WorldWideScience

Sample records for density fluctuations measured

  1. EPR measurement and the origin of cosmic density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morikawa Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore consistent application of quantum mechanics to the objects in the Universe and in laboratories. The measurement dynamics in quantum mechanics is modeled as a physical process of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB which is described by the generalized effective action method. A violation of the Bell inequality is observed in this model and the generation of the density fluctuations in the early Universe is described as the SSB process of the spatially translational symmetry.

  2. Density Fluctuation Measurements Using FIR Interferometer on HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan; PENG Bei-Bin; YANG Qing-wei; DUAN Xu-Ru; DING Xuan-Tong; LI Lian-Cai; LI Yong-Gao; JIAO Yi-Ming; DENG Zhong-Chao; YI Jiang; LIU Yi; ZHAO Kai-Jun; JI Xiao-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Denity fluctuations were first measured in the core region of HL-2A tokamak plasma using a newly developed multi-channel FIR interferometer system. In divertor ohmic discharges, we measured the radial density fluctuation levels of 5%, which increase to 10-20% during the appearance of MHD activity. Most of the power density in the density fluctuation spectrum is directly associated with m=2 tearing modes. The fluctuation levels reduce to 1/3 and plasma confinement is improved during off-axis electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH).Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 10575030 and 10675043.

  3. Density Fluctuation Measurements by Far-Forward Collective Scattering in the HSX Stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K.; Lore, J.; Schmitt, J. C.; Talmadge, J. N.; Wilcox, R.; Zhai, K.

    2010-11-01

    The multichannel interferometer system on the HSX stellarator is reconfigured to perform far-forward collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 9 viewing chords with 1.5 cm spacing. The source is a bias-tuned Gunn diode at 96 GHz with passive solid-state tripler providing output at 288 GHz (˜5 mW). The scattered power is measured using a homodyne detection scheme. Far-forward collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wave number range: k< 2 cm-1. The perpendicular wave number consists of poloidal and radial contributions which vary with chord position. Comparison of density fluctuations measured using scattering and interferometry techniques will be made. Both coherent modes and broadband fluctuations are measured. Comparison of fluctuation amplitude and frequency spectra for quasi-helically symmetric and non-axisymmetric magnetic configuration will be presented.

  4. Two dimensional density and its fluctuation measurements by using phase imaging method in GAMMA 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Negishi, S.; Shima, Y.; Hojo, H.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Mase, A. [Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 3-30-1 Wajiro-higashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Two dimensional (2D) plasma image analysis is useful to study the improvement of plasma confinement in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We have constructed a 2D interferometer system with phase imaging method for studying 2D plasma density distribution and its fluctuation measurement in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10. 2D profiles of electron density and its fluctuation have been successfully obtained by using this 2D phase imaging system. We show that 2D plasma density and fluctuation profiles clearly depends on the axial confining potential formation with application of plug electron cyclotron heating in GAMMA 10.

  5. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  6. Investigation of zonal flows by using the collective scattering measurement of density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. G.; Yu, Y.; Lan, T.; Li, Y. D.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ti, A.; Li, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The poloidal {{E}r}× {{B}\\text{T}} rotation velocities in the core plasma region are studied using the instantaneous frequency method (IFM) with the density fluctuations measured by the CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostics on the HT-7 tokamak. A coherent mode is observed in the fluctuations of poloidal velocities with the mode frequency from 10 to 20 kHz. It is identified as geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) zonal flow with poloidal symmetry (m = 0) and its mode frequency coinciding with the theoretical expected GAM frequency. The nonlinear interactions are investigated by applying the envelope analysis on the density fluctuations. The results confirm that the envelope modulation in the high frequency density fluctuations only comes from the shearing by GAM. The comparison between IFM and envelope analysis is also discussed.

  7. A molecular Rayleigh scattering setup to measure density fluctuations in thermal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.

    2016-12-01

    A Rayleigh scattering-based density fluctuation measurement system was set up inside a low-speed wind tunnel of NASA Ames Research Center. The immediate goal was to study the thermal boundary layer on a heated flat plate. A large number of obstacles had to be overcome to set up the system, such as the removal of dust particles using air filters, the use of photoelectron counting electronics to measure low intensity light, an optical layout to minimize stray light contamination, the reduction in tunnel vibration, and an expanded calibration process to relate photoelectron arrival rate to air density close to the plate surface. To measure spectra of turbulent density fluctuations, a two-PMT cross-correlation system was used to minimize the shot noise floor. To validate the Rayleigh measurements, temperature fluctuations spectra were calculated from density spectra and then compared with temperature spectra measured with a cold-wire probe operated in constant current mode. The spectra from the downstream half of the plate were found to be in good agreement with cold-wire probe, whereas spectra from the leading edge differed. Various lessons learnt are discussed. It is believed that the present effort is the first measurement of density fluctuations spectra in a boundary layer flow.

  8. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  9. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  10. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs.

  11. Novel analysis technique for measuring edge density fluctuation profiles with reflectometry in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creely, A. J.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujimura, T.; Akiyama, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Emoto, M.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new method for measuring density fluctuation profiles near the edge of plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been developed utilizing reflectometry combined with pellet-induced fast density scans. Reflectometer cutoff location was calculated by proportionally scaling the cutoff location calculated with fast far infrared laser interferometer (FIR) density profiles to match the slower time resolution results of the ray-tracing code LHD-GAUSS. Plasma velocity profile peaks generated with this reflectometer mapping were checked against velocity measurements made with charge exchange spectroscopy (CXS) and were found to agree within experimental uncertainty once diagnostic differences were accounted for. Measured density fluctuation profiles were found to peak strongly near the edge of the plasma, as is the case in most tokamaks. These measurements can be used in the future to inform inversion methods of phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements. This result was confirmed with both a fixed frequency reflectometer and calibrated data from a multi-frequency comb reflectometer, and this method was applied successfully to a series of discharges. The full width at half maximum of the turbulence layer near the edge of the plasma was found to be only 1.5-3 cm on a series of LHD discharges, less than 5% of the normalized minor radius.

  12. Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kishne, Andrea Sz; Chang, Hung-Chih; Kish, Laszlo B

    2007-01-01

    Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified re...

  13. Application of microwave imaging system for density fluctuation measurements on Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlichenko, R.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki (Japan); Ignatenko, M.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A. [Kyushu Univ., KASTEC, Kasuga (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    This short paper describes the microwave imaging reflectometry system that has been installed on the Large Helical Device as a plasma diagnostic system for spatially resolved plasma density fluctuations.

  14. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L., E-mail: lianglin@ucla.edu; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  15. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Ding, W X; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  16. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, H.; Tan, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xie, H. Q.; Gao, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer's capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  17. Density fluctuations in traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Yukawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Density fluctuations in traffic current are studied by computer simulations using the deterministic coupled map lattice model on a closed single-lane circuit. By calculating a power spectral density of temporal density fluctuations at a local section, we find a power-law behavior, \\sim 1/f^{1.8}, on the frequency f, in non-congested flow phase. The distribution of the headway distance h also shows the power law like \\sim 1/h^{3.0} at the same time. The power law fluctuations are destroyed by the occurence of the traffic jam.

  18. Variation of fractional electron density fluctuations inside 40 R(sub 0) observed by Ulysses ranging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Richard; Armstrong, J. W.; Bird, M. K.; Patzold, M.

    1995-01-01

    The first measurements of fractional electron density fluctuations delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e), where delta-n(sub e) is rms electron density fluctuation and n(sub e) is the mean electron density, have been carried out inside 40 R(sub 0) using 1991 Ulysses dual-frequency S- and X-band (13 and 3.6 cm) ranging (time delay) measurements. In the frequency band of approximately 6 x 10(exp -5) - 8 x 10(exp -4) Hz (periods of 20 min to 5 hr), delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e) varies from a high near 20% in the slow wind close to the neutral line to a low of 1% in the fast wind far from the neutral line. For spatial wavenumber K approximately = 1.4 x 10(exp -6)/km (period of 5 hr at 250 km/s), delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e) is essentially independent of heliocentric distance over 0.03-1.0 AU in the slow wind; it is a factor of 30 lower in the fast wind than in the slow wind inside 0.1 AU, but exhibits dramatic growth with heliocentric distance inside 0.3 AU. This latter result reinforces current views of the evolution of MHD turbulence and the association of Alfven waves with high speed streams based on in situ fields and particles measurements beyond 0.3 AU. That regions of enhanced density fluctuations near or above the neutral line coincide with regions of enhanced density confirms previous conclusions that they are the interplanetary manifestation of the heliospheric current sheet and extensions of coronal streamers. While the regions of enhanced density fluctuations lie within those of enhanced density, they have boundaries that are distinctly more abrupt, suggesting the separation of plasma of different nature and origin.

  19. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuationsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  20. Measuring long wavelength plasma density fluctuations by CO2 laser scattering (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. E.

    1985-05-01

    Long wavelength density fluctuations can be observed by scattering even with a probe beam of much shorter wavelength provided the scattering angle is small enough. This paper is concerned with experiments in which the scattering angle is comparable with the probe beam divergence so the scattered and incident radiation never achieve spatial separation. Under these circumstances, the role of diffraction is preeminent and Fourier optics methods are used to describe the propagation of the beam, which is taken to be TEM00 mode Gaussian. Interaction between the probe beam and the plasma disturbance is described by refraction and no appeal is made to explicit scattering theory. Analysis of the effect of a monochromatic wave disturbance confined to a plane perpendicular to the probe beam (a plane grating in effect) reveals oscillations at the wave frequency induced on the probe with an intensity varying over the beam profile in a regular pattern symmetric about the beam axis. Detail of the pattern depends on the wavelength of the disturbance, its direction, and its axial position relative to a local beam waist. These oscillations are readily identified as due to radiation scattered by the plasma wave into diffraction orders, beating with the unperturbed part of the beam. Indeed, it can be shown1 that Fourier optics plus refraction produce almost the same result as conventional scattering theory,2 the small discrepancy being traceable to the neglect in the latter of incident beam wavefront curvature. The results of the two approaches coincide in the Fraunhofer limit. Computations of this sort have been confirmed by experiments using transducer-driven waves in air3 and by plasma experiments where the same regular patterns are observed from spontaneous plasma waves.4,5 Calculation suggests and experiments have demonstrated6 that additional information, such as the absolute direction of wave propagation, can be deduced from phase, measured with a multichannel detector array

  1. Variation of Fractional Electron Density Fluctuations Near 0.1 AU From the Sun Observed by Ulysses Dual-Frequency Ranging Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Bird, M. K.; Patzold, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of determining fractional density fluctuations, which requires the measurement of absolute electron density as provided by dual-frequency observations of time delay or ranging conducted by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment.

  2. Simulation of nanoscale density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Howard; Bowles, Richard K.

    2000-11-01

    Problems associated with the simulation of density fluctuations of limited breadth in a small cell are exposed and studied. The fluctuations are viewed as "physical clusters" of the type that might appear in nucleation processes and related phenomena. One of the most important features of the study stems from the fact that the simulation of a small heterogeneity in a macroscopic system presents problems that do not occur in the simulation of a bulk homogeneous property of the system. For example, once having simulated the probability of appearance of the fluctuation in a small cell, how is that result to be "mapped" onto the macrosystem in order to specify the equilibrium number of such fluctuations in that system? This problem is closely associated with the proper separation of the translational and internal degrees of freedom of the system, and has arisen in a number of fields, including the theory of nucleation. There are other problems associated with exponential dependence of cluster probability on the work of formation of the cluster, and also with rareness of some important clusters. In the latter case, simulative "umbrella sampling" does not always solve the entire problem. The present study is confined to clusters that appear in rarefied gases. Such systems are important in a number of scenarios, including nucleation processes. Several cluster models are considered including those consisting of molecules confined to a "container" of fixed volume and those constructed on the center of mass of the cluster. Connections between them are derived and rigorous solutions to the mapping problem are derived. Quantitative measures for the accuracy of approximate solutions, applied to cases in which the cluster is compact, are provided and exact solutions are provided even for the noncompact case. Some surprising results emerge from the study, among which is the fact that a cluster whose location is determined by one of its molecules, does not always have a

  3. Simultaneous measurement of magnetic and density fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering and Doppler backscattering on the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Barada, K.; Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    An upgraded cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the simultaneous measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations B ˜ and density fluctuations ñ is presented. The system has eight radial quadrature channels acquired simultaneously with an eight-channel Doppler backscattering system (measures density fluctuations ñ and flows). 3-D ray tracing calculations based on the GENRAY ray tracing code are used to illustrate the scattering and geometric considerations involved in the CPS implementation on DIII-D. A unique quasi-optical design and IF electronics system allow direct comparison of B ˜ and ñ during dynamic or transient plasma events (e.g., Edge Localized Modes or ELMs, L to H-mode transitions, etc.). The system design allows the interesting possibility of both magnetic-density ( B ˜ -ñ) fluctuation and magnetic-temperature ( B ˜ - T ˜ ) fluctuation cross-phase measurements suitable for detailed tests of turbulence simulations.

  4. Multichannel Microwave Interferometer for Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Density and its Fluctuation on HL-2A Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiwan; Shi, Zhongbing; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Boyu; Li, Yonggao; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong

    2016-07-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer system has been developed on the HL-2A tokomak. Its working frequency is well designed to avoid the fringe jump effect. Taking the structure of HL-2A into account, its antennas are installed in the horizontal direction, i.e. one launcher in high field side (HFS) and four receivers in low field side (LFS). The fan-shaped measurement area covers those regions where the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are active. The heterodyne technique contributes to its high temporal resolution (1 μs). It is possible for the multichannel system to realize simultaneous measurements of density and its fluctuation. The quadrature phase detection based on the zero-crossing method is introduced to density measurement. With this system, reliable line-averaged densities and density profiles are obtained. The location of the saturated internal kink mode can be figured out from the mode showing different intensities on four channels, and the result agrees well with that measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI). supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104002, 2013GB107002, 2014GB107001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475058, 11475057, 11261140326, 11405049)

  5. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  6. Neutron fluctuation measurements on TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements of fluctuations in the neutron yield are made on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) with plastic scintillators. Light from the scintillators is coupled through acrylic rods or fiber-optic cables to photomultipliers operated in current mode. Discrimination against hard x rays is accomplished through comparison with the signal from a ZnS(6Li) scintillator. These measurements are useful in studies of deuterium pellet deposition, of the acceleration of beam ions during major radial compression, and of MHD instabilities. Techniques for measuring the neutral beam density profile and Qequivdt using neutron fluctuation measurements during pellet injection also have been proposed.

  7. Density fluctuations associated with the internal disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, F.; Gresillon, D.; Hennequin, P.; Quemeneur, A.; Truc, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises; Devynck, P.; Garbet, X.; Laviron, C.; Payan, J.; Pecquet, A.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1993-12-31

    Fluctuations specially related to the sawtooth relaxations have been recorded in TORE SUPRA ohmic plasmas with the CO{sub 2} scattering experiment ALTAIR. The temperature and density evolutions are simultaneously analysed to observe the sawtooth behaviour on a fast time scale. These observed fluctuations are perfectly connected with two characteristic phases of the sawtooth crash, lasting about 60 and 100 {mu}s respectively, as it can be seen on the soft X-ray signals or ECE temperature measurements. Frequency, wave number spectra and level of these fluctuations are analyzed for the two different sawtooth phases. Some specific turbulence correlated with the sawtooth crash has been previously reported. Theoretical models have suggested that enhanced turbulence could account for the rapid crash time and fast heat propagation observed on most tokamaks. The aim of this study is to check the validity of these models with a better knowledge of the characteristics of the observed turbulence. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Wave Beam Propagation Through Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balakin, A. A.; Bertelli, N.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations induced by edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beams propagating in fusion plasmas are studied by means of a quasi-optical code. The effects of such fluctuations are illustrated here by showing the beam propagation in the case of single harmonic perturbations to the wa

  9. Diagnostics for fluctuation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of particles and heat in magnetic confinement devices is largely attributed to the presence of microscopic instabilities. To better understand the physical mechanisms underlying plasma transport processes it is necessary to diagnose the fluctuations in the various quantities along with the

  10. Density fluctuation spectrum in whistler turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer, E-mail: dastgeer.shaikh@uah.ed [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2010-05-31

    We develop a nonlinear two-dimensional fluid model of whistler turbulence that includes effect of electron fluid density perturbations. The latter is coupled nonlinearly with wave magnetic field. This coupling leads essentially to finite compressibility effects in whistler turbulence model. We find from our simulations that despite strong compressibility effects, the density fluctuations follow the evolution of the wave magnetic field fluctuations. In a characteristic regime where large scale whistlers are predominant, the coupled density fluctuations are found to follow a Kolmogorov-like phenomenology in the inertial range turbulence. Consequently, the turbulent energy is dominated by the large scale (compared to electron inertial length) eddies and it follows a Kolmogorov-like k{sup -7/3} spectrum, where k is a characteristic wavenumber.

  11. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  12. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  13. Energy density fluctuations in inflationary cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H F; Muller, Harald F; Schmid, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the energy density fluctuations contributed by scalar fields \\Phi with vanishing expectation values, \\langle\\Phi\\rangle=0, which are present in addition to the inflaton field. For simplicity we take \\Phi to be non--interacting and minimally coupled to gravity. We use normal ordering to define the renormalized energy density operator \\rho, and we show that any normal ordering gives the same result for correlation functions of \\rho. We first consider massless fields and derive the energy fluctuations in a single mode \\vk, the two--point correlation function of the energy density, the power spectrum, and the variance of the smeared energy density, \\ddR. Mass effects are investigated for energy fluctuations in single modes. All quantities considered are scale invariant at the second horizon crossing (Harrison--Zel'dovich type) for massless and for unstable massive fields. The magnitude of the relative fluctuations \\de\\rho/\\rt is of order (\\Hi/\\Mp)^2 in the massless case, where \\Hi is the Hubble constan...

  14. Density fluctuations and correlations of confined fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varea, C.; Robledo, A.

    The density fluctuations about the equilibrium structure of fluids confined by parallel planar walls are analyzed for the cases of identical and symmetrically opposed fields at the walls. We determine the stability matrix (of the second derivatives of the free energy functional with respect to the density) for conditions both above and below the wetting transition temperature Tw of the semi-infinite system and corroborate in all cases that the equilibrium configurations are stable. We identify the fluctuations close to the walls and in the middle of the slab and discuss their effect when the wall separation L diverges. For competing walls above Tw the localized fluctuation with lowest eigenvalue describes the displacements of the incipient wetting films that become unimpeded interfacial translations for L→∞. Below Tw the fluctuations with lowest eigenvalue correspond to stiffer deformations extended across the slab. For identical walls above Tw coexisting states display incipient prewetting films and the lowest eigenvalue describes the nature of their growth as L increases. We also calculate the pair correlation function for the inhomogeneous states and, for symmetrically opposed walls, we obtain standard Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) behavior at the walls, but find significant deviations from this law at the interface-like region in the middle of the slab. To model fluids with short-ranged forces we use a ferromagnetic Ising-type Hamiltonian in mean-field approximation.

  15. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  16. Solidity of viscous liquids. IV. Density fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series exploring the physical consequences of the solidity of highly viscous liquids. It is argued that the two basic characteristics of a flow event (a jump between two energy minima in configuration space) are the local density change and the sum of all particle...... displacements. Based on this it is proposed that density fluctuations are described by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation with rates in k space of the form C+Dk^2 with D>>C a^2 where a is the average intermolecular distance. The inequality expresses a long-wavelength dominance of the dynamics which...... with Debye behavior at low frequencies and an omega^{−1/2} decay of the loss at high frequencies. Finally, a general formalism for the description of viscous liquid dynamics, which supplements the density dynamics by including stress fields, a potential energy field, and molecular orientational fields...

  17. Fluctuation of Quantum Information Density in Curved Time-Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Qiao

    2007-01-01

    A dynamical equation for quantum information density (QID)in curved spacetime is presented.The related fluctuation of QID with quantum Einstein equation is also discussed,which reveals the measuring of the dynamical mutual information condition using a Gaussian quantum channel.

  18. Multiresolution analysis of density fluctuation in supersonic mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the difficulties in measuring supersonic density field, the multiresolution analysis of supersonic mixing layer based on experimental images is still a formidable challenge. By utilizing the recently developed nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method, the density field of a supersonic mixing layer was measured at high spatiotemporal resolution. According to the dynamic behavior of coherent structures, the multiresolution characteristics of density fluctuation signals and density field images were studied based on Taylor’s hypothesis of space-time conversion and wavelet analysis. The wavelet coefficients reflect the characteristics of density fluctuation signals at different scales, and the detailed coefficients reflect the differences of approximation at adjacent levels. The density fluctuation signals of supersonic mixing layer differ from the periodic sine signal and exhibit similarity to the fractal Koch signal. The similarity at different scales reveals the fractal characteristic of mixing layer flowfield. The two-dimensional wavelet decomposition and reconstruction of density field images extract the approximate and detailed signals at different scales, which effectively resolve the characteristic structures of the flowfield at different scales.

  19. Kinetic Scale Density Fluctuations in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Bonnell, J W; Mozer, F S; Klein, K G; Bale, S D

    2013-01-01

    We motivate the importance of studying kinetic scale turbulence for understanding the macroscopic properties of the heliosphere, such as the heating of the solar wind. We then discuss the technique by which kinetic scale density fluctuations can be measured using the spacecraft potential, including a calculation of the timescale for the spacecraft potential to react to the density changes. Finally, we compare the shape of the density spectrum at ion scales to theoretical predictions based on a cascade model for kinetic turbulence. We conclude that the shape of the spectrum, including the ion scale flattening, can be captured by the sum of passive density fluctuations at large scales and kinetic Alfven wave turbulence at small scales.

  20. Chemical Measurement and Fluctuation Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Quentin S

    2016-12-20

    Fluctuation scaling reports on all processes producing a data set. Some fluctuation scaling relationships, such as the Horwitz curve, follow exponential dispersion models which have useful properties. The mean-variance method applied to Poisson distributed data is a special case of these properties allowing the gain of a system to be measured. Here, a general method is described for investigating gain (G), dispersion (β), and process (α) in any system whose fluctuation scaling follows a simple exponential dispersion model, a segmented exponential dispersion model, or complex scaling following such a model locally. When gain and dispersion cannot be obtained directly, relative parameters, GR and βR, may be used. The method was demonstrated on data sets conforming to simple, segmented, and complex scaling. These included mass, fluorescence intensity, and absorbance measurements and specifications for classes of calibration weights. Changes in gain, dispersion, and process were observed in the scaling of these data sets in response to instrument parameters, photon fluxes, mathematical processing, and calibration weight class. The process parameter which limits the type of statistical process that can be invoked to explain a data set typically exhibited 0 4 possible. With two exceptions, calibration weight class definitions only affected β. Adjusting photomultiplier voltage while measuring fluorescence intensity changed all three parameters (0 < α < 0.8; 0 < βR < 3; 0 < GR < 4.1). The method provides a framework for calibrating and interpreting uncertainty in chemical measurement allowing robust comparison of specific instruments, conditions, and methods.

  1. Direct Measurements of the Spatial and Velocity Dependence of the Ion Density Fluctuation Spectrum of a Laboratory Plasma with Two Independent LIF Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2014-10-01

    By using two independently tunable lasers, each with its own collection optics and Ar II LIF transition scheme, we are able to investigate plasma ion density fluctuations as a function of not only spatial scales but also as a function of ion velocities as sampled on different points of a single Doppler-broadened spectral emission line. We do this by measuring the two point correlation C (x , v ,x' ,v' , τ) = t . With the current system, the two carriages determine x and x', while the velocities selected by each laser determine v and v'. Using the two lasers to make two point correlations in phase space demonstrates effects that are not fully understood. In this experiment, we explore the striking difference in correlations when, in the past, the particle orbits overlap in space versus when they do not overlap. This is performed on a small cylindrical laboratory plasma with n ~109 cm-3 , Te ~ 5 eV, Ti ~ 0 . 06 , and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. LIF is performed on ions at two locations aligned with the magnetic field line with a viewing volume comparable to the size of the Larmor radius. Results and interpretations from these experiments are presented and discussed. DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  2. On Clustering Impurities by Liquid Density Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Shimkevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in liquid technology have created a new class of fluids called “nanofluids” which are two-phase mixtures of a non-metal-liquid matrix and addon particles usually less than 100 nm in size. It is reputed that such liquids have a great potential for application. Indeed, many tests have shown that their thermal conductivity can be increased by almost 20% compared to that of the base fluids for a relatively low particle loading (of 1 up to 5% in volume. It is confirmed by experimental data and simulation results. In this study, the author considers an effect of impurity clustering by liquid density fluctuations as a natural mechanism for stabilizing microstructure of the colloidal solution and estimates the effect of fractal structure of colloidal particles on thermal conductivity of water. The results of this study may be useful for motivating choosing the composition of heat-transfer suspension and developing technology for making the appropriate nanofluid.

  3. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid.

  4. Fluctuation Measurements at New Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Drake, Dereth; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements from a laser induced fluorescence detection system used to resolve ion density fluctuations on spatial scales approaching the ion Debye length ~0.5 mm. The detection system consists of a pair of moveable periscopes which collimate light collected from a small measurement region (~0.1 cm3) along the axis of a magnetized singly ionized Argon plasma column. The light is imaged onto a pair of 16-channel linear photomultiplier arrays with digitized photon counting on all 32 channels at 1 MHz or on 8 channels at 4 MHz. The viewing regions may be resolved spatially either along or radial to the magnetic field axis depending on the orientation of the entrance slit. Plasma fluctuations resolved in ion velocity have never been observed at this scale. Measurements may provide insight into transport phenomena, which are fundamentally linked to plasma fluctuations. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  5. Observations of ULF wave related equatorial electrojet and density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Biouele, C. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Boudouridis, A.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Anad, F.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hartinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Pc5 wave related electric field and vertical drift velocity oscillations at the equator as observed by ground magnetometers for an extended period on 9 August 2008. We show that the magnetometer-estimated equatorial E×B drift oscillates with the same frequency as ULF Pc5 waves, creating significant ionospheric density fluctuations. We also show ionospheric density fluctuations during the period when we observed ULF wave activity. At the same time, we detect the ULF activity on the ground using ground-based magnetometer data from the African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and the South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA). From space, we use magnetic field observations from the GOES 12 and the Communication/Navigation Outage and Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellites. Upstream solar wind conditions are provided by the ACE spacecraft. We find that the wave power observed on the ground also occurs in the upstream solar wind and in the magnetosphere. All these observations demonstrate that Pc5 waves with a likely driver in the solar wind can penetrate to the equatorial ionosphere and modulate the equatorial electrodynamics. While no direct drift measurements from equatorial radars exist for the 9 August 2008 event, we used JULIA 150 km radar drift velocities observed on 2 May 2010 and found similar fluctuations with the period of 5-8 min, as a means of an independent confirmation of our magnetometer derived drift dynamics.

  6. Observations of density fluctuations in an elongated Bose gas: ideal gas and quasicondensate regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, J; Trebbia, J-B; Schumm, T; Aspect, A; Westbrook, C I; Bouchoule, I

    2006-04-07

    We report in situ measurements of density fluctuations in a quasi-one-dimensional 87Rb Bose gas at thermal equilibrium in an elongated harmonic trap. We observe an excess of fluctuations compared to the shot-noise level expected for uncorrelated atoms. At low atomic density, the measured excess is in good agreement with the expected "bunching" for an ideal Bose gas. At high density, the measured fluctuations are strongly reduced compared to the ideal gas case. We attribute this reduction to repulsive interatomic interactions. The data are compared with a calculation for an interacting Bose gas in the quasicondensate regime.

  7. Direct measurement of antiferromagnetic domain fluctuations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpyrko, O. G.; Isaacs, E. D.; Logan, J. M.; Feng, Y.; Aeppli, G.; Jaramillo, R.; Kim, H. C.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Zschack, P.; Sprung, M.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. College London

    2007-05-03

    Measurements of magnetic noise emanating from ferromagnets owing to domain motion were first carried out nearly 100 years ago1, and have underpinned much science and technology2, 3. Antiferromagnets, which carry no net external magnetic dipole moment, yet have a periodic arrangement of the electron spins extending over macroscopic distances, should also display magnetic noise. However, this must be sampled at spatial wavelengths of the order of several interatomic spacings, rather than the macroscopic scales characteristic of ferromagnets. Here we present a direct measurement of the fluctuations in the nanometer-scale superstructure of spin- and charge-density waves associated with antiferromagnetism in elemental chromium. The technique used is X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, where coherent X-ray diffraction produces a speckle pattern that serves as a 'fingerprint' of a particular magnetic domain configuration. The temporal evolution of the patterns corresponds to domain walls advancing and retreating over micrometer distances. This work demonstrates a useful measurement tool for antiferromagnetic domain wall engineering, but also reveals a fundamental finding about spin dynamics in the simplest antiferromagnet: although the domain wall motion is thermally activated at temperatures above 100 K, it is not so at lower temperatures, and indeed has a rate that saturates at a finite value--consistent with quantum fluctuations--on cooling below 40 K.

  8. Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coda S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Density fluctuations near the edge of tokamak plasmas can affect the propagation of electron cyclotron (EC waves. In the present paper, the EC wave propagation in a fluctuating equilibrium is determined using the ray-tracing code C3PO. The evolution of the electron distribution function is calculated self-consistently with the EC wave damping using the 3-D Fokker-Planck solver LUKE. The cumulative effect of fluctuations results in a significant broadening of the current profile combined with a fluctuating power deposition profile. This mechanism improves the simulation of fully non-inductive EC discharges in the TCV tokamaks. Predictive simulations for ITER show that density fluctuations could make the stabilization of NTMs in ITER more challenging.

  9. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  10. The Phase Coherence of Interstellar Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley

    2015-01-01

    Studies of MHD turbulence often investigate the Fourier power spectrum to provide information on the nature of the turbulence cascade. However, the Fourier power spectrum only contains the Fourier amplitudes and rejects all information regarding the Fourier phases. Here we investigate the utility of two statistical diagnostics for recovering information on Fourier phases in ISM density data: the averaged amplitudes of the bispectrum and the phase coherence index (PCI), a new phase technique for the ISM. We create 3D density and 2D column density maps using a set of simulations of isothermal ideal MHD turbulence with a wide range of sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers. We find that the bispectrum averaged along different angles with respect to either the $k_1$ or $k_2$ axis is primarily sensitive to the sonic Mach number while averaging the bispectral amplitudes over different annuli is sensitive to both the sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers. The PCI of density suggests that the most correlated phases occur in s...

  11. Wall effects on density fluctuations in the GBL thermal lattice gas automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, A. G.; Sloot, P. M. A.

    2001-12-01

    We measure density fluctuations in a 19-bits thermal lattice gas automaton, in the presence of solid walls. The walls have a prominent effect on the dynamic structure factor. Fluctuating hydrodynamics predicts extra peaks in the spectrum. These extra features are indeed observed in the simulated dynamic structure factor.

  12. Charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 吕保维; O.Havnes

    1997-01-01

    The charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma, which is derived from the longitudinal dielectric permittivity of the dusty plasma, has been studied by kinetic theory. The results show that the P value, which describes the relative charge density on the dust in the plasma, and the charging frequency of a dust particle Ωc, which describes the ratio of charge changing of the dust particles, determine the character of the charge density fluctuation of low frequency. For a dusty plasma of P<<1, when the charging frequency Ωc is much smaller than the dusty plasma frequency wd, there is a strong charge density fluctuation which is of character of dust acoustic eigen wave. For a dusty plasma of P>>1, when the frequency Ωc, is much larger than wd there are weaker fluctuations with a wide spectrum. The results have been applied to the ionosphere and the range of radius and density of dust particles is found, where a strong charge density fluctuation of low frequency should exist.

  13. Charge and spin fluctuations in the density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoerffy, B.L.; Barbieri, A. (Bristol Univ. (UK). H.H. Wills Physics Lab.); Staunton, J.B. (Warwick Univ., Coventry (UK). Dept. of Physics); Shelton, W.A.; Stocks, G.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework which allow us to treat charge and spin fluctuations about the Local density Approximation (LDA) to the Density Functional Theory (DFT). We illustrate the approach by explicit study of the Disordered Local Moment (DLM) state in Fe above the Curie Temperature {Tc} and the Mott insulating state in MnO. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wei-jie; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward in [1,2]. In the present work we aim at improving the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and density, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results and recent experimental data from STAR.

  15. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  16. Measuring shape fluctuations in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzel, C.; Sengupta, K.

    2016-06-01

    Shape fluctuations of lipid membranes have intrigued cell biologists and physicists alike. In the cellular context, their origin—thermal or active—and their physiological significance are open questions. These small incessant displacements, also called membrane undulations, have mostly been studied in model membranes and membranes of simple cells like erythrocytes. Thermal fluctuations of such membranes have been very well described both theoretically and experimentally; active fluctuations are a topic of current interest. Experimentally, membrane fluctuations are not easy to measure, the main challenge being to develop techniques which are capable of measuring very small displacements at very high speed, and preferably over a large area and long time. Scattering techniques have given access to fluctuations in membrane stacks and a variety of optical microscopy based techniques have been devised to study membrane fluctuations of unilamellar vesicles, erythrocytes and other cells. Among them are flicker spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, diffraction phase microscopy and reflection interference contrast microscopy. Each of these techniques has its advantages and limitations. Here we review the basic principles of the major experimental techniques used to measure bending or shape fluctuations of biomembranes. We report seminal results obtained with each technique and highlight how these studies furthered our understanding of physical properties of membranes and their interactions. We also discuss suggested role of membrane fluctuations in different biological processes.

  17. Perturbing microwave beams by plasma density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köhn Alf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of microwaves across a turbulent plasma density layer is investigated with full-wave simulations. To properly represent a fusion edge-plasma, drift-wave turbulence is considered based on the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Scattering and broadening of a microwave beam whose amplitude distribution is of Gaussian shape is studied in detail as a function of certain turbulence properties. Parameters leading to the strongest deterioration of the microwave beam are identified and implications for existing experiments are given.

  18. Development of the W-band density profile and fluctuation reflectometer on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.M.; Gao, X., E-mail: xgao@ipp.ac.cn; Ling, B.L.; Zhang, S.B.; Zhang, T.; Han, X.; Liu, S.C.; Liu, Z.X.; Liu, Y.; Ti, A.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • A X-mode W-band reflectometer is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for the first time. • Both density profile and fluctuations can be measured by the newly developed reflectometer. • The core density profile has been measured in high magnetic field condition together with V-band reflectometer. • Sawtooth precursor has been measured by fluctuation reflectometer in the low magnetic field condition. -- Abstract: A X-mode polarized W-band reflectometer for plasma density profile and fluctuation measurement is designed and installed on EAST. In measuring the density profile, a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is used as the source, allowing a high temporal resolution measurement. The density profile in a plasma with high magnetic field (3.0 T) has been measured by combination of V- and W-band reflectometers. For fluctuation measurements, a frequency synthesizer is used instead of the VCO as a microwave source. The core density fluctuations during sawtooth activity are measured and analyzed.

  19. Density dependence in demography and dispersal generates fluctuating invasion speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren L; Li, Bingtuan; Miller, Tom E X; Neubert, Michael G; Shaw, Allison K

    2017-05-09

    Density dependence plays an important role in population regulation and is known to generate temporal fluctuations in population density. However, the ways in which density dependence affects spatial population processes, such as species invasions, are less understood. Although classical ecological theory suggests that invasions should advance at a constant speed, empirical work is illuminating the highly variable nature of biological invasions, which often exhibit nonconstant spreading speeds, even in simple, controlled settings. Here, we explore endogenous density dependence as a mechanism for inducing variability in biological invasions with a set of population models that incorporate density dependence in demographic and dispersal parameters. We show that density dependence in demography at low population densities-i.e., an Allee effect-combined with spatiotemporal variability in population density behind the invasion front can produce fluctuations in spreading speed. The density fluctuations behind the front can arise from either overcompensatory population growth or density-dependent dispersal, both of which are common in nature. Our results show that simple rules can generate complex spread dynamics and highlight a source of variability in biological invasions that may aid in ecological forecasting.

  20. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  1. Magnetic Fluctuation Measurement in Sino United Spherical Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fei; WANG Wen-Hao; HE Ye-Xi; LIU Jun; TAN Yi; XIE Li-Feng; ZENG Long

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the magnetic fluctuations and for further transport study, the poloidal and radial magnetic field measurement is conducted on the Sino United Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). Auto-power spectral density indicates that the magnetic fluctuation energy mainly concentrates in the frequency region lower than 10kHz. The magnetic field oscillations, which are characterized by harmonic frequencies of 40 kHz, are observed in the scrapeoff layer; by contrast, in the plasma core, the magnetic fluctuations are of Gaussian type. The time-frequency profiles show that the poloidal magnetic fluctuations are temporally intermittent. The autocorrelation calculation indicates that the fluctuations in decorrelation time vary between the core and the edge.

  2. Nonlinear Effects in the Amplitude of Cosmological Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Fry, J N; Jaffe, Andrew H

    2009-01-01

    The amplitude of cosmological density fluctuations, $\\sigma_8$, has been studied and estimated by analysing many cosmological observations. The values of the estimates vary considerably between the various probes. However, different estimators probe the value of $\\sigma_8$ in different cosmological scales and do not take into account the nonlinear evolution of the parameter at late times. We show that estimates of the amplitude of cosmological density fluctuations derived from cosmic flows are systematically higher than those inferred at early epochs because of nonlinear evolution at later times. Here we derive corrections to the value of $\\sigma_8$ and compare amplitudes after accounting for this effect.

  3. Collective motion and density fluctuations in bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Be'Er, Avraham; Florin, E.-L.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2010-03-01

    The emergence of collective motion such as in fish schools and swarming bacteria is a ubiquitous self-organization phenomenon. Such collective behavior plays an important role in a range of phenomenon, such as formation and migration of animal or fish groups. To understand the collective motion, tracking of large numbers of individuals is needed, but such measurements have been lacking. Here we examine a microscopic system, where we are able to measure simultaneously the positions, velocities, and orientations of up to a thousand bacteria in a colony. The motile bacteria form closely-packed dynamic clusters within which they move cooperatively. The number of bacteria in a cluster exhibits a power-law distribution truncated by an exponential tail, and the probability of finding large clusters grows markedly as bacterial density increases. Mobile clusters exhibit anomalous fluctuations in bacterial density: the standard deviation (δN) grows with the mean (N) of the number of bacteria as δN˜N^3/4 rather than δN˜N^1/2, as in thermal equilibrium systems.

  4. Field fluctuations measured by interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glauber, R J [Lyman Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Orozco, L A [Joint Quantum Institute, Department of Physics, University of Maryland and National Institute of Standards and Technology, College Park, MD 20742-4111 (United States); Vogel, K; Schleich, W P [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Walther, H, E-mail: glauber@physics.harvard.ed, E-mail: karl.vogel@uni-ulm.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    We derive the complete photon count statistics of an interferometer based on two beam splitters. As a special case we consider a joint intensity-electric field measurement. Our approach is based on the transformation properties of state vectors as well as field operators at a beam splitter.

  5. Collective motion and density fluctuations in swimming bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hepeng

    2011-03-01

    The emergence of collective motion such as in fish schools, mammal herds, and insect swarms is a ubiquitous self-organization phenomenon. Such collective behavior plays an important role in a range of problems, such as spreading of deceases in animal or fish groups. Current models have provided a qualitative understanding of collective motion, but progress in quantitative modeling in hindered by the lack of experimental data. Here we examine a model microscopic system, where we are able to measure simultaneously the positions, velocities, and orientations of up to a thousand bacteria in a colony. The motile bacteria form closely-packed dynamic clusters within which they move cooperatively. The number of bacteria in a cluster exhibits a power-law distribution truncated by an exponential tail, and the probability of finding large clusters grows markedly as bacterial density increases. Mobile clusters cause anomalous fluctuations in bacterial density as found in mathematical theories and numerical models. Our results demonstrate that bacteria are an excellent system to study general phenomena of collective motion.

  6. Dynamic density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric, E-mail: eve2@courant.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We derive a closed equation for the empirical concentration of colloidal particles in the presence of both hydrodynamic and direct interactions. The ensemble average of our functional Langevin equation reproduces known deterministic Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) [M. Rex and H. Löwen, “Dynamical density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and colloids in unstable traps,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 101(14), 148302 (2008)], and, at the same time, it also describes the microscopic fluctuations around the mean behavior. We suggest separating the ideal (non-interacting) contribution from additional corrections due to pairwise interactions. We find that, for an incompressible fluid and in the absence of direct interactions, the mean concentration follows Fick's law just as for uncorrelated walkers. At the same time, the nature of the stochastic terms in fluctuating DDFT is shown to be distinctly different for hydrodynamically-correlated and uncorrelated walkers. This leads to striking differences in the behavior of the fluctuations around Fick's law, even in the absence of pairwise interactions. We connect our own prior work [A. Donev, T. G. Fai, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, “A reversible mesoscopic model of diffusion in liquids: from giant fluctuations to Fick's law,” J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2014) P04004] on fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusion in liquids to the DDFT literature, and demonstrate that the fluid cannot easily be eliminated from consideration if one wants to describe the collective diffusion in colloidal suspensions.

  7. Observation of spatial fluctuations of the local density of states in random photonic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birowosuto, M D; Skipetrov, S E; Vos, W L; Mosk, A P

    2010-07-02

    We experimentally study spatial fluctuations of the local density of states (LDOS) inside three-dimensional random photonic media. The LDOS is probed at many positions inside random photonic media by measuring emission rates of a large number of individual fluorescent nanospheres. The emission rates are observed to fluctuate spatially, and the variance of the fluctuations increases with the scattering strength. The measured variance of the emission rates agrees well with a model that takes into account the effect of the nearest scatterer only.

  8. MEASUREMENT OF WHEAT DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯跟胜; 党金春; 等

    1995-01-01

    A method used for on line determining the change of wheat density with a automatic watering machine in a lqarge flour mill has been studied.The results show that the higher distinguishing ability is obtained when using 241Am as a γ-ray source for measuring the wheat density than using 137Cs.

  9. Scattering of ECRF waves by edge density fluctuations and blobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Abhay K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of electron cyclotron waves by density blobs embedded in the edge region of a fusion plasma is studied using a full-wave model. The full-wave theory is a generalization of the usual approach of geometric optics ray scattering by blobs. While the latter allows for only refraction of waves, the former, more general formulation, includes refraction, reflection, and diffraction of waves. Furthermore, the geometric optics, ray tracing, model is limited to blob densities that are slightly different from the background plasma density. Observations in tokamak experiments show that the fluctuating density differs from the background plasma density by 20% or more. Thus, the geometric optics model is not a physically realistic model of scattering of electron cyclotron waves by plasma blobs. The differences between the ray tracing approach and the full-wave approach to scattering are illustrated in this paper.

  10. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  11. Radial evolution of intermittency of density fluctuations in the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, R; Primavera, L; Pietropaolo, E; D'Amicis, R; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Carbone, V; Malara, F; Veltri, P

    2014-01-01

    We study the radial evolution of intermittency of density fluctuations in the fast solar wind. The study is performed analyzing the plasma density measurements provided by Helios 2 in the inner heliosphere between $0.3$ and $0.9$ AU. The analysis is carried out by means of a complete set of diagnostic tools, including the flatness factor at different time scales to estimate intermittency, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to estimate the degree of intermittency, and the Fourier transform to estimate the power spectral densities of these fluctuations. Density fluctuations within fast wind are rather intermittent and their level of intermittency, together with the amplitude of intermittent events, decreases with distance from the Sun, at odds with intermittency of both magnetic field and all the other plasma parameters. Furthermore, the intermittent events are strongly correlated, exhibiting temporal clustering. This indicates that the mechanism underlying their generation departs from a time-varying Poisson process....

  12. Nonlinear density fluctuation field theory for large scale structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhang; Hai-Xing Miao

    2009-01-01

    We develop an effective field theory of density fluctuations for a Newtonian self-gravitating N-body system in quasi-equilibrium and apply it to a homogeneous uni-verse with small density fluctuations. Keeping the density fluctuations up to second or-der, we obtain the nonlinear field equation of 2-pt correlation ξ(r), which contains 3-pt correlation and formal ultra-violet divergences. By the Groth-Peebles hierarchical ansatz and mass renormalization, the equation becomes closed with two new terms beyond the Gaussian approximation, and their coefficients are taken as parameters. The analytic solu-tion is obtained in terms of the hypergeometric functions, which is checked numerically.With one single set of two fixed parameters, the correlation ξ(r) and the corresponding power spectrum P(k) simultaneously match the results from all the major surveys, such as APM, SDSS, 2dfGRS, and REFLEX. The model gives a unifying understanding of several seemingly unrelated features of large scale structure from a field-theoretical per-spective. The theory is worth extending to study the evolution effects in an expanding universe.

  13. Amplitude of primeval fluctuations from cosmological mass density reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We use the POTENT reconstruction of the mass density field in the nearby universe to estimate the amplitude of the density fluctuation power spectrum for various cosmological models. We find that sigma(sub 8) Omega(sub m sup 0.6) = 1.3(sub -0.3 sup +0.4), almost independently of the power spectrum. This value agrees well with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization for the standard cold dark matter model, while alternative models predict an excessive amplitude compared with COBE. Flat, low Omega(sub m) models and tilted models with spectral index n less than 0.8 are particularly discordant.

  14. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, S.A. (Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  15. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, S.A. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fawcett, E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  16. Effect of Heating on Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Noise Generation From High Speed Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.; Eck, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Heated jets in a wide range of temperature ratios (TR), and acoustic Mach numbers (Ma) were investigated experimentally using far field microphones and a molecular Rayleigh scattering technique. The latter provided density fluctuations measurements. Two sets of operating conditions were considered: (1) TR was varied between 0.84 and 2.7 while Ma was fixed at 0.9; (2) Ma was varied between 0.6 and 1.48, while TR was fixed at 2.27. The implementation of the molecular Rayleigh scattering technique required dust removal and usage of a hydrogen combustor to avoid soot particles. Time averaged density measurements in the first set of data showed differences in the peripheral density shear layers between the unheated and heated jets. The nozzle exit shear layer showed increased turbulence level with increased plume temperature. Nevertheless, further downstream the density fluctuations spectra are found to be nearly identical for all Mach number and temperature ratio conditions. To determine noise sources a correlation study between plume density fluctuations and far field sound pressure fluctuations was conducted. For all jets the core region beyond the end of the potential flow was found to be the strongest noise source. Except for an isothermal jet, the correlations did not differ significantly with increasing temperature ratio. The isothermal jet created little density fluctuations. Although the far field noise from this jet did not show any exceptional trend, the flow-sound correlations were very low. This indicated that the density fluctuations only acted as a "tracer parameter" for the noise sources.

  17. Strongly intensive measures for multiplicity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, V. V.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    The two recently proposed families of strongly intensive measures of fluctuations and correlations are studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach to nucleus-nucleus collisions. We consider the measures ΔKπ and ΣKπ for kaon and pion multiplicities in Au+Au collisions in a wide range of collision energies and centralities. These strongly intensive measures appear to cancel the participant number fluctuations. This allows to enlarge the centrality window in the analysis of event-by-event fluctuations for up to at least 10% of the most central collisions. We also present a comparison of the HSD results with the data of the NA49 and STAR Collaborations. HSD describes ΣKπ reasonably well. However, the HSD results depend monotonously on collision energy and do not reproduce the bump-dip structure of ΔKπ observed from the NA49 data in the region of the center of mass energy of the nucleon pair \\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 8{--}12 GeV. This observation deserves further study. The origin of this ‘structure’ is not connected with simple geometrical or limited acceptance effects, as these effects are taken into account in HSD simulations.

  18. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  19. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  20. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  1. Representation of fluctuation features in pathological knee joint vibroarthrographic signals using kernel density modeling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanshan; Cai, Suxian; Zheng, Fang; Wu, Yunfeng; Liu, Kaizhi; Wu, Meihong; Zou, Quan; Chen, Jian

    2014-10-01

    This article applies advanced signal processing and computational methods to study the subtle fluctuations in knee joint vibroarthrographic (VAG) signals. Two new features are extracted to characterize the fluctuations of VAG signals. The fractal scaling index parameter is computed using the detrended fluctuation analysis algorithm to describe the fluctuations associated with intrinsic correlations in the VAG signal. The averaged envelope amplitude feature measures the difference between the upper and lower envelopes averaged over an entire VAG signal. Statistical analysis with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test indicates that both of the fractal scaling index (p=0.0001) and averaged envelope amplitude (p=0.0001) features are significantly different between the normal and pathological signal groups. The bivariate Gaussian kernels are utilized for modeling the densities of normal and pathological signals in the two-dimensional feature space. Based on the feature densities estimated, the Bayesian decision rule makes better signal classifications than the least-squares support vector machine, with the overall classification accuracy of 88% and the area of 0.957 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Such VAG signal classification results are better than those reported in the state-of-the-art literature. The fluctuation features of VAG signals developed in the present study can provide useful information on the pathological conditions of degenerative knee joints. Classification results demonstrate the effectiveness of the kernel feature density modeling method for computer-aided VAG signal analysis.

  2. Correlation between density fluctuations and plasma gradients at the edge of the TORE SUPRA tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devynck, P.; Garbet, X.; Laviron, C.; Payan, J.; Haas, J. de; Clairet, F.; Talvard, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Gervais, F.; Gresillon, D.; Hennequin, P.; Quemeneur, A.; Truc, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1993-12-31

    The ALTAIR diagnostic uses scattering on the plasma electrons with the help of an IR laser beam to obtain information on the density fluctuations. This diagnostic can simultaneously record fluctuations from two independent wave numbers. Two experiments are carried out: study of the density fluctuations during strong plasma heating that combined both low hybrid waves and ion cyclotron heating; density fluctuations associated to the tokamak gas-feed modulation. 6 figs., 5 refs.

  3. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  4. Compressibility and Density Fluctuations in Molecular-Cloud Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Haugbolle, Troels; Nordlund, Aake

    2015-01-01

    The compressibility of molecular cloud (MC) turbulence plays a crucial role in star formation models, because it controls the amplitude and distribution of density fluctuations. The relation between the compressive ratio (the ratio of powers in compressive and solenoidal motions) and the statistics of turbulence has been studied systematically only in idealized simulations with random external forces. In this work, we analyze a simulation of large-scale turbulence(250 pc) driven by supernova (SN) explosions that has been shown to yield realistic MC properties. We demonstrate that SN driving results in MC turbulence that is only mildly compressive, with the turbulent ratio of compressive to solenoidal modes ~0.3 on average, lower than the equilibrium value of 0.5 found in the inertial range of isothermal simulations with random solenoidal driving. We also find that the compressibility of the turbulence is not noticeably affected by gravity, nor is the mean cloud expansion or contraction velocity (MCs do not co...

  5. Out of Equilibrium Fields in Inflationary Dynamics Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, D; De Vega, H J; Holman, R; Kumar, S P

    1998-01-01

    The energy and time scales during the inflationary stage of the universe calls for an out of equilibrium quantum field treatment. Moreover, the high energy densities involved make necessary the use of non-perturbative approaches as large N and Hartree methods. We start these lectures by introducing such non-perturbative out of equilibrium methods in cosmological universes. We discuss the renormalization procedure and the choice of initial conditions. We then study the nonlinear dynamics of quantum fields in matter and radiation dominated FRW and de Sitter universes. For a variety of initial conditions, we compute the evolution of the inflaton,its quantum fluctuations and the equation of state. We investigate the explosive particle production due to spinodal unstabilities and parametric amplification in FRW and de Sitter universes with and without symmetry breaking.We find that the particle production is sensitive to the expansion of the universe.For symmetry breaking scenarios, we determine generic late time ...

  6. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  7. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  8. Gas Density Fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: Clumping Factor and Velocity Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Arevalo, P; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analyzed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 8 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10-30 kpc within radii of 30-160 kpc from the cluster center and from 9 to 7 per cent on scales of ~20-30 kpc in an outer, 60-220 kpc annulus. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km/s on ~20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km/s on smaller scales ~7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the power spectrum of the density fluctuations is low...

  9. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  10. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  11. Turbulent pressure fluctuations measured during CHATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven P. Oncley; William J. Massman; Edward G. Patton

    2008-01-01

    Fast-response pressure fluctuations were included in the Canopy Horizontal Array of Turbulence Study (CHATS) at several heights within and just above the canopy in a walnut orchard. Two independent systems were intercompared and then separated. We present an evaluation of turbulence statistics - including the pressure transport term in the turbulence kinetic energy...

  12. Holography and the scale-invariance of density fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Contaldi, C R; Magueijo, Joao; Smolin, Lee; Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2006-01-01

    We study a scenario for the very early universe in which there is a fast phase transition from a non-geometric, high temperature phase to a low temperature, geometric phase described by a classical solution to the Einstein equations. In spite of the absence of a classical metric, the thermodynamics of the high temperature phase may be described by making use of the holographic principle. The thermal spectrum of fluctuations in the high temperature phase manifest themselves after the phase transition as a scale invariant spectrum of fluctuations. A simple model of the phase transition confirms that the near scale invariance of the fluctuations is natural; but the model also withstands detailed comparison with the data.

  13. Holography and the scale invariance of density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magueijo, Joao [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St N, Waterloo N2 L 2Y5 (Canada); Smolin, Lee [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St N, Waterloo N2 L 2Y5 (Canada); Contaldi, Carlo R [Theoretical Physics Group, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-21

    We study a scenario for the very early universe in which there is a fast phase transition from a non-geometric, high temperature phase to a low temperature, geometric phase described by a classical solution to the Einstein equations. In spite of the absence of a classical metric, the thermodynamics of the high temperature phase may be described by making use of the holographic principle. The thermal spectrum of fluctuations in the high temperature phase manifests itself after the phase transition as a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. A simple model of the phase transition confirms that the near scale invariance of the fluctuations is natural, but the model also withstands a detailed comparison with the data.

  14. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  15. Non-equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard

    2007-07-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow us to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (for example, non-Gaussian fluctuations of density or non-convexity of the large deviation function which generalizes the notion of free energy) are compared with those of systems at equilibrium.

  16. Scaling laws for density correlations and fluctuations in multiparticle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, E.A. de [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Physics]|[Interuniversity Inst. for High Energies, Brussels (Belgium); Dremin, I.M. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Fizicheskij Inst.; Kittel, W. [Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1996-05-01

    Experimental data on particle correlations and fluctuations in various high-energy multiparticle collisions are presented, with special emphasis on evidence for scaling-law evolution in small phase-space domains. The notions of intermittency and fractality as related to the above findings are described. Phenomenological and theoretical work on the subject is reviewed. (orig.).

  17. The influence of the edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beam propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelli, N.; Balakin, A.A.; Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation...... are estimated in a vacuum beam propagation between the edge density layer and the EC resonance absorption layer. Consequences on the EC beam propagation are investigated by using a simplified model in which the density fluctuations are described by a single harmonic oscillation. In addition, quasi......-optical calculations are shown by using edge density fluctuations as calculated by two-dimensional interchange turbulence simulations and validated with the experimental data [O. E. Garcia et al, Nucl. Fusion 47 (2007) 667]...

  18. Density Fluctuation Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence between Ion and Electron Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Bonnell, J W; Mozer, F S; Bale, S D

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the spectral index of density fluctuations between ion and electron scales in solar wind turbulence using the EFI instrument on the ARTEMIS spacecraft. The mean spectral index at 1 AU was found to be -2.75 +/- 0.06, steeper than predictions for pure whistler or kinetic Alfven wave turbulence, but consistent with previous magnetic field measurements. The steep spectra are also consistent with expectations of increased intermittency or damping of some of the turbulent energy over this range of scales. Neither the spectral index nor the flattening of the density spectra before ion scales were found to depend on the proximity to the pressure anisotropy instability thresholds, suggesting that they are features inherent to the turbulent cascade.

  19. Non equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    OpenAIRE

    Derrida, B.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (fo...

  20. Direct Measurement of Thermal Fluctuation of High-Q Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Masatake; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyoki, Shinji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Telada, Souichi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    We achieved for the first time a direct measurement of the thermal fluctuation of a pendulum in an off-resonant region using a laser interferometric gravitational wave detector. These measurements have been well identified for over one decade by an agreement with a theoretical prediction, which was derived by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thermal fluctuation is dominated by the contribution of resistances in coil-magnet actuator circuits. When we tuned these resistances, the noise spectrum also changed according to a theoretical prediction. The measured thermal noise level corresponds to a high quality factor on the order of 10^5 of the pendulum.

  1. Cosmic Microwave Background and Density Fluctuations from Strings plus Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Contaldi, C; Magueijo, J; Contaldi, Carlo; Hindmarsh, Mark; Magueijo, Joao

    1999-01-01

    In cosmological models where local cosmic strings are formed at the end of a period of inflation, the perturbations are seeded both by the defects and by the quantum fluctuations. In a subset of these models, for example those based on $D$-term inflation, the amplitudes are similar. Using our recent calculations of structure formation with cosmic strings, we point out that in a flat cosmology with zero cosmological constant and 5% baryonic component, strings plus inflation fits the observational data much better than each component individually. The large-angle CMB spectrum is mildly tilted, for Harrison-Zeldovich inflationary fluctuations. It then rises to a thick Doppler bump, covering $\\ell=200-600$, modulated by soft secondary undulations. The standard CDM anti-biasing problem is cured, giving place to a slightly biased scenario of galaxy formation.

  2. X-Ray surface brightness and gas density fluctuations in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A; Parrish, I; Sunyaev, R; Forman, W; Boehringer, H; Randall, S

    2011-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core ($650 \\times 650$ kpc) region of the Coma cluster observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra are analyzed using a 2D power spectrum approach. The resulting 2D spectra are converted to 3D power spectra of gas density fluctuations. The characteristic amplitude of the volume filling density fluctuations relative to the smooth underlying density distribution varies from 7-10% on scales of $\\sim$500 kpc down to $\\sim$5% at scales $\\sim$ 30 kpc. On smaller spatial scales, projection effects smear the density fluctuations by a large factor, precluding strong limits on the fluctuations in 3D. On the largest scales probed (hundreds of kpc), the dominant contributions to the observed fluctuations most likely arise from perturbations of the gravitational potential by the two most massive galaxies in Coma, NGC4874 and NGC4889, and the low entropy gas brought to the cluster by an infalling group. Other plausible sources of density fluctuations are discussed, including turbulence...

  3. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006 is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  4. Fluctuations around Periodic BPS-Density Waves in the Calogero Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bardek, V; Meljanac, S

    2010-01-01

    The collective field formulation of the Calogero model supports periodic density waves. An important set of such density waves is a two-parameter family of BPS solutions of the equations of motion of the collective field theory. One of these parameters is essentially the average particle density, which determines the period, while the other parameter determines the amplitude. These BPS solutions are sometimes referred to as "small amplitude waves" since they undulate around their mean density, but never vanish. We present complete analysis of quadratic fluctuations around these BPS solutions. The corresponding fluctuation hamiltonian (i.e., the stability operator) is diagonalized in terms of bosonic creation and annihilation operators which correspond to the complete orthogonal set of Bloch-Floquet eigenstates of a related periodic Schr\\"odinger hamiltonian, which we derive explicitly. Remarkably, the fluctuation spectrum is independent of the parameter which determines the density wave's amplitude. As a cons...

  5. Measuring the Behavioral Component of Financial Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Corazzini, Luca; Costola, Michele

    We study the evolution of the behavioral component of the financial market by estimating a Bayesian mixture model in which two types of investors coexist: one rational, with standard subjective expected utility theory (SEUT) preferences, and one behavioral, endowed with an S-shaped utility function....... We perform our analysis by using monthly data on the constituents of the S&P 500 index from January 1962 to April 2012. We assume that agents take investment decisions by ranking the alternative assets according to their performance measures. A tuning parameter blending the rational...... and the behavioral choices can be estimated by using a criterion function. The estimated parameter can be interpreted as an endogenous market sentiment index. This is confirmed by a number of checks controlling for the correlation of our endogenous index with measures of (implied) financial volatility, market...

  6. Fluctuation BES measurements with the ITER core CXRS prototype spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokol, G.I., E-mail: pokol@reak.bme.hu [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Marchuk, O. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Baross, T. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Grunda, G.; Kiss, I.G. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Kovacsik, A. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Hellermann, M. von; Lischtschenko, O. [Dutch-Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster and ITER-NL, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Biel, W. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Jaspers, R.J.E. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Durkut, M. [TNO Science and Industry, Partner in ITER-NL, PO Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • We integrated a fluctuation beam emission measurement into the ITER CXRS prototype spectrometer. • The fluctuation BES measurement provided data at TEXTOR that agree well with the simulation based on the Simulation Of Spectra package. • The same simulation method has been used to evaluate the feasibility of a fluctuation BES measurement on the ITER DNB using the CXRS periscopes. -- Abstract: The ITER core CXRS diagnostic system collects the light emitted from the interaction of the diagnostic neutral beam with the core plasma and guides it via a mirror labyrinth through the upper port plug no. 3 towards a fiber bundle, which then transmits the light into a set of spectrometers for spectral analysis. In order to test the accessibility of the special parameter range required for the ITER measurement, a prototype spectrometer was built and operated successfully at the TEXTOR tokamak. In addition to the He/Be, C/Ne and H/D/T regular spectral channels, a fluctuation beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system has been integrated to measure core MHD activity, and validate corresponding ITER simulation results. The fluctuation system can be operated as an alternative to the spectral BES measurement, and has 8 spatial channels sampled at 2 MHz. In this paper, we present details of the fluctuation BES system and its interface to the ITER prototype spectrometer along with simulation and measurement results at TEXTOR. We show that the measurement fully confirms the simulation results on achievable photon current at the detector and on the signal to noise ratio.

  7. Dynamical density fluctuations of superfluids near the critical velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke; Watabe, Shohei

    2010-07-16

    We propose a stability criterion of superfluids in condensed Bose-Einstein systems, which incorporates the spectral function or the autocorrelation function of the local density. Within the Gross-Pitaevskii-Bogoliubov theory, we demonstrate the validity of our criterion for the soliton-emission instability, with use of explicit forms of zero modes of the Bogoliubov equation and a dynamical scaling near the saddle-node bifurcation. We also show that the criterion is applicable to the Landau phonon instability and the Landau roton instability within the single-mode approximation.

  8. An upgraded interferometer-polarimeter system for broadband fluctuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, E., E-mail: eparke@ucla.edu; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Duff, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measuring high-frequency fluctuations (above tearing mode frequencies) is important for diagnosing instabilities and transport phenomena. The Madison Symmetric Torus interferometer-polarimeter system has been upgraded to utilize improved planar-diode mixer technology. The new mixers reduce phase noise and allow more sensitive measurements of fluctuations at high frequency. Typical polarimeter rms phase noise values of 0.05°–0.07° are obtained with 400 kHz bandwidth. The low phase noise enables the resolution of fluctuations up to 250 kHz for polarimetry and 600 kHz for interferometry. The importance of probe beam alignment for polarimetry is also verified; previously reported tolerances of ≤0.1 mm displacement for equilibrium and tearing mode measurements minimize contamination due to spatial misalignment to within acceptable levels for chords near the magnetic axis.

  9. Floquet instability of a large density ratio liquid-gas coaxial jet with periodic fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen; HU Guo-hui; ZHOU Zhe-wei

    2008-01-01

    By numerical simulation of basic flow, this paper extends Floquet stability analysis of interfacial flow with periodic fluctuation into large density ratio range. Sta- bility of a liquid aluminum jet in a coaxial nitrogen stream with velocity fluctuation is investigated by Chebyshev collocation method and the Floquet theory. Parametric reso- nance of the jet and the influences of different physical parameters on the instability are discussed. The results show qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  10. Shock-associated MHD waves - A model for interstellar density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the density fluctuations responsible for radio scintillations could be due to ion-beam-generated MHD waves near interstellar shock waves is discussed. This suggestion is inspired by spacecraft observations which reveal these phenomena near shocks in the solar system. The model quite naturally accounts for the scale on which these fluctuations occur; it is dictated by the wavelength of the unstable waves.

  11. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Walther, J. H.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids.

  12. Water Density Fluctuations Relevant to Hydrophobic Hydration are Unaltered by Attractions

    CERN Document Server

    Remsing, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of density fluctuations in bulk water has made significant contributions to our understanding of the hydration and interactions of idealized, purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes. To similarly inform the hydration of realistic hydrophobic solutes that have dispersive interactions with water, here we characterize water density fluctuations in the presence of attractive fields that correspond to solute-water attractions. We find that when the attractive field acts only in the solute hydration shell, but not in the solute core, it does not significantly alter water density fluctuations in the solute core region. We further find that for a wide range of solute sizes and attraction strengths, the free energetics of turning on the attractive fields in bulk water are accurately captured by linear response theory. Our results also suggest strategies for more efficiently estimating hydration free energies of realistic solutes in bulk water and at interfaces.

  13. Density Fluctuation Effects on Collective Neutrino Oscillations in O-Ne-Mg Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, Joe; Duan, Huaiyu; Fuller, George M; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of matter density fluctuations on supernova collective neutrino flavor oscillations. In particular, we use full multi-angle, 3-flavor, self-consistent simulations of the evolution of the neutrino flavor field in the envelope of an O-Ne-Mg core collapse supernova at shock break-out (neutrino neutronization burst) to study the effect of the matter density "bump" left by the He-burning shell. We find a seemingly counterintuitive increase in the overall electron neutrino survival probability created by this matter density feature. We discuss this behavior in terms of the interplay between the matter density profile and neutrino collective effects. While our results give new insights into this interplay, they also suggest an immediate consequence for supernova neutrino burst detection: it will be difficult to use a burst signal to extract information on fossil burning shells or other fluctuations of this scale in the matter density profile. Consistent with previous studies, our results al...

  14. Scattering of diffracting beams of electron cyclotron waves by random density fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hannes; Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    The physics and first results of the new WKBeam code for electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas are presented. This code is developed on the basis of a kinetic radiative transfer model which is general enough to account for the effects of diffraction and density fluctuations on the beam. Our preliminary numerical results show a significant broadening of the power deposition profile in ITER due to scattering from random density fluctuations at the plasma edge, while such scattering effects are found to be negligible in medium-size tokamaks like ASDEX upgrade.

  15. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  16. Enhanced stochastic fluctuations to measure steep adhesive energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ahmad; Potter, Daniel; Sulchek, Todd A

    2016-12-13

    Free-energy landscapes govern the behavior of all interactions in the presence of thermal fluctuations in the fields of physical chemistry, materials sciences, and the biological sciences. From the energy landscape, critical information about an interaction, such as the reaction kinetic rates, bond lifetimes, and the presence of intermediate states, can be determined. Despite the importance of energy landscapes to understanding reaction mechanisms, most experiments do not directly measure energy landscapes, particularly for interactions with steep force gradients that lead to premature jump to contact of the probe and insufficient sampling of transition regions. Here we present an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach for measuring energy landscapes that increases sampling of strongly adhesive interactions by using white-noise excitation to enhance the cantilever's thermal fluctuations. The enhanced fluctuations enable the recording of subtle deviations from a harmonic potential to accurately reconstruct interfacial energy landscapes with steep gradients. Comparing the measured energy landscape with adhesive force measurements reveals the existence of an optimal excitation voltage that enables the cantilever fluctuations to fully sample the shape and depth of the energy surface.

  17. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  18. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  19. Pressure, density, temperature and entropy fluctuations in compressible turbulent plane channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of thermodynamic state-variables in compressible aerodynamic wall-turbulence, using results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent plane channel flow. The basic transport equations governing the behaviour of thermodynamic variables (density, pressure, temperature and entropy) are reviewed and used to derive the exact transport equations for the variances and fluxes (transport by the fluctuating velocity field) of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The scaling with Reynolds and Mach number of compressible turbulent plane channel flow is discussed. Correlation coefficients and higher-order statistics of the thermodynamic fluctuations are examined. Finally, detailed budgets of the transport equations for the variances and fluxes of the thermodynamic variables from a well-resolved DNS are analysed. Implications of these results both to the understanding of the thermodynamic interactions in compressible wall-turbulence and to possible improvements in statistical...

  20. A Theory of Grain Clustering in Turbulence: The Origin and Nature of Large Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theory for the density fluctuations of aerodynamic grains embedded in a turbulent, gravitating gas disk. The theory combines calculations for the average behavior of grains encountering a single turbulent eddy, with a hierarchical description of the eddy velocity statistics. We show that this makes analytic predictions for a wide range of quantities, including: the distribution of volume-average grain densities, the power spectrum and correlation functions of grain density fluctuations, and the maximum volume density of grains reached. For each, we predict how these scale as a function of grain stopping/friction time (t_stop), spatial scale, grain-to-gas mass ratio, strength of the turbulence (alpha), and detailed disk properties (orbital frequency, sound speed). We test these against numerical simulations and find good agreement over a huge parameter space. Results from 'turbulent concentration' simulations and laboratory experiments are also predicted as a special case. We predict that vortices...

  1. Density matrix of radiation of a black hole with a fluctuating horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iofa, Mikhail Z.

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix of Hawking radiation is calculated in the model of a black hole with a fluctuating horizon. Quantum fluctuations smear the classical horizon of a black hole and modify the density matrix of radiation producing the off-diagonal elements. The off-diagonal elements may store information on correlations between the radiation and the black hole. The smeared density matrix was constructed by convolution of the density matrix calculated with the instantaneous horizon with the Gaussian distribution over the instantaneous horizons. The distribution has the extremum at the classical radius of the black hole and the width of order of the Planck length. Calculations were performed in the model of a black hole formed by the thin collapsing shell which follows a trajectory that is a solution of the matching equations connecting the interior and exterior geometries.

  2. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Yates, T Y

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  3. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E.M.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a co...

  4. Observation of the electron density fluctuations by using the O-mode Microwave Imaging Reflectometry in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Kuwahara, Daisuke; LHD Experimental Team

    2016-10-01

    Visualization of local electron density fluctuations will be very useful to study the physics of confinement and instabilities in fusion plasma. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), the O-mode microwave imaging reflectometry (O-MIR) has been intensively developed in order to visualize the electron density fluctuations. The frequency is 26 - 34 GHz. This corresponds to the electron density of 0.8 - 1.5 × 1019 m-3. The plasma is illuminated by the Gaussian beam with four frequencies. The imaging optics make a plasma image onto the newly developed 2D (8 × 8) Horn-antenna Millimeter-wave Imaging Device (HMID). In HMID, the signal wave that is accumulated by the horn antenna is transduced to the micro-strip line by using the finline transducer. The signal wave is mixed by the double balanced mixer with the local wave that is delivered by cables. By using O-MIR, electron density fluctuations are measured at the H-mode edge and the ITB layer in LHD. This work is supported by NIFS/NINS under the project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network, by the NIFS LHD project, by KAKENHI, and by IMS.

  5. Dependence of intermittent density fluctuations on collisionality in TJ-K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuther, Kyle; Garland, Stephen; Ramisch, Mirko [Institut fuer Grenzflaechenverfahrenstechnikund Plasmatechnologie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Manz, Peter [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Particle and heat transport losses due to edge turbulence are well known phenomena commonly seen in toroidal magnetic confinement devices. Furthermore in the scrape-off layer (SOL), turbulent density fluctuations are often observed to be intermittent and dominate particle transport to the vessel walls. In the adiabatic limit (small collisionality), of the two-field Hasegawa-Wakatani model, simulated turbulent density fluctuations are observed to couple to potential fluctuations and exhibit Gaussian behavior. However, in the hydrodynamic limit (large collisionality) the density and potential decouple. As a result, the density becomes passively advected, evolves towards the vorticity, and exhibits intermittent behavior. The relationship between collisionality and intermittency is investigated experimentally at the stellarator TJ-K. To vary the plasma collisionality, which is related to electron density and temperature, parameters such as gas type, neutral gas pressure, magnetic field, and heating power are varied. Radial profiles of plasma density, temperature, floating potential, and vorticity are recorded via a scanning 7-tip Langmuir probe array. First results are presented.

  6. Measuring Happiness: From Fluctuating Happiness to Authentic–Durable Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrun, Michaël; Ricard, Matthieu; Després, Gérard; Drelon, Emilie; Gibelin, Eva; Gibelin, Marion; Loubeyre, Mélanie; Py, Delphine; Delpy, Aurore; Garibbo, Céline; Bray, Elise; Lac, Gérard; Michaux, Odile

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the theoretical distinction between self-centeredness and selflessness (Dambrun and Ricard, 2011), the main goal of this research was to develop two new scales assessing distinct dimensions of happiness. By trying to maximize pleasures and to avoid displeasures, we propose that a self-centered functioning induces a fluctuating happiness in which phases of pleasure and displeasure alternate repeatedly (i.e., Fluctuating Happiness). In contrast, a selfless psychological functioning postulates the existence of a state of durable plenitude that is less dependent upon circumstances but rather is related to a person’s inner resources and abilities to deal with whatever comes his way in life (i.e., Authentic–Durable Happiness). Using various samples (n = 735), we developed a 10-item Scale measuring Subjective Fluctuating Happiness (SFHS) and a 13-item scale assessing Subjective Authentic–Durable Happiness (SA–DHS). Results indicated high internal consistencies, satisfactory test–retest validities, and adequate convergent and discriminant validities with various constructs including a biological marker of stress (salivary cortisol). Consistent with our theoretical framework, while self-enhancement values were related only to fluctuating happiness, self-transcendence values were related only to authentic–durable happiness. Support for the distinction between contentment and inner-peace, two related markers of authentic happiness, also was found. PMID:22347202

  7. Effects of magnetohydrodynamics matter density fluctuations on the solar neutrino resonant spin-flavor precession

    CERN Document Server

    Reggiani, N; Colonia, J H; De Holanda, P C

    1998-01-01

    Taking into account the stringent limits from helioseismology observations on possible matter density fluctuations described by magnetohydrodynamics theory, we find the corresponding time variations of solar neutrino survival probability due to the resonant spin-flavor precession phenomenon with amplitude of order O(10%). We discuss the physics potential of high statistics real time experiments, like as Superkamiokande, to observe the effects of such magnetohydrodynamics fluctuations on their data. We conclude that these observations could be thought as a test of the resonant spin-flavor precession solution to the solar neutrino anomaly.

  8. Comparing measurements of breast density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highnam, R [Highnam Associates Limited, Wellington (New Zealand); Jeffreys, M [Massey University, Wellington (New Zealand); McCormack, V [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Warren, R [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Smith, G Davey [Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Brady, M [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    Breast density measurements can be made from mammograms using either area-based methods, such as the six category classification (SCC), or volumetric based methods, such as the standard mammogram form (SMF). Previously, we have shown how both types of methods generate breast density estimates which are generally close. In this paper, we switch our attention to the question of why, for certain cases, they provide widely differing estimates. First, we show how the underlying physical models of the breast employed in the methods need to be consistent, and how area-based methods are susceptible to projection effects. We then analyse a set of patients whose mammograms show large differences between their SCC and SMF assessments. More precisely, 12% of 657 patients were found to fall into this category. Of these, 2.7% were attributable to errors either in the SMF segmentation algorithms, human error in SCC categorization or poor image exposure. More importantly, 9.3% of the cases appear to be due to fundamental differences between the area- and volume-based techniques. We conclude by suggesting how we might remove half of those discrepancies by introducing a new categorization of the SMF estimates based on the breast thickness. We note however, that this still leaves 6% of patients with large differences between SMF and SCC estimates. We discuss why it might not be appropriate to assume SMF (or any volume measure) has a similar breast cancer risk prediction capability to SCC.

  9. Superresolution measurement on the minute fluctuation of cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; HUANG Yaoxiong; ZHAO Haiyan; TU Mei; CHEN Wenxin

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for measuring the minute fluctuation of cell membrane is developed by modifying the super-resolution theory, increasing dimension in Fourier space, enhancing brightness gradient and utilizing maximum adaptive weighted averaging filter (MAWA) in obstructing noise. The application of the method in studying aspergillus flavus cell (AFC) and red blood cell and the new findings from the study show that it is a useful tool.

  10. Measurement of the electric fluctuation spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, S D; Mozer, F S; Horbury, T S; Reme, H

    2005-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind is observed to show the spectral behavior of classical Kolmogorov fluid turbulence over an inertial subrange and departures from this at short wavelengths, where energy should be dissipated. Here we present the first measurements of the electric field fluctuation spectrum over the inertial and dissipative wavenumber ranges in a $\\beta \\gtrsim 1$ plasma. The $k^{-5/3}$ inertial subrange is observed and agrees strikingly with the magnetic fluctuation spectrum; the wave phase speed in this regime is shown to be consistent with the Alfv\\'en speed. At smaller wavelengths $k \\rho_i \\geq 1$ the electric spectrum is softer and is consistent with the expected dispersion relation of short-wavelength kinetic Alfv\\'en waves. Kinetic Alfv\\'en waves damp on the solar wind ions and electrons and may act to isotropize them. This effect may explain the fluid-like nature of the solar wind.

  11. The Measure-theoretic Identity Underlying Transient Fluctuation Theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Shargel, Benjamin Hertz

    2010-01-01

    We prove a measure-theoretic identity that underlies all transient fluctuation theorems (TFTs) for entropy production and dissipated work in inhomogeneous deterministic and stochastic processes, including those of Evans and Searles, Crooks, and Seifert. The identity is used to deduce a tautological physical interpretation of TFTs in terms of the arrow of time, and its generality reveals that the self-inverse nature of the various trajectory and process transformations historically relied upon to prove TFTs, while necessary for these theorems from a physical standpoint, is not necessary from a mathematical one. The moment generating functions of thermodynamic variables appearing in the identity are shown to converge in general only in a vertical strip in the complex plane, with the consequence that a TFT that holds over arbitrary timescales may fail to give rise to an asymptotic fluctuation theorem for any possible speed of the corresponding large deviation principle. The case of strongly biased birth-death ch...

  12. Kinetic Field Theory: Effects of momentum correlations on the cosmic density-fluctuation power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Dombrowski, Johannes; Mildenberger, Julius

    2016-01-01

    In earlier work, we have developed a Kinetic Field Theory (KFT) for cosmological structure formation and showed that the non-linear density-fluctuation power spectrum known from numerical simulations can be reproduced quite well even if particle interactions are taken into account to first order only. Besides approximating gravitational interactions, we had to truncate the initial correlation hierarchy of particle momenta at the second order. Here, we substantially simplify KFT. We show that its central object, the free generating functional, can be factorized, taking the full hierarchy of momentum correlations into account. The factors appearing in the generating functional have a universal form and can thus be tabulated for fast access in perturbation schemes. Our results show that the complete hierarchy of initial momentum correlations is responsible for a characteristic deformation in the density-fluctuation power spectrum, caused by mode transport independent of the particle interaction. At the present e...

  13. The Amplitude of Mass Fluctuations and Mass Density of the Universe Constrained by Strong Gravitational Lensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Ming Chen

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the linear amplitude of mass fluctuations in the universe,σ8, and the present mass density parameter of the Universe, Ωm, from statistical strong gravitational lensing. We use the two population model of lens halos with fixed cooling mass scale Mc = 3 × 1013h-1M to match the observed lensing probabilities, and leave σ8 or Ωm as a free parameter to be constrained by the data.Another varying parameter, the equation of state of dark energy ω, and its typical values of -1, -2/3, -1/2 and -1/3 are investigated. We find that σ8 is degenerate with Ωm in a way similar to that suggested by present day cluster abundance as well as cosmic shear lensing measurements: σ8Ω0.6m ≈ 0.33. However, both σ8 ≤ 0.7and Ωm ≤ 0.2 can be safely ruled out, the best fit is when σ8 = 1.0, Ωm = 0.3 and σ8 = 0.98 + 0.1 and Ωm = 0.17 ± 0.05. For σ8 = 1.0, the higher value of Ωm = 0.35requires ω = -2/3 and Ωm = 0.40 requires ω= -1/2.

  14. Vacuum Energy Density Fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir States via Smeared Quantum Fields and Point Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, N G; Phillips, Nicholas. G.

    2000-01-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universe, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life `time-machines'. For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the var...

  15. Ion gyroscale fluctuation measurement with microwave imaging reflectometer on KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W.; Leem, J.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Ko, S. H.; Wang, W. X.; Budny, R. V.; Luhmann, N. C.; Kim, K. W.

    2016-11-01

    Ion gyroscale turbulent fluctuations with the poloidal wavenumber kθ ˜ 3 cm-1 have been measured in the core region of the neutral beam (NB) injected low confinement (L-mode) plasmas on Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research. The turbulence poloidal wavenumbers are deduced from the frequencies and poloidal rotation velocities in the laboratory frame, measured by the multichannel microwave imaging reflectometer. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations also predict the unstable modes with the normalized wavenumber kθρs ˜ 0.4, consistent with the measurement. Comparison of the measured frequencies with the intrinsic mode frequencies from the linear simulations indicates that the measured ones are primarily due to the E × B flow velocity in the NB-injected fast rotating plasmas.

  16. Interaction between the lower hybrid wave and density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y., E-mail: yves.peysson@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Madi, M.; Kabalan, K. [AUB, Bliss Street (Lebanon); Decker, J. [EPFL, CRPP (Switzerland)

    2015-12-10

    In the present paper, the perturbation of the launched power spectrum of the Lower Hybrid wave at the separatrix by electron density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer is investigated. Considering a slab geometry with magnetic field lines parallel to the toroidal direction, the full wave equation is solved using Comsol Multiphysics® for a fully active multi-junction like LH antenna made of two modules. When electron density fluctuations are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, it is shown that the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the wave propagates. The diffraction effect leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions, a feature consistent with the recently developed model that has been applied successfully to high density discharges on the Tokamak Tore Supra corresponding to the large spectral gap regime [Decker J. et al. Phys. Plasma 21 (2014) 092504]. The perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength.

  17. Derivation of stochastic differential equations for scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations from experimentally measured statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekkaoui, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research-Plasma Physics, Research Center Juelich GmbH, Association FZJ-Euratom, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A stochastic differential equation for intermittent plasma density dynamics in magnetic fusion edge plasma is derived, which is consistent with the experimentally measured gamma distribution and the theoretically expected quadratic nonlinearity. The plasma density is driven by a multiplicative Wiener process and evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level. The sensitivity of intermittency to the nonlinear dynamics is investigated by analyzing the nonlinear Langevin representation of the beta process, which leads to a root-square nonlinearity.

  18. A phase contrast imaging–interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. This work describes the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI–interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10.6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density fluctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz measurement of ion- and electron-scale instabilities. Further, correlating our interferometer’s measurements with those from DIII-D’s pre-existing, toroidally separated interferometer allows core-localized, low-n MHD studies that may otherwise be inaccessible via external magnetic measurements. The combined diagnostic’s small port requirements and minimal access restrictions make it well-suited to the harsh neutron environments and limited port space expected in next-step devices.

  19. Precision of future experiments measuring primordial tensor fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Recently the second phase of Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP2) claimed a detection of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ($r$) of primordial fluctuation at $5\\sigma$ confidence level. If it is true, this large and measurable amplitude ($r \\simeq 0.2$) of B-mode polarization indicates that it is possible to measure the shape of CMB B-mode polarization with future experiments. Given the current understanding of the experimental noise and foreground contamination, we forecast the precision of $r$ and the tensor spectral index $n_{\\rm t}$ measurements from Planck, Spider and POLARBEAR with $n_{\\rm t}$ as a free parameter. We quantitatively determine the signal-to-noise of the measurement in $r$-$n_{\\rm t}$ parameter space for the three experiments. The forecasted signal-to-noise ratio of the B-mode polarization somewhat depends on $n_{\\rm t}$, but strongly depends on the true value of $r$.

  20. An edge density fluctuation diagnostic for DIII-D using lithium beams. Final report, March 15, 1990--September 15, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    The pivotal role played by edge physics in tokamak transport and performance is widely appreciated but not completely understood at this time. The evident bifurcation in transport behavior during the L-to-H transition and the modification of the edge region by edge localized modes (ELMs) are just two examples of this relationship. There is a clear need to understand the role that turbulence plays in the plasma transport problem. Various workers have seen a suppression of both the magnetic and plasma density fluctuations during the transition. It is clear that the turbulence and transport behavior are linked and we are coming to an understanding of the transition evolution, based on a model of shear suppression of the turbulence and the creation of a transport barrier. In the case of the H-mode, this barrier is known to form a short distance radially inside the location of the last closed flux surface. The VH-mode may be thought of as a natural extension of this situation where the transport barrier moves deeper into the core of the discharge. As summarized in the May 1989 report of the DOE Transport Task Force, one of the key issues to be addressed in making progress on the transport question was to characterize the nature of local fluctuations. The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of one particular measurement technique to determine density fluctuations in the region of interest on the DIII-D tokamak.

  1. From density to interface fluctuations: the origin of wavelength dependence in surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiester, Thorsten

    2008-12-01

    The height-height correlation function for a fluctuating interface between two coexisting bulk phases is derived by means of general equilibrium properties of the corresponding density-density correlation function. A wavelength-dependent surface tension gamma(q) can be defined and expressed in terms of the direct correlation function c(r,r;{'}) , the equilibrium density profile rho_{0}(r) , and an operator which relates density to surface configurations. Neither the concept of an effective interface Hamiltonian nor the difference in pressure is needed to determine the general structure of the height-height correlations or gamma(q) , respectively. This result generalizes the Mecke-Dietrich surface tension gamma_{MD}(q) [Phys. Rev. E 59, 6766 (1999)] and modifies recently published criticism concerning gamma_{MD}(q) [Tarazona, Checa, and Chacón, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 196101 (2007)].

  2. Volume and surface contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy within the coherent density fluctuation model

    CERN Document Server

    Antonov, A N; Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya

    2016-01-01

    The volume and surface components of the nuclear symmetry energy (NSE) and their ratio are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model (CDFM). The estimations use the results of the model for the NSE in finite nuclei based on the Brueckner energy-density functional for nuclear matter. In addition, we present results for the NSE and its volume and surface contributions obtained by using the Skyrme energy-density functional. The CDFM weight function is obtained using the proton and neutron densities from the self-consistent HF+BCS method with Skyrme interactions. We present and discuss the values of the volume and surface contributions to the NSE and their ratio obtained for the Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains studying their isotopic sensitivity. The results are compared with estimations of other approaches which have used available experimental data on binding energies, neutron-skin thicknesses, excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS) and also with results of other theoretical methods.

  3. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  4. Density and magnetic field fluctuations observed by ISEE 1-2 in the quiet magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lacombe

    Full Text Available We analyse the fluctuations of the electron density and of the magnetic field in the Earth's magnetosheath to identify the waves observed below the proton gyrofrequency. We consider two quiet magnetosheath crossings i.e. 2 days characterized by small-amplitude waves, for which the solar wind dynamic pressure was low. On 2 August 1978 the spacecraft were in the outer magnetosheath. We compare the properties of the observed narrow-band waves with those of the unstable linear wave modes calculated for an homogeneous plasma with Maxwellian electron and bi-Maxwellian (anisotropic proton and alpha particle distributions. The Alfvén ion cyclotron (AIC mode appears to be dominant in the data, but there are also density fluctuations nearly in phase with the magnetic fluctuations parallel to the magnetic field. Such a phase relation can be explained neither by the presence of a proton or helium AIC mode nor by the presence of a fast mode in a bi-Maxwellian plasma. We invoke the presence of the helium cut-off mode which is marginally stable in a bi-Maxwellian plasma with α particles: the observed phase relation could be due to a hybrid mode (proton AIC+helium cut-off generated by a non-Maxwellian or a non-gyrotropic part of the ion distribution functions in the upstream magnetosheath. On 2 September 1981 the properties of the fluctuations observed in the middle of the magnetosheath can be explained by pure AIC waves generated by protons which have reached a bi-Maxwellian equilibrium. For a given wave mode, the phase difference between BVert and the density is sensitive to the shape of the ion and electron distribution functions: it can be a diagnosis tool for natural and simulated plasmas.

  5. Density fluctuations from the quark-hadron epoch and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, G.M.; Mathews, G.J.; Alcock, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    We present a simple thermodynamic model of the quark-hadron transition in the early universe and use this model to estimate how the size of isothermal baryon number fluctuations which emerge from this epoch depend on the temperature of the transition and other uncertain quantities of the underlying QCD physics. We calculate primordial nucleosynthesis in the presence of these fluctuations and find that ..cap omega.. = 1 in baryons is possible only if the measured abundances of /sup 7/Li and /sup 2/H reflect substantial destruction during the evolution of the galaxy. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  6. How reproducible are the measurements of leaf fluctuating asymmetry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Kozlov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA represents small, non-directional deviations from perfect symmetry in morphological characters. FA is generally assumed to increase in response to stress; therefore, FA is frequently used in ecological studies as an index of environmental or genetic stress experienced by an organism. The values of FA are usually small, and therefore the reliable detection of FA requires precise measurements. The reproducibility of fluctuating asymmetry (FA was explored by comparing the results of measurements of scanned images of 100 leaves of downy birch (Betula pubescens conducted by 31 volunteer scientists experienced in studying plant FA. The median values of FA varied significantly among the participants, from 0.000 to 0.074, and the coefficients of variation in FA for individual leaves ranged from 25% to 179%. The overall reproducibility of the results among the participants was rather low (0.074. Variation in instruments and methods used by the participants had little effect on the reported FA values, but the reproducibility of the measurements increased by 30% following exclusion of data provided by seven participants who had modified the suggested protocol for leaf measurements. The scientists working with plant FA are advised to pay utmost attention to adequate and detailed description of their data acquisition protocols in their forthcoming publications, because all characteristics of instruments and methods need to be controlled to increase the quality and reproducibility of the data. Whenever possible, the images of all measured objects and the results of primary measurements should be published as electronic appendices to scientific papers.

  7. Derivation of stochastic differential equations for scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations from experimentally measured statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekkaoui, Abdessamad [IEK-4 Forschungszentrum Juelich 52428 (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A method to derive stochastic differential equations for intermittent plasma density dynamics in magnetic fusion edge plasma is presented. It uses a measured first four moments (mean, variance, Skewness and Kurtosis) and the correlation time of turbulence to write a Pearson equation for the probability distribution function of fluctuations. The Fokker-Planck equation is then used to derive a Langevin equation for the plasma density fluctuations. A theoretical expectations are used as a constraints to fix the nonlinearity structure of the stochastic differential equation. In particular when the quadratically nonlinear dynamics is assumed, then it is shown that the plasma density is driven by a multiplicative Wiener process and evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level. Strong criteria for statistical discrimination of experimental time series are proposed as an alternative to the Kurtosis-Skewness scaling. This scaling is broadly used in contemporary literature to characterize edge turbulence, but it is inappropriate because a large family of distributions could share this scaling. Strong criteria allow us to focus on the relevant candidate distribution and approach a nonlinear structure of edge turbulence model.

  8. Intermittency of the density fluctuations and its influence on the radial transport in the boundary of J-TEXT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Meng-Zhou; Zhuang Ge; Wang Zhi-Jiang; Pan Yuan

    2011-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the turbulence intermittency, a detailed investigation of the intermittency of the density fluctuations has been performed in the boundary of J-TEXT. The intermittency of the density fluctuations and its influence on the radial transport are reported. The probability distribution functions of the density fluctuations are not scale-invariant, being inconsistent with the self-organized criticality hypothesis. The underlying dynamics of the intermittency are detected using the quiet-time statistical method. The probability distribution function of the quiet times shows double-power-law regions, indicating the existence of correlations between the successive burst events.

  9. Changes in density fluctuations associated with confinement transitions close to a rational edge rotational transform in the W7-AS stellarator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoletnik, S,; Basse, Nils Plesner; Saffman, Mark;

    2002-01-01

    or by a small plasma current, these transitions offer a precise way to systematically analyse differences in plasma turbulence between bad and good confinement cases. This paper presents results of the study of electron density fluctuations associated with confinement changes. Wavenumber and frequency spectra...... and radial profiles are compared., A slow and reproducible transition is induced by a small plasma current and the sequence of events leading to bad confinement is investigated. The laser scattering core plasma density fluctuation measurements are complemented by edge beam emission spectroscopy results...

  10. Long-range correlations of density fluctuations in the Kerner-Klenov-Wolf cellular automata three-phase traffic flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J J; Sun, H J; Gao, Z Y

    2008-09-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a useful tool to measure the long-range power-law correlations in 1f noise. In this paper, we investigate the power-law dynamics behavior of the density fluctuation time series generated by the famous Kerner-Klenov-Wolf cellular automata model in road traffic. Then the complexities of spatiotemporal, average speed, and the average density have been analyzed in detail. By introducing the DFA method, our main observation is that the free flow and wide moving jam phases correspond to the long-range anticorrelations. On the contrary, at the synchronized flow phase, the long-range correlated property is observed.

  11. Three Dimensional Statistical Field Theory for Density Fluctuations in Heavy-Ion Collsiions

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, H C; Sarcevic, I

    1994-01-01

    A statistical field theory of particle production is presented using a gaussian functional in three dimensions. Identifying the field with the particle density fluctuation results in zero correlations of order three and higher, while the second order correlation function is of a Yukawa form. A detailed scheme for projecting the theoretical three-dimensional correlation onto data of three and fewer dimensions illustrates how theoretical predictions are tested against experimental moments in the different dimensions. An example given in terms of NA35 parameters should be testable against future NA35 data.

  12. Electron density fluctuations accelerate the branching of streamer discharges in air

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, A

    2011-01-01

    Branching is an essential element of streamer discharge dynamics but today it is understood only qualitatively. The variability and irregularity observed in branched streamer trees suggest that stochastic terms are relevant for the description of streamer branching. We here consider electron density fluctuations due to the discrete particle number as a source of stochasticity in positive streamers in air at standard temperature and pressure. We derive a quantitative estimate for the branching distance that agrees within a factor of 2 with experimental values. As branching without noise would occur later, if at all, we conclude that stochastic particle noise is relevant for streamer branching in air at atmospheric pressure.

  13. Fast temperature fluctuation measurements in SOL of tokamak TCV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Pitts, R.A.

    coupling both across the plasma sheath and in the probe circuit itself. Comparisons are also made between the results from higher frequency sweeping and the standard values derived from a slower sweep to show that the fast measurement is reliable. Considerable effort has been expended in recent years...... to compare the statistical character of turbulence in the SOL particle flux on TCV with results from the 2D fluid electrostatic model ESEL [2][4]. Using results from the fast sweeping, similar comparisons can now be made with the fluctuating Te and will be described in this contribution. We also present...... distribution function, introduced for SOL turbulence in [5]. The fast Te capability also allows the SOL response to Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) to be studied and new results will be presented for the far SOL Te response during Type III ELMs....

  14. The role of magnetic islands in modifying long range temporal correlations of density fluctuations and local heat transport

    CERN Document Server

    van Milligen, B Ph; Garcia, L; Bruna, D Lopez; Carreras, B A; Xu, Y; Ochando, M; Hidalgo, C; Reynolds-Barredo, J M; Fraguas, A Lopez

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the relation between magnetic islands, long range temporal correlations and heat transport. A low order rational surface ($\\iota/2\\pi = 3/2$) was purposely scanned outward through an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated (ECRH) plasma in the TJ-II stellarator. Density turbulence and the poloidal flow velocity (or radial electric field) were characterized using a two channel Doppler Reflectometer. Simultaneously, the ECRH power was modulated to characterize heat transport, using measurements from a 12 channel Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostic. A systematic variation of the poloidal velocity was found to be associated with the stationary $\\iota/2\\pi = 3/2$ magnetic island. Inside from the rational surface, the Hurst coefficient, quantifying the nature of long-range correlations, was found to be significantly enhanced. Simultaneously, heat transport was enhanced as well, establishing a clear link between density fluctuations and anomalous heat transport. The variation of the Hurst coefficie...

  15. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Michael A.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g2(r ) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  16. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui; Stone, James M.

    2017-08-01

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ, of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  17. Density Measurement of Liquid Metals Using Dilatometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianwen WANG; Qingsong MEI

    2006-01-01

    The dilatometer method for density measurement of liquid metals was improved to give a high measurement accuracy with simple operation. The density of liquid tin was measured and the results are in agreement with values in literature. The melting point density of liquid Sn was measured to be 6.966×103 Kg·m-3 and the temperature (T) dependence of the density (ρ) for liquid Sn can be well described by a polynomial equation ρ(T)=7.406 - 9.94 × 10-4T + 2.12 × 10-7T2.

  18. In-plane and transverse superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism in the presence of charge-density waves in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, F.; Berger, H.; Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C.; Mosqueira, J.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F.

    2007-03-01

    The fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the superconducting transition was measured in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound, and some experimental improvements, allowed us to measure the superconducting fluctuation effects in the two main crystallographic directions. These results reveal that the nonlocal electrodynamic effects on the FD are highly anisotropic, and they also discard a possible contribution to the FD coming from the charge-density waves (CDWs) appearing below TCDW>TC in 2H-NbSe2 , in agreement with a phenomenological estimate.

  19. Radar measurement of L-band signal fluctuations caused by propagation through trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Fluctuations of an L-band, horizontally polarized signal that was transmitted from the ground through a coniferous forest canopy to an airborne radar are examined. The azimuth synthetic aperture radar (SAR) impulse response in the presence of the measured magnitude fluctuations shows increased sidelobes over the case with no trees. Statistics of the observed fluctuations are similar to other observations.

  20. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  1. Mammographic density estimation with automated volumetric breast density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p = 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  2. Mammography density estimation with automated volumetic breast density measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  3. An Empirical Measure for Labor Market Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we derive a structural measure for labor market density based on the Ellison and Glasear (1997) index for industry concentration''. This labor market density measure serves as a proxy for the number of workers that can reach a certain work area within a reasonal amount of t

  4. Measurements of conductivity nonuniformities and fluctuations in combustion MHD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, R. M.

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostics for the characterization of electrical conductivity nonuniformities in combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasmas were developed. An initial characterization of nonuniformities in the Stanford M-2 linear generator was obtained and recommendations were made concerning the use of the diagnostics in practical MHD generator configurations. A laser induced fluorescene (LIF) diagnostic for nonintrusive measurements of local conductivity fluctuations was developed. This diagnostic and other line of sight averaged optical nonuniformity diagnostics were successfully demonstrated in several experiments in the Standford M-2 combustion systems. Results were used to characterize the nonuniformities in the M-2 system and to compare and evaluate the diagnostics. Conductivity nonuniformities were found to be predominantly streamers which had relatively long length scales of the order of l m in the axial flow direction. Shortet transverse length scales of the order of 0.1 m were found perpendicular to the flow direction. A combination of LIF and plasma luminosity diagnostics is recommended for future characterizations of conductivity uniformities in combustion MHD plasmas.

  5. Large-Scale Fluctuations in the Number Density of Galaxies in Independent Surveys of Deep Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, S I; Baryshev, Yu V; Gorokhov, V L

    2016-01-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval $0.1 < z < 3.5$, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches $R = 0.70 \\pm 0.16$. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctu...

  6. Probing intracellular mass density fluctuation through confocal microscopy: application in cancer diagnostics as a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Peeyush; Ghimire, Hemendra M; Almabadi, Huda; Yallappu, Murali M; Skalli, Omar; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular structural alterations are hallmark of several disease conditions and treatment modalities. However, robust methods to quantify these changes are scarce. In view of this, we introduce a new method to quantify structural alterations in biological cells through the widely used confocal microscopy. This novel method employs optical eigenfunctions localization properties of cells and quantifies the degree of structural alterations, in terms of nano- to micron scale intracellular mass density fluctuations, in one single parameter. Such approach allows a powerful way to compare changing structures in heterogeneous cellular media irrespective of the origin of the cause. As a case study, we demonstrate its applicability in cancer detection with breast and prostate cancer cases of different tumorigenicity levels. Adding new dimensions to the confocal based studies, this technique has potentially significant applications in areas ranging from disease diagnostics to therapeutic studies, such as patient pro...

  7. Mass Density Fluctuations in Quantum and Classical descriptions of Liquid Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galib, Mirza; Duignan, Timothy TS; Misteli, Yannick B.; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Hutter, Jürg; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2017-06-28

    First principles molecular dynamics simulation protocol is established using revised functional of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (revPBE) in conjunction with Grimme's third generation of dispersion (D3) correction to describe properties of water at ambient conditions. This study also demonstrates the consistency of the structure of water across both isobaric (NpT) and isothermal (NVT) ensembles. Going beyond the standard structural benchmarks for liquid water, we compute properties that are connected to both local structure and mass density fluctuations that are related to concepts of solvation and hydrophobicity. We directly compare our revPBE results to the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) plus Grimme dispersion corrections (D2) and both the empirical fixed charged model (SPC/E) and many body interaction potential model (MB-pol) to further our understanding of how the computed properties herein depend on the form of the interaction potential.

  8. Density fluctuation dynamics in a dissipative self-gravitating dilute gas revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, A. R.; García-Perciante, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of the behavior of density fluctuations in a dissipative self gravitating gas in the linear regime is revisited. A factorization for the dispersion relation given by approximate roots is proposed, which is analogous to the one introduced in the case without gravitational field. The threshold for the onset of a gravitational instability, namely Jeans wavenumber, is found to be unaltered by the presence of thermal and viscous dissipation. However, the behavior of damped modes does not correspond to the usual Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum when the gravitational field is taken into account. Additional to the usual central Rayleigh peak and Brillouin doublet, both corrected due to the presence of the field, non-Lorentizan terms are included in the structure factor. These terms are larger in the presence of the gravitational field and may lead in principle to relevant differences in the general properties of the spectrum. The possible mathematical origin of these modifications is briefly discussed.

  9. Planets in Other Universes: Habitability constraints on density fluctuations and galactic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred C; Bloch, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the possibility that different versions of the laws of physics could be realized within other universes, this paper delineates the galactic parameters that allow for habitable planets and revisits constraints on the amplitude $Q$ of the primordial density fluctuations. Previous work indicates that large values of $Q$ lead to galaxies so dense that planetary orbits cannot survive long enough for life to develop. Small values of $Q$ lead to delayed star formation, loosely bound galaxies, and compromised heavy element retention. This work generalizes previous treatments: [A] We consider models for the internal structure of galaxies and find the fraction of galactic real estate that allows stable, long-lived planetary orbits. [B] We perform a large ensemble of numerical simulations to estimate cross sections for the disruption of planetary orbits due to interactions with passing stars. [C] We consider disruption due to the background radiation fields produced by the galaxies. [D] One consequence of i...

  10. Simulations of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations I: Growth of Large-Scale Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Matsubara, Takahiko; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Shirata, Akihito; Taruya, Atsushi; Saito, Shun; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Suto, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    We critically examine how well the evolution of large-scale density perturbations is followed in cosmological $N$-body simulations. We first run a large volume simulation and perform a mode-by-mode analysis in three-dimensional Fourier space. We show that the growth of large-scale fluctuations significantly deviates from linear theory predictions. The deviations are caused by {\\it nonlinear} coupling with a small number of modes at largest scales owing to finiteness of the simulation volume. We then develop an analytic model based on second-order perturbation theory to quantify the effect. Our model accurately reproduces the simulation results. For a single realization, the second-order effect appears typically as ``zig-zag'' patterns around the linear-theory prediction, which imprints artificial ``oscillations'' that lie on the real baryon-acoustic oscillations. Although an ensemble average of a number of realizations approaches the linear theory prediction, the dispersions of the realizations remain large e...

  11. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  12. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  13. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Finkenthal, D; Muscatello, C; Taussig, D; Boivin, R

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  14. Measurement and Simulation of Signal Fluctuations Caused by Propagation through Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present measured magnitude and phase fluctuations of UHF, L band, and C band signals that were transmitted from the ground through a forest canopy to an airborne radar. We find that the measured fluctuations are similar to those calculated by a simple Monte Carlo simulation. Both observed and calculated RMS fluctuations are typically several decibels in magnitude and tens of degrees in phase at all three frequencies.

  15. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) Cosmological Measures

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Don N

    2014-01-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmolo...

  16. First in situ measurement of electric field fluctuations during strong spread F in the Indian zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. S. Sinha

    Full Text Available An RH-560 rocket flight was conducted from Sriharikota rocket range (SHAR (14°N, 80°E, dip 14°N along with other experiments, as a part of equatorial spread F (ESF campaign, to study the nature of irregularities in electric field and electron density. The rocket was launched at 2130 local time (LT and it attained an apogee of 348 km. Results of vertical and horizontal electric field fluctuations are presented here. Scale sizes of electric field fluctuations were measured in the vertical direction only. Strong ESF irregularities were observed in three regions, viz., 160-190 km, 210-257 km and 290-330 km. Some of the valley region vertical electric field irregularities (at 165 km and 168 km, in the intermediate-scale size range, observed during this flight, show spectral peak at kilometer scales and can be interpreted in terms of the image striation theory suggested by Vickrey et al. The irregularities at 176 km do not exhibit any peak at kilometer scales and appear to be of a new type. Scale sizes of vertical electric field fluctuations showed a decrease with increasing altitude. The most prominent scales were of the order of a few kilometers around 170 km and a few hundred meters around 310 km. Spectra of intermediate-scale vertical electric field fluctuations below the base of the F region (210-257 km showed a tendency to become slightly flatter (spectral index n = -2.1 ± 0.7 as compared to the valley region (n = -3.6 ± 0.8 and the region below the F peak (n = -2.8 ± 0.5. Correlation analysis of the electron density and vertical electric field fluctuations suggests the presence of a sheared flow of current in 160-330 km region.

    Keywords: Ionosphere (Electric fields and currents; ionospheric irregularities; Radio science (ionospheric physics

  17. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Measuring liquid density using Archimedes' principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-09-01

    A simple technique is described for measuring absolute and relative liquid density based on Archimedes' principle. The technique involves placing a container of the liquid under test on an electronic balance and suspending a probe (e.g. a glass marble) attached to a length of line beneath the surface of the liquid. If the volume of the probe is known, the density of liquid is given by the difference between the balance reading before and after immersion of the probe divided by the volume of the probe. A test showed that the density of water at room temperature could be measured to an accuracy and precision of 0.01 ± 0.1%. The probe technique was also used to measure the relative density of milk, Coca-Cola, fruit juice, olive oil and vinegar.

  19. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  20. Georadar Measurements for the Snow Cover Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Godio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground Probing Radar (GPR devices is adopted for the analysis of thickness and the mechanical properties (density of the snow cover in some test site in Alps, in Northern Italy. The performances of standard radar systems for the snow cover characterisation are analysed, the main aim is to assess the reliability of the method to estimate the snow density, the snowpack thickness and the depth resolution in terms of capability to detect thin layers. The main relationships between the electrical permittivity and the density of the dry-snow are applied to estimate the density vertical profiles inferred by the GPR investigation. The data were calibrated and compared with the results coming from direct measurements of the density and thickness.

  1. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Glass Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; LIU Qi; SHAO Cheng-Gang; ZHANG Ya-Ting; LUO Jun; Vadim Milyukov

    2008-01-01

    @@ The density inhomogeneity of a glass pendulum is determined by an optical interference method.The relative variations of the densities over a volume with sizes of 5 × 5 × 5mm3 are (0.64±0.97) × 10-5 and (0.99 ± 0.92) ×10-5 for the K9 glass and silica glass pendulum, respectively.These variations of densities contributing to the relative uncertainties of the Newtonian gravitational constant G are 0.20 ppm and 0.21 ppm in our experiment on measurement of G.

  2. CLIMATIC SIGNALS FROM INTRA-ANNUAL DENSITY FLUCTUATION FREQUENCY IN MEDITERRANEAN PINES AT A REGIONAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica eZalloni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs. IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait. and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 11 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain and 4 in Portugal, P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain and 4 in Portugal, and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution.

  3. Distance measurement in air without the precise knowledge of refractive index fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Morris; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of long distance measurement in air is limited by the fluctuation of refractive index. In this paper, we propose a technique which allows us to measure an absolute distance in air without the knowledge of air turbulence. The technique is based on a femtosecond frequency comb. The fluctuation of the environmental conditions is monitored by two independently operating reference interferometers. The deviations of optical path lengths, caused by the fluctuation of air refractive index, is compensated by feedbacks from the reference interferometers. The measured optical path length is then locked to certain environmental conditions, determined at an optimized moment before the measurement process.

  4. Measurement of 21 cm brightness fluctuations at z ~ 0.8 in cross-correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Masui, K W; Banavar, N; Bandura, K; Blake, C; Calin, L -M; Chang, T -C; Chen, X; Li, Y -C; Liao, Y -W; Natarajan, A; Pen, U -L; Peterson, J B; Shaw, J R; Voytek, T C

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling ~41 deg. sq. and 190 hours of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains Omega_HI b_HI r = [0.43 \\pm 0.07 (stat.) \\pm 0.04(sys.)] x 10^-3, where Omega_HI is the neutral hydrogen HI fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b_HI is the HI bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z ~ 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

  5. Intermittent dislocation density fluctuations in crystal plasticity from a phase-field crystal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Jens M.; Angheluta, Luiza; Mathiesen, Joachim;

    2014-01-01

    Plastic deformation mediated by collective dislocation dynamics is investigated in the two-dimensional phase-field crystal model of sheared single crystals. We find that intermittent fluctuations in the dislocation population number accompany bursts in the plastic strain-rate fluctuations. Disloc...

  6. Modelling an infinite nucleonic system. Static and dynamical properties. Study of density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Farine, M.; Remaud, B.; Sébille, F.

    For one decade, several fields in physics as well microscopic as macroscopic benefit from the computational particle-models (astrophysics, electronics, fluids mechanics...). In particular, the nuclear matter offers an interesting challenge as many body problem, owing to the quantal nature of its components and the complexity of the in-medium interaction. Using a model derived from semi-classical Vlasov equation and the projection of the Wigner function on a Gaussian coherent states basis (pseudo-particles), static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter are studied, featuring the growing of bulk instabilities in dilute matter. Using different zero and finite range effective interactions, the effect of the model parameters upon the relation total energy - density - temperature and surface energy of the pseudo-particles fluid is pointed out. The dynamical feature is first based upon a model of the 2-body Uehling-Ulhenbeck collisionnal term. A study of the relaxation of a nucleonic system is performed. At last, the pseudo-particle model is used in order to extract time scale for the growing of density fluctuations. This process is supposed to be a possible way to clusterization during heavy nuclei collisions. Depuis une dizaine d'années, plusieurs domaines de la physique aussi bien microscopiques que macroscopiques bénéficient des modèles à particules pour ordinateurs (astrophysique, électronique, plasmas...). En particulier, la matière nucléaire constitue un objet intéressant pour le problème à N corps ; tant par la nature quantique des nucléons que par la complexité des interactions dans ce milieu. A travers un modèle dérivant de l'équation de Vlasov semi-classique et de la projection de la fonction de Wigner sur une base d'état cohérents gaussiens (les pseudo-particules), on étudie les propriétés statiques et dynamiques de la matière nucléaire dont en particulier le développement des instabilités de volume en milieu dilué. Pour diff

  7. Interferometric velocity measurements through a fluctuating gas-liquid interface employing adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Lars; Leithold, Christoph; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-12-16

    Optical transmission through fluctuating interfaces of mediums with different refractive indexes is limited by the occurring distortions. Temporal fluctuations of such distortions deteriorate optical measurements. In order to overcome this shortcoming we propose the use of adaptive optics. For the first time, an interferometric velocity measurement technique with embedded adaptive optics is presented for flow velocity measurements through a fluctuating air-water interface. A low order distortion correction technique using a fast deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack camera with high frame rate is employed. The obtained high control bandwidth enables precise measurements also at fast fluctuating media interfaces. This methodology paves the way for several kinds of optical flow measurements in various complex environments.

  8. Ordinary mode reflectometry. Modification of the scattering and cut-off responses due to the shape of localized density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanack, C.; Boucher, I.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Nancy (France). Lab. de Physique du Solide; Clairet, F.; Zou, X.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1996-01-01

    Ordinary wave reflectometry in a plasma containing a localized density perturbation is studied with a 1-D model. The phase response is studied as a function of the wavenumber and position of the perturbation. It is shown that it strongly depends upon the perturbation shape and size. For a small perturbation wavenumber, the response is due to the oscillation of the cut-off layer. For larger wavenumbers, two regimes are found: for a broad perturbation, the phase response is an image of the perturbation itself; for a narrow perturbation, it is rather an image of the Fourier transform. For tokamak plasmas it turns out that, for the fluctuation spectra usually observed, the phase response comes primarily from those fluctuations that are localized at the cut-off. Results of a 2-D numerical model show that geometry effects are negligible for the scattering by radial fluctuations. (author). 18 refs.

  9. Influence of fluid density on the statistics of power fluctuations in von K\\'arm\\'an swirling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Opazo, A; Bustamante, G; Labbé, R

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental results for fluctuations of injected power in confined von K\\'arm\\'an swirling flows with constant external torque applied to the stirrers. Two experiments were performed at nearly equal Reynolds numbers in geometrically similar experimental setups, using air in one of them and water in the other. We found that the probability density function of power fluctuations is strongly asymmetric in air, while in water it is closer to a Gaussian, showing that the effect that a big change on the fluid density has on the flow-stirrer interaction is not reflected merely by a change in the amplitude of stirrers' response. In the case of water, with a density roughly 830 times greater than air density, the forcing exerted by the flow on the stirrers is stronger, so that they follow more closely the locally averaged rotation of the flow. When the fluid is air, the forcing is much weaker, resulting not only in a smaller stirrer response to the torque exerted by the flow, but also in power fluctuations ...

  10. Drought impact on water use efficiency and intra-annual density fluctuations in Erica arborea on Elba (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; DE Micco, Veronica; Brand, Willi A; Saurer, Matthias; Aronne, Giovanna; Linke, Petra; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Erica arborea (L) is a widespread Mediterranean species, able to cope with water stress and colonize semiarid environments. The eco-physiological plasticity of this species was evaluated by studying plants growing at two sites with different soil moistures on the island of Elba (Italy), through dendrochronological, wood-anatomical analyses and stable isotopes measurements. Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) were abundant in tree rings, and were identified as the key parameter to understand site-specific plant responses to water stress. Our findings showed that the formation of IADFs is mainly related to the high temperature, precipitation patterns and probably to soil water availability, which differs at the selected study sites. The recorded increase in the (13) C-derived intrinsic water use efficiency at the IADFs level was linked to reduced water loss rather than to increasing C assimilation. The variation in vessel size and the different absolute values of δ(18) O among trees growing at the two study sites underlined possible differences in stomatal control of water loss and possible differences in sources of water uptake. This approach not only helped monitor seasonal environmental differences through tree-ring width, but also added valuable information on E. arborea responses to drought and their ecological implications for Mediterranean vegetation dynamics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterizing intra-annual density fluctuations using fine-spatial resolution blue intensity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Flurin; Wright, William; Szejner, Paul; Wells, Leon; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Monson, Russell

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly rising evaporative demand threatens forests in semi-arid areas around the world, but the timing of stem growth response to drought is often coarsely known. This is partly due to a shortage of sub-annual growth records, particularly outside the Mediterranean region where most intra-annual density fluctuation (IADF) chronologies are based. We anticipate that an automated, cost-effective, and easily implementable method to characterize IADFs could foster more widespread development of sub-annual chronologies. Here, we applied a peak detection algorithm to fine-spatial resolution blue intensity (BI) profiles of Ponderosa pine tree rings from two sites located in neighboring mountain ranges in southern Arizona (~300 m elevation difference). This automated procedure proved reliable to isolate and characterize IADFs, thus offering an efficient and objective alternative to visual identification. Out of seven investigated BI parameters, peak height, width, and area showed satisfactory chronology statistics. We assessed the response of these BI and radial growth parameters to six monthly-resolved climate variables and to the onset date of the North American summer monsoon (NAM). The NAM is an atmospheric mode that provides a clear time marker for the termination of a pre-summer drought period (May-June) causing regular IADFs in trees growing near the dry margin of their distribution range. We observed divergent water limitation at the two sites, despite comparable site characteristics. Radial growth at the lower-elevation site depended mainly on winter precipitation, whereas the higher site relied on spring and monsoon precipitation. The pre-summer drought period indeed promoted IADFs in early ring portions at both sites. Yet, IADFs at the higher site were only formed, if spring was sufficiently humid to assume enough radial growth. Late-position IADFs were caused by a weak monsoon and additionally promoted by favorable conditions towards the end of the growing

  12. Radial profile measurements of plasma pressure-like fluctuations with the heavy ion beam diagnostic on the tokamak ISTTOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, R. B., E-mail: rhenriques@ipfn.ist.utl.pt; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Coelho, R.; Figueiredo, H.; Fernandes, H. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    The Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic (HIBD) on the tokamak ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Técnico TOKamak) has been modified, in terms of signal conditioning, to measure the local fluctuations of the n{sub e}σ{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) product (plasma density times the effective ionization cross-section) along the tokamak minor diameter, in 12 sample volumes in the range of −0.7a < r < 0.7a, with a maximum delay time of 1 μs. The corresponding signals show high correlation with the magnetic Mirnov coils in the characteristic MHD frequency range of ISTTOK plasmas and enable the identification of tearing modes. This paper describes the HIBD signal conditioning system and presents a preliminary analysis of the radial profile measurements of local n{sub e}σ{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) fluctuations.

  13. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  14. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N.B., E-mail: melnikov@cs.msu.su [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Reser, B.I., E-mail: reser@imp.uran.ru [Miheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Paradezhenko, G.V., E-mail: gparadezhenko@cs.msu.su [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  15. ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field and ionospheric sounding measurements at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ULF geomagnetic field fluctuations at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign (29 March-3 April 2004. During the whole campaign, mainly in the prenoon sector, a moderate Pc3-4 pulsation activity is observed, clearly related to interplanetary upstream waves. On 3 April, in correspondence to the Earth's arrival of a coronal mass ejection, two SIs are observed whose waveforms are indicative of a contribution of the high-latitude ionospheric currents to the low-latitude ground field. During the following geomagnetic storm, low frequency (Pc5 waves are observed at discrete frequencies. Their correspondence with the same frequencies detected in the radial components of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed suggests that Alfvénic solar wind fluctuations may act as direct drivers of magnetospheric fluctuations. A cross-phase analysis, using different pairs of stations, is also presented for identifying field line resonant frequencies and monitoring changes in plasmaspheric mass density. Lastly, an analysis of ionospheric vertical soundings, measured at the Rome ionosonde station (41.8° N, 12.5° E, and vertical TEC measurements deduced from GPS signals within an European network shows the relation between the ULF resonances in the inner magnetosphere and thermal plasma density variations during geomagnetically quiet conditions, in contrast to various storm phases at the end of the CAWSES campaign.

  16. Measurement of the internal magnetic fluctuation by the transport of runaways on J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Jiang, Z. H.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, Z. P.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of internal magnetic fluctuation is important for the study of transport in tokamak plasmas. The runaway electron transport induced by the sawtooth crash can be used to obtain the internal magnetic fluctuation. Inversed sawtooth-like activities on hard x-ray (HXR) fluxes following sawtooth activities were observed after the application of electrode biasing on J-TEXT tokamak. The runaway diffusion coefficient Dr is deduced to be about 30 m2/s according to the time delay of HXR flux peaks to the sawtooth crashes. The averaged value of normalized magnetic fluctuation in the discharges with electrode biasing was increased to the order of 1 × 10-4.

  17. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzà, G.; Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion—buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the measurement, and the reason for the choice of the procedure, among others. One of the most widespread approaches makes use of rubber balloons. Such an approach can be misleading if attention is not paid to the effect of the buoyant force on the balloon, exerted by the surrounding air. Air is weightless in an environment full of it. While this fact can usually be neglected in daily, nontechnical weight measurements, it is not the case when we are interested in the weight of air itself. A sketch such as the one depicted in Fig. 1 is often presented in elementary science textbooks, as a demonstration that air has weight. A search of the Internet will reveal that this misleading approach is often presented as the simplest one for this kind of measurement at an elementary level and represents one among other common misconceptions that can be found in K-6 science textbooks as discussed, for instance, in Ref. 2. For a more detailed description of the flaws inherent to the measurement of air's weight with a rubber balloon, see Ref. 3. In this paper we will describe two procedures to measure the density of air: weighing a PET bottle and a vacuum rigid container. There are other interesting ways to estimate the weight of air; see, for instance, the experiment of Zhu and Se-yuen using carbon dioxide and Archimedes' principle.4 We emphasize the experimental implications and the physical reasons for the accuracy and conceptual correctness of each method. It is important not to undervalue the importance of both simplicity and reliability for any experimental measurement made in a didactic context.

  18. Current Fluctuations in One Dimensional Diffusive Systems with a Step Initial Density Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Gerschenfeld, Antoine

    2009-12-01

    We show how to apply the macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim to study the current fluctuations of diffusive systems with a step initial condition. We argue that one has to distinguish between two ways of averaging (the annealed and the quenched cases) depending on whether we let the initial condition fluctuate or not. Although the initial condition is not a steady state, the distribution of the current satisfies a symmetry very reminiscent of the fluctuation theorem. We show how the equations of the MFT can be solved in the case of non-interacting particles. The symmetry of these equations can be used to deduce the distribution of the current for several other models, from its knowledge (Derrida and Gerschenfeld in J. Stat. Phys. 136, 1-15, 2009) for the symmetric simple exclusion process. In the range where the integrated current Qt˜sqrt{t} , we show that the non-Gaussian decay exp [- Q {/t 3}/ t] of the distribution of Q t is generic.

  19. The I-mode confinement regime at ASDEX Upgrade: global properties and characterization of strongly intermittent density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, T.; Manz, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Dunne, M.; Hennequin, P.; Hetzenecker, A.; Stroth, U.; Conway, G. D.; Guimarais, L.; Honoré, C.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    Properties of the I-mode confinement regime on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak are summarized. A weak dependence of the power threshold for the L-I transition on the toroidal magnetic field strength is found. During improved confinement, the edge radial electric field well deepens. Stability calculations show that the I-mode pedestal is peeling-ballooning stable. Turbulence investigations reveal strongly intermittent density fluctuations linked to the weakly coherent mode in the confined plasma, which become stronger as the confinement quality increases. Across all investigated structure sizes ({{k}\\bot}≈ 5 -12 cm-1, with {{k}\\bot} the perpendicular wavenumber of turbulent density fluctuations), the intermittent turbulence bursts are observed. Comparison with bolometry data shows that they move poloidally toward the X-point and finally end up in the divertor. This might be indicative that they play a role in inhibiting the density profile growth, such that no pedestal is formed in the edge density profile.

  20. Preliminary results of flow fluctuation measurements in the cryogenic transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovyev, V. N.; Lebiga, V. A.; Pak, A. Yu.; Quest, J.

    2012-01-01

    The detailed information about flow fluctuations structure inside the test section of Pilot of European Transonic Windtunnel (PETW) obtained by means of hot-wire anemometer and fluctuation diagram (FD) method within broad and narrow frequency band is presented. Fluctuation diagrams were derived from an array of hot wire output data measured at different overheating ratio of the probe (not less than 8) at freestream Mach numbers M = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.8, total temperature T0 = 118 . . . 294.7 K and unit Reynolds numbers Re1 = (5.54 . . . 108.6) · 106 1/m, respectively. Time series of these output signal data were used to obtain information of statistical and correlation features, mode, and spectral composition of flow fluctuations.

  1. A theory for scattering by density fluctuations based on three-wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, K. J.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of scattering by charged particle fluctuations of a plasma is developed for the case of zero magnetic field. The source current is derived on the basis of: (1) a three wave interaction between the incident and scattered electromagnetic waves and one electrostatic plasma wave (either Langmuir or ion acoustic), and (2) a synchronous interaction between the same two electromagnetic waves and the discrete components of the charged particle fluctuations. Previous work is generalized by no longer making the assumption that the frequency of the electromagnetic waves in large compared to the plasma frequency. The general result is then applied to incoherent scatter, and to scatter by strongly driven plasma waves. An expansion is carried out for each of those cases to determine the lower order corrections to the usual high frequency scattering formulas.

  2. The effect of turbulent density fluctuations on wave-particle interactions and solar flare X-ray spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, I G; Reid, H A S

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the effect of turbulent background density fluctuations on flare accelerated electron transport in the solar corona. Using the quasi-linear approximation, we numerically simulate the propagation of a beam of accelerated electrons from the solar corona to chromosphere, including the self-consistent response of the inhomogeneous background plasma in the form of Langmuir waves. We calculate the X-ray spectrum from these simulations using the bremsstrahlung cross-section and fit the footpoint spectrum using the collisional "thick-target" model, a standard approach adopted in observational studies. We find that the interaction of the Langmuir waves with the background electron density gradient shifts the waves to higher phase velocity where they then resonate with higher velocity electrons. The consequence is that some of the electrons are shifted to higher energies, producing more high energy X-rays than expected in the cases where the density inhomogeneity is not considered. We find that the level...

  3. Modeling a nucleon system: static and dynamical properties - density fluctuations; Modelisation d`un system de nucleons: proprietes statiques et dynamiques - fluctuation de densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idier, D. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France)

    1997-02-15

    This thesis sets forth a quasi-particle model for the static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter. This model is based on a scale ratio of quasi-particle to nucleons and the projection of the semi-classical distribution on a coherent Gaussian state basis. The first chapter is dealing with the transport equations, particularly with the Vlasov equation for Wigner distribution function. The second one is devoted to the statics of nuclear matter. Here, the sampling effect upon the nuclear density is treated and the state equation of the Gaussian fluid is compared with that given by Hartree-Fock approximation. We define state equation as the relationship between the nucleon binding energy and density, for a given temperature. The curvature around the state equation minimum of the quasi-particle system is shown to be related to the speed of propagation of density perturbation. The volume energy and the surface properties of a (semi-)infinite nucleon system are derived. For the resultant saturated auto-coherent semi-infinite system of quasi-particles the surface coefficient appearing in the mass formula is extracted as well as the system density profile. The third chapter treats the dynamics of the two-particle residual interactions. The effect of different parameters on relaxation of a nucleon system without a mean field is studied by means of a Eulerian and Lagrangian modeling. The fourth chapter treats the volume instabilities (spinodal decomposition) in nuclear matter. The quasi-particle systems, initially prepared in the spinodal region of the utilized interaction, are set to evolve. It is shown then that the scale ratio acts upon the amount of fluctuations injected in the system. The inhomogeneity degree and a proper time are defined and the role of collisions in the spinodal decomposition as well as that of the initial temperature and density, are investigated. Assuming different effective macroscopic interactions, the influence of quantities as

  4. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  5. Effective temperatures from the fluctuation-dissipation measurements in soft glassy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari-Farouji, S.; Mizuno, D.; Derks, D.; Wegdam, G. H.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Bonn, D.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the validity of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) and the applicability of the concept of effective temperature in a number of non-equilibrium soft glassy materials. Using a combination of passive and active microrheology to measure displacement fluctuations and the mechanical response function of probe particles embedded in the materials, we have directly tested the validity of the FDT. Our results show no violation of the FDT over several decades in frequency (1-104 Hz) for hard-sphere colloidal glasses and colloidal glasses and gels of Laponite. We further extended the bandwidth of our measurements to lower frequencies (down to 0.1 Hz) using video microscopy to measure the displacement fluctuations, again without finding any deviations from the FDT.

  6. MEASUREMENT OF 21 cm BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS AT z {approx} 0.8 IN CROSS-CORRELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, K. W.; Switzer, E. R.; Calin, L.-M.; Pen, U.-L.; Shaw, J. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Banavar, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bandura, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Blake, C. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Chang, T.-C.; Liao, Y.-W. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, X.; Li, Y.-C. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Voytek, T. C. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    In this Letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling {approx}41 deg. sq. and 190 hr of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains {Omega}{sub HI} b{sub HI} r = [0.43 {+-} 0.07(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.)] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, where {Omega}{sub HI} is the neutral hydrogen (H I) fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b{sub HI} is the H I bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z {approx} 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

  7. Measurement System of Reducing Temperature Fluctuation of Thermostat Bath for Calibrating Thermocouple

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Min; Liang, Feixia; Xie, Yue; Huang, Ruguo; Yuan, Haitao; Lu, Jiahua

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Based on the periodic unsteady state heat conduction theory, a new measurement system of reducing temperature fluctuation of thermostat bath was developed in order to obtain a liquid environment with uniform and constant temperature controlled for the measurement requirements of calibrating thermocouple. The experimental results show that the temperature stability in this measurement system is superior to that in traditional system. The measurement system had the advan...

  8. Random fluctuations and validity in measuring disease management effectiveness for small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J Ramsay; Kamali, Kyahn; Harner, Jeffrey; Duncan, Ian G; Messer, Thomas C

    2008-12-01

    One objective of a disease management (DM) program is the reduction of members' claims costs. A considerable amount of effort has been dedicated to standardizing the outcomes of DM measurement. An area that has not received as much attention is that of random fluctuations in measured outcomes and the related issue of the validity of outcomes subject to random fluctuation. From year to year, large random fluctuations in claims costs can increase or reduce actual savings from a DM program. Sponsors of DM programs want to know how large a group or sample is necessary to prevent the effect of random fluctuations from overwhelming the effect of claims reductions. In this paper, we measure the fluctuations in calculated DM savings in a large commercial population using an adjusted historical control methodology--the methodology that has become the industry standard and which is codified by DMAA's Guidelines. We then determine the sample size necessary to demonstrate DM program savings at different levels of confidence and model the effect on fluctuations in observed outcomes under different methods of choosing trend, different levels of truncation, and for different estimates of program savings. Some groups, particularly employers, will be smaller than the minimum size required for credible outcomes measurement. For groups smaller than this minimum size, we suggest a utilization-based outcomes measure that can be used as a proxy. For both claims- and utilization-based calculations, we provide confidence intervals to be placed around savings estimates. We do this for group sizes ranging from 1000 to 100,000 members.

  9. The power spectra of CMB and density fluctuations seeded by local cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Contaldi, C; Magueijo, J; Contaldi, Carlo; Hindmarsh, Mark; Magueijo, Joao

    1999-01-01

    We compute the power spectra in the cosmic microwave background and cold dark matter (CDM) fluctuations seeded by strings, using the largest string simulations performed so far to evaluate the two-point functions of their stress energy tensor. We find that local strings differ from global defects in that the scalar components of the stress-energy tensor dominate over vector and tensor components. This result has far reaching consequences. We find that cosmic strings exhibit a single Doppler peak of acceptable height at high although the CDM power spectrum in the ``standard'' cosmology (flat geometry, zero cosmological constant, 5% baryonic component) is the wrong shape to fit large scale structure data.

  10. CRIT II electric, magnetic, and density measurements within an ionizing neutral stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C. M.; Kelley, M. C.; Primdahl, F.; Baker, K. D.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements from rocket-borne sensors inside a high-velocity neutral barium beam show a-factor-of-six increase in plasma density in a moving ionizing front. This region was colocated with intense fluctuating electric fields at frequencies well under the lower hybrid frequency for a barium plasma. Large quasi-dc electric and magnetic field fluctuations were also detected with a large component of the current and the electric field parallel to B(0). An Alfven wave with a finite electric field component parallel to the geomagnetic field was observed to propagate along B(0), where it was detected by an instrumented subpayload.

  11. Extended fluctuation theorems for repeated measurements and feedback within Hamiltonian framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Sourabh, E-mail: sourabhlahiri@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75231 Paris (France); Jayannavar, A.M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2016-04-29

    We derive the extended fluctuation theorems in presence of multiple measurements and feedback, when the system is governed by Hamiltonian dynamics. We use only the forward phase space trajectories in the derivation. However, to obtain an expression for the efficacy parameter, we must necessarily use the notion of reverse trajectory. Our results show that the correction term appearing in the exponent of the extended fluctuation theorems is non-unique, whereas the physical meaning of the efficacy parameter is unique. - Highlights: • Extended Fluctuation Theorems under multiple measurements and feedback have been derived using Hamiltonian dynamics. • We prove the theorems without using the notion of reverse trajectory. • We show that the correction terms are not unique. • The efficacy parameter is shown to have a unique physical meaning.

  12. Progress Toward a Technique for Measuring Electric Field Fluctuations in Tokamak Core Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. S.; Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Couto, H. P.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of electric field fluctuations in magnetic confinement experiments are desired for validating turbulence and transport models. A new diagnostic to measure Ez (r , t) fluctuations is in development on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment. The approach is based on neutral beam emission spectroscopy using a high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer to resolve fluctuations in wavelength separation between components of the motional Stark effect spectrum. Fluctuations at mid-minor-radius, normalized to an estimated MSE field, are estimated to be δE /EMSE ~ 10-3. In order to resolve fluctuations at turbulent time scales (fNy ~ 500 kHz), beam and spectrometer designs minimize broadening and maximize signal-to-noise ratio. The diagnostic employs a Fabry-Pérot spectrometer with étendue-matched collection optics and low noise detectors. The interferometer spacing is varied across the face of the etalon to mitigate geometric Doppler broadening. An 80 keV H0 beam from PBX-M with a divergence Ω deployment on larger fusion facilities. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  13. Measurement of laser quantum frequency fluctuations using a Pound-Drever stabilization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul L.; Siegman, Anthony E.

    1994-06-01

    We describe a method for measuring the frequency fluctuation spectrum of a laser oscillator, especially the weak noise contributions in the wings of the spectrum, and apply this method to confirm the existence of large excess quantum frequency fluctuations in a laser oscillator using an unstable optical resonator. Our measurement apparatus uses the Pound-Drever technique, which employs an RF phase modulator and a Fabry-Perot cavity to produce a sensitive high-speed frequency discrimination signal. We show that this signal can also be used to measure the quantum noise contributions to the frequency spectrum of a laser oscillator. Experimental measurements on a miniature diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a stable optical cavity closely match the predictions of the usual Schawlow-Townes theory, while the frequency fluctuations in a nearly identical laser employing an unstable optical resonator are approximately 1300 times larger. These much larger fluctuations arise in part from the larger output coupling and cavity bandwidth of the unstable cavity, but they also appear to confirm a predicted excess spontaneous emission factor (Petermann excess noise factor) of approximately = 180 times arising from the nonorthogonal transverse mode properties of the unstable cavity.

  14. Conserved charge fluctuations using the D measure in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Garg, P.

    2017-05-01

    We study the net-charge fluctuation D -measure variable, in high-energy heavy-ion collisions in heavy-ion jet interaction generator (HIJING), ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD), and hadron resonance gas (HRG) models for various center-of-mass energies (√{sNN}). The effects of kinematic acceptance and resonance decay, in the pseudorapidity acceptance interval (Δ η ) and lower transverse momentum (pTmin) threshold, on fluctuation measures are discussed. A strong dependence of D with the Δ η in HIJING and UrQMD models is observed as opposed to results obtained from the HRG model. The dissipation of fluctuation signal is estimated by fitting the D measure as a function of the Δ η . An extrapolated function for higher Δ η values at lower √{sNN} is different from the results obtained from models. Particle species dependence of D and the effect of the pTmin selection threshold are discussed in HIJING and HRG models. The comparison of D , at midrapidity, of net-charge fluctuations at various √{sNN} obtained from the models with the data from the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) experiment is discussed. The results from the present paper as a function of Δ η and √{sNN} will provide a baseline for comparison to experimental measurements.

  15. New plasma measurements with a multichannel millimeter-wave fluctuation diagnostic system in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Carter, T. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States); White, A. E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A novel multichannel, tunable Doppler backscattering (DBS)/reflectometry system has recently been developed and applied to a variety of DIII-D plasmas. Either DBS or reflectometry can be easily configured for use in a wide range of plasma conditions using a flexible quasi-optical antenna system. The multiple closely spaced channels, when combined with other fluctuation diagnostic systems, have opened up new measurements of plasma properties. For example, the toroidal and fine-scale radial structure of coherent plasma oscillations, such as geodesic acoustic modes, have been probed simultaneously in the core of high temperature plasmas by applying correlation analysis between two toroidally separated DBS systems, as well as within the multichannel array. When configured as a reflectometer, cross-correlation with electron cyclotron emission radiometry has uncovered detailed information regarding the crossphase relationship between density and temperature fluctuations. The density-temperature crossphase measurement yields insight into the physics of tokamak turbulence at a fundamental level that can be directly compared with predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations.

  16. New plasma measurements with a multichannel millimeter-wave fluctuation diagnostic system in the DIII-D tokamak (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillesheim, J C; Peebles, W A; Rhodes, T L; Schmitz, L; White, A E; Carter, T A

    2010-10-01

    A novel multichannel, tunable Doppler backscattering (DBS)/reflectometry system has recently been developed and applied to a variety of DIII-D plasmas. Either DBS or reflectometry can be easily configured for use in a wide range of plasma conditions using a flexible quasi-optical antenna system. The multiple closely spaced channels, when combined with other fluctuation diagnostic systems, have opened up new measurements of plasma properties. For example, the toroidal and fine-scale radial structure of coherent plasma oscillations, such as geodesic acoustic modes, have been probed simultaneously in the core of high temperature plasmas by applying correlation analysis between two toroidally separated DBS systems, as well as within the multichannel array. When configured as a reflectometer, cross-correlation with electron cyclotron emission radiometry has uncovered detailed information regarding the crossphase relationship between density and temperature fluctuations. The density-temperature crossphase measurement yields insight into the physics of tokamak turbulence at a fundamental level that can be directly compared with predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations.

  17. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  18. Green's Dyadic, Spectral Function, Local Density of States, and Fluctuation Dissipation Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Chew, W C; Dai, Q I

    2015-01-01

    The spectral functions are studied in conjunction with the dyadic Green's functions for various media. The dyadic Green's functions are found using the eigenfunction expansion method for homogeneous, inhomogeneous, periodic, lossless, lossy, and anisotropic media, guided by the Bloch- Floquet theorem. For the lossless media cases, the spectral functions can be directly related to the photon local density of states, and hence, to the electromagnetic energy density. For the lossy case, the spectral function can be related to the ?eld correlation function. Because of these properties, one can derive properties for ?eld correlations and the Langevin-source correlations without resorting to the uctuation dissipation theorem. The results are corroborated by the uctuation dissipation theorem. An expression for the local density of states for lossy, inhomogeneous, and dispersive media has also been suggested.

  19. Influence of density fluctuations on the O–X mode conversion and on microwave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köhn A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Full-wave simulations are performed in order to investigate the interaction of plasma density perturbations and microwaves. The perturbations are divided into two cases: A single blob-like structure and a fully turbulent density profile. The resulting scattering of a microwave beam and the effect on the O–X mode conversion are presented for both cases. Quantitative analyses are performed as a function of the average size and position of the perturbations. The usage of spatial coordinates normalized to the vacuum wavelength of the microwave allows to easily adopt the results to a specific problem.

  20. Reineke’s stand density index: a quantitative and non-unitless measure of stand density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2013-01-01

    When used as a measure of relative density, Reineke’s stand density index (SDI) can be made unitless by relating the current SDI to a standard density but when used as a quantitative measure of stand density SDI is not unitless. Reineke’s SDI relates the current stand density to an equivalent number of trees per unit area in a stand with a quadratic mean diameter (Dq)...

  1. High-frequency fluctuation measurements by far-infrared laser Faraday-effect polarimetry-interferometry and forward scattering system on MST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, W. X., E-mail: wding@ucla.edu; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Duff, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced transport driven by global tearing modes has been measured by Faraday-effect polarimetry and interferometry (phase measurements) in the MST reversed field pinch. However, the role of small-scale broadband magnetic and density turbulence in transport remains unknown. In order to investigate broadband magnetic turbulence, we plan to upgrade the existing detector system by using planar-diode fundamental waveguide mixers optimized for high sensitivity. Initial tests indicate these mixers have ×10 sensitivity improvement compared to currently employed corner-cube Schottky-diode mixers and ×5 lower noise. Compact mixer design will allow us to resolve the wavenumbers up to k ∼ 1–2 cm{sup −1} for beam width w = 1.5 cm and 15 cm{sup −1} for beam width w = 2 mm. The system can also be used to measure the scattered signal (amplitude measurement) induced by both plasma density and magnetic fluctuations.

  2. High-frequency fluctuation measurements by far-infrared laser Faraday-effect polarimetry-interferometry and forward scattering system on MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W X; Lin, L; Duff, J R; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced transport driven by global tearing modes has been measured by Faraday-effect polarimetry and interferometry (phase measurements) in the MST reversed field pinch. However, the role of small-scale broadband magnetic and density turbulence in transport remains unknown. In order to investigate broadband magnetic turbulence, we plan to upgrade the existing detector system by using planar-diode fundamental waveguide mixers optimized for high sensitivity. Initial tests indicate these mixers have ×10 sensitivity improvement compared to currently employed corner-cube Schottky-diode mixers and ×5 lower noise. Compact mixer design will allow us to resolve the wavenumbers up to k ∼ 1-2 cm(-1) for beam width w = 1.5 cm and 15 cm(-1) for beam width w = 2 mm. The system can also be used to measure the scattered signal (amplitude measurement) induced by both plasma density and magnetic fluctuations.

  3. Multi-point measurement using two-channel reflectometer with antenna switching for study of high-frequency fluctuations in GAMMA 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Itagaki, J.; Hirata, M.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Izumi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    2017-03-01

    A two-channel microwave reflectometer system with fast microwave antenna switching capability was developed and applied to the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror device to study high-frequency small-amplitude fluctuations in a hot mirror plasma. The fast switching of the antennas is controlled using PIN diode switches, which offers the significant advantage of reducing the number of high-cost microwave components and digitizers with high bandwidths and large memory that are required to measure the spatiotemporal behavior of the high-frequency fluctuations. The use of two channels rather than one adds the important function of a simultaneous two-point measurement in either the radial direction or the direction of the antenna array to measure the phase profile of the fluctuations along with the normal amplitude profile. The density fluctuations measured using this system clearly showed the high-frequency coherent fluctuations that are associated with Alfvén-ion-cyclotron (AIC) waves in GAMMA 10. A correlation analysis applied to simultaneously measured density fluctuations showed that the phase component that was included in a reflected microwave provided both high coherence and a clear phase difference for the AIC waves, while the amplitude component showed neither significant coherence nor clear phase difference. The axial phase differences of the AIC waves measured inside the hot plasma confirmed the formation of a standing wave structure. The axial variation of the radial profiles was evaluated and a clear difference was found among the AIC waves for the first time, which would be a key to clarify the unknown boundary conditions of the AIC waves.

  4. Measuring dynamic membrane fluctuations in cell membrane using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    There is a strong correlation between the dynamic membrane fluctuations and the biomechanical properties of living cells. The dynamic membrane fluctuation consists of submicron displacements, and can be altered by changing the cells' pathophysiological conditions. These results have significant relevance to the understanding of RBC biophysics and pathology, as follows. RBCs must withstand large mechanical deformations during repeated passages through the microvasculature and the fenestrated walls of the splenic sinusoids. This essential ability is diminished with senescence, resulting in physiological destruction of the aging RBCs. Pathological destruction of the red cells, however, occurs in cells affected by a host of diseases such as spherocytosis, malaria, and Sickle cell disease, as RBCs depart from their normal discoid shape and lose their deformability. Therefore, quantifying the RBC deformability insight into a variety of problems regarding the interplay of cell structure, dynamics, and function. Furthermore, the ability to monitor mechanical properties of RBCs is of vital interest in monitoring disease progression or response to treatment as molecular and pharmaceutical approaches for treatment of chronic diseases. Here, we present the measurements of dynamic membrane fluctuations in live cells using quantitative phase imaging techniques. Measuring both the 3-D refractive index maps and the dynamic phase images of live cells are simultaneously measured, from which dynamic membrane fluctuation and deformability of cells are precisely calculated. We also present its applications to various diseases ranging from sickle cell diseases, babesiosis, and to diabetes.

  5. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence, supersonic density field exhibits strongly inhomogeneous and unsteady characteristics. Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution, limitation of measuring 3D density field, and low signal to noise ratio (SNR). A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field. This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles, which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes. The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper, and the results reveal shock wave, turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 μm/pixel. By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs, temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  6. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiFeng; YI ShiHe; ZHAO YuXin; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence,supersonic density field exhibits strongly inho-mogeneous and unsteady characteristics.Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution,limitation of measuring 3D density field,and low signal to noise ratio (SNR).A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field.This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles,which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes.The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper,and the results reveal shock wave,turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 pm/pixel.By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs,temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  7. Cosmological Inflation with Multiple Fields and the Theory of Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tent, B.J.W. van

    2002-01-01

    Inflation is a stage of extremely rapid expansion in the very early universe. It was proposed to solve a number of problems in the standard Big Bang theory. In particular it others an explanation for the origin of structures like (clusters of) galaxies on the one hand (by generating small density fl

  8. Anisotropic Frequency Response of Critical Density Fluctuations of NIPA Gel under Oscillation Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, M.; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Fukunaga, Toshiharu

    2006-01-01

    A relation between rheology and structure of high density NIPA gel around criticai point on volume phase transition was studied by a simultaneous rheology and smail-angle neutron scattering measuÆmeiit Just below the critical temperature, the NIPA gel showed softening: G’ and G” get doser (G’> G...

  9. Modeling Spin Fluctuations and Magnetic Excitations from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorni, Tommaso; Timrov, Iurii; Dal Corso, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano

    Harnessing spin fluctuations and magnetic excitations in materials is key in many fields of technology, spanning from memory devices to information transfer and processing, to name but a few. A proper understanding of the interplay between collective and single-particle spin excitations is still lacking, and it is expected that first-principle simulations based on TDDFT may shed light on this interplay, as well as on the role of important effects such as relativistic ones and related magnetic anisotropies. All the numerical approaches proposed so far to tackle this problem are based on the computationally demanding solution of the Sternheimer equations for the response orbitals or the even more demanding solution of coupled Dyson equations for the spin and charge susceptibilities. The Liouville-Lanczos approach to TDDFT has already proven to be a valuable alternative, the most striking of its features being the avoidance of sums over unoccupied single-particle states and the frequency-independence of the main numerical bottleneck. In this work we present an extension of this methodology to magnetic systems and its implementation in the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution, together with a few preliminary results on the magnon dispersions in bulk Fe.

  10. A novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Tomohiko; Fujii, Keisuke; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Kato, Yukihiro; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Matsuda, Takeshi; Settles, Ronald Dean; Sugiyama, Akira; Takahashi, Tohru; Tian, Junping; Watanabe, Takashi; Yonamine, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors using a UV laser. The technique is simple and requires a short data-taking time of about ten minutes. Furthermore, it is applicable for relatively low gas gains. Our experimental setup as well as the measurement principle, and the results obtained with a stack of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) operated in several gas mixtures are presented.

  11. A novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujii, K.; Fusayasu, T.; Ikematsu, K.; Kato, Y.; Kawada, S.; Matsuda, T.; Settles, R. D.; Sugiyama, A.; Takahashi, T.; Tian, J.; Watanabe, T.; Yonamine, R.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors using a UV laser. The technique is simple and requires a short data-taking time of about ten minutes. Furthermore, it is applicable for relatively low gas gains. Our experimental setup as well as the measurement principle, and the results obtained with a stack of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) operated in several gas mixtures are presented.

  12. Dynamics of supercritical methanol of varying density from first principles simulations: hydrogen bond fluctuations, vibrational spectral diffusion, and orientational relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2013-06-14

    A first principles study of the dynamics of supercritical methanol is carried out by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the fluctuation dynamics of hydroxyl stretch frequencies, hydrogen bonds, dangling hydroxyl groups, and orientation of methanol molecules are investigated for three different densities at 523 K. Apart from the dynamical properties, various equilibrium properties of supercritical methanol such as the local density distributions and structural correlations, hydrogen bonding aspects, frequency-structure correlations, and dipole distributions of methanol molecules are also investigated. In addition to the density dependence of various equilibrium and dynamical properties, their dependencies on dispersion interactions are also studied by carrying out additional simulations using a dispersion corrected density functional for all the systems. It is found that the hydrogen bonding between methanol molecules decreases significantly as we move to the supercritical state from the ambient one. The inclusion of dispersion interactions is found to increase the number of hydrogen bonds to some extent. Calculations of the frequency-structure correlation coefficient reveal that a statistical correlation between the hydroxyl stretch frequency and the nearest hydrogen-oxygen distance continues to exist even at supercritical states of methanol, although it is weakened with increase of temperature and decrease of density. In the supercritical state, the frequency time correlation function is found to decay with two time scales: One around or less than 100 fs and the other in the region of 250-700 fs. It is found that, for supercritical methanol, the times scales of vibrational spectral diffusion are determined by an interplay between the dynamics of hydrogen bonds, dangling OD groups, and inertial rotation of methanol molecules and the roles of these various components are found to vary with density of the supercritical solvent. Effects

  13. Multiple-capillary measurement of RBC speed, flux, and density with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frederic; Boas, David A

    2013-11-01

    As capillaries exhibit heterogeneous and fluctuating dynamics even during baseline, a technique measuring red blood cell (RBC) speed and flux over many capillaries at the same time is needed. Here, we report that optical coherence tomography can capture individual RBC passage simultaneously over many capillaries located at different depths. Further, we demonstrate the ability to quantify RBC speed, flux, and linear density. This technique will provide a means to monitor microvascular flow dynamics over many capillaries at different depths at the same time.

  14. Cold wire constant voltage anemometry to measure temperature fluctuations and its application in a thermoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleve, Sarah; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of temperature fluctuations is essential for most thermoacoustic systems. In the present paper, cold wire constant-voltage anemometry (CVA) to measure temperature fluctuations is presented. Corrections for the thermal inertia and for the end losses of the wire are applied during the post-processing. The correction for the thermal inertia of the cold wire is achieved by applying a time dependent thermal lag as proposed originally for a constant-current anemometry (CCA) system. This thermal lag is measured in parallel by a hot wire. The thermal end losses of the wires to their supports are also considered and approximate corrections are proposed. The procedure for the cold wire CVA is validated in the acoustic field of an acoustic resonator with wires of different lengths. A comparison between a CVA and a CCA measurement also confirms the CVA measurement. Furthermore, the proposed measurement procedure is applied close to the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Supposing a two-dimensional flow, the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature fluctuations is possible. This allows a detailed examination of the acoustic field close to the stack, including the study of the correlation between temperature and velocity.

  15. Quantifying Measurement Fluctuations from Stochastic Surface Processes on Sensors with Heterogeneous Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmet, Jérôme; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Daly, Ronan; Prasad, Abhinav; Thiruvenkathanathan, Pradyumna; Langley, Robin S.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in micro- and nanotechnology have enabled the development of ultrasensitive sensors capable of detecting small numbers of species. In general, however, the response induced by the random adsorption of a small number of objects onto the surface of such sensors results in significant fluctuations due to the heterogeneous sensitivity inherent to many such sensors coupled to statistical fluctuations in the particle number. At present, this issue is addressed by considering either the limit of very large numbers of analytes, where fluctuations vanish, or the converse limit, where the sensor response is governed by individual analytes. Many cases of practical interest, however, fall between these two limits and remain challenging to analyze. Here, we address this limitation by deriving a general theoretical framework for quantifying measurement variations on mechanical resonators resulting from statistical-number fluctuations of analyte species. Our results provide insights into the stochastic processes in the sensing environment and offer opportunities to improve the performance of mechanical-resonator-based sensors. This metric can be used, among others, to aid in the design of robust sensor platforms to reach ultrahigh-resolution measurements using an array of sensors. These concepts, illustrated here in the context of biosensing, are general and can therefore be adapted and extended to other sensors with heterogeneous sensitivity.

  16. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  17. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  18. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  19. Eccentricity fluctuations make flow measurable in high multiplicity p-p collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Elliptic flow is a hallmark of collectivity in hadronic collisions. Its measurement relies on analysis techniques which require high event multiplicity and could be applied so far to heavy ion collisions only. Here, we delineate the conditions under which elliptic flow becomes measurable in the samples of high-multiplicity ($dN_{\\rm ch}/dy \\geq 50$) p-p collisions, which will soon be collected at the LHC. We observe that fluctuations in the p-p interaction region can result in a sizable spatial eccentricity even for the most central p-p collisions. Under relatively mild assumptions on the nature of such fluctuations and on the eccentricity scaling of elliptic flow, we find that the resulting elliptic flow signal in high-multiplicity p-p collisions at the LHC becomes measurable with standard techniques.

  20. Density Fluctuations in the Yukawa One Component Plasma: An accurate model for the dynamical structure factor

    CERN Document Server

    Mithen, James P; Crowley, Basil J B; Gregori, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate the equilibrium dynamics of a single component fluid with Yukawa interaction potential. We show that, for a wide range of densities and temperatures, the dynamics of the system are in striking agreement with a simple model of generalized hydrodynamics. Since the Yukawa potential can describe the ion-ion interactions in a plasma, the model has significant applicability for both analyzing and interpreting the results of x-ray scattering data from high power lasers and fourth generation light sources.

  1. Gas Temperature Measurements of Fluctuating Coal - MHD Plasmas Using Modified Line Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleman, Bradley Carl

    The technique of modified line reversal is investigated and developed to allow accurate measurements on fluctuating coal fired magnetohydrodynamic plasmas and flows. Generalized modified line reversal equations applicable to any geometry and optical system are developed and presented. The generalized equations are specialized to the two most common optical systems, focussed and collimated, employed for modified line reversal measurements. Approximations introduced by specializing to the specific optical systems are investigated. Vignetting of the optical system images is shown to introduce large biases in the temperature measurement for certain optical configurations commonly applied. It is shown that symmetric optical systems are unacceptable for line reversal measurements. The errors introduced by non-simultaneous measurement of the required line reversal parameters due to rapidly fluctuating plasma characteristics are characterized. Line reversal signal and temperature measurements made on a coal fired MHD plasma are used to quantify the error in the temperature measurement due to non-simultaneous sampling of the measured line reversal parameters. A simple modified line reversal system based on interference filters and photodiodes that employs spatial separation to obtain the required line reversal parameters is described. Gas temperatures measured with devices using both the spatial and temporal separation techniques are compared. Modified line reversal temperature measurements are compared to theoretically predicted temperatures as well as CARS and high velocity thermocouple temperature measurements.

  2. The response of short-scale density fluctuations to the activity of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes during strong tearing modes on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, G. M.; Li, Y. D.; Li, Q.; Sun, P. J.; Wu, G. J.; Hu, L. Q.; the EAST Team

    2015-08-01

    Beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) during strong tearing modes (TMs) have been frequently observed in fast-electron plasmas of EAST tokamak. The dynamics of the short-scale ({k}\\perp {ρ }s~{1.5-4.3}) density fluctuations during the activity of BAEs with strong TMs has been preliminarily investigated by a tangential CO2 laser collective scattering system. The results suggest the active, but different, response of short-scale density fluctuations to the TMs and BAEs. In the low-frequency (0-10 kHz) part of density fluctuations, there are harmonic oscillations totally corresponding to those of TMs. In the medium-high frequency (10-250 kHz) part of density fluctuations, with the appearance of the BAEs, the medium-high frequency density fluctuations begin to be dominated by several quasi-coherent (QC) modes, and the frequencies of the QC modes seem to be related to the changes of both TMs and BAEs. These results would shed some light on the understanding of the multi-scale interaction physics.

  3. Solar wind density structure at 1 AU and comparison to Doppler scintillation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Woo, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1996-07-01

    Results of a survey of solar wind density fluctuations in different flow types observed by ISEE-3 at 1 AU are presented and compared with Doppler scintillation measurements. We consider coronal hole, plasma sheet, interstream, CME and sheath interaction region flow types. For the quasi-stationary solar wind, densities (N) and density fluctuation levels (ΔN) are low in coronal hole flow, and high in the plasma sheet containing the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The highest fluctuation levels are found in the sheath compression regions between CMEs and associated forward shocks. The streamer structure around the HCS broadens and erodes with distance from the Sun, and the broadened Doppler scintillation signature at 1 AU is in good qualitative agreement with ISEE-3 superposed epoch analysis. The observed asymmetry about the HCS is an expected result of solar wind dynamic evolution. A greater contrast between flow types is seen in ΔN levels rather than in N itself. Doppler scintillation responds to ΔN and thus provides a sensitive means of detecting interplanetary disturbances. However, we find that ΔN/N is not constant in the solar wind, and thus enhanced scintillation cannot unambiguously imply enhanced density.

  4. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17... measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample. (b... the specimen. The average of at least four measurements of each dimension is determined. (c) If...

  5. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with source state errors and statistical fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2017-03-01

    We show how to calculate the secure final key rate in the four-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution protocol with both source errors and statistical fluctuations with a certain failure probability. Our results rely only on the range of only a few parameters in the source state. All imperfections in this protocol have been taken into consideration without assuming any specific error patterns of the source.

  6. A Probe Head for Simultaneous Measurements of Electrostatic and Magnetic Fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade Edge Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittwieser, R W; Ionita, C; Vianello, N

    2010-01-01

    For ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) a new probe head was developed for simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic fluctuations in the edge plasma region. The probe head consists of a cylindrical graphite case. On the front side six graphite pins are mounted. With this arrangement the poloidal and rad...... is inserted up to three times for 100 ms each by the midplane manipulator into the scrape-off layer. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  7. Procedure for Uranium-Molybdenum Density Measurements and Porosity Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for preparing uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) specimens, performing density measurements, and computing sample porosity. Typical specimens (solids) will be sheared to small rectangular foils, disks, or pieces of metal. A mass balance, solid density determination kit, and a liquid of known density will be used to determine the density of U-Mo specimens using the Archimedes principle. A standard test weight of known density would be used to verify proper operation of the system. By measuring the density of a U-Mo sample, it is possible to determine its porosity.

  8. Measurement and interpretation of the velocity space correlation of a laboratory plasma fluctuation with laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, S. W.; Berumen, J.; Chu, F.; Hood, R.; Skiff, F.

    2013-11-01

    A technique for probing velocity space correlations has been developed using laser-induced fluorescence. In this paper, a description of the experimental setup is given, with results to follow in a later publication. The experiment consists of a cylindrical plasma column 3 m long and radius ~ 0.25 cm, holding singly-charged argon ions (Ar II) with density n ~ 109 cm-3, Te ~ 5 eV, Ti,|| ~ .06 eV, and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. Two separate metastable lines are excited by single frequency lasers at 611 nm and 668 nm. These lasers may tune with a precision of .01 pm. The separate lasers are used to measure independent slices of the velocity distribution function. To confirm the velocity distribution and magnetic field, the Doppler-broadened, sigma-polarized Zeeman line for each transition is measured. With this, the absolute parallel component of ion velocity subject to LIF can be determined. The two separate lasers then give us a signal as a function of two separate parallel ion velocities. Two point correlation is used to reduce the noise floor on the plasma fluctuation. This fluctuation is then investigated as a function of the difference in velocity.

  9. A Collective Scattering System for Measuring Electron Gyroscale Fluctuations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D. R.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.

    2009-02-13

    A collective scattering system has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure electron gyroscale fluctuations in NSTX plasmas. Up to five distinct wavenumbers are measured simultaneously, and the large toroidal curvature of NSTX plasmas provides enhanced spatial localization. Steerable optics can position the scattering volume throughout the plasma from the magnetic axis to the outboard edge. Initial measurements indicate rich turbulent dynamics on the electron gyroscale. The system will be a valuable tool for investigating the connection between electron temperature gradient turbulence and electron thermal transport in NSTX plasmas.

  10. Comparison of model measured runner blade pressure fluctuations with unsteady flow analysis predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate prediction of pressure fluctuations in Francis turbines has become more and more important over the last years, due to the continuously increasing requirements of wide operating range capability. Depending on the machine operator, Francis turbines are operated at full load, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load. Each of these operating conditions is associated with different flow phenomena and pressure fluctuation levels. The better understanding of the pressure fluctuation phenomena and the more accurate prediction of their amplitude along the hydraulic surfaces can significantly contribute to improve the hydraulic and mechanical design of Francis turbines, their hydraulic stability and their reliability. With the objective to acquire a deeper knowledge about the pressure fluctuation characteristics in Francis turbines and to improve the accuracy of numerical simulation methods used for the prediction of the dynamic fluid flow through the turbine, pressure fluctuations were experimentally measured in a mid specific speed model machine. The turbine runner of a model machine with specific speed around nq,opt = 60 min-1, was instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers at the runner blades. The model machine shaft was equipped with a telemetry system able to transmit the measured pressure values to the data acquisition system. The transient pressure signal was measured at multiple locations on the blade and at several operating conditions. The stored time signal was also evaluated in terms of characteristic amplitude and dominating frequency. The dynamic fluid flow through the hydraulic turbine was numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for selected operating points. Among others, operating points at full load, part load and deep part load were calculated. For the fluid flow numerical simulations more advanced turbulence models were used, such as the detached eddy simulation (DES) and scale adaptive simulation (SAS). At the

  11. X-Ray Fluctuation Power Spectral Densities of Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, A.; Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; George, I. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Kaspi, S.; Lawrence, A.; McHandy, I.; Nandra, K.

    2003-01-01

    By combining complementary monitoring observations spanning long, medium and short time scales, we have constructed power spectral densities (PSDs) of six Seyfert 1 galaxies. These PSDs span approx. greater than 4 orders of magnitude in temporal frequency, sampling variations on time scales ranging from tens of minutes to over a year. In at least four cases, the PSD shows a "break," a significant departure from a power law, typically on time scales of order a few days. This is similar to the behavior of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs), lower mass compact systems with breaks on time scales of seconds. NGC 3783 shows tentative evidence for a doubly-broken power law, a feature that until now has only been seen in the (much better-defined) PSDs of low-state XRBs. It is also interesting that (when one previously-observed object is added to make a small sample of seven), an apparently significant correlation is seen between the break time scale T and the putative black hole mass M(sub BH), while none is seen between break time scale and luminosity. The data are consistent with the linear relation T = M(sub BH) /10(exp 6.5) solar mass; extrapolation over 6-7 orders of magnitude is in reasonable agreement with XRBs. All of this strengthens the case for a physical similarity between Seyfert 1s and XRBs.

  12. Connection Between the Largest Lyapunov Exponent, Density Fluctuation and Multifragmentation in Excited Nuclear Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYing-xun; WUXi-zhen; LIZhu-xia

    2003-01-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) has been widely used to measure the levelof chaos of a system and was used to study the “solid-like” to “liquid-like” phase transition. Nuclear multifragmentation has been considered to be associated with a liquid-gas phase transition. Thus, in this paper we want to extend the study to the energy regime that encompasses fragmentation phenomena.

  13. Discriminating between Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Physisorbed Adsorbates: Role of Wavelike Charge-Density Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wang; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating between metallic (M ) and semiconducting (S ) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) remains a fundamental challenge in the field of nanotechnology. We address this issue by studying the adsorption of the isotropic atoms Xe, Kr, and a highly anisotropic molecule n heptane on M - and S -SWNTs with density functional theory that includes many-body dispersion forces. We find that the distinct polarizabilities of M - and S -SWNTs exhibit significantly different physisorption properties, which are also strongly controlled by the SWNT's diameter, adsorption site, adsorbate coverage, and the adsorbate's anisotropy. These findings stem from the wavelike nature of charge-density fluctuations in SWNTs. Particularly, these results allow us to rationalize the unusual √{3 }×√{3 }R 3 00 phase of Kr atoms on small gap M -SWNTs and the double desorption peak temperatures of n heptane on M -SWNTs in experiments, and also propose the n heptane as an effective sensor for experimentally discriminating M - and S -SWNTs.

  14. Modelling The Effects of Density Gradients and Fluctuations on the Apparent Sizes and Positions of Low Frequency Solar Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Benjamin Thomas; Kontar, Eduard; Jeffrey, Natasha

    2017-08-01

    Recent high spatial and temporal resolution imaging of fast growth of the Type-III source and movement of the source centroid. In this work, we use a Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation to model the passage of low frequency (5-240 MHz) radio waves through the solar corona from a point source, considering both isotropic and dipole emission. We model the effects of random density fluctuations and an isotropic density gradient on the transport of the rays, varying the strength of the scattering to observe the effects on images of the source from an observer at 1 AU. Absorption of photons is included, and the effects on the reproduced images and flux curves are observed. The apparent source size and centroid position are tracked through the simulation, and we find a general increase in source size with time, and a variation of centroid position in both directions throughout the simulation. We find that the size of the variation is strongly dependant upon frequency, with lower frequency sources appearing to move further on the disk than higher frequency sources. We also observe the strength of the effects at different viewing angles, finding that the greatest variation occurs closer to the solar limb. Further observational work is required to limit the scattering parameters, in order to allow for comparison with current radio images.

  15. Nanog Fluctuations in Embryonic Stem Cells Highlight the Problem of Measurement in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Stumpf, Patrick S; Ridden, Sonya J; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Harrington, Heather A; MacArthur, Ben D

    2017-06-20

    A number of important pluripotency regulators, including the transcription factor Nanog, are observed to fluctuate stochastically in individual embryonic stem cells. By transiently priming cells for commitment to different lineages, these fluctuations are thought to be important to the maintenance of, and exit from, pluripotency. However, because temporal changes in intracellular protein abundances cannot be measured directly in live cells, fluctuations are typically assessed using genetically engineered reporter cell lines that produce a fluorescent signal as a proxy for protein expression. Here, using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we show that there are unforeseen ways in which widely used reporter strategies can systematically disturb the dynamics they are intended to monitor, sometimes giving profoundly misleading results. In the case of Nanog, we show how genetic reporters can compromise the behavior of important pluripotency-sustaining positive feedback loops, and induce a bifurcation in the underlying dynamics that gives rise to heterogeneous Nanog expression patterns in reporter cell lines that are not representative of the wild-type. These findings help explain the range of published observations of Nanog variability and highlight the problem of measurement in live cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetosheath density fluctuations from a simulation of auroral kilometric radiation radio propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, J.L.; Hoang, S. [Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    1993-08-01

    Here the authors use a ray tracing technique to map the appearance of the image of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), originating above the auroral zone, as seen by a distant observer between 0200 and 0800 LT, at distances of 50 to 250 R{sub E}. It has been suggested that distant imaging of AKR may provide a way of imaging structures in the earths magnetosphere. They use satellite measurements to constrain the size and characteristics of the AKR source region, and their projections provide results consistent with data recorded by the ISEE-3 satellite.

  17. Intercomparison of snow density measurements: bias, precision and spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Density is a fundamental property of porous media such as snow. A wide range of snow properties and physical processes are linked to density, but few studies have addressed the uncertainty in snow density measurements. No study has yet considered the recent advances in snow measurement methods such as micro-computed tomography (CT. During the MicroSnow Davos 2014 workshop different approaches to measure snow density were applied in a controlled laboratory environment and in the field. Overall, the agreement between CT and gravimetric methods (density cutters was 5 to 9 %, with a bias of −5 to 2 %, expressed as percentage of the mean CT density. In the field, the density cutters tend to overestimate (1 to 6 % densities below and underestimate (1 to 6 % densities above 296 to 350 kg m−3, respectively, depending on the cutter type. Using the mean per layer of all measurement methods applied in the field (CT, box, wedge and cylinder cutter and ignoring ice layers, the variation of layer density between the methods was 2 to 5 % with a bias of −1 to 1 %. In general, our result suggests that snow densities measured by different methods agree within 9 %. However, the density profiles resolved by the measurement methods differed considerably. In particular, the millimeter scale density variations revealed by the high resolution CT contrasted the thick layers with sharp boundaries introduced by the observer. In this respect, the unresolved variation, i.e. the density variation within a layer, which is lost by sampling with lower resolution or layer aggregation, is critical when snow density measurements are used as boundary or initial conditions in numerical simulations.

  18. Neutron Flux Density Measured by Analysis of Annealing Heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Fan; SHI; Yong-qian; ZHU; Qing-fu; LU; Jin; LI; Lai-dong

    2015-01-01

    Neutron flux density measurement by thermal analysis is a new method different from the previous.This method is first put the sample to the neutron field.Second,measure the annealingheat of the sample.Find out the suitable mixture of crystal boron and apatite to measure the neutron flux density.Then put the sample to the neutron field in

  19. Dynamic structure factor of density fluctuations from direct imaging very near (both above and below) the critical point of SF(6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel A; Bayley, Brittany; Hegseth, John J; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre-Chabot, Carole; Beysens, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Large density fluctuations were observed by illuminating a cylindrical cell filled with sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), very near its liquid-gas critical point (|T-T(c)|critical wave number, which is related to the characteristic length of fluctuations, steadily decreases over time, supporting a sustained increase in the spatial scale of the fluctuating domains. The scaled evolution of the critical wave number obeys the universal evolution for the interconnected domains at high volume fraction with an apparent power law exponent of -0.35 ± 0.02. We also determined the correlation time of the fluctuations and inferred values for thermal diffusivity coefficient very near the critical point, above and below. The values were used to pinpoint the crossing of T(c) within 13 μK.

  20. Conceptual design of the tangentially viewing combined interferometer-polarimeter for ITER density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zeeland, M A; Boivin, R L; Brower, D L; Carlstrom, T N; Chavez, J A; Ding, W X; Feder, R; Johnson, D; Lin, L; O'Neill, R C; Watts, C

    2013-04-01

    One of the systems planned for the measurement of electron density in ITER is a multi-channel tangentially viewing combined interferometer-polarimeter (TIP). This work discusses the current status of the design, including a preliminary optical table layout, calibration options, error sources, and performance projections based on a CO2/CO laser system. In the current design, two-color interferometry is carried out at 10.59 μm and 5.42 μm and a separate polarimetry measurement of the plasma induced Faraday effect, utilizing the rotating wave technique, is made at 10.59 μm. The inclusion of polarimetry provides an independent measure of the electron density and can also be used to correct the conventional two-color interferometer for fringe skips at all densities, up to and beyond the Greenwald limit. The system features five chords with independent first mirrors to reduce risks associated with deposition, erosion, etc., and a common first wall hole to minimize penetration sizes. Simulations of performance for a projected ITER baseline discharge show the diagnostic will function as well as, or better than, comparable existing systems for feedback density control. Calculations also show that finite temperature effects will be significant in ITER even for moderate temperature plasmas and can lead to a significant underestimate of electron density. A secondary role TIP will fulfill is that of a density fluctuation diagnostic; using a toroidal Alfvén eigenmode as an example, simulations show TIP will be extremely robust in this capacity and potentially able to resolve coherent mode fluctuations with perturbed densities as low as δn∕n ≈ 10(-5).

  1. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  2. Direct Measurement of the Density Matrix of a Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Giner, L.; Chalich, Y.; Horton, M. J.; Banker, J.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    One drawback of conventional quantum state tomography is that it does not readily provide access to single density matrix elements since it requires a global reconstruction. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a scheme that can be used to directly measure individual density matrix elements of general quantum states. The scheme relies on measuring a sequence of three observables, each complementary to the last. The first two measurements are made weak to minimize the disturbance they cause to the state, while the final measurement is strong. We perform this joint measurement on polarized photons in pure and mixed states to directly measure their density matrix. The weak measurements are achieved using two walk-off crystals, each inducing a polarization-dependent spatial shift that couples the spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of the photons. This direct measurement method provides an operational meaning to the density matrix and promises to be especially useful for large dimensional states.

  3. Smart density: a more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Lucinda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. Methods We compared residential density (units/acre in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Results Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Conclusion Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  4. Cross-diagnostic comparison of fluctuation measurements in a linear plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Adam D.; Archer, Nicholas A. A.; Bashyal, Atit; Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Tynan, George R.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of fast imaging diagnostics, which provide two-dimensional measurements on relevant plasma time scales, has proven invaluable for interpreting plasma dynamics in laboratory devices. Despite its success, imaging remains a qualitative aid for many studies, because intensity is difficult to map onto a single physical variable for use in a theoretical model. This work continues our exploration of the relationship between visible-light and electrostatic probe measurements in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX). CSDX is a well-characterized linear machine producing dense plasmas relevant to the tokamak edge (Te ~ 3 eV, ne ~1013 /cc). Visible light from ArI and ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a fast digital camera. Floating potential and ion-saturation current are measured by an array of electrostatic probe tips. We present a detailed comparison between imaging and probe measurements of fluctuations, including temporal, spatial, and spectral properties in various operational regimes.

  5. Simultaneous Measurements of Electrostatic and Magnetic Fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade Edge Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionita, Codrina; Vianello, Nicola; Müller, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    in such a way that simultaneously the poloidal and radial electric field components, the ion saturation current and the current-voltage characteristic can be registered. During the AUG discharges of 7 s lengths the probe head is inserted two to three times for 100 ms each by the midplane manipulator......In ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in the edge plasma region were measured simultaneously during ELMy H-mode (high confinement) plasmas and L-mode (low confinement) plasmas and during a transition between the two modes. A special probe was used containing six Langmuir...

  6. Resonance Frequency of Optical Microbubble Resonators: Direct Measurements and Mitigation of Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Alessandro; Berneschi, Simone; Giannetti, Ambra; Farnesi, Daniele; Cosi, Franco; Baldini, Francesco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia; Barucci, Andrea; Righini, Giancarlo; Pelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the improvements in the sensing capabilities and precision of an Optical Microbubble Resonator due to the introduction of an encaging poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) box. A frequency fluctuation parameter σ was defined as a score of resonance stability and was evaluated in the presence and absence of the encaging system and in the case of air- or water-filling of the cavity. Furthermore, the noise interference introduced by the peristaltic and the syringe pumping system was studied. The measurements showed a reduction of σ in the presence of the encaging PMMA box and when the syringe pump was used as flowing system. PMID:27589761

  7. Direct Measurement of the Phase Space Ion Fluctuation Spectrum of a Laboratory Plasma Using Two Independently Tunable Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    A novel technique for probing velocity space correlations has been developed using laser-induced fluorescence. The experiment consists of a 3 m cylindrical plasma column of singly-charged Argon ions (Ar II) with density ~ 109 cm-3 , Te ~ 5 eV , Ti ~ . 06 eV , and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. Separate metastable lines of the Ar II ions are excited using two separate narrow bandwidth lasers. The LIF response from each laser is measured through an independently moveable periscope. These periscopes may be focused on the same localized region (~ 0 . 1 cm3) or separated to view different parts of the plasma simultaneously. By adjusting these lasers independently, one may measure a correlation function as a function of the difference in measured velocities. This measurement may be repeated for different periscope positions in the plasma to obtain a two-dimensional correlation function in space and velocity difference. This correlation is directly related to the fluctuation spectrum through a Fourier transform. Measurements of these correlations are reported and discussed. NSF DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  8. Aromaticity measures from fuzzy-atom bond orders (FBO). The aromatic fluctuation (FLU) and the para-delocalization (PDI) indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matito, Eduard; Salvador, Pedro; Duran, Miquel; Solà, Miquel

    2006-04-20

    In the past few years, there has been a growing interest for aromaticity measures based on electron density descriptors, the para-delocalization (PDI) and the aromatic fluctuation (FLU) indexes being two recent examples. These aromaticity indexes have been applied successfully to describe the aromaticity of carbon skeleton molecules. Although the results obtained are encouraging, because they follow the trends of other existing aromaticity measures, their calculation is rather expensive because they are based on electron delocalization indexes (DI) that involve cumbersome atomic integrations. However, cheaper electron-sharing indexes (ESIs), which in principle could play the same role as the DI in such aromaticity calculations, can be found in the literature. In this letter we show that PDI and FLU can be calculated using fuzzy-atom bond order (FBO) measures instead of DIs with an important saving of computing time. In addition, a basis-set-dependence study is performed to assess the reliability of these measures. FLU and PDI based on FBO are shown to be both good aromaticity indexes and almost basis-set-independent measures. This result opens up a wide range of possibilities for PDI and FLU to also be calculated on large organic systems. As an example, the DI and FBO-based FLU and PDI indexes have also been calculated and compared for the C60 molecule.

  9. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  10. Measurement and Modeling of the Fluctuating Wall Pressure Field Beneath Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarski, Stephen R.

    2001-11-01

    Measurements have been performed to better understand the space-varying character of the fluctuating wall pressure field beneath a transitional boundary layer and to develop an appropriate model for the space-varying (nonhomogeneous) wavenumber-frequency wall pressure spectrum. Although a great deal is understood regarding the structure of the wall pressure field beneath turbulent boundary layers, the current understanding of the wall pressure field beneath the transitional boundary layer is incomplete. Overlooked have been critical issues concerning spatial variations in turbulence structure and the convection and decay of pressure producing disturbances—properties that define the character of the field and resulting form of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. The experiments involve measurement of the space-time fluctuating wall pressure field across the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer by means of a 64-element linear array of hearing-aid microphones and hot wire velocity measurements in the adjacent laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers. Because the field is nonhomogeneous, wavelet based transform methods are required to appropriately resolve the space-varying structure of the field and form of the nonhomogeneous wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  11. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric drag, which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO satellites, provides a direct means of measuring mass density. The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days, depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data. This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution. One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite. Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite. The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite. When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values, the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%. An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  12. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyu Chen; Jizhang Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric drag,which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO)satellites,provides a direct means of measuring mass density.The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days,depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data.This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution.One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite.Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD) process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite.The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite.When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values,the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%.An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  13. Measurements of magnetic field fluctuations using an array of Hall detectors on the TEXTOR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuran, I.; Stöckel, J.; Mank, G.; Finken, K. H.; Fuchs, G.; Oost, G. Van

    2002-10-01

    Hall detectors have been used to measure the magnetic field together with its' fluctuations in the boundary of a tokamak. The results show, that the measurements which have been performed so far, mainly by use of coils together with subsequent integration, either on-line or later by computer, can be substituted by Hall probe measurements giving the desired value of B directly. Because the integration of the coil signal becomes more and more difficult with long pulses, Hall detectors may give advantages in future fusion devices. We implemented a stack of nine Hall detectors mounted on three planes on a rod in such a way, that the three components of the magnetic field can be measured. To avoid capacitive and charge pickup from the plasma, the probes are electrically shielded. The damping due to skin effect within this shield has been taken into account. The probes have been calibrated using a known magnetic field of a straight wire driven with a LC bank. This field has been precisely measured with a Rogowski coil. The dependence of the Hall coefficient on the frequency has been measured and the pickup in the feeds due to Ḃ has been withdrawn from the results. We demonstrate the method with measurements on the TEXTOR tokamak, where we could clearly detect the small stray fields associated with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations. On TEXTOR we have been able to detect the MHD activity preceding discharge disruptions as well as the precursors of the so called sawteeth. The results are compared to those of other diagnostics on TEXTOR as, e.g., magnetic loops and electron cyclotron emission, and they do well compare.

  14. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  15. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G. [Association EURATOM-FOM, FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Howard, J. [Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Fusion Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koenig, R. [EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, TI Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr.1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the H{sub {gamma}} line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  16. Measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations in oscillating flows using thermal anemometry – application to thermoacoustic refrigerators

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaelle; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper summarizes our recent work on the development of thermal anemometry to measure velocity and temperature fluctuations in oscillating flows. First, we demonstrate that velocity cannot be measured accurately by hot-wire anemometry in oscillating flows when the flow reverses its direction. Indeed, there is no unique and well-defined correlation between the flow velocity and heat transfer near flow reversal, which prevents the recovery of velocity fluctuations fr...

  17. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Rustamov, A.; Stachel, J.

    2017-04-01

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase-space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  18. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun-Munzinger, P., E-mail: p.braun-munzinger@gsi.de [Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rustamov, A., E-mail: a.rustamov@cern.ch [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Stachel, J., E-mail: stachel@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase–space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  19. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  20. Current Fluctuation Measurements of Amperometric Gas Sensors Constructed with Three Different Technology Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlak Petr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical amperometric gas sensors represent a well-established and versatile type of devices with unique features: good sensitivity and stability, short response/recovery times, and low power consumption. These sensors operate at room temperature, and therefore have been applied in monitoring air pollutants and detection of toxic and hazardous gases in a number of areas. Some drawbacks of classical electrochemical sensors are overcome by the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE based on ionic liquids. This work presents evaluation of an SPE-based amperometric sensor from the point of view of current fluctuations. The sensor is based on a novel three-electrode sensor platform with solid polymer electrolytes containing ionic liquid for detection of nitrogen dioxide − a highly toxic gas that is harmful to the environment and presenting a possible threat to human health even at low concentrations. The paper focuses on using noise measurement (electric current fluctuation measurement for evaluation of electrochemical sensors which were constructed by different fabrication processes: (i lift-off and drop-casting technology, (ii screen printing technology on a ceramic substrate and (iii screen printing on a flexible substrate.

  1. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  2. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  3. A Tall-Tower Instrument for Mean and Fluctuating Velocity, Fluctuating Temperature and Sensible Heat Flux Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Thomson, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor. The tem......For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor...

  4. Optical density measurements in a multiphase cryogenic fluid flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John; Gregory, Don A.

    2006-05-01

    An accurate determination of fluid flow in a cryogenic propulsion environment is difficult under the best of circumstances. The extreme thermal environment increases the mechanical constraints, and variable density conditions create havoc with traditional flow measurement schemes. Presented here are secondary results of cryogenic testing of an all-optical sensor capable of a mass flow measurement by directly interrogating the fluid's density state and a determination of the fluid's velocity. The sensor's measurement basis does not rely on any inherent assumptions as to the state of the fluid flow (density or otherwise). The fluid sensing interaction model will be discussed. Current test and evaluation data and future development work will be presented.

  5. Direct measurements reveal non-Markovian fluctuations of DNA threading through a solid-state nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Nicholas A W

    2016-01-01

    The threading of a polymer chain through a small pore is a classic problem in polymer dynamics and underlies nanopore sensing technology. However important experimental aspects of the polymer motion in a solid-state nanopore, such as an accurate measurement of the velocity variation during translocation, have remained elusive. In this work we analysed the translocation through conical quartz nanopores of a 7 kbp DNA double-strand labelled with six markers equally spaced along its contour. These markers, constructed from DNA hairpins, give direct experimental access to the translocation dynamics. On average we measure a 5% reduction in velocity during the translocation. We also find a striking correlation in velocity fluctuations with a decay constant of 100s of {\\mu}s. These results shed light on hitherto unresolved problems in the dynamics of DNA translocation and provide guidance for experiments seeking to determine positional information along a DNA strand.

  6. Experimental free energy measurements of kinetic molecular states using fluctuation theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, Anna; Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix; 10.1038/nphys2375

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and single molecule technologies make it possible to extract free energy differences from irreversible work measurements in pulling experiments. To date, free energy recovery has been focused on native or equilibrium molecular states, whereas free energy measurements of kinetic states (i.e. finite lifetime states that are generated dynamically and are metastable) have remained unexplored. Kinetic states can play an important role in various domains of physics, such as nanotechnology or condensed matter physics. In biophysics, there are many examples where they determine the fate of molecular reactions: protein and peptide-nucleic acid binding, specific cation binding, antigen-antibody interactions, transient states in enzymatic reactions or the formation of transient intermediates and non-native structures in molecular folders. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain free energies of kinetic states by applying extended fluctuation relations. T...

  7. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in a resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, N; Ciliberto, S

    2005-06-01

    In small systems where relevant energies are comparable to thermal agitation, fluctuations are of the order of average values. In systems in thermodynamical equilibrium, the variance of these fluctuations can be related to the dissipation constant in the system, exploiting the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In nonequilibrium steady systems, fluctuations theorems (FT) additionally describe symmetry properties of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations of injected and dissipated energies. We experimentally probe a model system: an electrical dipole driven out of equilibrium by a small constant current I, and show that FT are experimentally accessible and valid. Furthermore, we stress that FT can be used to measure the dissipated power P = R I2 in the system by just studying the PDFs' symmetries.

  8. Measuring fluctuations in paranoia: Validity and psychometric properties of brief state versions of the Paranoia Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlier, Björn; Moritz, Steffen; Lincoln, Tania M

    2016-07-30

    Research increasingly assesses momentary changes in paranoia in order to elucidate causal mechanisms. Observed or manipulated changes in postulated causal factors should result in fluctuations in state paranoid ideation. Previous studies often employed a state-adapted Paranoia Checklist (Freeman et al., 2005) to measure state paranoia. This study examined whether the Paranoia Checklist or subsets of its items are appropriate for this purpose. Thirteen studies (N=860) were subjected to meta-analyses of each Paranoia Checklist item. We selected items based on (1) whether they showed pre-to-post change in the expected direction and (2) whether this effect was larger in experimental vs. control conditions. All resulting item selections were cross-validated on a hold-out sample (n=1893). Finally, we explored how much variation in paranoia was captured by the state-adapted version in a brief ambulatory assessment study (N=32). A thirteen item State Paranoia Checklist as well as a five item and a three item Brief State Paranoia Checklist were extracted. Cross validation revealed better model fit and increased sensitivity to change. Multilevel analysis indicated 25-30% of the variance in the Brief State Paranoia Checklists to be due to intra-individual daily fluctuations in paranoia. Our analyses produced reliable and valid revised scales. Increases in change sensitivity indicate that future assessment of state paranoia in experimental and ambulatory assessment studies can be optimized by using the revised scales.

  9. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  10. 2D spatial profile measurements of potential fluctuation with heavy ion beam probe on the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, A.; Ido, T.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Ogawa, K.; Takahashi, H.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional spatial profiles of potential fluctuation were measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). For 2D spatial profile measurements, the probe beam energy has to be changed, which requires the adjustment of many deflectors in the beam transport line to optimize the beam trajectory, since the transport line of LHD-HIBP system is long. The automatic beam adjustment system was developed, which allows us to adjust the beam trajectory easily. By analyzing coherence between potential fluctuation and magnetic probe signal, the noise level of the mode power spectrum of the potential fluctuation can be reduced. By using this method, the 2D spatial profile of potential fluctuation profile was successfully obtained.

  11. Mammographic density measurement: a comparison of automated volumetric density measurement to BIRADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Damases, Christine N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare mammographic breast density assessment with automated volumetric software with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by radiologists on two imaging systems. A data set of 120 mammograms was classified by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) Examiners. The mammograms were of 20 women (mean age, 60 years; range, 42-89 years). These women were image twice once with GE system and the following year with Hologic system. These images also had their volumetric density classified by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG). The radiologists were asked to estimate the mammographic density according to BIRADS categories (1- 4). There was a moderate agreement between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (K=0.45; pBIRADS having a mean of 2.13 and the mean VDG higher at 2.50 (t = -11.99; pBIRADS showed a positive strong correlation (r=0.84; pBIRADS and VDG AvBD% also showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.86; pBIRADS categories for each of the VDG AvBD% classifications. Using Volpara, the Hologic system showed a higher meanAvBD% (10.02 vs. 9.97). However using BIRADS the Hologic systems showed a lower mean (2.05 vs. 2.21). Automated systems demonstrated higher internal validity. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement and a strong correlation between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density assessment.

  12. Quantitatively measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light : Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although many techniques are efficient at measuring optical orbital angular momentum (OAM), they do not allow one to obtain a quantitative measurement for the OAM density across an optical field and instead only measure its global OAM. Numerous...

  13. Hydrogen density measurements using an open-ended microwave cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, N. C.; Smetana, J.

    1972-01-01

    The density measurement of liquid hydrogen and two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous hydrogen is considered. This paper describes a complete prototype system that uses an open-ended microwave cavity for making dynamic density measurements of flowing hydrogen in a transfer line. The theory of operation along with test results for both the single- and two-phase cases are presented and discussed.

  14. Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FA Spane, Jr.

    1999-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

  15. Critical fluctuations of the proton density in A+A collisions at 158A GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anticic, T.; Kadija, K.; Susa, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Baatar, B.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bartke, J.; Kowalski, M.; Rybicki, A. [Polish Academy of Science, H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Beck, H.; Blume, C.; Book, J.; Mitrovski, M.; Renfordt, R.; Rustamov, A.; Schuster, T.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Betev, L.; Buncic, P.; Karev, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B. [National Center for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Bogusz, M.; Cetner, T.; Grebieszkow, K.; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M.; Peryt, W.; Pluta, J.; Slodkowski, M.; Szuba, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Botje, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Leeuwen, M. van [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chvala, O. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D. [University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA (United States); Eckardt, V.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Fodor, Z.; Laszlo, A.; Palla, G.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Hoehne, C.; Kresan, D.; Sandoval, A.; Vranic, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gazdzicki, M. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Jan Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Makariev, M. [BAS, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Mateev, M. [Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski, Atomic Physics Department, Sofia (Bulgaria); Mrowczynski, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Stefanek, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A. [Jan Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Panagiotou, A.D.; Vassiliou, M.; Antoniou, N.G.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.K. [University of Athens, Department of Physics, Athens (Greece); Puehlhofer, F. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet, Marburg (Germany); Roland, C.; Roland, G. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Skrzypczak, E. [University of Warsaw, Institute for Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Varga, D. [Eoetvoes Lorant University, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: (NA49 Collaboration)

    2015-12-15

    We look for fluctuations expected for the QCD critical point using an intermittency analysis in the transverse momentum phase space of protons produced around midrapidity in the 12.5 % most central C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at the maximum SPS energy of 158A GeV. We find evidence of power-law fluctuations for the Si+Si data. The fitted power-law exponent φ{sub 2} = 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.38}(stat.)±0.16(syst.) is consistent with the value expected for critical fluctuations. Power-law fluctuations had previously also been observed in low-mass π{sup +}π{sup -} pairs in the same Si+Si collisions. (orig.)

  16. The new method for the residual gas density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Krasnov, A A; Malyshev, O B; Nas'mov, V P; Pyata, E I; Shaftan, T V

    2001-01-01

    A new method of measurement for residual gas density in the vacuum chambers in presence of synchrotron radiation (SR) is described. The method is based on using a photomultiplier tube for the detection of the SR-stimulated residual gas luminescence, which is proportional to the residual gas density and SR intensity. The design of the experimental setup and results of the measurements of densities of residual gases (H sub 2 , CO sub 2 , CO, N sub 2 , Ar and O sub 2) are submitted.

  17. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; McEntee, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman's density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists' visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer's equipment affects a woman's MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), while the VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and AvBD% ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]).

  18. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas Kazys

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%.

  19. Dynamic density and spin responses of a superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Path integral formulation and pair fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lianyi

    2016-10-01

    We present a standard field theoretical derivation of the dynamic density and spin linear response functions of a dilute superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover in both three and two dimensions. The derivation of the response functions is based on the elegant functional path integral approach which allows us to calculate the density-density and spin-spin correlation functions by introducing the external sources for the density and the spin density. Since the generating functional cannot be evaluated exactly, we consider two gapless approximations which ensure a gapless collective mode (Goldstone mode) in the superfluid state: the BCS-Leggett mean-field theory and the Gaussian-pair-fluctuation (GPF) theory. In the mean-field theory, our results of the response functions agree with the known results from the random phase approximation. We further consider the pair fluctuation effects and establish a theoretical framework for the dynamic responses within the GPF theory. We show that the GPF response theory naturally recovers three kinds of famous diagrammatic contributions: the Self-Energy contribution, the Aslamazov-Lakin contribution, and the Maki-Thompson contribution. We also show that unlike the equilibrium state, in evaluating the response functions, the linear (first-order) terms in the external sources as well as the induced order parameter perturbations should be treated carefully. In the superfluid state, there is an additional order parameter contribution which ensures that in the static and long wavelength limit, the density response function recovers the result of the compressibility (compressibility sum rule). We expect that the f-sum rule is manifested by the full number equation which includes the contribution from the Gaussian pair fluctuations. The dynamic density and spin response functions in the normal phase (above the superfluid critical temperature) are also derived within the Nozières-Schmitt-Rink (NSR) theory.

  20. Force spectroscopy with dual-trap optical tweezers: molecular stiffness measurements and coupled fluctuations analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Ritort, F

    2012-11-07

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Measured Predictively by a Density-Salinity Refractometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Lorenzon

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are major contributors to hemolymph density, and the present study correlates the easy and low cost measure of hemolymph density by a density-salinity refractometer with the total protein concentration, measured with a colorimetric method. Moreover, the study evaluates the accuracy of the relationship and provides a conversion factor from hemolymph density to protein in seven species of crustaceans, representative of taxa far apart in the phylogenetic tree and characterized by different life habits. Measuring serum-protein concentration by using a refractometer can provide a non-destructive field method to assess crustacean populations/species protein-related modifications of physiological state without need of costly laboratory facilities and procedures.

  2. Wireless Sensor Node for Surface Seawater Density Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Saletti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes’ law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  3. Experimental measurements of large-scale temperature fluctuation structures in a heated incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.

    1993-03-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements over a heated flat plate are made for three different temperature difference cases of 10, 15, and 20 C. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime are determined from which mean convection velocities, mean inclination angles, extent in space, and coherence characteristics of T-prime large-scale structure are calculated. The T-prime mean convection velocity is found as a function of y(+). The T-prime structure inclination angle is 30 deg. The T-prime structure is limited to the viscous defect length in the normal and spanwise directions. However, in the streamwise direction, the structure is mildly dependent on the temperature difference.

  4. A detailed procedure for measuring turbulent velocity fluctuations using constant-voltage anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Taifour, Abdelouahab; Weiss, Julien; Sadeghi, Atabak; Vétel, Jérôme; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2015-09-01

    A detailed procedure to use a constant-voltage anemometer (CVA) for the accurate measurement of turbulent flows is proposed. The procedure is based on the usual small-perturbation analysis of hot-wire signals. It consists in three steps: (1) the calibration of internal elements, required to estimate the two main electrical parameters of the CVA circuitry that are needed in the data analysis, (2) a flow calibration to relate the CVA output voltage and the hot-wire time constant to the flow velocity, and (3) a data-processing algorithm to recover the fluctuating flow quantities from the output voltage. The procedure is tested in two classical turbulent flows: a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer and a round jet. In both cases, the CVA results are shown to be essentially indistinguishable from the results obtained with a research-grade constant-temperature anemometer.

  5. Measurement of flow fluctuations in single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Rawat; N Kawade; G Sridhar; Sunita Singh; L M Gantayet

    2014-02-01

    A simple technique had been demonstrated for measuring flow-induced fluctuations in the single longitudinal mode (SLM) pulsed dye laser. Two prominent frequency components of 10.74 Hz and 48.83 Hz were present in the output of the Nd:YAG-pumped SLM dye laser. The flow-induced frequency component of 48.83 Hz was present due to the revolution per minute of the motor attached to the magnetically coupled gear pump. The time average bandwidth of 180 MHz has been obtained for this SLM dye laser. The effect of pump pulse energy on the bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was studied. The bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was increased to 285 MHz from 180 MHz, when the pump pulse energy was increased to 0.75 mJ from 0.15 mJ for a constant dye flow velocity of 0.5 m/s.

  6. Measuring Water Level Fluctuations of two Connected Wetlands in the Dominican Republic Using InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo Marcano, M. D.; Liu, L.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are ecosystems of high endemism and great biodiversity. Using the double-reflected radar waves off the water surface and trunks of inundated vegetation, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring water level fluctuations from space at a cm-level accuracy in these ecosystems with emergent vegetation. InSAR can provide a high spatial resolution over a large area that the more traditional terrestrial-based methods lack. In this study, we applied InSAR to study the seasonal variations in water level of the wetlands near two lakes in the southwest of the Dominican Republic: Lake Enriquillo, a highly saline lake designated as a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention in 2002, and Laguna del Limon. Both lake-wetland systems are located in the Jaragua-Bahoruco-Enriquillo Biosphere Reserve. Since 2003 the water level of Lake Enriquillo has increased drastically and caused the evacuation of many farmers from nearby villages. Lake level changes also affected the habitats of several native and migratory species. We used the data acquired by the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor on board of the Japanese Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) from October 2008 to January 2011. For the smaller lake, Laguna del Limon, we found a seasonal variation of 10-15 centimeters. This result was confirmed using two different satellite paths. For Lake Enriquillo we found a net decrease of about 20 centimeters in the water level from September 2009 to January 2011. This result agrees with an independent estimation based on lake hydrodynamics model predictions. In addition, our InSAR-based time series of lake level fluctuations revealed distinct behaviors of the two wetlands. For the Lake Enriquillo we found a continuous decrease in the water level throughout 2010 with a brief increase of the water level during the summer months, while for Laguna del Limon during the summer months the water level

  7. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  8. Measurement and analyses of molten Ni-Co alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; K. MUKAI; FANG Liang; FU Ya; YANG Ren-hui

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of powerful mathematical modeling techniques for material phenomena, there is renewed interest in reliable data for the density of the Ni-based superalloys. Up to now, there has been few report on the density of molten Ni-Co alloy.In order to obtain more accurate density data for molten Ni-Co alloy, the density of molten Ni-Co alloy was measured with a modified sessile drop method, and the accommodation of different atoms in molten Ni-Co alloy was analyzed. The density of alloy is found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of molten Ni-Co alloy increases with increasing Co concentration. The molar volume of Ni-Co alloy determined shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume, and the deviation of molar volume from ideal mixing increases with increasing Co concentration over the experimental concentration range.

  9. Electrostatic density measurements in green-state PM parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Georg H. W.

    The goal of this research is to show the feasibility of detecting density variations in greenstate powder metallurgy (P/M) compacts from surface voltage measurements. By monitoring a steady electric current flow through the sample and recording the voltages over the surface, valuable information is gathered leading to the prediction of the structural health of the compacts. Unlike prior research that concentrated on the detection of surface-breaking and subsurface defects, the results presented in this thesis target the density prediction throughout the volume of the sample. The detection of density variations is achieved by establishing a correlation between the conductivity and their respective density. The data obtained from the surface measurements is used as part of an inversion algorithm, calculating the conductivity distribution, and subsequently the density within the compact. In a first step, the relationship between conductivity and density of green-state P/M compacts was investigated. Tests were conducted for a number of parts of various powder mixtures. In all cases a clear correlation between conductivity and density could be established, indicating that measurements of electric conductivity could indeed be exploited in an effort to render valid information about the density of the sample under test. We found a linear correlation for nonlubricated parts and a non-linear behavior for lubricated samples. Specifically, it was found that the conductivity increases with increasing density only up to a maximum value obtained at approximately 6.9g/cm 3. Interestingly, any additional density increase leads to a reduction of the conductivity. This behavior was confirmed to be inherent in all powder mixtures with lubricants. The thesis research is able to provide a physical model and a mathematical formulation describing this counter-intuitive phenomenon. A finite element solver in conjunction with an inversion algorithm was then implemented to study arbitrarily

  10. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  11. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  12. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with SDSS10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this article we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  13. Local Spin Density Approximation Solution for Spinel LiV2O4: Spin Fluctuation as a Possible Role for Heavy Fermion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭明秋; 陶向明

    2001-01-01

    We report on a self-consistent full-potential linear muffin tin orbital band-structure calculation for the heavy fermion (HF) compound LiV2O4. It is found that a stable local spin density approximation solution for LiV2O4 is lower in total energy than the local density approximation calculation. We speculate that the mechanism responsible for HF properties in LiV2O4 might be of spin fluctuation type and is different from the Kondo mechanism in conventional 4f and 5f HF compounds.

  14. Astrophysical implications of the neutrino rest mass. II. The density-perturbation spectrum and small-scale fluctuations in the microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Zel' dovich, Y.B.; Syunyaev, R.A.; Khlopov, M.Y.

    1980-07-01

    If the neutrino has a rest mass, a scale comparable with the distance between clusters of galaxies would have been singled out in the universe. The amplitude of neutrino density perturbations on smaller scales should diminish in proportion to a high power of the perturbation wavelength. The evolution of adiabatic and entropic (isothermal) density perturbations is considered, and it is shown that the existence of a neutrino rest mass would imply smaller fine-scale fluctuations in the microwave background radiation than models in which m/sub ..nu../=0.

  15. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  16. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  17. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  18. Modification of SOL profiles and fluctuations with line-average density and divertor flux expansion in TCV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, N.; Tsui, C.; Theiler, C.

    2017-01-01

    that this modification does not influence neither the detachment density threshold, nor the development of a flat SOL density profile which instead depends strongly on the increase of the core line average density. The modification of the SOL upstream profile, with the appearance of what is generally called a density...

  19. A Method to Measure the Mass of Damped Ly-alpha Absorber Host Galaxies Using Fluctuations in 21cm Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wyithe, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Observations of damped Ly-alpha absorbers (DLA) indicate that the fraction of hydrogen in its neutral form (HI) is significant by mass at all redshifts. This gas represents the reservoir of material that is available for star formation at late times. As a result, observational identification of the systems in which this neutral hydrogen resides is an important missing ingredient in models of galaxy formation. Precise identification of DLA host mass via traditional clustering studies is not practical owing to the small numbers of known systems being spread across sparsely distributed sight lines. However following the completion of reionization, 21cm surface brightness fluctuations will be dominated by neutral hydrogen in DLAs. Observations of these fluctuations will measure the combined clustering signal from all DLAs within a large volume. We show that measurement of the spherically averaged power-spectrum of 21cm intensity fluctuations due to DLAs could be used to measure the galaxy bias for DLA host galaxi...

  20. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  1. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  2. Standardizing CT lung density measure across scanner manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu Heather; Fuld, Matthew K; Hoppel, Bernice; Judy, Philip F; Sieren, Jered P; Guo, Junfeng; Lynch, David A; Possolo, Antonio; Fain, Sean B

    2017-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) imaging of the lung, reported in Hounsfield Units (HU), can be parameterized as a quantitative image biomarker for the diagnosis and monitoring of lung density changes due to emphysema, a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CT lung density metrics are global measurements based on lung CT number histograms, and are typically a quantity specifying either the percentage of voxels with CT numbers below a threshold, or a single CT number below which a fixed relative lung volume, nth percentile, falls. To reduce variability in the density metrics specified by CT attenuation, the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Lung Density Committee has organized efforts to conduct phantom studies in a variety of scanner models to establish a baseline for assessing the variations in patient studies that can be attributed to scanner calibration and measurement uncertainty. Data were obtained from a phantom study on CT scanners from four manufacturers with several protocols at various tube potential voltage (kVp) and exposure settings. Free from biological variation, these phantom studies provide an assessment of the accuracy and precision of the density metrics across platforms solely due to machine calibration and uncertainty of the reference materials. The phantom used in this study has three foam density references in the lung density region, which, after calibration against a suite of Standard Reference Materials (SRM) foams with certified physical density, establishes a HU-electron density relationship for each machine-protocol. We devised a 5-step calibration procedure combined with a simplified physical model that enabled the standardization of the CT numbers reported across a total of 22 scanner-protocol settings to a single energy (chosen at 80 keV). A standard deviation was calculated for overall CT numbers for each density, as well as by scanner and other variables, as a measure of the variability, before and after the

  3. TRACTOGRAPHY DENSITY AND NETWORK MEASURES IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Gautam; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    Brain connectivity declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD), both functionally and structurally. Connectivity maps and networks derived from diffusion-based tractography offer new ways to track disease progression and to understand how AD affects the brain. Here we set out to identify (1) which fiber network measures show greatest differences between AD patients and controls, and (2) how these effects depend on the density of fibers extracted by the tractography algorithm. We computed brain networks from diffusion-weighted images (DWI) of the brain, in 110 subjects (28 normal elderly, 56 with early and 11 with late mild cognitive impairment, and 15 with AD). We derived connectivity matrices and network topology measures, for each subject, from whole-brain tractography and cortical parcellations. We used an ODF lookup table to speed up fiber extraction, and to exploit the full information in the orientation distribution function (ODF). This made it feasible to compute high density connectivity maps. We used accelerated tractography to compute a large number of fibers to understand what effect fiber density has on network measures and in distinguishing different disease groups in our data. We focused on global efficiency, transitivity, path length, mean degree, density, modularity, small world, and assortativity measures computed from weighted and binary undirected connectivity matrices. Of all these measures, the mean nodal degree best distinguished diagnostic groups. High-density fiber matrices were most helpful for picking up the more subtle clinical differences, e.g. between mild cognitively impaired (MCI) and normals, or for distinguishing subtypes of MCI (early versus late). Care is needed in clinical analyses of brain connectivity, as the density of extracted fibers may affect how well a network measure can pick up differences between patients and controls.

  4. Measurement of Pressure Fluctuations inside a Model Thrust Bearing Using PVDF Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Andrew; Matthews, David; Guzzomi, Andrew; Pan, Jie

    2017-04-16

    Thrust bearings play a vital role in propulsion systems. They rely on a thin layer of oil being trapped between rotating surfaces to produce a low friction interface. The "quality" of this bearing affects many things from noise transmission to the ultimate catastrophic failure of the bearing itself. As a result, the direct measure of the forces and vibrations within the oil filled interface would be very desirable and would give an indication of the condition of the bearing in situ. The thickness of the oil film is, however, very small and conventional vibration sensors are too cumbersome to use in this confined space. This paper solves this problem by using a piezoelectric polymer film made from Polyvinylidine Fluoride (PVDF). These films are very thin (50 m) and flexible and easy to install in awkward spaces such as the inside of a thrust bearing. A model thrust bearing was constructed using a 3D printer and PVDF films inserted into the base of the bearing. In doing so, it was possible to directly measure the force fluctuations due to the rotating pads and investigate various properties of the thrust bearing itself.

  5. Precision measurements of Linear Scattering Density using Muon Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Åström, E; Calliari, I; Calvini, P; Checchia, P; Donzella, A; Faraci, E; Forsberg, F; Gonella, F; Hu, X; Klinger, J; Ödqvist, L S; Pagano, D; Rigoni, A; Ramous, E; Urbani, M; Vanini, S; Zenoni, A; Zumerle, G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  6. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  7. Density measurements of compressed-liquid dimethyl ether + pentane mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Stephanie L; Lemmon, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Compressed-liquid densities of three compositions of the binary mixture dimethyl ether (CAS No. 115-10-6) + pentane (CAS No. 109-66-0) have been measured with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Measurements were made at temperatures from 270 K to 390 K with pressures from 1.0 MPa to 50 MPa. The overall combined uncertainty (k=2) of the density data is 0.81 kg·m(-3). Data presented here have been used to improve a previously formulated Helmholtz energy based mixture model. The newly derived parameters are given.

  8. Spectral density matrix of a single photon measured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Wojciech; Kolenderski, Piotr; Frankowski, Robert

    2007-09-21

    We propose and demonstrate a method for measuring the spectral density matrix of a single photon pulse. The method is based on registering Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between a photon to be measured and a pair of attenuated and suitably delayed laser pulses described by a known spectral amplitude. The density matrix is retrieved from a two-dimensional interferogram of coincidence counts. The method has been implemented for a type-I down-conversion source, pumped by ultrashort laser pulses. The experimental results agree well with a theoretical model which takes into account the temporal as well as spatial effects in the source.

  9. Spectral density matrix of a single photon measured

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Frankowski, R; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Kolenderski, Piotr; Frankowski, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method for measuring the spectral density matrix of a single photon pulse. The method is based on registering Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between photon to be measured and a pair of attenuated and suitably delayed laser pulses described by a known spectral amplitude. The density matrix is retrieved from a two-dimensional interferogram of coincidence counts. The method has been implemented for a type-I downconversion source, pumped by ultrashort laser pulses. The experimental results agree well with a theoretical model which takes into account the temporal as well as spatial effects in the source.

  10. Signatures of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator from AUREOL-3 ULF/ELF fluctuation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Ni, B. B.

    2006-01-01

    From the AUREOL-3 satellite, simultaneous measurements of plasma density and ULF/ELF electric and magnetic fields on March 16, 1982 were obtained. Based on spectra analysis and impedance function calculation of data from 04:48:37 to 04:52:10 UT time (hh:mm:ss), the origin of the field fluctuations below 5.0 Hz is examined. A high coherence exists between the correlated variations of the mutually orthogonal electric and magnetic fields. Below 2.0 Hz an oscillatory phase difference of about ±π implies the excitation of traveling waves. The phase difference of ±π/2 appears at 4.0 Hz, indicative of a standing wave. Taking into account the local magnetic field and plasma density, for the frequencies between 0.3 and 4.0 Hz, the impedance comes very near to the local Alfvén impedance. In this way, the peaks at 0.5 and 4.0 Hz are identified, respectively, as a traveling and a standing shear Alfvén wave, which presumably resulted from the operation of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR). At the lowest frequency below 0.1 Hz, the approach of the wave impedance to the reciprocal of local height-integrated Pedensen conductivity implies the AUREOL-3 satellite's crossing of spatially structured field-aligned currents closed through the ionosphere, as suggested by Forget et al. (1991. Ionospheric closure of small scale Birkeland currents. Journal of Geophysical Research 96, 1843 1847).

  11. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score 30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  12. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  13. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3).

  14. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A. [ENEA CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F. [CISAS ' G.Colombo,' Universita degli studi di Padova, Via Venezia 15, 35131 Padova (Italy); Accatino, L. [ACC Antenna and MW tech, Via Trieste 16/B, 10098 Rivoli (Italy); Pavarin, D. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale (DII), Universita degli Studi di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); Selmo, A. [RESIA, Studio Progettazione e Realizzazione di Apparati Elettronici, via Roma 17, 37041 Albaredo d' Adige (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  15. Experimental Measurement of Asymmetric Fluctuations of Poloidal Magnetic Field in Damavand Tokomak at Different Plasma Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi-Fard, Mahmoud; Alinejad, Naser; Rasouli, Chapar; Sadigzadeh, Asghar

    2012-08-01

    Toroidal and Poloidal magnetic fields have an important effect on the tokomak topology. Damavand Tokomak is a small size tokomak characterized with k = 1.2, B t = 1T, R 0 = 36 cm, maximum plasma current is about 35 KA with a discharge time of 21 ms. In this experimental work, the variation of poloidal magnetic field on the torodial cross section is measured and analyzed. In order to measure the polodial magnetic field, 18 probes were installed on the edge of tokomak plasma with ∆θ = 18°, while a limiter was installed inside the torus. Plasma current, I p, induces a polodial magnetic field, B p, smaller than the torodial magnetic field B t. Magnetic lines B produced as a combination of B t and B p, are localized on the nested toroidal magnetic surfaces. The presence of polodial magnetic field is necessary for particles confinement. Mirnov oscillations are the fluctuations of polodial magnetic field, detected by magnetic probes. Disrupted instability in Tokomak typically starts with mirnov oscillations which appear as fluctuations of polodial magnetic field and is detected by magnetic probes. Minor disruptions inside the plasma can contain principal magnetic islands and their satellites can cause the annihilation of plasma confinement. Production of thin layer of turbulent magnetic field lines cause minor disruption. Magnetic limiter may cause the deformation of symmetric equilibrium configuration and chaotic magnetic islands reveal in plasma occurring in thin region of chaotic field lines close to their separatrix. The width of this chaotic layer in the right side of poloidal profile of Damavand Tokomak is smaller than the width in the left side profile because of Shafranov displacement. Ergodic region in the left side of profile develops a perturbation on the magnetic polodial field lines, B p, that are greater in magnitude than that in the right side, although the values of B p on the left side are smaller than that on the right side of the profile. The Left

  16. Improved measurement of ice layer density in seasonal snowpacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice layers in snowpacks introduce uncertainty in satellite derived estimates of snow water equivalent, have ecological impacts on plants and animals, and change the thermal and vapour transport properties of the snowpack. The microstructure and specifically the density of ice layers is poorly quantified. Here we present a new field method, for measuring the density of ice layers caused by melt or rain-on-snow events. The method was used on 87 ice layer samples in the Canadian Arctic and mid-latitudes; the mean measured ice layer density was 909 ± 18 kg m−3 with a standard deviation of 23 kg m−3, significantly higher than values typically used in the literature.

  17. Urinary density measurement and analysis methods in neonatal unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess urine collection methods through cotton in contact with genitalia and urinary collector to measure urinary density in newborns. This is a quantitative intervention study carried out in a neonatal unit of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in 2010. The sample consisted of 61 newborns randomly chosen to compose the study group. Most neonates were full term (31/50.8% males (33/54%. Data on urinary density measurement through the methods of cotton and collector presented statistically significant differences (p<0.05. The analysis of interquartile ranges between subgroups resulted in statistical differences between urinary collector/reagent strip (1005 and cotton/reagent strip (1010, however there was no difference between urinary collector/ refractometer (1008 and cotton/ refractometer. Therefore, further research should be conducted with larger sampling using methods investigated in this study and whenever possible, comparing urine density values to laboratory tests.

  18. 3 dimensional ionospheric electron density reconstruction based on GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, C.; Schlüter, S.; Jacobi, C.; Jakowski, N.

    When radio waves as sended by the naviagtion system GPS are passing through the ionosphere they are subject to delays in phase, travel time and polarisation which is an effect of the free electrons. The measured integrated value of Total Electron Content can be utilised for three-dimensional reconstruction of electron density patterns in the ionosphere. Here a tomographic approach is represented. Scince the distribution of data is very sparse and patchy we decided for an algebraic iterative algorithm. The ground based GPS data collected by IGS receivers can be combined by space based GPS of radio limb sounding, incoherent scatter radar and ionosondes data. Hereby, radio occultation data improve beside the amount of available data especially the vertical resolution of electron density distribution. Ionosonde peack electron densities are taken as stop criteria determination for iteration. Reconstructed ionospheric scenarios and validations of the system by independent measurements are presented.

  19. A new sensor for stress measurement based on blood flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, I.; Kaminsky, A. V.; Shenkman, L.

    2016-03-01

    It is widely recognized that effective stress management could have a dramatic impact on health care and preventive medicine. In order to meet this need, efficient and seamless sensing and analytic tools for the non-invasive stress monitoring during daily life are required. The existing sensors still do not meet the needs in terms of specificity and robustness. We utilized a miniaturized dynamic light scattering sensor (mDLS) which is specially adjusted to measure skin blood flow fluctuations and provides multi- parametric capabilities. Based on the measured dynamic light scattering signal from the red blood cells flowing in skin, a new concept of hemodynamic indexes (HI) and oscillatory hemodynamic indexes (OHI) have been developed. This approach was utilized for stress level assessment for a few usecase scenario. The new stress index was generated through the HI and OHI parameters. In order to validate this new non-invasive stress index, a group of 19 healthy volunteers was studied by measuring the mDLS sensor located on the wrist. Mental stress was induced by using the cognitive dissonance test of Stroop. We found that OHIs indexes have high sensitivity to the mental stress response for most of the tested subjects. In addition, we examined the capability of using this new stress index for the individual monitoring of the diurnal stress level. We found that the new stress index exhibits similar trends as reported for to the well-known diurnal behavior of cortisol levels. Finally, we demonstrated that this new marker provides good sensitivity and specificity to the stress response to sound and musical emotional arousal.

  20. Quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we derive expressions for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light, for both symmetric and nonsymmetric optical fields, that allow a direct comparison between theory and experiment. We present a simple method for measuring...

  1. Measurement of D-region electron density by partial reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R. O.; Mott, D. L.; Gammill, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of electron density in the lower ionosphere were made at White Sands Missile Range throughout the STRATCOM VIII launch day using a partial-reflection sounder. Information regarding the sounder's antenna pattern was gained from the passage of the balloon over the array.

  2. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential nonuniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to 10% of the average current density in the discharge and 5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  3. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, You-Qi; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@ustc.edu.cn; Pan, Jian-Wei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Huang, Leilei; Payne, Frank [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  4. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, You-Qi; Huang, Leilei; Liu, Yang; Payne, Frank; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-06-01

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  5. NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER/IRAC SURVEY DATA AND THEIR COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. [SSAI, Lanham MD 20706 (United States); Arendt, R. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G., E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with depths of {approx_equal} 12 hr pixel{sup -1} over three epochs are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of mag{sub AB} {approx_equal} 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 {mu}m power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to >10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign . The low shot-noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large-scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.

  6. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging (JT-SOFI)

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Zhiping; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition....

  7. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  8. Continuous measurements of instantaneous heart rate and its fluctuations before and after hatching in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, K; Pearson, J T; Burggren, W W; Ar, A; Tazawa, H

    2000-03-01

    There has been considerable interest in heart rate (fh) fluctuations in relation to cardiovascular control systems and foetal conditions during pregnancy in mammals. Prominent fluctuations in fh also occur in avian embryos, which are an important experimental model for studying developmental physiology. The present study determined the instantaneous fh of seven chick embryos continuously from the last stage of prenatal development (day 18), throughout the pipping (perinatal) period (days 19-21) until hatching and, subsequently, of newly hatched chicks (up to day 2). The distinctive patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations took the form of specific changes within a broad mean fh baseline. Cyclic oscillations (ultradian rhythm) occurred until an early stage of the perinatal period, when the fh baseline started rising. Subsequently, the baseline dropped and respiratory arrhythmia began to appear concomitant with external pipping. During the final stage of external pipping, when the fh baseline rose again prior to hatching, three unique patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations were evident: relatively long-lasting cyclic small accelerations, irregular intermittent large accelerations and short-term repeated large accelerations. Furthermore, repeated alternate occurrences of the latter two types of acceleration formed an additional oscillating pattern with a period of 10-15 min. During the early period after hatching, when the fh baseline reached its maximum, instantaneous fh changed relatively slowly accompanied by transient rapid decelerations, probably due to augmented vagal tone. Subsequently, the mean fh baseline dropped to its minimum, and a circadian rhythm and three types of previously reported fh fluctuations (types I-III) appeared. Developmental patterns of mean fh and the appearance of distinctive patterns of instantaneous fluctuations in fh and circadian rhythms were not influenced by an ultimate failure of hatching after a normal development. The

  9. Humidity fluctuations in the marine boundary layer measured at a coastal site with an infrared humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1996-01-01

    An extensive set of humidity turbulence data has been analyzed from 22-m height in the marine boundary layer. Fluctuations of humidity were measured by an ''OPHIR'', an infrared humidity sensor with a 10 Hz scanning frequency and humidity spectra were produced. The shapes of the normalized spectr...

  10. Evaluating the quality of ground-based microwave radiometer measurements and retrievals using detrended fluctuation and spectral analysis methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, K; Shirer, H N; Ackerman, T P; Liljegren, J C; Ausloos, M

    2001-01-01

    Time series both of microwave radiometer brightness temperature measurements at 23.8 and 31.4 GHz and of retrievals of water vapor and liquid water path from these brightness temperatures are evaluated using the detrended fluctuation analysis method. As quantified by the parameter $\\alpha$, this method (i) enables identification of the time scales over which noise dominates the time series and (ii) characterizes the temporal range of correlations in the time series. The more common spectral analysis method is also used to assess the data and its results are compared with those from detrended fluctuation analysis method. The assumption that measurements should have certain scaling properties allows the quality of the measurements to be characterized. The additional assumption that the scaling properties of the measurements of an atmospheric quantity are preserved in a useful retrieval provides a means for evaluating the retrieval itself. Applying these two assumptions to microwave radiometer measurements and r...

  11. Grain bulk density measurement based on wireless network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Fangming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To know the accurate quantity of stored grain, grain density sensors must be used to measure the grain’s bulk density. However, multi-sensors should be inserted into the storage facility, to quickly collect data during the inventory checking of stored grain. In this study, the ZigBee and Wi-Fi coexistence network’s ability to transmit data collected by density sensors was investigated. A system consisting of six sensor nodes, six router nodes, one gateway and one Android Pad was assembled to measure the grain’s bulk density and calculate its quantity. The CC2530 chip with ZigBee technology was considered as the core of the information processing, and wireless nodes detection in sensor, and router nodes. ZigBee worked in difference signal channel with Wi-Fi to avoid interferences and connected with Wi-Fi module by UART serial communications interfaces in gateway. The Android Pad received the measured data through the gateway and processed this data to calculate quantity. The system enabled multi-point and real-time parameter detection inside the grain storage. Results show that the system has characteristics of good expansibility, networking flexibility and convenience.

  12. Characterization of the local density-of-states fluctuations near the integer quantum Hall transition in a quantum-dot array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Giancarlo; Ziegler, Klaus

    1997-10-01

    We present a calculation for the second moment of the local density of states in a model of a two-dimensional quantum dot array near the quantum Hall transition. The quantum dot array model is a realistic adaptation of the lattice model for the quantum Hall transition in the two-dimensional electron gas in an external magnetic field proposed by Ludwig, Fisher, Shankar, and Grinstein. We make use of a Dirac fermion representation for the Green's functions in the presence of fluctuations for the quantum dot energy levels. A saddle-point approximation yields nonperturbative results for the first and second moments of the local density of states, showing interesting fluctuation behavior near the quantum Hall transition. To our knowledge we discuss here one of the first analytic characterizations of chaotic behavior for a two-dimensional mesoscopic structure. The connection with possible experimental investigations of the local density of states in the quantum dot array structures (by means of NMR Knight-shift or single-electron-tunneling techniques) and our work is also established.

  13. Tide-induced fluctuations of salinity and groundwater level in unconfined aquifers - Field measurements and numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Elad; Yechieli, Yoseph; Gvirtzman, Haim; Shalev, Eyal

    2017-08-01

    The responses of the fresh-saline water interface (FSI) and the groundwater level (GWL) to the Mediterranean Sea tide were monitored in the coastal aquifer of Israel, modeled numerically and analyzed using cross-correlation analysis. Different time-lags between sea level fluctuations and hydraulic head and salinity fluctuations were detected for the FSI and the GWL. At the FSI, the time-lag of hydraulic head behind the sea level is much shorter than the lag of the salinity at the same point. Surprisingly, similar time-lags behind the sea level were measured for both the hydraulic head at the GWL and the salinity at the FSI, both at the same distance from the shoreline. Results from a numerical model, simulating the flow and transport processes at the field scale, agree with field measurements. In both, the GWL and the salinity in the FSI fluctuate almost simultaneously, while the hydraulic head in the FSI reacts faster to sea level fluctuations. The actual movement of the fresh water body, which is controlled by the unsaturated flow in the capillary fringe ('capillary effect'), lags behind the pressure head fluctuations in the deeper parts of the aquifer, which is controlled by saturated parameters of the aquifer. The overall results agree with the conceptual mechanism suggested by Levanon et al. (2016), in which the effect of sea tide on the coastal groundwater system comprises two main processes: (1) tidal fluctuations at the sea floor boundary which cause pressure wave propagation into the aquifer, and (2) attenuation at the GWL due to the capillary effect which control also the change in the salinity and the actual movement of the FSI.

  14. DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUD DENSITIES FROM UV MEASUREMENTS OF CO ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We use UV measurements of interstellar CO toward nearby stars to calculate the density in the diffuse molecular clouds containing the molecules responsible for the observed absorption. Chemical models and recent calculations of the excitation rate coefficients indicate that the regions in which CO is found have hydrogen predominantly in molecular form and that collisional excitation is by collisions with H{sub 2} molecules. We carry out statistical equilibrium calculations using CO-H{sub 2} collision rates to solve for the H{sub 2} density in the observed sources without including effects of radiative trapping. We have assumed kinetic temperatures of 50 K and 100 K, finding this choice to make relatively little difference to the lowest transition. For the sources having T{sup ex}{sub 10} only for which we could determine upper and lower density limits, we find (n(H{sub 2})) = 49 cm{sup -3}. While we can find a consistent density range for a good fraction of the sources having either two or three values of the excitation temperature, there is a suggestion that the higher-J transitions are sampling clouds or regions within diffuse molecular cloud material that have higher densities than the material sampled by the J = 1-0 transition. The assumed kinetic temperature and derived H{sub 2} density are anticorrelated when the J = 2-1 transition data, the J = 3-2 transition data, or both are included. For sources with either two or three values of the excitation temperature, we find average values of the midpoint of the density range that is consistent with all of the observations equal to 68 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 100 K and 92 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 50 K. The data for this set of sources imply that diffuse molecular clouds are characterized by an average thermal pressure between 4600 and 6800 K cm{sup -3}.

  15. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  16. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  17. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bison, G; Daum, M; Kirch, K; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Meier, M; Ries, D; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Zsigmond, G

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCN) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments 32 liter e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  18. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Krempel, J. [Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Lauss, B., E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Meier, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ries, D., E-mail: dieter.ries@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  19. Microwave/Sonic Apparatus Measures Flow and Density in Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the rate of flow and the mass density of a liquid or slurry includes a special section of pipe instrumented with microwave and sonic sensors, and a computer that processes digitized readings taken by the sensors. The apparatus was conceived specifically for monitoring a flow of oil-well-drilling mud, but the basic principles of its design and operation are also applicable to monitoring flows of other liquids and slurries.

  20. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... to the least relative influence of weight and stress loading because of migration of calcium to weight and stress-bearing areas. Since the effect of this migration could mask local osteoporotic bone loss, shoulder BMD measurement is likely to minimize false indicators of healthy bone in women with high BMI...

  1. Cosmic infrared background fluctuations of the COSMOS field in the SPLASH survey: new measurements and the cosmological explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) is the integrated emission of all sources through cosmic time and carries an abundance of information about the star formation and galaxy growth in the Universe. Due to significant and complex foregrounds from our Galaxy, the optimal way to study the unresolved background is to actually study its fluctuations, especially at large angular scales where they reflect the clustering of unresolved galaxies. Our new measurements of the CIB fluctuations reach the largest angular scale to date for such a study, thanks to new observations of the COSMOS field from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We analyzed Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 um data of the whole field, with an average depth of 1.33 hour/pixel over 4 epochs spanning 2 years. We found that the auto-power spectra are consistent among various epochs and are correlated at the two channels. We confirmed the previously detected excess flux at large scales of the power spectra.The cross-correlation of the CIB fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths is an extremely useful technique to understand the excess flux. The previously seen CIB and X-ray background (CXB) cross-correlation suggests significant contribution to the CIB fluctuations from accreting black holes that is much higher than among any known populations, and such a cross-correlation is also used as an evidence for the existence of direct collapse black holes in the early Universe.In this talk, we will present the first CIB fluctuation measurements of the COSMOS field using the new SPLASH data and we will also revisit the CIB and CXB cross-correlation in this field, which is about 20 times larger than the previous study and therefore with much improved significance levels. Measuring CIB fluctuations is a powerful tool to study the large-scale structure of the Universe. The CIB and CXB cross-correlation can not only provide observational constrains on the theoretical modeling of the CIB

  2. Acceleration of the effect of solute on the entropy-volume cross fluctuation density in aqueous 2-butoxyethanol, 1-propanol, and glycerol: The fourth derivative of Gibbs energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koh; Baluja, Shipra; Inaba, Akira; Koga, Yoshikata

    2011-06-01

    Using a differential pressure perturbation calorimetry developed by us recently [K. Yoshida, S. Baluja, A. Inaba, K. Tozaki, and Y. Koga, "Experimental determination of third derivative of G (III): Differential pressure perturbation calorimetry (II)," J. Solution Chem. (in press)], we experimentally determined the partial molar S-V cross fluctuation density of solute B, SVδB, in binary aqueous solutions for B = 1-propanol (1P) and glycerol (Gly). This third derivative of G provides information about the effect of solute B on the S-V cross fluctuation density, SVδ, in aqueous solution as the concentration of B varies. Having determined SVδB by better than 1% uncertainty, we evaluated for the first time the fourth derivative quantity SVδB-B = N(∂SVδB /∂nB) for B = 1P and Gly graphically without resorting to any fitting functions within several percent. This model-free quantity gives information about the acceleration of the effect of solute B on SVδ. By comparing fourth derivative quantities, SVδB-B, among B = 1P, Gly, and 2-butoxyethanol obtained previously, the distinction of the effect of solute on H2O becomes clearer than before when only the third derivative quantities were available.

  3. Measurement of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgül Köse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine thechanges of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasisvulgaris.Methods: 33 patients, diagnosed with psoriasis vulgarisin Erciyes University, Medical School, Department of Dermatology,and 23 healthy subjects as control group wereincluded in this study. Lumbar and femur bone mineraldensity of all patients and control group were measured.Biochemical tests related to bone metabolism were performed.Results: We did not find statistically significant differencebetween patient and control groups’ bone mineral density.However, the lumbar spine t score of men, were found tobe significantly lower in the patient group than the controlgroup (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant differencein bone mineral density of women between thepatient and control groups. The effects on bone mineraldensity of disease period and using the topical corticosteroidswere not statistically significant.Conclusion: Our study indicates that bone mineral densityof patients with psoriasis vulgaris was not differentfrom healthy subject.Key words: Psoriasis vulgaris, bone mineral density, osteoporosis

  4. Single-beam measurement of bose-einstein fluctuations in a natural gaussian radiation field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.; Bolwijn, P.T.; Veer, J.H.C. van der

    1966-01-01

    Excess noise caused by Bose-Einstein fluctuations in the radiation from the anode of a carbon-arc was detected in the photo current of a cooled InSb photodiode. Its dependence on several parameters was found to agree with our theory.

  5. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects of fi...

  6. Neutralino relic density from ILC measurements in the CPV MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Bélanger, G; Kraml, Sabine; Martyn, H -U; Pukhov, A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss ILC measurements for a specific MSSM scenario with CP phases, where the lightest neutralino is a good candidate for dark matter, annihilating efficiently through t-channel exchange of light staus. These prospective (CP-even) ILC measurements are then used to fit the underlying model parameters. A collider prediction of the relic density of the neutralino from this fit gives 0.116measurements of electric dipole moments is also discussed. Finally we comment on collider measurements at higher energies for refining the prediction of Omega h^2.

  7. Shadowgraph Analysis of Non-equilibrium Fluctuations for Measuring Transport Properties in Microgravity in the GRADFLEX Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croccolo, Fabrizio; Giraudet, Cédric; Bataller, Henri; Cerbino, Roberto; Vailati, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    In a fluid system driven out of equilibrium by the presence of a gradient, fluctuations become long-ranged and their intensity diverges at large spatial scales. This divergence is prevented by vertical confinement and, in a stable configuration, by gravity. Gravity and confinement also affect the dynamics of non-equilibrium fluctuations (NEFs). In fact, small wavelength fluctuations decay diffusively, while the decay of long wavelength ones is either dominated by buoyancy or by confinement. In normal gravity, from the analysis of the dynamics one can extract the diffusion coefficients as well as other transport properties. For example, in a thermodiffusion experiment one can measure the Soret coefficient. Under microgravity, the relaxation of fluctuations occurs by diffusion only and this prevents the determination of the Soret coefficient of a binary mixture from the study of the dynamics. In this work we propose an innovative self-referencing optical method for the determination of the thermal diffusion ratio of a binary mixture that does not require previous knowledge of the temperature difference applied to the sample. The method relies on the determination of the ratio between the mean squared amplitude of concentration and temperature fluctuations. We investigate data from the GRADFLEX experiment, an experiment flown onboard the Russian satellite FOTON M3 in 2007. The investigated sample is a suspension of polystyrene polymer chains (MW=9,100g/mol, concentration 1.8wt %) in toluene, stressed by different temperature gradients. The use of a quantitative shadowgraph technique allows to perform measurements in the absence of delicate alignment and calibration procedures. The statics of the concentration and temperature NEFs are obtained and their ratio is computed. At large wave vectors the ratio becomes constant and is shown to be proportional to the thermal diffusion ratio of the sample.

  8. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    The Ultra-Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ˜0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528 and 530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermo-electrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs' gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs' gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. A gain of ˜100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the edge harmonic oscillation in quiescent H-mode plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS' capabilities.

  9. Note: Design of a full photon-timing recorder down to 1-ns resolution for fluorescence fluctuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Goro, E-mail: gnishi@imd.es.hokudai.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A photon timing recorder was realized in a field programmable gate array to capture all timing data of photons on multiple channels with down to a 1-ns resolution and to transfer all data to a host computer in real-time through universal serial bus with more than 10 M events/s transfer rate. The main concept is that photon time series can be regarded as a serial communication data stream. This recorder was successfully applied for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence fluctuation and lifetime of near-infrared dyes in solution. This design is not only limited to the fluorescence fluctuation measurement but also applicable to any kind of photon counting experiments in a nanosecond time range because of the simple and easily modifiable design.

  10. Fast super-resolution imaging with ultra-high labeling density achieved by joint tagging super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-02-10

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods.

  11. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods. PMID:25665878

  12. The Physical Density of the City—Deconstruction of the Delusive Density Measure with Evidence from Two European Megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Taubenböck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Density is among the most important descriptive as well as normative measures in urban research. While its basic concept is generally understandable, approaches towards the density measure are manifold, diverse and of multidimensional complexity. This evolves from differing thematic, spatial and calculative specifications. Consequently, applied density measures are often used in a subjective, non-transparent, unspecific and thus non-comparable manner. In this paper, we aim at a systematic deconstruction of the measure density. Varying thematic, spatial and calculative dimensions show significant influence on the measure. With both quantitative and qualitative techniques of evaluation, we assess the particular influences on the measure density. To do so, we reduce our experiment setting to a mere physical perspective; that is, the quantitative measures building density, degree of soil sealing, floor space density and, more specifically, the density of generic structural classes such as open spaces and highest built-up density areas. Using up-to-date geodata derived from remote sensing and volunteered geographic information, we build upon high-quality spatial information products such as 3-D city models. Exemplified for the comparison of two European megacities, namely Paris and London, we reveal and systemize necessary variables to be clearly defined for meaningful conclusions using the density measure.

  13. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  14. The impact of mammographic imaging systems on density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer equipment will affect a woman's breast density (BD) measurement. The data set comprised of 40 cases, each containing a combined image of the left craniocaudal (LCC) and left mediolateral oblique (LMLO). These images were obtained from 20 women age between 42-89 years. The images were acquired on two imaging systems (GE and Hologic) one year apart. Volumetric BD was assessed by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average BD% (AvBD%). Twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners assessed the same images using the BIRADS BD scale 1-4. Statistical comparisons were performed on the means using Mann-Whitney, on correlation using Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation and agreement using Cohen's Kappa. The absolute median BIRADS difference between GE and Hologic was 0.225 (2.00 versus 2.00; pBIRADS for GE and Hologic systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; pBIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001).

  15. Application of MODIS GPP to Forecast Risk of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Based on Fluctuations in Reservoir Population Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehman, R.; Heinsch, F. A.; Mills, J. N.; Wagoner, K.; Running, S.

    2003-12-01

    Recent predictive models for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) have used remotely sensed spectral reflectance data to characterize risk areas with limited success. We present an alternative method using gross primary production (GPP) from the MODIS sensor to estimate the effects of biomass accumulation on population density of Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse), the principal reservoir species for Sin Nombre virus (SNV). The majority of diagnosed HPS cases in North America are attributed to SNV, which is transmitted to humans through inhalation of excretions and secretions from infected rodents. A logistic model framework is used to evaluate MODIS GPP, temperature, and precipitation as predictors of P. maniculatus density at established trapping sites across the western United States. Rodent populations are estimated using monthly minimum number alive (MNA) data for 2000 through 2002. Both local meteorological data from nearby weather stations and 1.25 degree x 1 degree gridded data from the NASA DAO were used in the regression model to determine the spatial sensitivity of the response. MODIS eight-day GPP data (1-km resolution) were acquired and binned to monthly average and monthly sum GPP for 3km x 3km grids surrounding each rodent trapping site. The use of MODIS GPP to forecast HPS risk may result in a marked improvement over past reflectance-based risk area characterizations. The MODIS GPP product provides a vegetation dynamics estimate that is unique to disease models, and targets the fundamental ecological processes responsible for increased rodent density and amplified disease risk.

  16. CryoSat-2: Measuring fluctuations of land and marine ice fields from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Richard; Wingham, Duncan; Cullen, Robert

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION CryoSat was chosen as the first of ESA's Earth Explorer Opportunity missions in late 1999, following a competitive selection process [1]. Unfortunately, the CryoSat satellite was lost as the result of a launch failure on 8 October 2005. The decision was made to rebuild the satellite in order to complete the mission, and as a result of this the new satellite, CryoSat-2, will be launched on 25 February 2010. 2. MISSION OBJECTIVES The mission goal of CryoSat is the measurement of secular change in the cryosphere, particularly in the elevation of the ice caps and the thickness of sea ice [2]. The required accuracy corresponds to about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry, although the instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of previous altimetry missions, particularly ERS and EnviSat. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along- track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will enable detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The satellite payload, which includes a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination and a set of star trackers to measure the orientation of the interferometer, is quite complex and demanding. 3. CRYOSAT-1 LAUNCH FAILURE

  17. A multi-channel capacitive probe for electrostatic fluctuation measurement in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Stone, Douglas R.; Triana, Joseph C.; Almagri, Abdulgader F.; Fiksel, Gennady; Ding, Weixing; Sarff, John S.; McCollam, Karsten J.; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2017-02-01

    A 40-channel capacitive probe has been developed to measure the electrostatic fluctuations associated with the tearing modes deep into Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac component of the plasma potential via the voltage induced on stainless steel electrodes capacitively coupled with the plasma through a thin annular layer of boron nitride (BN) dielectric (also serves as the particle shield). When bombarded by the plasma electrons, BN provides a sufficiently large secondary electron emission for the induced voltage to be very close to the plasma potential. The probe consists of four stalks each with ten cylindrical capacitors that are radially separated by 1.5 cm. The four stalks are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid so that at each radial position, there are four electrodes forming a square grid. Every two adjacent radial sets of four electrodes form a cube. The fluctuating electric field can be calculated by the gradient of the plasma potential fluctuations at the eight corners of the cube. The probe can be inserted up to 15 cm (r/a = 0.7) into the plasma. The capacitive probe has a frequency bandwidth from 13 Hz to 100 kHz, amplifier-circuit limit, sufficient for studying the tearing modes (5-30 kHz) in the MST reversed-field pinch.

  18. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  19. Analytical representations of the spread harmonic measure density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2015-05-01

    We study the spread harmonic measure that characterizes the spatial distribution of reaction events on a partially reactive surface. For Euclidean domains in which Brownian motion can be split into independent lateral and transverse displacements, we derive analytical formulas for the spread harmonic measure density and analyze its asymptotic behavior. This analysis is applicable to slab domains, general cylindrical domains, and a half-space. We investigate the spreading effect due to multiple reflections on the surface, and the underlying role of finite reactivity. We discuss further extensions and applications of analytical results to describe Laplacian transfer phenomena such as permeation through semipermeable membranes, secondary current distribution on partially blocking electrodes, and surface relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance.

  20. Selection and Evaluation of a new Pu Density Measurement Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziewinska, Krystyna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Patrick P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziewinski, Jacek J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Stephen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Verne, Jake A [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Rajesh, P [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts leading to selection of a new fluid for the determination of the density of large Pu parts. Based on an extended literature search, perfluorotributylamine (FC-43) was chosen for an experimental study. Plutonium coupon corrosion studies were performed by exposing Pu to deaerated and aerated solutions and measuring corrosion gravimetrically. Corrosion rates were determined. Samples of deaerated and aerated perfuluorotributylamine (FC-43) were also irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays (96 Gy/min) to various doses. The samples were extracted with NaOH and analyzed by IC and showed the presence of F and Cl{sup -}. The G-values were established. In surface study experiments Pu coupons were exposed to deaerated and aerated solutions of FC-43 and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data indicate that there is no detectable surface effect caused by the new fluid. In conclusion the FC-43 was determined to be a very effective and practical fluid for Pu density measurements.

  1. Density-fluctuation symbolic computation on the (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Kudryashov-Sinelshchikov equation for a bubbly liquid with experimental support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Liquids with gas bubbles are commonly seen in medical science, natural science, daily life and engineering. Nonlinear-wave symbolic computation on the (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Kudryashov-Sinelshchikov model for a bubbly liquid is hereby performed. An auto-Bäcklund transformation and with some solitonic solutions are obtained. With respect to the density fluctuation of the bubble-liquid mixture, both the auto-Bäcklund transformation and solitonic solutions depend on the bubble-liquid-viscosity, transverse-perturbation, bubble-liquid-nonlinearity and bubble-liquid-dispersion coefficient functions. We note that some shock waves given by our solutions have been observed by the gas-bubble/liquid-mixture experiments. Effects on a bubbly liquid with respect to the bubble-liquid-viscosity, transverse-perturbation, bubble-liquid-nonlinearity and bubble-liquid-dispersion coefficient functions might be detected by the future gas-bubble/liquid-mixture experiments.

  2. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Source Masses in Time-of-Swing Method of Measuring G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; SHAO Cheng-Gang; TU Liang-Cheng; LUO Jun

    2009-01-01

    A method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is presented to measure the density inhomogeneity of the stainless steel (SS316) sphere prepared for measuring G using time-of-swing method. The experimental result shows that the relative density inhomogeneity of the sphere is better than 5.9 × 10-4 over the volume of 0.272 × 0.234 × 0.005 mm3. If we assume that the density inhomogeneity of the spheres used in our G measurement is the same as that of the sphere destroyed in testing, it will contribute to G value with an uncertainty of less than O.034 ppm in our G measurement. Furthermore, the mass centre offset from the geometric centre of the sphere will be less than 4.3 × 10-4 μm due to this inhomogeneity.

  3. Autocorrelation in ultraviolet radiation measured at ground level using detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Filho, Paulo Cavalcante; da Silva, Francisco Raimundo; Corso, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the autocorrelation among four ultraviolet (UV) radiation data sets obtained at 305 nm, 320 nm, 340 nm, and 380 nm. The data were recorded at ground level at the INPE climate station in Natal, RN, Brazil, which is a site close to the equator. The autocorrelations were computed by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to estimate the index α. We found that the ​fluctuations in the UV radiation data were fractal, with scale-free behavior at a DFA index α ≃ 0.7. In addition, we performed a power law spectral analysis, which showed that the power spectrum exhibited a power law behavior with an exponent of β ≃ 0.45. Given that the theoretical result is β = 2 α - 1, these two results are in good agreement. Moreover, the application of the DFA ​method to the UV radiation data required detrending using a polynomial with an order of at least eight, which was related to the complex daily solar radiation curve obtained at ground level in a tropical region. The results indicated that the α exponent of UV radiation is similar to other climatic records such as air temperature, wind, or rain, but not solar activity.

  4. Lower-thermospheric wind fluctuations measured with an FPI during pulsating aurora at Tromsø, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oyama

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations were conducted with a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI at a wavelength of 557.7 nm, an all-sky camera at a wavelength of 557.7 nm, and the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar during the Dynamics and Energetics of the Lower Thermosphere in Aurora 2 (DELTA-2 campaign in January 2009. This paper concentrated on two events during periods of pulsating aurora. The lower-thermospheric wind velocity measured with the FPI showed obvious fluctuations in both vertical and horizontal components. Of particular interest is that the location of the fluctuations was found in a darker area that appeared within the pulsating aurora. During the same time period, the EISCAT radar observed sporadic enhancements in the F-region backscatter echo power, which suggests the presence of low-energy electron (1 keV or lower precipitation coinciding with increase in amplitude of the electromagnetic wave (at the order of 10 Hz or higher. While we have not yet identified the dominant mechanism causing the fluctuations in FPI-derived wind velocity during the pulsating aurora, the frictional heating energy dissipated by the electric-field perturbations may be responsible for the increase in ionospheric thermal energy thus modifying the local wind dynamics in the lower thermosphere.

  5. Measurement of Bone Mineral Density in Male Detainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bakan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the increased risk for osteoporosis due to closed environment and sedentary lifestyle of prisoners. In this way, we planned to inform prisoners and supervisors for protective measures that should be taken if low bone mineral density (BMD is detected compared with normal population. Materials and Methods: Sixty six prisoner men over the age of 45 as the study group and 66 male volunteers who are not detainees over the age of 45 as a control group were included in the study. All participants' age, occupation, duration in prison, habits, nutrition, exercise, diseases and medications used were noted. BMD values were measured using a phalangeal radiographic absorptiometry (Alara Metriscan®. Results: BMD values in the study group were measured as 0.341±0.030 g/cm2 and as 0.346±0.029 g/cm2 in the control group (p=0.968. BMD values of the study group were lower than those of the control group. Conclusion: In this study, we found that BMD values of the detainees were lower than those of the control group but this difference was not statistically significant. However, there was a negative correlation between BMD values and duration in prison. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2012;18: 81-5

  6. Reliability of the two-point measurement of the spatial correlation length from Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals in fusion-grade plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jaewook; Lampert, M; Ghim, Y -c

    2016-01-01

    A statistical method for the estimation of spatial correlation lengths of Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals with two measurement points is examined to quantitatively evaluate its reliability (variance) and accuracy (bias error). The standard deviation of the correlation value is analytically derived for randomly distributed Gaussian shaped fluctuations satisfying stationarity and homogeneity, allowing us to evaluate, as a function of fluctuation-to-noise ratios, sizes of averaging time windows and ratios of the distance between the two measurement points to the true correlation length, the goodness of the two-point measurement for estimating the spatial correlation length. Analytic results are confirmed with numerically generated synthetic data and real experimental data obtained with the KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Our results can be applied to Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals where a correlation length must be measured with only two measurement points.

  7. Reliability of the two-point measurement of the spatial correlation length from Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals in fusion-grade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Nam, Y. U.; Lampert, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical method for the estimation of the spatial correlation lengths of Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals with two measurement points is examined to quantitatively evaluate its reliability (variance) and accuracy (bias error). The standard deviation of the correlation value is analytically derived for randomly distributed Gaussian shaped fluctuations satisfying stationarity and homogeneity, allowing us to evaluate, as a function of fluctuation-to-noise ratios, the sizes of averaging time windows and the ratios of the distance between the two measurement points to the true correlation length, and the goodness of the two-point measurement for estimating the spatial correlation length. Analytic results are confirmed with numerically generated synthetic data and real experimental data obtained with the KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Our results can be applied to Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals where a correlation length must be measured with only two measurement points.

  8. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  9. Femtosecond measurements of electric fields: from classical amplitudes to quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Claudius; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    Ultrabroadband electro-optic sampling is presented as an extremely sensitive technique to detect electric field amplitudes in free space. The temporal resolution provided by few-femtosecond laser pulses results in a bandwidth exceeding 100 THz, potentially covering the entire infrared spectral range. A pedagogic introduction to the operational principle of the method is given along the lines of a classical coherent input field and a zincblende-type electro-optic sensor. We then show that even the bare vacuum fluctuations of the electric field in the quantum ground state may be detected. This time-domain approach to quantum physics operates directly on sub-cycle scales where no local energy conservation holds. Therefore, signals may be obtained from purely virtual photons without amplification to finite intensity.

  10. A Novel Platform to Study the Effect of Small-scale Turbulent Density Fluctuations on Underwater Imaging in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    velocities in the probe- or earth -referenced data (left panel, blue line). The ambiguity velocity is determined by an instrument setting, which controls the...involved in the Batchelor fit. Furthermore, a spectral correction to the signal measured by the thermistor is applied through a single pole response function...the inverse of the filter function. To ensure thatU varies as little as possible over the segment used to calculate temperature gradient spectra

  11. The competition of different measures to increase flexibility in energy systems with a high share of fluctuating renewable energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Christoph; Teufel, Felix [EnBW Energie Baden-Wuerttemberg AG, Karlsruhe (Germany). Research and Innovation Dept.

    2013-04-01

    The continuous expansion of electricity generation from intermittent renewable energy sources (RES) is changing the present generation structure that has been designed to follow fluctuating demand considerably. In order to utilise a high share of supply-dependent RES, the future energy system needs to become more flexible than it is today. This paper describes the different flexibility options that can be implemented with regard to their major restrictions as well as their suitability to balance a certain deficit or surplus of RES generation. Furthermore, it outlines the importance of competition between these different balancing measures to meet the required level of flexibility at lowest cost. (orig.)

  12. How to measure the charm density in the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, N Ya

    2012-01-01

    We study two experimental ways to measure the heavy-quark content of the proton: using the Callan-Gross ratio $R(x,Q^2)=F_L/F_T$ and/or the azimuthal $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ asymmetry in DIS. Our approach is based on the following observations. First, the ratio $R(x,Q^2)=F_L/F_T$ and azimuthal $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ asymmetry in heavy-quark leptoproduction are stable, both parametrically and perturbatively, within pQCD. Second, both these quantities are sensitive to resummation of the mass logarithms of the type $\\alpha_{s}\\ln(Q^{2}/m^{2})$. We conclude that the heavy-quark densities in the nucleon can, in principle, be determined from high-$Q^2$ data on the Callan-Gross ratio and/or the azimuthal asymmetry. In particular, the charm content of the proton can be measured in future studies at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron (LHeC) and Electron-Ion (EIC) Colliders.

  13. Effect of Clothing on Measurement of Bone Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Feldman, Anna Z; Malabanan, Alan O; Abate, Ejigayehu G; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Yano-Litwin, Amanda; Dorazio, Jolene; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether allowing patients to have BMD (bone mineral density) studies acquired while wearing radiolucent clothing adlib contributes appreciably to the measurement error seen. To examine this question, a spine phantom was scanned 30 times without any clothing, while draped with a gown, and while draped with heavy winter clothing. The effect on mean BMD and on SD (standard deviation) was assessed. The effect of clothing on mean or SD of the area was not significant. The effect of clothing on mean and SD for BMD was small but significant and was around 1.6% for the mean. However, the effect on BMD precision was much more clinically important. Without clothing the spine phantom had an least significant change of 0.0077 gm/cm(2), while when introducing variability of clothing the least significant change rose as high as 0.0305 gm/cm(2). We conclude that, adding clothing to the spine phantom had a small but statistically significant effect on the mean BMD and on variance of the measurement. It is unlikely that the effect on mean BMD has any clinical significance, but the effect on the reproducibility (precision) of the result is likely clinically significant.

  14. First measurements results of the LHC longitudinal density monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff , A; Bravin, E; Boccardi, A; Bozyigit, S; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Roncarolo, F; Welsch, C P; Fisher, A S

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, for example to check the injection quality and to characterize the development of ghost bunches before and during the physics periods. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. The LDM is able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. The LDM operated during the 2010 lead ion run and during 2011 with protons. Measurements from both runs are presented in this contribution along with an analysis of the LDM performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  15. Constraints for proton structure fluctuations from exclusive scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mäntysaari, H

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the average density profile of the proton and the amount of event-by-event fluctuations by simultaneously calculating the coherent and incoherent exclusive diffractive vector meson production cross section in deep inelastic scattering. Working within the Color Glass Condensate picture, we find that the gluonic density of the proton must have large geometric fluctuations in order to describe the experimentally measured large incoherent cross section.

  16. A Nonlinear Dynamic Characterization of The Universal Scrape-off Layer Plasma Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mekkaoui, A

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic differential equation of plasma density dynamic is derived, consistent with the experimentally measured pdf and the theoretical quadratic nonlinearity. The plasma density evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale and is driven by a stochastic white noise proportional to the turbulence fluctuations amplitude, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level $n_e(t)/\\bar{n}_e$.

  17. Real-time Measurement of Mechanical Fluctuations in Carbon Nanotube Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsioutsios, Ioannis; Tavernarakis, Alexandros; Osmond, Johann; Verlot, Pierre; Bachtold, Adrian

    Carbon nanotube resonators have been recently shown to hold an exceptional sensing potential, relying on their extremely low mass. As a consequence, they are also expected to transduce the fundamental thermal force into very large motion fluctuations. Recently, an increasing number of theoretical proposals have suggested that this property may strongly affect the vibrational behaviour of carbon nanotube resonators, which has so far remained unobserved. Here we report the first, real-time detection of the thermally-induced vibrations in carbon nanotube resonators with masses in the 10 ag range. We show that coupling singly-clamped carbon nanotubes to a focused electron beam enables the full access to their mechanical trajectories. Our detailed analysis demonstrates that our devices behave as linear harmonic oscillators undergoing thermally-driven Brownian motion. Our result establish the viability of carbon nanotube resonator technology at room temperature and paves the way towards the observing novel thermodynamics regimes in nanomechanics. ICFO, Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain.

  18. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  19. Fluctuation in measurements of pulmonary nodule under tidal volume ventilation on four-dimensional computed tomography: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateishi, Ukihide [National Cancer Center Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Okumura, Miwa [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, CT Systems Development, Otawara (Japan); Moriyama, Noriyuki [National Cancer Center, Division of Cancer Screening, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    The present study aimed to assess the feasibility of four-dimensional (4D) chest computed tomography (CT) under tidal volume ventilation and the impact of respiratory motion on quantitative analysis of CT measurements. Forty-four pulmonary nodules in patients with metastatic disease were evaluated. CT examinations were performed using a 256 multidetector-row CT (MDCT) unit. Volume data were obtained from the lower lung fields (128 mm) above the diaphragm during dynamic CT acquisition. The CT parameters used were 120 kV, 100 or 150 mA, 0.5 s{sup -1}, and 0.5 mm collimation. Image data were reconstructed every 0.1 s during one respiratory cycle by a 180 reconstruction algorithm for four independent fractions of the respiratory cycle. Pulmonary nodules were measured along their longest and shortest axes using electronic calipers. Automated volumetry was assessed using commercially available software. The diameters of long and short axes in each frame were 9.0-9.6 mm and 7.1-7.5 mm, respectively. There was fluctuation of the long axis diameters in the third fraction. The mean volume in each fraction ranged from 365 to 394 mm{sup 3}. Statistically significant fluctuation was also found in the third fraction. 4D-CT under tidal volume ventilation is feasible to determine diameter or volume of the pulmonary nodule. (orig.)

  20. Measuring protoplanetary disk gas surface density profiles with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Jonathan P Williams Conor

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best (2014) to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, Mgas = 0.048 solar masse, and accretion disk characteristic size Rc = 213au and gradient gamma = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2--1 image and indicates an abundance ratio [13CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2--1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3-10 Jupiter masses at 150pc, ALMA observations with a resolutio...

  1. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  2. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  3. Measurements of the fluctuating liquid velocity of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Juan Carlos; Mendez, Santos; Zenit, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    Experiments were performed in a vertical channel to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. The capillaries are small enough to generate bubbles in the range of 1 to 6 mm in diameter. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, the vertical component of the fluctuating liquid velocity was obtained using a flying hot wire anemometer technique. The system is characterized by the dimensionless Reynolds and Weber numbers in the range of 22measurements were obtained for three ratios R of gas volume fraction: R = 1/3, 1 and 3, where R=αlarge/αsmall% . The results show that the flow agitation, characterized by the liquid velocity variance increases with bubble concentration. We also found that the variance, normalized with the mean bubble velocity squared, Tf% =Uf^^'2/Ub^2, increased as the Reynolds number decreased. Bidisperse flows, in general, show larger values of fluctuation.

  4. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, Katie; Orban, Chris; Colgan, James; Ducret, Jean-Eric; Fontes, Christopher J.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Heeter, Robert F.; Kilcrease, Dave; Le Pennec, Maelle; Mancini, Roberto; Perry, Ted; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Trantham, Matt

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun’s opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al, 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions.This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  5. Thin laser beam wandering and intensity fluctuations method for evapotranspiration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Antonin; Fernandez, Angel; Perez, Dario G.; Barille, Regis; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2016-06-01

    We compare in this study two simple optical setups to measure the atmospheric turbulence characterized by the refractive index structure parameter Cn2. The corresponding heat flux values sensed by the laser beam propagation are calculated leading to the plant evapotranspiration. The results are discussed and compared to measurements obtained with a well-known and calibrated eddy-covariant instrument. A fine analysis gives a good insight of the accuracy of the optical devices proposed here to measure the crop evapotranspiration. Additional evapotranspiration values calculated with meteorological sensor data and the use of different models are also compared in parallel.

  6. Quantum-limited measurements of distance fluctuations with a multimode detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Valérian; Roslund, Jonathan; Jian, Pu; Fabre, Claude; Treps, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    An experimental scheme is introduced to measure multiple parameters that are encoded in the phase quadrature of a light beam. Using a modal description and a spectrally resolved homodyne detection, it is shown that all of the information is collected simultaneously, such that a single measurement allows extracting the value of multiple parameters post-facto. With a femtosecond laser source, we apply this scheme to a measurement of the delay between two pulses with a shot-noise limited sensitivity as well as extracting the dispersion value of a dispersive medium.

  7. Experimental Measurements of Concentration Fluctuations and Scales in a Dispersing Plume in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Obtained Using a Very Fast Response Concentration Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    VOLUME 33 Experimental Measurements of Concentration Fluctuations and Scales in a Dispersing Plume in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Obtained Using a...final form 22 December 1993) ABSTRACT High-frequency fluctuations of concentration in a plume dispersing in the atmospheric surface layer have... layer is of critical importance in many industrial and envi- ronmental fluid mechanics problems, ranging from air quality control and regulation of

  8. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  9. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knowlton

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  10. Fluctuation modes of nanoconfined DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpusenko, Alena; Carpenter, Joshua H; Zhou, Chunda; Lim, Shuang Fang; Pan, Junhan; Riehn, Robert

    2012-01-15

    We report an experimental investigation of the magnitude of length and density fluctuations in DNA that has been stretched in nanofluidic channels. We find that the experimental data can be described using a one-dimensional overdamped oscillator chain with nonzero equilibrium spring length and that a chain of discrete oscillators yields a better description than a continuous chain. We speculate that the scale of these discrete oscillators coincides with the scale at which the finite extensibility of the polymer manifests itself. We discuss how the measurement process influences the apparent measured dynamic properties, and outline requirements for the recovery of true physical quantities.

  11. Investigating the temporal fluctuations in geoelectrical and geochemical signals Jointly measured in a seismic area of Southern Apennine chain (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Piscitelli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse geoelectrical and geochemical time series jointly measured by means of a multiparametric automatic station close to an anomalous fluid emission in Val d'Agri (Basilicata, Southern Italy. In the investigated are some destructive seismic events occurred in past and recent years. We analysed the temporal fluctuations of the signals by spectral tools. We detected scaling behaviours in the power spectra of the time series recorded, that are typical fingerprints of fractional Brownian motions. The estimated values of the spectral indices reveal the presence of antipersistent behaviour in the time dynamics of all geoelectrical and geochemical data recorded. This work intends to improve our knowledge of the inner time dynamics of geophysical non-seismometric parameters.

  12. Emotional fluctuations in Bob Dylan's lyrics measured by the dictionary of affect accompany events and phases in his life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whissell, Cynthia

    2008-04-01

    Lyrics for Bob Dylan's songs between 1962 and 2001 (close to 100,000 words) were scored with the help of the Dictionary of Affect in Language (Whissell, 2006). Means for Pleasantness, Activation, and Imagery are reported for 22 Blocks characterizing this time span. Significant but weak differences across Blocks were found for all three measures at the level of individual words. Emotional fluctuations in words included in Bob Dylan's lyrics accompanied events and phases in his life, although they were not entirely dictated by these events. Dylan used more highly Imaged and more Active words at times when his work was critically acclaimed. More Passive word choices characterized times of prolonged stress, and more Pleasant choices times of experimentation. Dylan's three popularity peaks were used to divide the singer's career into three stages (rhetor, poet, sage) which differed in terms of pronouns used.

  13. Measurement of the lidar signal fluctuation with a shot-per-shot instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux, E; Fiorani, L

    1998-10-20

    A measurement of the signal noise was carried out with a shot-per-shot lidar. This system was operated in the UV spectral region for ozone profiling in the low troposphere. We report on important discrepancies between our results and the estimations based on the assumptions commonly supporting the numerical modeling of lidar experiments.

  14. Microwave-induced excess quasiparticles in superconducting resonators measured through correlated conductivity fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Yates, S.J.C.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the number of quasiparticles and their lifetime in aluminium superconducting microwave resonators. The number of excess quasiparticles below 160 mK decreases from 72 to 17 μm−3 with a 6 dB decrease of the microwave power. The quasiparticle lifetime increases accordingly from 1.4 to

  15. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Yoo, A.J.; Beenen, L.F.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Blanken, M.D. den; Wismans, C.; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and

  16. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. Santos (Emilie M.); A.J. Yoo (Albert J.); L.F.M. Beenen (Ludo); O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); M.D. Den Blanken (Mark D.); C. Wismans (Carrie); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); C.B. Majoie (Charles); H. Marquering (Henk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by

  17. Density-based similarity measures for content based search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hush, Don R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We consider the query by multiple example problem where the goal is to identify database samples whose content is similar to a coUection of query samples. To assess the similarity we use a relative content density which quantifies the relative concentration of the query distribution to the database distribution. If the database distribution is a mixture of the query distribution and a background distribution then it can be shown that database samples whose relative content density is greater than a particular threshold {rho} are more likely to have been generated by the query distribution than the background distribution. We describe an algorithm for predicting samples with relative content density greater than {rho} that is computationally efficient and possesses strong performance guarantees. We also show empirical results for applications in computer network monitoring and image segmentation.

  18. Multiple Traffic Control Using Wireless Sensor and Density Measuring Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita RAI

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present scenario vehicular travel is increasing all over the world, especially in large urban areas. Therefore for simulating and optimizing traffic control to better accommodate this increasing demand is arises. In this paper we studied the optimization of traffic light controller in a City using wireless sensor and CCTV (Camera. We have proposed a traffic light controller and simulator that allows us to study different situation of traffic density in City and controlling the traffic of entire City by visual monitoring using CCTV. Using wireless sensor we can easily senses the density of traffic because the general architecture of wireless sensor network is an infrastructure less communication network.

  19. Development of a pressure based vortex-shedding meter: measuring unsteady mass-flow in variable density gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, C. L.; Winroth, M.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2016-08-01

    An entirely pressure-based vortex-shedding meter has been designed for use in practical time-dependent flows. The meter is capable of measuring mass-flow rate in variable density gases in spite of the fact that fluid temperature is not directly measured. Unlike other vortex meters, a pressure based meter is incredibly robust and may be used in industrial type flows; an environment wholly unsuitable for hot-wires for example. The meter has been tested in a number of static and dynamic flow cases, across a range of mass-flow rates and pressures. The accuracy of the meter is typically better than about 3% in a static flow and resolves the fluctuating mass-flow with an accuracy that is better than or equivalent to a hot-wire method.

  20. Cross-diagnostic comparison of fluctuation measurements in a cylindrical argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Adam; Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Tynan, George

    2016-10-01

    The advent of fast imaging diagnostics, which provide two-dimensional measurements on relevant plasma time scales, has proven invaluable for interpreting plasma dynamics in laboratory devices. Despite its success, imaging remains a qualitative aid for many studies, because intensity is difficult to map onto a single physical variable for use in a theoretical model. This work continues our exploration of the relationship between visible-light imaging and other diagnostics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX). CSDX is a well-characterized linear machine producing dense plasmas relevant to the tokamak edge (Te 5 eV, ne 1013 /cc). Visible light from ArI and ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a fast digital camera, floating potential and ion-saturation current are measured by an array of electrostatic probe tips, and average profiles of ion temperature and velocity are obtained using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We present a detailed comparison between these measurements, including temporal, spatial, and spectral properties in various operational regimes.

  1. Measurement of air-refractive-index fluctuation from laser frequency shift with uncertainty of order 10-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh Quoc, Tuan; Ishige, Masashi; Ohkubo, Yuria; Aketagawa, Masato

    2009-12-01

    In the previous work (Ishige et al 2009 Meas. Sci. Technol. 20 084019), we presented a method of measuring the relative air-refractive-index fluctuation (Δnair) from the laser frequency shift with the measurement uncertainty of order 10-8 using a phase modulation homodyne interferometer (Basile et al 1991 Metrologia 28 455), which was supported by an ultralow thermal expansion material (ULTEM) and an external cavity laser diode (ECLD). In this paper, an improvement in the uncertainty of the Δnair measurement is presented. The improvement method is based on a Fabry-Perot cavity constructed on the ULTEM, which has a thermal expansion coefficient of 2 × 10-8 K-1 and an ECLD. The Pound-Drever-Hall method (Drever et al 1983 Appl. Phys. B 31 97) is also used to control the ECLD frequency to track the resonance of the cavity. Δnair can be derived from the ECLD frequency shift. The estimated measurement uncertainty of Δnair for a short time (~150 s) in the experiment is of order 2.5 × 10-9 or less.

  2. Temporal Changes in Local Functional Connectivity Density Reflect the Temporal Variability of the Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations in Gray Matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tomasi

    Full Text Available Data-driven functional connectivity density (FCD mapping is being increasingly utilized to assess brain connectomics at rest in the healthy brain and its disruption in neuropsychiatric diseases with the underlying assumption that the spatiotemporal hub distribution is stationary. However, recent studies show that functional connectivity is highly dynamic. Here we study the temporal variability of the local FCD (lFCD at high spatiotemporal resolution (2-mm isotropic; 0.72s using a sliding-window approach and 'resting-state' datasets from 40 healthy subjects collected under the Human Connectome Project. Prominent functional connectivity hubs in visual and posterior parietal cortices had pronounced temporal changes in local FCD. These dynamic patterns in the strength of the lFCD hubs occurred in cortical gray matter with high sensitivity (up to 85% and specificity (> 85% and showed high reproducibility (up to 72% across sessions and high test-retest reliability (ICC(3,1 > 0.5. The temporal changes in lFCD predominantly occurred in medial occipitoparietal regions and were proportional to the strength of the connectivity hubs. The temporal variability of the lFCD was associated with the amplitude of the low frequency fluctuations (ALFF. Pure randomness did not account for the probability distribution of lFCD. Shannon entropy increased in proportion to the strength of the lFCD hubs suggesting high average flow of information per unit of time in the lFCD hubs, particularly in medial occipitoparietal regions. Thus, the higher dynamic range of the lFCD hubs is consistent with their role in the complex orchestration of interacting brain networks.

  3. Fast PSP measurements of wall-pressure fluctuation in low-speed flows: improvements using proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Yingzheng

    2016-04-01

    Fast pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is very useful in flow diagnostics due to its fast response and high spatial resolution, but its applications in low-speed flows are usually challenging due to limitations of paint's pressure sensitivity and the capability of high-speed imagers. The poor signal-to-noise ratio in low-speed cases makes it very difficult to extract useful information from the PSP data. In this study, unsteady PSP measurements were made on a flat plate behind a cylinder in a low-speed wind tunnel (flow speed from 10 to 17 m/s). Pressure fluctuations (Δ P) on the plate caused by vortex-plate interaction were recorded continuously by fast PSP (using a high-speed camera) and a microphone array. Power spectrum of pressure fluctuations and phase-averaged Δ P obtained from PSP and microphone were compared, showing good agreement in general. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was used to reduce noise in PSP data and extract the dominant pressure features. The PSP results reconstructed from selected POD modes were then compared to the pressure data obtained simultaneously with microphone sensors. Based on the comparison of both instantaneous Δ P and root-mean-square of Δ P, it was confirmed that POD analysis could effectively remove noise while preserving the instantaneous pressure information with good fidelity, especially for flows with strong periodicity. This technique extends the application range of fast PSP and can be a powerful tool for fundamental fluid mechanics research at low speed.

  4. Resolving Vacuum Fluctuations in an Electrical Circuit by Measuring the Lamb Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragner, Andreas; Goppl, Martin; Blais, Alexandre; Wallraff, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Quantum theory predicts that empty space is not truly empty. Even in the absence of any particles or radiation, in pure vacuum, virtual particles are constantly created and annihilated. In an electromagnetic field, the presence of virtual photons manifests itself as a small renormalization of the energy of a quantum system, known as the Lamb shift. We present an experimental observation of the Lamb shift in a solid-state system. The strong dispersive coupling of a superconducting electronic circuit acting as a quantum bit (qubit) to the vacuum field in a transmission-line resonator leads to measurable Lamb shifts of up to 1.4% of the qubit transition frequency. The qubit is also observed to couple more strongly to the vacuum field than to a single photon inside the cavity, an effect that is explained by taking into account the limited anharmonicity of the higher excited qubit states.

  5. Density measurement of confined water with neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kamitakahara, William [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University; Mou, Chung-Yuan [National Taiwan University; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chang, Sung C [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This is a response to Soper's two comments (1) regarding our papers (2, 3) in PNAS that (a) the distribution of water across the pores is not uniform and (b) the majority of water may reside outside the pores. Here, we show that we have given proper consideration to both issues and have reconfirmed the validity of our method and conclusion as elaborated in the following. The possibility that layering effects across the pores may introduce errors in associating the (100) interchannel peak height with density is not a new idea (reference 3 in ref. 1), and it has already been addressed (2). The arguments of Sopor (4) mainly rest on the assumption that the average density of water does not depend on temperature.

  6. Density Measurement System for Weights of 1 kg to 20 kg Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jae; Lee, Woo Gab; Abdurahman, Mohammed; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    This paper presents a density measurement system to determine density of weights from 1 kg to 20 kg using hydrostatic weighing. The system works based on Archimedes principle. The density of reference liquid is determined using this setup while determining the density of the test weight. Density sphere is used as standard density ball to determine density of the reference liquid. A new immersion pan is designed for dual purpose to carry the density sphere and the cylindrical test weight for weighing in liquid. Main parts of the setup are an electronic balance, a thermostat controlled liquid bath, reference weights designed for bottom weighing, dual purpose immersion pans and stepping motors to load and unload in weighing process. The results of density measurement will be evaluated as uncertainties for weights of 1 kg to 20 kg.

  7. Measurement of the fluctuating temperature field in a heated swirling jet with BOS tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Henning M.; Oberleithner, Kilian; Paschereit, C. Oliver; Sieber, Moritz

    2017-07-01

    This work investigates the potential of background-oriented schlieren tomography (3D-BOS) for the temperature field reconstruction in a non-isothermal swirling jet undergoing vortex breakdown. The evaluation includes a quantitative comparison of the mean and phase-averaged temperature field with thermocouple and fast-response resistance thermometer as well as a qualitative comparison between the temperature field and the flow field obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV). Compared to other temperature-measuring techniques, 3D-BOS enables non-invasive capturing of the entire three-dimensional temperature field. In contrast to previous 3D-BOS applications, the present investigation makes use of the special character of the flow, which provides a global instability that leads to a rotational symmetry of the jet. Additionally, the rotational motion of the jet is used to obtain a tomographic reconstruction from a single camera. The quality of 3D-BOS results with respect to the physical setup as well as the numerical procedure is analyzed and discussed. Furthermore, a new approach for the treatment of thin occluding objects in the field of view is presented.

  8. Influence of the turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation on the sound intensity measurement in a mean flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SHI, Xiao-jun; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    overwhelm the true source pressure in some cases. In this paper, the model of the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is described firstly. Based upon the developed model, the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is calculated using the available models of the wave...

  9. Gas-driven lava lake fluctuations at Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) revealed by MODIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergniolle, Sylvie; Bouche, Emmanuella

    2016-09-01

    The long-lived lava lake of Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) is remotely monitored by moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometers (MODIS) installed on satellites. The Normalised Thermal Index (NTI) (Wright et al. Remote Sens Environ 82:135-155 2002) is shown to be proportional to the volume of the lava lake based on visual observations. The lava lake's variable level can be plausibly related to a stable foam, i.e. a mixture composed of densely packed non-coalescing bubbles in suspension within a liquid. This foam is trapped at the top of the magma reservoir, and its thickness changes in response to the gas flux feeding the foam being successively turned on and off. The temporal evolution of the foam thickness, and the resulting variation of the volume of the lava lake, is calculated numerically by assuming that the gas flux feeding the foam, initially constant and homogeneous since December 9, 2002, is suddenly stopped on December 13, 2002 and not restarted before May 2003. The best fit between the theoretical foam thickness and the level of the lava lake deduced from the NTI provides an estimate of both the reservoir radius, 155-170 m, and the gas flux feeding the foam, 5.5×10-3-7.2×10-3 m 3 s -1 when existing. This is in agreement with previous estimates from acoustic measurements (Bouche et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 295:37-48 2010). The very good agreement between the theoretical foam thickness and that deduced from MODIS data shows for the first time the existence of a regime based on the behaviour of a stable foam, whose spreading towards the conduit ("wide" conduit condition), can explain the long-lived activity. Our predictive model, which links the gas flux at the vent to the foam spreading, could potentially be used on any volcano with a long-lived activity. The underlying gas flux and the horizontal surface area of the magma reservoir can then be deduced by combining modelling to continuous measurements of gas flux. The lava lake, when high, often shows

  10. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  11. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  12. Beat-induced fluctuations in auditory cortical beta-band activity: Using EEG to measure age-related changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Cirelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available People readily extract regularity in rhythmic auditory patterns, enabling prediction of the onset of the next beat. Recent magnetoencephalography (MEG research suggests that such prediction is reflected by the entrainment of oscillatory networks in the brain to the tempo of the sequence. In particular, induced beta-band oscillatory activity from auditory cortex decreases after each beat onset and rebounds prior to the onset of the next beat across tempi in a predictive manner. The objective of the present study was to examine the development of such oscillatory activity by comparing electroencephalography (EEG measures of beta-band fluctuations in 7-year-old children to adults. EEG was recorded while participants listened passively to isochronous tone sequences at three tempi (390, 585, and 780ms for onset-to-onset interval. In adults, induced power in the high beta-band (20-25 Hz decreased after each tone onset and rebounded prior to the onset of the next tone across tempo conditions, consistent with MEG findings. In children, a similar pattern was measured in the two slower tempo conditions, but was weaker in the fastest condition. The results indicate that the beta-band timing network works similarly in children, although there are age-related changes in consistency and the tempo range over which it operates.

  13. Multi Point Velocity, Density and Temperature Measurements using LITA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a nonintrusive, transient-grating optical technique that provides simultaneous high-accuracy measurements of velocity,...

  14. Analysis of density fluctuations in the Tore Supra tokamak. Up-down asymmetries and limiter effect on plasma turbulence; Etude des fluctuations de density dans les plasmas du tokamak Tore Supra. Asymetries haut-bas et effet du limiteur sur la turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenzi, Ch

    1999-10-29

    In magnetic fusion devices, the optimisation of the power deposition profile on plasma facing components crucially depends on the heat diffusivity across the magnetic field fines, which is determined by the plasma edge turbulence. In this regard, spatial asymmetries of plasma edge turbulence are of great interest. In this work, we interest in up-down asymmetries of density fluctuations which are usually observed in Tore Supra, using a coherent light scattering experiment. It is shown that these asymmetries are correlated to the plasma edge geometrical configuration (plasma facing components, limiters). In fact, the plasma-limiter interaction induces locally in the plasma edge and the SOL (r/a > 0.9) an additional turbulence with short correlation length along the magnetic field fines, which spreads in the plasma core (0.9 {>=} r/a {>=} 0.5). The resultant up-down asymmetry weakly depends on density, increases with the edge safety factor, and inverts when the plasma current direction is reversed. Such up-down asymmetry observations bring strong impact on edge turbulence and transport models, which usually predict a ballooning of the turbulence in the high-field side but not an up-down asymmetry. A possible model is proposed here, based on the Kelvin Helmholtz instability. (author)

  15. Evaluation of Modified Pycnometric Method for Accurately Measuring the Density of Molten Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang; FU Yuechao; YANG Lingchuan

    2004-01-01

    A modified pycnometric method has been developed to obtain accurate densities of molten nickel.The new method allows continuous measurement of density over a wide temperature range from a single experiment.The measurement error of the method was analyzed, and the total uncertainty of the measurement was estimated to be within ±0.34%. The measured density of molten nickel decreases linearly with increasing temperature over a range from the melting point to 1873K. The density at the melting point and the thermal expansion coefficient of molten nickel are 7.90Mg·m-3 and 1.92×10-4 K-1,respectively.

  16. Accuracy of cutoff probe for measuring electron density: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Woong; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Si-June; Lee, Jang-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2016-09-01

    The electron density has been used for characterizing the plasma for basic research as well as industrial application. To measure the exact electron density, various type of microwave probe has been developed and improved. The cutoff probe is a promising technique inferring the electron density from the plasma resonance peak on the transmission spectrum. In this study, we present the accuracy of electron density inferred from cutoff probe. The accuracy was investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment. The discrepancy between the electron densities from the cutoff probe and other sophisticated microwave probes were investigated and discussed. We found that the cutoff probe has good accuracy in inferred electron density. corresponding author.

  17. Two new methods to detect cosmic voids without density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elyiv, Andrii; Pollina, Giorgia; Baldi, Marco; Branchini, Enzo; Cimatti, Andrea; Moscardini, Lauro

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic voids are effective cosmological probes to discriminate among competing world models. Their precise and unbiased identification is a prerequisite to perform accurate observational tests. The identification is generally based on density or geometry criteria that, because of their very nature, are prone to shot noise errors. In this work we propose two new void finders that are based on dynamical and clustering criteria to select voids in the Lagrangian coordinates and minimise the impact of sparse sampling. The first approach exploits the Zeldovich approximation to trace back in time the orbits of galaxies located in the voids and their surroundings, whereas the second uses the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function to relax the objects' spatial distribution to homogeneity and isotropy. In both cases voids are defined as regions of the negative velocity divergence in Lagrangian coordinates, that can be regarded as sinks of the back-in-time streamlines of the mass tracers. To assess the performance ...

  18. WALL PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS OF TURBULENT FLOW OVER BACKWARD-FACING STEP WITH AND WITHOUT ENTRAINMENT: MICROPHONE ARRAY MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Feng; LIU Ying-zheng; WANG Wei-zhe; CHEN Han-ping

    2006-01-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations in turbulent boundary layer flow over backward-facing step with and without entrainment were investigated. Digital array pressure sensors and multi-arrayed microphones were employed to acquire the time-averaged static pressure and fluctuating pressure, respectively. The differences of two flows were scrutinized in terms of static pressure characteristics, pressure fluctuations, cross-correlation and coherence of wall pressure. Introduction of the entrainment increased scale of large-scale vortical structure and reduced its convection velocity. However, shedding frequency of large-scale vortical structures was found to be the same for both flows.

  19. Reconstruction of conductivity and current density images using only one component of magnetic field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Yoon, Jeong-Rock; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Ohin

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) is to provide current density images of a subject using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner with a current injection apparatus. The injection current generates a magnetic field that we can measure from MR phase images. We obtain internal current density images from the measured magnetic flux densities via Ampere's law. However, we must rotate the subject to acquire all of the three components of the induced magnetic flux density. This subject rotation is impractical in clinical MRI scanners when the subject is a human body. In this paper, we propose a way to eliminate the requirement of subject rotation by careful mathematical analysis of the MRCDI problem. In our new MRCDI technique, we need to measure only one component of the induced magnetic flux density and reconstruct both cross-sectional conductivity and current density images without any subject rotation.

  20. Edge Particle Flux with Temperature Fluctuation in the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jun; YAN Long-Wen; HONG Wen-Yu; QIAN Jun; ZHAO Kai-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Electron temperature, density, plasma potential and their fluctuation profiles at edge plasmas are measured simultaneously with a reciprocating probe system in HL-2A. The analysis results of four-tip data indicate that the temperature fluctuation has relative amplitude of 10-15%, gives more contribution to particle flux in lower (0- 25 kHz) and higher frequency (50-250 kHz) ranges. The coherence between temperature fluctuation's and density or potential fluctuations implies that their coupling will impact anomalous transport. The measured diffusion coefficient is about three times of the Bohm diffusion coefficient when considering the temperature fluctuation. The particle flux with temperature fluctuation is discussed in HL-2A for the first time.

  1. Identification of defluidization region in a gas-solid fluidized bed using a method based on pressure fluctuation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Parise

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications that involve fluidized bed operations must prevent the undesirable phenomenon of partial or complete bed defluidization. Defluidization can be avoided by increasing the gas velocity and/or, in some cases, changing the solid feed conditions in the system, provided that the changes in the hydrodynamics of the flow are detected early enough. The use of a technique that can perform an early detection of the defluidization condition in industrial applications is important, in order to avoid the loss of efficiency or even an undesirable shutting down of the process. The objective of this work is to show the application of a method for early detection of the condition where the bed is tending to the defluidization, in a gas-solid fluidized bed flow. The method is based on pressure fluctuation measurements. Experimental tests are carried out using two solid particles: microcrystalline cellulose and sand. Results show that the proposed method is efficient in detecting the fluidization condition in a conventional bubbling bed regime. The potential of application of the technique is also shown for the control of the defluidization phenomenon in industry.

  2. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey IV: Data Reduction Procedures for Surface Brightness Fluctuation Measurements with the Advanced Camera for Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, S; Tonry, J L; Jordan, A; Peng, E W; Côté, P; Ferrarese, L; Merritt, D; Milosavljevic, M; West, M J; Mei, Simona; Blakeslee, John P.; Tonry, John L.; Jordan, Andres; Peng, Eric W.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Merritt, David; Milosavljevic, Milos; West, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Virgo Cluster Survey is a large program to image 100 early-type Virgo galaxies using the F475W and F850LP bandpasses of the Wide Field Channel of the ACS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The scientific goals of this survey include an exploration of the three-dimensional structure of the Virgo Cluster and a critical examination of the usefulness of the globular cluster luminosity function as a distance indicator. Both of these issues require accurate distances for the full sample of 100 program galaxies. In this paper, we describe our data reduction procedures and examine the feasibility of accurate distance measurements using the method of surface brightness fluctuations (SBF) applied to the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey F850LP imaging. The ACS exhibits significant geometrical distortions due to its off-axis location in the HST focal plane; correcting for these distortions by resampling the pixel values onto an undistorted frame results in pixel correlations tha...

  3. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  4. Modeling dendrite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, CD; Østergaard, Leif;

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides a noninvasive tool to probe tissue microstructure. We propose a simplified model of neural cytoarchitecture intended to capture the essential features important for water diffusion as measured by NMR. Two components contribute to the NMR signal in this mo...

  5. Bioimpedance for the spot measurement of tissue density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylke, E. S.; Ward, L. C.; Stannard, C.; Leigh, A.; Kilbreath, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    Long-standing lymphoedema is characterised by tissues changes which are currently not detectable using bioimpedance spectroscopy. It has been suggested that a combination of bipolar and tetrapolar measurements may be used to detect these tissues changes for a single site in the transverse direction. This was technique was trialled in a group of control participants with no history of lymphoedema or recent upper limb trauma. Repeated spot measurements were done without removal of electrodes to determine biological variability as well as with removal of electrodes to determine technical reproducibility. The inter-limb spot ratio of the controls was then compared to that of a number of women previously diagnosed with secondary lymphoedema in the forearm. Biological variability was not found to greatly influence repeated measures but only moderate technical reliability was found despite excellent co-efficient of variation for the majority of the measurements. A difference was seen between those with more severe swelling and the controls. This novel technique shows promise in detecting tissue changes associated with long-standing lymphoedema.

  6. Spatial fluctuation theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Redig, Frank; Giardinà, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    For non-equilibrium systems of interacting particles and for interacting diffusions in d-dimensions, a novel fluctuation relation is derived. The theorem establishes a quantitative relation between the probabilities of observing two current values in different spatial directions. The result is a consequence of spatial symmetries of the microscopic dynamics, generalizing in this way the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem related to the time-reversal symmetry. This new perspective opens up the possibility of direct experimental measurements of fluctuation relations of vectorial observables.

  7. Ballistic protons in incoherent exclusive vector meson production as a measure of rare parton fluctuations at an electron-ion collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappi, T; Mäntysaari, H; Venugopalan, R

    2015-02-27

    We argue that the proton multiplicities measured in Roman pot detectors at an electron ion collider can be used to determine centrality classes in incoherent diffractive scattering. Incoherent diffraction probes the fluctuations in the interaction strengths of multiparton Fock states in the nuclear wave functions. In particular, the saturation scale that characterizes this multiparton dynamics is significantly larger in central events relative to minimum bias events. As an application, we study the centrality dependence of incoherent diffractive vector meson production. We identify an observable which is simultaneously very sensitive to centrality triggered parton fluctuations and insensitive to details of the model.

  8. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  9. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Emilie M.M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yoo, Albert J. [Texas Stroke Institute, Plano, TX (United States); Beenen, Ludo F.; Majoie, Charles B. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berkhemer, Olvert A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Blanken, Mark D. den; Wismans, Carrie [AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the MR CLEAN investigators

    2016-02-15

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  10. Effect of fluctuations on time-averaged multi-line NO-LIF thermometry measurements of the gas-phase temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroughi, Omid M.; Kronemayer, Helmut; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-09-01

    Multi-line NO laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry enables accurate gas-phase temperature imaging in combustion systems through least-squares fitting of excitation spectra. The required excitation wavelength scan takes several minutes which systematic biases the results in case of temperature fluctuations. In this work, the effect of various types (linear, Gaussian and bimodal) and amplitudes of temperature fluctuations is quantified based on simulated NO-LIF excitation spectra. Temperature fluctuations of less than ±5 % result in a negligible error of less than ±1 % in temperature for all cases. Bimodal temperature distributions have the largest effect on the determined temperature. Symmetric temperature fluctuations around 900 K have a negligible effect. At lower mean temperatures, fluctuations cause a positive bias leading to over-predicted mean temperatures, while at higher temperatures the bias is negative. The results of the theoretical analysis were applied as a guide for interpreting experimental multi-line NO-LIF temperature measurements in a mildly turbulent pilot-plant scale flame reactor dedicated for nanoparticle synthesis.

  11. Influence of temperature fluctuations on plasma turbulence investigations with Langmuir probes

    CERN Document Server

    Nold, B; Ramisch, M; Huang, Z; Müller, H W; Scott, B D; Stroth, U

    2011-01-01

    The reliability of Langmuir probe measurements for plasma-turbulence investigations is studied on GEMR gyro-fluid simulations and compared with results from conditionally sampled I-V characteristics as well as self-emitting probe measurements in the near scrape-off layer of the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. In this region, simulation and experiment consistently show coherent in-phase fluctuations in density, plasma potential and also in electron temperature. Ion-saturation current measurements turn out to reproduce density fluctuations quite well. Fluctuations in the floating potential, however, are strongly influenced by temperature fluctuations and, hence, are strongly distorted compared to the actual plasma potential. These results suggest that interpreting floating as plasma-potential fluctuations while disregarding temperature effects is not justified near the separatrix of hot fusion plasmas. Here, floating potential measurements lead to corrupted results on the ExB dynamics of turbulent structures in the cont...

  12. Hydrodynamics of charge fluctuations and balance functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, B; Stephanov, M

    2013-01-01

    We apply stochastic hydrodynamics to the study of charge density fluctuations in QCD matter undergoing Bjorken expansion. We find that the charge density correlations are given by a time integral over the history of the system, with the dominant contribution coming from the QCD crossover region where the change of susceptibility per entropy, chi T/s, is most significant. We study the rapidity and azimuthal angle dependence of the resulting charge balance function using a simple analytic model of heavy-ion collision evolution. Our results are in agreement with experimental measurements, indicating that hydrodynamic fluctuations contribute significantly to the measured charge correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. The sensitivity of the balance function to the value of the charge diffusion coefficient D allows us to estimate the typical value of this coefficient in the crossover region to be rather small, of the order of 1/(2pi T), characteristic of a strongly coupled plasma.

  13. One versus Two Breast Density Measures to Predict 5- and 10-Year Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Gard, Charlotte C; Sprague, Brian L; Tice, Jeffrey A; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2015-06-01

    One measure of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density improves 5-year breast cancer risk prediction, but the value of sequential measures is unknown. We determined whether two BI-RADS density measures improve the predictive accuracy of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium 5-year risk model compared with one measure. We included 722,654 women of ages 35 to 74 years with two mammograms with BI-RADS density measures on average 1.8 years apart; 13,715 developed invasive breast cancer. We used Cox regression to estimate the relative hazards of breast cancer for age, race/ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, history of breast biopsy, and one or two density measures. We developed a risk prediction model by combining these estimates with 2000-2010 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results incidence and 2010 vital statistics for competing risk of death. The two-measure density model had marginally greater discriminatory accuracy than the one-measure model (AUC, 0.640 vs. 0.635). Of 18.6% of women (134,404 of 722,654) who decreased density categories, 15.4% (20,741 of 134,404) of women whose density decreased from heterogeneously or extremely dense to a lower density category with one other risk factor had a clinically meaningful increase in 5-year risk from breast cancer risk and improves risk classification for women with risk factors and a decrease in density. A two-density model should be considered for women whose density decreases when calculating breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  15. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  16. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  17. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  18. Lensing Reconstruction using redshifted 21cm Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, O; Zahn, Oliver; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the potential of second generation measurements of redshifted 21 cm radiation from the epoch of reionization (EOR) to reconstruct the matter density fluctuations along the line of sight. To do so we generalize the quadratic methods developed for the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to 21cm fluctuations. The three dimensional signal can be analyzed into a finite number of line of sight Fourier modes that contribute to the lensing reconstruction. In comparison with reconstruction using the CMB, 21cm fluctuations have a disadvantage of relative featurelessness, which can be compensated for by the fact that there are multiple uncorrelated backgrounds. The multiple redshift information allows to reconstruct relatively small scales even if one is limited by angular resolution. We estimate that a square kilometer of collecting area is needed with a maximal baseline of 3 km to achieve lensing reconstruction noise levels an order of magnitude below CMB quadratic estimator constraints at $l=1000$, and c...

  19. Exchange Flow Rate Measurement Technique in Density Different Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoo Fumizawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Buoyancy-driven exchange flows of helium-air through inclined a narrow tube was investigated. Exchange flows may occur following the opening of a window for ventilation, as well as when a pipe ruptures in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The experiment in this paper was carried out in a test chamber filled with helium and the flow was visualized using the smoke wire method. A high-speed camera recorded the flow behavior. The image of the flow was transferred to digital data, and the slow flow velocity, i.e. micro flow rate was measured by PIV software. Numerical simulation was carried out by the code of moving particle method with Lagrange method.

  20. Elasticity-density and viscoelasticity-density relationships at the tibia mid-diaphysis assessed from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Schneider, Joannes; Varga, Peter; Laugier, Pascal; Raum, Kay; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-02-01

    Cortical bone tissue is an anisotropic material characterized by typically five independent elastic coefficients (for transverse isotropy) governing shear and longitudinal deformations in the different anatomical directions. It is well established that the Young's modulus in the direction of the bone axis of long bones has a strong relationship with mass density. It is not clear, however, whether relationships of similar strength exist for the other elastic coefficients, for they have seldom been investigated, and the results available in the literature are contradictory. The objectives of the present work were to document the anisotropic elastic properties of cortical bone at the tibia mid-diaphysis and to elucidate their relationships with mass density. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used to measure the transverse isotropic stiffness tensor of 55 specimens from 19 donors. Except for Poisson's ratios and the non-diagonal stiffness coefficient, strong linear correlations between the different elastic coefficients (0.7 tibia. RUS also measures the viscous part of the stiffness tensor. An anisotropy ratio close to two was found for damping coefficients. Damping increased as the mass density decreased. The data suggest that a relatively accurate estimation of all the mid-tibia elastic coefficients can be derived from mass density. This is of particular interest (1) to design organ-scale bone models in which elastic coefficients are mapped according to Hounsfield values from computed tomography scans as a surrogate for mass density and (2) to model ultrasound propagation at the mid-tibia, which is an important site for the in vivo assessment of bone status with axial transmission techniques.

  1. Large density amplification measured on jets ejected from a magnetized plasma gun

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Gunsu S.; You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Observation of a large density amplification in the collimating plasma jet ejected from a coplanar coaxial plasma gun is reported. The jet velocity is ~30 km s^-1 and the electron density increases from ~10^20 to 10^(22–23) m^-3. In previous spheromak experiments, electron density of the order 10^(19–21) m^-3 had been measured in the flux conserver region, but no density measurement had been reported for the source gun region. The coplanar geometry of our electrodes permits direct observation...

  2. Separate density and viscosity measurements of unknown liquid using quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous liquids have a wide range of applications in many fields. Basic physical properties like the density and the viscosity have great impacts on the functionalities of a given ionic liquid. For the millions kinds of existing liquids, only a few have been systematically measured with the density and the viscosity using traditional methods. However, these methods are limited to measure the density and the viscosity of an ionic liquid simultaneously especially in processing micro sample volumes. To meet this challenge, we present a new theoretical model and a novel method to separate density and viscosity measurements with single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in this work. The agreement of experimental results and theocratical calculations shows that the QCM is capable to measure the density and the viscosity of ionic liquids.

  3. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Wickham, Logan; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau-Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids.

  4. Numerical shadows: measures and densities on the numerical range

    CERN Document Server

    Dunkl, Charles F; Holbrook, John A; Puchała, Zbigniew; Zyczkowski, Karol \\

    2010-01-01

    For any operator $M$ acting on an $N$-dimensional Hilbert space $H_N$ we introduce its numerical shadow, which is a probability measure on the complex plane supported by the numerical range of $M$. The shadow of $M$ at point $z$ is defined as the probability that the inner product $(Mu,u)$ is equal to $z$, where $u$ stands for a random complex vector from $H_N$, satisfying $||u||=1$. In the case of N=2 the numerical shadow of a non-normal operator can be interpreted as a shadow of a hollow sphere projected on a plane. A similar interpretation is provided also for higher dimensions. For a hermitian $M$ its numerical shadow forms a probability distribution on the real axis which is shown to be a one dimensional $B$-spline. In the case of a normal $M$ the numerical shadow corresponds to a shadow of a transparent solid simplex in $R^{N-1}$ onto the complex plane. Numerical shadow is found explicitly for Jordan matrices $J_N$, direct sums of matrices and in all cases where the shadow is rotation invariant. Results...

  5. Blood Density Is Nearly Equal to Water Density: A Validation Study of the Gravimetric Method of Measuring Intraoperative Blood Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello, Dominic J; Ripper, Richard M; Fettiplace, Michael R; Weinberg, Guy L; Vitello, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The gravimetric method of weighing surgical sponges is used to quantify intraoperative blood loss. The dry mass minus the wet mass of the gauze equals the volume of blood lost. This method assumes that the density of blood is equivalent to water (1 gm/mL). This study's purpose was to validate the assumption that the density of blood is equivalent to water and to correlate density with hematocrit. Methods. 50 µL of whole blood was weighed from eighteen rats. A distilled water control was weighed for each blood sample. The averages of the blood and water were compared utilizing a Student's unpaired, one-tailed t-test. The masses of the blood samples and the hematocrits were compared using a linear regression. Results. The average mass of the eighteen blood samples was 0.0489 g and that of the distilled water controls was 0.0492 g. The t-test showed P = 0.2269 and R (2) = 0.03154. The hematocrit values ranged from 24% to 48%. The linear regression R (2) value was 0.1767. Conclusions. The R (2) value comparing the blood and distilled water masses suggests high correlation between the two populations. Linear regression showed the hematocrit was not proportional to the mass of the blood. The study confirmed that the measured density of blood is similar to water.

  6. Quantifying economic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Nunes Amaral, Luis A.; Gabaix, Xavier; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki

    2001-12-01

    This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena-scale invariance and universality-can be useful in guiding research on interpreting empirical data on economic fluctuations. Using this conceptual framework as a guide, we empirically quantify the relation between trading activity-measured by the number of transactions N-and the price change G( t) for a given stock, over a time interval [ t, t+Δ t]. We relate the time-dependent standard deviation of price changes-volatility-to two microscopic quantities: the number of transactions N( t) in Δ t and the variance W2( t) of the price changes for all transactions in Δ t. We find that the long-ranged volatility correlations are largely due to those of N. We then argue that the tail-exponent of the distribution of N is insufficient to account for the tail-exponent of P{ G> x}. Since N and W display only weak inter-dependency, our results show that the fat tails of the distribution P{ G> x} arises from W. Finally, we review recent work on quantifying collective behavior among stocks by applying the conceptual framework of random matrix theory (RMT). RMT makes predictions for “universal” properties that do not depend on the interactions between the elements comprising the system, and deviations from RMT provide clues regarding system-specific properties. We compare the statistics of the cross-correlation matrix C-whose elements Cij are the correlation coefficients of price fluctuations of stock i and j-against a random matrix having the same symmetry properties. It is found that RMT methods can distinguish random and non-random parts of C. The non-random part of C which deviates from RMT results, provides information regarding genuine collective behavior among stocks. We also discuss results that are reminiscent of phase transitions in spin systems, where the divergent behavior of the response function at

  7. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  8. Turbulence in nearly incompressible fluids: density spectrum, flows, correlations and implication to the interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dastgeer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstellar scintillation and angular radio wave broadening measurements show that interstellar and solar wind (electron density fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k-5/3 power spectrum extending over many decades in wavenumber space. The ubiquity of the Kolmogorov-like interstellar medium (ISM density spectrum led to an explanation based on coupling incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD fluctuations to density fluctuations through a 'pseudosound' relation within the context of 'nearly incompressible' (NI hydrodynamics (HD and MHD models. The NI theory provides a fundamentally different explanation for the observed ISM density spectrum in that the density fluctuations can be a consequence of passive scalar convection due to background incompressible fluctuations. The theory further predicts generation of long-scale structures and various correlations between the density, temperature and the (magneto acoustic as well as convective pressure fluctuations in the compressible ISM fluids in different thermal regimes that are determined purely by the thermal fluctuation level. In this paper, we present the results of our two dimensional nonlinear fluid simulations, exploring various nonlinear aspects that lead to inertial range ISM turbulence within the context of a NI hydrodymanics model. In qualitative agreement with the NI predictions and the in-situ observations, we find that i the density fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like spectrum via a passive convection in the field of the background incompressible fluctuations, ii the compressible ISM fluctuations form long scale flows and structures, and iii the density and the temperature fluctuations are anti-correlated.

  9. Density Measurements of Na2WO4-WO3-ZnO Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Archimedes principle, the densities of Na2WO4-WO3-ZnO melts at a fixed mole ratio of 3.43 of Na2WO4 to ZnO were measured. The results indicated that there was a linear relationship between the densities and temperatures at a fixed composition. At a fixed temperature, the linear relationship between densities and compositions showed different slop within different composition regions. The reasons were explained in view of ionic composition changes.

  10. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  11. A Model for Lightcone Fluctuations due to Stress Tensor Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H; Ribeiro, C C H

    2016-01-01

    We study a model for quantum lightcone fluctuations in which vacuum fluctuations of the electric field and of the squared electric field in a nonlinear dielectric material produce variations in the flight times of probe pulses. When this material has a non-zero third order polarizability, the flight time variations arise from squared electric field fluctuations, and are analogous to effects expected when the stress tensor of a quantized field drives passive spacetime geometry fluctuations. We also discuss the dependence of the squared electric field fluctuations upon the geometry of the material, which in turn determines a sampling function for averaging the squared electric field along the path of the pulse. This allows us to estimate the probability of especially large fluctuations, which is a measure of the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations.

  12. Monitoring of cockroach density and seasonal fluctuation in Haikou City%2009~2010年海口市蟑螂种群密度及季节消长监测结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓花; 陈永薇

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解海口市蟑螂种类、密度、季节消长情况,为海口市的蟑螂防治提供科学依据.方法 采用粘捕法分别在居民住宅、餐饮、宾馆、农贸市场和医院等不同环境中进行蟑螂种群分布、密度、季节消长情况调查.结果 海口市蟑螂种群有德国小蠊、美洲大蠊、澳洲大蠊和斑蠊,其中德国小蠊为海口市的优势种群.海口市区蟑螂密度较高[4],全年平均达到2.76只/张,栖息场所蟑螂密度以餐饮业密度最高,达5.86只/张,宾馆次之,达3.26只/张,农贸市场、医院和居民较低,分别为1.16只/张、0.55只/张、0.34只/张.蟑螂一年四季均有活动,8月份蟑螂密度最高,1月份蟑螂密度最低.结论 海口市蟑螂种群发生了明显变化,尤其是德国小蠊侵害严重,应加强蟑螂密度和抗药性等监测,根据监测结果,及时预警预报,提出科学合理的防治措施.%Objective To survey the cockroach species,the density and the seasonal fluctuation and provide scientific basis for elimination cockroach in Haikou. Methods The population distribution,density and seasonal flunctuation of cockroach were suveyed using night sticky trap method in residential areas,hotels,eating houses,markets and hospitals. Results There were four cockroachs species in Haikou:the German cockroach,the American cockroach,the Australian cockroach and the Neostylopyga rhombifolia. The German cockroach was predominant. The cockroach density was high with average density of 2.76/nights and the numbers of cockroadch in eating houses,hotel,market,hospital,residential areas were 5.86/ night,3.26/night, 1.16/night,0.55/night and 0.34/night. The cockroach density was the highest in August and the lowest in January. Conclusion The population and density of cockroach in Haikou varied and integrated monitoring and eliminating measures be adopted to control the pervalence of cockroad.

  13. Comparison of subjective and fully automated methods for measuring mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Waade, Gunvor G; Ursin, Giske; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast radiologists of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program subjectively classified mammographic density using a three-point scale between 1996 and 2012 and changed into the fourth edition of the BI-RADS classification since 2013. In 2015, an automated volumetric breast density assessment software was installed at two screening units. Purpose To compare volumetric breast density measurements from the automated method with two subjective methods: the three-point scale and the BI-RADS density classification. Material and Methods Information on subjective and automated density assessment was obtained from screening examinations of 3635 women recalled for further assessment due to positive screening mammography between 2007 and 2015. The score of the three-point scale (I = fatty; II = medium dense; III = dense) was available for 2310 women. The BI-RADS density score was provided for 1325 women. Mean volumetric breast density was estimated for each category of the subjective classifications. The automated software assigned volumetric breast density to four categories. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was assessed using weighted kappa (kw). Results Mean volumetric breast density was 4.5%, 7.5%, and 13.4% for categories I, II, and III of the three-point scale, respectively, and 4.4%, 7.5%, 9.9%, and 13.9% for the BI-RADS density categories, respectively ( P for trend density categories was kw = 0.5 (95% CI = 0.47-0.53; P density increased with increasing density category of the subjective classifications. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was moderate.

  14. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  15. Measurement of Plasma Density Produced in Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Active Aerodynamic Control with Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHANG Yi; XU Yan-Ji; LIN Bin; LI Yu-Tong; ZHU Jun-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an interferometer to investigate the changes of the refractive index caused by dielectric barrier discharge plasma.The electronic density of the plasma produced is measured and analyzed tentatively.The results show that density of the plasma increases linearly with exciting voltages.

  16. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  17. Delayed density-dependent effects and population fluctuations in the prairie vole Microtus ochrogaster%橙腹田鼠中延缓性密度依赖效应和种群波动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lowell L. GETZ; Laura E. SIMMS; Joyce E. HOFMANN; Betty McGUIRE

    2004-01-01

    We tested for delayed density-dependent effects on survival and reproduction in a fluctuating population of the prairie vole Microtus ochrogaster monitored at 3.5-day intervals for 63 months. The population underwent four fluctuations in density during the study; all peaked November-January, with winter declines. Survival and reproduction displayed negative density-dependent effects, with an approximate 2-month lag time for maximum effects. There was a 2-month lag for maximum positive effects of increased survival on population density and a 3-month lag in respect to increased reproduction. Extrinsic factors, winter, may have been involved in the delayed density-dependent effects on reproduction, but we could not test for role of intrinsic factors. Seasonal effects did not appear to be responsible for the delayed density-dependent effects on survival. The net effect of the negative delayed density-dependent effects on survival and reproduction are suggested to moderate amplitudes, but not prevent, population fluctuations of M. Ochrogaster.%检验了延迟的密度依赖对橙腹田鼠(Microtus ochrogaster)一个波动种群的生存和生殖的影响,研究持续了63个月,取样间隔为3.5天.在研究期间,该种群的密度经历了4次波动,每次波动的高峰都在11月至次年1月,种群数量在冬季下降.生存和生殖都有负面的密度依赖效应,最大效应具有2个月的时滞.种群存活率增长对种群密度最大的正面效应具有2个月的时滞,而对与增加生殖则有3个月的时滞.内部因素和冬季都可能推延对生殖的密度依赖效应,但是本文未能检验这些内部因素的影响.季节性影响看来与对生存的延缓性密度依赖效应无关.负面的延缓性密度依赖效应对生存和生殖的净作用可能在于减少、而不是阻止橙腹田鼠种群波动的幅度.

  18. Density manifolds, geometric measures and high-energy physics in transfinite dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nada, S.I. [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)], E-mail: snada@qu.edu.qa

    2009-11-15

    We discuss certain manifolds with density. Furthermore, we outline natural connections leading to E-infinity theory and high-energy physics from a geometric measure and transfinite dimensional theoretical viewpoints.

  19. Modal decomposition for measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to measure the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light. The technique is based on modal decomposition, enabling the complete reconstruction of optical fields, including the reconstruction of the beams Poynting...

  20. Order parameter fluctuations at a buried quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yejun; Wang, Jiyang; Jaramillo, R; van Wezel, Jasper; Haravifard, S; Srajer, G; Liu, Y; Xu, Z-A; Littlewood, P B; Rosenbaum, T F

    2012-05-08

    Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an X-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe(2) at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase; and in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the long-standing expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low-dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface.

  1. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement of electron momentum density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B L Ahuja; N L Heda

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a new design and construction of a low intensity (100 mCi) 241Am -ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design. The measured profile is in good agreement with the existing theoretical data and our density functional calculations.

  2. Critical point fluctuations in supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Simon D; Heath, George; Olmsted, Peter D; Kisil, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to observe many aspects of critical phenomena in supported lipid bilayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the aid of stable and precise temperature control. The regions of criticality were determined by accurately measuring and calculating phase diagrams for the 2 phase L(d)-L(o) region, and tracking how it moves with temperature, then increasing the sampling density around the estimated critical regions. Compositional fluctuations were observed above the critical temperature (T(c)) and characterised using a spatial correlation function. From this analysis, the phase transition was found to be most closely described by the 2D Ising model, showing it is a critical transition. Below T(c) roughening of the domain boundaries occurred due to the reduction in line tension close to the critical point. Smaller scale density fluctuations were also detected just below T(c). At T(c), we believe we have observed fluctuations on length scales greater than 10 microm. The region of critically fluctuating 10-100 nm nanodomains has been found to extend a considerable distance above T(c) to temperatures within the biological range, and seem to be an ideal candidate for the actual structure of lipid rafts in cell membranes. Although evidence for this idea has recently emerged, this is the first direct evidence for nanoscale domains in the critical region.

  3. Charge density wave fluctuations in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and their competition with superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Thomas; Lester, Christopher; Hayden, Stephen [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bombardi, Alessandro; Senn, Mark [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The recent observations of charge and stripe correlations in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} and La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} has reinvigorated interest in their role in influencing the superconductivity of the cuprates. However, structural complications of these systems makes it difficult to isolate the effect the lattice has in inducing the charge order. Here, we report hard X-ray diffraction measurements on three compositions (x=0.11,0.12,0.13) of the high-temperature superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, a canonical example of HTS with T{sub c} ∼ 35 K and a simple crystal structure. All samples show charge-density-wave (CDW) order with onset temperatures in the range 51-80 K and ordering wavevectors close to (0.23,0,0.5). We present a phase diagram of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} including the pseudogap phase, CDW and magnetic order.

  4. Development of a Lithium Beam Probe and Measurement of Density Pedestal in JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Atsushi; Kamiya, Kensaku; Fujita, Takaaki; Kubo, Hirotaka; Iguchi, Harukazu; Oyama, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kamada, Yutaka; JT-60 Team

    A lithium beam probe (LiBP) has been developed for the measurement of electron density profiles with highly spatial and temporal resolutions in JT-60U. Using an electron beam heating ion source with a capability of 10 mA extraction, a 5.5 mA beam has been injected to the plasmas. It corresponds to the equivalent neutral beam current of 2 mA. A spectrum width of the beam emission has been small enough to separate Zeeman splitting. By use of the LiBP, time evolutions of pedestal density profiles during type I and grassy edge localized modes (ELMs) have been obtained for the first time. After a type I ELM crash, the drop of the line-integrated density measured by an interferometer delays by 2 ms later than that of the pedestal density. Comparing the line-integrated density to the line integration of the edge density profile measured by the LiBP, it is found that the recovery from the type I ELM crash is correlated with the reduction of core plasma density. As for grassy ELMs, grassy ELMs have smaller density crashes than that of type I ELMs, which is mainly derived from the narrower ELM affected area.

  5. Measurement of hard tissue density of head phantom based on the HU by using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Sun; Kang, Dong Wan; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine a conversion coefficient for Hounsfield Units(HU) to material density (g cm{sup -3}) obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBMercuRay{sup TM}) data and to measure the hard tissue density based on the Hounsfield scale on dental head phantom. CT Scanner Phantom (AAPM) equipped with CT Number Insert consists of five cylindrical pins of materials with different densities and teflon ring was scanned by using the CBMercuRay{sup TM} (Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) volume scanner. The raw data were converted into DICOM format and the HU of different areas of CT number insert measured by using CBWorks{sup TM}. Linear regression analysis and Student t-test were performed statistically. There was no significant difference (P>0.54) between real densities and measured densities. A linear regression was performed using the density, {rho} (g cm{sup -3}), as the dependent variable in terms of the HU (H). The regression equation obtained was {rho}=0.00072 H-0.01588 with an R2 value of 0.9968. Density values based on the Hounsfield scale was 1697.1 {+-} 24.9 HU in cortical bone, 526.5 {+-} 44.4 HU in trabecular bone, 2639.1 {+-} 48.7 HU in enamel, 1246.1 {+-} 39.4 HU in dentin of dental head phantom. CBCT provides an effective option for determination of material density expressed as Hounsfield Units.

  6. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Adachi, Ichiro; Morita, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Keiko; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.09.001

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n = 1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |\\delta (n - 1)/(n - 1)| < 4% in a focusing dual layer radiator (with different refractive indices) scheme. We applied the radiographic technique to evaluate the density uniformity of our original aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within \\pm 1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  7. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  8. Brief communication: Improved measurement of ice layer density in seasonal snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Tom; Rutter, Nick; Toose, Peter; Derksen, Chris; Sandells, Melody; Woodward, John

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and density of ice layers in snowpacks is poorly quantified. Here we present a new field method for measuring the density of ice layers caused by melt or rain-on-snow events. The method was used on 87 ice layer samples taken from natural and artificial ice layers in the Canadian Arctic and mid-latitudes. Mean measured ice layer density was 909 ± 28 kg m-3 with a standard deviation of 23 kg m-3, significantly higher than values typically used in the literature.

  9. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, I. A., E-mail: i.sharov@spbstu.ru; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V. [Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tamura, N.; Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kuteev, B. V. [Russian Scientific Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  10. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  11. Does the prediction of breast cancer improve using a combination of mammographic density measures compared to individual measures alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Sik Hee, Joseph Ryan; Harkness, Elaine F.; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, D. Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Astley, Susan M.

    2017-03-01

    High mammographic density is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, however whether the association is stronger when there is agreement across measures is unclear. This study investigates whether a combination of density measures is a better predictor of breast cancer risk than individual methods alone. Women recruited to the Predicting Risk of Cancer At Screening (PROCAS) study and with mammographic density assessed using three different methods were included (n=33,304). Density was assessed visually using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) and by two fully automated methods, Quantra and Volpara. Percentage breast density was divided into (high, medium and low) and combinations of measures were used to further categorise individuals (e.g. `all high'). A total of 667 breast cancers were identified and logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between breast density and breast cancer risk. In total, 44% of individuals were in the same tertile for all three measures, 8.6% were in non-adjacent (high and low) or mixed categories (high, medium and low). For individual methods the strongest association with breast cancer risk was for medium and high tertiles of VAS with odds ratios (OR) adjusted for age and BMI of 1.63 (95% CI 1.31-2.03) and 2.33 (1.87-2.90) respectively. For the combination of density methods the strongest association was for `all high' (OR 2.42, 1.77-3.31) followed by "two high" (OR 1.90, 1.35-3.31) and "two medium" (OR 1.88, 1.40-2.52). Combining density measures did not affect the magnitude of risk compared to using individual methods.

  12. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  13. Experimental test of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliberto, S.; Garnier, N.; Hernandez, S.; Lacpatia, C.; Pinton, J.-F.; Ruiz Chavarria, G.

    2004-09-01

    We test the fluctuation theorem from measurements in turbulent flows. We study the time fluctuations of the force acting on an obstacle, and we consider two experimental situations: the case of a von Kármán swirling flow between counter-rotating disks and the case of a wind tunnel jet. We first study the symmetries implied by the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem (FT) on the probability density distributions of the force fluctuations; we then test the Sinai scaling. We observe that in both experiments the symmetries implied by the FT are well verified, whereas the Sinai scaling is established, as expected, only for long times.

  14. Estimation of Several Turbulent Fluctuation Quantities Using an Approximate Pulsatile Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent fluctuation behavior is approximately modeled using a pulsatile flow model analogy.. This model follows as an extension to the turbulent laminar sublayer model developed by Sternberg (1962) to be valid for a fully turbulent flow domain. Here unsteady turbulent behavior is modeled via a sinusoidal pulsatile approach. While the individual modes of the turbulent flow fluctuation behavior are rather crudely modeled, approximate temporal integration yields plausible estimates for Root Mean Square (RMS) velocity fluctuations. RMS pressure fluctuations and spectra are of particular interest and are estimated via the pressure Poisson expression. Both RMS and Power Spectral Density (PSD), i.e. spectra are developed. Comparison with available measurements suggests reasonable agreement. An additional fluctuating quantity, i.e. RMS wall shear fluctuation is also estimated, yielding reasonable agreement with measurement.

  15. Microsecond resolved electron density measurements with a hairpin resonator probe in a pulsed ICP discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, David; Larson, Lynda; Shannon, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using a hairpin resonance probe using low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. Time resolution of less than one microsecond has been demonstrated. A signal generator produces the applied microwave frequency; the reflected waveform is passed through a directional coupler and filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is heterodyned with a frequency mixer and read by an oscilloscope. At certain points during the pulse, the plasma density is such that the applied frequency is the same as the resonance frequency of the probe/plasma system, creating a dip in the reflected signal. The applied microwave frequency is shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine to determine the density as a function of time. The system uses a grounded probe to produce low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements that can work in harsh chemical environments. Measurement...

  16. Principles for microwave moisture and density measurement in grain and seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stuart O; Trabelsi, Samir

    2004-01-01

    The importance of cereal grain moisture content in determining time of harvest and in preserving grain quality is described. Techniques for moisture measurement, including electronic moisture meters, are also discussed briefly, and the need for better moisture sensing techniques for modern agricultural on-line moisture monitoring is described. Principles of microwave free-space measurements involving attenuation and phase-shift determination are explained, and density-independent functions of the grain permittivity are presented that permit reliable moisture sensing applicable to moving grain in which bulk density variation occurs. Three different approaches are discussed for determining moisture content and bulk density of grain from microwave measurement of the dielectric properties. A new moisture calibration function, based on complex-plane plots of dielectric constant and loss factor, each divided by bulk density, is described, which promises a universal calibration for different types of grain and seed. This important advantage should encourage commercial development for practical use.

  17. Summer sudden Na number density enhancements measured with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinrich

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present summer Na-densities and atmospheric temperatures measured 80 to 110 km above the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR. The Weber Na Lidar is part of ALOMAR, located at 69° N in Norway, 150 km north of the Arctic Circle. The sun does not set here during the summer months, and measurements require a narrowband Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (FADOF.

    We discuss an observed sudden enhancement in the Na number density around 22:00 UT on 1 to 2 June 2006. We compare this observation with previous summer measurements and find a frequent appearance of Na number density enhancements near local midnight. We describe the time of appearance, the altitude distribution, the duration and the strength of these enhancements and compare them to winter observations. We investigate possible formation mechanisms and, as others before, we find a strong link between these Na number density enhancements and sporadic E layers.

  18. Development of density measurement method of negative ion in plasmas using laser Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yukihiko; Saiho, Hiroatsu; Uchino, Kiichiro; Muraoka, Katsunori

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of negative ion density in plasmas have been an important subject for many years. We have proposed a new method to measure the negative ion density in plasmas using laser Thomson scattering (LTS), and successfully measured O^- ion density in an radio frequency inductively coupled plasma [1]. In order to ensure the reliability of this technique and to estimate the accuracy, we have measured O^- ion density in the same experimental conditions using the second (SHG) and third harmonics (THG) of a Nd:YAG laser as different laser sources. The LTS spectra measured at pure argon plasma (500 W, 20 mTorr) fitted in a straight line well in both SHG and THG cases. As for the plasma at 500 W in 20 mTorr with Ar/O_2=95%/5%, a clear bump in LTS spectra, which is caused by photo-detached electrons, was observed below 0.9 eV for the SHG case and 2 eV for the case, as predicted by a difference between the electron affinity of O^- ion and the laser photon energy. The electron temperatures, the electron densities and the O^- ion densities, which were obtained from the spectral shape and intensity of both LTS spectra, were in agreement each other within an experimental error. [1] M. Noguchi, K. Ariga, T. Hirao, P. Suanpoot, Y. Yamagata, K. Uchino, K. Muraoka, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 11 (2002) 57.

  19. Current density imaging using directly measured harmonic Bz data in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz . We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, [Symbol: see text](2) Bz , measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured [Symbol: see text](2) Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom.

  20. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes advantage of a particular