air exposure on graphite implanted by low energy high density deuterium plasma

  12. ICRF Traveling Wave launcher for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragona, R

    2017-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive is a method that has the ability to heat directly the ions in the Deuterium-Tritrium fuel to the high temperature needed for the fusion reaction to works. The capability of efficiently couple the Radio Frequency power to the plasma plays a big role in the overall performance of a fusion device. A Traveling Wave Antenna in a resonant ring configuration is a good candidate for an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive system. It has the capability to increase the coupled power with respect to present designs and to have a highly selective power spectrum that can be peaked around the maximally absorbed wave. It is also insensitive to the loading variations due to fluctuation of the plasma edge increasing the reliability and the efficiency of the system. It works as a low power density launcher due to the possible large number of current carrying elements. (paper)

  13. Nuclear fusion power supply device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Satoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To use a hybrid power supply device, which comprises a thyristor power supply and a diode power supply, to decrease cost of a nuclear fusion power supply device. Structure: The device comprises a thyristor power supply connected through a closing unit and a diode power supply connected in parallel through a breaker, input of each power supply being applied with an output voltage of a flywheel AC generator. When a current transformer is excited, a disconnecting switch is turned on to close the diode power supply and a current of the current transformer is increased by an automatic voltage regulator to a set value within a predetermined period of time. Next, the current is cut off by a breaker, and when the breaker is in on position, the disconnecting switch is opened to turn on the closing unit. Thus, when a plasma electric current reaches a predetermined value, the breaker is turned on, and the current of the current transformer is controlled by the thyristor power supply. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Electromagnetic computations for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1989-09-01

    Among the difficulties in making nuclear fusion a useful energy source, two important ones are producing the magnetic fields needed to drive and confine the plasma, and controlling the eddy currents induced in electrically conducting components by changing fields. All over the world, researchers are developing electromagnetic codes and employing them to compute electromagnetic effects. Ferromagnetic components of a fusion reactor introduce field distortions. Eddy currents are induced in the vacuum vessel, blanket and other torus components of a tokamak when the plasma current disrupts. These eddy currents lead to large forces, and 3-D codes are being developed to study the currents and forces. 35 refs., 6 figs

  15. Maximum neutron yeidls in experimental fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1979-02-01

    The optimal performances of 12 types of fusion devices are compared with regard to neutron production rate, neutrons per pulse, and fusion energy multiplication, Q/sub p/ (converted to the equivalent value in D-T operation). The record values in all categories are held by the beam-injected tokamak plasma, followed by other beam-target systems. The achieved values of Q/sub p/ for nearly all laboratory plasma fusion devices (magnetically or inertially confined) are found to roughly satisfy a common empirical scaling, Q/sub p/ approx. 10 -6 E/sub in//sup 3/2/, where E/sub in/ is the energy (in kilojoules) injected into the plasma during one or two energy confinement times, or the total energy delivered to the target for inertially confined systems. Fusion energy break-even (Q/sub p/ = 1) in any system apparently requires E/sub in/ approx. 10,000 kJ

  16. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume II. Design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This volume summarizes the design of the FED. It includes a description of the major systems and subsystems, the supporting plasma design analysis, a projected device cost and associated construction schedule, and a description of the facilities to house and support the device. This effort represents the culmination of the FY81 studies conducted at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). Unique in these design activities has been the collaborative involvement of the Design Center personnel and numerous resource physicists from the fusion community who have made significant contributions in the physics design analysis as well as the physics support of the engineering design of the major FED systems and components

  17. Open-ended fusion devices and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, T.; Nariai, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies on fusion reactors based upon open-ended confinement schemes, such as the tandem mirror and rf plugged cusp, have been carried out in Japan. These studies may be classified into two categories: near-term devices (Fusion Engineering Test Facility), and long-term fusion power recators. In the first category, a two-component cusp neutron source was proposed. In the second category, the GAMMA-R, a tandem-mirror power reactor, and the RFC-R, an axisymetric mirror and cusp, reactor studies are being conducted at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of Plasma Physics. Mirror Fusion Engineering Facility parameters and a schematic are shown. The GAMMA-R central-cell design schematic is also shown

  18. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France

  19. Tokamak devices: towards controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Tokamak family is from Soviet Union. These devices were exclusively studied at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow for more than ten years. The first occidental Tokamak started in 1970 at Princeton. The TFR (Tokamak Fontenay-aux-Roses) was built to be superior to the Russian T4. Tokamak future is now represented by the JET (Joint European Tokamak) [fr

  20. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L.

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak

  1. Data-Acquisition Systems for Fusion Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, P. C.; Oomens, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    During the last two decades, computerized data acquisition systems (DASs) have been applied at magnetic confinement fusion devices. Present-day data acquisition is done by means of distributed computer systems and transient recorders in CAMAC systems. The development of DASs has been technology

  2. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  3. Philosophy and physics of predemonstration fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A PDFD will operate in the 1980's and must provide the plasma and plasma support technology information necessary to warrant design, construction, and operation of succeeding experimental power reactors and then the demonstration plant. The PDFD must be prototypical of economic fusion devices to justify its cost. Therefore, development of the fusion core will be the focus of the PDFD. The physics performance, power production objectives, and characteristics of the PDFD, and their relationship to the research and development needs to achieve them are outlined. The design criteria for a PDFD which satisfied these constraints will be established

  4. Development of superconducting equipment for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Masayuki; Ueda, Toshio; Hiue, Hisaaki; Ohgushi, Kouzou

    1993-01-01

    At Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., the development of superconductivity was started from 1960, and superconducting equipment for fusion device has been developed for ten years. The superconducting equipment, which is developed for fusion by Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., are able to be grouped in three categories which are current lead, superconducting coil and superconducting bus-line. The current lead is an electrical feeder between a superconducting coil and an electrical power supply. The rated current of developed current lead is 30kA at continuous use and 100kA at short time use respectively. The advanced disk type coil is developed for the toroidal field coil and some coils are developed for critical current measurement. Superconductor is applied to the superconducting bus-line between the superconducting coils and the current leads, and the bus-line is being developed for the Large Helical Device. This report describes an abstract of these equipment. (author)

  5. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  6. High-density-plasma diagnostics in magnetic-confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahoda, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The lectures will begin by defining high density in the context of magnetic confinement fusion research and listing some alternative reactor concepts, ranging from n/sub e/ approx. 2 x 10 14 cm -3 to several orders of magnitude greater, that offer potential advantages over the main-line, n/sub e/ approx. 1 x 10 14 cm -3 , Tokamak reactor designs. The high density scalings of several major diagnostic techniques, some favorable and some disadvantageous, will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to interferometric methods, both electronic and photographic, for which integral n/sub e/dl measurements and associated techniques are accessible with low wavelength lasers. Reactor relevant experience from higher density, smaller dimension devices exists. High density implies high β, which implies economies of scale. The specialized features of high β diagnostics will be discussed

  7. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub α/ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra

  8. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra.

  9. Pressure measurements in magnetic-fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1981-11-01

    Accurate pressure measurements are important in magnetic fusion devices for: (1) plasma diagnostic measurements of particle balance and ion temperature; (2) discharge cleaning optimization; (3) vacuum system performance; and (4) tritium accountability. This paper reviews the application, required accuracy, and suitable instrumentation for these measurements. Demonstrated uses of ionization-type and capacitance-diaphragm gauges for various pressure and gas-flow measurements in tokamaks are presented, with specific reference to the effects of magnetic fields on gauge performance and the problems associated with gauge calibration

  10. Protector in a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Yamane, Katsumi; Niwa, Sadahiko; Ogata, Fumio; Masuda, Jun-ichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To block an abnormal voltage, which shifts from plasma to coil or power supply by means of action of mutual induction, by a circuit utilizing non-linear impedance elements. Structure: The nuclear fusion device includes a current transformer coil, a vertical field coil and a plasma circuit, with a non-linear impedance element disposed in parallel with at least the current transformer coil, said impedance element being disposed in parallel with a short-circuiting switch, relative to the abnormal voltage moving from the plasma by means of action of mutual induction. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Pressure measurements in magnetic-fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1981-11-01

    Accurate pressure measurements are important in magnetic fusion devices for: (1) plasma diagnostic measurements of particle balance and ion temperature; (2) discharge cleaning optimization; (3) vacuum system performance; and (4) tritium accountability. This paper reviews the application, required accuracy, and suitable instrumentation for these measurements. Demonstrated uses of ionization-type and capacitance-diaphragm gauges for various pressure and gas-flow measurements in tokamaks are presented, with specific reference to the effects of magnetic fields on gauge performance and the problems associated with gauge calibration.

  12. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  13. Eddy current analysis in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1988-06-01

    In magnetic fusion devices, particularly tokamaks and reversed field pinch (RFP) experiments, time-varying magnetic fields are in intimate contact with electrically conducting components of the device. Induced currents, fields, forces, and torques result. This note reviews the analysis of eddy current effects in the following systems: Interaction of a tokamak plasma with the eddy currents in the first wall, blanket, and shield (FWBS) systems; Eddy currents in a complex but two-dimensional vacuum vessel, as in TFTR, JET, and JT-60; Eddy currents in the FWBS system of a tokamak reactor, such as NET, FER, or ITER; and Eddy currents in a RFP shell. The cited studies are chosen to be illustrative, rather than exhaustive. 42 refs

  14. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Wang, Ning; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen; Zhao Enguang

    2006-01-01

    The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied

  15. Dispersion interferometer for controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drachev, V.P.; Krasnikov, Yu.I.; Bagryansky, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    A common feature in interferometry is the presence of two independent optical channels. Since wave phase in a medium depends on the geometrical path, polarization and radiation frequency, respectively, one can distinguish three types of interferometric schemes when the channels are geometrically separated, or separation occurs in polarizations or radiation frequencies. We have developed a measurement scheme based on a dispersion interferometer (DI) for plasma diagnostics in the experiments on controlled fusion. DI optical channels have the same geometrical path and are separated in radiation frequency. Use of a common optical path causes the main advantage of the DI technique - low sensitivity to vibrations of optical elements. The use of the DI technique for diagnostics of a laser spark in air and of arc discharges has shown its essential advantages as compared to classical interferometers. Interest in the DI technique from the viewpoint of its application in controlled fusion devices is determined also generated by the possibility of developing a compact multichannel interferometer not requiring a vibration isolation structure. (author) 14 refs., 3 figs

  16. Data acquisition systems for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Haren, P.C.; Oomens, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    During the last two decades, computerized data acquisition systems (DASs) have been applied at magnetic confinement fusion devices. Present-day data acquisition is done by means of distributed computer systems and transient recorders in CAMAC systems. The development of DASs has been technology driven; the emphasis has been on the development of computer hardware and system software. For future DASs, challenging problems are to be solved: The DASs have to be better optimized with respect to the needs of the users. Existing bottlenecks, such as CAMAC-computer coupling or pulse file merging, need to be eliminated. Continuous or long-pulse operation will require the introduction of event abstraction in DAS design. 59 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Vacuum vessel for a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Sato, Hiroshi; Owada, Koro.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a reinforcing member on a bellows portion to reduce a stress at the bellows portion thereby increasing the strength of a vessel. Structure: A vacuum vessel for a nuclear fusion device has a bellows portion and a wall thick portion. A support extended toward the bellows portion is secured inside of a toroidal section in order to reduce the stress at the bellows portion. An insulator is interposed between the support and the bellows portion and is retained on the support by a bolt. Since the stress may be reduced by the support, the wall thick of the bellows portion may be decreased to sufficiently secure the low electric resistance value. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. Coil supporting device in a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hirohisa; Sasaki, Katsutoki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To slide a vacuum vessel in the nuclear fusion device and a coil within the vacuum vessel and to mount the coil within the vacuum vessel in a manner that it may not be moved by an electromagnetic force, thereby preventing stress from being produced in the coil. Structure: A coil supporting plate mounted at upper and lower parts prevents damage to an insulation of the coil, said coil being held in a U-shaped groove, and can be moved integral with the coil by the action of a roller bearing with a plurality of needle-like rollers arranged in parallel. The coil supporting plate has a plurality of projections disposed on the lower surface thereof, and flat springs are placed in the projections one over another so that the spring action exerted in the lower plate causes the coil to be resiliently bias in a direction of an electromagnetic force applied thereto and to support the coil. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Plasma Photonic Devices for High Energy Density Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, R.

    2005-01-01

    High power laser technologies are opening a variety of attractive fields of science and technology using high energy density plasmas such as plasma physics, laboratory astrophysics, material science, nuclear science including medical applications and laser fusion. The critical issues in the applications are attributed to the control of intense light and enormous density of charged particles including efficient generation of the particles such as MeV electrons and protons with a current density of TA/cm2. Now these application possibilities are limited only by the laser technology. These applications have been limited in the control of the high power laser technologies and their optics. However, if we have another device consisted of the 4th material, i.e. plasma, we will obtain a higher energy density condition and explore the application possibilities, which could be called high energy plasma device. One of the most attractive devices has been demonstrated in the fast ignition scheme of the laser fusion, which is cone-guiding of ultra-intense laser light in to high density regions1. This is one of the applications of the plasma device to control the ultra-intense laser light. The other role of the devices consisted of transient plasmas is control of enormous energy-density particles in a fashion analogous to light control with a conventional optical device. A plasma fibre (5?m/1mm), as one example of the devices, has guided and deflected the high-density MeV electrons generated by ultra-intense laser light 2. The electrons have been well collimated with either a lens-like plasma device or a fibre-like plasma, resulting in isochoric heating and creation of ultra-high pressures such as Giga bar with an order of 100J. Plasmas would be uniquely a device to easily control the higher energy density particles like a conventional optical device as well as the ultra-intense laser light, which could be called plasma photonic device. (Author)

  20. Neutronic analysis of fusion tokamak devices by PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Takiyoshi, Kouji; Amano, Toshio; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Okuno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    A complete 3D neutronic analysis by PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) has been performed for fusion tokamak devices such as JT-60U device and JT-60 Superconducting tokamak device (JT-60 Super Advanced). The mono-energetic neutrons (E n =2.45 MeV) of the DD fusion devices are used for the neutron source in the analysis. The visual neutron flux distribution for the estimation of the port streaming and the dose rate around the fusion tokamak devices has been calculated by the PHITS. The PHITS analysis makes it clear that the effect of the port streaming of superconducting fusion tokamak device with the cryostat is crucial and the calculated neutron spectrum results by PHITS agree with the MCNP-4C2 results. (author)

  1. Theory of high density laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.B.; Nuckolls, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A basic laser fusion scheme is presented. Some of its subtleties are described and the theoretical difficulties which now appear to be the major obstacles are considered. Interpretations of some recent laser compression experiments are given. (U.S.)

  2. Magnetic field coil in nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Takano, Hirohisa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide an electrical-insulatively stabilized magnetic field coil in nuclear fusion device, restraining an increase in voltage when plasma current is rapidly changed. Structure: A magnetic field coil comprises coils arranged coaxial with respective vacuum vessels, said coils being wound in positive and reverse polarities so as to form a vertical magnetic field within the plasma. The coils of the positive polarity are arranged along the vacuum vessel inside of an axis vertical in section of the annular plasma and are arranged symmetrically up and down of a horizontal axis. On the other hand, the coils of the reverse polarity are arranged along the vacuum vessel outside of a vertical axis and arranged symmetrically up and down of the horizontal axis. These positive and reverse polarity coils are alternately connected in series, and lead portions of the coils are connected to a power source by means of connecting wires. In this case, lead positions of the coils are arranged in one direction, and the connecting wires are disposed in closely contact relation to offset magnetic fields formed by the connecting wires each other. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Device for measuring fission product density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Mitsunori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the fission product density of xenon or the like and enable measurement of real time of fission product density in a reactor by calculating the disintegration and annihilation of the fission product on the basis of neutron detected output. Constitution: The neutron flux in a reactor is detected by a detector, and applied to first and second density calculators. Second fission product density signal of xenon or the like outputted from first device is again inputted to the device to form an annihilation signal due to disintegration to determine the present density of the second fission product of xenon or the like corresponding to the decrease of the neutron due to the poison of xeron or the like. Similarly, second device determines the first fission product density of iodine or the like. (Sekiya, K.)

  4. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume 1. Mission and program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This volume presents, in summary form, a recommended approach to implementing the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980. These recommendations constitute the findings of the FED Technical Management Board (TMB). The TMB and the affiliated technical managers gave particular scrutiny to elucidating the role of FED in fusion development and to defining the device mission

  5. Erosion and redeposition at the vessel walls in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naujoks, D.; Behrisch, R.

    1995-01-01

    The plasma induced erosion and redeposition at the vessel walls in today's fusion devices have been investigated both with the computer simulation code ERO, and in experiments. Well prepared carbon probes with implanted and evaporated markers in the surface layers have been exposed in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of several tokamaks such as JET, TEXTOR and ASDEX-Upgrade. The main plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, impurity concentration in the SOL) are simultaneously determined. After exposure to single plasma discharges, erosion and redeposition of the marker material were measured by surface layer analysis with MeV ion beam techniques. The experimental results were compared with the results from the ERO code. The measured erosion/redeposition could be described with ERO, which takes into account the impurity concentration in the SOL, the dynamical change of the surface composition (causing a modification of the sputtering yield during the exposure) and ExB drift effects. ((orig.))

  6. Health physics appraisal guidelines for fusion/confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeson, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of fusion/confinement devices have been developed for a variety of research applications. The health physics considerations for these devices can vary, depending on a number of parameters. This paper presents guidelines for health physics appraisal of such devices, which can be tailored to apply to specific systems. The guidelines can also be useful for establishing ongoing health physics programs for safe operation of the devices

  7. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd [Centre of Photonics and Advance Material, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  8. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd

    2015-01-01

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices

  9. High density linear systems for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.R.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The physics and technological limitations and uncertainties associated with the linear theta pinch are discussed in terms of a generalized energy balance, which has as its basis the ratio (Q/sub E/) of total electrical energy generated to net electrical energy consumed. Included in this total is the virtual energy of bred fissile fuel, if a hybrid blanket is used, as well as the actual of real energy deposited in the blanket by the fusion neutron. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed operation demanded by the linear theta pinch are also discussed

  10. Process and device for energy production from thermonuclear fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussard, R.W.; Coppi, Bruno.

    1977-01-01

    An energy generating system is described using a fusion reaction. It includes several contrivances for confining a plasma in an area, a protective device around a significant part of each of these confinement contrivances, an appliance for introducing a fusion reaction fuel in each of the confinements so that the plasma may be formed. Each confinement can be separated from the protective device so that it may be replaced by another. The system is connected to the confinements, to the protective devices or to both. It enables the thermal energy to be extracted and transformed into another form, electric, mechanical or both [fr

  11. Particle and impurity control in toroidal fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A review of working particle and impurity control techniques used in and proposed for magnetic fusion devices is presented. The requirements of both present-day machines and envisaged fusion reactors are considered. The various techniques which have been proposed are characterized by whether they affect sources, sinks, or fluxes; in many cases a particular method or device can appear in more than one category. Examples are drawn from published results. The solutions proposed for the large devices which will be operating during the next 5 years are discussed

  12. Three equipment concepts for the Fusion Engineering Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Masson, L.S.; Watts, K.D.; Grant, N.R.; Kuban, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Maintenance equipment which is needed to remotely handle fusion device components is being conceptually developed for the Fusion Engineering Design Center. This will test the assumption that these equipment needs can be satisfied by present technology. In addition, the development of equipment conceptual designs will allow for cost estimates which have a much higher degree of certainty. Accurate equipment costs will be useful for assessments which trade off gains in availability as a function of increased investments in maintenance equipment

  13. Database for fusion devices and associated fuel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolgar, P.W.

    1983-03-01

    A computerized database storage and retrieval system has been set up for fusion devices and the associated fusion fuel systems which should be a useful tool for the CFFTP program and other users. The features of the Wang 'Alliance' system are discussed for this application, as well as some of the limitations of the system. Recommendations are made on the operation, upkeep and further development that should take place to implement and maintain the system

  14. Laser fusion and high energy density science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2005-01-01

    High-power laser technology is now opening a variety of new fields of science and technology using laser-produced plasmas. The laser plasma is now recognized as one of the important tools for the investigation and application of matter under extreme conditions, which is called high energy density science. This chapter shows a variety of applications of laser-produced plasmas as high energy density science. One of the more attractive industrial and science applications is the generation of intense pulse-radiation sources, such as the generation of electro-magnetic waves in the ranges of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) to gamma rays and laser acceleration of charged particles. The laser plasma is used as an energy converter in this regime. The fundamental science applications of high energy density physics are shown by introducing laboratory astrophysics, the equation of state of high pressure matter, including warm dense matter and nuclear science. Other applications are also presented, such as femto-second laser propulsion and light guiding. Finally, a new systematization is proposed to explore the possibility of the high energy density plasma application, which is called high energy plasma photonics''. This is also exploration of the boundary regions between laser technology and beam optics based on plasma physics. (author)

  15. Helical-type device and laser fusion. Rivals for tokamak-type device at n-fusion development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Under the current policy on the research and development of nuclear fusion in Japan, as enunciated by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, the type of a prototype fusion reactor will be chosen after 2020 from tokamak, helical or some other type including the inertial confinement fusion using lasers. A prototype fusion reactor is the next step following the tokamak type International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). With the prototype reactor, the feasibility as a power plant will be examined. At present the main research and development of nuclear fusion in Japan are on tokamak type, which have been promoted by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). As for the other types of nuclear fusion, researches have been carried out on the helical type in Kyoto University and National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), the mirror type in Tsukuba University, the tokamak type using superconductive coils in Kyushu University, and the laser fusion in Osaka University. The features and the present state of research and development of the Large Helical Device and the laser fusion which is one step away from the break-even condition are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Institute for Fusion Research and Large Helical Device program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, Atsuo

    1989-01-01

    In the research on nuclear fusion, the final objective is to materialize nuclear fusion reactors, and for the purpose, it is necessary to cause nuclear combustion by making the plasma of higher than 100 million deg and confine it for a certain time. So far in various universities, the researches on diversified fusion processes have been advanced, but in February, 1986, the Science Council issued the report 'Nuclear fusion research in universities hereafter'. As the next large scale device, an external conductor system helical device was decided, and it is desirable to found the organization for joint utilization by national universities to promote the project. The researches on the other processes are continued by utilizing the existing facilitie. The reason of selecting a helical device is the data base of the researches carried out so far can be utilized sufficiently, it is sufficiently novel even after 10 years from now, and many researchers can be collected. The place of the research is Toki City, Gifu Prefecture, where the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, is to be moved. The basic concept of the superconducting helical device project, the trend of nuclear fusion development in the world, the physical research using a helical system and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Coil for a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadotani, Kenzo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a thin nuclear fusion coil having good thermal insulation and insulating properties in which mica and glass materials are wound round conductors subjected to varnish treatment and hardened, which is then sealed into a metallic case along with negative gases of more than two atmospheric pressures. Structure: A plurality of conductors impregnated with varnish are hardened by a rare insulating layer, after which it is coated with a layer of mica not impregnated with varnish and a layer of glass substance and is then received into a metallic case and filled under pressure with negative gases at a pressure more than two atmospheric pressures. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Initial trade and design studies for the fusion engineering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), initiated a program of trade and design studies in October 1980 to support the selection of the FED concept. This document presents the results of these initial trade and design studies. Based on these results, a baseline configuration has been identified and the Design Center effort for the remainder of the fiscal year will be devoted to the development of a self-consistent FED design description

  19. Local wall power loading variations in thermonuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    A 2 1/2-dimensional geometric model is presented that allows calculation of power loadings at various points on the first wall of a thermonuclear fusion device. Given average wall power loadings for brems-strahlung, cyclotron radiation charged particles, and neutrons, which are determined from various plasma-physics computation models, local wall heat loads are calculated by partitioning the plasma volume and surface into cells and superimposing the heating effects of the individual cells on selected first-wall differential areas. Heat loads from the entire plasma are thus determined as a function of position on the first-wall surface. Significant differences in local power loadings were found for most fusion designs, and it was therefore concluded that the effect of local power loading variations must be taken into account when calculating temperatures and heat transfer rates in fusion device first walls

  20. Protective coatings for in-vessel fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossa, F.

    1984-01-01

    Coatings of Al/Si, SAP (Sintered Aluminium Powder), Al 2 O 3 , TiC (low-Z material) and Ta have been developed for in-vessel component protection. Anodic oxidation, vapor depositions, reactive sputtering, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and plasma spray have been the coating formation methods studied. AISI 316, 310, 304, Inconel 600 and Mo were adopted as base materials. the coatings were characterized in terms of composition, structure and connection with the supporting material. The behavior of coatings under H + , D + and He + irradiation in the energy range 100 eV-8 keV was tested and compared to the solid massive samples. TiC and Ta coatings were tested with thermal shock under power density pulses of 1 kW/cm 2 generated by an electron beam gun. Temperature-dependence of the erosion of TiC by vacuum arcs in a magnetic field was also studied. TiC coatings have low sputtering values, good resistance to arcing and a high chemical stability. TiC and Ta, CVD and plasma spray coatings are thermal-shock resistant. High thermal loads produce cracks but no spalling. Destruction occurred only after melting of the base material. The plasma spray coating method seems to be most appropriate for developing remote handling applications in fusion devices. (orig.)

  1. Diagnostics Development towards Steady State Operation in Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burhenn, R.; Baldzuhn, J.; Dreier, H.; Endler, M.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hildebrandt, D.; Hirsch, M.; Koenig, R.; Kornejev, P.; Krychowiak, M.; Laqua, H.P.; Laux, M.; Oosterbeek, J.W.; Pasch, E.; Schneider, W.; Thomsen, H.; Weller, A.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R.; Zhang, D. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Biel, W. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is being presently under construction and is already equipped with superconducting coil systems and principally is capable of quasi-continuous operation. However, W7-X is faced with new enhanced technical requirements which have to be met by plasma facing components as well as the diagnostic systems in general. Depending on the available heating power, the continuous heat flux to plasma facing components during long pulse operation might lead to unacceptable local thermal overload and necessitates sufficient but often complicate active cooling precautions. Fusion devices with electron cyclotron frequency heating (ECRH) are concerned with significant stray radiation, depending on the chosen heating scheme and the plasma parameters. The required shielding is often not compatible with optimal UHV-consistent design and high intensity throughput. For machine safety, diagnostics are required which are able to identify enhanced plasma wall interaction on a fast time scale in order to prevent damage in time. For W7-X, video camera systems covering most of the inner wall, fast IR-camera systems with coating-resistant pinhole-optics for the observation of the divertor surface temperature and spectrometers with large spectral survey covering relevant spectral lines of all intrinsic impurities with sufficient spectral resolution and sensitivity are necessary. In combination with energy integrating but spatially resolving diagnostics like bolometers and soft-X cameras slow impurity accumulation phenomena on a time scale much larger than flat-top times typically achieved in short-pulse operation can be identified and a radiative plasma collapse possibly be avoided by counteractive measures. Longer port dimensions due to thermal insulation of the cryogenic coil system and high density operation with strong density gradients necessitate the choice of shorter wavelengths for interferometer laser beams. This complicates the avoidance of fringe

  2. Characterization of the Plasma Edge for Technique of Atomic Helium Beam in the CIEMAT Fusion Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, the measurement of Electron Temperature and Density in the Boundary Plasma of TJ-II with a Supersonic Helium Beam Diagnostic and work devoted to the upgrading of this technique are described. Also, simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. This last technique is now being installed in the CIEMAT fusion device. (Author )

  3. Interfacing between concrete and steel construction and fusion research devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willoughby, E.

    1981-01-01

    In 1976 Giffels Associates, Inc. an architect/engineer organization, was retained by the United States Department of Energy to provide Title I and Title II design services and Title III construction inspection services for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor now being installed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey. Construction of the complex required to house and serve the reactor itself, designed by others, now commencing. During building construction several problems occurred with respect to the interface between the building design, construction and the fusion device (reactor). A brief description of some of these problems and related factors is presented, which may be of benefit to those persons active in continuing fusion research and experimental work

  4. Aggregation and fusion of modified low density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentikäinen, M O; Lehtonen, E M; Kovanen, P T

    1996-12-01

    In atherogenesis, low density lipoprotein (LDL, diameter 22 nm) accumulates in the extracellular space of the arterial intima in the form of aggregates of lipid droplets (droplet diameter up to 400 nm). Here we studied the effects of various established in vitro LDL modifications on LDL aggregation and fusion. LDL was subjected to vortexing, oxidation by copper ions, proteolysis by alpha-chymotrypsin, lipolysis by sphingomyelinase, and nonenzymatic glycosylation, and was induced to form adducts with malondialdehyde or complexes with anti-apoB-100 antibodies. To assess the amount of enlarged LDL-derived structures formed (due to aggregation or fusion), we measured the turbidity of solutions containing modified LDL, and quantified the proportion of modified LDL that 1) sedimented at low-speed centrifugation (14,000 g), 2) floated at an increased rate at high-speed centrifugation (rate zonal flotation at 285,000 gmax), 3) were excluded in size-exclusion column chromatography (exclusion limit 40 MDa), or 4) failed to enter into 0.5%. Fast Lane agarose gel during electrophoresis. To detect whether particle fusion had contributed to the formation of the enlarged LDL-derived structures, particle morphology was examined using negative staining and thin-section transmission electron microscopy. We found that 1) aggregation was induced by the formation of LDL-antibody complexes, malondialdehyde treatment, and glycosylation of LDL; 2) fusion of LDL was induced by proteolysis of LDL by alpha-chymotrypsin; and 3) aggregation and fusion of LDL were induced by vortexing, oxidation by copper ions, and lipolysis by sphingomyclinase of LDL. The various modifications of LDL differed in their ability to induce aggregation and fusion.

  5. Progress of research and development of nuclear fusion and development of large nuclear fusion device technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the last several years, the results of tokamak experiments were conspicuous, and the progress of plasma confinement performance, transport mechanism, divertors and impurities, helium transport and exhaust, electric current drive, magnetic field ripple effect and high speed particle transport and DT experiment are reported. The other confinement methods than tokamak, the related theories and reactor technology are described. The conceptual design of ITER was carried out by the cooperation of Japan, USA, EC and the former USSR. The projects of developing nuclear fusion in various countries, the design and the required research and development of ITER, the reconstruction and the required research and development of JT-60, JET and TFTR, the design and the required research and development of large helical device, the state of research and development of laser nuclear fusion and inversion magnetic field pinch nuclear fusion, the activities and roles of industrial circles in large nuclear fusion device technology, and the long term perspective of the technical development of nuclear fusion are described. (K.I.)

  6. High density, high magnetic field concepts for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    One rather discouraging feature of our conventional approaches to fusion energy is that they do not appear to lend themselves to a small reactor for developmental purposes. This is in contrast with the normal evolution of a new technology which typically proceeds to a full scale commercial plant via a set of graduated steps. Accordingly' several concepts concerned with dense plasma fusion systems are being studied theoretically and experimentally. A common aspect is that they employ: (a) high to very high plasma densities (∼10 16 cm -3 to ∼10 26 cm -3 ) and (b) magnetic fields. If they could be shown to be viable at high fusion Q, they could conceivably lead to compact and inexpensive commercial reactors. At least, their compactness suggests that both proof of principle experiments and development costs will be relatively inexpensive compared with the present conventional approaches. In this paper, the following concepts are considered: (1) The staged Z-pinch, (2) Liner implosion of closed-field-line configurations, (3) Magnetic ''fast'' ignition of inertial fusion targets, (4) The continuous flow Z-pinch

  7. Numerical Experiments Providing New Insights into Plasma Focus Fusion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent extensive and systematic numerical experiments have uncovered new insights into plasma focus fusion devices including the following: (1 a plasma current limitation effect, as device static inductance is reduced towards very small values; (2 scaling laws of neutron yield and soft x-ray yield as functions of storage energies and currents; (3 a global scaling law for neutron yield as a function of storage energy combining experimental and numerical data showing that scaling deterioration has probably been interpreted as neutron ‘saturation’; and (4 a fundamental cause of neutron ‘saturation’. The ground-breaking insights thus gained may completely change the directions of plasma focus fusion research.

  8. Properties of plasma sheath with ion temperature in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyuan; Wang Feng; Sun Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    The plasma sheath properties in a strong magnetic field are investigated in this work using a steady state two-fluid model. The motion of ions is affected heavily by the strong magnetic field in fusion devices; meanwhile, the effect of ion temperature cannot be neglected for the plasma in such devices. A criterion for the plasma sheath in a strong magnetic field, which differs from the well-known Bohm criterion for low temperature plasma sheath, is established theoretically with a fluid model. The fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures, plasma densities, and magnetic field strengths.

  9. Safety considerations in the design of the fusion engineering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Safety considerations play a significant role in the design of a near-term Fusion Engineering Device (FED). For the safety of the general public and the plant workers, the radiation environment caused by the reacting plasma and the potential release of tritium fuel are the dominant considerations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and guidelines for radiation protection have been reviewed and are being applied to the device design. Direct radiation protection is provided by the device shield and the reactor building walls. Radiation from the activated device components and the tritium fuel is to be controlled with shielding, contamination control, and ventilation. The potential release of tritium from the plant has influenced the selection of reactor building and plant designs and specifications. The safety of the plant workers is affected primarily by the radiation from the activated device components and from plasma chamber debris. The highly activated device components make it necessary to design many of the maintenance activities in the reactor building for totally remote operation. The hot cell facility has evolved as a totally remote maintenance facility due to the high radiation levels of the device components. Safety considerations have had substantial impacts on the design of FED. Several examples of safety-related design impacts are discussed in the paper. Feasible solutions have been identified for all outstanding safety-related items, and additional optimization of these solutions is anticipated in future design studies

  10. Development of new low activation aluminum alloys for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kohji; Kakihana, Hidetake.

    1985-01-01

    As the materials for the R facility (a tokamak nuclear fusion device in the R project intended for D-T burning) in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, Al-4 % Mg-0.2 % Bi (5083 improved type) and Al-4 % Mg-1 % Li, aimed at low radioactivability, high electric resistance and high strength, have been developed. The results of the nuclear properties evaluation with 14 MeV neutrons and of the measurements of electric resistance and mechanical properties were satisfactory. The possibility of producing large Al-4 % Mg-1 % Li plate (1 m x 2 m x 25 mm) in the existing factory was confirmed, with the properties retained. The electric resistances were higher than those in the conventional aluminum alloys, and still with feasibility for the further improvement. General properties of the fusion aluminum alloys and the 26 Al formation in (n, 2n) reaction were studied. (Mori, K.)

  11. Overview of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Flanagan, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The device has a major radius of 5.0 m with a plasma minor radius of 1.3 m elongated by 1.6. Capability is provided for operating the toroidal field coils up to 10 T, but the bulk of the operations are designed for 8 T. At 8-T conditions the fusion power is approx. 180 MW (neutron wall loading approx. 0.4 MW/m 2 ) and a plasma Q of approx. 5 is expected. At 10-T conditions, which are expected to be limited to about 10% of the total operations, the fusion power is approx. 450 MW (approx. 1.0 MW/m 2 ) and ignition is expected

  12. Overview of the fusion engineering device (FED) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Flanagan, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    The device has a major radius of 5.0 m with a plasma minor radius of 1.3 m elongated by 1.6. Capability is provided for operating the toroidal field coils up to 10 T, but the bulk of the operations are designed for 8 T. At 8-T conditions, the fusion power is approx. 180 MW (neutron wall loading approx. 0.4 MW/m 2 ) and a plasma Q of approx. 5 is expected. At 10-T conditions, which are expected to be limited to about 10% of the total operations, the fusion power is approx. 450 MW (approx. 1.0 MW/m 2 ) and ignition is expected

  13. Railgun pellet injection system for fusion experimental devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Adv. Tech. Dev. Dept.; Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Adv. Tech. Dev. Dept.; Azuma, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Adv. Tech. Dev. Dept.; Satake, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Adv. Tech. Dev. Dept.; Kasai, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun 319-11 (Japan); Hasegawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun 319-11 (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    A railgun pellet injection system has been developed for fusion experimental devices. Using a low electric energy railgun system, hydrogen pellet acceleration tests have been conducted to investigate the application of the electromagnetic railgun system for high speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. In the system, the pellet is pre-accelerated before railgun acceleration. A laser beam is used to induce plasma armature. The ignited plasma armature is accelerated by an electromagnetic force that accelerates the pellet. Under the same operational conditions, the energy conversion coefficient for the dummy pellets was around 0.4%, while that for the hydrogen pellets was around 0.12%. The highest hydrogen pellet velocity was 1.4 km s{sup -1} using a 1 m long railgun. Based on the findings, it is estimated that the hydrogen pellet has the potential to be accelerated to 5 km s{sup -1} using a 3 m long railgun. (orig.).

  14. Railgun pellet injection system for fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Hasegawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A railgun pellet injection system has been developed for fusion experimental devices. Using a low electric energy railgun system, hydrogen pellet acceleration tests have been conducted to investigate the application of the electromagnetic railgun system for high speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. In the system, the pellet is pre-accelerated before railgun acceleration. A laser beam is used to induce plasma armature. The ignited plasma armature is accelerated by an electromagnetic force that accelerates the pellet. Under the same operational conditions, the energy conversion coefficient for the dummy pellets was around 0.4%, while that for the hydrogen pellets was around 0.12%. The highest hydrogen pellet velocity was 1.4 km s -1 using a 1 m long railgun. Based on the findings, it is estimated that the hydrogen pellet has the potential to be accelerated to 5 km s -1 using a 3 m long railgun. (orig.)

  15. A study of hydrogen isotopes fuel control by wall effect in magnetic fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motevalli, S.M., E-mail: motavali@umz.ac.ir; Safari, M.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A particle balance model for the main plasma and wall inventory in magnetic fusion device has been represented. • The dependence of incident particles energy on the wall has been considered in 10–300 eV for the sputtering yield and recycling coefficient. • The effect of fueling methods on plasma density behavior has been studied. - Abstract: Determination of plasma density behavior in magnetic confinement system needs to study the plasma materials interaction in the facing components such as first wall, limiter and divertor. Recycling of hydrogen isotope is an effective parameter in plasma density rate and plasma fueling. Recycling coefficient over the long pulse operation, gets to the unity, so it has a significant effect on steady state in magnetic fusion devices. Typically, sputtered carbon atoms from the plasma facing components form hydrocarbons and they redeposit on the wall. In this case little rate of hydrogen loss occurs. In present work a zero dimensional particle equilibrium model has been represented to determine particles density rate in main plasma and wall inventory under recycling effect and codeposition of hydrogen in case of continues and discontinues fueling methods and effective parameters on the main plasma decay has been studied.

  16. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10 10 to 10 11 rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10 19 neutrons/cm 2

  17. Development and application of charcoal sorbents for cryopumping fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedgley, D.W. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Space Systems Div.)

    1989-06-01

    Progress has been made in defining the capabilities of charcoal as the most promising absorbent to be used in cryopumps for fusion power application. The capabilities of alternative methods of cryopumping helium have been examined in a literature survey and by test, and the results are described here. Considerations include pumping speed, capacity to accumulate pumped gas, ease of reconditioning, use of alternative materials and tolerance to the fusion environment. Vacuum pumps for future fusion devices must handle large quantities of helium/hydrogen isotopes and other impurities. Cryopumps or turbomolecular pumps have demonstrated the capability on a small scale, and each has an important advantage: TMPs do not accumulate gases; cryopumps can separate helium from other effluents. This paper includes a review of a method for selecting charcoals for helium cryopumping, testing of a continuously operating cryopump system, and definition of a design that is based on the requirements of the Next European Torus. Tritium limits are satisfied. The pump design incorporates the charcoal sorbent system that has been recently developed and is based on a reasonable extrapolation of current state-of-the-art. Evaluation of alternative methods of separating helium and other gases led to selection of a movable barrier as the preferred solution. (orig.).

  18. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  19. Electrical insulation and conduction coating for fusion experimental devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Masanori; Tsujimura, Seiji; Toyoda, Masahiko; Inoue, Masahiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Abe, Tetsuya; Murakami, Yoshio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    The development of electrical insulation and conduction coating methods that can be applied to large components of fusion experimental devices has been investigated. A thermal spraying method is used to coat the insulation or conduction materials on the structural components because of its applicability for large surfaces. The insulation material chosen was Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and WC-NiCr were chosen as conduction materials. These materials were coated on stainless steel substrates to examine the basic characteristics of the coated layers, such as their adhesive strength to the substrate, thermal shock resistance, electrical resistance, dielectric breakdown voltage, and thermal conductivity. It was found that they have sufficient electrical insulation and conduction properties, respectively. In addition, the sliding tests of the coated layers showed adequate frictional properties. The spraying method was tested on a 100- x 1000-mm surface and found to be applicable for large surfaces of experimental fusion devices. 9 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Electrical insulation and conduction coating for fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Masanori; Tsujimura, Seiji; Toyoda, Masahiko; Inoue, Masahiko; Abe, Tetsuya; Murakami, Yoshio

    1996-01-01

    The development of electrical insulation and conduction coating methods that can be applied to large components of fusion experimental devices has been investigated. A thermal spraying method is used to coat the insulation or conduction materials on the structural components because of its applicability for large surfaces. The insulation material chosen was Al 2 O 3 , while Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr and WC-NiCr were chosen as conduction materials. These materials were coated on stainless steel substrates to examine the basic characteristics of the coated layers, such as their adhesive strength to the substrate, thermal shock resistance, electrical resistance, dielectric breakdown voltage, and thermal conductivity. It was found that they have sufficient electrical insulation and conduction properties, respectively. In addition, the sliding tests of the coated layers showed adequate frictional properties. The spraying method was tested on a 100- x 1000-mm surface and found to be applicable for large surfaces of experimental fusion devices. 9 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs

  1. Exploring novel high power density concepts for attractive fusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A. [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; APEX Team

    1999-05-01

    The advanced power extraction study is aimed at exploring innovative concepts for fusion power technology (FPT) that can tremendously enhance the potential of fusion as an attractive and competitive energy source. Specifically, the study is exploring new and `revolutionary` concepts that can provide the capability to efficiently extract heat from systems with high neutron and surface heat loads while satisfying all the FPT functional requirements and maximizing reliability, maintainability, safety, and environmental requirements. The primary criteria for measuring performance of the new concepts are: (1) high power density capability with a peak neutron wall load (NWL) of {proportional_to}10 MW m{sup -2} and surface heat flux of {proportional_to}2 MW m{sup -2}; (2) high power conversion efficiency, {proportional_to}40% net; and (3) clear potential to achieve high availability; specifically low failure rate, large design margin, and short downtime for maintenance. A requirement that MTBF{>=}43 MTTR was derived as a necessary condition to achieve the required first wall/blanket availability, where MTBF is the mean time between failures and MTTR is the mean time to recover. Highlights of innovative and promising new concepts that may satisfy these criteria are provided. (orig.) 40 refs.

  2. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  3. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, R S

    2015-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 10 10 J/m 3 . The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I 4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  4. Tritium inventory and recovery in next-step fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, R.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Federici, G.

    2002-01-01

    Future fusion devices will use tritium and deuterium fuel. Because tritium is both radioactive and expensive, it is absolutely necessary that there be an understanding of the tritium retention characteristics of the materials used in these devices as well as how to recover the tritium. There are three materials that are strong candidates for plasma-facing-material use in next-step fusion devices. These are beryllium, tungsten, and carbon. While beryllium has the disadvantage of high sputtering and low melting point (which limits its power handling capabilities in divertor areas), it has the advantages of being a low-Z material with a good thermal conductivity and the ability to get oxygen from the plasma. Due to beryllium's very low solubility for hydrogen, implantation of beryllium with deuterium and tritium results in a saturated layer in the very near-surface with limited inventory (J. Nucl. Mater. 273 (1999) 1). Unfortunately, there are nuclear reactions generated by neutrons that will breed tritium and helium in the material bulk (J. Nucl. Mater. 179 (1991) 329). This process will lead to a substantial tritium inventory in the bulk of the beryllium after long-term neutron exposure (i.e. well beyond the operation life time of a next-step reactor like ITER). Tungsten is a high-Z material that will be used in the divertor region of next-step devices (e.g. ITER) and possibly as a first wall material in later devices. The divertor is the preferred location for tungsten use because net erosion is very low there due to low sputtering and high redeposition. While experiments are still continuing on tritium retention in tungsten, present data suggest that relatively low tritium inventories will result with this material (J. Nucl. Mater. 290-293 (2001) 505). For tritium inventories, carbon is the problem material. Neutron damage to the graphite can result in substantial bulk tritium retention (J. Nucl. Mater. 191-194 (1992) 368), and codeposition of the sputtered carbon

  5. Reducing the tritium inventory in waste produced by fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamela, J., E-mail: jerome.pamela@cea.fr [CEA, Agence ITER-France, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Decanis, C. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Canas, D. [CEA, DEN/DADN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Liger, K.; Gaune, F. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Fusion devices including ITER will generate tritiated waste, some of which will need to be detritiated before disposal. • Interim storage is the reference solution offering an answer for all types of tritiated radwaste. • Incineration is very attractive for VLLW and possibly SL-LILW soft housekeeping waste, since it offers higher tritium and waste volume reduction than the alternative thermal treatment technique. • For metallic waste, further R&D efforts should be made to optimize tritium release management and minimize the need for interim storage. - Abstract: The specific issues raised by tritiated waste resulting from fusion machines are described. Of the several categories of tritium contaminated waste produced during the entire lifespan of a fusion facility, i.e. operating phase and dismantling phase, only two categories are considered here: metal components and solid combustible waste, especially soft housekeeping materials. Some of these are expected to contain a high level of tritium, and may therefore need to be processed using a detritiation technique before disposal or interim storage. The reference solution for tritiated waste management in France is a 50-year temporary storage for tritium decay, with options for reducing the tritium content as alternatives or complement. An overview of the strategic issues related to tritium reduction techniques is proposed for each radiological category of waste for both metallic and soft housekeeping waste. For this latter category, several options of detritiation techniques by thermal treatment like heating up or incineration are described. A comparison has been made between these various technical options based on several criteria: environment, safety, technical feasibility and costs. For soft housekeeping waste, incineration is very attractive for VLLW and possibly SL-LILW. For metallic waste, further R&D efforts should be conducted.

  6. High density plasmas formation in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Val, J. M.; Minguez, E.; Velarde, P.; Perlado, J. M.; Velarde, G.; Bravo, E.; Eliezer, S.; Florido, R.; Garcia Rubiano, J.; Garcia-Senz, D.; Gil de la Fe, J. M.; Leon, P. T.; Martel, P.; Ogando, F.; Piera, M.; Relano, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Garcia, C.; Gonzalez, E.; Lachaise, M.; Oliva, E.

    2005-01-01

    In inertially confined fusion (ICF), high densities are required to obtain high gains. In Fast Ignition, a high density, low temperature plasma can be obtained during the compression. If the final temperature reached is low enough, the electrons of the plasma can be degenerate. In degenerate plasmas. Bremsstrahlung emission is strongly suppressed an ignition temperature becomes lower than in classical plasmas, which offers a new design window for ICF. The main difficulty of degenerate plasmas in the compression energy needed for high densities. Besides that, the low specific heat of degenerate electrons (as compared to classical values) is also a problem because of the rapid heating of the plasma. Fluid dynamic evolution of supernovae remnants is a very interesting problem in order to predict the thermodynamical conditions achieved in their collision regions. Those conditions have a strong influence in the emission of light and therefore the detection of such events. A laboratory scale system has been designed reproducing the fluid dynamic field in high energy experiments. The evolution of the laboratory system has been calculated with ARWEN code, 2D Radiation CFD that works with Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Results are compared with simulations on the original system obtained with a 3D SPH astrophysical code. New phenomena at the collision plane and scaling of the laboratory magnitudes will be described. Atomic physics for high density plasmas has been studied with participation in experiments to obtain laser produced high density plasmas under NLTE conditions, carried out at LULI. A code, ATOM3R, has been developed which solves rate equations for optically thin plasmas as well as for homogeneous optically thick plasmas making use of escape factors. New improvements in ATOM3R are been done to calculate level populations and opacities for non homogeneous thick plasmas in NLTE, with emphasis in He and H lines for high density plasma diagnosis. Analytical expression

  7. OVERVIEW OF NEUTRON MEASUREMENTS IN JET FUSION DEVICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, P; Villari, R; Obryk, B; Packer, L W; Stamatelatos, I E; Popovichev, S; Colangeli, A; Colling, B; Fonnesu, N; Loreti, S; Klix, A; Klosowski, M; Malik, K; Naish, J; Pillon, M; Vasilopoulou, T; De Felice, P; Pimpinella, M; Quintieri, L

    2017-10-05

    The design and operation of ITER experimental fusion reactor requires the development of neutron measurement techniques and numerical tools to derive the fusion power and the radiation field in the device and in the surrounding areas. Nuclear analyses provide essential input to the conceptual design, optimisation, engineering and safety case in ITER and power plant studies. The required radiation transport calculations are extremely challenging because of the large physical extent of the reactor plant, the complexity of the geometry, and the combination of deep penetration and streaming paths. This article reports the experimental activities which are carried-out at JET to validate the neutronics measurements methods and numerical tools used in ITER and power plant design. A new deuterium-tritium campaign is proposed in 2019 at JET: the unique 14 MeV neutron yields produced will be exploited as much as possible to validate measurement techniques, codes, procedures and data currently used in ITER design thus reducing the related uncertainties and the associated risks in the machine operation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Interrupter and hybrid-switch testing for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, W.M.; Warren, R.W.; Honig, E.M.; Lindsay, J.D.G.; Bellamo, P.; Cassel, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses recent and ongoing switch testing for fusion devices. The first part describes testing for the TFTR ohmic-heating circuit. In this set of tests, which simulated the stresses produced during a plasma initiation pulse, circuit breakers were required to interrupt a current of 24 kA with an associated recovery voltage of 25 kV. Two interrupter systems were tested for over 1000 operations each, and both appear to satisfy TFTR requirements. The second part discusses hybrid-switch development for superconducting coil protection. These switching systems must be capable of carrying large currents on a continuous basis as well as performing interruption duties. The third part presents preliminary results on an early-counterpulse technique applied to vacuum interrupters. Implementation of this technique has resulted in large increases in interruptible current as well as a marked reduction in contact erosion

  9. Speckle interferometry application for erosion measurements in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, E.; Roupillard, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    In order to measure erosion/redeposition in fusion devices, a new diagnostic based on speckle interferometry is investigated. First experiments performed on carbon fibre composite (CFC) materials have shown that this technique is able to measure a modification of the surface in the range of 1 {mu}m. Further experiments have been performed on different materials using a second wavelength in order to carry out 3-dimensional measurements of the surface and to increase the dynamic range of the depth measurement. A diagnostic, based on two-wavelength TV-holography to measure in situ erosion/redeposition during long duration discharges on the CIEL limiter in Tore Supra, is under development at CEA Cadarache. (authors)

  10. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper

  11. Numerical modelling of electromagnetic loads on fusion device structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettini, Paolo; Palumbo, Maurizio Furno; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices, during abnormal operations (disruptions) the plasma begins to move rapidly towards the vessel wall in a vertical displacement event (VDE), producing plasma current asymmetries, vessel eddy currents and open field line halo currents, each of which can exert potentially damaging forces upon the vessel and in-vessel components. This paper presents a methodology to estimate electromagnetic loads, on three-dimensional conductive structures surrounding the plasma, which arise from the interaction of halo-currents associated to VDEs with a magnetic field of the order of some Tesla needed for plasma confinement. Lorentz forces, calculated by complementary formulations, are used as constraining loads in a linear static structural analysis carried out on a detailed model of the mechanical structures of a representative machine

  12. Alternative divertor target concepts for next step fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazul, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    The operational conditions of a divertor target in the next steps of fusion devices are more severe in comparison with ITER. The current divertor designs and technologies have a limited application concerning these conditions, and so new design concepts/technologies are required. The main reasons which practically prevent the use of the traditional motionless solid divertor target are analyzed. We describe several alternative divertor target concepts in this paper. The comparative analysis of these concepts (including the advantages and the drawbacks) is made and the prospects for their practical implementation are prioritized. The concept of the swept divertor target with a liquid metal interlayer between the moving armour and motionless heat-sink is presented in more detail. The critical issues of this design are listed and outlined, and the possible experiments are presented.

  13. Numerical modelling of electromagnetic loads on fusion device structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Paolo; Furno Palumbo, Maurizio; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-03-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices, during abnormal operations (disruptions) the plasma begins to move rapidly towards the vessel wall in a vertical displacement event (VDE), producing plasma current asymmetries, vessel eddy currents and open field line halo currents, each of which can exert potentially damaging forces upon the vessel and in-vessel components. This paper presents a methodology to estimate electromagnetic loads, on three-dimensional conductive structures surrounding the plasma, which arise from the interaction of halo-currents associated to VDEs with a magnetic field of the order of some Tesla needed for plasma confinement. Lorentz forces, calculated by complementary formulations, are used as constraining loads in a linear static structural analysis carried out on a detailed model of the mechanical structures of a representative machine.

  14. Modelling of surface evolution of rough surface on divertor target in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Shuyu; Liu, Shengguang; Sun, Jizhong; Kirschner, A.; Kawamura, G.; Tskhakaya, D.; Ding, Rui; Luo, Guangnan; Wang, Dezhen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the surface evolution of rough surface on divertor target in fusion devices. • The effects of gyration motion and E × B drift affect 3D angular distribution. • A larger magnetic field angle leads to a reduced net eroded areal density. • The rough surface evolution affects the physical sputtering yield. - Abstract: The 3D Monte-Carlo code SURO has been used to study the surface evolution of rough surface on the divertor target in fusion devices. The edge plasma at divertor region is modelled by the SDPIC code and used as input data for SURO. Coupled with SDPIC, SURO can perform more sophisticated simulations to calculate the local angle and surface evolution of rough surface. The simulation results show that the incident direction of magnetic field, gyration and E × B force has a significant impact on 3D angular distribution of background plasma and accordingly on the erosion of rough surface. The net eroded areal density of rough surface is studied by varying the magnetic field angle with surface normal. The evolution of the microscopic morphology of rough surface can lead to a significant change in the physical sputtering yield

  15. Conceptual design report for a Fusion Engineering Device sector-handling machine and movable manipulator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, K.D.; Masson, L.S.; McPherson, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Design requirements, trade studies, design descriptions, conceptual designs, and cost estimates have been completed for the Fusion Engineering Device sector handling machine, movable manipulator system, subcomponent handling machine, and limiter blade handling machine. This information will be used by the Fusion Engineering Design Center to begin to determine the cost and magnitude of the effort required to perform remote maintenance on the Fusion Engineering Device. The designs presented are by no means optimum, and the costs estimates are rough-order-of-magnitude

  16. The Roles and Developments needed for Diagnostics in the ITER Fusion Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Michael [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon - CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Harnessing the power from Fusion on earth is an important and challenging task. Excellent work has been carried out in this area over the years with several demonstrations of the ability to produce power. Now, a new large device is being constructed in the south of France. This is called ITER. ITER is a large-scale scientific experiment that aims to demonstrate a possibility to produce commercial energy from fusion. This project is now well underway with the many teams working on the construction and completing various aspects of the design. This device will carry up to 15 MA of plasma current and produce about 500 MW of power, 400 MW approximately in high energy neutrons. The typical temperatures of the electrons inside this device are in the region of a few hundred million Kelvin. It is maintained using a magnetic field. This device is pushing several boundaries from those currently existing. As a result of this, several technologies need to be developed or extended. This is especially true for the systems or diagnostics that measure the performance and provide the control signals for this device. A diagnostic set will be installed on the ITER machine to provide the measurements necessary to control, evaluate and optimize plasma performance in ITER and to further the understanding of plasma physics. These include amongst others, measurements of the plasma shape, temperature, density, impurity concentration, and particle and energy confinement times. The system will comprise about 45 individual measuring systems drawn from the full range of modern plasma diagnostic techniques, including magnetics, lasers, X-rays, neutron cameras, impurity monitors, particle spectrometers, radiation bolometers, pressure and gas analysis, and optical fibres. These devices will have to be made to work in the new and challenging environment inside the vacuum vessel. These systems will have to cope with a range of phenomena that extend the current knowledge in the Fusion field. One

  17. Summary of the 16th IAEA Technical Meeting on 'Research using Small Fusion Devices'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribkov, V.; Oost, G. van; Malaquias, A.; Herrera, J.

    2006-01-01

    Common research topics that are being studied in small, medium and large devices such as H-mode like or improved confinement, turbulence and transport are reported. These included modelling and diagnostic developments for edge and core, to characterize plasma density, temperature, electric potential, plasma flows, turbulence scale, etc. Innovative diagnostic methods were designed and implemented which could be used to develop experiments in small devices (in some cases not possible in large devices due to higher power deposition) to allow a better understanding of plasma edge and core properties. Reports are given addressing research in linear devices that can be used to study particular plasma physics topics relevant for other magnetic confinement devices such as the radial transport and the modelling of self-organized plasma jets involved in spheromak-like plasma formation. Some aspects of the work presented are of interest to the astrophysics community since they are believed to shed light on the basis of the physics of stellar jets. On the dense magnetized plasmas (DMP) topic, the present status of research, operation of new devices, plasma dynamics modelling and diagnostic developments is reported. The main devices presented belong to the class of Z-pinches, mostly plasma foci, and several papers were presented under this topic. The physics of DMP is important both for the main-stream fusion investigations as well as for providing the basis for elaboration of new concepts. New high-current technology introduced in the DMP devices design and construction make these devices nowadays more reliably fitted to various applications and give the possibility to widen the energy range used by them in both directions-to the multi-MJ level facilities and down to miniature plasma focus devices with energy of just a few J. (conference report)

  18. Management of water leaks on Tore Supra actively cooled fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatchressian, J.C.; Gargiulo, L.; Samaille, F.; Soler, B.

    2005-01-01

    Up to now, Tore Supra is the only fusion device fully equipped with actively cooled Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In case of abnormal events during a plasma discharge, the PFCs could be submitted to a transient high power density (run away electrons) or to a continuous phenomena as local thermal flux induced by trapped suprathermal electrons or ions). It could lead to a degradation of the PFC integrity and in the worst case to a water leak occurrence. Such water leak has important consequence on the tokamak operation that concerns PFCs themselves, monitoring equipment located in the vacuum vessel or connected to the ports as RF antennas, diagnostics or pumping systems. Following successive water leak events (the most important water leak, that occurred in September 2002, is described in the paper), a large feedback experience has been gained on Tore supra since more than 15 years that could be useful to actively cooled next devices as W7X and ITER. (authors)

  19. Magnet and device for magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder, H.; Rem, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    A planar magnet for magnetic density separation, comprising an array of pole pieces succeeding in longitudinal direction of a mounting plane, each pole piece having a body extending transversely along the mounting plane with a substantially constant cross section that includes a top segment that is

  20. Safety analysis and evaluation of the next fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shigetada; Honda, Tsutomu; Ohmura, Hiroshi; Kawai, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Mitsuaki; Nakahara, Katsuhiko; Seki, Yasushi.

    1988-12-01

    As a part of safety evaluation, a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been attempted for the Next Fusion Device system. Among the various events related to safety, a number of representative events have been selected for assessment, from the events in normal operation state, repair and maintenance state and accidental state. In the first chapter, in order to conduct the probabilistic risk assessment of the whole Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER), the data base required for the analysis was investigated in 1.1, the results on the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), accident sequence, radioactive inventory leakage flow path, event tree analysis (ETA) and fault tree analysis (FTA) were summarized in 1.2 to 1.5, respectively. Based on these results, accident initiating events were evaluated in 1.6, and overall risk was assessed in 1.7 and the tasks for the future were summarized in 1.8. It is important to analyze and evaluate various events during normal operations, repair and maintenance and accidents. However, due to the large uncertainties in the modeling of phenomena or the data base, there are many events for which realistic analyses are difficult. Three such events were selected and studied in chapter two. In 2.1, the temperature rise in the reactor structure after the Loss-of-Coolant-Accident caused by the decay heat under various heat removal conditions were investigated. In 2.2, the radiation dose of personnel during repair and maintenance period caused by the release of activated dust were estimated. Lastly, in 2.3 tritium behavior in the stainless steel first wall and graphite armour were studied. (author)

  1. Conceptual radiation shielding design of superconducting tokamak fusion device by PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Okuno, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A complete 3D neutron and photon transport analysis by Monte Carlo transport code system PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) have been performed for superconducting tokamak fusion device such as JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA). It is possible to make use of PHITS in the port streaming analysis around the devices for the tokamak fusion device, the duct streaming analysis in the building where the device is installed, and the sky shine analysis for the site boundary. The neutron transport analysis by PHITS makes it clear that the shielding performance of the superconducting tokamak fusion device with the cryostat is improved by the graphical results. From the standpoint of the port streaming and the duct streaming, it is necessary to calculate by 3D Monte Carlo code such as PHITS for the neutronics analysis of superconducting tokamak fusion device. (author)

  2. High energy density redox flow device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, William Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  3. Turbomolecular pumping systems for nuclear fusion devices in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohga, Tokumichi; Arai, Takashi

    1978-01-01

    The turbomolecular pumping systems for the nuclear fusion devices JFT-2, JFT-2a and the injector test stands ITS-1, 2 and 3 in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are mainly reported. For these vacuum systems, many requirements exist, such as oil free, large exhausting speed up to high pressure region (10 -3 Torr), compactness and easy operation and maintenance, etc., for the special usage. The outline of the systems and components, and the functions and the operational characteristics of the turbomolecular pumps are introduced. Concerning to the vacuum systems for JFT-2 and JFT-2a, the main system flow charts, the key specifications, the exhausting characteristic curves in case of starting from the atmospheric pressure for both JFT-2 and JFT-2a, and the conductance for hydrogen gas in the high vacuum side of JFT-2a are explained. As for the vacuum system for ITS-2, the main specification, the system flow chart, the main components, the functions, the conductance for hydrogen gas, the pumping characteristic curve, the starting characteristic of the turbomolecular pump, the exhausting speed for hydrogen gas and an example of mass spectrum are shown. The vacuum pressure obtained is almost 10 -5 -- 10 -6 torr for the three pumping systems. (Nakai, Y.)

  4. Improved zero dimensional model of a reversed field pinch fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model has been developed which accurately predicts conditions observed during several runs of the ZT-40M reversed field pinch fusion device at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model is based on a physical model developed by E.H. Klevans at Penn State University. Improvements made to this model included the use of coronal non-equilibrium equations for predicting impurity effects, the inclusion of an exponentially decaying ion heating term, and the relaxation of the assumption that ion and electron densities are equal in the device. The model has been used to simulate ZT-40M in both flat-top and slowly ramped current modes. Using experimentally measured density and current evolutions, the model accurately predicts observed tau/sub E/, β/sub Θ/, T/sub e/, T/sub i/, Z/sub eff/, and radiated power. The continuing goal of this work is to predict conditions in the ZT-H device, which is under construction. 28 refs., 18 figs

  5. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Steven M; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4-S1) intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.

  6. Managing fusion high-level waste-A strategy for burning the long-lived products in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion devices appear to be a viable option for burning their own high-level waste (HLW). We propose a novel strategy to eliminate (or minimize) the HLW generated by fusion systems. The main source of the fusion HLW includes the structural and recycled materials, refractory metals, and liquid breeders. The basic idea involves recycling and reprocessing the waste, separating the long-lived radionuclides from the bulk low-level waste, and irradiating the limited amount of HLW in a specially designed module to transmute the long-lived products into short-lived radioisotopes or preferably, stable elements. The potential performance of the new concept seems promising. Our analysis indicated moderate to excellent transmutation rates could be achieved in advanced fusion designs. Successive irradiation should burn the majority of the HLW. The figures of merit for the concept relate to the HLW burn-up fraction, neutron economy, and impact on tritium breeding. Hopefully, the added design requirements could be accommodated easily in fusion power plants and the cost of the proposed system would be much less than disposal in a deep geological HLW repository. Overall, this innovative approach offers benefits to fusion systems and helps earn public acceptance for fusion as a HLW-free source of clean nuclear energy

  7. A unified model of density limit in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, P.; Sattin, F.; Escande, D. F.; Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we identify by analytical and numerical means the conditions for the existence of a magnetic and thermal equilibrium of a cylindrical plasma, in the presence of Ohmic and/or additional power sources, heat conduction and radiation losses by light impurities. The boundary defining the solutions’ space having realistic temperature profile with small edge value takes mathematically the form of a density limit (DL). Compared to previous similar analyses the present work benefits from dealing with a more accurate set of equations. This refinement is elementary, but decisive, since it discloses a tenuous dependence of the DL on the thermal transport for configurations with an applied electric field. Thanks to this property, the DL scaling law is recovered almost identical for two largely different devices such as the ohmic tokamak and the reversed field pinch. In particular, they have in common a Greenwald scaling, linearly depending on the plasma current, quantitatively consistent with experimental results. In the tokamak case the DL dependence on any additional heating approximately follows a 0.5 power law, which is compatible with L-mode experiments. For a purely externally heated configuration, taken as a cylindrical approximation of the stellarator, the DL dependence on transport is found stronger. By adopting suitable transport models, DL takes on a Sudo-like form, in fair agreement with LHD experiments. Overall, the model provides a good zeroth-order quantitative description of the DL, applicable to widely different configurations.

  8. Oscillatory vapour shielding of liquid metal walls in nuclear fusion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eden, G.G.; Kvon, V.; Van De Sanden, M.C.M.; Morgan, T.W.

    2017-01-01

    Providing an efficacious plasma facing surface between the extreme plasma heat exhaust and the structural materials of nuclear fusion devices is a major challenge on the road to electricity production by fusion power plants. The performance of solid plasma facing surfaces may become critically

  9. Contributions to the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report contains three papers presented in the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices held in Princeton (USA) 5-9 May 1986, all referred to the FT Tokamak

  10. New directions in fusion machines: report on the MFAC Panel X on high power density options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    The high cost of fusion is motivating a shift in research interest toward smaller, lower-cost systems. Panel X of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee (MFAC) was charged to assess the potential benefits and problems associated with small, high-power-density approaches to fusion. The Panel identified figures of merit which are useful in evaluating various approaches to reduce the development costs and capital costs of fusion systems. As a result of their deliberations, the Panel recommended that ''...increased emphasis should be given to improving the mass power density of fusion systems, aiming at a minimum target of 100 kWe/tonne'', and that ''Increased emphasis should be given to concepts that offer the potential to reduce substantially the cost of development steps in physics and technology.''

  11. New directions in fusion machines: Report on the MFAC panel X on high power density options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    The high cost of fusion is motivating a shift in research interest toward smaller, lower-cost systems. Panel X of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee (MFAC) was charged to assess the potential benefits and problems associated with small, highpower-density approaches to fusion. The Panel identified figures of merit which are useful in evaluating various approaches to reduce the development costs and capital costs of fusion systems. As a result of their deliberations, the Panel recommended that ''...increased emphasis should be given to improving the mass power density of fusion systems, aiming at a minimum target of 100 kWe/tonne'', and that ''Increased emphasis should be given to concepts that offer the potential to reduce4 substantially the cost of development steps in physics and technology.''

  12. New directions in fusion machines: report on the MFAC Panel X on high power density options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    The high cost of fusion is motivating a shift in research interest toward smaller, lower-cost systems. Panel X of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee (MFAC) was charged to assess the potential benefits and problems associated with small, high-power-density approaches to fusion. The Panel identified figures of merit which are useful in evaluating various approaches to reduce the development costs and capital costs of fusion systems. As a result of their deliberations, the Panel recommended that ''...increased emphasis should be given to improving the mass power density of fusion systems, aiming at a minimum target of 100 kWe/tonne'', and that ''Increased emphasis should be given to concepts that offer the potential to reduce substantially the cost of development steps in physics and technology.''

  13. High-density fusion and the Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Munger, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of a Z-pinch in dense gas is investigated using numerical modeling in one and two dimensions. Hot, dense Z-pinches are calculated with n approximately 2 x 10 21 cm 3 and T = 10 keV. Relaxation by sausage instability of an unstable pinch profile to a marginally stable one is calculated along with end losses in 2 dimensions to show that, if plasma is confined for N = 50 to 200 sound transits across the radius a, pinches with length L = Na are of interest for fusion power. A conceptual, ''no-wall'' fusion reactor is discussed. (author)

  14. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  15. Design, construction, and characterization of high-performance membrane fusion devices with target-selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamane, Iori; Tsuboi, Mana; Ando, Shun; Matsuda, Kiyomi

    2012-01-31

    Membrane fusion proteins such as the hemagglutinin glycoprotein have target recognition and fusion accelerative domains, where some synergistically working elements are essential for target-selective and highly effective native membrane fusion systems. In this work, novel membrane fusion devices bearing such domains were designed and constructed. We selected a phenylboronic acid derivative as a recognition domain for a sugar-like target and a transmembrane-peptide (Leu-Ala sequence) domain interacting with the target membrane, forming a stable hydrophobic α-helix and accelerating the fusion process. Artificial membrane fusion behavior between the synthetic devices in which pilot and target liposomes were incorporated was characterized by lipid-mixing and inner-leaflet lipid-mixing assays. Consequently, the devices bearing both the recognition and transmembrane domains brought about a remarkable increase in the initial rate for the membrane fusion compared with the devices containing the recognition domain alone. In addition, a weakly acidic pH-responsive device was also constructed by replacing three Leu residues in the transmembrane-peptide domain by Glu residues. The presence of Glu residues made the acidic pH-dependent hydrophobic α-helix formation possible as expected. The target-selective liposome-liposome fusion was accelerated in a weakly acidic pH range when the Glu-substituted device was incorporated in pilot liposomes. The use of this pH-responsive device seems to be a potential strategy for novel applications in a liposome-based delivery system. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Implications of fusion results for a reactor: a proposed next step device-JIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Simulations with a critical-temperature model have been made of proposed future devices (NET, ITER, JIT, etc.). These show that only machines with a current capability of ∼ 30MA have a sufficient ignition domain to cope with more realistic operating conditions (i.e. taking into account sawteeth effects, impurity dilution and semi-continuous operation). The importance of dilution and Bremsstrahlung radiation are clearly demonstrated; a mean temperature > 7keV is required for ignition. This prevents higher field, lower current devices from reaching ignition. Transient operations with monster sawteeth or H-mode allow such devices (>30MA) to reach ignition at lower density without additional heating. To investigate the problems of a controlled burning plasma for days in semi-continuous operation, the plasma of the next-step tokamak should be similar in size and performance to an energy producing reactor. The scientific and technical aims of such a machine should be to study burning plasma, test wall technology, provide a test-bed for breeding blankets and most importantly to demonstrate the potential and viability of fusion as an energy source. The main design characteristics of a Thermonuclear Furnace-JIT-dedicated to these objectives are presented. Watercooled copper magnets are used to benefit from proven technology. A single-null divertor configuration ensures helium exhaust and possibly benefits from an H-mode to reach the ignition domain. The X-point position relative to the dump plates would be swept to limit wall loading

  17. Integrative Multi-Spectral Sensor Device for Far-Infrared and Visible Light Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Tiezhu; Chen, Lulu; Pang, Yusong; Yan, Gaowei

    2018-06-01

    Infrared and visible light image fusion technology is a hot spot in the research of multi-sensor fusion technology in recent years. Existing infrared and visible light fusion technologies need to register before fusion because of using two cameras. However, the application effect of the registration technology has yet to be improved. Hence, a novel integrative multi-spectral sensor device is proposed for infrared and visible light fusion, and by using the beam splitter prism, the coaxial light incident from the same lens is projected to the infrared charge coupled device (CCD) and visible light CCD, respectively. In this paper, the imaging mechanism of the proposed sensor device is studied with the process of the signals acquisition and fusion. The simulation experiment, which involves the entire process of the optic system, signal acquisition, and signal fusion, is constructed based on imaging effect model. Additionally, the quality evaluation index is adopted to analyze the simulation result. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed sensor device is effective and feasible.

  18. Tungsten as First Wall Material in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the PLT tokamak with a tungsten limiter strong cooling of the central plasma was observed. Since then mostly graphite has been used as limiter or target plate material. Only a few tokamaks (limiter: FTU, TEXTOR; divertor: Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade) gained experience with high-Z-materials. With the observed strong co- deposition of tritium together with carbon in JET and as a result of design studies of fusion reactors, it became clear that in the long run tungsten is the favourite for the first-wall material. Tungsten as a plasma facing material requires intensive research in all areas, i.e. in plasma physics, plasma wall-interaction and material development. Tungsten as an impurity in the confined plasma reveals considerable differences to carbon. Strong radiation at high temperatures, in connection with mostly a pronounced inward drift forms a particular challenge. Turbulent transport plays a beneficial role in this regard. The inward drift is an additional problem in the pedestal region of H-mode plasmas in ITER-like configurations. The erosion by low energy hydrogen atoms is in contrast to carbon small. However, erosion by fast particles from heating measures and impurity ions, accelerated in the sheath potential, play an important role in the case of tungsten. Radiation by carbon in the plasma boundary reduces the load to the target plates. Neon or Argon as substitutes will increase the erosion of tungsten. So far experiments have demonstrated that in most scenarios the tungsten content in the central plasma can be kept sufficiently small. The material development is directed to the specific needs of existing or future devices. In ASDEX Upgrade, which will soon be a divertor experiment with a complete tungsten first-wall, graphite tiles are coated with tungsten layers. In ITER, the solid tungsten armour of the target plates has to be castellated because of its difference in thermal expansion compared to the cooling structure. In a reactor the technical

  19. Electron density measurement in an evolving plasma. Experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consoli, Terenzio; Dagai, Michel

    1960-01-01

    The experimental devices described here allow the electron density measurements in the 10 16 e/m 3 to 10 20 e/m 3 interval. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 1223-1225, sitting of 15 February 1960 [fr

  20. High precision measurement of fuel density profiles in nuclear fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, J.; von Hellermann, M.; Konig, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for deducing fuel density profiles of nuclear fusion plasmas in realtime during an experiment. A Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network is used to create a mapping between plasma radiation spectra and indirectly deduced hydrogen isotope densities. By combining

  1. Design study of an indirect cooling superconducting magnet for a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, Toshiyuki; Hemmi, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    The design study of superconducting magnets adapting a new coil winding scheme of an indirect cooling method is reported. The superconducting magnet system for the spherical tokamak (ST), which is proposed to study the steady state plasma experiment with Q - equiv-1, requires high performances with a high current density compared to the ordinal magnet design because of its tight spatial restriction. The superconducting magnet system for the fusion device has been used in the condition of high magnetic field, high electromagnetic force, and high heat load. The pool boiling liquid helium cooling outside of the conductor or the forced flow of supercritical helium cooling inside of the conductor, such as cable-in-conduit conductors, were used so far for the cooling method of the superconducting magnet for a fusion application. The pool cooling magnet has the disadvantages of low mechanical rigidities and low withstand voltages of the coil windings. The forced flow cooling magnet with cable-in-conduit conductors has the disadvantages of the restriction of the coil design because of the path of the electric current must be the same as that of the cooling channel for refrigerant. The path of the electric current and that of the cooling channel for refrigerant can be independently designed by adopting the indirect cooling method that inserts the independent cooling panel in the coil windings and cools the conductor from the outside. Therefore the optimization of the coil windings structure can be attempted. It was shown that the superconducting magnet design of the high current density became possible by the indirect cooling method compared with those of the conventional cooling scheme. (author)

  2. Plasma facing materials and components for future fusion devices - development, characterization and performance under fusion specific loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik

    2006-04-15

    The plasma exposed components in existing and future fusion devices are strongly affected by the plasma material interaction processes. These mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; in addition they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour and the joining interface between the plasma facing material (PFM) and the heat sink. Besides physical and chemical sputtering processes, high heat quasi-stationary fluxes during normal and intense thermal transients are of serious concern for the engineers who develop reliable wall components. In addition, the material and component degradation due to intense fluxes of energetic neutrons is another critical issue in D-T-burning fusion devices which requires extensive RandD. This paper presents an overview on the materials development and joining, the testing of PFMs and components, and the analysis of the neutron irradiation induced degradation.

  3. Plasma facing materials and components for future fusion devices - development, characterization and performance under fusion specific loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma exposed components in existing and future fusion devices are strongly affected by the plasma material interaction processes. These mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; in addition they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour and the joining interface between the plasma facing material (PFM) and the heat sink. Besides physical and chemical sputtering processes, high heat quasi-stationary fluxes during normal and intense thermal transients are of serious concern for the engineers who develop reliable wall components. In addition, the material and component degradation due to intense fluxes of energetic neutrons is another critical issue in D-T-burning fusion devices which requires extensive RandD. This paper presents an overview on the materials development and joining, the testing of PFMs and components, and the analysis of the neutron irradiation induced degradation

  4. Development of MW gyrotrons for fusion devices by University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Numakura, T.; Endo, Y.; Nakabayashi, H.; Eguchi, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Mutoh, T.; Ito, S.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Sakamoto, Keishi; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Over-1 MW power gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been developed in the joint program of NIFS and University of Tsukuba. The obtained maximum outputs are 1.9 MW for 0.1 s on the 77 GHz Large Helical Device (LHD) tube and 1.0 MW for 1 ms on the 28 GHz GAMMA 10 one, which are new records in these frequency ranges. In long pulse operation, 300 kW for 40 min at 77 GHz and 540 kW for 2 s at 28 GHz were achieved. A new program of 154 GHz 1 MW development has started for high density plasma heating in LHD and the first tube has been fabricated. These lower frequency tubes like 77 GHz or 28 GHz one are also important for advanced magnetic fusion devices, which use Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating / current drive. As a next activity of 28 GHz gyrotron, we have already started the development of over-1.5 MW gyrotron and a new design study of 28 GHz / 35 GHz dual frequency gyrotron, which indicates the practicability of the multi-purpose gyrotron. (author)

  5. Safety considerations in the design of the Fusion Engineering Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and guidelines for radiation protection have been reviewed and are being applied to the device design. Direct radiation protection is provided by the device shield and the reactor building walls. Radiation from the activated device components and the tritium fuel is to be controlled with shielding, contamination control, and ventilation. The potential release of tritium from the plant has influenced the selection of reactor building and plant designs and specifications. The safety of the plant workers is affected primarily by the radiation from the activated device components and from plasma chamber debris

  6. Highly efficient red electrophosphorescent devices at high current densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Youzhi; Zhu Wenqing; Zheng Xinyou; Sun, Runguang; Jiang Xueyin; Zhang Zhilin; Xu Shaohong

    2007-01-01

    Efficiency decrease at high current densities in red electrophosphorescent devices is drastically restrained compared with that from conventional electrophosphorescent devices by using bis(2-methyl-8-quinolinato)4-phenylphenolate aluminum (BAlq) as a hole and exciton blocker. Ir complex, bis(2-(2'-benzo[4,5-α]thienyl) pyridinato-N,C 3' ) iridium (acetyl-acetonate) is used as an emitter, maximum external quantum efficiency (QE) of 7.0% and luminance of 10000cd/m 2 are obtained. The QE is still as high as 4.1% at higher current density J=100mA/cm 2 . CIE-1931 co-ordinates are 0.672, 0.321. A carrier trapping mechanism is revealed to dominate in the process of electroluminescence

  7. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  8. Experimental laser fusion devices and related vacuum problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.; Campbell, D.E.; Glaros, S.S.; Hurley, C.A.; Kobierecki, M.W.; McFann, C.B. Jr.; Monjes, J.A.; Patton, H.G.; Rienecker, F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Laser fusion experiments require hard vacuum in the laser-beam spatial filters, target chambers and for target diagnostics instruments. Laser focusing lenses and windows, and target alignment windows must hold vacuum without optical distortion, and must be protected from target debris. The vacuum must be sufficient to prevent residual gas breakdown in focused laser light, avoid arcing at high voltage terminals, minimize contamination and melting of cryogenic targets, and prevent adsorption of the target's microfusion radiation before it reaches the diagnostics instruments

  9. Applicability of the PHITS code to a tokamak fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Okuno, Koichi; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code PHITS (particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) has been developed to perform the radiation transport analysis, design of the radiation shields and neutronics calculations for tokamak-type D-D fusion reactors. A subroutine was included in PHITS to represent the toroidal neutron source of 2.45 MeV neutrons from the D-D reaction. Here, an example of preliminary tests using PHITS is given. (author)

  10. Spatial heterogeneity of tungsten transmutation in a fusion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Sublet, J.-Ch.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2017-04-01

    Accurately quantifying the transmutation rate of tungsten (W) under neutron irradiation is a necessary requirement in the assessment of its performance as an armour material in a fusion power plant. The usual approach of calculating average responses, assuming large, homogenised material volumes, is insufficient to capture the full complexity of the transmutation picture in the context of a realistic fusion power plant design, particularly for rhenium (Re) production from W. Combined neutron transport and inventory simulations for representative spatially heterogeneous high-resolution models of a fusion power plant show that the production rate of Re is strongly influenced by the surrounding local spatial environment. Localised variation in neutron moderation (slowing down) due to structural steel and coolant, particularly water, can dramatically increase Re production because of the huge cross sections of giant resolved resonances in the neutron-capture reaction of 186W at low neutron energies. Calculations using cross section data corrected for temperature (Doppler) effects suggest that temperature may have a relatively lesser influence on transmutation rates.

  11. Utilization of a Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011–2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    The IAEA actively promotes the development of controlled fusion as a source of energy. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA helps Member States to exchange and establish scientific and technical knowledge required for the design, construction and operation of a fusion reactor. Due to their compactness, flexibility and low operation costs, small fusion devices are a great resource for supporting and accelerating the development of mainstream fusion research on large fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. They play an important role in investigating the physics of controlled fusion, developing innovative technologies and diagnostics, testing new materials, training highly qualified personnel for larger fusion facilities, and supporting educational programmes for young scientists. This publication reports on the research work accomplished within the framework of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Utilization of the Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research, organized and conducted by the IAEA in 2011–2016. The CRP has contributed to the coordination of a network of research institutions, thereby enhancing international collaboration through scientific visits, joint experiments and the exchange of information and equipment. A total of 16 institutions and 14 devices from 13 Member States participated in this CRP (Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United Kingdom).

  12. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A; Prentice, R [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d` Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Density limit studies in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B.J.; Miyazawa, J.; Nishimura, K.

    2005-01-01

    Steady state densities of up to 1.6 x 10 20 m -3 have been sustained using gas puff fuelling and NBI heating up to 11 MW in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The density limit in LHD is observed to be ∼ 1.6 times the Sudo limit. The density is ultimately limited by radiative collapse which is attributed to the onset of a radiative thermal instability of the light impurities in the edge region of the plasma based on several observations. First of all the onset of the radiative thermal instability is tied to a certain edge temperature threshold. Secondly, the onset of thermal instability occurs first in oxygen and then carbon as expected from their cooling rate temperature dependencies. Finally, radiation profiles show that as the temperature drops and the plasma collapses the radiating zone broadens and moves inward. In addition, comparison with the total radiated power behaviour indicates that Carbon is the dominant radiator. Two dimensional tomographic inversions of AXUVD array data and comparison of modelling with images of radiation brightness from imaging bolometers and indicate that the poloidal asymmetry which accompanies the radiative collapse is toroidally symmetric. Ain addition to the operational density limit where the discharge is terminated by radiative collapse, a confinement limit has been recognized in LHD. This confinement limit appears at lower density than the operational density limit, similar to the saturated ohmic confinement observed in tokamaks. To investigate the physics behind this degradation, the parameter dependence of the thermal diffusivity, χ, has been investigated. While the temperature dependence in ISS95 is as strong as the gyro-Bohm model of χ ∝ T e 1.5 , weaker T e dependence of χ ∝ T e 0.5 appears in the high-density regime. Such weak T e dependence results in the weak density dependence of the global energy confinement as τ E ∝ n e 13 -bar. (author)

  14. Ion surface collisions on surfaces relevant for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasul, B.; Endstrasser, N.; Zappa, F.; Grill, V.; Scheier, P.; Mark, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: One of the great challenges of fusion research is the compatibility of reactor grade plasmas with plasma facing materials coating the inner walls of a fusion reactor. The question of which surface coating should be used is of particular interest for the design of ITER. The impact of energetic plasma particles leads to sputtering of wall material into the plasma. A possible solution for the coating of plasma facing walls would be the use of special carbon surfaces. Investigations of these various surfaces have been started at BESTOF ion-surface collision apparatus. Experiment beam of singly charged molecular ions of hydrocarbon molecules, i.e. C 2 H + 4 , is generated in a Nier-type electron impact ionization source at an electron energy of about 70 eV. In the first double focusing mass spectrometer the ions are mass and energy analyzed and afterwards refocused onto a surface. The secondary reaction products are monitored using a Time Of Flight mass spectrometer. The secondary ion mass spectra are recorded as a function of the collision energy for different projectile ions and different surfaces. A comparison of these spectra show for example distinct changes in the survival probability of the same projectile ion C 2 H + 4 for different surfaces. (author)

  15. First fusion neutrons from a thermonuclear weapon device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    An account of the first observation of thermonuclear neutrons from a hydrogen weapon, the George shot, is presented. A personal narrative by the researchers J. Allred and L. Rosen includes such topics as the formation of the experimental team, description of the experimental technique, testing the experimental apparatus, testing the effects of a blast, a description of the test area, and the observation of neutrons from fusion. Excerpts are presented from several chapters of the Scientific Director's report on the atomic weapons tests of 1951. Also included is a brief description of the basic design of the hydrogen bomb, a recounting of subsequent developments, and short scientific biographies of the researchers. 21 figures, 2 tables

  16. Radio-frequency-assisted current startup in the Fusion Engineering Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowski, S.K.; Kammash, T.; Martin Peng, Y.K.

    1984-01-01

    Auxiliary radio-frequency (RF) heating of electrons before and during the current rise phase of a large tokamak, such as the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) (R 0 = 4.8 m, a = 1.3 m, sigma = 1.6, B(R 0 ) = 3.62 T), is examined as a means of reducing both the initiation loop voltage and resistive flux expenditure during startup. Prior to current initiation, 1 to 2 MW of electron cyclotron resonance heating power at about90 GHz is used to create a small volume of high conductivity plasma (T /sub e/ approx. = 100 eV, n /sub e/ approx. = 10 19 m -3 ) near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. This plasma conditioning, referred to as preheating, permits a small radius (a 0 approx. = 0.2 to 0.4 m) current channel to be established with a relatively low initial loop voltage (less than or equal to 25 V as opposed to about 100 V without rf assist). During the subsequent plasma expansion and current rise phase, a combination of rf heating (up to 5 MW) and linear current ramping leads to a substantial savings in voltseconds by (a) minimizing the resistive flux consumption and (b) producing broad current density profiles. (With such broad profiles, the internal flux requirements are maintained at or near the flat profile limit.)

  17. IAEA technical committee meeting on research using small fusion devices (abstracts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The thirteenth IAEA technical committee meeting on research using small fusion devices are held in Chengdu, P. R. China on 18-20 Oct. , 1999. 41 articles are received and the content includes toroidal systems, helical systems, plasma focus, diagnostic systems, theory and modeling, improving confinement, numerical simulation, innovative concepts and others

  18. Non-superconducting magnet structures for near-term, large fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    File, J.; Knutson, D.S.; Marino, R.E.; Rappe, G.H.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the magnet and structural design in the following American tokamak devices: the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Joint European Torus (JET), also presented herein, has a magnet structure evolved from several European programs and, like TFTR, represents state of the art magnet and structure design

  19. Characterization of the Plasma Edge for Technique of Atomic Helium Beam in the CIEMAT Fusion Device; Caracterizacion del Borde del Plasma del Dispositivo de Fusion TJ-II del CIEMAT mediante el Diagnostico del Haz Supersonico de Helio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, A.

    2003-07-01

    In this report, the measurement of Electron Temperature and Density in the Boundary Plasma of TJ-II with a Supersonic Helium Beam Diagnostic and work devoted to the upgrading of this technique are described. Also, simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. This last technique is now being installed in the CIEMAT fusion device. (Author ) 36 refs.

  20. A conceptual fusion reactor based on the high-plasma-density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.; Hoffman, M.; Werner, R.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual DT and DD fusion reactors are discussed based on magnetic confinement with the high-plasma-density Z-pinch. The reactor concepts have no ''first wall'', the fusion neutrons and plasma energy being absorbed directly into a surrounding lithium vortex blanket. Efficient systems with low re-circulated power are projected, based on a flow-through pinch cycle for which overall Q values can approach 10. The conceptual reactors are characterized by simplicity, small minimum size (100MW(e)) and by the potential for minimal radioactivity hazards. (author)

  1. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan D.A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Celata, C.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Debonnel, C.S.; Grote, D.P.; Efthimiom, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.E.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Rose, D.V.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Startsev, E.A.; Tabak, M.; Thoma, C.; Vay, J-L; Wadron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.R.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  2. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Research for High Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  3. Coils in a fusion device and its fabrication method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hideto; Moritani, Einoshin.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a coil for nuclear fusion equipment, which coil has superior rigidity and strength and is separable into two sections and used for removing impurity ions from high temperature plasma such as heavy hydrogen and tritium. Structure: The coil according to the invention is manufactured by (1) a step of insulating horseshoe-shaped conductors one from another and bundling them into coil halves. (2) a step of assembling a flange on a coil case accommodating each coil half and hermetically welding a lid to each end of the coil half, (3) a step of evacuating the interior of each coil case, (4) a step of pouring a thermosetting resin into each evacuated coil case and hardening the resin, (5) a step of connecting the two coil halves with their ends not covered with resin held in abutting relation to each other, (6) a step of coupling coil case joint pieces to the joined portions and covering the joint pieces with a seal box and hermetically welding the box to the joint pieces, and (7) a step of pouring a thermosetting resin into each evacuated joint portion and hardening the resin. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. A review of fusion device fuel cleanup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombra, A.H.; Carney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Design options for a small fusion fuel purification system are assessed by comparing six conceptual system designs based on one of the following: a Zr/Al getter pump for in vacuo applications, a cryogenic molecular sieve adsorber at 77K, a palladium-alloy membrane diffuser, a U-bed reactor at 1170K, a two-compartment cryogenic freezer at 27-50K and 50-300K, a U-bed and non-regenerative Zr/Al gas purifier. The latter system introduces a new concept of fuel purification based on well-established techniques: recovery of purified D 2 -DT-T 2 from a helium carrier gas with the U-bed, followed by the removal of impurities from the carrier gas with the non-regenerative Zr/Al gas purifier. The main advantages of this system are simplicity, safety and relatively small quantity of tritiated waste produced by the process. The tritium in the waste is immobilized as a stable tritide of Zr/Al

  5. On the role of turbulence on momentum redistribution in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the generation of plasma flows play a crucial role in understanding key issues on transport in magnetically confined plasmas. It is well known the importance of driving shear in plasma rotation in the development of transport barriers. Rotation can be driven by external forces such as momentum from Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). However, in large scale devices like ITER (where the available NBI power is limited and the energy of injected neutrals must be high to reach the core plasma region) the NBI driven rotation will be limited. Then, it is important to study the possible role of other mechanisms which can drive plasma rotation. The amplitude of parallel flow measured in the scrape-off layer (SOL) is significantly larger than those resulting from simulations. Recent experiments have pointed out the possible influence of turbulence in explaining a component of the anomalous flows observed in the plasma boundary region. In the plasma core region, evidence of anomalous toroidal momentum transport has been reported. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain these results, including neoclassical effects, turbulence driven models and fast particle effects. The response of toroidal rotation to near-perpendicular NB injection on JT-60U has been interpreted on the basis of the influence of loss of high-energy particles. The flow reversal observed in the CHS stellarator can be explained by the spontaneous flow driven by large radial electric fields. Neoclassical effects can also play an import role. Recent experiments in the TJ-II stellarator have shown that the generation of spontaneous perpendicular sheared flows requires a minimum plasma density. Near this critical density, the level of edge turbulent transport and the turbulent kinetic energy significantly increases in the plasma edge. Experimental results also show significant turbulent parallel forces at plasma densities above the threshold value to trigger perpendicular ExB sheared

  6. TPX foams for inertial fusion laser experiments: foam preparation, machining, characterization, and discussion of density issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, M.; Guillot, L.; Reneaume, B.; Fleury, E.; Hermerel, C.; Choux, A.; Jeannot, L.; Geoffray, I.; Faivre, A.; Breton, O.; Andre, J.; Collier, R.; Legaie, O.

    2011-01-01

    Low density foams (in this work, foam density refers to apparent density) are materials of interest for fusion experiments. Low density poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)(commercial name TPX) foams have been produced for 30 years. TPX foams have been shown to have densities as low as 3 mg.cm -3 , which is very close to air density (1.2 mg.cm -3 ). Around this density foams are very light and highly fragile. Their fabrication is thus a real technological challenge. However, shrinking always appears in ranges ranking from 25% to almost 200%. As a result, the apparent density of the final foam never matches the expected value given by the precursor solution concentration. Besides, even if the mold dimensions are precisely known, shrinkage is never linear, and foams have to be machined for precise density measurement. In our work we present a fabrication process for TPX foams and discuss machining and density measuring issues. Particularly, we have found that there are volume and weight limits for a determination of density within the range of 3% uncertainty. This raises the question whether density should rather be determined directly on millimeter-sized targets or should be performed on a bigger scale sample prepared from the same batch. (authors)

  7. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedditch, John, E-mail: john.hedditch@sydney.edu.au; Bowden-Reid, Richard, E-mail: rbow3948@physics.usyd.edu.au; Khachan, Joe, E-mail: joe.khachan@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Whales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  8. Improvement of density models of geological structures by fusion of gravity data and cosmic muon radiographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourde, K.; Gibert, D.; Marteau, J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines how the resolution of small-scale geological density models is improved through the fusion of information provided by gravity measurements and density muon radiographies. Muon radiography aims at determining the density of geological bodies by measuring their screening effect on the natural flux of cosmic muons. Muon radiography essentially works like a medical X-ray scan and integrates density information along elongated narrow conical volumes. Gravity measurements are linked to density by a 3-D integration encompassing the whole studied domain. We establish the mathematical expressions of these integration formulas - called acquisition kernels - and derive the resolving kernels that are spatial filters relating the true unknown density structure to the density distribution actually recovered from the available data. The resolving kernel approach allows one to quantitatively describe the improvement of the resolution of the density models achieved by merging gravity data and muon radiographies. The method developed in this paper may be used to optimally design the geometry of the field measurements to be performed in order to obtain a given spatial resolution pattern of the density model to be constructed. The resolving kernels derived in the joined muon-gravimetry case indicate that gravity data are almost useless for constraining the density structure in regions sampled by more than two muon tomography acquisitions. Interestingly, the resolution in deeper regions not sampled by muon tomography is significantly improved by joining the two techniques. The method is illustrated with examples for the La Soufrière volcano of Guadeloupe.

  9. Development of electrical insulation and conduction coating for fusion experimental devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Tsujimura, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Toyoda, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Abe, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka (Japan); Murakami, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Development of electrical insulation and conduction methods that can be applied for large components have been investigated for future large fusion experimental devices. A thermal spraying method is employed to coat the insulation or conduction materials on the structural components. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been selected as an insulation material, while Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and WC-NiCr have been chosen as conduction materials. These materials were coated on stainless steel base plates to examine the basic characteristics of the coated layers, such as their adhesive strength to the base plate and electrical resistance. It was found that they have sufficient electrical insulation and conduction properties, respectively. In addition, the sliding tests of the coated layers showed sufficient frictional properties. The applicability of the spraying method was examined on a 100mm x 1000mm surface and found to be applicable for large surfaces in fusion experimental devices. (orig.).

  10. Development of electrical insulation and conduction coating for fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Tsujimura, S.; Toyoda, M.; Inoue, M.; Abe, T.; Murakami, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Development of electrical insulation and conduction methods that can be applied for large components have been investigated for future large fusion experimental devices. A thermal spraying method is employed to coat the insulation or conduction materials on the structural components. Al 2 O 3 has been selected as an insulation material, while Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr and WC-NiCr have been chosen as conduction materials. These materials were coated on stainless steel base plates to examine the basic characteristics of the coated layers, such as their adhesive strength to the base plate and electrical resistance. It was found that they have sufficient electrical insulation and conduction properties, respectively. In addition, the sliding tests of the coated layers showed sufficient frictional properties. The applicability of the spraying method was examined on a 100mm x 1000mm surface and found to be applicable for large surfaces in fusion experimental devices. (orig.)

  11. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  12. Study of lower hybrid current drive system in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, Sunao

    2001-01-01

    This report describes R and D of a high-power klystron, RF vacuum window, low-outgassing antenna and a front module for a plasma-facing antenna aiming the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system for the next Tokamak Fusion Device. 5 GHz klystron with a low-perveances of 0.7 μP is designed for a high-power and a high-efficiency, the output-power of 715 kW and the efficiency of 63%, which are beyond the conventional design scaling of 450 kW-45%, are performed using the prototype klystron which operates at the pulse duration of 15 μsec. A new pillbox window, which has an oversized length in both the axial and the radial direction, are designed to reduce the RF power density and the electric field strength at the ceramics. It is evaluated that the power capability by cooling edge of ceramics is 1 MW with continuous-wave operation. The antenna module using Dispersion Strengthened Copper which combines high mechanical property up to 500degC with high thermal conductivity, are developed for a low-outgassing antenna in a steady state operation. It is found that the outgassing rate is in the lower range of 4x10 -6 Pam 3 /sm 2 at the module temperature of 300degC, which requires no active vacuum pumping of the LHCD antenna. A front module using Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) are fabricated and tested for a plasma facing antenna which has a high heat-resistive. Stationary operation of the CFC module with water cooling is performed at the RF power of 46 MWm -2 (about 2 times higher than the design value) during 1000 sec, it is found that the outgassing rate is less than 10 -5 Pam 3 /sm 2 which is low enough for an antenna material. (author)

  13. THIDA: code system for calculation of the exposure dose rate around a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiromasa; Igarashi, Masahito.

    1978-12-01

    A code system THIDA has been developed for calculation of the exposure dose rates around a fusion device. It consists of the following: one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate transport codes; induced activity calculation code; activation chain, activation cross section, radionuclide gamma-ray energy/intensity and gamma-ray group constant files; and gamma ray flux to exposure dose rate conversion coefficients. (author)

  14. Plasma sprayed TiC coatings for first wall protection in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, P.; Laan, J.G. van der; Laas, L.; Mack, M.; Dvorak, M.

    1989-01-01

    For protection of plasma facing components in nuclear fusion devices thick titanium carbide coatings are being developed. Coatings have been produced by plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS) and low pressure (LPPS) and analyzed with respect to microstructure and chemical composition. Thermo-mechanical evaluation has been performed by applying short pulse laser heat flux tests. The influence of coating thickness and porosity on the resistance to spalling by thermal shocks appears to be more important than aspects of chemical composition. (author)

  15. Irradiation devices for fusion reactor materials results obtained from irradiated lithium aluminate at the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.; Rasneur, B.; Botter, F.

    1986-06-01

    Studies about controlled fusion reactor of the Tokamak type require the examination of the radiation effects on the behaviour of various potential materials. Thus, in the first part of this paper, are presented the devices adapted to these materials studies and used in the OSIRIS reactor. In a second part, is described an experiment of irradiation ceramics used as candidates for breeding material and are given the first results

  16. Sausage instability of Z-discharged plasma channel in LIB-fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Kawata, S.; Niu, K.

    1982-07-01

    Current-carring plasma channels have been proposed for transporting intense ion beams from diodes to a target in a LIB-fusion device. In this paper, the growth rate of the most dangerous surface mode, that is, axisymmetric sausage instability is examined for the plasma channel. The growth rate is shown to be smaller than that of the plasma channel with no fluid motion in a sharp boundary. It is concluded that the stable plasma channel can be formed. (author)

  17. Aggregation and fusion of low-density lipoproteins in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursky, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs, also known as ‘bad cholesterol’) are the major carriers of circulating cholesterol and the main causative risk factor of atherosclerosis. Plasma LDLs are 20- to 25-nm nanoparticles containing a core of cholesterol esters surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and a single copy of apolipoprotein B (550 kDa). An early sign of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of LDL-derived lipid droplets in the arterial wall. According to the widely accepted ‘response-to-retention hypothesis’, LDL binding to the extracellular matrix proteoglycans in the arterial intima induces hydrolytic and oxidative modifications that promote LDL aggregation and fusion. This enhances LDL uptake by the arterial macrophages and triggers a cascade of pathogenic responses that culminate in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Hence, LDL aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation are important early steps in atherogenesis. In vitro, a variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of LDL can induce these reactions and thereby provide useful models for their detailed analysis. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the in vivo and in vitro modifications of LDLs leading to their aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation; outline the techniques used to study these reactions; and propose a molecular mechanism that underlies these pro-atherogenic processes. Such knowledge is essential in identifying endogenous and exogenous factors that can promote or prevent LDL aggregation and fusion in vivo and to help establish new potential therapeutic targets to decelerate or even block these pathogenic reactions. PMID:25197325

  18. The measurement of potential distribution of plasma in MM-4 fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Zhongyu; Ming Linzhou; Feng Xiaozhen; Feng Chuntang; Yi Youjun; Wang Jihai; Liu Yihua

    1988-11-01

    Some experimental results of the potential distribution in MM-4 fusion device are presented by measuring the floating potential of probe. The results showed that the distribution of axial potential is asymmetrical, but the radial potential is symmetrical. There are double ion potential wells in the plasma. The depth of the deepest potential well become deeper is the strength of the magnetic field and injection current are increasing. The location of the deepest well is moved towards the device center along with the increasing of injection energy. This is different from others results. The mechanism of causing this distribution in also discussed

  19. DD fusion neutron production at UW-Madison using IEC devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Aaron; Michalak, Matt; Kulcinski, Gerald; Santarius, John; Bonomo, Richard

    2017-10-01

    An inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device using spherical, gridded electrodes at high voltage accelerates deuterium ions, allowing for neutrons to be produced within the device from DD fusion reactions. The effects of the device cathode voltage (30-170 kV), current (30-100 mA), and pressure (0.15-1.25 mTorr) on the neutron production rate have been measured. New high voltage capabilities have resulted in the achievement of a steady state neutron production rate of 3.3x108 n/s at 175 kV, 100 mA, and 1.0 mTorr of deuterium. Applications of IEC devices include the production of DD neutrons to detect chemical explosives and special nuclear materials using active interrogation methods. Research supported by US Dept. of Homeland Security Grant 2015-DN-077-AR1095 and the Grainger Foundation.

  20. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses E.I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The National Ignition Facility (NIF, a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF and high-energy-density science (HEDS, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL. A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC, an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE. This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  1. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Storm, E.

    2013-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density science (HEDS), is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  2. Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices. Summary report of the 1. research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2009-03-01

    Nine experts on dust formation and their physical and behavioural characteristics attended the first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on Characterization of Size, Composition and Origins of Dust in Fusion Devices held at IAEA Headquarters on 10-12 December 2008. Participants summarized recent relevant developments related to dust in fusion devices. The specific objectives of the CRP and a detailed work plan were formulated. Discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  3. A problem to be solved for tungsten diagnostics through EUV spectroscopy in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Dong, C.F.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Oishi, T.; Huang, X.L.; Wang, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength ranges of 10-650Å. When the electron temperature is less than 2keV, the EUV spectra from plasma core are dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) composing of a lot of spectral lines, e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W"+"2"4"-"+"3"3 in 15-35Å. In order to understand the UTA spectrum, the EUV spectra measured from LHD plasmas are compared to those measured from Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT), in which the electron beam is operated with monoenergetic energy of E_e ≤ 2keV. The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The collisional-radiative (C-R) model has been developed to explain the UTA spectra from LHD in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. If the electron temperature is higher than 2keV, Zn-like WXLV (W"4"4"+) and Cu-like WXLVI (W"4"5"+) spectra can be observed in LHD. Such ions of W"4"4"+ and W"4"5"+ can exhibit much simpler atomic configuration compared to other ionization stages of tungsten. Quantitative analysis of the tungsten density is attempted for the first time on the radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W"4"4"+) 4p-4s transition measured at 60.9Å, based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5x10"1"0 cm"-"3 at the plasma center of LHD is reasonably obtained. Finally, the present problem for tungsten diagnostics in fusion plasmas is summarized. (author)

  4. Studies on advanced superconductors for fusion device. Pt. 1. Present status of Nb3Sn conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Kyoji; Yamamoto, Junya

    1996-03-01

    Nb 3 Sn conductors have been developed with great expectation as an advanced high-field superconductor to be used in fusion devices of next generation. Furthermore, Nb 3 Sn conductors are being developed for NMR magnet and superconducting generator as well as for cryogen-free superconducting magnet. A variety of fabrication procedures, such as bronze process, internal tin process and Nb tube method, have been developed based on the diffusion reaction. Recently, Nb 3 Sn conductors with ultra-thin filaments have been fabricated for AC use. Both high-field and AC performances of Nb 3 Sn conductors have been significantly improved by alloying addition. The Ti-doped Nb 3 Sn conductor has generated 21.5T at 1.8K operation. This report summarizes manufacturing procedures, superconducting performances and applications of Nb 3 Sn conductors fabricated through different processes in different countries. More detailed subjects included in this report are high-field properties, AC properties, conductors for fusion with large current capacities, stress-strain effect and irradiation effect as well as standardization of critical current measurement method regarding to Nb 3 Sn conductors. Comprehensive grasp on the present status of Nb 3 Sn conductors provided by this report will act as a useful data base for the future planning of fusion devices. (author). 172 refs

  5. Role of inert gases in first wall phenomena in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    The first wall surfaces of fusion devices will be exposed to bombardment by inert gaseous projectiles such as helium. The flux, energy and angular distribution of the helium radiation will depend not only on the type of device but also on its design parameters. For near term tokamak devices, the first wall surface phenomena caused by helium bombardment that appear to be quite important are physical sputtering and radiation blistering. Examples of these processes for a number of first wall candidate materials are discussed. While the physical sputtering phenomen is well understood, the mechanism of blister formation is still not fully understood. The various models proposed for radiation blistering of metal during helium bombardment is critically reviewed in the light of most recent experimental results

  6. Final Technical Report for "Nuclear Technologies for Near Term Fusion Devices"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul P.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bohm, Tim D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Over approximately 18 years, this project evolved to focus on a number of related topics, all tied to the nuclear analysis of fusion energy systems. For the earliest years, the University of Wisconsin (UW)’s effort was in support of the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) study to investigate high power density first wall and blanket systems. A variety of design concepts were studied before this study gave way to a design effort for a US Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be installed in ITER. Simultaneous to this TBM project, nuclear analysis supported the conceptual design of a number of fusion nuclear science facilities that might fill a role in the path to fusion energy. Beginning in approximately 2005, this project added a component focused on the development of novel radiation transport software capability in support of the above nuclear analysis needs. Specifically, a clear need was identified to support neutron and photon transport on the complex geometries associated with Computer-Aided Design (CAD). Following the initial development of the Direct Accelerated Geoemtry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) capability, additional features were added, including unstructured mesh tallies and multi-physics analysis such as the Rigorous 2-Step (R2S) methodology for Shutdown Dose Rate (SDR) prediction. Throughout the project, there were also smaller tasks in support of the fusion materials community and for the testing of changes to the nuclear data that is fundamental to this kind of nuclear analysis.

  7. TASKA-M - a low cost, near term tandem mirror device for fusion technology testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Guebaly, L.; Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Maynard, C.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Plute, K.E.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Scharer, J.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Sze, D.K.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Leppelmeier, G.W.; Grover, J.M.; Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.; Borie, E.; Taczanowski, S.; Arendt, F.; Dittrich, H.G.; Fett, T.; Haferkamp, B.; Heinz, W.; Hoelzchen, E.; Kleefeldt, K.; Klingelhoefer, R.; Komarek, P.; Kuntze, M.; Leiste, H.G.; Link, W.; Malang, S.; Manes, B.M.; Maurer, W.; Michael, I.; Mueller, R.A.; Neffe, G.; Schramm, K.; Suppan, A.; Weinberg, D.

    1984-04-01

    TASKA-M (Modifizierte Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe) is a study of a dedicated fusion technology device based on the mirror principle, in continuation of the 1981/82 TASKA study. The main objective is to minimize cost while retaining key requirements of neutron flux and fluence for blanket and material development and for component testing in a nuclear environment. Direct costs are reduced to about 400 M$ by dropping reactor-relevant aspects not essential to technology testing: No thermal barrier and electrostatic plugging of the plasma; fusion power of 7 MW at an injected power of 44 MW; tritium supply from external sources. All technologies for operating the machine are expected to be available by 1990; the plasma physics relies on microstabilization in a sloshing ion population. (orig.) [de

  8. Collective laser light scattering from electron density fluctuations in fusion research plasmas (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzhauer, E.; Dodel, G.

    1990-01-01

    In magnetically confined plasmas density fluctuations of apparently turbulent nature with broad spectra in wave number and frequency space are observed which are thought to be the cause for anomalous energy and particle transport across the confining magnetic field. Collective laser light scattering has been used to study the nature of these fluctuations. Specific problems of scattering from fusion plasmas are addressed and illustrated with experimental results from the 119 μm far infrared laser scattering experiment operated on the ASDEX tokamak. Using the system in the heterodyne mode the direction of propagation with respect to the laboratory frame can be determined. Spatial resolution has bean improved by making use of the change in pitch of the total magnetic field across the minor plasma radius. Special emphasis is placed on the ohmic phase where a number of parameter variations including electron density, electron temperature, toroidal magnetic field, and filling gas were performed

  9. Reconstruction and analysis of temperature and density spatial profiles inertial confinement fusion implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, R. C.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss several methods for the extraction of temperature and density spatial profiles in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores based on the analysis of the x-ray emission from spectroscopic tracers added to the deuterium fuel. The ideas rely on (1) detailed spectral models that take into account collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark broadened line shapes, and radiation transport calculations, (2) the availability of narrow-band, gated pinhole and slit x-ray images, and space-resolved line spectra of the core, and (3) several data analysis and reconstruction methods that include a multi-objective search and optimization technique based on a novel application of Pareto genetic algorithms to plasma spectroscopy. The spectroscopic analysis yields the spatial profiles of temperature and density in the core at the collapse of the implosion, and also the extent of shell material mixing into the core. Results are illustrated with data recorded in implosion experiments driven by the OMEGA and Z facilities

  10. Multilayer mirror based monitors for impurity controls in large fusion reactor type devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, S.P.; May, M.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Multilayer Mirror (MLM) based monitors are compact, high throughput diagnostics capable of extracting XUV emissions (the wavelength range including the soft-x-ray and the extreme ultraviolet, 10 angstrom to 304 angstrom) of impurities from the harsh environment of large fusion reactor type devices. For several years the Plasma Spectroscopy Group at Johns Hopkins University has investigated the application of MLM based XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. MLM based monitors have been constructed for and extensively used on DIII-D, Alcator C-mod, TEXT, Phaedrus-T, and CDX-U tokamaks to study the impurity behavior of elements ranging from He to Mo. On ITER MLM based devices would be used to monitor the spectral line emissions from Li I-like to F I-like charge states of Fe, Cr, and Ni, as well as extractors for the bands of emissions from high Z elements such as Mo or W for impurity controls of the fusion plasma. In addition to monitoring the impurity emissions from the main plasma, MLM based devices can also be adapted for radiation measurements of low Z elements in the divertor. The concepts and designs of these MLM based monitors for impurity controls in ITER will be presented. The results of neutron irradiation experiments of the MLMs performed in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will also be discussed. These preliminary neutron exposure studies show that the dispersive and reflective qualities of the MLMs were not affected in a significant manner

  11. Study of lower hybrid current drive system in tokamak fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maebara, Sunao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    This report describes R and D of a high-power klystron, RF vacuum window, low-outgassing antenna and a front module for a plasma-facing antenna aiming the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system for the next Tokamak Fusion Device. 5 GHz klystron with a low-perveances of 0.7 {mu}P is designed for a high-power and a high-efficiency, the output-power of 715 kW and the efficiency of 63%, which are beyond the conventional design scaling of 450 kW-45%, are performed using the prototype klystron which operates at the pulse duration of 15 {mu}sec. A new pillbox window, which has an oversized length in both the axial and the radial direction, are designed to reduce the RF power density and the electric field strength at the ceramics. It is evaluated that the power capability by cooling edge of ceramics is 1 MW with continuous-wave operation. The antenna module using Dispersion Strengthened Copper which combines high mechanical property up to 500degC with high thermal conductivity, are developed for a low-outgassing antenna in a steady state operation. It is found that the outgassing rate is in the lower range of 4x10{sup -6} Pam{sup 3}/sm{sup 2} at the module temperature of 300degC, which requires no active vacuum pumping of the LHCD antenna. A front module using Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) are fabricated and tested for a plasma facing antenna which has a high heat-resistive. Stationary operation of the CFC module with water cooling is performed at the RF power of 46 MWm{sup -2} (about 2 times higher than the design value) during 1000 sec, it is found that the outgassing rate is less than 10{sup -5} Pam{sup 3}/sm{sup 2} which is low enough for an antenna material. (author)

  12. Development and Testing of Atomic Beam-Based Plasma Edge Diagnostics in the CIEMAT Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafalla, D.; Tabares, F.L.; Ortiz, P.; Herrero, V.J.; Tanarro, I.

    1998-01-01

    In this report the development of plasma edge diagnostic based on atomic beam techniques fir their application in the CIEMAT fusion devices is described. The characterisation of the beams in laboratory experiments at the CSIC, together with first results in the Torsatron TJ-II are reported. Two types of beam diagnostics have been developed: a thermal (effusive) Li and a supersonic, pulsed He beams. This work has been carried out in collaboration between the institutions mentioned above under partial financial support by EURATOM. (Author) 17 refs

  13. Energy system for the generation of divertor magnetic fields in the PDX fusion research device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turitzin, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    One of the major problems encountered in the development of Tokamak type fusion reactors is the presence of impurities in the plasma. The PDX device is designed to study the operation of poloidal magnetic field divertors and consequent magnetic limiters for controlling and reducing the amount of impurities. A system of coils placed at specific locations produces a required field configuration for the poloidal divertor. This paper describes the system of energy supplies required and the interrelations of field coil currents during plasma current initiation, growth and steady state

  14. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume VI. Complementary development plan for engineering development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The basic approach followed in this volume is to define key technical issues for several fusion reactor technologies and to device program strategies to resolve each of these issues. Particular attention has been paid to elucidating the role of FED vis-a-vis complementary (non-FED) facilities in this process. The remainder of this chapter consists of summaries of the major conclusions of the technology plans in each of the areas studied, i.e., plasma heating, magnetics, nuclear, and systems considerations

  15. IAEA technical meeting on nuclear data library for advanced systems - Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2008-04-01

    A Technical Meeting on 'Nuclear Data Library for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices' was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 31 October to 2 November 2007. The main objective of the initiative has been to define a proposal and detailed plan of activities for a Co-ordinated Research Project on this subject. Details of the discussions which took place at the meeting, including a review of the current activities in the field, a list of recommendations and a proposed timeline schedule for the CRP are summarized in this report. (author)

  16. Performance of large-scale helium refrigerators subjected to pulsed heat load from fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, R.; Ghosh, P.; Chowdhury, K. [Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    2012-07-01

    The immediate effect of pulsed heat load from fusion devices in helium refrigerators is wide variation in mass flow rate of low pressure stream returning to the cold-box. In this paper, a four expander based modified Claude cycle has been analyzed in quasi steady and dynamic simulations using Aspen HYSYS to identify critical equipment that may be affected due to such flow rate fluctuations at the return stream and their transient performance. Additional constraints on process parameters over steady state design have been identified. Suitable techniques for mitigation of fluctuation of return stream have also been explored. (author)

  17. Performance of large-scale helium refrigerators subjected to pulsed heat load from fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, R.; Ghosh, P.; Chowdhury, K.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate effect of pulsed heat load from fusion devices in helium refrigerators is wide variation in mass flow rate of low pressure stream returning to the cold-box. In this paper, a four expander based modified Claude cycle has been analyzed in quasi steady and dynamic simulations using Aspen HYSYS to identify critical equipment that may be affected due to such flow rate fluctuations at the return stream and their transient performance. Additional constraints on process parameters over steady state design have been identified. Suitable techniques for mitigation of fluctuation of return stream have also been explored. (author)

  18. Energy system for the generation of divertor magnetic fields in the PDX fusion research device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turitzin, N.M.

    1976-05-01

    One of the major problems encountered in the development of Tokamak type fusion reactors is the presence of impurities in the plasma. The PDX device is designed to study the operation of poloidal magnetic field divertors and consequent magnetic limiters for controlling and reducing the amount of impurities. A system of coils placed at specific locations produces a required field configuration for the poloidal divertor. This paper describes the system of energy supplies required and the interrelations of field coil currents during plasma current initiation, growth and steady state

  19. 7. IAEA Technical Meeting on Steady State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Booklet of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This meeting has provided an appropriate forum to discuss current issues covering a wide range of technical topics related to the steady state operation issues and also to encourage forecast of the ITER performances. The technical meeting includes invited and contributed papers. The topics that have been dealt with are: 1) Superconducting devices (ITER, KSTAR, Tore-Supra, HT-7U, EAST, LHD, Wendelstein-7-X,...); 2) Long-pulse operation and advanced tokamak physics; 3) steady state fusion technologies; 4) Long pulse heating and current drive; 5) Particle control and power exhaust, and 6) ITER-related research and development issues. This document gathers the abstracts

  20. On fractal properties of equipotentials over a real rough surface faced to plasma in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, V.P.; Yakovlev, M.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a sheath region bounded by a corrugated surface of material conductor and a flat boundary held to a constant voltage bias. The real profile of the film deposited from plasma on a limiter in a fusion device was used in numerical solving of the Poisson's equation to find a profile of electrostatic potential. The rough surface influences the equipotential lines over the surface. We characterized a shape of equipotential lines by a fractal dimension. The long-range correlation in the potential field is imposed by the non-trivial fractal structure of the surface. Dust particles bounced in such irregular potential field can accelerate due to the Fermi acceleration. (author)

  1. Device for supporting a toroidal coil in a toroidal type nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Hakaru; Sato, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily manufacture a center block having a strength sufficient to withstand an electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a toroidal coil and to increase its reliability. Structure: In a device for supporting toroidal coils wherein the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a plurality of toroidal coils arranged in toroidal fashion, the contact surface between the toroidal coil and the center block is arranged parallel to the center axis of toroidal so as to receive the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of the toroidal coil as the component of force in a radial direction. (Taniai, N.)

  2. Effects of Lumbar Fusion Surgery with ISOBAR Devices Versus Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery on Pain and Disability in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Fen; Wu, Meng-Shan; Yeh, Wen-Ting; Liao, Ying-Chin

    2018-06-01

    Purpose/Aim: Lumbar degenerative diseases (LDDs) cause pain and disability and are treated with lumbar fusion surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lumbar fusion surgery with ISOBAR devices versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery for alleviating LDD-associated pain and disability. We performed a literature review and meta-analysis conducted in accordance with Cochrane methodology. The analysis included Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation assessments, Jadad Quality Score evaluations, and Risk of Bias in Non-randomized Studies of Interventions assessments. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Library, ProQuest, the Airiti Library, and the China Academic Journals Full-text Database for relevant randomized controlled trials and cohort studies published in English or Chinese between 1997 and 2017. Outcome measures of interest included general pain, lower back pain, and disability. Of the 18 studies that met the inclusion criteria, 16 examined general pain (802 patients), 5 examined lower back pain (274 patients), and 15 examined disability (734 patients). General pain, lower back pain, and disability scores were significantly lower after lumbar fusion surgery with ISOBAR devices compared to presurgery. Moreover, lumbar fusion surgery with ISOBAR devices was more effective than PLIF for decreasing postoperative disability, although it did not provide any benefit in terms of general pain or lower back pain. Lumbar fusion surgery with ISOBAR devices alleviates general pain, lower back pain, and disability in LDD patients and is superior to PLIF for reducing postoperative disability. Given possible publication bias, we recommend further large-scale studies.

  3. Oscillatory vapour shielding of liquid metal walls in nuclear fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eden, G G; Kvon, V; van de Sanden, M C M; Morgan, T W

    2017-08-04

    Providing an efficacious plasma facing surface between the extreme plasma heat exhaust and the structural materials of nuclear fusion devices is a major challenge on the road to electricity production by fusion power plants. The performance of solid plasma facing surfaces may become critically reduced over time due to progressing damage accumulation. Liquid metals, however, are now gaining interest in solving the challenge of extreme heat flux hitting the reactor walls. A key advantage of liquid metals is the use of vapour shielding to reduce the plasma exhaust. Here we demonstrate that this phenomenon is oscillatory by nature. The dynamics of a Sn vapour cloud are investigated by exposing liquid Sn targets to H and He plasmas at heat fluxes greater than 5 MW m -2 . The observations indicate the presence of a dynamic equilibrium between the plasma and liquid target ruled by recombinatory processes in the plasma, leading to an approximately stable surface temperature.Vapour shielding is one of the interesting mechanisms for reducing the heat load to plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Here the authors report on the observation of a dynamic equilibrium between the plasma and the divertor liquid Sn surface leading to an overall stable surface temperature.

  4. The reversed-field pinch as a poloidal-field-dominated, compact, high-power-density fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of reversed-field pinch devices as future thermonuclear reactors. Safety, cost, ion temperatures, Lawson numbers, and power densities are reviewed for these types of devices. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Experimental study of potential structure in a spherical IEC fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Y.; Miley, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    The spherical inertial-electrostatic confinement (SIEC) concept is designed to focus and accelerate ions and electrons radially inward towards the center of a negatively biased, highly transparent spherical grid. The converging ions create a high-density plasma core where a high fusion rate occurs. In addition, under proper conditions, the ion and electron flows create a space-charge induced double potential well (a negative potential well nested inside a positive potential well). This structure traps high-energy ions within the virtual anode created by the double potential, providing a high fusion density in the trap volume. The present experiment was designed to verify double potential well formation and trapping by a measurement of the radial birth profile of energetic (3-MeV) protons produced by D-D fusion reactions in a deuterium discharge. This experiment was designed to operate at high perveance (0.4 to 1.4 mA/kV 3/2 ), where formation of a double well is predicted theoretically. Additional steps to aid well formation included: use of the unique Star mode of operation to obtain ion beam focusing down to approximately 1.6 H the ballistic limit and the incorporation of a second electrically floating grid (in addition to the focusing/accelerating cathode grid) to reduce the ion radial energy spread to 0.34 mA/kV 3/2 . As the perveance increased, the depth of the double well also increased. At the maximum perveance studied, 1.38 mA/kV 3/2 (corresponding to 80 mA and 15 kV), the negative potential well depth, corresponding to the measured proton-rate density, was estimated to be 22%--27% of the applied cathode voltage. This represents the first conclusive demonstration of double well formation in an SIEC, since prior measurements by other researchers typically yielded marginal or negative results

  6. Probabilistic Multi-Sensor Fusion Based Indoor Positioning System on a Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, smart mobile devices include more and more sensors on board, such as motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, wireless signal strength indicators (WiFi, Bluetooth, Zigbee, and visual sensors (LiDAR, camera. People have developed various indoor positioning techniques based on these sensors. In this paper, the probabilistic fusion of multiple sensors is investigated in a hidden Markov model (HMM framework for mobile-device user-positioning. We propose a graph structure to store the model constructed by multiple sensors during the offline training phase, and a multimodal particle filter to seamlessly fuse the information during the online tracking phase. Based on our algorithm, we develop an indoor positioning system on the iOS platform. The experiments carried out in a typical indoor environment have shown promising results for our proposed algorithm and system design.

  7. A stacked memory device on logic 3D technology for ultra-high-density data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Hong, Augustin J; Kim, Sung Min; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Song, Emil B; Hwang, Yongha; Xiu, Faxian; Galatsis, Kosmas; Chui, Chi On; Candler, Rob N; Wang, Kang L; Choi, Siyoung; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated, for the first time, a novel three-dimensional (3D) memory chip architecture of stacked-memory-devices-on-logic (SMOL) achieving up to 95% of cell-area efficiency by directly building up memory devices on top of front-end CMOS devices. In order to realize the SMOL, a unique 3D Flash memory device and vertical integration structure have been successfully developed. The SMOL architecture has great potential to achieve tera-bit level memory density by stacking memory devices vertically and maximizing cell-area efficiency. Furthermore, various emerging devices could replace the 3D memory device to develop new 3D chip architectures.

  8. A stacked memory device on logic 3D technology for ultra-high-density data storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Hong, Augustin J; Kim, Sung Min; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Song, Emil B; Hwang, Yongha; Xiu, Faxian; Galatsis, Kosmas; Chui, Chi On; Candler, Rob N; Wang, Kang L [Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Choi, Siyoung; Moon, Joo-Tae, E-mail: hbt100@ee.ucla.edu [Advanced Technology Development Team and Process Development Team, Memory R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-24

    We have demonstrated, for the first time, a novel three-dimensional (3D) memory chip architecture of stacked-memory-devices-on-logic (SMOL) achieving up to 95% of cell-area efficiency by directly building up memory devices on top of front-end CMOS devices. In order to realize the SMOL, a unique 3D Flash memory device and vertical integration structure have been successfully developed. The SMOL architecture has great potential to achieve tera-bit level memory density by stacking memory devices vertically and maximizing cell-area efficiency. Furthermore, various emerging devices could replace the 3D memory device to develop new 3D chip architectures.

  9. High-Z plasma facing components in fusion devices: boundary conditions and operational experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, R.

    2006-04-01

    In present day fusion devices optimization of the performance and experimental freedom motivates the use of low-Z plasma facing materials (PFMs). However, in a future fusion reactor, for economic reasons, a sufficient lifetime of the first wall components is essential. Additionally, tritium retention has to be small to meet safety requirements. Tungsten appears to be the most realistic material choice for reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because it exhibits the lowest erosion. But besides this there are a lot of criteria which have to be fulfilled simultaneously in a reactor. Results from present day devices and from laboratory experiments confirm the advantages of high-Z PFMs but also point to operational restrictions, when using them as PFCs. These are associated with the central impurity concentration, which is determined by the sputtering yield, the penetration of the impurities and their transport within the confined plasma. The restrictions could exclude successful operation of a reactor, but concomitantly there exist remedies to ameliorate their impact. Obviously some price has to be paid in terms of reduced performance but lacking of materials or concepts which could substitute high-Z PFCs, emphasis has to be put on the development and optimization of reactor-relevant scenarios which incorporate the experiences and measures.

  10. High-Z plasma facing components in fusion devices: boundary conditions and operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R.

    2006-01-01

    In present day fusion devices optimization of the performance and experimental freedom motivates the use of low-Z plasma facing materials (PFMs). However, in a future fusion reactor, for economic reasons, a sufficient lifetime of the first wall components is essential. Additionally, tritium retention has to be small to meet safety requirements. Tungsten appears to be the most realistic material choice for reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because it exhibits the lowest erosion. But besides this there are a lot of criteria which have to be fulfilled simultaneously in a reactor. Results from present day devices and from laboratory experiments confirm the advantages of high-Z PFMs but also point to operational restrictions, when using them as PFCs. These are associated with the central impurity concentration, which is determined by the sputtering yield, the penetration of the impurities and their transport within the confined plasma. The restrictions could exclude successful operation of a reactor, but concomitantly there exist remedies to ameliorate their impact. Obviously some price has to be paid in terms of reduced performance but lacking of materials or concepts which could substitute high-Z PFCs, emphasis has to be put on the development and optimization of reactor-relevant scenarios which incorporate the experiences and measures

  11. Low-Z coating as a first wall of nuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Okada, Masatoshi

    1984-01-01

    The tokamak nuclear fusion devices of the largest scale in the world, TFTR in USA and JET in Europe, started the operation from the end of 1982 to 1983. Also in Japan, the tokamak JT-60 is scheduled to begin the operation in 1985. One of the technological obstacles is the problem of first walls facing directly to plasma and subjected to high particle loading and thermal loading. Moreover, first walls achieve the active role of controlling impurities in plasma and recycling hydrogen isotopes. It is impossible to find a single material which satisfies all these requirements. The compounding of materials can create a material having new function, but also has the meaning of expanding the range of material selection. One of the material compounding methods is surface coating. In this paper, as the materials for first walls, the characteristics of low Z materials are discussed from the design examples of actual takamak nuclear fusion devices. The outline of first walls is explained. High priority is given to the impurity control in plasma, and in view of plasma energy emissivity and the rate of self sputtering, low Z material coating seems to be the solution. The merits and the problems of such low Z material coating are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  12. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  13. Far-infrared imaging arrays for fusion plasma density and magnetic field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neikirk, D.P.; Rutledge, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Far-infrared imaging detector arrays are required for the determination of density and local magnetic field in fusion plasmas. Analytic calculations point out the difficulties with simple printed slot and dipole antennas on ungrounded substrates for use in submillimeter wave imaging arrays because of trapped surface waves. This is followed by a discussion of the use of substrate-lens coupling to eliminate the associated trapped surface modes responsible for their poor performance. This integrates well with a modified bow-tie antenna and permits diffraction-limited imaging. Arrays using bismuth microbolometers have been successfully fabricated and tested at 1222μm and 119μm. A 100 channel pilot experiment designed for the UCLA Microtor tokamak is described. (author)

  14. Impaction durability of porous polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and titanium-coated PEEK interbody fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Klosterhoff, Brett S; Westerlund, L Erik; Foley, Kevin T; Gochuico, Joanna; Lee, Christopher S D; Gall, Ken; Safranski, David L

    2018-05-01

    Various surface modifications, often incorporating roughened or porous surfaces, have recently been introduced to enhance osseointegration of interbody fusion devices. However, these topographical features can be vulnerable to damage during clinical impaction. Despite the potential negative impact of surface damage on clinical outcomes, current testing standards do not replicate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare the impaction durability of conventional smooth polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) cervical interbody fusion devices with two surface-modified PEEK devices that feature either a porous structure or plasma-sprayed titanium coating. A recently developed biomechanical test method was adapted to simulate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions during cervical interbody fusion procedures. Three cervical interbody fusion devices were used in this study: smooth PEEK, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated PEEK, and porous PEEK (n=6). Following Kienle et al., devices were impacted between two polyurethane blocks mimicking vertebral bodies under a constant 200 N preload. The posterior tip of the device was placed at the entrance between the polyurethane blocks, and a guided 1-lb weight was impacted upon the anterior face with a maximum speed of 2.6 m/s to represent the strike force of a surgical mallet. Impacts were repeated until the device was fully impacted. Porous PEEK durability was assessed using micro-computed tomography (µCT) pre- and postimpaction. Titanium-coating coverage pre- and postimpaction was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Changes to the surface roughness of smooth and titanium-coated devices were also evaluated. Porous PEEK and smooth PEEK devices showed minimal macroscopic signs of surface damage, whereas the titanium-coated devices exhibited substantial visible coating loss. Quantification of the porous PEEK deformation

  15. Device for measuring neutron-flux distribution density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenbljum, N.D.; Mitelman, M.G.; Kononovich, A.A.; Kirsanov, V.S.; Zagadkin, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement is described for measuring the distribution of neutron flux density over the height of a nuclear reactor core and which may be used for monitoring energy release or for detecting deviations of neutron flux from an optimal level so that subsequent balance can be achieved. It avoids mutual interference of detectors. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  16. Motion-sensor fusion-based gesture recognition and its VLSI architecture design for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenping; Liu, Leibo; Yin, Shouyi; Hu, Siqi; Tang, Eugene Y.; Wei, Shaojun

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid proliferation of smartphones and tablets, various embedded sensors are incorporated into these platforms to enable multimodal human-computer interfaces. Gesture recognition, as an intuitive interaction approach, has been extensively explored in the mobile computing community. However, most gesture recognition implementations by now are all user-dependent and only rely on accelerometer. In order to achieve competitive accuracy, users are required to hold the devices in predefined manner during the operation. In this paper, a high-accuracy human gesture recognition system is proposed based on multiple motion sensor fusion. Furthermore, to reduce the energy overhead resulted from frequent sensor sampling and data processing, a high energy-efficient VLSI architecture implemented on a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA board is also proposed. Compared with the pure software implementation, approximately 45 times speed-up is achieved while operating at 20 MHz. The experiments show that the average accuracy for 10 gestures achieves 93.98% for user-independent case and 96.14% for user-dependent case when subjects hold the device randomly during completing the specified gestures. Although a few percent lower than the conventional best result, it still provides competitive accuracy acceptable for practical usage. Most importantly, the proposed system allows users to hold the device randomly during operating the predefined gestures, which substantially enhances the user experience.

  17. Computerized cost estimation spreadsheet and cost data base for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.R.; Rothe, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    An automated approach to performing and cataloging cost estimates has been developed at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), wherein the cost estimate record is stored in the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet on an IBM personal computer. The cost estimation spreadsheet is based on the cost coefficient/cost algorithm approach and incorporates a detailed generic code of cost accounts for both tokamak and tandem mirror devices. Component design parameters (weight, surface area, etc.) and cost factors are input, and direct and indirect costs are calculated. The cost data base file derived from actual cost experience within the fusion community and refined to be compatible with the spreadsheet costing approach is a catalog of cost coefficients, algorithms, and component costs arranged into data modules corresponding to specific components and/or subsystems. Each data module contains engineering, equipment, and installation labor cost data for different configurations and types of the specific component or subsystem. This paper describes the assumptions, definitions, methodology, and architecture incorporated in the development of the cost estimation spreadsheet and cost data base, along with the type of input required and the output format

  18. The first operation of the superconducting optimized stellarator fusion device Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The confinement of a high-temperature plasma by a suitable magnetic field is the most promising path to master nuclear fusion of Deuterium and Tritium on the scale of a reasonable power station. The two leading confinement concepts are the tokamak and the stellarator. Different from a tokamak, the stellarator does not require a strong current in the plasma but generates the magnetic field by external coils only. This has significant advantages, e.g. better stability properties and inherent steady-state capability. But stellarators need optimization, since ad hoc chosen magnetic field geometries lead to insufficient confinement properties, unfavourable plasma equilibria, and loss of fast particles. Wendelstein 7-X is a large (plasma volume 30 m{sup 3}) stellarator device with shaped superconducting coils that were determined via pure physics optimization criteria. After 19 years of construction, Wendelstein 7-X has now started operation. This talk introduces into the stellarator concept as a candidate for a future fusion power plant, summarizes the optimization principles, and presents the first experimental results with Helium and Hydrogen high temperature plasmas. An outlook on the physics program and the main goals of the project is given, too.

  19. Proceedings of the Japan-U.S. workshop P-118 on vacuum technologies for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, A.

    1989-01-01

    Fusion community does not appreciate vacuum technologies to the same extent as accelerator community does. This is because, in the case of accelerators, in particular storage ring systems, the requirement of attaining ultrahigh vacuum in order to avoid collisional loss is well defined, on the other hand, it is not possible to define the requirement so precisely in the case of fusion devices. One of the reasons is that core plasma interacts with vessel wall so strongly and unpredictably that it becomes difficult to identify the role played by individual components. However, in the next step and the next generation machines like CIT, LHS, ITER, FER and NET, vacuum technologies would play more significant roles, because the CIT will introduce tritium in a vacuum vessel, and the aim of the ITER project is to demonstrate particle balance, namely, to achieve steady state operation with D-T fuel. The Japan-U.S. workshop P-118 was held at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, from August 1 to 5, 1988. 33 participants including 4 from the U.S. took part in the workshop. In the plenary session, 12 lectures were given, and also the topics-oriented session on pumping, gauging, remote maintenance, first wall, pump limiter, divertor and others was held. (K.I.)

  20. Developing Boundary/PMI Solutions for Next-Step Fusion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H. Y.; Leonard, A. W.; Thomas, D. M.; Allen, S. L.; Hill, D. N.; Unterberg, Z.

    2014-10-01

    The path towards next-step fusion development requires increased emphasis on the boundary/plasma-material interface. The new DIII-D Boundary/Plasma-Material Interactions (PMI) Center has been established to address these critical issues on a timescale relevant to the design of FNSF, adopting the following transformational approaches: (1) Develop and test advanced divertor configurations on DIII-D compatible with core plasma high performance operational scenarios in FNSF; (2) Validate candidate reactor PFC materials at reactor-relevant temperatures in DIII-D high-performance plasmas, in collaboration with the broad material research/development community; (3) Integrate validated boundary-materials interface with high performance plasmas to provide viable boundary/PMI solutions for next-step fusion devices. This program leverages unique DIII-D capabilities, promotes synergistic programs within the broad PMI community, including linear material research facilities. It will also enable us to build a compelling bridge for the US research on long-pulse facilities. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC05-00OR2725.

  1. Calculational models for the treatment of pulsed/intermittent activation within fusion energy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, S.E.; Sisolak, J.E.; Henderson, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Two calculationally efficient methods have been developed to compute the induced radioactivity due to pulsed/intermittent irradiation histories as encountered in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy devices. The numerical algorithms are based on the linear chain method (Bateman Equations) and employ series reduction and matrix algebra. The first method models the case in which the irradiated materials are present throughout a series of irradiation pulses. The second method treats the case where a fixed amount of radioactive and transmuted material is created during each pulse. Analytical solutions are given for each method for a three nuclide linear chain. Numerical results and comparisons are presented for a select number of linear chains. (orig.)

  2. Characterization of Size, Composition and Origins of Dust in Fusion Devices. Summary Report of the Second Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Skinner, C.H.

    2010-11-01

    Eleven experts on processes of dust in fusion experiments met for the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices' held at IAEA Headquarters 21-23 June 2010. Participants summarized their studies on dust in fusion experiments and reviewed progress made since the first RCM. Gaps in knowledge were identified and a plan of work for the remainder of the CRP was developed. Presentations, discussions and recommendations of the RCM are summarized in this report. Eleven experts on processes of dust in fusion experiments met for the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices' held at IAEA Headquarters 21-23 June 2010. Participants summarized their studies on dust in fusion experiments and reviewed progress made since the first RCM. Gaps in knowledge were identified and a plan of work for the remainder of the CRP was developed. Presentations, discussions and recommendations of the RCM are summarized in this report. (author)

  3. Optimization of fusion power density in the two-energy-component tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1974-10-01

    The optimal plasma conditions for maximizing fusion power density P/sub f/ in a beam-driven D--T tokamak reactor (TCT) are considered. Given T/sub e/ = T/sub i/ and fixed total plasma pressure, there is an optimal n/sub e/tau/sub E/ for maximizing P/sub f/, viz. n/sub e/tau/sub E/ = 4 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 13 cm -3 sec for T/sub e/ = 3--15 keV and 200-keV D beams. The corresponding anti GAMMA equals (beam pressure/bulk-plasma pressure) is 0.96 to 0.70. P/sub fmax/ increases as T/sub e/ is reduced and can be an order of magnitude larger than the maximum P/sub f/ of a thermal reactor of the same beta, at any temperature. A lower practical limit to T/sub e/ may be set by requiring a minimum beam power multiplication Q/sub b/. For the purpose of fissile breeding, the minimum Q/sub b/ approximately 0.6, requiring T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 3 keV if Z = 1. The optimal operating conditions of a TCT for obtaining P/sub fmax/ are considerably different from those for enhancing Q/sub b/. Maximizing P/sub f/ requires restricting both T/sub e/ and n/sub e/tau/sub E/, maintaining a bulk plasma markedly enriched in tritium, and spoiling confinement of fusion alphas. Considerable impurity content can be tolerated without seriously degrading P/sub fmax/, and high-Z impurity radiation may be useful for regulating tau/sub E/. (auth)

  4. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon-Golcher, E.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter ∼ few mm), high current density (J ∼ several tens of mA/cm 2 ) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield ( ) at different operating conditions are presented for K + and Cs + contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K + beam of ∼90 mA/cm 2 were observed in 2.3 (micro)s pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times (∼ 1 (micro)s), high current densities (∼ 100 mA/cm 2 ) and low operating pressures ( e psilon) n (le) 0.006 π mm · mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I ∼ 5mA) by about a factor of 10

  5. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon-Golcher, Edwin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter ~ few mm), high current density (J ~ several tens of mA/cm2) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield () at different operating conditions are presented for K+ and Cs+ contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K+ beam of ~90 mA/cm2 were observed in 2.3 μs pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times (~ 1 μs), high current densities (~ 100 mA/cm+) and low operating pressures (< 2 mtorr) were verified. For the latter, high but acceptable levels of beam emittance were measured (εn ≤ 0.006 π· mm · mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I ~ 5mA) by about a factor of 10.

  6. Dust in fusion devices-a multi-faceted problem connecting high- and low-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, J

    2004-01-01

    Small particles with sizes between a few nanometers and a few 10 μm (dust) are formed in fusion devices by plasma-surface interaction processes. Though it is not a major problem today, dust is considered a problem that could arise in future long pulse fusion devices. This is primarily due to its radioactivity and due to its very high chemical reactivity. Dust formation is particularly pronounced when carbonaceous wall materials are used. Dust particles can be transported in the tokamak over significant distances. Radioactivity leads to electrical charging of dust and to its interaction with plasmas and electric fields. This may cause interference with the discharge but may also result in options for particle removal. This paper discusses some of the multi-faceted problems using information both from fusion research and from low-temperature dusty plasma work

  7. Suppression of hydrogenated carbon film deposition by scavenger techniques and their application to the tritium inventory control of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.; Tafalla, D.; Tanarro, I.; Herrero, V.J.; Islyaikin, A.; Maffiotte, C.

    2002-01-01

    The well-known radical and ion scavenger techniques of application in amorphous hydrogenated carbon film deposition studies are investigated in relation to the mechanism of tritium and deuterium co-deposition in carbon-dominated fusion devices. A particularly successful scheme results from the injection of nitrogen into methane/hydrogen plasmas for conditions close to those prevailing in the divertor region of present fusion devices. A complete suppression of the a-C : H film deposition has been achieved for N 2 /CH 4 ratios close to one in methane (5%)/hydrogen DC plasma. The implications of these findings in the tritium retention control in future fusion reactors are addressed. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  8. Separation of density and viscosity influence on liquid-loaded surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F.; Hahn, D.; Büttgenbach, S.

    1999-05-01

    Love-mode sensors are reported for separate measurement of liquid density and viscosity. They combine the general merits of Love-mode devices, e.g., ease of sensitivity adjustment and robustness, with a highly effective procedure of separate determination of liquid density and viscosity. A model is proposed to describe the frequency response of the devices to liquid loading. Moreover, design rules are given for further optimization and sensitivity enhancement.

  9. Development of laser-based techniques for in situ characterization of the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philipps, V.; Malaquias, A.; Hakola, A.; Karhunen, J.; Maddaluno, G.; Almaviva, S.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Fortuna, E.; Gasior, P.; Kubkowska, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Laan, M.; Lissovski, A.; Paris, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Petersson, P.; Rubel, M.; Huber, A.; Zlobinski, M.; Schweer, B.; Gierse, N.; Xiao, Q.; Sergienko, G.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and understanding of wall erosion, material transport and fuel retention are among the most important tasks for ITER and future devices, since these questions determine largely the lifetime and availability of the fusion reactor. These data are also of extreme value to improve the

  10. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeman, R.M.; Kemna, Evelien; Wolbers, F.; van den Berg, Albert

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped

  11. A comparison of hydrogen vs. helium glow discharge effects on fusion device first-wall conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1989-09-01

    Hydrogen- and deuterium-fueled glow discharges are used for the initial conditioning of magnetic fusion device vacuum vessels following evacuation from atmospheric pressure. Hydrogenic glow discharge conditioning (GDC) significantly reduces the near-surface concentration of simple adsorbates, such as H 2 O, CO, and CH 4 , and lowers ion-induced desorption coefficients by typically three orders of magnitude. The time evolution of the residual gas production observed during hydrogen-glow discharge conditioning of the carbon first-wall structure of the TFTR device is similar to the time evolution observed during hydrogen GDC of the initial first-wall configuration in TFTR, which was primarily stainless steel. Recently, helium GDC has been investigated for several wall-conditioning tasks on a number of tokamaks including TFTR. Helium GDC shows negligible impurity removal with stainless steel walls. For impurity conditioning with carbon walls, helium GDC shows significant desorption of H 2 O, CO, and CO 2 ; however, the total desorption yield is limited to the monolayer range. In addition, helium GDC can be used to displace hydrogen isotopes from the near-surface region of carbon first-walls in order to lower hydrogenic retention and recycling. 38 refs., 6 figs

  12. Prediction of density limits in tokamaks: Theory, comparison with experiment, and application to the proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2002-01-01

    A framework for the predictive calculation of density limits in future tokamaks is proposed. Theoretical models for different density limit phenomena are summarized, and the requirements for additional models are identified. These theoretical density limit models have been incorporated into a relatively simple, but phenomenologically comprehensive, integrated numerical calculation of the core, edge, and divertor plasmas and of the recycling neutrals, in order to obtain plasma parameters needed for the evaluation of the theoretical models. A comparison of these theoretical predictions with observed density limits in current experiments is summarized. A model for the calculation of edge pedestal parameters, which is needed in order to apply the density limit predictions to future tokamaks, is summarized. An application to predict the proximity to density limits and the edge pedestal parameters of the proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment is described

  13. Power density forecasting device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Kiguchi, Takashi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To attain effective reactor operation in a bwr type reactor by forecasting the power density of the reactor after adjustment and comparing the same with the present status of the reactor by the on-line calculation in a short time. Constitution: The present status for the reactor is estimated in a present status decision section based on a measurement signal from the reactor and it is stored in an operation result collection section. The reactor status after the forecasting is estimated in a forecasting section based on a setting signal from a forecasting condition setting section and it is compared with the result value from the operation results collection section. If the forecast value does not coincide with the result value in the above comparison, the setting value in the forecast condition setting section is changed in the control section. The above procedures are repeated so as to minimize the difference between the forecast value and the result value to thereby exactly forecast the reactor status and operate the reactor effectively. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Engineering and physics of high-power-density, compact, reversed-field-pinch fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technical feasibility and key developmental issues of compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field-Pinch (RFP) reactors are the primary results of the TITAN RFP reactor study. Two design approaches emerged, TITAN-I and TITAN-II, both of which are steady-state, DT-burning, circa 1000 MWe power reactors. The TITAN designs are physically compact and have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW m 2 . Detailed analyses indicate that: a) each design is technically feasible; b) attractive features of compact RFP reactors can be realized without sacrificing the safety and environmental potential of fusion; and c) major features of this particular embodiment of the RFP reactor are retained in a design window of neutron wall loading ranging from 10 to 20 MW/m 2 . A major product of the TITAN study is the identification and quantification of major engineering and physics requirements for this class of RFP reactors. These findings are the focus of this paper. (author). 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate theoretical opacities. Testing these opacities requires well-characterized plasmas at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission. These problems can be overcome with the new generation of high energy density (HED) facilities. For example, recent experiments at Sandia's Z facility [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] measured the transmission of a mixed Mg and Fe plasma heated to 156±6 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other HED plasmas. This tutorial reviews experimental methods for testing opacity models, including experiment design, transmission measurement methods, accuracy evaluation, and plasma diagnostics. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments illustrate the techniques.

  16. Self-shielding characteristics of aqueous self-cooled blankets for next generation fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    The present study examines self-shielding characteristics for two aqueous self-cooled tritium producing driver blankets for next generation fusion devices. The aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB) is a very simple blanket concept that relies on just structural material and coolant. Lithium compounds are dissolved in water to provide for tritium production. An ASCB driver blanket would provide a low technology and low temperature environment for blanket test modules in a next generation fusion reactor. The primary functions of such a blanket would be shielding, energy removal and tritium production. One driver blanket considered in this study concept relates to the one proposed for the Next European Torus (NET), while the second concept is indicative for the inboard shield design for the Engineering Test Reactor proposed by the USA (TIBER II/ETR). The driver blanket for NET is based on stainless steel for the structural material and aqueous solution, while the inboard shielding blanket for TIBER II/ETR is based on a tungsten/aqueous solution combination. The purpose of this study is to investigate self-shielding and heterogeneity effects in aqueous self-cooled blankets. It is found that no significant gains in tritium breeding can be achieved in the stainless steel blanket if spatial and energy self-shielding effects are considered, and the heterogeneity effects are also insignificant. The tungsten blanket shows a 5 percent increase in tritium production in the shielding blanket when energy and spatial self-shielding effects are accounted for. However, the tungsten blanket shows a drastic increase in the tritium breeding ratio due to heterogeneity effects. (author) 17 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Plasma electron density measurement with multichannel microwave interferometer on the HL-1 tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Deming; Zhang Hongyin; Liu Zetian; Ding Xuantong; Li Qirui; Wen Yangxi

    1989-11-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer which is composed of different microwave interferometers (one 2 mm band, one 4 mm band and two 8 mm band) has been used to measure the plasma electron density on HL-1 tokamak device. The electron density approaching to 5 x 10 13 cm -3 is measured by a 2 mm band microwave interferometer. In the determinable range, the electron density profile in the cross-section on HL-1 device has been measured by this interferometer. A microcomputer data processing system is also developed

  18. The high-density Z-pinch as a pulsed fusion neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Sethian, J.D.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch (DZP) is one of the earliest and simplest plasma heating and confinement schemes. Recent experimental advances based on plasma initiation from hair-like (10s μm in radius) solid hydrogen filaments have so far not encountered the usually devastating MHD instabilities that plagued early DZP experiments. These encouraging results along with debt of a number of proof-of principle, high-current (1--2 MA in 10--100 ns) experiments have prompted consideration of the DZP as a pulsed source of DT fusion neutrons of sufficient strength (/dot S//sub N/ ≥ 10 19 n/s) to provide uncollided neutron fluxes in excess of I/sub ω/ = 5--10 MW/m 2 over test volumes of 10--30 litre or greater. While this neutron source would be pulsed (100s ns pulse widths, 10--100 Hz pulse rate), giving flux time compressions in the range 10 5 --10 6 , its simplicity, near-time feasibility, low cost, high-Q operation, and relevance to fusion systems that may provide a pulsed commercial end-product (e.g., inertial confinement or the DZP itself) together create the impetus for preliminary considerations as a neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testings. The results of a preliminary parametric systems study (focusing primarily on physics issues), conceptual design, and cost versus performance analyses are presented. The DZP promises an expensive and efficient means to provide pulsed DT neutrons at an average rate in excess of 10 19 n/s, with neutron currents I/sub ω/ /approx lt/ 10 MW/m 2 over volumes V/sub exp/ ≥ 30 litre using single-pulse technologies that differ little from those being used in present-day experiments. 34 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Characterization of Size, Composition and Origins of Dust in Fusion Devices. Summary Report of the Third Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2013-02-01

    Twelve experts on processes of dust in fusion experiments met at IAEA Headquarters 30 November - 02 December 2011 for the 3rd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on ''Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices.'' Participants reviewed their work done in the course of the CRP and the current state of knowledge, and they made plans for a dust database and a final CRP report. Presentations, discussions and recommendations of the RCM are summarized here. (author)

  20. A study to compare the efficacy of polyether ether ketone rod device with titanium devices in posterior spinal fusion in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nanxiang; Xie, Huanxin; Xi, Chunyang; Zhang, Han; Yan, Jinglong

    2017-03-09

    The benefits of posterior lumbar fusion surgery with orthotopic paraspinal muscle-pediculated bone flaps are well established. However, the problem of non-union due to mechanical support is not completely resolved. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) rod device with conventional titanium devices in the posterior lumbar fusion surgery with orthotopic paraspinal muscle-pediculated bone flaps. This was a randomized controlled study with an experimental animal model. Thirty-two mongrel dogs were randomly divided into two groups-control group (n = 16), which received the titanium device and the treatment group (n = 16), which received PEEK rods. The animals were sacrificed 8 or 16 weeks after surgery. Lumbar spines of dogs in both groups were removed, harvested, and assessed for radiographic, biomechanical, and histological changes. Results in the current study indicated that there was no significant difference in the lumbar spine of the control and treatment groups in terms of radiographic, manual palpation, and gross examination. However, certain parameters of biomechanical testing showed significant differences (p < 0.05) in stiffness and displacement, revealing a better fusion (treatment group showed decreased stiffness with decreased displacement) of the bone graft. Similarly, the histological analysis also revealed a significant fusion mass in both treatment and control groups (p < 0.05). These findings revealed that fixation using PEEK connecting rod could improve the union of the bone graft in the posterior lumbar spine fusion surgery compared with that of the titanium rod fixation.

  1. Mechanical Property Characteristics of Butt-Fusion Joint of High Density Polyethylene Pipe for NPP Safety Class Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Kyoungsu; Lee, Seunggun; Park, Heungbae; Yu, Jeongho; Kim, Jongsung; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jang, Changheui; Choi, Sunwoong

    2013-01-01

    Several NPPs in United States replaced parts of sea water or raw water system pipes to HDPE (high density polyethylene) pipes, which have outstanding resistance for oxidation and seismic loading. ASME B and PV code committee developed Code Case N-755, which describes rules for the construction of Safety Class 3 polyethylene pressure piping components. Several NPP's in US proposed relief requests in order to apply Code Case N-755. Although US NRC permitted using Code Case N-755 and HDPE materials for Class 3 buried piping, their permission was limited to only 10 years because of several concerns for material performance of HDPE. US NRC's major concerns are about material properties and the quality of fusion zone of HDPE. In this study, material property tests for HDPE fusion zone are conducted with varying standard fusion procedures. Mechanical property tests for fused material for HDPE pipes were conducted. Fused material shows lower toughness than base material and fused material of lower fusion pressure shows higher toughness than that of higher fusion pressure

  2. A carbon-metal brazing for divertor plates in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Miki, S.; Sogabe, T.; Okada, M.; Kubota, Y.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Motojima, O.; Hino, T.; Yamashina, T.

    1993-01-01

    A divertor unit, which consists of carbon armors brazed to a copper cooling channel, is under development for fusion devices. Isotropic graphite (IG-430U) and CFC (CX-2002U) are used for the armor, and a copper for the cooling tube. A technique named as dissolution and deposit of base metal was employed for brazing. The reliability of the brazed components was evaluated both by 4-point bending test and thermal shock test. According to the results of a 4-point bending test under the temperature ranged from RT to 800 C in a vacuum, it was found that the strength of the brazed surface at RT was maintained up to the higher temperature, 600 C. High heat load test has been also performed on the brazed sample in order to find whether the samples meet the requirement of the divertor plates of LHD (Large Helical Device). Active Cooling Teststand (ACT:NIFS) with electron beam power of 100kW was used. In LHD, it is presumed that the maximum heat flux is 10MW/m 2 . In addition, the surface temperature of divertor has to be kept below 1,200 C to avoid RES, by active cooling. The heat load test showed that the brazing components of CX-2002U (flat plate type CFC-Cu brazed) was stable at 1,300 C under a heat flux of 10MW/m 2 , when the flow velocity of cooling water was 6m/s. No damage nor deterioration was found at the brazed zone after the heat load test

  3. Experimental evaluation of torsional fatigue strength of welded bellows and application to design of fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shimizu, Masatsugu; Suzuki, Kazuo; Sonobe, Tadashi; Hayashi, Yuzo; Mizuno, Gen-ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Torsional fatigue strength of the welded bellows was evaluated experimentally, aiming the application to a port of a fusion device. The welded bellows revealed elastic torsional buckling and spiral distorsion even under a small angle of torsion. Twisting load never leads the welded bellows to fracture easily so far as the angle of torsion is not excessively large, and the welded bellows has the torsional fatigue strength much larger than that expected so far. Two formulae were proposed to evaluate the stress of the welded bellows under the forced angle of torsion; shearing stress evaluation formula in the case that torsional buckling does not occur and the axial bending stress evaluation formula in the case that torsional buckling occurs. And the results of the torsional fatigue experiments showed that the former is reasonably conservative and simulates the actual behavior of the welded bellows better than the latter in the high cycle fatigue region and vice versa in the low cycle fatigue region from the viewpoint of the mechanical design. The present evaluation method of the torsional fatigue strength was applied to the welded bellows for the port of the JT-60 vacuum vessel and its structural integrity was confirmed under the design load condition. (author)

  4. Encoding technique for high data compaction in data bases of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, J.; Cremy, C.; Sanchez, E.; Portas, A.; Dormido, S.

    1996-01-01

    At present, data requirements of hundreds of Mbytes/discharge are typical in devices such as JET, TFTR, DIII-D, etc., and these requirements continue to increase. With these rates, the amount of storage required to maintain discharge information is enormous. Compaction techniques are now essential to reduce storage. However, general compression techniques may distort signals, but this is undesirable for fusion diagnostics. We have developed a general technique for data compression which is described here. The technique, which is based on delta compression, does not require an examination of the data as in delayed methods. Delta values are compacted according to general encoding forms which satisfy a prefix code property and which are defined prior to data capture. Several prefix codes, which are bit oriented and which have variable code lengths, have been developed. These encoding methods are independent of the signal analog characteristics and enable one to store undistorted signals. The technique has been applied to databases of the TJ-I tokamak and the TJ-IU torsatron. Compaction rates of over 80% with negligible computational effort were achieved. Computer programs were written in ANSI C, thus ensuring portability and easy maintenance. We also present an interpretation, based on information theory, of the high compression rates achieved without signal distortion. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. Benefits and drawbacks of low magnetic shears on the confinement in magnetic fusion toroidal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firpo, Marie-Christine; Constantinescu, Dana

    2012-10-01

    The issue of confinement in magnetic fusion devices is addressed within a purely magnetic approach. As it is well known, the magnetic field being divergence-free, the equations of its field lines can be cast in Hamiltonian form. Using then some Hamiltonian models for the magnetic field lines, the dual impact of low magnetic shear is demonstrated. Away from resonances, it induces a drastic enhancement of magnetic confinement that favors robust internal transport barriers (ITBs) and turbulence reduction. However, when low-shear occurs for values of the winding of the magnetic field lines close to low-order rationals, the amplitude thresholds of the resonant modes that break internal transport barriers by allowing a radial stochastic transport of the magnetic field lines may be much lower than the ones obtained for strong shear profiles. The approach can be applied to assess the robustness versus magnetic perturbations of general almost-integrable magnetic steady states, including non-axisymmetric ones such as the important single helicity steady states. This analysis puts a constraint on the tolerable mode amplitudes compatible with ITBs and may be proposed as a possible explanation of diverse experimental and numerical signatures of their collapses.

  6. Ohmic heating coil power supply using thyristor circuit breaker in a thermonuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Keiji; Shimada, Ryuichi; Tamura, Sanae; Yabuno, Kohei; Koseki, Shoichiro.

    1982-01-01

    In a large scale Tokamak thermonuclear fusion device such as the critical plasma testing facility (JT60) presently under construction, mechanical breakers such as vacuum and air breakers are mostly used for interrupting DC heavy current which is supplied to the ohmic heating coils of inductive energy accumulation method. The practical use of the DC breakers employing thyristors has just been started because the history of thyristor development is short and thristors are still expensive, in spite of the advantages. In this paper, the circuit is investigated in which the excellent high speed controllability of thyristors is fully utilized, while the economy is taken into accout, and the experiment carried out with a unit model is described. It was found that a thyristor switch, which was constructed by connecting the high speed thyristors of peak off-state voltage rating 2,000 V and mean current rating 500 A in direct parallel, was able to interrupt 12.7 kA current in the power supply circuit of ohmic heating coils developed this time. In addition, the switch configuration was able to be greatly simplified. When the multistage raising of plasma current is required, the raise can be performed with a single thyristor breaker because it can make high speed control. Therefore, the capacity of the breaker can be doubly and drastically reduced. Also, if current unbalance might occur between thyristor switch units, it gives no problem since the time of reverse voltage after current interruption dispersed smaller as current increased. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Surface temperature measurements by means of pulsed photothermal effects in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loarer, Th.; Brygo, F.; Gauthier, E.; Grisolia, C.; Le Guern, F.; Moreau, F.; Murari, A.; Roche, H.; Semerok, A.

    2007-01-01

    In fusion devices, the surface temperature of plasma facing components is measured using infrared cameras. This method requires a knowledge of the emissivity of the material, the reflected and parasitic fluxes (Bremsstrahlung). For carbon, the emissivity is known and constant over the detection wavelength (∼3-5 μm). For beryllium and tungsten, the reflected flux could contribute significantly to the collected flux. The pulsed photothermal method described in this paper allows temperature measurements independently of both reflected and parasitic fluxes. A local increase of the surface temperature (ΔT ∼ 10-15 K) introduced by a laser pulse (few ns) results in an additional component of the photon flux collected by the detector. Few μs after the pulse, a filtering of the signal allows to extract a temporal flux proportional only to the variation of the emitted flux, the emissivity and ΔT. The ratio of simultaneous measurements at two wavelengths leads to the elimination of ΔT and emissivity. The range of application increases for measurements at short wavelengths (1-1.7 μm) with no limitation due to the Bremsstrahlung emission

  8. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs

  9. Stimulated scattering in laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L., E-mail: lyin@lanl.gov; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Finnegan, S. M.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    In laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments, one often encounters a kλ{sub D} range of 0.15 < kλ{sub D} < 0.5, where stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is active (k is the initial electron plasma wave number and λ{sub D} is the Debye length). Using particle-in-cell simulations, the SRS reflectivity is found to scale as ∼ (kλ{sub D}){sup −4} for kλ{sub D} ≳ 0.3 where electron trapping effects dominate SRS saturation; the reflectivity scaling deviates from the above for kλ{sub D} < 0.3 when Langmuir decay instability (LDI) is present. The SRS risk is shown to be highest for kλ{sub D} between 0.2 and 0.3. SRS re-scattering processes are found to be unimportant under conditions relevant to ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Large-scale simulations of the hohlraum plasma show that the SRS wavelength spectrum peaks below 600 nm, consistent with most measured NIF spectra, and that nonlinear trapping in the presence of plasma gradients determines the SRS spectral peak. Collisional effects on SRS, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), LDI, and re-scatter, together with three dimensional effects, are examined. Effects of collisions are found to include de-trapping as well as cross-speckle electron temperature variation from collisional heating, the latter of which reduces gain, introduces a positive frequency shift that counters the trapping-induced negative frequency shift, and affects SRS and SBS saturation. Bowing and breakup of ion-acoustic wavefronts saturate SBS and cause a dramatic, sharp decrease in SBS reflectivity. Mitigation of SRS and SBS in the strongly nonlinear trapping regime is discussed.

  10. Computation of stationary 3D halo currents in fusion devices with accuracy control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Paolo; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the calculation of the resistive distribution of halo currents in three-dimensional structures of large magnetic confinement fusion machines. A Neumann electrokinetic problem is solved on a geometry so complicated that complementarity is used to monitor the discretization error. An irrotational electric field is obtained by a geometric formulation based on the electric scalar potential, whereas three geometric formulations are compared to obtain a solenoidal current density: a formulation based on the electric vector potential and two geometric formulations inspired from mixed and mixed-hybrid Finite Elements. The electric vector potential formulation is usually considered impractical since an enormous computing power is wasted by the topological pre-processing it requires. To solve this challenging problem, we present novel algorithms based on lazy cohomology generators that enable to save orders of magnitude computational time with respect to all other state-of-the-art solutions proposed in literature. Believing that our results are useful in other fields of scientific computing, the proposed algorithm is presented as a detailed pseudocode in such a way that it can be easily implemented.

  11. Recent US advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev, E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2007-01-01

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport, and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by >50X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. We are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy

  12. Engineering challenges encountered in the design of the ELMO BUMPY TORUS proof-of-principle fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillow, C.F.; Imster, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper first provides a summary of the history and current status of the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) fusion concept. A brief description of the EBT-P is then provided in which the many unique features of this fusion device are highlighted. This description will provide the technical background for the following discussions of some of the more challenging mechanical engineering problems encountered to date in the evolution of the EBT-P design. The problems discussed are: optimization of the device primary structure design, optimization of the superconducting magnet x-ray shield design, design of the liquid helium supply and distribution system, and selection of high vacuum seals and pumps and their protection from the high power microwave environment. The common challenge in each of these design issues was to assure adequate performance at minimum cost

  13. Performance test of dual modulator polarimeters in two different configurations for magneto-optic measurement of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenji Higuchi; Tsuyoshi Akiyama; Yoshifumi Azuma; Shunji Tsuji-Iio; Hiroaki Tsutsui; Ryuichi Shimada

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the magnetic field around plasma is indispensable for real-time control and data analysis on magnetic fusion devices such as tokamaks. Instead of commonly used pick-up loops, which have the problems of zero-point drifts, we proposed and tested a magneto-optic polarimeter based on the polarization modulation method using two photoelastic modulators (PEMs). Polarization detection using a pair of PEMs has been applied to the motional Stark effect (MSE) measurements in some tokamaks. The CO 2 laser polarimeter for electron density measurement on JT-60U adopted this method and demonstrated long time stability for several hours. However, this method requires the same number of pairs of PEMs, which are delicate and expensive, as that of channels so that this method is not easy to apply to multi-point measurements of magnetic fields around tokamaks. To cope with this problem, the two PEMs, which are conventionally placed behind each magnetic sensor, are used to modulate the incident beam before split for each magneto-optic sensor. This configuration can reduce the number of PEMs drastically and the optical system becomes simple. In this new optical configuration, the polarization angle resolution comparable to the conventional optical configuration of 0.002 o with response time of 10 ms was achieved at an incident polarization angle of about 0 o while that at 21 o was 0.07 o . The resolution of 0.07 o corresponds to 7 gauss when a 40-mm-long ZnSe sensing rod is used. Performance test between the two optical configurations were also made on the long-time stability and the accuracy with increasing numbers of beam splitters and/or mirrors for multi-point measurements. (author)

  14. Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL 3.0). Summary report of the Third Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, Mohamed E.

    2012-03-01

    The third Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL-3) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 9 December 2011. A summary of the presentations given during meeting is given in this report along with the discussions that took place. A list of actions necessary to complete the library production, processing and testing are given. Details of the documents arising from the CRP were agreed. (author)

  15. Interacting with mobile devices by fusion eye and hand gestures recognition systems based on decision tree approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuch, Hanene; Wali, Ali; Samet, Anis; Alimi, Adel M.

    2017-03-01

    Two systems of eyes and hand gestures recognition are used to control mobile devices. Based on a real-time video streaming captured from the device's camera, the first system recognizes the motion of user's eyes and the second one detects the static hand gestures. To avoid any confusion between natural and intentional movements we developed a system to fuse the decision coming from eyes and hands gesture recognition systems. The phase of fusion was based on decision tree approach. We conducted a study on 5 volunteers and the results that our system is robust and competitive.

  16. Properties of an interspinous fixation device (ISD) in lumbar fusion constructs: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techy, Fernando; Mageswaran, Prasath; Colbrunn, Robb W; Bonner, Tara F; McLain, Robert F

    2013-05-01

    Segmental fixation improves fusion rates and promotes patient mobility by controlling instability after lumbar surgery. Efforts to obtain stability using less invasive techniques have lead to the advent of new implants and constructs. A new interspinous fixation device (ISD) has been introduced as a minimally invasive method of stabilizing two adjacent interspinous processes by augmenting an interbody cage in transforaminal interbody fusion. The ISD is intended to replace the standard pedicle screw instrumentation used for posterior fixation. The purpose of this study is to compare the rigidity of these implant systems when supplementing an interbody cage as used in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. An in vitro human cadaveric biomechanical study. Seven human cadaver spines (T12 to the sacrum) were mounted in a custom-designed testing apparatus, for biomechanical testing using a multiaxial robotic system. A comparison of segmental stiffness was carried out among five conditions: intact spine control; interbody spacer (IBS), alone; interbody cage with ISD; IBS, ISD, and unilateral pedicle screws (unilat); and IBS, with bilateral pedicle screws (bilat). An industrial robot (KUKA, GmbH, Augsburg, Germany) applied a pure moment (±5 Nm) in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) through an anchor to the T12 vertebral body. The relative vertebral motion was captured using an optoelectronic camera system (Optotrak; Northern Digital, Inc., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada). The load sensor and the camera were synchronized. Maximum rotation was measured at each level and compared with the intact control. Implant constructs were compared with the control and with each other. A statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. A comparison between the intact spine and the IBS group showed no significant difference in the range of motion (ROM) in FE, LB, or AR for the operated level, L3-L4. After implantation of the ISD to augment

  17. Confinement studies of a high current density RFP in the Extrap T1 Upgrade device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.R.; Brzozowski, J.H.; Brunsell, P.; Hellblom, G.; Karlsson, P.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.; Welander, A.; Zastrow, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    Confinement studies have been carried out on the Extrap T1 device operated in the reversed field pinch (RFP) mode. Extrap T1 is a small device with a major radius of R=0.5 m and a high aspect ratio, R/a=8.9. For these experiments, the device has been operated with a resistive shell with measured, toroidally-averaged flux penetration times of τ sv = 500μs (vertical) and τ sR =300μs (radial). The pulse lengths are about 600 μs, which is slightly longer than the shell penetration time. The purpose of these experiments is to study energy confinement in a high aspect-ratio, high current-density RFP device with a resistive shell. The device can be operated with high current densities which exceed 20 MAm -2 on axis. For these discharges, the average electron density is relatively high, ≅ 1x10 20 m -3 . Therefore, although the average current density exceeds 5 MAm -2 , the important parameter / ≅ I/N is maintained less than 1x10 -13 Am, where N is the line density. The plasma diagnostics for the device include a single chord CO 2 laser interferometer ( ), single point Thomson scattering (T e , n o ), VUV and visible spectroscopy (T e , Z eff ) surface barrier diodes for soft X-ray measurements (T e ), bolometry (P rad ), surface probes (Γ p ,T i ) and comprehensive magnetic diagnostics for both equilibrium and magnetic fluctuation studies. (author) 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Bridge between fusion plasma and plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    In the present review, relationship between fusion plasma and processing plasma is discussed. From boundary-plasma studies in fusion devices new applications such as high-density plasma sources, erosion of graphite in a hydrogen plasma, formation of helium bubbles in high-melting-point metals and the use of toroidal plasmas for plasma processing are emerging. The authors would like to discuss a possibility of knowledge transfer from fusion plasmas to processing plasmas. (T. Ikehata)

  19. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M.; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs). PMID:26848664

  20. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Miguel Pires

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs.

  1. Study on Tensile Fatigue Behavior of Thermal Butt Fusion in Safety Class III High-Density Polyethylene Buried Piping in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Young Ju; Oh, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping, which has recently been applied to safety class III piping in nuclear power plants, can be butt-joined through the thermal fusion process, which heats two fused surfaces and then subject to axial pressure. The thermal fusion process generates bead shapes on the butt fusion. The stress concentrations caused by the bead shapes may reduce the fatigue lifetime. Thus, investigating the effect of the thermal butt fusion beads on fatigue behavior is necessary. This study examined the fatigue behavior of thermal butt fusion via a tensile fatigue test under stress-controlled conditions using finite element elastic stress analysis. Based on the results, the presence of thermal butt fusion beads was confirmed to reduce the fatigue lifetime in the low-cycle fatigue region while having a negligible effect in the medium- and high-cycle fatigue regions

  2. Study on Tensile Fatigue Behavior of Thermal Butt Fusion in Safety Class III High-Density Polyethylene Buried Piping in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Young Ju [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young Jin [KEPCO E and C, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping, which has recently been applied to safety class III piping in nuclear power plants, can be butt-joined through the thermal fusion process, which heats two fused surfaces and then subject to axial pressure. The thermal fusion process generates bead shapes on the butt fusion. The stress concentrations caused by the bead shapes may reduce the fatigue lifetime. Thus, investigating the effect of the thermal butt fusion beads on fatigue behavior is necessary. This study examined the fatigue behavior of thermal butt fusion via a tensile fatigue test under stress-controlled conditions using finite element elastic stress analysis. Based on the results, the presence of thermal butt fusion beads was confirmed to reduce the fatigue lifetime in the low-cycle fatigue region while having a negligible effect in the medium- and high-cycle fatigue regions.

  3. Critical plasma-wall interaction issues for plasma-facing materials and components in near-term fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Coad, J.P.; Haasz, A.A.; Janeschitz, G.; Noda, N.; Philipps, V.; Roth, J.; Skinner, C.H.; Tivey, R.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    The increase in pulse duration and cumulative run-time, together with the increase of the plasma energy content, will represent the largest changes in operation conditions in future fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) compared to today's experimental facilities. These will give rise to important plasma-physics effects and plasma-material interactions (PMIs) which are only partially observed and accessible in present-day experiments and will open new design, operation and safety issues. For the first time in fusion research, erosion and its consequences over many pulses (e.g., co-deposition and dust) may determine the operational schedule of a fusion device. This paper identifies the most critical issues arising from PMIs which represent key elements in the selection of materials, the design, and the optimisation of plasma-facing components (PFCs) for the first-wall and divertor. Significant advances in the knowledge base have been made recently, as part of the R and D supporting the engineering design activities (EDA) of ITER, and some of the most relevant data are reviewed here together with areas where further R and D work is urgently needed

  4. An Intraoperative Site-specific Bone Density Device: A Pilot Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Moschioni, Monica; Banfi, Luca Maria; Di Stefano, Anilo Alessio

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports a case of all-on-four rehabilitation where bone density at implant sites was assessed both through preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans and using a micromotor working as an intraoperative bone density measurement device. Implant-supported rehabilitation is a predictable treatment option for tooth replacement whose success depends on the clinician's experience, the implant characteristics and location and patient-related factors. Among the latter, bone density is a determinant for the achievement of primary implant stability and, eventually, for implant success. The ability to measure bone density at the placement site before implant insertion could be important in the clinical setting. A patient complaining of masticatory impairment was presented with a plan calling for extraction of all her compromised teeth, followed by implant rehabilitation. A week before surgery, she underwent CT examination, and the bone density on the CT scans was measured. When the implant osteotomies were created, the bone density was again measured with a micromotor endowed with an instantaneous torque-measuring system. The implant placement protocols were adapted for each implant, according to the intraoperative measurements, and the patient was rehabilitated following an all-on-four immediate loading protocol. The bone density device provided valuable information beyond that obtained from CT scans, allowing for site-specific, intraoperative assessment of bone density immediately before implant placement and an estimation of primary stability just after implant insertion. Measuring jaw-bone density could help clinicians to select implant-placement protocols and loading strategies based on site-specific bone features.

  5. High-density and high-ρR fuel assembly for fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, R.; Zhou, C.

    2005-01-01

    Scaling relations to optimize implosion parameters for fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion are derived and used to design high-gain fast-ignition targets. A method to assemble thermonuclear fuel at high densities, high ρR, and with a small-size hot spot is presented. Massive cryogenic shells can be imploded with a low implosion velocity V I on a low adiabat α using the relaxation-pulse technique. While the low V I yields a small hot spot, the low α leads to large peak values of the density and areal density. It is shown that a 750 kJ laser can assemble fuel with V I ≅1.7x10 7 cm/s, α≅0.7, ρ≅400 g/cc, ρR≅3 g/cm 2 , and a hot-spot volume of less than 10% of the compressed core. If fully ignited, this fuel assembly can produce high gains of interest to inertial fusion energy applications

  6. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  7. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems

  8. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Rogier M; Kemna, Evelien W M; Wolbers, Floor; van den Berg, Albert

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped curved microchannel using a double T-junction, with a frequency over 2000 Hz, followed by controlled droplet pairing with a 100% success rate. Subsequently, droplet fusion is realized using electrical actuation resulting in electro-coalescence of two droplets, each containing a single HL60 cell, with 95% efficiency. Finally, volume reduction of the fused droplet up to 75% is achieved by a triple pitchfork structure. This droplet volume reduction is necessary to obtain close cell-cell membrane contact necessary for final cell electrofusion, leading to hybridoma formation, which is the ultimate aim of this research. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium—tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekynia, B.; Razavipour, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x = 0 qualitatively. A high threshold energy flux density, i.e., E* = 4.3 × 10 12 J/m 2 , has been reached. Recently, fast ignition by employing clean petawatt—picosecond laser pulses was performed. The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses. The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium—tritium fuel at solid-state density. The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated. Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition. In this paper, the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks, thermonuclear reaction, heat transfer, electron—ion equilibration, stopping power of alpha particles, bremsstrahlung, expansion, density dependence, and fluid dynamics. New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations, including the density profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity. The density is only a function of x and independent of time. The ignition energy flux density, E* t , for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 10 12 J/m 2 . Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x = 0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  10. Calculation of induced current densities for humans by magnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Kang, Gang

    2001-11-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the impedance method to calculate the electric fields and current densities induced in millimetre resolution anatomic models of the human body, namely an adult and 10- and 5-year-old children, for exposure to nonuniform magnetic fields typical of two assumed but representative electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices at 1 and 30 kHz, respectively. The devices assumed for the calculations are a solenoid type magnetic deactivator used at store checkouts and a pass-by panel-type EAS system consisting of two overlapping rectangular current-carrying coils used at entry and exit from a store. The impedance method code is modified to obtain induced current densities averaged over a cross section of 1 cm2 perpendicular to the direction of induced currents. This is done to compare the peak current densities with the limits or the basic restrictions given in the ICNIRP safety guidelines. Because of the stronger magnetic fields at lower heights for both the assumed devices, the peak 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the CNS tissues such as the brain and the spinal cord are increasingly larger for smaller models and are the highest for the model of the 5-year-old child. For both the EAS devices, the maximum 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the brain of the model of the adult are lower than the ICNIRP safety guideline, but may approach or exceed the ICNIRP basic restrictions for models of 10- and 5-year-old children if sufficiently strong magnetic fields are used.

  11. Calculation of induced current densities for humans by magnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, O P; Kang, G

    2001-11-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the impedance method to calculate the electric fields and current densities induced in millimetre resolution anatomic models of the human body, namely an adult and 10- and 5-year-old children, for exposure to nonuniform magnetic fields typical of two assumed but representative electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices at 1 and 30 kHz, respectively. The devices assumed for the calculations are a solenoid type magnetic deactivator used at store checkouts and a pass-by panel-type EAS system consisting of two overlapping rectangular current-carrying coils used at entry and exit from a store. The impedance method code is modified to obtain induced current densities averaged over a cross section of 1 cm2 perpendicular to the direction of induced currents. This is done to compare the peak current densities with the limits or the basic restrictions given in the ICNIRP safety guidelines. Because of the stronger magnetic fields at lower heights for both the assumed devices, the peak 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the CNS tissues such as the brain and the spinal cord are increasingly larger for smaller models and are the highest for the model of the 5-year-old child. For both the EAS devices, the maximum 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the brain of the model of the adult are lower than the ICNIRP safety guideline, but may approach or exceed the ICNIRP basic restrictions for models of 10- and 5-year-old children if sufficiently strong magnetic fields are used.

  12. High current density M-type cathodes for vacuum electron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ji; Yu Zhiqiang; Shao Wensheng; Zhang Ke; Gao Yujuan; Yuan Haiqing; Wang Hui; Huang Kaizhi; Chen Qilue; Yan Suqiu; Cai Shaolun

    2005-01-01

    We investigated high current density emission capabilities of M-type cathodes used for vacuum electron devices (VEDs). The experimental results of emission and lifetime evaluating in both close-spaced diode structure and electron gun testing vehicles are given. Emission current densities measured in the diode structure at 1020 deg. C Br in the CW mode were above 10 A/cm 2 ; while in electron gun testing vehicles, emission current densities were above 8 A/cm 2 in CW mode and above 32 A/cm 2 in pulsed mode, respectively. The current density above 94 A/cm 2 has been acquired in no. 0306 electron gun vehicle while the practical temperature is 1060 deg. C Br . For a comparison some of the data from I-scandate cathodes are presented. Finally, several application examples in practical travelling wave tubes (TWTs) and multi beam klystrons (MBKs) are also reported

  13. Contributions to the 14th Symposium on fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, R.

    1987-01-01

    The ENEA contributions to the 14. Symposium on fusion technology is represented by 15 papers. They are dealing mainly with the FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade), a device under construction, through which high densities and confinement times will be obtained

  14. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described

  15. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Cook, R.C.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    We describe progress made during 1986 in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser fusion. The foam materials are polystyrene and resorcinolformaldehyde. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationships of their properties to target specifications are presented. In the final section, we discuss statistical experimental design techniques that are being used to optimize the foams. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Mechanical device for enhancing halo density in the TMX-U tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, W.L.; Barr, W.L.; Simonen, T.C.

    1984-04-01

    The halo recycler, a mechanical device similar to pumped limiters used in tokamaks, is studied as a means of enhancing the halo plasma density in the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U). The recycler structure consists of an annular chamber at each end of the tandem mirror device where the halo plasma is collected. The halo plasma density is increased by recycling the halo ions as they are neutralized by the collector plate. With sufficient power fed into the halo electrons, the recycler can sustain an upstream electron temperature of 30 eV for effective halo shielding while maintaining a low temperature of 5 eV near the collector plate to reduce sputtering. A power flow model has shown that the required power for heating the halo is low enough to make the halo recycler a practical concept

  17. Low intrinsic carrier density LSMO/Alq3/AlOx/Co organic spintronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riminucci, Alberto; Graziosi, Patrizio; Calbucci, Marco; Cecchini, Raimondo; Prezioso, Mirko; Borgatti, Francesco; Bergenti, Ilaria; Dediu, Valentin Alek

    2018-04-01

    The understanding of spin injection and transport in organic spintronic devices is still incomplete, with some experiments showing magnetoresistance and others not detecting it. We have investigated the transport properties of a large number of tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum-based organic spintronic devices with an electrical resistance greater than 5 MΩ that did not show magnetoresistance. Their transport properties could be described satisfactorily by known models for organic semiconductors. At high voltages (>2 V), the results followed the model of space charge limited current with a Poole-Frenkel mobility. At low voltages (˜0.1 V), that are those at which the spin valve behavior is usually observed, the charge transport was modelled by nearest neighbor hopping in intra-gap impurity levels, with a charge carrier density of n0 = (1.44 ± 0.21) × 1015 cm-3 at room temperature. Such a low carrier density can explain why no magnetoresistance was observed.

  18. Density measurements of H- and D- for fusion applications (final scientific report contract FU-CT-2000-50001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boilson, D

    2003-03-01

    The main topic of this contract is the implementation of the Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy (CRS) technique proposed for quantitative measurement of negative H{sup -} and D{sup -} densities in the Kamaboko III ion source on the MANTIS test bed in the DRFC, CEA Cadarache. MANTIS is used for the development of high density negative ion current beams for use in NBI systems in proposed nuclear fusion reactors. The source used at the MANTIS test stand is a scale version of the source designed for the ITER neutral beam injection system called the Kamaboko III ion source. This report outlines the performance of the KAMABOKO source when operated in caseiated mode. The effect of plasma grid temperature, Cs seeding, Cs consumption, and long pulse, 1000 s, beam extraction are discussed, and the limitations observed with the MANTIS system are identified and further objectives outlined. (author)

  19. Summary report from 1. research coordination meeting on nuclear data libraries for advance systems - fusion devices (FENDL - 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    The first Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advance Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL - 3) was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 2 to 5 December 2008. A summary of the meeting is given in this report along with discussions which took place. An important outcome of the meeting was the agreement to create a new FENDL-3.0 Starter Library. Finally, a list of task assignments was prepared together with the plan for future CRP activities. (author)

  20. Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL-3). Summary report from the Second Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, Mohamed E.

    2010-06-01

    The second Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL - 3) was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 23 to 26 March 2010. A summary of the meeting is given in this report along with the discussions which took place. An important outcome of the meeting was the decision to provide ENDF data libraries (FENDL-3/T) by April 2011. Finally, a list of task assignments was prepared together with the plan for future CRP activities. (author)

  1. Automated pose estimation of objects using multiple ID devices for handling and maintenance task in nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umetani, Tomohiro; Morioka, Jun-ichi; Tamura, Yuichi; Inoue, Kenji; Arai, Tatsuo; Mae, Yasusi

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the automated estimation of three-dimensional pose (position and orientation) of objects by autonomous robots, using multiple identification (ID) devices. Our goal is to estimate the object pose for assembly or maintenance tasks in a real nuclear fusion reactor system, with autonomous robots cooperating in a virtual assembly system. The method estimates the three-dimensional pose for autonomous robots. This paper discusses a method of motion generation for ID acquisition using the sensory data acquired by the measurement system attached to the robots and from the environment. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed method. (author)

  2. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  3. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage

  4. Temperature and carrier-density dependence of Auger and radiative recombination in nitride optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Yan, Qimin; Steiauf, Daniel; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2013-01-01

    Nitride light-emitting diodes are a promising solution for efficient solid-state lighting, but their performance at high power is affected by the efficiency-droop problem. Previous experimental and theoretical work has identified Auger recombination, a three-particle nonradiative carrier recombination mechanism, as the likely cause of the droop. In this work, we use first-principles calculations to elucidate the dependence of the radiative and Auger recombination rates on temperature, carrier density and quantum-well confinement. Our calculated data for the temperature dependence of the recombination coefficients are in good agreement with experiment and provide further validation on the role of Auger recombination in the efficiency reduction. Polarization fields and phase-space filling negatively impact device efficiency because they increase the operating carrier density at a given current density and increase the fraction of carriers lost to Auger recombination. (paper)

  5. High density high performance plasma with internal diffusion barrier in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, R.; Kobayashi, M.; Miyazawa, J.

    2008-10-01

    A attractive high density plasma operational regime, namely an internal diffusion barrier (IDB), has been discovered in the intrinsic helical divertor configuration on the Large Helical Device (LHD). The IDB which enables core plasma to access a high density/high pressure regime has been developed. It is revealed that the IDB is reproducibly formed by pellet fueling in the magnetic configurations shifted outward in major radius. Attainable central plasma density exceeds 1x10 21 m -3 . Central pressure reaches 1.5 times atmospheric pressure and the central β value becomes fairly high even at high magnetic field, i.e. β(0)=5.5% at B t =2.57 T. (author)

  6. High-speed repetitive pellet injector prototype for magnetic confinement fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Gasparotto, M.; Migliori, S.; Angelone, G.; Baldarelli, M.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Ronci, G.; Reggiori, A.; Riva, G.; Carlevaro, R.; Daminelli, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    The design of a test facility aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of high-speed repetitive acceleration of solid D 2 pellets for fusion applications, developed in a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ENEA Frascati, is presented. The results of tests performed at the CNPM/CNR on the piston wear in a repetitively operating two-stage gun are also reported

  7. Performance of Hall sensor-based devices for magnetic field diagnosis at fusion reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolshakova, I.; Ďuran, Ivan; Holyaka, R.; Hristoforou, E.; Marusenkov, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2007), s. 283-288 ISSN 1546-198X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Galvanomagnetic * Sensor * Fusion Reactor * Magnetic Diagnostics * Radiation Hardness Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.587, year: 2007

  8. Neutron spectra and level density parameters from 16O + 12C fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, J.; Remington, B.; Galonsky, A.; Haas, F.; Racca, R.; Prosser, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    Residues following 16 O + 12 C fusion were identified by their characteristic γ-rays. For several transitions in 23 Mg, 25 Mg, and 26 Al coincident neutron spectra were measured at six angles. Through use of the evaporation code CASCADE, comparisons were made of these spectra with predictions of the statistical model at five 16 O projectile energies between 43.2 and 56.0 MeV. The results require an excitation energy dependence for the effective radius parameter r 0 which determines the spin cutoff factor

  9. Controlled nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussard, R.W.; Coppi, B.

    1982-01-01

    A fusion power generating device is disclosed having a relatively small and inexpensive core region which may be contained within an energy absorbing blanket region. The fusion power core region contains apparatus of the toroidal type for confining a high density plasma. The fusion power core is removable from the blanket region and may be disposed and/or recycled for subsequent use within the same blanket region. Thermonuclear ignition of the plasma is obtained by feeding neutral fusible gas into the plasma in a controlled manner such that charged particle heating produced by the fusion reaction is utilized to bootstrap the device to a region of high temperatures and high densities wherein charged particle heating is sufficient to overcome radiation and thermal conductivity losses. The high density plasma produces a large radiation and particle flux on the first wall of the plasma core region thereby necessitating replacement of the core from the blanket region from time to time. A series of potentially disposable and replaceable central core regions are disclosed for a large-scale economical electrical power generating plant

  10. Studies on advanced superconductors for fusion device. Pt. 2. Metallic superconductors other than Nb{sub 3}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Mito, T. [eds.

    1997-03-01

    A comprehensive report on the present status of the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors was published as the NIFS-MEMO-20 in March, 1996 (Part 1 of this report series). The second report of this study covers various progress so far achieved in the research and development on advanced metallic superconductors other than Nb{sub 3}Sn. Among different A15 crystal-type compounds, Nb{sub 3}Al has been fabricated into cables with large current-carrying capacity for fusion device referring its smaller sensitivity to mechanical strain than Nb{sub 3}Sn. Other high-field A15 superconductors, e.g. V{sub 3}Ga, Nb{sub 3}Ge and Nb{sub 3}(Al,Ge), have been also fabricated through different novel processes as promising alternatives to Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors. Meanwhile, B1 crystal-type NbN and C15 crystal-type V{sub 2}(Hf,Zr) high-field superconductors are characterized by their excellent tolerance to mechanical strain and neutron irradiation. Chevrel-type PbMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} compound has gained much interests due to its extremely high upper critical field. In addition, this report includes the recent progress in ultra-fine filamentary NbTi wires for AC use, and that in NbTi/Cu magnetic shields necessary in the application of high magnetic field. The data on the decay of radioactivity in a variety of metals relating to fusion superconducting magnet are also attached as appendices. We hope that this report might contribute substantially as a useful reference for the planning of fusion apparatus of next generation as well as that of other future superconducting devices. (author)

  11. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  12. Development and application of ZM-2 drilling fluid density adjustment mixing device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongming Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure shallow (gas/water flow is often hidden in the deepwater seabed, so penetrating shallow flow in drilling without BOP will be highly risky. In this case, the conventional well killing method to balance the formation pressure with back pressure generated by well head equipment is no longer suitable. Based on the analysis of structural characteristics of domestic and foreign multi-phase mixing systems, a ZM-2 drilling fluid density adjustment mixing device with independent intellectual property right was developed according to the principles of dynamic well killing. The device is mainly composed of a throttle valve, a high-precision electromagnetic flowmeter, a mixer, dumbbell-shaped nozzles, connecting pipes and other components. Fixed on the mixer are three inlets to fill heavy mud, seawater and additives. Opposed jetting is adopted to realize rapid and uniform mixing of fluids with different densities. A laboratory test was conducted to work out the relationship between throttle opening and injection flow rate and establish a linear relationship between killing fluid density and heavy mud flow. The results of field test conducted in the Nanhai No.8 drill ship showed that the mixing device was stable in operation and excellent in mixing performance. The density difference of ingredient mixture could be controlled within 0.05 g/cm3 after the mixture flowed out of the mixing chamber of the mixer of about 0.3 m long, so such high precision can meet the requirement of dynamic well killing.

  13. Simulation of a coupled dynamic system of temperature and density in a fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, M.N.; Weiland, J.; Wilhelmsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Simulation studies of a coupled system of equations for the evolution of temperature and density have been performed. The results are presented in graphs displaying the evolution in time of the temperature and density profiles, as well as in phase-plane plots, relating the central values of temperature and density. Particular emphasis is devoted to the particle and heat pinch effects, which tend to counter-balance the ordinary diffusion, and to co-operate with the alpha particle heating in sustaining plasma equilibrium. Oscillatory approaches to equilibria are recorded. 28 refs., 20 figs

  14. Evaluation of efficacy of a new hybrid fusion device: a randomized, two-centre controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewe, Jan; Bredow, Jan; Oppermann, Johannes; Koy, Timmo; Delank, Stefan; Knoell, Peter; Eysel, Peer; Sobottke, Rolf; Zarghooni, Kourosh; Röllinghoff, Marc

    2014-09-05

    The 360° fusion of lumbar segments is a common and well-researched therapy to treat various diseases of the spine. But it changes the biomechanics of the spine and may cause adjacent segment disease (ASD). Among the many techniques developed to avoid this complication, one appears promising. It combines a rigid fusion with a flexible pedicle screw system (hybrid instrumentation, "topping off"). However, its clinical significance is still uncertain due to the lack of conclusive data. The study is a randomized, therapy-controlled, two-centre trial conducted in a clinical setting at two university hospitals. If they meet the criteria, outpatients presenting with degenerative disc disease, facet joint arthrosis or spondylolisthesis will be included in the study and randomized into two groups: a control group undergoing conventional fusion surgery (PLIF - posterior lumbar intervertebral fusion), and an intervention group undergoing fusion surgery using a new flexible pedicle screw system (PLIF + "topping off"), which was brought on the market in 2013. Follow-up examination will take place immediately after surgery, after 6 weeks and after 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. An ongoing assessment will be performed every year.Outcome measurements will include quality of life and pain assessments using validated questionnaires (ODI - Ostwestry Disability Index, SF-36™ - Short Form Health Survey 36, COMI - Core Outcome Measure Index). In addition, clinical and radiologic ASD, sagittal balance parameters and duration of work disability will be assessed. Inpatient and 6-month mortality, surgery-related data (e.g., intraoperative complications, blood loss, length of incision, surgical duration), postoperative complications (e.g. implant failure), adverse events, and serious adverse events will be monitored and documented throughout the study. New hybrid "topping off" systems might improve the outcome of lumbar spine fusion. But to date, there is a serious lack of and a great need

  15. High-energy-density physics foundation of inertial fusion and experimental astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, R Paul

    2018-01-01

    The raw numbers of high-energy-density physics are amazing: shock waves at hundreds of km/s (approaching a million km per hour), temperatures of millions of degrees, and pressures that exceed 100 million atmospheres. This title surveys the production of high-energy-density conditions, the fundamental plasma and hydrodynamic models that can describe them and the problem of scaling from the laboratory to the cosmos. Connections to astrophysics are discussed throughout. The book is intended to support coursework in high-energy-density physics, to meet the needs of new researchers in this field, and also to serve as a useful reference on the fundamentals. Specifically the book has been designed to enable academics in physics, astrophysics, applied physics and engineering departments to provide in a single-course, an introduction to fluid mechanics and radiative transfer, with dramatic applications in the field of high-energy-density systems. This second edition includes pedagogic improvements to the presentation ...

  16. Measurements of line-averaged electron density of pulsed plasmas using a He-Ne laser interferometer in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, D.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    In next step of fusion devices such as ITER, lifetime of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) is strongly affected by transient heat and particle loads during type I edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption. To clarify damage characteristics of the PFMs, transient heat and particle loads have been simulated by using a plasma gun device. We have performed simulation experiments by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The line-averaged electron density measured by a He-Ne interferometer is 2x10^21 m-3 in a drift tube. The plasma velocity measured by a time of flight technique and ion Doppler spectrometer was 70 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 100 eV for helium. Thus, the ion flux density is 1.4x10^26 m-2s-1. On the other hand, the MCPG is connected to a target chamber for material irradiation experiments. It is important to measure plasma parameters in front of target materials in the target chamber. In particular, a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material produced by the pulsed plasma irradiation has to be characterized in order to understand surface damage of PFMs under ELM-like plasma bombardment. In the conference, preliminary results of application of the He-Ne laser interferometer for the above experiment will be shown.

  17. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Agia Paraskevi, Attiki, 60092 (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a {sup 137}Cs source for density measurements and an {sup 241}Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  18. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a 137 Cs source for density measurements and an 241 Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  19. Fusion reaction cross-sections using the Wong model within Skyrme energy density based semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Raj, E-mail: rajkumarfzr@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Sharma, Manoj K. [School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Gupta, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2011-11-15

    First, the nuclear proximity potential, obtained by using the semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi (ETF) approach in Skyrme energy density formalism (SEDF), is shown to give more realistic barriers in frozen density approximation, as compared to the sudden approximation. Then, taking advantage of the fact that, in ETF method, different Skyrme forces give different barriers (height, position and curvature), we use the l-summed extended-Wong model of Gupta and collaborators (2009) under frozen densities approximation for calculating the cross-sections, where the Skyrme force is chosen with proper barrier characteristics, not-requiring additional 'barrier modification' effects (lowering or narrowing, etc.), for a best fit to data at sub-barrier energies. The method is applied to capture cross-section data from {sup 48}Ca + {sup 238}U, {sup 244}Pu, and {sup 248}Cm reactions and to fusion-evaporation cross-sections from {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni, {sup 64}Ni + {sup 64}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni + {sup 100}Mo reactions, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included, wherever required. Interestingly, whereas the capture cross-sections in Ca-induced reactions could be fitted to any force, such as SIII, SV and GSkI, by allowing a small change of couple of units in deduced l{sub max}-values at below-barrier energies, the near-barrier data point of {sup 48}Ca + {sup 248}Cm reaction could not be fitted to l{sub max}-values deduced for below-barrier energies, calling for a check of data. On the other hand, the fusion-evaporation cross-sections in Ni-induced reactions at sub-barrier energies required different Skyrme forces, representing 'modifications of the barrier', for the best fit to data at all incident center-of-mass energies E{sub c.m.}'s, displaying a kind of fusion hindrance at sub-barrier energies. This barrier modification effect is taken into care here by using different Skyrme forces for reactions belonging to different regions of

  20. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Jon; Rapp,; Miller,Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, post...

  1. Development of a swelling equation for 20%-CW 316 in a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The difficulties involved in the development of swelling correlations for AISI 316 in fusion environments are discussed. A set of void and bubble-swelling correlations has been developed which incorporates the limited available data from EBR-II and HFIR irradiations. It appears that at high fluences helium may play a minor role in the determination of total swelling over a considerable temperature range

  2. Density profile measurements from a two-gun plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, C.C.; Yen, C.K.; Yeh, T.R.; Kuo, Y.Y.; Shang, D.J.; Yu, Y.Z.; Hou, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of the plasma evolution in a two-gun plasma focus device has been studied using the laser shadowgraphy as well as the laser interferometry. The experiments were carried out from a 700 kJ two-gun plasma focus device reported earlier, which consisted of a pair of Mather type coaxial electrodes connected muzzle to muzzle. Previous results indicated that the simultaneous formation of the two deuterium plasma foci occurred earlier and then after ∼ 100 ns a disk-shaped plasma of ∼ 1.5 cm in diameter appeared in the middle region between the anodes. It is, therefore, the authors' goal to study the density profiles in the plasma foci and the middle region in order to understand further the formation of the plasma foci and their time evolution. The laser shadowgraphy was done with a XeCl excimer pumped dye laser system which operated at 550 nm with pulse width of ∼ 10 ns. The laser interferometry, on the other hand, was carried out using a TEA-TEA oscillator-amplifier N 2 -laser system with 337.1 nm and subnano-second pulse width. Both results show that the maximum electron density is ≥2 x 10 19 cm -3 and, in addition, the growth of the hydrodynamic instabilities are observed. These results together with the detailed density profiles are presented and discussed

  3. Bipolar sealer device reduces blood loss and transfusion requirements in posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Zachary L; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Thompson, George H

    2013-01-01

    Reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements is important in the operative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis. This can be achieved with special frames, cell saver systems, pharmacologic aspects, and other techniques. Recently there has been interest in bipolar sealer devices as an adjunct to traditional monopolar electrocautery. However, there is limited information on this device in pediatric spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed our experience with this device in a setting of a standard institutional operative carepath. Perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements of 50 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing a posterior spinal fusion and segmental spinal instrumentation and who had a bipolar sealer device used during their surgery was compared with a control group of the 50 preceding consecutive patients who did not. Anesthesia, surgical technique, use of intraoperative epsilon aminocaproic acid (Amicar), postoperative protocol, and indications for transfusions (hemoglobin≤7.0 g/dL) were identical in both groups. The preoperative demographics for the patients in both groups were statistically the same. The bipolar sealer group demonstrated a significant reduction in intraoperative estimated blood loss, total perioperative blood loss, volume of blood products transfused, and overall transfusion rate when compared with the control group. When subgroups consisting of only hybrid or all-pedicle screw constructs were considered individually, these findings remained consistent. There were no complications associated with the use of this device. Using the bipolar sealer device is a significant adjunct in decreasing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Level III-retrospective comparative study.

  4. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  5. Plasma Equilibrium Control in Nuclear Fusion Devices 2. Plasma Control in Magnetic Confinement Devices 2.1 Plasma Control in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takeshi

    The plasma control technique for use in large tokamak devices has made great developmental strides in the last decade, concomitantly with progress in the understanding of tokamak physics and in part facilitated by the substantial advancement in the computing environment. Equilibrium control procedures have thereby been established, and it has been pervasively recognized in recent years that the real-time feedback control of physical quantities is indispensable for the improvement and sustainment of plasma performance in a quasi-steady-state. Further development is presently undertaken to realize the “advanced plasma control” concept, where integrated fusion performance is achieved by the simultaneous feedback control of multiple physical quantities, combined with equilibrium control.

  6. Magnetic Cusp and Electric Nested- or Single-Well Configurations for High Density Antihydrogen and Fusion Nonneutral Plasma Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.A. Ordonez

    1999-01-01

    Malmberg-Penning traps have had limited uses for applications that require high density nonneutral plasma confinement. For such traps, the density is severely limited because a magnetic field is used to provide a radially inward force to balance both self-electric and centrifugal radially outward forces. A possible way to confine higher density nonneutral plasmas is to use a magnetic cusp configuration. An annular nonneutral plasma would be confined in the radial magnetic field of a magnetic cusp such that radial confinement is provided by an externally produced electric potential well while axial confinement is provided by the magnetic field. In addition, a radial electric potential profile having a nested-well configuration can be used to simultaneously confine two oppositely signed plasma species (e.g., positrons and antiprotons) that overlap. In the work reported, various aspects of using magnetic cusp configurations and electric nested-well configurations are considered. Plasma confinement with these configurations may be useful for obtaining fast antihydrogen recombination and trapping rates and for achieving practical fusion power production

  7. Magnetic cusp and electric nested- or single-well configurations for high density antihydrogen and fusion nonneutral plasma applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Malmberg-Penning traps have had limited uses for applications that require high density nonneutral plasma confinement. For such traps, the density is severely limited because a magnetic field is used to provide a radially inward force to balance both self-electric and centrifugal radially outward forces. A possible way to confine higher density nonneutral plasmas is to use a magnetic cusp configuration. An annular nonneutral plasma would be confined in the radial magnetic field of a magnetic cusp such that radial confinement is provided by an externally produced electric potential well while axial confinement is provided by the magnetic field. In addition, a radial electric potential profile having a nested-well configuration can be used to simultaneously confine two oppositely signed plasma species (e.g., positrons and antiprotons) that overlap. In the work reported, various aspects of using magnetic cusp configurations and electric nested-well configurations are considered. Plasma confinement with these configurations may be useful for obtaining fast antihydrogen recombination and trapping rates and for achieving practical fusion power production

  8. Migrational polarization in high-current density molten salt electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, J.; Vallet, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrochemical flux equations based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been derived in terms of experimental transport coefficients for binary molten salt mixtures analogous to those proposed for high temperature batteries and fuel cells. The equations and some numerical solutions indicate steady state composition gradients of significant magnitude. The effects of migrational separation must be considered along with other melt properties in the characterization of electrode behavior, melt composition, operating temperatures and differences of phase stability, wettability and other physicochemical properties at positive and negative electrodes of high current density devices with mixed electrolytes.

  9. Controllers for high-performance nuclear fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, de M.R.

    2012-01-01

    A succesful nuclear fusion reactor will confine plasma at hig temperatures and densities, with low thermal losses. The workhorse of the nuclear fusion community is the tokamak, a toroidal device in which plasmas are confined by poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields. Ideally, the confirming magnetic

  10. Fundamental processes of plasma and reactive gas surface treatment for the recovery of hydrogen isotopes from carbon co-deposits in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Soeren

    2014-01-01

    experiments are conducted. Sets of a-C:D layers with different thickness and structure are exposed to TCR, using O 2 and NO 2 , at temperatures of 470 to 630 K and pressures of 2 and 20 kPa to investigate the strong impact of exposure and layer properties, as predicted by the model. Plasmas produced by electron (ECR) and ion cyclotron frequencies (ICWC) are investigated with several base gases in a compact toroidal plasma device and the tokamak TEXTOR. The ion fluxes of these plasmas are investigated with Langmuir probes to allow the model comparison. Pre/Post determination of the layers allows quantifying the removal rates of the tested methods. The areal density of deuterium and carbon is determined by nuclear reaction analysis and Rutherfordbackscattering-spectrometry (NRA/RBS). Layer thicknesses are measured with ellipsometry. The experiments are conducted using well defined, high purity a-C:D layers deposited by plasmachemical-vapour-deposition from CD 4 in a specifically adapted vacuum device to be able to separate the effects of layers properties and exposure parameters. The experiments demonstrate that a 95% removal of a-C:D layers with NO 2 -TCR at 630K is possible within 3min. The model's prediction of a linear relation between the TCR rate and the co-deposits inventory is experimentally approved, validating its volume effect. The experiments with plasma removal reveal D 2 with a removal rate of 5.7±0.9 * 10 15 D/(cm 2 s) as the fastest base gas in tokamaks. Comparisons with O 2 show that the higher sputtering yield of O is counteracted by an 11-fold lower ion surface flux density, introduced by fundamental properties of O 2 . Pumping speed and partial exhaust gas pressures are identified as limiting factors for the removal rate, explaining differences to non-local observations from the literature. Furthermore, it is possible to remove O stored in surfaces in TEXTOR in, for fusion plasma operation, detrimental amounts by D 2 -ICWC. The models are in agreement with

  11. Fundamental processes of plasma and reactive gas surface treatment for the recovery of hydrogen isotopes from carbon co-deposits in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Soeren

    2014-11-01

    experiments are conducted. Sets of a-C:D layers with different thickness and structure are exposed to TCR, using O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, at temperatures of 470 to 630 K and pressures of 2 and 20 kPa to investigate the strong impact of exposure and layer properties, as predicted by the model. Plasmas produced by electron (ECR) and ion cyclotron frequencies (ICWC) are investigated with several base gases in a compact toroidal plasma device and the tokamak TEXTOR. The ion fluxes of these plasmas are investigated with Langmuir probes to allow the model comparison. Pre/Post determination of the layers allows quantifying the removal rates of the tested methods. The areal density of deuterium and carbon is determined by nuclear reaction analysis and Rutherfordbackscattering-spectrometry (NRA/RBS). Layer thicknesses are measured with ellipsometry. The experiments are conducted using well defined, high purity a-C:D layers deposited by plasmachemical-vapour-deposition from CD{sub 4} in a specifically adapted vacuum device to be able to separate the effects of layers properties and exposure parameters. The experiments demonstrate that a 95% removal of a-C:D layers with NO{sub 2}-TCR at 630K is possible within 3min. The model's prediction of a linear relation between the TCR rate and the co-deposits inventory is experimentally approved, validating its volume effect. The experiments with plasma removal reveal D{sub 2} with a removal rate of 5.7±0.9{sup *}10{sup 15} D/(cm{sup 2}s) as the fastest base gas in tokamaks. Comparisons with O{sub 2} show that the higher sputtering yield of O is counteracted by an 11-fold lower ion surface flux density, introduced by fundamental properties of O{sub 2}. Pumping speed and partial exhaust gas pressures are identified as limiting factors for the removal rate, explaining differences to non-local observations from the literature. Furthermore, it is possible to remove O stored in surfaces in TEXTOR in, for fusion plasma operation, detrimental

  12. Novel analysis technique for measuring edge density fluctuation profiles with reflectometry in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creely, A. J.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujimura, T.; Akiyama, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Emoto, M.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new method for measuring density fluctuation profiles near the edge of plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been developed utilizing reflectometry combined with pellet-induced fast density scans. Reflectometer cutoff location was calculated by proportionally scaling the cutoff location calculated with fast far infrared laser interferometer (FIR) density profiles to match the slower time resolution results of the ray-tracing code LHD-GAUSS. Plasma velocity profile peaks generated with this reflectometer mapping were checked against velocity measurements made with charge exchange spectroscopy (CXS) and were found to agree within experimental uncertainty once diagnostic differences were accounted for. Measured density fluctuation profiles were found to peak strongly near the edge of the plasma, as is the case in most tokamaks. These measurements can be used in the future to inform inversion methods of phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements. This result was confirmed with both a fixed frequency reflectometer and calibrated data from a multi-frequency comb reflectometer, and this method was applied successfully to a series of discharges. The full width at half maximum of the turbulence layer near the edge of the plasma was found to be only 1.5-3 cm on a series of LHD discharges, less than 5% of the normalized minor radius.

  13. Low-emittance uniform density Cs+ sources for heavy ion fusion accelerators studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Garvey, T.; Johnson, R.; Chupp, W.

    1991-04-01

    Low-emittance (high-brightness) Cs + thermionic sources were developed for the heavy ion induction linac experiment MBE-4 at LBL. The MBE-4 linac accelerates four 10 mA beams from 200 ke V to 900 ke V while amplifying the current up to a factor of nine. Recent studies of the transverse beam dynamics suggested that characteristics of the injector geometry were contributing to the normalized transverse emissions growth. Phase-space and current density distribution measurements of the beam extracted from the injector revealed overfocusing of the outermost rays causing a hollow density profile. We shall report on the performance of a 5 mA scraped beam source (which eliminates the outermost beam rays in the diode) and on the design of an improved 10 mA source. The new source is based on EGUN calculations which indicated that a beam with good emissions and uniform current density could be obtained by modifying the cathode Pierce electrodes and using a spherical emitting surface. The measurements of the beam current density profile on a test stand were found to be in agreement with the numerical simulations. 3 refs., 6 figs

  14. Development of functional ceramics for nuclear fusion devices and their property measurements in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Hideo; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1989-01-01

    The research and development of high performance ceramics related to nuclear energy increase their importance. Especially innovation and application of ceramics are needed in fusion reactors. Necessity of the selection of composite elements for low activation ceramics and transmutation effects with high energy neutron are summarized in general requirements. The development of new materials such as Si 3 N 4 with good dielectric properties and the application of zirconia for high temperature electrolysis of tritiated water in tritium recycling system are summarized as topical issues. (author)

  15. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  16. 8th international workshop on plasma edge theory in fusion devices. Abstracts of invited and contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipilae, S.K.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The 8th International Workshop on Plasma Edge Theory in Fusion Devices, held at Dipoli Congress Centre, Espoo, Finland, is organised on behalf of the International Scientific Committee by Helsinki University of Technology and VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland). Similar to the seven preceding Workshops, it addresses the theory for the boundary layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. It reflects the present status of the theory for the edge region of fusion plasmas. Emphasis is placed on the development of theory and of appropriate numerical methods as well as on self-consistent modelling of experimental data (including also empirical elements). The following topics are covered: basic edge plasma theory, models of special phenomena and edge control, and integrated edge plasma modelling. The International Scientific Committee has selected the papers and compiled the scientific programme. All other arrangements have been made by the Local Organising Committee. The Workshop is supported by the European Commission, High-Level Scientific Conferences. This Book of Abstracts contains the scientific programme and the abstracts of the invited and contributed papers. The Workshop has seven invited lectures of 60 minutes duration (including 10 minutes for discussion). In addition, 10 contributed papers were selected for oral presentation of 30 minutes duration (including five minutes for discussion). All oral presentations are given in plenary sessions. The remaining 34 contributed papers are presented as posters in three sessions. The invited lectures and contributed oral papers are presented also as posters. All invited and contributed papers will be refereed and published also as a regular issue of the journal Contributions to Plasma Physics. (orig.)

  17. Development of a diagnostic technique based on Cherenkov effect for measurements of fast electrons in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Jakubowski, L.; Zebrowski, J.; Malinowski, K.; Rabinski, M.; Sadowski, M. J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), 7 Andrzeja Soltana Str., 05-400 Otwock (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    A diagnostic technique based on the Cherenkov effect is proposed for detection and characterization of fast (super-thermal and runaway) electrons in fusion devices. The detectors of Cherenkov radiation have been specially designed for measurements in the ISTTOK tokamak. Properties of several materials have been studied to determine the most appropriate one to be used as a radiator of Cherenkov emission in the detector. This technique has enabled the detection of energetic electrons (70 keV and higher) and the determination of their spatial and temporal variations in the ISTTOK discharges. Measurement of hard x-ray emission has also been carried out in experiments for validation of the measuring capabilities of the Cherenkov-type detector and a high correlation was found between the data of both diagnostics. A reasonable agreement was found between experimental data and the results of numerical modeling of the runaway electron generation in ISTTOK.

  18. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, Ahmed [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  19. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  20. Synthesis of low density foam shells for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattaud, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the fabrication process of low density foam shells and the sharp control of their shape (diameter, thickness, density, sphericity, non-concentricity). During this PhD we focused on the non-concentricity criterion which has to be lower than 1%. The shells are synthesized using a microencapsulation process leading to a double emulsion and followed by a thermal polymerization at 60 C. According to the literature, three major parameters, the density of the three phases, the deformations of the shells along the process and the kinetics of the polymerization have a direct influence on the shells non-concentricity. The results obtained showed that when the density gap between the internal water phase and the organic phase increases, the TMPTMA shells non-concentricity improves. A density gap of 0.078 g.cm -3 at 60 C, leads to an average non-concentricity of 2.4% with a yield of shells of 58%. It was also shown that the synthesis process can be considered as reproducible. While using the same internal water phase, equivalent non-concentricity results are obtained using either a straight tube, a tube with areas of constriction or a short wound tube. The time required to fix the shell's shape is at least 20 minutes with thermal polymerization. So, it seems that the time spent by the shells inside the rotating flask allows the centering of the internal water phase inside the organic phase, whatever the circulation process used. In order to get higher polymerization rates and to avoid destabilization phenomena, we then focused our study on photo polymerization. When the synthesis is performed using a UV lamp with an efficient light intensity, the shells have a slightly higher thickness than the shells synthesized by thermal polymerization. Moreover, a really higher yield, around 80%, is achieved with UV polymerization. However, the average non-concentricity of the shells synthesized lays around 20%, which is really high compared to the 2.4% average

  1. Scattering measurements in Tokamak type devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoba, Tohru

    1975-03-01

    Theories, experiments and proposals for light scattering in Tokamak type devices are reviewed. Thomson scattering, measuring method of the current density distribution by scattering and resonance fluorescence are summarily described. These methods may be useful for diagnosis of the fusion plasmas. The report may help planning of the measuring apparatus for the fusion plasmas in future. (auth.)

  2. Mechanical performance of cervical intervertebral body fusion devices: A systematic analysis of data submitted to the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Jonathan H; Sing, David C; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Peck, Deepa G; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Dmitriev, Anton E

    2017-03-21

    Cervical intervertebral body fusion devices (IBFDs) are utilized to provide stability while fusion occurs in patients with cervical pathology. For a manufacturer to market a new cervical IBFD in the United States, substantial equivalence to a cervical IBFD previously cleared by FDA must be established through the 510(k) regulatory pathway. Mechanical performance data are typically provided as part of the 510(k) process for IBFDs. We reviewed all Traditional 510(k) submissions for cervical IBFDs deemed substantially equivalent and cleared for marketing from 2007 through 2014. To reduce sources of variability in test methods and results, analysis was restricted to cervical IBFD designs without integrated fixation, coatings, or expandable features. Mechanical testing reports were analyzed and results were aggregated for seven commonly performed tests (static and dynamic axial compression, compression-shear, and torsion testing per ASTM F2077, and subsidence testing per ASTM F2267), and percentile distributions of performance measurements were calculated. Eighty-three (83) submissions met the criteria for inclusion in this analysis. The median device yield strength was 10,117N for static axial compression, 3680N for static compression-shear, and 8.6Nm for static torsion. Median runout load was 2600N for dynamic axial compression, 1400N for dynamic compression-shear, and ±1.5Nm for dynamic torsion. In subsidence testing, median block stiffness (Kp) was 424N/mm. The mechanical performance data presented here will aid in the development of future cervical IBFDs by providing a means for comparison for design verification purposes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Predictive Simulation of Process Windows for Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: Influence of the Powder Bulk Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Alexander M; Küng, Vera E; Pobel, Christoph; Markl, Matthias; Körner, Carolin

    2017-09-22

    The resulting properties of parts fabricated by powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes are determined by their porosity, local composition, and microstructure. The objective of this work is to examine the influence of the stochastic powder bed on the process window for dense parts by means of numerical simulation. The investigations demonstrate the unique capability of simulating macroscopic domains in the range of millimeters with a mesoscopic approach, which resolves the powder bed and the hydrodynamics of the melt pool. A simulated process window reveals the influence of the stochastic powder layer. The numerical results are verified with an experimental process window for selective electron beam-melted Ti-6Al-4V. Furthermore, the influence of the powder bulk density is investigated numerically. The simulations predict an increase in porosity and surface roughness for samples produced with lower powder bulk densities. Due to its higher probability for unfavorable powder arrangements, the process stability is also decreased. This shrinks the actual parameter range in a process window for producing dense parts.

  4. The Catchment Feature Model: A Device for Multimodal Fusion and a Bridge between Signal and Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Francis

    2004-12-01

    The catchment feature model addresses two questions in the field of multimodal interaction: how we bridge video and audio processing with the realities of human multimodal communication, and how information from the different modes may be fused. We argue from a detailed literature review that gestural research has clustered around manipulative and semaphoric use of the hands, motivate the catchment feature model psycholinguistic research, and present the model. In contrast to "whole gesture" recognition, the catchment feature model applies a feature decomposition approach that facilitates cross-modal fusion at the level of discourse planning and conceptualization. We present our experimental framework for catchment feature-based research, cite three concrete examples of catchment features, and propose new directions of multimodal research based on the model.

  5. The Catchment Feature Model: A Device for Multimodal Fusion and a Bridge between Signal and Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Quek

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The catchment feature model addresses two questions in the field of multimodal interaction: how we bridge video and audio processing with the realities of human multimodal communication, and how information from the different modes may be fused. We argue from a detailed literature review that gestural research has clustered around manipulative and semaphoric use of the hands, motivate the catchment feature model psycholinguistic research, and present the model. In contrast to “whole gesture” recognition, the catchment feature model applies a feature decomposition approach that facilitates cross-modal fusion at the level of discourse planning and conceptualization. We present our experimental framework for catchment feature-based research, cite three concrete examples of catchment features, and propose new directions of multimodal research based on the model.

  6. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, F.Q.L.; John, B.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Calle, C.I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  7. Liquid metals as alternative solution for the power exhaust of future fusion devices: status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, J W; Philipps, V; Sergienko, G; Terra, A; Unterberg, B; Wegener, T; De Temmerman, G; Van den Bekerom, D C M; Federici, G; Strohmayer, G

    2014-01-01

    Applying liquid metals as plasma facing components for fusion power-exhaust can potentially ameliorate lifetime issues as well as limitations to the maximum allowed surface heat loads by allowing for a more direct contact with the coolant. The material choice has so far been focused on lithium (Li), as it showed beneficial impact on plasma operation. Here materials such as tin (Sn), gallium (Ga) and aluminum (Al) are discussed as alternatives potentially allowing higher operating temperatures without strong evaporation. Power loads of up to 25 MW m −2 for a Sn/W component can be envisioned based on calculations and modeling. Reaching a higher operating temperature due to material re-deposition will be discussed. Liquids typically face stability issues due to j × B forces, potential pressure and magnetohydrodynamic driven instabilities. The capillary porous system is used for stabilization by a mesh (W and Mo) substrate and replenishment by means of capillary action. (paper)

  8. Computerized cost estimation spreadsheet and cost data base for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.R.; Rothe, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Component design parameters (weight, surface area, etc.) and cost factors are input and direct and indirect costs are calculated. The cost data base file derived from actual cost experience within the fusion community and refined to be compatible with the spreadsheet costing approach is a catalog of cost coefficients, algorithms, and component costs arranged into data modules corresponding to specific components and/or subsystems. Each data module contains engineering, equipment, and installation labor cost data for different configurations and types of the specific component or subsystem. This paper describes the assumptions, definitions, methodology, and architecture incorporated in the development of the cost estimation spreadsheet and cost data base, along with the type of input required and the output format

  9. Assessment of martensitic steels as structural materials in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.; Chen, W.Y.K.; Cheng, E.T.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Miller, P.H.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Thompson, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    This manuscript documents the results of preliminary experiments and analyses to assess the feasibility of incorporating ferromagnetic martensitic steels in fusion reactor designs and to evaluate the possible advantages of this class of material with respect to first wall/blanket lifetime. The general class of alloys under consideration are ferritic steels containing from about 9 to 13 percent Cr with some small additions of various strengthening elements such as Mo. These steels are conventionally used in the normalized and tempered condition for high temperature applications and can compete favorably with austenitic alloys up to about 600 0 C. Although the heat treatment can result in either a tempered martensite or bainite structure, depending on the alloy and thermal treatment parameters, this general class of materials will be referred to as martensitic stainless steels for simplicity

  10. The manufacture of carbon armoured plasma-facing components for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedler, B.; Huber, T.; Zabernig, A.; Rainer, F.; Scheiber, K.H.; Schedle, D.

    2001-01-01

    Within the last decade Plansee has been active in the development and manufacture of different plasma-facing-components for nuclear fusion experiments consisting in a tungsten or CFC-armor joined onto metallic substrates like TZM, stainless steel or copper-alloys. The manufacture of these components requires unique joining technologies in order to obtain reliable thermo mechanical stable joints able to withstand highest heat fluxes without any deterioration of the joint. In an overview the different techniques will be presented by some examples of components already manufactured and successfully tested under high heat flux conditions. Furthermore an overview will be given on the manufacture of different high heat flux components for TORE SUPRA, Wendelstein 7-X and ITER. (author)

  11. High-density plasma etching of III-nitrides: Process development, device applications and damage remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajwinder

    Plasma-assisted etching is a key technology for III-nitride device fabrication. The inevitable etch damage resulting from energetic pattern transfer is a challenge that needs to be addressed in order to optimize device performance and reliability. This dissertation focuses on the development of a high-density inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) etch process for III-nitrides, the demonstration of its applicability to practical device fabrication using a custom built ICP reactor, and development of techniques for remediation of etch damage. A chlorine-based standard dry etch process has been developed and utilized in fabrication of a number of electronic and optoelectronic III-nitride devices. Annealing studies carried out at 700°C have yielded the important insight that the annealing time necessary for making good-quality metal contacts to etch processed n-GaN is very short (water, prior to metallization, removes some of the etch damage and is helpful in recovering contact quality. In-situ treatment consisting of a slow ramp-down of rf bias at the end of the etch is found to achieve the same effect as the ex-situ treatment. This insitu technique is significantly advantageous in a large-scale production environment because it eliminates a process step, particularly one involving treatment in hydrochloric acid. ICP equipment customization for scaling up the process to full 2-inch wafer size is described. Results on etching of state of the art 256 x 256 AlGaN focal plane arrays of ultraviolet photodetectors are reported, with excellent etch uniformity over the wafer area.

  12. Density-controllable nonvolatile memory devices having metal nanocrystals through chemical synthesis and assembled by spin-coating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangli; Chen Yubin; Shi Yi; Pu Lin; Pan Lijia; Zhang Rong; Zheng Youdou

    2010-01-01

    A novel two-step method is employed, for the first time, to fabricate nonvolatile memory devices that have metal nanocrystals. First, size-averaged Au nanocrystals are synthesized chemically; second, they are assembled into memory devices by a spin-coating technique at room temperature. This attractive approach makes it possible to tailor the diameter and control the density of nanocrystals individually. In addition, processes at room temperature prevent Au diffusion, which is a main concern for the application of metal nanocrystal-based memory. The experimental results, both the morphology characterization and the electrical measurements, reveal that there is an optimum density of nanocrystal monolayer to balance between long data retention and a large hysteresis memory window. At the same time, density-controllable devices could also feed the preferential emphasis on either memory window or retention time. All these facts confirm the advantages and novelty of our two-step method. (semiconductor devices)

  13. Fusion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang [eds.

    2012-09-15

    Recreating the energy production process of the Sun - nuclear fusion - on Earth in a controlled fashion is one of the greatest challenges of this century. If achieved at affordable costs, energy supply security would be greatly enhanced and environmental degradation from fossil fuels greatly diminished. Fusion Physics describes the last fifty years or so of physics and research in innovative technologies to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for energy production. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved since its establishment in 1957 in fusion research. It has been the driving force behind the biennial conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, today known as the Fusion Energy Conference. Hosted by several Member States, this biennial conference provides a global forum for exchange of the latest achievements in fusion research against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and, eventually, a fusion power plant. The scientific and technological knowledge compiled during this series of conferences, as well as by the IAEA Nuclear Fusion journal, is immense and will surely continue to grow in the future. It has led to the establishment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which represents the biggest experiment in energy production ever envisaged by humankind.

  14. Neutronic design of pulse operation simulating device for in-pile functional test of fusion blanket by MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Nakamichi, Masaru; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The pulse operation of a fusion reactor can be simulated in a fission reactor by controlling the neutron flux entering a test section by using a rotating 'hollow cylinder with window' made of hafnium. The rotating cylinder is installed between the test section and the fixed outer neutron absorber cylinder and is also made of hafnium with an opening in the direction to the core center. For gathering engineering data for the tritium breeding blanket such as characteristics of temperature change, tritium release and recovery, etc., it is desirable that the ratio of minimum to maximum thermal neutron fluxes is greater than 1:10. Design calculations were performed for the test assembly which considered local neutronic effects and the mechanical constraints of the device. From the results of these calculations, the ratio of minimum to maximum thermal neutron flux under irradiation would be about 1:10 using a pulse operation simulating device which has a thickness of 6.5 mm and a 150deg window angle for the rotating hollow cylinder and 5.0 mm in thickness of fixed neutron absorber. (author)

  15. Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10 20 sec m -3 , the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation

  16. Measuring device for the spatial neutron density distribution within a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fracke, A.; Wachtler, H.

    1974-01-01

    A solid probe in a pneumatic tube is lead from the core to a measuring device outside the pressure vessel and reversely, in order to measure the local neutron density distribution inside a reactor core. The activiable solid probe is in the form of a steel spiral spring with densely open coils and semi-spherical end pieces. A good curve negotiating characteristic of the measuring probe and defined duration times are secured in the reactor core. Furthermore, the interior of the spiral can be filled with a lubricating medium, e.g. molybdenum sulphite, so that a better sliding of the measuring probe into the tubes of the pneumatic tube is ensured. (DG) [de

  17. Method and device for secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertsching, Alan Kevin; Trantor, Troy Joseph; Ebner, Matthias Anthony; Norby, Brad Curtis

    2016-04-05

    A method and device for producing secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon. A substrate comprising carbon is provided. A precursor is intercalated between carbon in the substrate. The precursor intercalated in the substrate is irradiated until at least a portion of the precursor, preferably a majority of the precursor, is transmutated into tritium and bonds with carbon of the substrate forming bonded tritium. The resulting bonded tritium, tritium bonded with carbon, produces electrons via beta decay. The substrate is preferably a substrate from the list of substrates consisting of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite, carbon fibers, carbon nanotunes, buckministerfullerenes, and combinations thereof. The precursor is preferably boron-10, more preferably lithium-6. Preferably, thermal neutrons are used to irradiate the precursor. The resulting bonded tritium is preferably used to generate electricity either directly or indirectly.

  18. Multi-Sensor Fusion for Enhanced Contextual Awareness of Everyday Activities with Ubiquitous Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Guiry

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors investigate the role that smart devices, including smartphones and smartwatches, can play in identifying activities of daily living. A feasibility study involving N = 10 participants was carried out to evaluate the devices’ ability to differentiate between nine everyday activities. The activities examined include walking, running, cycling, standing, sitting, elevator ascents, elevator descents, stair ascents and stair descents. The authors also evaluated the ability of these devices to differentiate indoors from outdoors, with the aim of enhancing contextual awareness. Data from this study was used to train and test five well known machine learning algorithms: C4.5, CART, Naïve Bayes, Multi-Layer Perceptrons and finally Support Vector Machines. Both single and multi-sensor approaches were examined to better understand the role each sensor in the device can play in unobtrusive activity recognition. The authors found overall results to be promising, with some models correctly classifying up to 100% of all instances.

  19. Effects of DD and DT neutron irradiation on some Si devices for fusion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Y.; Iida, T.

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the difference in the irradiation effects on Si devices between DT and DD neutrons, CCD image sensors, memory ICs and a Si detector were irradiated with neutrons from a deuteron accelerator. The transient effects (i.e. neutron-induced background noises) and permanent effects (i.e. neutron damage) on them were in situ measured during irradiation. Regarding the transient effects, brightening spot noises, soft-error upsets and induced-charge noises were measured for the CCDs, memory ICs and Si detector, respectively. As for the permanent effect, the number of damaged cells of the CCDs and the leakage current of the Si detector increased with neutron fluence. Also we developed a Monte-Carlo code with the TRIM code to evaluate the correlation of DT and DD neutron effects on Si devices. The calculated correlation factor of DT and DD neutron damage for Si devices agreed approximately with the correlation factor obtained from the irradiation experiments on the CCDs and Si detector. (orig.)

  20. Effects of DD and DT neutron irradiation on some Si devices for fusion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Iida, Toshiyuki

    1998-10-01

    In order to examine the difference in the irradiation effects on Si devices between DT and DD neutrons, CCD image sensors, memory ICs and a Si detector were irradiated with neutrons from a deuteron accelerator. The transient effects (i.e. neutron-induced background noises) and permanent effects (i.e. neutron damage) on them were in situ measured during irradiation. Regarding the transient effects, brightening spot noises, soft-error upsets and induced-charge noises were measured for the CCDs, memory ICs and Si detector, respectively. As for the permanent effect, the number of damaged cells of the CCDs and the leakage current of the Si detector increased with neutron fluence. Also we developed a Monte-Carlo code with the TRIM code to evaluate the correlation of DT and DD neutron effects on Si devices. The calculated correlation factor of DT and DD neutron damage for Si devices agreed approximately with the correlation factor obtained from the irradiation experiments on the CCDs and Si detector.

  1. Conceptual design of a generic pulse schedule and event handling editor for improved fusion device operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barana, Oliviero; Nouailletas, Rémy; Brémond, Sylvain; Moreau, Philippe; Allegretti, Ludovic; Balme, Stéphane; Ravenel, Nathalie; Mannori, Simone; Guillerminet, Bernard; Leroux, Fabrice; Douai, David; Nardon, Eric; Hertout, Patrick; Saint-Laurent, François

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Real-time event handling requires extended functionalities of pulse schedule editors and plasma control systems ► A new pulse schedule editor, conceived for parameterization of systematic off-normal event handling, is described ► A global, generic approach on off-normal event handling is highlighted ► The functional architecture of an off-normal event handling oriented plasma control system is discussed ► The main objects of the pulse schedule editor are the segment-descriptor object and the scenario-descriptor object. -- Abstract: Coping with unexpected events is an important issue of nuclear fusion experiments. The future machines, characterized by very long plasma discharges and actively cooled metallic plasma-facing components, will require a systematic intervention in real time, in order to maximize the performance and protect the investment. The real-time management of events will require extending the functionalities of the current pulse schedule editors with the possibility of using reference waveforms provided with acceptability margins and setting up advanced mitigation strategies and event countermeasures. With this purpose, a new pulse schedule editor, based on a time-segment approach for the preparation of experimental scenarios, is being conceived on Tore Supra, together with a new plasma control system. This paper will report on their conceptual design and give account of the preliminary results of a feasibility study currently under way in order to prepare a possible implementation on Tore Supra

  2. Conceptual design of a generic pulse schedule and event handling editor for improved fusion device operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barana, Oliviero, E-mail: oliviero.barana@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France); Nouailletas, Rémy; Brémond, Sylvain; Moreau, Philippe; Allegretti, Ludovic; Balme, Stéphane; Ravenel, Nathalie [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France); Mannori, Simone [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano (Italy); Guillerminet, Bernard; Leroux, Fabrice; Douai, David; Nardon, Eric; Hertout, Patrick; Saint-Laurent, François [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Real-time event handling requires extended functionalities of pulse schedule editors and plasma control systems ► A new pulse schedule editor, conceived for parameterization of systematic off-normal event handling, is described ► A global, generic approach on off-normal event handling is highlighted ► The functional architecture of an off-normal event handling oriented plasma control system is discussed ► The main objects of the pulse schedule editor are the segment-descriptor object and the scenario-descriptor object. -- Abstract: Coping with unexpected events is an important issue of nuclear fusion experiments. The future machines, characterized by very long plasma discharges and actively cooled metallic plasma-facing components, will require a systematic intervention in real time, in order to maximize the performance and protect the investment. The real-time management of events will require extending the functionalities of the current pulse schedule editors with the possibility of using reference waveforms provided with acceptability margins and setting up advanced mitigation strategies and event countermeasures. With this purpose, a new pulse schedule editor, based on a time-segment approach for the preparation of experimental scenarios, is being conceived on Tore Supra, together with a new plasma control system. This paper will report on their conceptual design and give account of the preliminary results of a feasibility study currently under way in order to prepare a possible implementation on Tore Supra.

  3. Two-dimensional cross-section and SED uncertainty analysis for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Urban, W.T.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of two-dimensional cross-section and secondary-energy-distribution (SED) sensitivity was implemented by developing a two-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code, SENSIT-2D. Analyses of the Fusion Engineering Design (FED) conceptual inboard shield indicate that, although the calculated uncertainties in the 2-D model are of the same order of magnitude as those resulting from the 1-D model, there might be severe differences. The more complex the geometry, the more compulsory a 2-D analysis becomes. Specific results show that the uncertainty for the integral heating of the toroidal field (TF) coil for the FED is 114.6%. The main contributors to the cross-section uncertainty are chromium and iron. Contributions to the total uncertainty were smaller for nickel, copper, hydrogen and carbon. All analyses were performed with the Los Alamos 42-group cross-section library generated from ENDF/B-V data, and the COVFILS covariance matrix library. The large uncertainties due to chromium result mainly from large convariances for the chromium total and elastic scattering cross sections

  4. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Particle and energy transport in tokamak plasmas have long been subjects of vigorous investigation. Present-day measurement techniques permit radially resolved studies of the transport of electron perturbations, low- and high-Z impurities, and energy. In addition, developments in transport theory provide tools that can be brought to bear on transport issues. Here, we examine local particle transport measurements of electrons, fully-stripped thermal helium, and helium-like iron in balanced-injection L-mode and enhanced confinement deuterium plasmas on TFTR of the same plasma current, toroidal field, and auxiliary heating power. He 2+ and Fe 24+ transport has been studied with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, while electron transport has been studied by analyzing the perturbed electron flux following the same helium puff used for the He 2+ studies. By examining the electron and He 2+ responses following the same gas puff in the same plasmas, an unambiguous comparison of the transport of the two species has been made. The local energy transport has been examined with power balance analysis, allowing for comparisons to the local thermal fluxes. Some particle and energy transport results from the Supershot have been compared to a transport model based on a quasilinear picture of electrostatic toroidal drift-type microinstabilities. Finally, implications for future fusion reactors of the observed correlation between thermal transport and helium particle transport is discussed

  5. The long way to steady state fusion plasmas - the superconducting stellarator device Wendelstein 7-X

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The stable generation of high temperature Hydrogen plasmas (ion and electron temperature in the range 10-20 keV) is the basis for the use of nuclear fusion to generate heat and thereby electric power. The most promising path is to use strong, toroidal, twisted magnetic fields to confine the electrically charged plasma particles in order to avoid heat losses to the cold, solid wall elements. Two magnetic confinement concepts have been proven to be most suitable: (a) the tokamak and (b) the stellarator. The stellarator creates the magnetic field by external coils only, the tokamak by combining the externally created field with the magnetic field generated by a strong current in the plasma. “Wendelstein 7-X” is the name of a large superconducting stellarator that went successfully into operation after 15 years of construction. With 30 m3 plasma volume, 3 T magnetic field on axis, and 10 MW micro wave heating power, Hydrogen plasmas are generated that allow one to establish a scientific basis for the extrapol...

  6. Multi parametric sensitivity study applied to temperature measurement of metallic plasma facing components in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumeunier, M-H.; Corre, Y.; Firdaouss, M.; Gauthier, E.; Loarer, T.; Travere, J-M.; Gardarein, J-L.; EFDA JET Contributor

    2013-06-01

    In nuclear fusion experiments, the protection system of the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) is commonly ensured by infrared (IR) thermography. Nevertheless, the surface monitoring of new metallic plasma facing component, as in JET and ITER is being challenging. Indeed, the analysis of infrared signals is made more complicated in such a metallic environment since the signals will be perturbed by the reflected photons coming from high temperature regions. To address and anticipate this new measurement environment, predictive photonic models, based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing (SPEOS R CAA V5 Based), have been performed to assess the contribution of the reflective part in the total flux collected by the camera and the resulting temperature error. This paper deals with the effects of metals features, as the emissivity and reflectivity models, on the accuracy of the surface temperature estimation. The reliability of the features models is discussed by comparing the simulation with experimental data obtained with the wide angle IR thermography system of JET ITER like wall. The impact of the temperature distribution is studied by considering two different typical plasma scenarios, in limiter (ITER start-up scenario) and in X-point configurations (standard divertor scenario). The achievable measurement performances of IR system and risks analysis on its functionalities are discussed. (authors)

  7. Study on the impact of the engineering energy gain and the FPC mass power density on the generation cost of fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Desuo; Wu Yican

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the engineering energy gain and the fusion-power-core (FPC) mass power density (MPD) on the generation cost of fusion power plant are analyzed based on the economic elasticity approach in this paper. From the functions describing the relationship of the generation cost with the engineering energy gain and the MPD, the elasticity coefficients of the generation cost with the engineering energy gain and the MPD have been derived respectively to analyze their sensitivity to the generation cost and the MPD to the generation cost decreases with increasing the engineering energy gain or the MPD. (authors)

  8. Detective studies of soft X-ray tomography on controlled thermonuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linzhong; Su Fei

    2004-01-01

    In is necessary to design tomographic detective system with very high accuracy and high quality. It is such a detective system that its five resolutions are all very high quality. The five resolutions are: the radial resolution, the angular resolution, the spatial resolution of detector, the resolution of detector array, and the time resolution. The radial resolution is decided by the number of detectors in detector array. The angular resolutions depend on the number of detector arrays. According to the concrete condition of controlled device, through making special rectangular detector the optimum spatial resolution of detector and the optimum spatial resolution of detector array can be obtained. The high time resolution can be got by making wide-band ampli-filter circuit system. The tomographic system with high quality can use the multi-angle multi-array mode or perfect single array mode. The soft X-ray tomographic system with high sensitivity can measure the stable signal and perform the tomography under the conditions of Te ∼150 eV, ne ∼1013 cm-3 on the small Tokamak devices. (authors)

  9. Change of the dominant luminescent mechanism with increasing current density in molecularly doped organic light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liang; Zhang Hongjie; Meng Qingguo; Liu Fengyi; Yu Jiangbo; Deng Ruiping; Peng Zeping; Li Zhefeng; Guo Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated and measured a series of electroluminescent devices with the structure of ITO/TPD/Eu(TTA) 3 phen (x):CBP/BCP/ALQ/LiF/Al, where x is the weight percentage of Eu(TTA) 3 phen (from 0% to 6%). At very low current density, carrier trapping is the dominant luminescent mechanism and the 4% doped device shows the highest electroluminescence (EL) efficiency among all these devices. With increasing current density, Foerster energy transfer participates in EL process. At the current density of 10.0 and 80.0 mA/cm 2 , 2% and 3% doped devices show the highest EL efficiency, respectively. From analysis of the EL spectra and the EL efficiency-current density characteristics, we found that the EL efficiency is manipulated by Foerster energy transfer efficiency at high current density. So we suggest that the dominant luminescent mechanism changes gradually from carrier trapping to Foerster energy transfer with increasing current density. Moreover, the conversion of dominant EL mechanism was suspected to be partly responsible for the EL efficiency roll-off because of the lower EL quantum efficiency of Foerster energy transfer compared with carrier trapping

  10. Core configuration of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device for fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, H., E-mail: nakaya@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y. [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Shimakawa, S.; Goto, M.; Nakagawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur 54100 (Malaysia)

    2014-05-01

    The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device is examined, assuming the compound LiAlO{sub 2} as the tritium-producing material. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300 MWe nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations are carried out. To load sufficient Li into the core, LiAlO{sub 2} is loaded into the removable reflectors that surround the ring-shaped fuel blocks in addition to the burnable poison insertion holes. It is shown that module high-temperature gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW can produce almost 8 kg of tritium in a year.

  11. Practical sublimation source for large-scale chromium gettering in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, J E; Gabbard, W A; Emerson, L C; Mioduszewski, P K [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1984-05-01

    This paper describe the fabrication and testing of a large-scale chromium sublimation source that resembles the VARIAN Ti-ballsup(TM) in its design. The device consists of a hollow chromium sphere with a diameter of approximately 3 cm and an incandescent filament for radiation heating from inside the ball. We also discuss the gettering technique utilizing this source. The experimental arrangement consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system instrumented for total and partial pressure measurements, a film thickness monitor, thermocouples, an optical pyrometer, and appropriate instrumentation to measure the heating power. The results show the temperature and corresponding sublimation rate of the Cr-ball as functions of input power. In addition, an example of the total pumping speed of a gettered surface is shown.

  12. A practical sublimation source for large-scale chromium gettering in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Gabbard, W.A.; Emerson, L.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describe the fabrication and testing of a large-scale chromium sublimation source that resembles the VARIAN Ti-ballsup(TM) in its design. The device consists of a hollow chromium sphere with a diameter of approximately 3 cm and an incandescent filament for radiation heating from inside the ball. We also discuss the gettering technique utilizing this source. The experimental arrangement consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system instrumented for total and partial pressure measurements, a film thickness monitor, thermocouples, an optical pyrometer, and appropriate instrumentation to measure the heating power. The results show the temperature and corresponding sublimation rate of the Cr-ball as functions of input power. In addition, an example of the total pumping speed of a gettered surface is shown. (orig.)

  13. Research on nuclear fusion reactor - Development of mm-wve (Electron cyclotron) heating device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sae Young; Myung, Jung Su; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Myung Jae; Kim, Hyung Suk; Hur, Jin Woo; Song, Ho Young [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    To establish cooperating system with foreign relevant research institutes, consultation has been given to IAE by Dr. T. V. George regarding ECRH and gyrotron development plan. Discussions with Prof. Temkin and Dr. Kreisher at MIT, who are working for ITER gyrotron development, were made and those helped IAE to collect necessary information for fundamental parameters of ECCD. Also, Prof. Vic Granatstein, U. of Maryland, and Dr. Baruch Levush, NRL, were consulted for computer codes of the gyrotron R and D. It will also be prepared for cooperation in ECCD and mm-wave heating with device research teams of General Atomics and Russia. By visiting various University labs and research institutes and investigating the up-to-date research results, the basic operating parameters of gyrotron for KSTAR project has been determined. By cooperation with MIT, a conceptual design has been made for the KSTAR gyrotron that should generate 1 MW and 110 GHz CW waves. The simulation result of EGUN using self-consistent theory shows that 1.2 MW power with the efficiency of 42.8% can be obtained for TE22,6,1 mode where the average ohmic loss is 0.54 kW/cm{sup 2} assuming 77 kV cathode voltage, 34 A beam current, velocity ratio of 1.62 and perpendicular velocity spread of 6.5%. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  14. Radio frequency siliconization: An approach to the coating for the future large superconducting fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Zhao, Y.P.; Wan, B.N.; Gong, X.Z.; Zhen, M.; Gu, X.M.; Zhang, X.D.; Luo, J.R.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Li, C.F.; Chen, J.L.; Toi, K.; Noda, N.; Watari, T.

    2001-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) siliconization has been carried out on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak in the presence of a high magnetic field, which is a try on superconducting tokamaks. Three different procedures of rf siliconization have been tested and a very promising method to produce high quality silicon films was found after comparing the film properties and plasma performance produced by these three different procedures. The Si/C films are amorphous, semitransparent, and homogeneous throughout the layer and adhere firmly to all the substrates. The advantages of silicon atoms as a powerful radiator and a good oxygen getter have been proved. An outstanding merit of rf siliconization to superconducting devices is its fast recovery after a serious degradation of the condition due to the leakage of air to good wall conditions. A wider stable operation region has been obtained and plasma performance is improved immediately after each siliconization due to significant reduction of impurities. Energy confinement time increases more than 50% and particle confinement time increases by a factor of 2. The lifetime of the silicon film is more than 400 standard ohmic heated plasma discharges. Simulation shows that the confinement improvement is due to the reduction of the electron thermal diffusivity in the outer region of the plasma

  15. An electrically conducting first wall for the fusion engineering device-A (FED-A) tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, B.A.; Fuller, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The first wall of the tokamak FED-A device was designed to satisfy two conflicting requirements. They are a low electrical resistance to give a long eddy-current decay time and a high neutron transparency to give a favorable tritium breeding ratio. The tradeoff between these conflicting requirements resulted in a copper alloy first wall that satisfied the specific goals for FED-A, i.e., a minimum eddy-current decay time of 0.5 sec and a tritium breeding ratio of at least 1.2. Aluminum alloys come close to meeting the requirements and would also probably work. Stainless steel will not work in this application because shells thin enough to satisfy temperature and stress limits are not thick enough to give a long eddy-current decay time and to avoid disruption induced melting. The baseline first wall design is a rib-stiffened, double-wall construction. The total wall thickness is 1.5 cm, including a water coolant thickness of 0.5 cm. The first wall is divided into twelve 30-degree sectors. Flange rings at the ends of each sector are bolted together to form the torus. Structural support is provided at the top center of each sector

  16. Tungsten: An option for divertor and main chamber plasma facing components in future fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R.; Dux, R.; Kallenbach, A.; Maggi, C.F.; Puetterich, T.; Balden, M.; Eich, T.; Fuchs, J.C.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Maier, H.; Mueller, H.W.; Pugno, R.; Radivojevic, I.; Rohde, V.; Sips, A.C.C.; Suttrop, W.; Ye, M.Y.; O'Mullane, M.; Whiteford, A.

    2005-01-01

    The tungsten programme in ASDEX Upgrade is pursued towards a full high-Z device. The spectroscopic diagnostic and the cooling factor of W have been extended and refined. The W-coated surfaces represent now a fraction of 65% (24.8 m2). The only two major components which are not yet coated are the strikepoint region of the lower divertor as well as the limiters at the low field side. While extending the W surfaces, the W concentration and the discharge behaviour have changed gradually pointing to critical issues when operating with a W wall: anomalous transport in the plasma centre should not be too low, otherwise neoclassical accumulation can occur. A very successful remedy is the addition of central RF heating at the 20-30% level. Regimes with low ELM activity show increased impurity concentration over the whole plasma radius. These discharges can be cured by increasing the ELM frequency through pellet ELM pacemaking or by higher heating power. Moderate gas puffing also mitigates the impurity influx and penetration, however at the expense of lower confinement. The erosion yield at the low field side guard limiter can be as high as 10 -3 and fast particle losses from NBI were identified to contribute a significant part to the W sputtering. Discharges run in the upper, W coated divertor do not show higher W concentrations than comparable discharges in the lower C-based divertor. (author)

  17. Rotor-dynamic design aspects for a variable frequency drive based high speed cryogenic centrifugal pump in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Jotirmoy; Vaghela, Hitensinh; Bhattacharya, Ritendra; Patel, Pratik; Shukla, Vinit; Shah, Nitin; Sarkar, Biswanath

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting magnets of large size are inevitable for fusion devices due to high magnetic field requirements. Forced flow cooling of the superconducting magnets with high mass flowrate of the order ∼3 kg/s is required to keep superconducting magnets within its safe operational boundaries during various plasma scenarios. This important requirement can be efficiently fulfilled by employing high capacity and high efficiency cryogenic centrifugal pumps. The efficiency > 70% will ensure overall lower heat load to the cryoplant. Thermo-hydraulic design of cryogenic centrifugal pump revealed that to achieve the operational regime with high efficiency, the speed should be ∼ 10,000 revolutions per minute. In this regard, the rotor-dynamic design aspect is quite critical from the operational stability point of view. The rotor shaft design of the cryogenic pump is primarily an outcome of optimization between thermal heat-in leak at cryogenic temperature level from ambient, cryogenic fluid impedance and designed rotation speed of the impeller wheel. The paper describes the basic design related to critical speed of the rotor shaft, rotor whirl and system instability prediction to explore the ideal operational range of the pump from the system stability point of view. In the rotor-dynamic analysis, the paper also describes the Campbell plots to ensure that the pump is not disturbed by any of the critical speeds, especially while operating near the nominal and enhanced operating modes. (author)

  18. The role and application of ion beam analysis for studies of plasma-facing components in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Marek, E-mail: Marek.Rubel@ee.kth.se [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Petersson, Per [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Alves, Eduardo [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Brezinsek, Sebastijan [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Institut für Klima- und Energieforschung, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Coad, Joseph Paul [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Heinola, Kalle [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Mayer, Matej [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85478 Garching (Germany); Widdowson, Anna [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    First wall materials in controlled fusion devices undergo serious modification by several physical and chemical processes arising from plasma–wall interactions. Detailed information is required for the assessment of material lifetime and accumulation of hydrogen isotopes in wall materials. The intention of this work is to give a concise overview of key issues in the characterization of plasma-facing materials and components in tokamaks, especially in JET with an ITER-Like Wall. IBA techniques play a particularly prominent role here because of their isotope selectivity in the low-Z range (1–10), high sensitivity and combination of several methods in a single run. The role of {sup 3}He-based NRA, RBS (standard and micro-size beam) and HIERDA in fuel retention and material migration studies is presented. The use of tracer techniques with rare isotopes (e.g. {sup 15}N) or marker layers on wall diagnostic components is described. Special instrumentation, development of equipment to enhance research capabilities and issues in handling of contaminated materials are addressed.

  19. The role and application of ion beam analysis for studies of plasma-facing components in controlled fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Marek; Petersson, Per; Alves, Eduardo; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Coad, Joseph Paul; Heinola, Kalle; Mayer, Matej; Widdowson, Anna

    2016-03-01

    First wall materials in controlled fusion devices undergo serious modification by several physical and chemical processes arising from plasma-wall interactions. Detailed information is required for the assessment of material lifetime and accumulation of hydrogen isotopes in wall materials. The intention of this work is to give a concise overview of key issues in the characterization of plasma-facing materials and components in tokamaks, especially in JET with an ITER-Like Wall. IBA techniques play a particularly prominent role here because of their isotope selectivity in the low-Z range (1-10), high sensitivity and combination of several methods in a single run. The role of 3He-based NRA, RBS (standard and micro-size beam) and HIERDA in fuel retention and material migration studies is presented. The use of tracer techniques with rare isotopes (e.g. 15N) or marker layers on wall diagnostic components is described. Special instrumentation, development of equipment to enhance research capabilities and issues in handling of contaminated materials are addressed.

  20. Irradiation creep at temperatures of 400 degrees C and below for application to near-term fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    To study irradiation creep at 400 degrees C and below, a series of six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys was irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor; and, after an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa, the specimens were moved to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the 19 dpa accumulated. Irradiation temperatures of 60, 200, 330, and 400 degrees C were studied with internally pressurized tubes of type 316 stainless steel, PCA, HT 9, and a series of four laboratory heats of: Fe-13.5Cr-15Ni, Fe-13.5Cr-35Ni, Fe-1 3.5Cr-1 W-0.18Ti, and Fe-16Cr. At 330 degrees C, irradiation creep was shown to be linear in fluence and stress. There was little or no effect of cold-work on creep under these conditions at all temperatures investigated. The HT9 demonstrated a large deviation from linearity at high stress levels, and a minimum in irradiation creep with increasing stress was observed in the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloys

  1. The life test of a DC circuit breaker of tokamak device JT-60 for a nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Ryuichi; Tani, Keiji; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Tamura, Sanae; Yanabu, Satoru.

    1979-01-01

    In the Tokamak devices for nuclear fusion research, the construction of the current transformer circuits having plasma as the secondary circuit and the change of the primary circuit current are necessary for generating current in the plasma. This is considered to be fairly difficult in practice if conventional methods using capacitor discharge and iron core coils are employed. Considering such circumstances, it was decided for JT-60 to use an air-core current transformer coil and to employ the method of storing energy in the form of current in the coil inductance instead of a capacitor. For this reason, a DC circuit breaker is required to interrupt coil current. The authors improved an AV vacuum breaker, which had been developed as the vacuum breaker of longitudinal magnetic field type applying a magnetic field in parallel with an arc, to get the one for DC circuit for the purpose of applying it to JT-60. In this paper, the operational characteristic of the DC breaker is described, the construction and function of the life test circuit is explained, and the test results are reported. Finally, interruptions of 10,000 times at 20 kA were carried out. It is successful that the restrike of arc occurring during tens of milli-seconds after interruptions was improved to 0.05% or less for 10,000 times operations. Further, it was found that the generation of arc restrike can be reduced practically to zero with two breakers in series. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. On helium cluster dynamics in tungsten plasma facing components of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Faney, T.; Wirth, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of helium clustering behaviour within either a nanometer-sized tendril of fuzz, or a half-space domain, as predicted by a reaction–diffusion model. This analysis has identified a dimensionless parameter, P Δ , which is a balance of the reaction and diffusion actions of insoluble He in a metal matrix and which governs the self-trapping effects of He into growing bubbles within a tendril. The impact of He self-trapping, as well as trapping caused by pre-existing traps in the form of lattice defects or clusters of impurities, within a half-space domain results in the formation of a densely packed layer of nanometer-sized bubbles with high number density. This prediction is consistent with available experimental observations in which a dense zone of helium bubbles is observed in tungsten, which are compared to estimates of the layer characteristics. Direct numerical simulation of the reaction–diffusion cluster dynamics supports the analysis presented here. (paper)

  3. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to ∼1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to ∼1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described

  4. Collection of Summaries of reports on result of research at basic experiment device for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The development of nuclear fusion reactors reached such stage that the generation of fusion power output comparable with the input power into core plasma is possible. At present, the engineering design of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor, ITER, is advanced by the cooperation of Japan, USA, Europe and Russia, aiming at the start of operation at the beginning of 21st century. This meeting for reporting the results has been held every year, and this time, it was held on May 19, 1995 at University of Tokyo with the theme ''The interface properties of fusion reactor materials and the control of particle transport''. About 50 participants from academic, governmental and industrial circles discussed actively on the theme. Three lectures on the topics of fusion reactor engineering and materials and seven lectures on the basic experiment of fusion reactor blanket design related to the next period project were given at the meeting. (K.I.)

  5. Low Defect Density Substrates and High-Quality Epi-Substrate Interfaces for ABCS Devices and Progress Toward Phonon-Mediated THz Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodhue, William; Bliss, David; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Vangala, Shivashankar; Li, Jin; Zhu, Beihong

    2005-01-01

    ... has been developing technology for producing low defect density substrates and high-quality epi-substrate interfaces for ABCS device applications as well as developing fabrication and device concepts...

  6. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using nonresorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices: a prospective, randomized study to assess fusion and clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; Deddens, J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVE.: To assess fusion, clinical outcome, and complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Resorbable poly-L- lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages intended to aid spinal interbody fusion have been introduced into clinical practice within

  7. Determination of electron temperature and density at plasma edge in the Large Helical Device with opacity-incorporated helium collisional-radiative model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.; Sawada, K.

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of neutral helium in the visible wavelength range are measured for a discharge in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The electron temperature (T e ) and density (n e ) are derived from the intensity distribution of helium emission lines. For that purpose, a collisional-radiative model developed by Sawada et al. [Plasma and Fusion Res. 2010;5:001] which takes the reabsorption effect into account is used. It is found that incorporation of the reabsorption effect is necessary to obtain a set of T e and n e giving consistent line intensity distribution with the measurement, and that those parameters obtained vary as the line-averaged n e changes in the course of time. The position where the helium line emission dominantly takes place is located with the help of T e and n e profiles measured by the Thomson scattering system. The result indicates that the emission position is almost fixed at the place where the connection length of the magnetic field lines to the divertor plate leaps beyond 10 m. Because intense neutral atom line emission suggests the vigorous ionization of neutral atoms, the helium line emission location determined here can be regarded as the effective boundary of the plasma. - Highlights: • The reabsorption effect is included in the helium collisional-radiative model. • Electron temperature and density are derived for the Large Helical Device (LHD). • Line emission location is found to be little changed during the discharge. • This measurement method can be used to determine the position of effective plasma boundary

  8. Simulation study of a high power density rectenna array for biomedical implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Yoon, Hargsoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    2016-04-01

    The integration of wireless power transmission devices using microwaves into the biomedical field is close to a practical reality. Implanted biomedical devices need a long lasting power source or continuous power supply. Recent development of high efficiency rectenna technology enables continuous power supply to these implanted devices. Due to the size limit of most of medical devices, it is imperative to minimize the rectenna as well. The research reported in this paper reviews the effects of close packing the rectenna elements which show the potential of directly empowering the implanted devices, especially within a confined area. The rectenna array is tested in the X band frequency range.

  9. Fabrication technology for lead-alloy Josephson devices for high-density integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, T.; Hoko, H.; Tamura, H.; Yoshida, A.; Suzuki, H.; Morohashi, S.; Ohara, S.; Hasuo, S.; Yamaoka, T.

    1986-01-01

    Fabrication technology for lead-alloy Josephson devices was evaluated from the viewpoint of application to large-scale integrated circuits. Metal and insulating layers used in the circuits were evaluated, and optimization of techniques for deposition or formation of these layers was investigated. Metallization of the Pb-In-Au base electrode and the Pb-Bi counterelectrode was studied in terms of optimizing the deposited films, to improve the reliability of junction electrodes. The formation of the oxide barrier was studied by in situ ellipsometry. SiO/sub x/ deposited in oxygen was developed as the insulation layer with less defect density than conventional SiO. A liftoff technique using toluene soaking was developed, and patterns with a minimum line width of 2 μm were consistently reproduced. The characteristics of each element in the circuits were evaluated for test vehicles. For the junction, the following items were evaluated: controllability of the critical current I/sub c/, junction quality, I/sub c/ uniformity, junction yield, and thermal cycling and storage stability. For the peripheral elements, integrity of lines and contacts, and characteristics of resistors were evaluated. 8-kbit memory cell arrays with a full vertical structure were fabricated to evaluate these technologies in combination. The continuity of each metal layer and insulation between metal layers were evaluated with an autoprober at room temperature. For selected chips, cell characteristics have been measured, and their I/sub c/ uniformity and production yields for cells are discussed. Normal operation of the memory cells was confirmed for all of the 24 accessible cells on a chip

  10. Chamber and Wall Response to Target Implosion in Inertial and Z-Pinch Fusion and Lithography Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    The chamber walls, both solid and liquid, in inertial fusion energy (IFE) and Z-pinch reactors and Lithography devices are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion or pinching of plasma. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to target implosion. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, neutrons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The hydrodynamic response of chamber walls in bare or in gas-filled cavities and the photon transport of the deposited energy has been calculated by means of new and advanced numerical techniques for accurate shock treatment and propagation. These models include detail media hydrodynamics, non-LTE multi-group for both continuum and line radiation transport, and dynamics of eroded debris resulting from the intense energy deposition. The focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in various proposed protection methods for IFE systems. Key requirements are that: (i) the chamber wall accommodates the cyclic energy deposition while providing the required lifetime due to various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls, and (ii) after each shot the chamber is cleared and returned to a quiescent state in preparation for the target injection and the firing of the driver for the subsequent shot. This paper investigates in details these two important issues and found that the required operating frequency of the IFE reactors for power production may be severely limited due to these two requirements. (author)

  11. Image fusion analysis of 99mTc-HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide SPECT and diagnostic CT using an immobilisation device with external markers in patients with endocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, Michael; Hausler, Florian; Moncayo, Roy; Decristoforo, Clemens; Virgolini, Irene; Bale, Reto; Kovacs, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of multimodality imaging using a novel repositioning device with external markers for fusion of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) images. The additional benefit derived from this methodological approach was analysed in comparison with SPECT and diagnostic CT alone in terms of detection rate, reliability and anatomical assignment of abnormal findings with SPECT. Fifty-three patients (30 males, 23 females) with known or suspected endocrine tumours were studied. Clinical indications for somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy (SPECT/CT image fusion) included staging of newly diagnosed tumours (n=14) and detection of unknown primary tumour in the presence of clinical and/or biochemical suspicion of neuroendocrine malignancy (n=20). Follow-up studies after therapy were performed in 19 patients. A mean activity of 400 MBq of 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr 3 -octreotide was given intravenously. SPECT using a dual-detector scintillation camera and diagnostic multi-detector CT were sequentially performed. To ensure reproducible positioning, patients were fixed in an individualised vacuum mattress with modality-specific external markers for co-registration. SPECT and CT data were initially interpreted separately and the fused images were interpreted jointly in consensus by nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology physicians. SPECT was true-positive (TP) in 18 patients, true-negative (TN) in 16, false-negative (FN) in ten and false-positive (FP) in nine; CT was TP in 18 patients, TN in 21, FP in ten and FN in four. With image fusion (SPECT and CT), the scan result was TP in 27 patients (50.9%), TN in 25 patients (47.2%) and FN in one patient, this FN result being caused by multiple small liver metastases; sensitivity was 95% and specificity, 100%. The difference between SPECT and SPECT/CT was statistically as significant as the difference between CT and SPECT/CT image fusion (P<0

  12. Creation of Novel Solid-Solution Alloy Nanoparticles on the Basis of Density-of-States Engineering by Interelement Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-06-16

    Currently 118 known elements are represented in the periodic table. Of these 118 elements, only about 80 elements are stable, nonradioactive, and widely available for our society. From the viewpoint of the "elements strategy", we need to make full use of the 80 elements to bring out their latent ability and create innovative materials. Furthermore, there is a strong demand that the use of rare or toxic elements be reduced or replaced while their important properties are retained. Advanced science and technology could create higher-performance materials even while replacing or reducing minor or harmful elements through the combination of more abundant elements. The properties of elements are correlated directly with their electronic states. In a solid, the magnitude of the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level affects the physical and chemical properties. In the present age, more attention has been paid to improving the properties of materials by means of alloying elements. In particular, the solid-solution-type alloy is advantageous because the properties can be continuously controlled by tuning the compositions and/or combinations of the constituent elements. However, the majority of bulk alloys are of the phase-separated type under ambient conditions, where constituent elements are immiscible with each other. To overcome the challenge of the bulk-phase metallurgical aspects, we have focused on the nanosize effect and developed methods involving "nonequilibrium synthesis" or "a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption". We propose a new concept of "density-of-states engineering" for the design of materials having the most desirable and suitable properties by means of "interelement fusion". In this Account, we describe novel solid-solution alloys of Pd-Pt, Ag-Rh, and Pd-Ru systems in which the constituent elements are immiscible in the bulk state. The homogeneous solid-solution alloys of Pd and Pt were created from Pd core/Pt shell nanoparticles using a

  13. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  14. Surface modification study of zirconium on exposure to fusion grade plasma in an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R.K.; Kaushik, T.C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Mishra, P.

    2017-01-01

    In continuation of our investigation on effect of fusion grade plasma produced in an existing MEPF-12 (11.5 kJ, 40 μF, 24 kV) plasma focus (PF) facility on different materials, likely to be used in future fusion reactors, we have reported here the study on Zirconium (Zr) metal. In the present work, the Zr sample in disc (2 mm thick, 10 mm diameter) form was exposed to twenty shots of plasma focus operated at 4 mbar deuterium gas filling pressure and 11.5 kJ bank energy. The samples were placed at a distance of 6 cm from the tip of the anode in the MEPF-12 PF device. The emissions from the device comprise of deuterium ions in wide energy range (a few keV to several hundreds of keV), high temperature plasma (in general a few keV) and neutrons of 2.45 MeV energy produced due to D(D, 3 He)n fusion reactions

  15. Collection of summaries of reports on result of research at basic experiment device for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This report meeting was held on May 22, 1995 at University of Tokyo by about 40 participants. As the topics on the fusion reactor engineering research in Japan, lectures were given on the present state and future of nuclear fusion networks and on the strong magnetic field tokamak using electromagnetic force-balanced coils being planned. Thereafter, the reports of the results of the researches which were carried out by using this experimental facility were made, centering around the subject related to the future conception 'The interface properties of fusion reactor materials and particle transport control'. The publication was made on the future conception of the basic experiment setup for fusion reactor blanket design, the application of high temperature superconductors to the advancement of nuclear fusion reactors, the modeling of the dynamic irradiation behavior of fusion reactor materials, the interface particle behavior in plasma-wall interaction, the behavior of tritium on the surface of breeding materials, and breeding materials and the behavior of tritium in plasma-wall interaction. (K.I.)

  16. Rational decision making in a wide scenario of different minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion approaches and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz; Tohmeh, Antoine; Jones, David; Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Pittman, Bruce C; Bae, Hyun

    2018-03-01

    With the proliferation of a variety of modern MIS spine surgery procedures, it is mandatory that the surgeon dominate all aspects involved in surgical indication. The information related to the decision making in patient selection for specific procedures is mandatory for surgical success. The objective of this study is to present decision-making criteria in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) selection for a variety of patients and pathologies. In this article, practicing surgeons who specialize in various MIS approaches for spinal fusion were engaged to provide expert opinion and literature review on decision making criteria for several MIS procedures. Pros, cons, relative limitations, and case examples are provided for patient selection in treatment with MIS posterolateral fusion (MIS-PLF), mini anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF), lateral interbody fusion (LLIF), MIS posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-PLIF) and MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). There is a variety of aspects to consider when deciding which modern MIS surgical approach is most appropriate to use based on patient and pathologic characteristics. The surgeon must adapt them to the characteristic of each type of patients, helping them to choose the most effective and efficient therapeutic option for each case.

  17. Proceedings of US/Japan Workshop (97FT5-06) on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, Richard; Kureczko, Diana

    1998-10-01

    The 1997 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices was held at the Warwick Regis Hotel in San Francisco, California, on December 8-11, 1997. There were 53 presentations as well as discussions on technical issues and on planning for future collaborations, and 35 researchers from japan and the US participated in the workshop. Over the last few years, with the strong emphasis in the US on technology for ITER, there has been less work done in the US fusion program on basic plasma materials interaction and this change in emphasis workshops. The program this year emphasized activities that were not carried out under the ITER program and a new element this year in the US program was planning and some analysis on liquid surface concepts for advanced plasma facing components. The program included a ceremony to honor Professor Yamashina, who was retiring this year and a special presentation on his career

  18. Effects of fusion relevant transient energetic radiation, plasma and thermal load on PLANSEE double forged tungsten samples in a low-energy plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Ouyang, B.; Zhang, Z.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.; Rawat, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    Tungsten is the leading candidate for plasma facing component (PFC) material for thermonuclear fusion reactors and various efforts are ongoing to evaluate its performance or response to intense fusion relevant radiation, plasma and thermal loads. This paper investigates the effects of hot dense decaying pinch plasma, highly energetic deuterium ions and fusion neutrons generated in a low-energy (3.0 kJ) plasma focus device on the structure, morphology and hardness of the PLANSEE double forged tungsten (W) samples surfaces. The tungsten samples were provided by Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), Germany via International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria. Tungsten samples were irradiated using different number of plasma focus (PF) shots (1, 5 and 10) at a fixed axial distance of 5 cm from the anode top and also at various distances from the top of the anode (5, 7, 9 and 11 cm) using fixed number (5) of plasma focus shots. The virgin tungsten sample had bcc structure (α-W phase). After PF irradiation, the XRD analysis showed (i) the presence of low intensity new diffraction peak corresponding to β-W phase at (211) crystalline plane indicating the partial structural phase transition in some of the samples, (ii) partial amorphization, and (iii) vacancy defects formation and compressive stress in irradiated tungsten samples. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed the distinctive changes to non-uniform surface with nanometer sized particles and particle agglomerates along with large surface cracks at higher number of irradiation shots. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated the reduction in relative tungsten oxide content and the increase in metallic tungsten after irradiation. Hardness of irradiated samples initially increased for one shot exposure due to reduction in tungsten oxide phase, but then decreased with increasing number of shots due to increasing concentration of defects. It is demonstrated that the plasma focus device provides

  19. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  20. Fusion engineering. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.E.; Pinter, G.R.; Spinos, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray crystal spectrometer is scheduled for installation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in 1984 coinciding with the TFTR deuterium operation phase. This spectrometer is designed to measure the spectra of hydrogen-like and helium-like impurities in the plasma. Ion temperatures electron temperatures, electron density and the distribution of impurity charge states are obtained from the x-ray detector count ratios. The velocity of the toroidal rotation of the plasma is also discerned using this device. The x-ray crystal spectrometer is based on the Bragg diffraction of x-rays from a curved crystal impinging on a multiwire proportional counter. Only those x-rays that satisfy the Bragg relationship (lambda =2d sin theta) will be diffracted and strike the proportional counter. This paper is limited to a discussion of the physical characteristics of the spectrometer and the methods devised to satisfy the operational aspects of such a device

  1. Field device to measure viscosity, density, and other slurry properties in drilled shafts : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Proper performance of mineral slurries used to stabilize drilled shaft excavations is maintained by assuring the : density, viscosity, pH, and sand content stay within state specified limits. These limits have been set either by : past experience, re...

  2. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  3. Stability of the superconductive operating mode in high current-density devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipf, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The superconductive operating mode represents a thermal equilibrium that can tolerate a certain amount of disturbance before it is lost. The basin of attraction (BOA), in many ways equivalent to a potential well, is a measure of the size of disturbance needed to lift the device from the superconductive into a resistive operating mode. The BOA for a simple geometry is calculated and discussed. Experimental results are reported, showing how the concept is used to gain information on the disturbances occurring in a superconducting device

  4. Fusion technology 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, C.; Gasparatto, M.; Knoepfel, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the biennial series of symposia on the title subject, organized by the European Fusion Laboratories, is the exchange of information on the design, construction and operation of fusion experiments and on the technology being developed for the next step devices and fusion reactors. The coverage of the volume includes the technological aspects of fusion reactors in relation to new developments, this forming a guideline for the definition of future work. These proceedings comprise three volumes and contain both the invited lectures and contributed papers presented at the symposium which was attended by 569 participants from around the globe. The 343 papers, including 12 invited papers, characterize the increasing interest of industry in the fusion programme, giving a broad and current overview on the progress and trends fusion technology is experiencing now, as well as indicating the future for fusion devices

  5. Engineering design of a toroidal divertor for the EBT-S fusion device. Final report, Phase II. EBT-S divertor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.P.; Malick, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical, structural, thermal, electrical, and vacuum design of a magnetic toroidal divertor system for the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT-S) is presented. The EBT-S is a toroidal magnetic fusion device located at the ORNL that operates under steady state conditions. The engineering of the divertor was performed during the second of three phases of a program aimed at the selection, design, fabrication, and installation of a magnetic divertor for EBT-S. The magnetic analysis of the toroidal divertor was performed during Phase I of the program and has been reported in a separate document. In addition to the details of the divertor design, the modest modifications that are required to the EBT-S device and facility to accommodate the divertor system are presented

  6. High-density 3D graphene-based monolith and related materials, methods, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Kucheyev, Sergei; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Shin, Swanee; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-03-21

    A composition comprising at least one high-density graphene-based monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds and having a density of at least 0.1 g/cm.sup.3. Also provided is a method comprising: preparing a reaction mixture comprising a suspension and at least one catalyst, said suspension selected from a graphene oxide (GO) suspension and a carbon nanotube suspension; curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, said drying step is substantially free of supercritical drying and freeze drying; and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a high-density graphene-based monolith. Exceptional combinations of properties are achieved including high conductive and mechanical properties.

  7. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises dt, dd, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 1017 to 1020 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 mev, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner

  8. Physics and technology of large plasma focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the plasma focus (PF) which produces a high temperature (0,5 to 1 keV), high density (5 · 10 18 cm -3 ), short living (up to 500 ns) fusion plasma in a very simple and cheap device. In the focus plasma, fusion processes take place with an energy efficiency which is not surpassed even by large Tokamak or Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. But this fusion efficiency and the high fusion neutron yield are not the only impetus to PF research. Due to the high energy density in the focus plasma (j ≥ 10 6 A/cm 2 exclamation point), many very interesting, mostly nonlinear phenomena take place which led to high intensity electron, ion and radiation emission. Micro- and macro instabilities, turbulence and selforganization processes develop. Most of these phenomena are not or only poorly understood

  9. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  10. Radiation effect test on ADC/DAC and high density memory devices with 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Kefei; Wang Yueke; Pan Huafeng

    2006-01-01

    A test platform was constructed for 60 Co γ-ray irradiation experiment of microelectronics, with the aid of computer and a FPGA module. The tested sample devices included analog-to-digital converter AD10465, digital-to-analog converter AD9857, high density Flash memory MEF64M16 and anti-fused PROM XQR17V16, which are used in signal processing module in spaceborne systems. Evaluations were made on their ability of resisting the total dose based on the proper function criterion of the devices. The results showed that AD10465 and AD9857 ran properly after 1.59 kGy(Si) irradiation, but errors were found when MEF64M16 and XQR17V16's total ionizing dose is 0.13 kGy(Si) and 0.99 kGy(Si), respectively. (authors)

  11. Canada's Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  12. Total Ionizing Dose Effects on Threshold Switching in 1T-Tantalum Disulfide Charge-Density-Wave Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, G.; Zhang, E. X.; Liang, C. D.; Bloodgood, M. A.; Salguero, T. T.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Balandin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The 1T polytype of TaS2 exhibits voltage-triggered threshold switching as a result of a phase transition from nearly commensurate to incommensurate charge density wave states. Threshold switching, persistent above room temperature, can be utilized in a variety of electronic devices, e.g., voltage controlled oscillators. We evaluated the total-ionizing-dose response of thin film 1T-TaS2 at doses up to 1 Mrad(SiO2). The threshold voltage changed by less than 2% after irradiation, with persisten...

  13. On interaction of large dust grains with fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    So far the models used to study dust grain-plasma interactions in fusion plasmas neglect the effects of dust material vapor, which is always present around dust in rather hot and dense edge plasma environment in fusion devices. However, when the vapor density and/or the amount of ionized vapor atoms become large enough, they can alter the grain-plasma interactions. Somewhat similar processes occur during pellet injection in fusion plasma. In this brief communication the applicability limits of the models ignoring vapor effects in grain-plasma interactions are obtained.

  14. Assessing the effects of lumbar posterior stabilization and fusion to vertebral bone density in stabilized and adjacent segments by using Hounsfield unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öksüz, Erol; Deniz, Fatih Ersay; Demir, Osman

    2017-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) with Hounsfield unit (HU) is being used with increasing frequency for determining bone density. Established correlations between HU and bone density have been shown in the literature. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the bone density changes of the stabilized and adjacent segment vertebral bodies by comparing HU values before and after lumbar posterior stabilization. Methods Sixteen patients who had similar diagnosis of lumbar spondylosis and stenosis were evaluated in this study. Same surgical procedures were performed to all of the patients with L2-3-4-5 transpedicular screw fixation, fusion and L3-4 total laminectomy. Bone mineral density measurements were obtained with clinical CT. Measurements were obtained from stabilized and adjacent segment vertebral bodies. Densities of vertebral bodies were evaluated with HU before the surgeries and approximately one year after the surgeries. The preoperative HU value of each vertebra was compared with postoperative HU value of the same vertebrae by using statistical analysis. Results The HU values of vertebra in the stabilized and adjacent segments consistently decreased after the operations. There were significant differences between the preoperative HU values and the postoperative HU values of the all evaluated vertebral bodies in the stabilized and adjacent segments. Additionally first sacral vertebra HU values were found to be significantly higher than lumbar vertebra HU values in the preoperative group and postoperative group. Conclusions Decrease in the bone density of the adjacent segment vertebral bodies may be one of the major predisposing factors for adjacent segment disease (ASD). PMID:29354730

  15. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  16. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NYGREN, RICHARD E.; STAVROS, DIANA T.

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed

  17. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Single-Electron Tunneling Devices with Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a single-electron source, modeled as a quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to an adjacent lead in time-dependent density-functional theory. Based on this system, we develop a time-nonlocal exchange-correlation potential by exploiting analogies with quantum-transport theory. The time nonlocality manifests itself in a dynamical potential step. We explicitly link the time evolution of the dynamical step to physical relaxation timescales of the electron dynamics. Finally, we discuss prospects for simulations of larger mesoscopic systems.

  18. Comparison of SAR and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Burdalo, M; Sanchis, A; Martin, A; Villar, R [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Instituto de Fisica Aplicada, C/Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mercedes@iec.csic.es

    2010-02-21

    Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific absorption rates (SARs) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum SAR values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and SAR values are below basic restrictions.

  19. Comparison of SAR and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Burdalo, M; Sanchis, A; Martin, A; Villar, R

    2010-01-01

    Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific absorption rates (SARs) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum SAR values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and SAR values are below basic restrictions.

  20. Comparison of SAR and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Sanchis, A.; Martín, A.; Villar, R.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific absorption rates (SARs) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum SAR values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and SAR values are below basic restrictions.

  1. Fabrication of ultrahigh density metal-cell-metal crossbar memory devices with only two cycles of lithography and dry-etch procedures

    KAUST Repository

    Zong, Baoyu; Goh, J. Y.; Guo, Zaibing; Luo, Ping; Wang, Chenchen; Qiu, Jinjun; Ho, Pin; Chen, Yunjie; Zhang, Mingsheng; Han, Guchang

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach to the fabrication of metal-cell-metal trilayer memory devices was demonstrated by using only two cycles of lithography and dry-etch procedures. The fabricated ultrahigh density crossbar devices can be scaled down to ≤70 nm in half

  2. Influence of the pulse wave in the stratification of high density particles in a JIG device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Ospina-Alarcón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of particle motion subjected to four different pulsation profiles on a pulsated fluidized bed jig concentrator was carried out. The profiles used in the simulation were – sinusoidal, triangle, sawtooth-backward and sawtooth-forward. Two-dimensional local velocities of the water flow field were calculated from the continuity and momentum equations by CFD techniques implementing SIMPLE algorithm. The particle motion is modeled by a forces balance applying the Newton’s second law of motion. Liquid-solid interactions forces are calculated by the mathematical Euler-Lagrangian model extended to a particle suspension having a wide size and density distribution. To analyze the particle motion in jig, we derived a trajectory equation for the response time of particle that include virtual mass, gravity, pressure gradient, drag and Basset forces. The study demonstrates significant differences in the particle trajectories for various pulsation profiles applied to the boundary condition at the inlet to the jig chamber.

  3. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su; Shikhovtsev, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5–1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  4. Application of structural mechanics methods to the design of large tandem mirror fusion devices (MFTF-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.; Ng, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory requires state-of-the-art structural-mechanics methods to deal with access constraints for plasma heating and diagnostics, alignment requirements, and load complexity and variety. Large interactive structures required an integrated analytical approach to achieve a resonable level of overall system optimization. The Tandem Magnet Generator (TMG) creates a magnet configuration for the EFFI calculation of electromagnetic-field forces that, coupled with other loads, form the input loading to magnetic and vessel finite-element models. The anlytical results provide the data base for detailed design of magnet, vessel, foundation, and interaction effects. (orig.)

  5. Selected topics on surface effects in fusion devices: neutral-beam injectors and beam-direct converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral-beam injectors are being used for the heating and fueling of plasmas in existing devices such as PLT (Princeton), ISX (Oak Ridge) and 2XIIB (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory) and will be used in devices such as TFTR (Princeton), MX (Livermore) and Doublet III (Gulf Atomic). For example, TFTR has been designed to receive a total of 20 MW of 120-keV deuterium atoms in pulses of 0.5-sec duration from 12 neutral beam injectors; for the MX experiment it is planned to inject a total of 750A (equivalent) of deuterium atoms with a mean energy of 56 keV in 0.5-sec pulses. The interaction of energetic deuterium atoms with exposed surfaces of device components such as beam dumps, beam-direct-convertors collectors, beam calorimeters, and armor plates, cause a variety of surface effects which affect deleteriously the operation of such devices. Some of the major effects will be discussed

  6. A Novel Remote Rehabilitation System with the Fusion of Noninvasive Wearable Device and Motion Sensing for Pulmonary Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Chuang-Kit; An, Jinyoung; Chung, Wan-Young

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a type of lung disease caused by chronically poor airflow that makes breathing difficult. As a chronic illness, it typically worsens over time. Therefore, pulmonary rehabilitation exercises and patient management for extensive periods of time are required. This paper presents a remote rehabilitation system for a multimodal sensors-based application for patients who have chronic breathing difficulties. The process involves the fusion of sensory data-captured motion data by stereo-camera and photoplethysmogram signal by a wearable PPG sensor-that are the input variables of a detection and evaluation framework. In addition, we incorporated a set of rehabilitation exercises specific for pulmonary patients into the system by fusing sensory data. Simultaneously, the system also features medical functions that accommodate the needs of medical professionals and those which ease the use of the application for patients, including exercises for tracking progress, patient performance, exercise assignments, and exercise guidance. Finally, the results indicate the accurate determination of pulmonary exercises from the fusion of sensory data. This remote rehabilitation system provides a comfortable and cost-effective option in the healthcare rehabilitation system.

  7. The Penning fusion experiment-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, M. M.; Umstadter, K. R.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Penning fusion experiment (PFX) studies the feasibility of using a Penning trap as a fusion confinement device. Such use would require spatial and/or temporal compression of the plasma to overcome the Brillouin density limit imposed by the nonneutrality of Penning trap plasmas. In an earlier experiment, we achieved enhanced plasma density at the center of a pure, electron plasma confined in a hyperbolic, Penning trap by inducing spherically convergent flow in a nonthermal plasma. The goal of this work is to induce similar flow in a positive ion plasma confined in the virtual cathode provided by a spherical, uniform density electron plasma. This approach promises the greatest flexibility in operating with multi-species plasmas (e.g. D + /T + ) or implementing temporal compression schemes such as the Periodically Oscillating Plasma Sphere of Nebel and Barnes. Here, we report on our work to produce and diagnose the necessary electron plasma

  8. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Allain, J.P.; Efe, Mert; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 10 23 –2.0 × 10 24  ions m −2  s −1 , the sample bias ranged from a negative (20–65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600–1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma. (paper)

  9. Real-time crowd density mapping using a novel sensory fusion model of infrared and visual systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yaseen, S; Al-Habaibeh, A; Su, D; Otham, F

    2013-01-01

    Crowd dynamic management research has seen significant attention in recent years in research and industry in an attempt to improve safety level and management of large scale events and in large public places such as stadiums, theatres, railway stations, subways and other places where high flow of people at high densities is expected. Failure to detect the crowd behaviour at the right time could lead to unnecessary injuries and fatalities. Over the past decades there have been many incidents o...

  10. Excellent nonlinearity of a selection device based on anti-series connected Zener diodes for ultrahigh-density bipolar RRAM arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingtao; Li, Rongrong; Wang, Yang; Tao, Chunlan; Fu, Liping; Gao, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    A crossbar array is usually used for the high-density application of a resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. However, the cross-talk interference limits the increase in the integration density. In this paper, anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device are proposed for bipolar RRAM arrays. Simulation results show that, by using the anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device, the readout margin is sufficiently improved compared to that obtained without a selection device or with anti-parallel connected diodes as the selection device. The maximum size of the crossbar arrays with anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device over 1 TB is estimated by theoretical simulation. In addition, the feasibility of using the anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device for bipolar RRAM is demonstrated experimentally. These results indicate that anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device opens up great opportunities to realize ultrahigh-density bipolar RRAM arrays. (paper)

  11. Finite element and node point generation computer programs used for the design of toroidal field coils in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The structural analysis of toroidal field coils in Tokamak fusion machines can be performed with the finite element method. This technique has been employed for design evaluations of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The application of the finite element method can be simplified with computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element code. There are three areas of data input where significant automation can be provided by supplementary computer codes. These concern the definition of geometry by a node point mesh, the definition of the finite elements from the geometric node points, and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil are computed from the vector cross product of the coil current and the magnetic field. The computer programs named PDXNODE and ELEMENT are described. The program PDXNODE generates the geometric node points of a finite element model for a toroidal field coil. The program ELEMENT defines the finite elements of the model from the node points and from material property considerations. The program descriptions include input requirements, the output, the program logic, the methods of generating complex geometries with multiple runs, computational time and computer compatibility. The output format of PDXNODE and ELEMENT make them compatible with PDXFORC and two general purpose finite element computer codes: (ANSYS) the Engineering Analysis System written by the Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc., and (WECAN) the Westinghouse Electric Computer Analysis general purpose finite element program. The Fortran listings of PDXNODE and ELEMENT are provided

  12. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may be u...

  13. Radiation effects on superconducting fusion magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fusion devices based on the magnetic confinement principle heavily rely on the existence and performance of superconducting magnets and have always significantly contributed to advancing superconductor and magnet technology to their limits. In view of the presently ongoing construction of the tokamak device ITER and the stellerator device Wendelstein 7X and their record breaking parameters concerning size, complexity of design, stored energy, amperage, mechanical and magnetic forces, critical current densities and stability requirements, it is deemed timely to review another critical parameter that is practically unique to these devices, namely the radiation response of all magnet components to the lifetime fluence of fast neutrons and gamma rays produced by the fusion reactions of deuterium and tritium. I will review these radiation effects in turn for the currently employed standard "technical" low temperature superconductors NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, the stabilizing material (Cu) as well as the magnet insulation materials and conclude by discussing the potential of high temperature superconducting materials for future generations of fusion devices, such as DEMO. (author)

  14. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    Written contributions from participants of the Joint 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) - 21st IAEA Technical Meeting on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (21st IAEA TM RUSFD). The International Advisory Committees of the 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and the 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD), agreed to carry out together this Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st RUSFD in San José, Costa Rica, on 27-31 January 2014. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st RUSFD meeting, organized by the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, and Ad Astra Rocket Company in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP) is a series of events which has been held periodically since 1982, with the purpose of providing a forum in which the research of the Latin American plasma physics community can be displayed, as well as fostering collaborations among plasma scientists within the region and with researchers from the rest of the world. Recognized plasma scientists from developed countries are specially invited to the meeting to present the state of the art on several "hot" topics related to plasma physics. It is an open meeting, with an International Advisory Committee, in which the working language is English. It was firstly held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by workshops in Medellín, Colombia (1985), Santiago de Chile, Chile (1988), Buenos Aires, Argentina (1990), Mexico City, Mexico (1992), Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil (1994, combined with the International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP)), Caracas, Venezuela (1997), Tandil, Argentina (1998), La Serena, Chile (2000), Sao Pedro, Brazil (2003), Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Caracas, Venezuela (2007), Santiago de Chile, Chile (2010, combined with the ICPP) and Mar de Plata, Argentina (2011). The 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices is an ideal forum for

  15. Steady-state operation of magnetic fusion devices: Plasma control and plasma facing components. Report on the IAEA technical committee meeting held at Fukuoka, 25-29 October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, F.

    2000-01-01

    An IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Steady-State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Plasma Control and Plasma Facing Components was held at Fukuoka, Japan, from 25 to 29 October 1999. The meeting was the second IAEA Techical Committee Meeting on the subject, following the one held at Hefei, China, a year earlier. The meeting was attended by over 150 researchers from 10 countries

  16. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Bill; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies with out requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma "b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  17. The development of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature conditions needed in a controlled nuclear fusion reactor are now being approached in experiments using magnetic fields to confine and isolate the plasma, especially in systems of the tokamak type. The underlying reasons for the successes are discussed and it is concluded that the remaining advances needed in temperature and thermal insulation may well be achieved in new large tokamak experiments now under construction. Comparable progress is being made also in inertial confinement systems; key experiments on achieving the required super-high densities with high-powered pulsed laser systems are about to commence. To achieve fusion reactors will require the combination of three major disciplines: plasma physics, electromechanical engineering and nuclear engineering. Proposals have been made for an international study group to be set up under the IAEA auspices to consider technical objectives and the nature of the next large fusion device which could be constructed internationally, and in which this synthesis could be attempted. (author)

  18. Characterization of a segmented plasma torch assisted High Heat Flux (HHF) system for performance evaluation of plasma facing components in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngangom, Aomoa; Sarmah, Trinayan; Sah, Puspa; Kakati, Mayur; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of high heat and particle flux test facilities are being used by the fusion community to evaluate the thermal performance of plasma facing materials/components, which includes electron beam, ion beam, neutral beam and thermal plasma assisted sources. In addition to simulate heat loads, plasma sources have the additional advantage of reproducing exact fusion plasma like conditions, in terms of plasma density, temperature and particle flux. At CPP-IPR, Assam, we have developed a high heat and particle flux facility using a DC, non-transferred, segmented thermal plasma torch system, which can produce a constricted, stabilized plasma jet with high ion density. In this system, the plasma torch exhausts into a low pressure chamber containing the materials to be irradiated, which produces an expanded plasma jet with more uniform profiles, compared to plasma torches operated at atmospheric pressure. The heat flux of the plasma beam was studied by using circular calorimeters of different diameters (2 and 3 cm) for different input power (5-55 kW). The effect of the change in gas (argon) flow rate and mixing of gases (argon + hydrogen) was also studied. The heat profile of the plasma beam was also studied by using a pipe calorimeter. From this, the radial heat flux was calculated by using Abel inversion. It is seen that the required heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 is achievable in our system for pure argon plasma as well as for plasma with gas mixtures. The plasma parameters like the temperature, density and the beam velocity were studied by using optical emission spectroscopy. For this, a McPherson made 1.33 meter focal length spectrometer; model number 209, was used. A plane grating with 1800 g/mm was used which gave a spectral resolution of 0.007 nm. A detailed characterization with respect to these plasma parameters for different gas (argon) flow rate and mixing of gases (argon+hydrogen) for different input power will be presented in this paper. The plasma

  19. Sensor Data Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plascencia, Alfredo; Stepán, Petr

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a sensor fusion approach to scene environment mapping as part of a Sensor Data Fusion (SDF) architecture. This approach involves combined sonar array with stereo vision readings.  Sonar readings are interpreted using probability density functions...

  20. Fusion energy division computer systems network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammons, C.E.

    1980-12-01

    The Fusion Energy Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operated by Union Carbide Corporation Nuclear Division (UCC-ND) is primarily involved in the investigation of problems related to the use of controlled thermonuclear fusion as an energy source. The Fusion Energy Division supports investigations of experimental fusion devices and related fusion theory. This memo provides a brief overview of the computing environment in the Fusion Energy Division and the computing support provided to the experimental effort and theory research

  1. Demonstration tests of tritium removal device under the conditions of nuclear fusion reactor. Cooperation test between Japan and USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2001-01-01

    Performance of oxidation catalysis in emergency tritium removal device was tested in Los Alamos National Laboratory by cooperation between Japan and USA on November 8, 2000. To reduce the effects of tritium on the environment, a plan of the closed space for trapping tritium was made. A tritium removal device using oxidation catalysis and water vapor adsorption removes the tritium in the closed space. The treatment flow rate of the device is about 2,500 m 3 /h, the same as ITER(3,000 to 4,500 m 3 /h). Catalysis is Pt/ alumina. The closed space is 3,000m 2 . The initial concentration of tritium was about 7 Bq/cm 2 , ten times as large as the concentration limit in atmosphere. The concentration of tritium in the test laboratory decreased linearly with time and attained to the limit value after about 200 min. Residue of tritium on the wall had been removed and the significant quantity was not detected after three days. The results proved to satisfy safety of ITER. (S.Y.)

  2. Busbar arcs at large fusion magnets: Conductor to feeder tube arcing model experiments with the LONGARC device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry.klimenko@kit.edu; Pasler, Volker

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The LONGARC device was successfully implemented for busbar to feeder tubes arcing model experiments. •Arcing at an ITER busbar inside its feeder tube was simulated in scaled model experiments. •The narrower half tubes imply a slight increase of the arc propagation speed in compare to full tube experiments. •All simulated half tubes experiments show severe damage indicating that the ITER inner feeder tube will not withstand a busbar arc. -- Abstract: Electric arcs moving along the power cables (the so-called busbars) of the toroidal field (TF) coils of ITER may reach and penetrate the cryostat wall. Model experiments with the new LONGARC device continue the VACARC (VACuum ARC) experiments that were initiated to investigate the propagation and destruction mechanisms of busbar arcs in small scale [1]. The experiments are intended to support the development and validation of a numerical model. LONGARC overcomes the space limitations inside VACARC and allows also for advanced 1:3 (vs. ITER full scale) model setups. The LONGARC device and first results are presented below.

  3. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  4. Evaluation of the physico-chemical properties of nanocomposites of low density linear polyethylene and organophilic montmorillonite obtained by fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, Aline; Sandrin, Bianca M.; Pezzin, A.P.T.; Meier, Marcia M.; Balzer, Palova S.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2016-01-01

    In this project they were produced and characterized nanocomposite organoclay applied to linear low density polyethylene in order to improve their physicochemical properties. Samples were produced by means of extrusion and injection process, varying proportions of nanoclay (2; 2.5; 3.0 and 3.5%) in LLDPE. Samples nanocomposites were characterized by TGA, DSC and Flammability test (UL-94). The TGA analysis showed that adding nanoclay increased thermal stability, especially for LLDPE / OMMT2,0 sample increased thermal stability at 4.4%. By DSC it was found that samples with nanoclay incorporation did not affect the Tm of LLDPE, though the increase of nanoclay raised the degree of crystallinity of the samples 52.7% in LLDPE / 2.5 OMMT sample. The flammability results show that the sample LLDPE / OMMT 2.0 showed a decrease of 37.77% in the flame propagation velocity. The NMR showed that the samples up LLDPE / 2.5 OM has an exfoliated nanocomposite formation. (author)

  5. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may......, whereas in 1 case loose pedicle screws were detected at a wrong vertebral level. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT may be useful to detect a lack of fixation of the metallic implants, and hence instability of the spondylodesis by evaluating the focal bone mineralization activity in relation to the pedicle screws....

  6. Conceptual design studies of special-purpose equipment for Fusion Engineering Device torus-sector remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.; Watts, K.D.; Aldrich, W.E.; McPherson, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major maintenance operations anticipated for fusion reactors of the Tokamak configuration is remote removal and replacement of torus sectors. This operation will be difficult due to the massive nature of the sector (375 tonnes), and also due to the precision with which it must be positioned within the fixed structure. The same problem, only to a lesser degree, applies to sub-components of the sector such as the limiter blades, shielding, test assemblies, etc. General and specific design requirements have been generated and trade studies conducted on reactor interfacing details as well as handling machine concepts. On the basis of the design requirements and trade studies, a perferred concept for the sector handling machine was developed. In addition, a similar machine was developed for handling the intermediate sized sector sub-components. While most operations will be performed by special purpose machines such as described above, there is a need for a versatile, relatively high capacity mobile system. A concept suitable for this mobile application was also developed as part of these studies. The general conclusion, to the extent these studies have been completed, was that special single-purpose machines will be required to perform the operations requiring high load capacity and handling precision. The machine concepts developed were felt to be within the state-of-the-art, and will make extensive use of commercially available components. The most serious problem was felt to be development of simple methods to obtain the required precision in positioning massive objects such as the torus sector

  7. GEM gas detectors for soft X-ray imaging in fusion devices with neutron–gamma background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Danilo, E-mail: danilo.pacella@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Romano, Afra; Gabellieri, Lori [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Murtas, Fabrizio [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Mazon, Didier [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, DSM/IRFM, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2013-08-21

    A triple gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector has been built and characterized in a collaboration between ENEA, INFN and CEA to develop a soft X-ray imaging diagnostic for magnetic fusion plasmas. It has an active area of 5×5 cm{sup 2}, 128 pixels and electronics in counting mode. Since burning plasma experiments will have a very large background of radiation, this prototype has been tested with contemporary X-ray, neutron and gamma irradiation, to study the detection efficiencies, and the discrimination capabilities. The detector has been preliminarily characterized under DD neutron irradiation (2.45 MeV) up to 2.2×10{sup 6} n/s on the detector active area, showing a detection efficiency of about 10{sup −4}, while the detection efficiency of X-rays is more than three orders of magnitude higher. The detector has been also tested under DT neutron flux (14 MeV) up to 2.8×10{sup 8} n/s on the whole detector, with a detection efficiency of about 10{sup −5}. The calibration of the γ-rays detection has been done by means of a source of {sup 60}Co (gamma rays of energy 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV) and the detection efficiency was found of the order of 10{sup −4}. Thanks to the adjustable gain of the detector and the discrimination threshold of the electronics, it is possible to minimize the sensitivity to neutrons and gamma, and discriminate the X-ray signals even with very high radiative background.

  8. No difference in long-term trunk muscle strength, cross-sectional area, and density in patients with chronic low back pain 7 to 11 years after lumbar fusion versus cognitive intervention and exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froholdt, Anne; Holm, Inger; Keller, Anne; Gunderson, Ragnhild B; Reikeraas, Olav; Brox, Jens I

    2011-08-01

    Reduced muscle strength and density observed at 1 year after lumbar fusion may deteriorate more in the long term. To compare the long-term effect of lumbar fusion and cognitive intervention and exercises on muscle strength, cross-sectional area, density, and self-rated function in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and disc degeneration. Randomized controlled study with a follow-up examination at 8.5 years (range, 7-11 years). Patients with CLBP and disc degeneration randomized to either instrumented posterolateral fusion of one or both of the two lower lumbar levels or a 3-week cognitive intervention and exercise program were included. Isokinetic muscle strength was measured by a Cybex 6000 (Cybex-Lumex, Inc., Ronkonkoma, NY, USA). All patients had previous experience with the test procedure. The back extension (E) flexion (F) muscles were tested, and the E/F ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional area and density of the back muscles were measured at the L3-L4 segment by computed tomography. Patients rated their function by the General Function Score. Trunk muscle strength, cross-sectional area, density, and self-rated function. Fifty-five patients (90%) were included at long-term follow-up. There were no significant differences in cross-sectional area, density, muscle strength, or self-rated function between the two groups. The cognitive intervention and exercise group increased trunk muscle extension significantly (parea was reduced by 8.5%, and muscle density was reduced by 27%. Although this study did not assess the morphology of muscles likely damaged by surgery, trunk muscle strength and cross-sectional area above the surgical levels are not different between those who had lumbar fusion or cognitive intervention and exercises at 7- to 11-year follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  10. Investigating the effect of acene-fusion and trifluoroacetyl substitution on the electronic and charge transport properties by density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Irfan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We designed novel derivatives of 4,6-di(thiophen-2-ylpyrimidine (DTP. Two benchmark strategies including mesomerically deactivating group, as well as the extension of π-conjugation bridge (acene-fusion have been employed to enhance the electrical and charge transport properties. The density functional theory (DFT and time dependent DFT methods have been used to get optimized geometries in ground and first excited state, respectively. The structural properties (geometric parameters, electronic properties (frontier molecular orbitals; highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence, and important charge transport properties are discussed to establish a molecular level structure–property relationship among these derivatives. Our calculated electronic spectra i.e., absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence have been found in good semi-quantitative agreement with available experimental data. All the newly designed derivatives displayed significantly improved electron injection ability than those of the parent molecule. The values of reorganization energy and transfer integral elucidate that DTP is a potential hole transport material. Based on our present investigation, it is expected that the naphtho and anthra derivatives of DTP are better hole transporters than those of some well-known charge transporter materials like naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and pentacene.

  11. Optimization of a high-yield, low-areal-density fusion product source at the National Ignition Facility with applications in nucleosynthesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Casey, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Craxton, R. S.; Ellison, C. L.; Farrell, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Garbett, W.; Garcia, E. M.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hohensee, M.; Holunga, D. M.; Hoppe, M.; Jackson, M.; Kabadi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kohut, T. R.; Lahmann, B.; Le, H. P.; Li, C. K.; Masse, L.; McKenty, P. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T. G.; Parker, C. E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pino, J.; Remington, B.; Rice, N. G.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sanchez, J.; Sayre, D. B.; Schoff, M. E.; Shuldberg, C. M.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Walters, Z. B.; Whitley, H. D.

    2018-05-01

    Polar-direct-drive exploding pushers are used as a high-yield, low-areal-density fusion product source at the National Ignition Facility with applications including diagnostic calibration, nuclear security, backlighting, electron-ion equilibration, and nucleosynthesis-relevant experiments. In this paper, two different paths to improving the performance of this platform are explored: (i) optimizing the laser drive, and (ii) optimizing the target. While the present study is specifically geared towards nucleosynthesis experiments, the results are generally applicable. Example data from T2/3He-gas-filled implosions with trace deuterium are used to show that yield and ion temperature (Tion) from 1.6 mm-outer-diameter thin-glass-shell capsule implosions are improved at a set laser energy by switching from a ramped to a square laser pulse shape, and that increased laser energy further improves yield and Tion, although by factors lower than predicted by 1 D simulations. Using data from D2/3He-gas-filled implosions, yield at a set Tion is experimentally verified to increase with capsule size. Uniform D3He-proton spectra from 3 mm-outer-diameter CH shell implosions demonstrate the utility of this platform for studying charged-particle-producing reactions relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis.

  12. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  13. Health physics around a controlled fusion research device: the Tokamak at Fontenay-aux-Roses (T.F.R.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The X and neutron dosimetry measurement near the magnetic confinement device for hot plasma, called T.F.R. (Tokamak, Fontenay-aux-Roses) are presented. The biological shielding consists of an ordinary concrete wall 30 cm thick; the dose rate is thus limited at 10 -1 mrem per discharge (corresponding to 10 mrem per day) in the whole area frequented by people during T.F.R. operation. A numerical calculation, taking into account the true geometry and X ray reflexion by the walls and roof, and normalized to the measurements, gives some indications on the electron beam which produces X rays. The photoneutron source (up to 10 10 neutrons per dischage) and the activation of the vacuum vessel result from high energy electrons (>= 10 MeV) supporting a 10 to 1,000 A current [fr

  14. Fabrication of ultrahigh density metal-cell-metal crossbar memory devices with only two cycles of lithography and dry-etch procedures

    KAUST Repository

    Zong, Baoyu

    2013-05-20

    A novel approach to the fabrication of metal-cell-metal trilayer memory devices was demonstrated by using only two cycles of lithography and dry-etch procedures. The fabricated ultrahigh density crossbar devices can be scaled down to ≤70 nm in half-pitch without alignment issues. Depending on the different dry-etch mechanisms in transferring high and low density nanopatterns, suitable dry-etch angles and methods are studied for the transfer of high density nanopatterns. Some novel process methods have also been developed to eliminate the sidewall and other conversion obstacles for obtaining high density of uniform metallic nanopatterns. With these methods, ultrahigh density trilayer crossbar devices (∼2 × 1010 bit cm-2-kilobit electronic memory), which are composed of built-in practical magnetoresistive nanocells, have been achieved. This scalable process that we have developed provides the relevant industries with a cheap means to commercially fabricate three-dimensional high density metal-cell-metal nanodevices. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  16. Fusion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, N.J.

    1995-09-01

    This article traces developments in the spectroscopy of high temperature laboratory plasma used in controlled fusion research from the early 1960's until the present. These three and a half decades have witnessed many orders of magnitude increase in accessible plasma parameters such as density and temperature as well as particle and energy confinement timescales. Driven by the need to interpret the radiation in terms of the local plasma parameters, the thrust of fusion spectroscopy has been to develop our understanding of (i) the atomic structure of highly ionised atoms, usually of impurities in the hydrogen isotope fuel; (ii) the atomic collision rates and their incorporation into ionization structure and emissivity models that take into account plasma phenomena like plasma-wall interactions, particle transport and radiation patterns; (iii) the diagnostic applications of spectroscopy aided by increasingly sophisticated characterisation of the electron fluid. These topics are discussed in relation to toroidal magnetically confined plasmas, particularly the Tokamak which appears to be the most promising approach to controlled fusion to date. (author)

  17. Toroidal electron beam energy storage for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.; Korn, P.; Mondelli, A.; Rostoker, N.

    1976-01-01

    In the presence of an external magnetic field stable equilibria exist for an unneutralized electron beam with ν/γ >1. As a result, it is in principle, possible to store very large quantities of energy in relatively small volumes by confining an unneutralized electron beam in a Tokamak-like device. The energy is stored principally in the electrostatic and self-magnetic fields associated with the beam and is available for rapid heating of pellets for controlled fusion. The large electrostatic potential well in such a device would be sufficient to contain energetic alpha particles, thereby reducing reactor wall bombardment. This approach also avoids plasma loss and wall bombardment by charge exchange neutrals. The conceptual design of an electrostatic Tokamak fusion reactor (ETFR) is discussed. A small toroidal device (the STP machine) has been constructed to test the principles involved. Preliminary experiments on this device have produced electron densities approximately 10% of those required in a reactor

  18. Turbulence measurements in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, G D

    2008-01-01

    Turbulence measurements in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas have a long history and relevance due to the detrimental role of turbulence induced transport on particle, energy, impurity and momentum confinement. The turbulence-the microscopic random fluctuations in particle density, temperature, potential and magnetic field-is generally driven by radial gradients in the plasma density and temperature. The correlation between the turbulence properties and global confinement, via enhanced diffusion, convection and direct conduction, is now well documented. Theory, together with recent measurements, also indicates that non-linear interactions within the turbulence generate large scale zonal flows and geodesic oscillations, which can feed back onto the turbulence and equilibrium profiles creating a complex interdependence. An overview of the current status and understanding of plasma turbulence measurements in the closed flux surface region of magnetic confinement fusion devices is presented, highlighting some recent developments and outstanding problems.

  19. 21 CFR 886.1880 - Fusion and stereoscopic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fusion and stereoscopic target. 886.1880 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1880 Fusion and stereoscopic target. (a) Identification. A fusion and stereoscopic target is a device intended for use as a viewing object...

  20. Sensor Fusion of a Mobile Device to Control and Acquire Videos or Images of Coffee Branches and for Georeferencing Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jimena Ramos Giraldo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones show potential for controlling and monitoring variables in agriculture. Their processing capacity, instrumentation, connectivity, low cost, and accessibility allow farmers (among other users in rural areas to operate them easily with applications adjusted to their specific needs. In this investigation, the integration of inertial sensors, a GPS, and a camera are presented for the monitoring of a coffee crop. An Android-based application was developed with two operating modes: (i Navigation: for georeferencing trees, which can be as close as 0.5 m from each other; and (ii Acquisition: control of video acquisition, based on the movement of the mobile device over a branch, and measurement of image quality, using clarity indexes to select the most appropriate frames for application in future processes. The integration of inertial sensors in navigation mode, shows a mean relative error of ±0.15 m, and total error ±5.15 m. In acquisition mode, the system correctly identifies the beginning and end of mobile phone movement in 99% of cases, and image quality is determined by means of a sharpness factor which measures blurriness. With the developed system, it will be possible to obtain georeferenced information about coffee trees, such as their production, nutritional state, and presence of plagues or diseases.

  1. Sensor Fusion of a Mobile Device to Control and Acquire Videos or Images of Coffee Branches and for Georeferencing Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Paula Jimena Ramos; Aguirre, Álvaro Guerrero; Muñoz, Carlos Mario; Prieto, Flavio Augusto; Oliveros, Carlos Eugenio

    2017-04-06

    Smartphones show potential for controlling and monitoring variables in agriculture. Their processing capacity, instrumentation, connectivity, low cost, and accessibility allow farmers (among other users in rural areas) to operate them easily with applications adjusted to their specific needs. In this investigation, the integration of inertial sensors, a GPS, and a camera are presented for the monitoring of a coffee crop. An Android-based application was developed with two operating modes: ( i ) Navigation: for georeferencing trees, which can be as close as 0.5 m from each other; and ( ii ) Acquisition: control of video acquisition, based on the movement of the mobile device over a branch, and measurement of image quality, using clarity indexes to select the most appropriate frames for application in future processes. The integration of inertial sensors in navigation mode, shows a mean relative error of ±0.15 m, and total error ±5.15 m. In acquisition mode, the system correctly identifies the beginning and end of mobile phone movement in 99% of cases, and image quality is determined by means of a sharpness factor which measures blurriness. With the developed system, it will be possible to obtain georeferenced information about coffee trees, such as their production, nutritional state, and presence of plagues or diseases.

  2. Investigation of plasma interaction with carbon based and mixed materials related to next-generation fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Korshunov, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    under steady state and power pulsed plasma irradiation are described. Erosion products were investigated in the experiments on the plasma disruption simulation in two accelerators (MKT and MK-200) with different energy densities. The studies of energy flux density influence under the pulsed deuterium plasma effect on graphite, as well as those of simultaneous irradiation of two different targets (W and C-C composite) on the erosion product morphology, were realized. Deuterium retention in tungsten, graphite, as well as in W-C and W-Be mixed layers was investigated as a result of steady state plasma exposition and power pulsed plasma irradiation. (author)

  3. The tritium confinement and surface chemistry of plasma facing materials in controlled D-T fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Tritium permeation through first walls, limiters or divertors subjected to energetic tritium charge exchange neutral bombardment is a potentially serious problem area for advanced D-T reactors operating at elevated temperatures. High concentrations of tritium in the near surface region can be reached by implantation of the charge neutral flux combined with a relatively slow recombination of these atoms into molecules at the plasma/ first wall interface. A concentration gradient is established, causing tritium to diffuse into the bulk and essentially to the outer wall surface where it can enter the first wall coolant. Since tritium separation from cooling water is very costly, release of even a small fraction of tritium to the environment could pose undesirable safety problems. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce the tritium permeation. An analysis of the way of inhibition has been made. The tritium interacts with the solid surface of the plasma facing components, resulting in trapping and material erosion, and posing problems with respect to plasma density control. The erosion of the plasma facing component materials is mainly caused by physical and chemical erosion. A detailed analysis of chemical erosion by tritium has been performed and the results are described. (author)

  4. Contribution of the different erosion processes to material release from the vessel walls of fusion devices during plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    2002-01-01

    In high temperature plasma experiments several processes contribute to erosion and loss of material from the vessel walls. This material may enter the plasma edge and the central plasma where it acts as impurities. It will finally be re-deposited at other wall areas. These erosion processes are: evaporation due to heating of wall areas. At very high power deposition evaporation may become very large, which has been named ''blooming''. Large evaporation and melting at some areas of the vessel wall surface may occur during heat pulses, as observed in plasma devices during plasma disruptions. At tips on the vessel walls and/or hot spots on the plasma exposed solid surfaces electrical arcs between the plasma and the vessel wall may ignite. They cause the release of ions, atoms and small metal droplets, or of carbon dust particles. Finally, atoms from the vessel walls are removed by physical and chemical sputtering caused by the bombardment of the vessel walls with ions as well as energetic neutral hydrogen atoms from the boundary plasma. All these processes have been, and are, observed in today's plasma experiments. Evaporation can in principle be controlled by very effective cooling of the wall tiles, arcing is reduced by very stable plasma operation, and sputtering by ions can be reduced by operating with a cold plasma in front of the vessel walls. However, sputtering by energetic neutrals, which impinge on all areas of the vessel walls, is likely to be the most critical process because ions lost from the plasma recycle as neutrals or have to be refuelled by neutrals leading to the charge exchange processes in the plasma. In order to quantify the wall erosion, ''materials factors'' (MF) have been introduced in the following for the different erosion processes. (orig.)

  5. Hard TiCx/SiC/a-C:H nanocomposite thin films using pulsed high energy density plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Z.A.; Rawat, R.S.; Tan, K.S.; Kumar, A.K.; Ahmad, R.; Hussain, T.; Kloc, C.; Chen, Z.; Shen, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The energetic ions and electron beams are used to synthesize TiC x /SiC/a-C:H films. •As-deposited crystalline and hard nanocomposite TiC x /SiC/a-C:H films are synthesized. •Very high average deposition rates of 68 nm/shot are achieved using dense plasma focus. •The maximum hardness of 22 GPa is achieved at the surface of the film. -- Abstract: Thin films of TiC x /SiC/a-C:H were synthesized on Si substrates using a complex mix of high energy density plasmas and instability accelerated energetic ions of filling gas species, emanated from hot and dense pinched plasma column, in dense plasma focus device. The conventional hollow copper anode of Mather type plasma focus device was replaced by solid titanium anode for synthesis of TiC x /SiC/a-C:H nanocomposite thin films using CH 4 :Ar admixture of (1:9, 3:7 and 5:5) for fixed 20 focus shots as well as with different number of focus shots with fixed CH 4 :Ar admixture ratio 3:7. XRD results showed the formation of crystalline TiC x /SiC phases for thin film synthesized using different number of focus shots with CH 4 :Ar admixture ratio fixed at 3:7. SEM results showed that the synthesized thin films consist of nanoparticle agglomerates and the size of agglomerates depended on the CH 4 :Ar admixture ratio as well as on the number of focus shots. Raman analysis showed the formation of polycrystalline/amorphous Si, SiC and a-C for different CH 4 :Ar ratio as well as for different number of focus shots. The XPS analysis confirmed the formation of TiC x /SiC/a-C:H composite thin film. Nanoindentation results showed that the hardness and elastic modulus values of composite thin films increased with increasing number of focus shots. Maximum values of hardness and elastic modulus at the surface of the composite thin film were found to be about 22 and 305 GPa, respectively for 30 focus shots confirming the successful synthesis of hard composite TiC x /SiC/a-C:H coatings

  6. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo; Peng, Yingquan

    2013-12-01

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs.

  7. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Peng, Yingquan, E-mail: yqpeng@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-12-28

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs.

  8. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo; Peng, Yingquan

    2013-01-01

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs

  9. Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85-90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams

  10. High temperature superconductors for fusion magnets -influence of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudy, M.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work authors present the results of study of influence of neutron irradiation of high temperature superconductors for fusion magnets. High temperature superconductors (type of YBCO (Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxygen)) are strong candidates to be applied in the next step of fusion devices. Defects induced by fast neutrons are effective pinning centres, which can significantly improve critical current densities and reduce J c anisotropy. Due to induced lattice disorder, T c is reduced. Requirements for ITER (DEMO) are partially achieved at 64 K.

  11. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985

  12. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  13. Post-doctoral research work developed at the National Institute for Fusion Science - Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.

    1992-05-01

    This is a research report report on the work developed at the National Institute for Fusion Science - Japan, involving study of Beam Emission Spectroscopy. It describes the use of a fast neutral lithium beam (8 KeV) to measure the density profile in a Compact Helical Device. (A.C.A.S.)

  14. Directions for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts

  15. Fusion power and its prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, T.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in research towards the development of fusion power is reviewed. In the magnetic approach, the impressive advances made in Tokamak research in the past few years have bolstered the confidence that experimental Tokamak devices currently under construction will demonstrate the break-even condition or scientific feasibility of fusion power. Exciting and innovative ideas in mirror magnetic confinement are expected to culminate in high-Q devices which will make open-ended confinement a serious contender for fusion reactors. In the inertial confinement approach, conflicting pellet temperature requirements have placed severe constraints on useful laser intensities and wavelengths for laser-driven fusion. Relativistic electron beam fusion must solve critical focusing and pellet coupling problems, and the newly proposed heavy ion beam fusion, though feasible and attractive in principle, requires very high energy particles for which the accelerator technology may not be available for some time to come

  16. Vacuum fusion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1957-01-01

    After having outlined that vacuum fusion and moulding of uranium and of its alloys have some technical and economic benefits (vacuum operations avoid uranium oxidation and result in some purification; precision moulding avoids machining, chip production and chemical reprocessing of these chips; direct production of the desired shape is possible by precision moulding), this report presents the uranium fusion unit (its low pressure enclosure and pumping device, the crucible-mould assembly, and the MF supply device). The author describes the different steps of cast production, and briefly comments the obtained results

  17. Revitalizing Fusion via Fission Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    Existing tokamaks could generate significant nuclear fuel. TFTR, operating steady state with DT might generate enough fuel for a 300 MW nuclear reactor. The immediate goals of the magnetic fusion program would necessarily shift from a study of advanced plasma regimes in larger sized devices, to mostly known plasmas regimes, but at steady state or high duty cycle operation in DT plasmas. The science and engineering of breeding blankets would be equally important. Follow on projects could possibly produce nuclear fuel in large quantity at low price. Although today there is strong opposition to nuclear power in the United States, in a 21st century world of 10 billion people, all of whom will demand a middle class life style, nuclear energy will be important. Concern over greenhouse gases will also drive the world toward nuclear power. There are studies indicating that the world will need 10 TW of carbon free energy by 2050. It is difficult to see how this can be achieved without the breeding of nuclear fuel. By using the thorium cycle, proliferation risks are minimized. [1], [2]. 1 W. Manheimer, Fusion Technology, 36, 1, 1999, 2.W. Manheimer, Physics and Society, v 29, #3, p5, July, 2000

  18. The fusion-fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1985-01-01

    As the history of the development of fusion energy shows, a sustained controlled fusion reaction is much more difficult to produce than rapid uncontrolled release of fusion energy. Currently, the ''magnetic bottle'' technique shows sufficient progress that it might applied for the commercial fuel production of /sup 233/U, suitable for use in fission reactors, by developing a fusion-fission hybrid. Such a device would consist of a fusion chamber core surrounded by a region containing cladded uranium pellets cooled by helium, with lithium salts also present to produce tritium to refuel the fusion process. Successful development of this hybrid might be possible within 10 y, and would provide both experience and funds for further development of controlled fusion energy

  19. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through...... individual fusion events using time-lapse and antagonists of CD47 and syncytin-1. All time-lapse recordings have been studied by two independent observers. A total of 1808 fusion events were analyzed. The present study shows that CD47 and syncytin-1 have different roles in osteoclast fusion depending...... broad contact surfaces between the partners' cell membrane while syncytin-1 mediate fusion through phagocytic-cup like structure. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 1-8, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  20. ITER Experts' meeting on density limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrass, K.; Igitkhanov, Y.L.; Uckan, N.A.

    1989-12-01

    The necessity of achieving a prescribed wall load or fusion power essentially determines the plasma pressure in a device like ITER. The range of operation densities and temperatures compatible with this condition is constrained by the problems of power exhaust and the disruptive density limit. The maximum allowable heat loads on the divertor plates and the maximum allowable sheath edge temperature practically impose a lower limit on the operating densities, whereas the disruptive density limit imposes an upper limit. For most of the density limit scalings proposed in the past an overlap of the two constraints or at best a very narrow accessible density range is predicted for ITER. Improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms is therefore a crucial issue in order to provide a more reliable basis for extrapolation to ITER and to identify possible ways of alleviating the problem

  1. The restructured fusion program and the role of alternative fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    This testimony to the subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the U.S. House of Representatives's Committee on Science pushes for about 25% of the fusion budget to go to alternative fusion concepts. These concepts are: low density magnetic confinement, inertial confinement fusion, high density magnetic confinement, and non- thermonuclear and miscellaneous programs. Various aspects of each of these concepts are outlined

  2. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; van Royen, B.J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactideco-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first

  3. Fusion-power demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W.; Campbell, R.B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I.R.; Carpenter, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment

  4. Fusion power demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment

  5. Investigations of image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong

    1999-12-01

    The objective of image fusion is to combine information from multiple images of the same scene. The result of image fusion is a single image which is more suitable for the purpose of human visual perception or further image processing tasks. In this thesis, a region-based fusion algorithm using the wavelet transform is proposed. The identification of important features in each image, such as edges and regions of interest, are used to guide the fusion process. The idea of multiscale grouping is also introduced and a generic image fusion framework based on multiscale decomposition is studied. The framework includes all of the existing multiscale-decomposition- based fusion approaches we found in the literature which did not assume a statistical model for the source images. Comparisons indicate that our framework includes some new approaches which outperform the existing approaches for the cases we consider. Registration must precede our fusion algorithms. So we proposed a hybrid scheme which uses both feature-based and intensity-based methods. The idea of robust estimation of optical flow from time- varying images is employed with a coarse-to-fine multi- resolution approach and feature-based registration to overcome some of the limitations of the intensity-based schemes. Experiments show that this approach is robust and efficient. Assessing image fusion performance in a real application is a complicated issue. In this dissertation, a mixture probability density function model is used in conjunction with the Expectation- Maximization algorithm to model histograms of edge intensity. Some new techniques are proposed for estimating the quality of a noisy image of a natural scene. Such quality measures can be used to guide the fusion. Finally, we study fusion of images obtained from several copies of a new type of camera developed for video surveillance. Our techniques increase the capability and reliability of the surveillance system and provide an easy way to obtain 3-D

  6. Fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of fusion power, and its advantages and disadvantages, are outlined. Present research programmes and future plans directed towards the development of a fusion power reactor, are summarized. (U.K.)

  7. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum......This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...

  8. Fusion Simulation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. (1). Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  9. Fusion: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  10. Magnetic and inertial fusion status and development plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correll, D.; Storm, E.

    1987-01-01

    Controlled fusion, pursued by investigators in both the magnetic and inertial confinement research programs, continues to be a strong candidate as an intrinsically safe and virtually inexhaustible long-term energy source. We describe the status of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion in terms of the accomplishments made by the research programs for each concept. The improvement in plasma parameters (most frequently discussed in terms of the Tn tau product of ion temperature, T, density, n, and confinement time, tau) can be linked with the construction and operation of experimental facilities. The scientific progress exhibited by larger scale fusion experiments within the US, such as Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Fusion Test Reactor for magnetic studies and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Nova laser for inertial studies, has been optimized by the theoretical advances in plasma and computational physics. Both TFTR and Nova have exhibited ion temperatures in excess of 10 keV at confinement parameters of n tau near 10 13 cm -3 . sec. At slightly lower temperatures (near a few keV), the value of n tau has exceeded 10 14 cm -3 . sec in both devices. Near-term development plans in fusion research include experiments within the US, Europe, and Japan to improve the plasma performance to reach conditions where the rate of fusion energy production equals or exceeds the heating power incident upon the plasma. 9 refs., 7 figs

  11. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, technical research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    Research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature fusion plasmas (plasma theory, RF heating, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator A and C tokamaks, including pioneering investigations of the equilibrium, stability, transport and radiation properties of fusion plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of a new and innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experimental facility scheduled for 1983; and (4) a broadly based program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas

  12. Rencontre on fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, S.F.J.

    1979-02-01

    This report of a rencontre held to consider the technology of magnetic confinement fusion devices gives the agenda for the meeting and lists those topics which were identified as areas of research. These topics included materials, tritium, structures and heat transfer, neutronics and nuclear data, and corrosion problems. (UK)

  13. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  14. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  15. Room-temperature vertically-aligned copper oxide nanoblades synthesized by electrochemical restructuring of copper hydroxide nanorods: An electrode for high energy density hybrid device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuetao; Zhou, Jinyuan; Dou, Wei; Wang, Junya; Mu, Xuemei; Zhang, Yue; Abas, Asim; Su, Qing; Lan, Wei; Xie, Erqing; Zhang, Chuanfang (John)

    2018-04-01

    The fast growing of portable electronics has greatly stimulated the development of energy storage materials, such as transition metal oxides (TMOs). However, TMOs usually involve harsh synthesis conditions, such as high temperature. Here we take advantage of the metastable nature of Cu(OH)2 and grow CuO nanoblades (NBs) on Cu foam under the electric field at room temperature. The electrochemical polarization accelerates the dissolution of Cu(OH)2 nanorods, guides the deposition of the as-dissolved Cu(OH)42- species and eventually leads to the phase transformation of CuO NBs. The unique materials architecture render the vertically-aligned CuO NBs with enhanced electronic and ionic diffusion kinetics, high charge storage (∼779 mC cm-2 at 1 mA cm-2), excellent rate capability and long-term cycling performances. Further matching with activated carbon electrode results in high-performance hybrid device, which displays a wide voltage window (1.7 V) in aqueous electrolyte, high energy density (0.17 mWh cm-2) and power density (34 mW cm-2) coupled with long lifetime, surpassing the best CuO based device known. The hybrid device can be randomly connected and power several light-emitting diodes. Importantly, such an electrochemical restructuring approach is cost-effective, environmentally green and universal, and can be extended to synthesize other metastable hydroxides to in-situ grow corresponding oxides.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Wood, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Edward Teller has been a strong proponent of harnessing nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes. There are two approaches: Plowshare, which utilizes macro- explosions, and inertial confinement fusion, which utilizes microexplosions. The development of practical fusion power plants is a principal goal of the inertial program. It is remarkable that Teller's original thermonuclear problem, how to make super high yield nuclear explosions, and the opposite problem, how to make ultra low yield nuclear explosions, may both be solved by Teller's radiation implosion scheme. This paper reports on the essential physics of these two thermonuclear domains, which are separated by nine orders of magnitude in yield, provided by Teller's similarity theorem and its exceptions. Higher density makes possible thermonuclear burn of smaller masses of fuel. The leverage is high: the scale of the explosion diminishes with the square of the increase in density. The extraordinary compressibility of matter, first noticed by Teller during the Los Alamos atomic bomb program, provides an almost incredible opportunity to harness fusion. The energy density of thermonuclear fuels isentropically compressed to super high-- -densities---even to ten thousand times solid density---is small compared to the energy density at thermonuclear ignition temperatures. In small masses of fuel imploded to these super high matter densities, the energy required to achieve ignition may be greatly reduced by exploiting thermonuclear propagation from a relatively small hot spot

  17. Micro- and nano-scale optical devices for high density photonic integrated circuits at near-infrared wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Rohit

    In this research work, we explore fundamental silicon-based active and passive photonic devices that can be integrated together to form functional photonic integrated circuits. The devices which include power splitters, switches and lenses are studied starting from their physics, their design and fabrication techniques and finally from an experimental standpoint. The experimental results reveal high performance devices that are compatible with standard CMOS fabrication processes and can be easily integrated with other devices for near infrared telecom applications. In Chapter 2, a novel method for optical switching using nanomechanical proximity perturbation technique is described and demonstrated. The method which is experimentally demonstrated employs relatively low powers, small chip footprint and is compatible with standard CMOS fabrication processes. Further, in Chapter 3, this method is applied to develop a hitless bypass switch aimed at solving an important issue in current wavelength division multiplexing systems namely hitless switching of reconfigurable optical add drop multiplexers. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the application of the nanomechanical proximity perturbation technique to practical situations. In Chapter 4, a fundamental photonic component namely the power splitter is described. Power splitters are important components for any photonic integrated circuits because they help split the power from a single light source to multiple devices on the same chip so that different operations can be performed simultaneously. The power splitters demonstrated in this chapter are based on multimode interference principles resulting in highly compact low loss and highly uniform power splitting to split the power of the light from a single channel to two and four channels. These devices can further be scaled to achieve higher order splitting such as 1x16 and 1x32 power splits. Finally in Chapter 5 we overcome challenges in device

  18. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC)

  19. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  20. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  1. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  2. Nuclear fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention pertains to the method and apparatus for the confining of a stream of fusible positive ions at values of density and high average kinetic energy, primarily of tightly looping motions, to produce nuclear fusion at a useful rate; more or less intimately mixed with the fusible ions will be lowerenergy electrons at about equal density, introduced solely for the purpose of neutralizing the positive space charge of the ions

  3. Fusion Canada issue 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue the opening of the Garching ITER site, a CCFM/TdeV update,a tritium release field test, measuring radial profile of plasma current density on TdeV, power supplies for TdeV, 5th International Tritium Technology conference, and 1994 basic tritium course. 4 figs

  4. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiya, Timothy U; Smit, T; van Royen, B J; Mullender, M

    2011-04-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first randomized prospective study that assesses clinical outcome of PLDLLA cage compared with a poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) implant. Twenty-six patients were randomly assigned to undergo instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) whereby either a PEEK cage or a PLDLLA cage was implanted. Clinical outcome based on visual analogue scale scores for leg pain and back pain, as well as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-36 questionnaires were documented and analysed. When compared with preoperative values, all clinical parameters have significantly improved in the PEEK group at 2 years after surgery with the exception of SF-36 general health, SF-36 mental health and SF-36 role emotional scores. No clinical parameter showed significant improvement at 2 years after surgery compared with preoperative values in the PLDLLA patient group. Only six patients (50%) in the PLDLLA group showed improvement in the VAS scores for leg and back pain as well as the ODI, as opposed to 10 patients (71%) in the PEEK group. One-third of the patients in the PLDLLA group actually reported worsening of their pain scores and ODI. Three cases of mild to moderate osteolysis were seen in the PLDLLA group. Following up on our preliminary report, these 2-year results confirm the superiority of the PEEK implant to the resorbable PLDLLA implant in aiding spinal fusion and alleviating symptoms following PLIF in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis associated with either canal stenosis or foramen stenosis or both and emanating from a single lumbar segment.

  5. Development and characterization of high temperature, high energy density dielectric materials to establish routes towards power electronics capacitive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Dennis P.

    The maximum electrostatic energy density of a capacitor is a function of the relative permittivity (epsilonr) and the square of the dielectric breakdown strength (Eb). Currently, state-of-the art high temperature (>200 °C), SiC-based power electronics utilize CaZrO3-rich NP0/C0G-type capacitors, which have low relative permittivities of epsilonr ˜ 30-40, high breakdown strengths (> 1.0 MV/cm), and are chosen for their minimal change in energy storage with temperature. However, with operating temperatures exceeding the rated temperatures for such capacitors, there is an opportunity to develop new dielectric ceramics having higher energy densities and volumetric efficiencies at high temperatures (>200 °C) by utilizing higher permittivity dielectrics while maintaining high breakdown strengths via doping. The solid solution behavior of was characterized in order to determine the optimal composition for balancing permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength to obtain high energy densities at elevated temperatures. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed Vegard's law behavior across the solid solution with minimal 2nd phases. To determine a Ca(TixZr1-x)O3 composition that will also minimize electronic or band conduction, the optical properties of the Ca(TixZr1-x)O3 solid solution were investigated to identify a composition on the CaTiO3 - rich end of the solid solution with a large band gap. Both ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and spectroscopic ellipsometry were utilized to determine the Ca(TixZr1-x)O3 band gaps and optical properties. The resistivity at 250 °C scaled with the band gap energy across the solid solution. Comparing the current-voltage (I--V) behavior at 250 °C for Ca(Tix-yMnyZr0.2)O3 (CTZ + Mn) where x = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, and y = 0.005, it was found that the Ca(Ti 0.795Mn0.005Zr0.2)O3 composition showed the lowest current density and a decrease in current density of 5 orders of magnitude compared to the un

  6. Sub-15 nm nano-pattern generation by spacer width control for high density precisely positioned self-assembled device nanomanufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    We present a conventional micro-fabrication based thin film vertical sidewall (spacer) width controlled nano-gap fabrication process to create arrays of nanopatterns for high density precisely positioned self-assembled nanoelectronics device integration. We have used conventional optical lithography to create base structures and then silicon nitride (Si 3N4) based spacer formation via reactive ion etching. Control of Si3N4 thickness provides accurate control of vertical sidewall (spacer) besides the base structures. Nano-gaps are fabricated between two adjacent spacers whereas the width of the gap depends on the gap between two adjacent base structures minus width of adjacent spacers. We demonstrate the process using a 32 nm node complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) platform to show its compatibility for very large scale heterogeneous integration of top-down and bottom-up fabrication as well as conventional and selfassembled nanodevices. This process opens up clear opportunity to overcome the decade long challenge of high density integration of self-assembled devices with precise position control. © 2012 IEEE.

  7. Sub-15 nm nano-pattern generation by spacer width control for high density precisely positioned self-assembled device nanomanufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2012-08-01

    We present a conventional micro-fabrication based thin film vertical sidewall (spacer) width controlled nano-gap fabrication process to create arrays of nanopatterns for high density precisely positioned self-assembled nanoelectronics device integration. We have used conventional optical lithography to create base structures and then silicon nitride (Si 3N4) based spacer formation via reactive ion etching. Control of Si3N4 thickness provides accurate control of vertical sidewall (spacer) besides the base structures. Nano-gaps are fabricated between two adjacent spacers whereas the width of the gap depends on the gap between two adjacent base structures minus width of adjacent spacers. We demonstrate the process using a 32 nm node complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) platform to show its compatibility for very large scale heterogeneous integration of top-down and bottom-up fabrication as well as conventional and selfassembled nanodevices. This process opens up clear opportunity to overcome the decade long challenge of high density integration of self-assembled devices with precise position control. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  9. A Tutorial on Basic Principles of Microwave Reflectometry Applied to Fluctuation Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Kramer, G.J.; Valeo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Microwave reflectometry is now routinely used for probing the structure of magnetohydrodynamic and turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Conditions specific to the core of tokamak plasmas, such as small amplitude of density irregularities and the uniformity of the background plasma, have enabled progress in the quantitative interpretation of reflectometer signals. In particular, the extent of applicability of the 1-D [one-dimensional] geometric optics description of the reflected field is investigated by direct comparison to 1-D full wave analysis. Significant advances in laboratory experiments are discussed which are paving the way towards a thorough understanding of this important measurement technique. Data is presented from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 33 (1991) 1509] identifying the validity of the geometric optics description of the scattered field and demonstrating the feasibility of imaging turbulent fluctuations in fusion scale devices

  10. Plasma processed coating of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Crane, J.K.; Illige, J.D.; Hatcher, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion targets have been deposited in an inductively coupled discharge device by plasma polymerization. Two feed gases were used: perfluoro-2-butene, which produced a fluorocarbon coating (CF 1 3 ) with a density of 1.8 g/cc, and trans-2-butene which produced a hydrocarbon coating (CH 1 3 ) with a density of 1.0 g/cc. Uniform pin-hole free films have been deposited to a thickness of up to 30 μm of fluorocarbon and up to 110 μm of hydrocarbon. The effect of process variables on surface smoothness has been investigated. The basic defect in the coating has been found to result from shadowing by a small surface irregularity in an anisotropic coating flux

  11. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  12. Recent fusion research in the National Institute for Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Sakakibara, Satoru; Sagara, Akio; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), which was established in 1989, promotes academic approaches toward the exploration of fusion science for steady-state helical reactor and realizes the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of toroidal plasmas as an inter-university research organization and a key center of worldwide fusion research. The Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Science Project, and the Fusion Engineering Project are organized for early realization of net current free fusion reactor, and their recent activities are described in this paper. The LHD has been producing high-performance plasmas comparable to those of large tokamaks, and several new findings with regard to plasma physics have been obtained. The numerical simulation science project contributes understanding and systemization of the physical mechanisms of plasma confinement in fusion plasmas and explores complexity science of a plasma for realization of the numerical test reactor. In the fusion engineering project, the design of the helical fusion reactor has progressed based on the development of superconducting coils, the blanket, fusion materials and tritium handling. (author)

  13. A real time 155 GHz millimeter wave interferometer module for electron density measurement in large plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettemann, P.W.; Waidmann, G.

    1982-09-01

    A homodyne, real time 155 GHz interferometer channel is described which is one module of a multichannel system for use on TEXTOR tokamak. A standing sine wave is generated in a phase bridge by transmitting a frequency modulated millimeter wave down two unequal interferometer branches. The presence of plasma produces a phase slip of the sine wave with respect to a reference signal. The phase shift is linear proportional to plasma density for expected TEXTOR plasmas. Long plasma paths give multiradian phase shifts which are recorded by a digital fringe counting system. The accuracy of phase measurement is ΔPHI = 2π/16. Phase changes of 7π/8 are accepted per modulation period. The microwave in the measurement branch of the interferometer is transmitted using a quasioptical technique. Components and technical details are described. The interferometer was tested in a simulation set-up and in two different plasma experiments. Experimental results are presented. (orig.)

  14. Next-generation fabrication technologies for optical pickup devices in high-density optical disk storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoe, Shigeru

    1999-05-01

    This paper shows a direction of friction technologies to make aspherical plastic objective lens with higher optical performance for high density optical disk storage systems. Specifically, a low birefringence and low water absorption (less than 0.1%) optical resin, low tool abrasion mold material, high circularity diamond tool which nose circularity is less than 30 nm, and 1 nm axis resolution precision lathe which tool position is stabilized against drift by environmental change are referred. Cut optical surface of a mold sample was constantly attained in less than 5 nmRtm surface roughness. Using these new technologies, aspherical plastic objective lens (NA0.6) for DVD which wave aberration is less than 35 m (lambda) rms was realized.

  15. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the present position of research into controlled fusion. After a brief reminder of the nuclear reactions of fusion and the principle of their use as a source of energy, the results obtained by the method of magnetic confinement are summarized. Among the many solutions that have been imagined and tried out to achieve a magnetic containing vessel capable of holding the thermonuclear plasma, the devices of the Tokamak type have a good lead and that is why they are described in greater detail. An idea is then given of the problems that arise when one intends conceiving the thermonuclear reactor based on the principle of the Tokamaks. The last section deals with fusion by lasers which is a new and most attractive alternative, at least from the viewpoint of basis physics. The report concludes with an indication of the stages to be passed through to reach production of energy on an industrial scale [fr

  16. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  17. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  18. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  19. Fusion research at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress

  20. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  1. Insulators for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Design studies for fusion devices and reactors have become more detailed in recent years and with this has come a better understanding of requirements and operating conditions for insulators in these machines. Ceramic and organic insulators are widely used for many components of fusion devices and reactors namely: radio frequency (RF) energy injection systems (BeO, Al 2 O 3 , Mg Al 2 O 4 , Si 3 N 4 ); electrical insulation for the torus structure (SiC, Al 2 O 3 , MgO, Mg Al 2 O 4 , Si 4 Al 2 O 2 N 6 , Si 3 N 4 , Y 2 O 3 ); lightly-shielded magnetic coils (MgO, MgAl 2 O 4 ); the toroidal field coil (epoxies, polyimides), neutron shield (B 4 C, TiH 2 ); high efficiency electrical generation; as well as the generation of very high temperatures for high efficiency hydrogen production processes (ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - mat, graphite and carbon - felt). Timely development of insulators for fusion applications is clearly necessary. Those materials to be used in fusion machines should show high resistance to radiation damage and maintain their structural integrity. Now the need is urgent for a variety of radiation resistant materials, but much effort in these areas is required for insulators to be considered seriously by the design community. This document contains 14 papers from an IAEA meeting. It was the objective of this meeting to identify existing problems in analysing various situations of applications and requirements of electrical insulators and ceramics in fusion and to recommend strategies and different stages of implementation. This meeting was endorsed by the International Fusion Research Council

  2. Thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisse, J.

    2000-01-01

    This document takes stock of the two ways of thermonuclear fusion research explored today: magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion. The basic physical principles are recalled first: fundamental nuclear reactions, high temperatures, elementary properties of plasmas, ignition criterion, magnetic confinement (charged particle in a uniform magnetic field, confinement and Tokamak principle, heating of magnetized plasmas (ohmic, neutral particles, high frequency waves, other heating means), results obtained so far (scale laws and extrapolation of performances, tritium experiments, ITER project), inertial fusion (hot spot ignition, instabilities, results (Centurion-Halite program, laser experiments). The second part presents the fusion reactor and its associated technologies: principle (tritium production, heat source, neutron protection, tritium generation, materials), magnetic fusion (superconducting magnets, divertor (role, principle, realization), inertial fusion (energy vector, laser adaptation, particle beams, reaction chamber, stresses, chamber concepts (dry and wet walls, liquid walls), targets (fabrication, injection and pointing)). The third chapter concerns the socio-economic aspects of thermonuclear fusion: safety (normal operation and accidents, wastes), costs (costs structure and elementary comparison, ecological impact and external costs). (J.S.)

  3. Atomic and molecular physics of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachain, C.J.; Post, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    This book attempts to provide a comprehensive introduction to the atomic and molecular physics of controlled thermonuclear fusion, and also a self-contained source from which to start a systematic study of the field. Presents an overview of fusion energy research, general principles of magnetic confinement, and general principles of inertial confinement. Discusses the calculation and measurement of atomic and molecular processes relevant to fusion, and the atomic and molecular physics of controlled thermonuclear research devices. Topics include recent progress in theoretical methods for atomic collisions; current theoretical techniques for electron-atom and electronion scattering; experimental aspects of electron impact ionization and excitation of positive ions; the theory of charge exchange and ionization by heavy particles; experiments on electron capture and ionization by multiply charged ions; Rydberg states; atomic and molecular processes in high temperature, low-density magnetically confined plasmas; atomic processes in high-density plasmas; the plasma boundary region and the role of atomic and molecular processes; neutral particle beam production and injection; spectroscopic plasma diagnostics; and particle diagnostics for magnetic fusion experiments

  4. Thermal energy and bootstrap current in fusion reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-01-01

    For DT fusion reactors with prescribed alpha particle heating power P α , plasma volume V and burn temperature i > ∼ 10 keV specific relations for the thermal energy content, bootstrap current, central plasma pressure and other quantities are derived. It is shown that imposing P α and V makes these relations independent of the magnitudes of the density and temperature, i.e. they only depend on P α , V and shape factors or profile parameters. For model density and temperature profiles analytic expressions for these shape factors and for the factor C bs in the bootstrap current formula I bs ∼ C bs (a/R) 1/2 β p I p are given. In the design of next-step devices and fusion reactors, the fusion power is a fixed quantity. Prescription of the alpha particle heating power and plasma volume results in specific relations which can be helpful for interpreting computer simulations and for the design of fusion reactors. (author) 5 refs

  5. Optimal III-nitride HEMTs: from materials and device design to compact model of the 2DEG charge density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexin; Rakheja, Shaloo

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a physically motivated compact model of the charge-voltage (Q-V) characteristics in various III-nitride high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) operating under highly non-equilibrium transport conditions, i.e. high drain-source current. By solving the coupled Schrödinger-Poisson equation and incorporating the two-dimensional electrostatics in the channel, we obtain the charge at the top-of-the-barrier for various applied terminal voltages. The Q-V model accounts for cutting off of the negative momenta states from the drain terminal under high drain-source bias and when the transmission in the channel is quasi-ballistic. We specifically focus on AlGaN and AlInN as barrier materials and InGaN and GaN as the channel material in the heterostructure. The Q-V model is verified and calibrated against numerical results using the commercial TCAD simulator Sentaurus from Synopsys for a 20-nm channel length III-nitride HEMT. With 10 fitting parameters, most of which have a physical origin and can easily be obtained from numerical or experimental calibration, the compact Q-V model allows us to study the limits and opportunities of III-nitride technology. We also identify optimal material and geometrical parameters of the device that maximize the carrier concentration in the HEMT channel in order to achieve superior RF performance. Additionally, the compact charge model can be easily integrated in a hierarchical circuit simulator, such as Keysight ADS and CADENCE, to facilitate circuit design and optimization of various technology parameters.

  6. Fusion technology 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, B.; Libeyre, P.; Gentile, B. de; Tonon, G.

    1998-01-01

    The Symposium On Fusion Technology (SOFT) is held every two years with the objective to set the stage for the exchange of information on the design, construction and operation of fusion experiments and on the technology which is being developed for the next step devices and fusion reactors. By decision of the International Organizing Committee, the 20. SOFT includes invited talks, and oral and poster contributions in the following topics: plasma facing components, plasma heating and current drive, plasma engineering and control, experimental systems and diagnostics, magnets and power supplies, fuel technologies, remote operation, blanket and shield technologies, safety and environment, and system engineering and future devices. This symposium differs from the previous ones of this series by the way the present proceedings are produced. In order to have the written material available to the participants and the community at the nearest to the conference event, the papers have been collected 2 months in advance and printed in the present books. The goal was to deliver them to each participant upon arrival to the conference centre. These books contain all the papers corresponding to poster presentation, and the abstracts of the oral contributions and invited papers. The papers corresponding to these presentations, both oral and invited, will be published in 1999, after a standard review process, in a supplement of Fusion Engineering and Design. (author)

  7. Density limit experiments on FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Apicella, M.L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Belli, F.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cianfarani, C.; Cocilovo, V.; Dimatteo, L.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Bin, W.; Granucci, G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main problems in tokamak fusion devices concerns the capability to operate at a high plasma density, which is observed to be limited by the appearance of catastrophic events causing loss of plasma confinement. The commonly used empirical scaling law for the density limit is the Greenwald limit, predicting that the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald density limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Recently, it has been shown on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) that the Greenwald density limit is exceeded in gas-fuelled discharges with a high value of the edge safety factor. In order to understand this behaviour, dedicated density limit experiments were performed on FTU, in which the high density domain was explored in a wide range of values of plasma current (I p = 500–900 kA) and toroidal magnetic field (B T = 4–8 T). These experiments confirm the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling holds for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord passing at r/a ≃ 4/5. On the other hand, the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord does not depend on the average plasma current density and essentially depends on the toroidal magnetic field only. This behaviour is explained in terms of density profile peaking in the high density domain, with a peaking factor at the disruption depending on the edge safety factor. The possibility that the MARFE (multifaced asymmetric radiation from the edge) phenomenon is the cause of the peaking has been considered, with the MARFE believed to form a channel for the penetration of the neutral particles into deeper layers of the plasma. Finally, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis has shown that also the central line

  8. The scientific status of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The development of fusion energy has been a large-scale scientific undertaking of broad interest. The magnetic plasma containment in tokamaks and the laser-drive ignition of microfusion capsules appear to be scientifically feasible sources of energy. These concepts are bounded by questions of required intensity in magnetid field and plasma currents or in drive energy and, for both concepts, by issues of plasma stability and energy transport. The basic concept and the current scientific issues are described for magnetic fusion and for the interesting, but likely infeasible, muon-catalyzed fusion concept. Inertial fusion is mentioned, qualitatively, to complete the context. For magnetic fusion, the required net energy production within the plasma may be accomplished soon, but the more useful goal of self-sustained plasma ignition requires a new device of somewhat uncertain (factor of 2) cost and size. (orig.)

  9. Invited Article: A novel calibration method for the JET real-time far infrared polarimeter and integration of polarimetry-based line-integrated density measurements for machine protection of a fusion plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boboc, A; Bieg, B; Felton, R; Dalley, S; Kravtsov, Yu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present the work in the implementation of a new calibration for the JET real-time polarimeter based on the complex amplitude ratio technique and a new self-validation mechanism of data. This allowed easy integration of the polarimetry measurements into the JET plasma density control (gas feedback control) and as well as machine protection systems (neutral beam injection heating safety interlocks). The new addition was used successfully during 2014 JET Campaign and is envisaged that will operate routinely from 2015 campaign onwards in any plasma condition (including ITER relevant scenarios). This mode of operation elevated the importance of the polarimetry as a diagnostic tool in the view of future fusion experiments.

  10. Invited Article: A novel calibration method for the JET real-time far infrared polarimeter and integration of polarimetry-based line-integrated density measurements for machine protection of a fusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boboc, A., E-mail: Alexandru.Boboc@ccfe.ac.uk; Felton, R.; Dalley, S. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bieg, B.; Kravtsov, Yu. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin (Poland)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we present the work in the implementation of a new calibration for the JET real-time polarimeter based on the complex amplitude ratio technique and a new self-validation mechanism of data. This allowed easy integration of the polarimetry measurements into the JET plasma density control (gas feedback control) and as well as machine protection systems (neutral beam injection heating safety interlocks). The new addition was used successfully during 2014 JET Campaign and is envisaged that will operate routinely from 2015 campaign onwards in any plasma condition (including ITER relevant scenarios). This mode of operation elevated the importance of the polarimetry as a diagnostic tool in the view of future fusion experiments.

  11. Application of structural-mechanics methods to the design of large tandem-mirror fusion devices (MFTF-B). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.; Ng, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory requires state-of-the-art structural-mechanics methods to deal with access constraints for plasma heating and diagnostics, alignment requirements, and load complexity and variety. Large interactive structures required an integrated analytical approach to achieve a reasonable level of overall system optimization. The Tandem Magnet Generator (TMG) creates a magnet configuration for the EFFI calculation of electromagnetic-field forces that, coupled with other loads, form the input loading to magnet and vessel finite-element models. The analytical results provide the data base for detailed design of magnet, vessel, foundation, and interaction effects. 13 refs

  12. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, O (Uppsala Univ., Aangstroem laboratory, div. of electricity, Uppsala (Sweden)); Moiseenko, V.E. (Inst. of Plasma Physics, National Science Center, Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)); Noack, K. (Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany))

    2008-10-15

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  13. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagren, O; Moiseenko, V.E.; Noack, K.

    2008-10-01

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  14. Alternative fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostagni, G.

    1981-01-01

    The paper reports the discussions and statements made by the participants on the actual state and future of five different approaches on the fusion concept; they are the following: bumpy torus, reversed-field pinch, open-ended configurations, compact toroids and stellarators. Tables show for each concept parameters that represent the achieved results; data expected for future devices and extrapolations on reactor requirements are included

  15. Fusion development and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R ampersand D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development

  16. (Fusion energy research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  17. [Fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer

  18. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  19. Canadian contributions to the safety and environmental aspects of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, R.; Wong, K.

    1987-05-01

    Since next-step fusion devices will be fuelled with mixtures of tritium and deuterium, the knowledge base and tritium handling experience associated with the operation of CANDU reactors is viewed as relevant to the development of safe fusion technology. Fusion safety issues will be compared with fission safety experience, after which specific Canadian activities in support of fusion safety will be overviewed. In addition, recommendations for appropriate fusion safety criteria will be summarized. 18 refs

  20. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig