WorldWideScience

Sample records for densified carbon matrix

  1. Densified waste form and method for forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  2. Densifying carbon nanotubes on assembly surface by the self-contraction of silk fibroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunyang; Yang, Xueqin; Zhao, Jingna; Li, Qingsong; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Qingwen

    2018-04-01

    High densification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is important for high utilization efficiency of their superior properties in macroscopic assemblies. However, the conventional "top-down" compressing strategies have met problems to modify CNT assemblies at and below the micrometer scale. Here we report a molecular way to strap CNTs together via the self-contraction of silk fibroin (SF) during its drying process, resulting in a localized densification below the micrometer scale. Importantly, after the thermal removal of SF molecules, the densified assembly was well maintained. The SF-induced densification increased the average strength from 355 MPa to 960 MPa for CNT fibers, and from 1.45 GPa to 1.82 GPa for CNT ribbons, which contain much more CNTs on the surface.

  3. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  4. Pretreated densified biomass products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2014-03-18

    A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

  5. Structure-property relations for silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Olivier, C.; Veyret, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon pre-coated Hi-Nicalon (SiC) fibers, were studied using tensile testing and transmission electron microscopy. Three types of samples were evaluated all with a nominal coating thickness of 200 nm. The composites were densified by hot pressing at

  6. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  7. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1999-02-09

    A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

  8. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao M.; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1999-01-01

    A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

  9. Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of CVI-Densified Composites at Fiber and Bundle Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Kang; Wu, Jianqing; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the thermal conductivities of the unidirectional, 2D woven and 3D braided composites during the CVI (chemical vapor infiltration) process have been numerically studied by the finite element method. The results show that the dual-scale pores play an important role in the thermal conduction of the CVI-densified composites. According to our results, two thermal conductivity models applicable for CVI process have been developed. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the parameter with the most influence on the CVI-densified composites’ thermal conductivity is matrix cracking’s density, followed by volume fraction of the bundle and thermal conductance of the matrix cracks, finally by micro-porosity inside the bundles and macro-porosity between the bundles. The obtained results are well consistent with the reported data, thus our models could be useful for designing the processing and performance of the CVI-densified composites. PMID:28774130

  10. Molten carbonate fuel cell integral matrix tape and bubble barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    A molten carbonate fuel cell matrix material is described made up of a matrix tape portion and a bubble barrier portion. The matrix tape portion comprises particles inert to molten carbonate electrolyte, ceramic particles and a polymeric binder, the matrix tape being flexible, pliable and having rubber-like compliance at room temperature. The bubble barrier is a solid material having fine porosity preferably being bonded to the matrix tape. In operation in a fuel cell, the polymer binder burns off leaving the matrix and bubble barrier providing superior sealing, stability and performance properties to the fuel cell stack

  11. Permanently densified SiO2 glasses: a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, C; Kassir-Bodon, A; Deschamps, T; Cornet, A; Le Floch, S; Martinez, V; Champagnon, B

    2015-08-19

    Densified silica can be obtained by different pressure and temperature paths and for different stress conditions, hydrostatic or including shear. The density is usually the macroscopic parameter used to characterize the different compressed silica samples. The aim of our present study is to compare structural modifications for silica glass, densified from several routes. For this, densified silica glasses are prepared from cold and high temperature (up to 1020 °C) compressions. The different densified glasses obtained in our study are characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Intertetrahedral angles from the main band relative to the bending mode decrease and their values are larger for densified samples from high temperature compression than those samples from cold compression. The relative amount of 3-membered rings deduced from the D2 line area increases as a function of density for cold compression. The temperature increase during the compression process induces a decrease of the 3 fold ring population. Moreover, 3 fold rings are more deformed and stressed for densified samples at room temperature at the expense of those densified at high temperature. Temperature plays a main role in the reorganization structure during the densification and leads to obtaining a more relaxed structure with lower stresses than glasses densified from cold compression. The role of hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic applied stresses on the glass structure is discussed. From the Sen and Thorpe central force model, intertetrahedral angle average value and their distribution are estimated.

  12. Carbon Nano tubes Based Mixed Matrix Membrane for Gas Separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanip, S.M.; Ismail, A.F.; Goh, P.S.; Norrdin, M.N.A.; Soga, T.; Tanemura, M.; Yasuhiko, H.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nano tubes based mixed matrix membrane (MMM) was prepared by the solution casting method in which the functionalized multi walled carbon nano tubes (f-MWNTs) were embedded into the polyimide membrane and the resulting membranes were characterized. The effect of nominal MWNTs content between 0.5 and 1.0 wt % on the gas separation properties were looked into. The morphologies of the MMM also indicated that at 0.7 % loading of f- MWNTs, the structures of the MMM showed uniform finger-like structures which have facilitated the fast gas transport through the polymer matrix. It may also be concluded that addition of open ended and shortened MWNTs to the polymer matrix can improve its permeability by increasing diffusivity through the MWNTs smooth cavity. (author)

  13. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  14. Elastic Moduli of Permanently Densified Silica Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, T.; Margueritat, J.; Martinet, C.; Mermet, A.; Champagnon, B.

    2014-01-01

    Modelling the mechanical response of silica glass is still challenging, due to the lack of knowledge concerning the elastic properties of intermediate states of densification. An extensive Brillouin Light Scattering study on permanently densified silica glasses after cold compression in diamond anvil cell has been carried out, in order to deduce the elastic properties of such glasses and to provide new insights concerning the densification process. From sound velocity measurements, we derive phenomenological laws linking the elastic moduli of silica glass as a function of its densification ratio. The found elastic moduli are in excellent agreement with the sparse data extracted from literature, and we show that they do not depend on the thermodynamic path taken during densification (room temperature or heating). We also demonstrate that the longitudinal sound velocity exhibits an anomalous behavior, displaying a minimum for a densification ratio of 5%, and highlight the fact that this anomaly has to be distinguished from the compressibility anomaly of a-SiO2 in the elastic domain. PMID:25431218

  15. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  16. Matrix acidification in carbonate reservoirs; Acidificacoes matriciais em reservatorios carbonaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcio de Oliveira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Carbonate reservoirs are characterized by great diversity of its properties, including permeability and porosity. When submitted to matrix acidification, if no effort is employed, acid will tend to consume carbonates where permeability and porosity are higher, further increasing conductivity of these sites and also increasing permeability and porosity contrast existing before acid effects on formation. That would give limited production as result of small effective producer zone extent, with probable underutilization of potential reservoirs productivity. To overcome this effect and to achieve greater coverage of treatments, divergence techniques should be applied, including associations of them. This paper presents divergence techniques performed in matrix acidification of Campos and Espirito Santo basins wells, which represent great structural diversity and, as consequence, a significant range of situations. Formations tests results are analyzed to verify diversion systems effectiveness, and how they contribute to the growth of productive potential. (author)

  17. Hydraulic conductivities of fractures and matrix in Slovenian carbonate aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotej Verbovšek

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic conductivities and specific storage coefficients of fractures and matrix in Slovenian carbonate aquifers were determined by Barker’s method for pumping test analysis, based on fractional flow dimension. Values are presented for limestones and mainly for dolomites, and additionally for separate aquifers, divided by age andlithology in several groups. Data was obtained from hydrogeological reports for 397 water wells, and among these, 79 pumping tests were reinterpreted. Hydraulic conductivities of fractures are higher than the hydraulic conductivities of matrix, and the differences are highly statistically significant. Likewise, differences are significant for specific storage, and the values of these coefficients are higher in the matrix. Values of all coefficients vary in separate aquifers, and the differences can be explained by diagenetic effects, crystal size, degree of fracturing, andcarbonate purity. Comparison of the methods, used in the reports, and the Barker’s method (being more suitable for karstic and fractured aquifers, shows that the latter fits real data better.

  18. Effect of particulate matrix inhibitors on microstructure and properties of 2-D carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlomak, P.; Takano, Shigeru; Wright, M.A.; Ju, Chien-Ping.

    1991-01-01

    Extended-life applications of structural carbon-carbon (C-C) composites involve multiple periods of operation in high-temperature oxidizing environments and as such require a reliable oxidation protection system (OPS). Advanced OPS's generally consist of an external ceramic coating combined with an in-depth matrix inhibitor. This work investigated the effects produced by particulate inhibitors doped on the matrix on the microstructure of 2D, PAN fiber-pitch matrix C-C's. Boron and zirconium-based particulate inhibitors were added to the matrix material prior to heat treatment. A process was developed to assure a uniform distribution of the inhibitors. Oxidation behavior of such matrix-inhibited composites was evaluated using isothermal oxidation tests. 5 refs

  19. Carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites: processing routes and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Petitcorps, Y. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB; Poueylaud, J.M. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB; Albingre, L. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB; Berdeu, B. [L`Electrolyse, 33 - Latresne (France); Lobstein, P. [L`Electrolyse, 33 - Latresne (France); Silvain, J.F. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB

    1997-06-01

    Copper matrix composites are of interest for applications in the electronic field which requires materials with high thermal conductivity properties. The use of carbon fibres can (1) decrease the density and the coefficient of thermal expansion of the material and (2) increase the stiffness and strength to rupture of the resulting composite. In order to produce cheap materials, chemical plating and uniaxial hot pressing processing routes were chosen. 1D-C{sub (P55Thornel)} / Cu prepregs were hot pressed in an argon atmosphere at 750 C during 30 min. The volume fraction of the fibres within the composite was in the range of 10-35%. Physical (density and thermal expansion coefficient) and thermal conductivity properties of the composite were in good agreement with the predictions. However this material exhibits very poor mechanical properties (Young`s modulus and tensile strength). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of the surfaces of ruptures have shown that (1) a very weak bonding between the graphite fibres and the copper matrix was formed and (2) the rupture of the composite was initiated in the matrix at the copper grain boundaries. In order to overcome these two difficulties, the carbon fibres were pre-coated with a thin layer (100 nm) of cobalt. The aim of the cobalt was to react with the carbon to form carbide compounds and as a consequence to increase the bonding between the metal and the fibre. The tensile properties ({sigma}{sub c}{sup R} and E{sub c}) of this composite were then increased by 50% in comparison with the former material; however the strain to rupture was still too weak ({epsilon}{sub c}{sup R} = 0.5%). In order to explain the role of each constituents, X-ray profiles and TEM analyses were done at the fibre/matrix interface and at the grain boundaries. Some modifications of the chemical plating steps were done to improve the purity of the copper. (orig.)

  20. Effect of epoxy coatings on carbon fibers during manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hui; Huang, Yudong; Liu, Li; Shi, Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    The changes in oxygen and nitrogen during manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites were measured using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The effects of the change in oxygen and nitrogen on the strength of the carbon fibers were investigated and the results revealed that the change of the tensile strength with increasing heat curing temperature was attributed to the change in the surface flaws of the carbon fibers because the carbon fibers are sensitive to the surface flaws. The effect of the surface energy that was calculated using Kaelble's method on the strength of the carbon fibers was investigated. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the carbon fibers was measured using atom force microscopy. The change trend of roughness was reverse to that of the strength, which was because of the brittle fracture of the carbon fibers.

  1. Engineering properties of sintered waste sludge as lightweight aggregate in a densified concrete mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭予柱

    2009-01-01

    The global trend towards carbon reduction,energy conservation,and sustainable use of resources has led to an increased focus on the use of waste sludge in construction.We used waste sludge from a reservoir to produce high-strength sintered lightweight aggregate,and then used the densified mixture design algorithm to create high-performance concrete from the sintered aggregate with only small amounts of mixing water and cement.Ultrasonic,electrical resistance and concrete strength efficiency tests were perfo...

  2. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  3. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  4. Analyse technico–économique des Aliments densifies sur les ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une étude portant sur l'influence des aliments densifiés sur la performance de croissance des boucs roux de Maradi a été conduite entre juillet 2016 à septembre 2016. Quarante deux (42) boucs ont été répartis au hasard en six lots de sept individus. Chaque lot correspond à un aliment ou traitement préparé à partir des.

  5. Methods for producing and using densified biomass products containing pretreated biomass fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Bruce E.; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2015-05-26

    A process is provided comprising subjecting a quantity of plant biomass fibers to a pretreatment to cause at least a portion of lignin contained within each fiber to move to an outer surface of said fiber, wherein a quantity of pretreated tacky plant biomass fibers is produced; and densifying the quantity of pretreated tacky plant biomass fibers to produce one or more densified biomass particulates, wherein said biomass fibers are densified without using added binder.

  6. Process-morphology scaling relations quantify self-organization in capillary densified nanofiber arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ashley L; Stein, Itai Y; Cui, Kehang; Wardle, Brian L

    2018-02-07

    Capillary-mediated densification is an inexpensive and versatile approach to tune the application-specific properties and packing morphology of bulk nanofiber (NF) arrays, such as aligned carbon nanotubes. While NF length governs elasto-capillary self-assembly, the geometry of cellular patterns formed by capillary densified NFs cannot be precisely predicted by existing theories. This originates from the recently quantified orders of magnitude lower than expected NF array effective axial elastic modulus (E), and here we show via parametric experimentation and modeling that E determines the width, area, and wall thickness of the resulting cellular pattern. Both experiments and models show that further tuning of the cellular pattern is possible by altering the NF-substrate adhesion strength, which could enable the broad use of this facile approach to predictably pattern NF arrays for high value applications.

  7. Supercritical carbon dioxide extracted extracellular matrix material from adipose tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun Kit; Luo, Baiwen; Guneta, Vipra [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Liang; Foo, Selin Ee Min [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Dai, Yun; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Tan, Nguan Soon [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); KK Research Centre, KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, 100 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 229899 (Singapore); Choong, Cleo, E-mail: cleochoong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); KK Research Centre, KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, 100 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 229899 (Singapore); Wong, Marcus Thien Chong [Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore)

    2017-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of extracellular matrix (ECM) material that can be isolated by delipidating and decellularizing the tissue. However, the current delipidation and decellularization methods either involve tedious and lengthy processes or require toxic chemicals, which may result in the elimination of vital proteins and growth factors found in the ECM. Hence, an alternative delipidation and decellularization method for adipose tissue was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) that eliminates the need of any harsh chemicals and also reduces the amount of processing time required. The resultant SC-CO{sub 2}-treated ECM material showed an absence of nuclear content but the preservation of key proteins such as collagen Type I, collagen Type III, collagen Type IV, elastin, fibronectin and laminin. In addition, other biological factors such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also retained. Subsequently, the resulting SC-CO{sub 2}-treated ECM material was used as a bioactive coating on tissue culture plastic (TCP). Four different cell types including adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), immortalized human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1) were used in this study to show that the SC-CO{sub 2}-treated ECM coating can be potentially used for various biomedical applications. The SC-CO{sub 2}-treated ECM material showed improved cell-material interactions for all cell types tested. In addition, in vitro scratch wound assay using HaCaT cells showed that the presence of SC-CO{sub 2}-treated ECM material enhanced keratinocyte migration whilst the in vitro cellular studies using THP-1-derived macrophages showed that the SC-CO{sub 2}-treated ECM material did not evoke pro-inflammatory responses from the THP-1-derived macrophages. Overall

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide extracted extracellular matrix material from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Kit; Luo, Baiwen; Guneta, Vipra; Li, Liang; Foo, Selin Ee Min; Dai, Yun; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo; Wong, Marcus Thien Chong

    2017-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of extracellular matrix (ECM) material that can be isolated by delipidating and decellularizing the tissue. However, the current delipidation and decellularization methods either involve tedious and lengthy processes or require toxic chemicals, which may result in the elimination of vital proteins and growth factors found in the ECM. Hence, an alternative delipidation and decellularization method for adipose tissue was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO 2 ) that eliminates the need of any harsh chemicals and also reduces the amount of processing time required. The resultant SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material showed an absence of nuclear content but the preservation of key proteins such as collagen Type I, collagen Type III, collagen Type IV, elastin, fibronectin and laminin. In addition, other biological factors such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also retained. Subsequently, the resulting SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material was used as a bioactive coating on tissue culture plastic (TCP). Four different cell types including adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), immortalized human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1) were used in this study to show that the SC-CO 2 -treated ECM coating can be potentially used for various biomedical applications. The SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material showed improved cell-material interactions for all cell types tested. In addition, in vitro scratch wound assay using HaCaT cells showed that the presence of SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material enhanced keratinocyte migration whilst the in vitro cellular studies using THP-1-derived macrophages showed that the SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material did not evoke pro-inflammatory responses from the THP-1-derived macrophages. Overall, this study shows the efficacy

  9. Supercritical carbon dioxide extracted extracellular matrix material from adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun Kit; Luo, Baiwen; Guneta, Vipra; Li, Liang; Foo, Selin Ee Min; Dai, Yun; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo; Wong, Marcus Thien Chong

    2017-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of extracellular matrix (ECM) material that can be isolated by delipidating and decellularizing the tissue. However, the current delipidation and decellularization methods either involve tedious and lengthy processes or require toxic chemicals, which may result in the elimination of vital proteins and growth factors found in the ECM. Hence, an alternative delipidation and decellularization method for adipose tissue was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO 2 ) that eliminates the need of any harsh chemicals and also reduces the amount of processing time required. The resultant SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material showed an absence of nuclear content but the preservation of key proteins such as collagen Type I, collagen Type III, collagen Type IV, elastin, fibronectin and laminin. In addition, other biological factors such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also retained. Subsequently, the resulting SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material was used as a bioactive coating on tissue culture plastic (TCP). Four different cell types including adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), immortalized human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1) were used in this study to show that the SC-CO 2 -treated ECM coating can be potentially used for various biomedical applications. The SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material showed improved cell-material interactions for all cell types tested. In addition, in vitro scratch wound assay using HaCaT cells showed that the presence of SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material enhanced keratinocyte migration whilst the in vitro cellular studies using THP-1-derived macrophages showed that the SC-CO 2 -treated ECM material did not evoke pro-inflammatory responses from the THP-1-derived macrophages. Overall, this study shows the efficacy

  10. An Experiment on the Carbonization of Fuel Compact Matrix Graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cho, Moon Sung

    2012-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a properly prepared matrix graphite powder, pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact, and finally heat-treated at about 1800 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, over coating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K, In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is of extreme importance to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the carbonization condition, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the carbonization behavior of green compact samples prepared from the matrix graphite powder mixtures with different binder materials was investigated in order to elucidate the behavior of binders during the carbonization heat treatment by analyzing the change in weight, density and its

  11. Investigation of the structure of multiwall carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, A Adamne; Belina, K

    2013-01-01

    In the last ten years carbon nanotube composites are in the focus of the researchers. Concentration series were prepared using carbon nanotube containing master blend by IDMX mixer. In the experiments polypropylene, polycarbonate and ABS polymers were used as matrix materials. The prepared materials were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. The carbon nanotubes can be seen on the fractured surfaces. We did not find any sign of agglomerates in the materials. The nanocomposites were investigated by LP-FTIR method. The specimens were irradiated with 1 W for 1 minute by CO 2 laser. The polymer matrix was burnt or charred by the CO 2 laser; the structure of the carbon nanotubes in the matrix was studied. The carbon nanotubes create a physical network in the polymers we used

  12. Finite element analysis of stresses in Berkovich, Vickers and Knoop indentation for densifying and non-densifying glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kanghua

    2002-08-01

    A constitutive law for fused silica accounting for its permanent densification under large compressive stresses is presented. The implementation of the constitutive equations in the general-purpose finite element code ABAQUS via user subroutine is proposed and carefully verified. The three-dimensional indentation mechanics under Berkovich, Vickers and Knoop indenters is extensively investigated based on the proposed constitutive relation. The results of stress distribution and plastic zone for both densifying and non-densifying optical glasses are systematically compared. These numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental observations of optical manufacturing. That is, fused silica shows lower material removal rate, smaller surface roughness and subsurface damage in contrast to non-densifying optical glasses under the same grinding condition. Material densification of fused silica is thoroughly studied through numerical simulations of indentation mechanics. The exact amount of densification and shear strain of fused silica under Berkovich indentation is calculated to show the deformation mechanism of glass materials under three-dimensional indentations. The surface profiles show the material "pile-up" around the indenter tip for non-densifying glasses and "sink-in" for fused silica after the indentation load is removed. An important inverse problem is studied: estimation of abrasive size and indentation load through the examination of residual indentation footprints. A series of 2D axisymmetric spherical indentation simulations generate a wide range of relationships among the indentation load, indenter size, residual indentation depth and size of residual indentation zone for the five selected brittle materials: glass fused silica (FS), BK7, semiconductor Si, laser glass LHG8, and optical crystal CaF2.. The application of the inverse problem is verified by the good agreement between the estimated abrasive size and the actual abrasive size found

  13. Coated powder for electrolyte matrix for carbonate fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacovangelo, C.D.; Browall, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    A plurality of electrolyte carbonate-coated ceramic particle which does not differ significantly in size from that of the ceramic particle and wherein no significant portion of the ceramic particle is exposed is fabricated into a porous tape comprised of said coated-ceramic particles bonded together by the coating for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell

  14. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber-Matrix Adhesion on Polymeric Nanocomposite Properties—Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Lafdi

    2008-01-01

    carbon nanocomposite. Carbon nanofibers were subjected to electrochemical oxidation in 0.1 M nitric acid for varying times. The strength of adhesion between the nanofiber and an epoxy matrix was characterized by flexural strength and modulus. The surface functional groups formed and their concentration of nanofibers showed a dependence on the degree of oxidation. The addition of chemical functional groups on the nanofiber surface allows them to physically and chemically adhere to the continuous resin matrix. The chemical interaction with the continuous epoxy matrix results in the creation of an interphase region. The ability to chemically and physically interact with the epoxy region is beneficial to the mechanical properties of a carbon nanocomposite. A tailored degree of surface functionalization was found to increase adhesion to the matrix and increase flexural modulus.

  15. Influence of the matrix texture on the fracture behavior of 2D carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guozhong; Li Hejun; Bai Ruicheng; Wei Jian; Zha, Yanqiang

    2008-01-01

    The influence of matrix texture on the fracture behavior of 2D carbon/carbon composites infiltrated by isobaric, isothermal CVI technique at ambient pressure was investigated. The flexural strength of the as-obtained samples has been studied using a three-point bending test. After flexural test, the texture of pyrocarbon on the fracture surface and the morphology of the fracture surface were observed by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results show that the sample with pure medium-textured pyrocarbon exhibits typical brittle fracture behavior due to no sliding between sub-layers in the medium-textured pyrocarbon layer. However, both the sample with the three-layer structure of medium-textured pyrocarbon, high-textured pyrocarbon and low-textured pyrocarbon, and the sample with the double-layer structure of medium-textured pyrocarbon and high-textured pyrocarbon exhibit remarkable pseudo-plastic fracture behavior, which is caused by the sliding occurred between different textured pyrocarbon layers and between sub-layers in high-textured pyrocarbon layer

  16. Brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-05-22

    Current understanding of the brittleness of glass is limited by our poor understanding and control over the microscopic structure. In this study, we used a pressure quenching route to tune the structure of silica glass in a controllable manner, and observed a systematic increase in ductility in samples quenched under increasingly higher pressure. The brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass can be attributed to the critical role of 5-fold Si coordination defects (bonded to 5 O neighbors) in facilitating shear deformation and in dissipating energy by converting back to the 4-fold coordination state during deformation. As an archetypal glass former and one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crest, a fundamental understanding of the microscopic structure underpinning the ductility of silica glass will not only pave the way toward rational design of strong glasses, but also advance our knowledge of the geological processes in the Earth's interior.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Densified Tectosilicate Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Nicole; Lamberson, Lisa; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    Aluminosilicate glasses are widely used in applications such as LCD glass, touchscreens for hand held devices and car windows. We have shown that the tectosilicate compositions exhibit an interesting non-monotonic variation in hardness with increasing SiO2 content. From 40% to 85 mol% SiO2......, hardness and indentation modulus both decrease, consistent with the topological constraint theory. Above 85 mol% SiO2 , hardness increases rapidly with increasing SiO2 content while modulus continues to decrease. A switch from shear to densification based on the species present in the glass has been...... proposed to explain this behavior. To reduce densification and study shear deformation independently, a series of calcium aluminosilicate glasses with tectosilicate compositions were densified by isostatic compression in a gas pressure chamber at elevated temperatures. The compressed glasses have increased...

  18. Preparation and mechanical properties of carbon nanotube-silicon nitride nano-ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, C. Y.; Jiang, H.

    2018-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-silicon nitride nano-ceramic matrix composites were fabricated by hot-pressing nano-sized Si3N4 powders and carbon nanotubes. The effect of CNTs on the mechanical properties of silicon nitride was researched. The phase compositions and the microstructure characteristics of the samples as well as the distribution of carbon nanotube in the silicon nitride ceramic were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The results show that the microstructure of composites consists mainly of α-Si3N4, β-Si3N4, Si2N2O and carbon natubes. The addition of proper amount of carbon nanotubes can improve the fracture toughness and the flexural strength, and the optimal amount of carbon nanotube are both 3wt.%. However the Vickers hardness values decrease with the increase of carbon nanotubes content.

  19. Short and long carbon fibre reinforced Cu-matrix composites: microstructural results and structural origin of properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchgraber, W.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites possess properties of copper, i.e. excellent thermal and electrical conductivities, and properties of carbon fibre, i.e. a small thermal expansion coefficient. Since the desirable properties of the composite can be obtained by selecting the amount, type and orientation of the carbon fibres, it is considered to be suitable for use as electric and electronic materials. This lecture focuses on two-dimensional isotropic carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites with long or short carbon fibres. Short carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites have been produced by hot-pressing of copper coated short carbon fibres. During hot-pressing, the carbon fibres take on a preferred orientation in a plane perpendicular to the hot pressing direction. Within this plane the fibre orientation is random. Long carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites have been made by hot pressing of monolayers consisting of copper coated long carbon fibres. Different orientations of the monolayers will be compared. Both the physical and mechanical properties of the discussed composites are strongly influenced not only by the properties of its individual constituents, but also by the microstructure and properties of the fibre matrix interface. The problem of poor wettability of the carbon fibre by the copper matrix will be discussed. The microstructure of several types of carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites will be discussed. Their thermophysical properties will be compared with microstructural results. (author)

  20. Matrix coatings based on anodic alumina with carbon nanostructures in the pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokh, G. G.; Pashechko, M. I.; Borc, J. T.; Lozovenko, A. A.; Kashko, I. A.; Latos, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    The nanoporous anodic alumina matrixes thickness of 1.5 mm and pore sizes of 45, 90 and 145 nm were formed on Si substrates. The tubular carbon nanostructures were synthesized into the matrixes pores by pyrolysis of fluid hydrocarbon xylene with 1% ferrocene. The structure and composition of the matrix coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy, Auger analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The carbon nanostructures completely filled the pores of templates and uniformly covered the tops. The structure of carbon nanostructures corresponded to the structure of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Investigations of mechanical and tribological properties of nanostructured oxide-carbon composite performed by scratching and nanoindentation showed nonlinear dependencies of the frictional force, penetration depth of the cantilever, hardness and plane strain modulus on the load. It was found that the microhardness of the samples increases with reduced of alumina pore diameter, and the penetration depth of the cantilever into the film grows with carbon nanostructures size. The results showed the high mechanical strength of nanostructured oxide-carbon composite.

  1. Cobalt magnetic nanoparticles embedded in carbon matrix: biofunctional validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolow, Matheus Z., E-mail: matheuskrolow@ifsul.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Monte, Leonardo G.; Remiao, Mariana H.; Hartleben, Claudia P.; Moreira, Angela N.; Dellagostin, Odir A. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Piva, Evandro [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Faculdade de Odontologia (Brazil); Conceicao, Fabricio R. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Carreno, Neftali L. V. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites display versatile allotropic morphologies, physico-chemical properties and have a wide range of applications in mechanics, electronics, biotechnology, structural material, chemical processing, and energy management. In this study we report the synthesis, characterization, and biotechnological application of cobalt magnetic nanoparticles, with diameter approximately 15-40 nm, embedded in carbon structure (Co/C-MN). A single-step chemical process was used in the synthesis of the Co/C-MN. The Co/C-MN has presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature an essential property for immunoseparation assays carried out here. To stimulate interactions between proteins and Co/C-MN, this nanocomposite was functionalized with acrylic acid (AA). We have showed the bonding of different proteins onto Co/C-AA surface using immunofluorescence assay. A Co/C-AA coated with monoclonal antibody anti-pathogenic Leptospira spp. was able to capture leptospires, suggesting that it could be useful in immunoseparation assays.

  2. Cobalt magnetic nanoparticles embedded in carbon matrix: biofunctional validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolow, Matheus Z.; Monte, Leonardo G.; Remião, Mariana H.; Hartleben, Cláudia P.; Moreira, Ângela N.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Piva, Evandro; Conceição, Fabricio R.; Carreño, Neftalí L. V.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites display versatile allotropic morphologies, physico-chemical properties and have a wide range of applications in mechanics, electronics, biotechnology, structural material, chemical processing, and energy management. In this study we report the synthesis, characterization, and biotechnological application of cobalt magnetic nanoparticles, with diameter approximately 15–40 nm, embedded in carbon structure (Co/C-MN). A single-step chemical process was used in the synthesis of the Co/C-MN. The Co/C-MN has presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature an essential property for immunoseparation assays carried out here. To stimulate interactions between proteins and Co/C-MN, this nanocomposite was functionalized with acrylic acid (AA). We have showed the bonding of different proteins onto Co/C-AA surface using immunofluorescence assay. A Co/C-AA coated with monoclonal antibody anti-pathogenic Leptospira spp. was able to capture leptospires, suggesting that it could be useful in immunoseparation assays.

  3. Interaction of hydrogen in carbon matrix with impurities of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervasoni, L L; Segui, S

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to define general criteria to allow theoretical and experimental design of new materials with high hydrogen content, with a view to their potential application as moderators in reactors at high temperatures and hydrogen storage materials. To this end we study the effects of Ni impurities on the properties of pure carbon (slabs as well as nanoparticles and gels) in order to analyze the thermodynamical characteristics, and improve the behavior of alloys for Ni-metal hydride rechargeable batteries. These elements are chosen because they have a wide range of solubility of hydrogen, which from the technological point of view makes them important candidates for the search for new materials. Our results show that this kind of carbon material could be used as support for hydrogen storage improving the screening charge density and the density of available states, as analyzed by the authors in previous works (author)

  4. Research Progress on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cu-matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAO Jing-mei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The critical issues of CNTs/Cu composites were reviewed. The preparation techniques of the composites were classified, and the research progress on powder metallurgic methods, electrochemical methods and other methods was summarized, with an emphasis on the relationship between preparation methods and properties. The interfacial characteristic of the CNTs/Cu composites was analyzed, and the research progress and existing problems of mechanical properties, electrical properties, thermal properties and wear and friction properties of the composites were also summarized. It was pointed out that the key to increase the comprehensive properties of the composites is to obtain the homogeneous distribution of CNTs and good interfacial bonding between CNTs and the Cu matrix by improving the preparation methods.

  5. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  6. ECOS E-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisien, Lia [The Environmental Council Of The States, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-31

    This final scientific/technical report on the ECOS e-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database provides a disclaimer and acknowledgement, table of contents, executive summary, description of project activities, and briefing/technical presentation link.

  7. Oxidation kinetics of a continuous carbon phase in a nonreactive matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Cawley, James D.; Parthasarathy, Triplicane A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical solutions of and experimental results on the oxidation kinetics of carbon in a pore are presented. Reaction rate, reaction sequence, oxidant partial pressure, total system pressure, pore/crack dimensions, and temperature are analyzed with respect to the influence of each on an overall linear-parabolic rate relationship. Direct measurement of carbon recession is performed using two microcomposite model systems oxidized in the temperature range of 700 to 1200 C, and for times to 35 h. Experimental results are evaluated using the derived analytical solutions. Implications on the oxidation resistance of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites containing a carbon constituent are discussed.

  8. Reaction products of densified silica fume agglomerates in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Sidney; Sahu, Sadananda; Thaulow, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Most silica fume currently used in concrete is in the dry densified form and consists of agglomerates of sizes between 10 μm and several millimeters. Many of these agglomerates may break down only partially in normal concrete mixing. Examination of various mature silica-fume-bearing concretes using backscatter mode scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis shows that such agglomerates have reacted in situ and given rise to recognizable types of reaction products filling the space within the original outline of the agglomerate. One type is 'quiescent', and usually shows no evidence of volume instability. EDX spectra indicate that the product formed within such grains is C-S-H of very low Ca/Si ratio, with modest alkali contents. Other silica fume agglomerates may undergo a distinct alkali-silica-type reaction (ASR), with the reaction product found within the original outline of the agglomerate having significantly less calcium and usually much higher alkali contents than the quiescent type. Such reacted agglomerates show evidence of local expansion, shrinkage cracking (on drying), and other features common to ASR. Both types may be found within the same concrete, sometimes in close proximity. It further appears that exposure to seawater may convert previously formed reaction products of silica fume agglomerates to magnesium silicate hydrates

  9. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Hua [Key Laboratory for Liquid phase chemical oxidation Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Chengguo, E-mail: sduwangchg@gmail.com [Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Shan; Lin Xue [Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, KClO{sub 3} and silane coupling agent ({gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor

  10. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hua; Wang Chengguo; Zhang Shan; Lin Xue

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. ► Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. ► Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. ► Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H 2 SO 4 , KClO 3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  11. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.L.; Liu, B.; Hwang, K.C.; Chen, Y.L.; Huang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT-) reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and fracture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  12. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  13. Failure Modes of a Unidirectional Ultra-High-Modulus Carbon-Fiber/Carbon-Matrix Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaldivar, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of various microstructural features on the in situ, room-temperature tensile fracture behavior of an ultra-high-modulus, unidirectional carbon/carbon (C/C...

  14. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

    2003-03-01

    Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared

  15. Studies of CoSn grains in the carbon matrix structure of nanostructured tin–cobalt–carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.P.; Fleischauer, M.D.; LaForge, J.M.; Todd, A.D.W.; Li, P.; Dahn, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sn–Co–C alloys as negative electrode for Li-ion batteries. ► Sn–Co–C alloys prepared by mechanical alloying and by sputtering. ► CoSn grains embedded in carbon matrix structure was observed from SANS and TEM. ► SANS quickly characterized Sn–Co–C alloys equivalently to TEM. - Abstract: Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to qualitatively analyze the structure of Sn 30 Co 30 C 40 alloys produced by vertical axis mechanical attriting to those produced by magnetron sputter deposition. From SANS and TEM, CoSn grains embedded in a carbon matrix structure were observed for all samples. The size of CoSn grains in the attrited samples was approximately 10 ± 3 nm by both TEM and SANS, while that of the sputtered samples was about 7 times smaller.

  16. STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF NEW FORMATIONS IN CEMENT MATRIX USING CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSIONS AND NANOSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanodispersed systems with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodispersed silica have a significant impact on the processes of hydration, hardening and strength gain of construction composites predetermining their durability. While using a scanning electron microscope with an attachment for X-ray microanalysis and a device for infrared spectral analysis investigations have shown that the main effect of the cement matrix modification in the case of adding complex nanodispersed systems is provided by direct influence of hydration processes with subsequent crystallization of new formations. It has been noted that while adding carbon nanotube dispersion and nanosized silica a binding matrix is structured in the form of an extremely dense shell from crystalline hydrate new formations on the surface of solid phases that provides strong binding matrix in cement concrete. The addition effect of carbon nanotubes has been analyzed and quantitatively assessed through an investigation for every case of one sample with nanotubes and one sample without them with the help of a nanoindenter and scanning electron microscope. It is necessary to solve rather complicated challenging task in order to assess quantitatively the addition effect of CNT on material characteristics at a micromechanical level. At the same time it is possible to investigate surface of a concrete sample with one-micron resolution. In this case it is necessary to prepare samples for nanoindentation with exclusion of all CNT defectable effects that have been shown by a SEM. So in this case more adequate method for assessment must be a picoindenter , which combines a test method for nanoindentation with an optical SEM potential. Such equipment is in the stage of in-situ testing process at the Vienna University of Technology. The investigation is based on the fact that the main modification effect of mineral binding matrix while using incorporated complex nanodispersed systems and

  17. The Effect of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes on Some Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saadi, Tagreed M.; hammed Aleabi, Suad; Al-Obodi, Entisar E.; Abdul-Jabbar Abbas, Hadeel

    2018-05-01

    This research involves using epoxy resin as a matrix for making a composite material, while the multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWNCTs) is used as a reinforcing material with different fractions (0.0,0.02, 0.04, 0.06) of the matrix weight. The mechanical ( hardness ), electrical ( dielectric constant, dielectric loss factor, dielectric strength, electrical conductivity ), and thermal properties (thermal conductivity ) were studied. The results showed the increase of hardness, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and break down strength with the increase of MWCNT concentration, but the behavior of dielectric loss factor and dielectric constant is opposite that.

  18. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Magnesium Matrix Composites Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Jin; Kim, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    A combination of accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and high-energy ball milling was used to fabricate carbon nano tube (CNT)-reinforced Mg composites in sheet form. CNT-Al composite powders synthesized using the high-energy ball-milling process, were coated on the surface of Mg sheets using either spraying or dipping methods. The coated sheets were stacked and then subjected to ARB. Formation of CNT-intermetallic compounds through inter-diffusion between Al and Mg, fragmentation of the CNTintermetallic compounds, and their dispersion into the matrix by plastic flow; as well as dissolution of the intermetallic compound particles into the matrix while leaving CNTs in the matrix, occurred in sequence during the ARB process. This eventually resulted in the uniform distribution of nano-sized CNT particles in the Mg matrix. As the thickness of the Mg sheet and of the coating layer of Al-CNT powder on the surface of the Mg sheet were similar, the dispersion of CNTs into the Mg matrix occurred more uniformly and the strengthening effect of adding CNTs was greater. The strengthening gained by adding CNTs was attributed to Orowan strengthening and dislocation-density increase due to a thermal mismatch between the matrix and the CNTs.

  19. The development and mechanical characterization of aluminium copper-carbon fiber metal matrix hybrid composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, M. U.; Feroze, M.; Ahmad, T.; Kamran, M.; Butt, M. T. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) come under advanced materials that can be used for a wide range of industrial applications. MMCs contain a non-metallic reinforcement incorporated into a metallic matrix which can enhance properties over base metal alloys. Copper-Carbon fiber reinforced aluminium based hybrid composites were prepared by compo casting method. 4 weight % copper was used as alloying element with Al because of its precipitation hardened properties. Different weight compositions of composites were developed and characterized by mechanical testing. A significant improvement in tensile strength and micro hardness were found, before and after heat treatment of the composite. The SEM analysis of the fractured surfaces showed dispersed and embedded Carbon fibers within the network leading to the enhanced strength.

  20. Why to synthesize vaterite polymorph of calcium carbonate on the cellulose matrix via sonochemistry process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lian-Hua; Dong, Yan-Yan; Ma, Ming-Guo; Yue, Wen; Sun, Shao-Long; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-09-01

    Vaterite is an important biomedical material due to its features such as high specific surface area, high solubility, high dispersion, and small specific gravity. The purposes of this article were to explore the growth mechanism of vaterite on the cellulose matrix via sonochmistry process. In the work reported herein, the influences of experimental parameters on the polymorph of calcium carbonate were investigated in detail. The calcium carbonate crystals on the cellulose matrix were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results revealed that all the reactants, solvent, and synthesis method played an important role in the polymorph of calcium carbonate. The pure phase of vaterite polymorph was obtained using Na2CO3 as reactant in ethylene glycol on the cellulose matrix via sonochmistry process. Based on the experimental results, one can conclude that the synthesis of vaterite polymorph is a system process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites tailored for multifunctionality by filler incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seungjin

    This dissertation provides multifunctional carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for vibration damping, thermal conduction and thermoelectricity. Specifically, (i) it has strengthened and stiffened carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites by the incorporation of halloysite nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and silicon carbide whiskers, (ii) it has improved mechanical energy dissipation using carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites with filler incorporation, (iii) it has increased the through-thickness thermal conductivity of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composite by curing pressure increase and filler incorporation, and (iv) it has enhanced the thermoelectric behavior of carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites. Low-cost natural halloysite nanotubes (0.1 microm diameter) were effective for strengthening and stiffening continuous fiber polymer-matrix composites, as shown for crossply carbon fiber (5 microm diameter, ˜59 vol.%) epoxy-matrix composites under flexure, giving 17% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 21% decrease in ductility. They were less effective than expensive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (0.02 microm diameter), which gave 25% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 14% decrease in ductility. However, they were more effective than expensive silicon carbide whiskers (1 microm diameter), which gave 15% increase in strength, 9% increase in modulus and 20% decrease in ductility. Each filler, at ˜2 vol.%, was incorporated in the composite at every interlaminar interface by fiber prepreg surface modification. The flexural strength increase due to halloysite nanotubes incorporation related to the interlaminar shear strength increase. The measured values of the composite modulus agreed roughly with the calculated values based on the Rule of Mixtures. Continuous carbon fiber composites with enhanced vibration damping under flexure are provided by incorporation of fillers between the laminae

  2. Direct observation of toughening mechanisms in carbon nanotube ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Z.; Riester, L.; Curtin, W.A.; Li, H.; Sheldon, B.W.; Liang, J.; Chang, B.; Xu, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) are driving research into the creation of new strong, tough nanocomposite systems. Here, the first evidence of toughening mechanisms operating in carbon-nanotube-reinforced ceramic composites is presented. A highly ordered array of parallel multiwall CNTs in an alumina matrix was fabricated. Nanoindentation introduced controlled cracks and the damage was examined by scanning electron microscopy. These nanocomposites exhibit the three hallmarks of toughening found in micron-scale fiber composites: crack deflection at the CNT/matrix interface; crack bridging by CNTs; and CNT pullout on the fracture surfaces. Interface debonding and sliding can thus occur in materials with microstructures approaching the atomic scale. Furthermore, for certain geometries a new mechanism of nanotube collapse in 'shear bands' occurs, rather than crack formation, suggesting that these materials can have multiaxial damage tolerance. The quantitative indentation data and computational models are used to determine the multiwall CNT axial Young's modulus as 200-570 GPa, depending on the nanotube geometry and quality. Three-dimensional FEM analysis indicates that matrix residual stresses on the order of 300 MPa are sustained in these materials without spontaneous cracking, suggesting that residual stress can be used to engineer enhanced performance. These nanoscale ceramic composites thus have potential for toughening and damage tolerance at submicron scales, and so are excellent candidates for wear-resistant coatings

  3. Poly(borosiloxanes as precursors for carbon fiber ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luiz Siqueira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, constituted of a silicon boron oxycarbide (SiBCO matrix and unidirectional carbon fiber rods as a reinforcement phase, were prepared by pyrolysis of carbon fiber rods wrapped in polysiloxane (PS or poly(borosiloxane (PBS matrices. The preparation of the polymeric precursors involved hydrolysis/condensation reactions of alkoxysilanes in the presence and absence of boric acid, with B/Si atomic ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. Infrared spectra of PBS showed evidence of Si-O-B bonds at 880 cm-1, due to the incorporation of the crosslinker trigonal units of BO3 in the polymeric network. X ray diffraction analyses exhibited an amorphous character of the resulting polymer-derived ceramics obtained by pyrolysis up to 1000 °C under inert atmosphere. The C/SiBCO composites showed better thermal stability than the C/SiOC materials. In addition, good adhesion between the carbon fiber and the ceramic phase was observed by SEM microscopy

  4. The computational design of junctions by carbon nanotube insertion into a graphene matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yuliang; Zhong Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, two types of junction models constructed from armchair and zigzag carbon nanotube (CNT) insertion into a graphene matrix have been envisioned. It has been found that the insertion of the CNT into the graphene matrix leads to the formation of C-C covalent bonds between graphene and the CNT that distort the CNT geometry. However, the hydrogenation of the suspended carbon bonds on the graphene resumes the graphene-like structure of the pristine tube. The calculated band structure of armchair CNT insertion into graphene or hydrogenation graphene opens up a band gap and converts the metallic CNT into a semiconductor. For the zigzag CNT, the sp 3 hybridization between the graphene and nanotube alters the band structure of the tube significantly, whereas saturating the dangling bonds of terminal carbon atoms of graphene makes the CNT almost keep the same character of the bands as that in the pristine tube. The synthesis of our designed hybrid structures must be increasingly driven by an interest in molecules that not only have intriguing structures but also have special functions such as hydrogen storage.

  5. Functionalized carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes of polymers of intrinsic microporosity for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muntazim Munir; Filiz, Volkan; Bengtson, Gisela; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Rahman, Mushfequr; Abetz, Volker

    2012-09-06

    The present work reports on the gas transport behavior of mixed matrix membranes (MMM) which were prepared from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and dispersed within polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) matrix. The MWCNTs were chemically functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) for a better dispersion in the polymer matrix. MMM-incorporating functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs) were fabricated by dip-coating method using microporous polyacrylonitrile membrane as a support and were characterized for gas separation performance. Gas permeation measurements show that MMM incorporated with pristine or functionalized MWCNTs exhibited improved gas separation performance compared to pure PIM-1. The f-MWCNTs MMM show better performance in terms of permeance and selectivity in comparison to pristine MWCNTs. The gas permeances of the derived MMM are increased to approximately 50% without sacrificing the selectivity at 2 wt.% of f-MWCNTs' loading. The PEG groups on the MWCNTs have strong interaction with CO2 which increases the solubility of polar gas and limit the solubility of nonpolar gas, which is advantageous for CO2/N2 selectivity. The addition of f-MWCNTs inside the polymer matrix also improved the long-term gas transport stability of MMM in comparison with PIM-1. The high permeance, selectivity, and long term stability of the fabricated MMM suggest that the reported approach can be utilized in practical gas separation technology.

  6. Effects of carbonation, irradiation and temperature onto strontium immobilization into a cementitious matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Nes, G.; Arbel-Haddad, M.; Chomat, L.; Poyet, S.; Mace, N.; Hossepied, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the decoupled effects of carbonation, irradiation and temperature on strontium immobilization in a CEM-I cement matrix are described. After 6 months of treatment, mineralogical characterization (X-ray diffraction - XRD and thermogravimetric analysis - TGA), leaching tests (according to ANSI.ANS-16.1 standard method) and sorption experiments were carried out. The mineralogical evolution was shown to be similar for samples submitted to irradiation at atmospheric conditions or carbonation at a controlled temperature of 40 C. degrees. The main mineralogical change during these two treatments is the formation of calcium carbonate; calcite is detected at the sample surface and the two carbonate metastable phases (aragonite and vaterite) in the depth of the sample. Although it was not possible to identify, by the techniques used, the association of Sr with any specific cementitious phase present in the investigated samples, the leaching results showed that the fraction of Sr leached from samples exposed to carbonation during their degradation process, was approximately 6 times lower compared to the corresponding samples degraded under inert conditions. The sorption experiments onto the hydrated cement paste show a small but significant retention of Sr in these matrices without allowing a possible identification of the phase responsible for the retention. Post leaching mineralogical characterization is to be performed in order to study the effect of the leaching process on the sample mineralogy and to locate the binding sites of the Sr ions within the cementitious paste. (authors)

  7. Effective functionalization of carbon nanotubes for bisphenol F epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A brand-new type of multifunctional nanocomposites with high DC conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength was fabricated. Ionic liquid functionalized Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs-IL were embedded into epoxy matrix with covalent bonding by the attached epoxy groups. The highest DC conductivity was 8.38 x 10-3 S.m-1 with 1.0 wt. (% loading of CNTs-IL and the tensile strength was increased by 36.4% only at a 0.5 wt. (% concentration. A mixing solvent was used to disperse CNTs-IL in the epoxy monomer. The dispersion and distribution of CNTs-IL in the polymer matrix were measured by utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively.

  8. Characterisation of Microstructure of We43 Magnesium Matrix Composites Reinforced with Carbon Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gryc A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the microstructures of WE43 matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres have been characterised. The influence of reinforcement type and T6 heat treatment (a solution treatment at 525°C for 8 h, a hot water quench and a subsequent ageing treatment at 250°C for 16 h on microstructure have been evaluated. The light microscope and scanning electron microscope investigations have been carried out. No significant differences in samples reinforced with non-coated textiles have been reported. The substantial changes in sample reinforced with nickel-coated textile have been observed. The segregation of alloying elements to the matrix-reinforcement layer has been identified. The T6 heat treatment caused the appearance of disperse precipitates of β phase, but the process cannot be considered as satisfactory (irregular distribution, low volume fraction, relatively large size.

  9. Carbon nanotube based 3-D matrix for enabling three-dimensional nano-magneto-electronics [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Hong

    Full Text Available This letter describes the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT-based arrays with estimated 2-nm thick cobalt (Co nanoparticles deposited inside individual tubes to unravel the possibility of using the unique templates for ultra-high-density low-energy 3-D nano-magneto-electronic devices. The presence of oriented 2-nm thick Co layers within individual nanotubes in the CNT-based 3-D matrix is confirmed through VSM measurements as well as an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS.

  10. Modeling the Role of Bulk and Surface Characteristics of Carbon Fiber on Thermal Conductance across the Carbon Fiber/Matrix Interface (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-09

    heat flow from carbon fiber to the matrix (most of the laser energy is absorbed by the carbon fiber), subsequently determining the temperature rise and...Reductase- Trimethoprim , a Drug-Receptor System. Proteins: Struct., Funct., Genet. 1988, 4, 31−47. (37) Sun, H.; Mumby, S. J.; Maple, J. R.; Hagler, A. T

  11. Green starch conversions : Studies on starch acetylation in densified CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muljana, Henky; Picchioni, Francesco; Heeres, Hero J.; Janssen, Leon P. B. M.

    2010-01-01

    The acetylation of potato starch with acetic anhydride (AAH) and sodium acetate (NaOAc) as catalyst in densified CO2 was explored in a batch reactor setup. The effects of process variables such as pressure (6-9.8 MPa), temperature (40-90 degrees C), AAH to starch ratio (2-5 mol/mol AGU), NaOAc to

  12. Simultaneous infrared and UV-visible absorption spectra of matrix-isolated carbon vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Joe; Huffman, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon molecules were suggested as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. In particular, it was proposed that the 443 nm diffuse interstellar band is due to the same molecule which gives rise to the 447 nm absorption feature in argon matrix-isolated carbon vapor. If so, then an associated C-C stretching mode should be seen in the IR. By doing spectroscopy in both the IR and UV-visible regions on the same sample, the present work provides evidence for correlating UV-visible absorption features with those found in the IR. Early data indicates no correlation between the strongest IR feature (1997/cm) and the 447 nm band. Correlation with weaker IR features is being investigated.

  13. Carbon nanotubes within polymer matrix can synergistically enhance mechanical energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Taimoor; Ranaiefar, Meelad; Khatri, Sumit; Kavosi, Jamshid; Gardea, Frank; Glaz, Bryan; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Safe operation and health of structures relies on their ability to effectively dissipate undesired vibrations, which could otherwise significantly reduce the life-time of a structure due to fatigue loads or large deformations. To address this issue, nanoscale fillers, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been utilized to dissipate mechanical energy in polymer-based nanocomposites through filler-matrix interfacial friction by benefitting from their large interface area with the matrix. In this manuscript, for the first time, we experimentally investigate the effect of CNT alignment with respect to reach other and their orientation with respect to the loading direction on vibrational damping in nanocomposites. The matrix was polystyrene (PS). A new technique was developed to fabricate PS-CNT nanocomposites which allows for controlling the angle of CNTs with respect to the far-field loading direction (misalignment angle). Samples were subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis, and the damping of the samples were measured as the ratio of the loss to storage moduli versus CNT misalignment angle. Our results defied a notion that randomly oriented CNT nanocomposites can be approximated as a combination of matrix-CNT representative volume elements with randomly aligned CNTs. Instead, our results points to major contributions of stress concentration induced by each CNT in the matrix in proximity of other CNTs on vibrational damping. The stress fields around CNTs in PS-CNT nanocomposites were studied via finite element analysis. Our findings provide significant new insights not only on vibrational damping nanocomposites, but also on their failure modes and toughness, in relation to interface phenomena.

  14. Liquid-phase plasma synthesis of silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix for lithium battery anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Ying [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Yu, Hang; Li, Haitao; Ming, Hai; Pan, Keming; Huang, Hui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) were fabricated. • SiQDs/C exhibits excellent battery performance as anode materials with high specific capacity. • The good performance was attributed to the marriage of small sized SiQDs and carbon. - Abstract: Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) nanocomposites were prepared by a novel liquid-phase plasma assisted synthetic process. The SiQDs/C nanocomposites were demonstrated to show high specific capacity, good cycling life and high coulmbic efficiency as anode materials for lithium-ion battery.

  15. Liquid-phase plasma synthesis of silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix for lithium battery anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Ying; Yu, Hang; Li, Haitao; Ming, Hai; Pan, Keming; Huang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) were fabricated. • SiQDs/C exhibits excellent battery performance as anode materials with high specific capacity. • The good performance was attributed to the marriage of small sized SiQDs and carbon. - Abstract: Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) nanocomposites were prepared by a novel liquid-phase plasma assisted synthetic process. The SiQDs/C nanocomposites were demonstrated to show high specific capacity, good cycling life and high coulmbic efficiency as anode materials for lithium-ion battery

  16. Matrix effects in nilotinib formulations with pH-responsive polymer produced by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Stefano; Brisander, Magnus; Haglöf, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Factors determining the pH-controlled dissolution kinetics of nilotinib formulations with the pH-titrable polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate, obtained by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation, were mechanistically examined in acid and neutral environment. The matrix effect, modulating...... in the polymer matrix were mediated by hydrogen bonding between the drug and the phthalate groups on the polymer. Simultaneous Raman and UV-imaging studies of the effect of drug load on the swelling and dissolution of the polymer matrix revealed that high nilotinib load prevented matrix swelling on passage from...

  17. The skeletal organic matrix from Mediterranean coral Balanophyllia europaea influences calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo, Stefano; Vergni, Patrizia; Reggi, Michela; Caroselli, Erik; Sparla, Francesca; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Scleractinian coral skeletons are made mainly of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite. The mineral deposition occurs in a biological confined environment, but it is still a theme of discussion to what extent the calcification occurs under biological or environmental control. Hence, the shape, size and organization of skeletal crystals from the cellular level through the colony architecture, were attributed to factors as diverse as mineral supersaturation levels and organic mediation of crystal growth. The skeleton contains an intra-skeletal organic matrix (OM) of which only the water soluble component was chemically and physically characterized. In this work that OM from the skeleton of the Balanophyllia europaea, a solitary scleractinian coral endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is studied in vitro with the aim of understanding its role in the mineralization of calcium carbonate. Mineralization of calcium carbonate was conducted by overgrowth experiments on coral skeleton and in calcium chloride solutions containing different ratios of water soluble and/or insoluble OM and of magnesium ions. The precipitates were characterized by diffractometric, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that both soluble and insoluble OM components influence calcium carbonate precipitation and that the effect is enhanced by their co-presence. The role of magnesium ions is also affected by the presence of the OM components. Thus, in vitro, OM influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology, aggregation and polymorphism as a function of its composition and of the content of magnesium ions in the precipitation media. This research, although does not resolve the controversy between environmental or biological control on the deposition of calcium carbonate in corals, sheds a light on the role of OM, which appears mediated by the presence of magnesium ions.

  18. The Skeletal Organic Matrix from Mediterranean Coral Balanophyllia europaea Influences Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo, Stefano; Vergni, Patrizia; Reggi, Michela; Caroselli, Erik; Sparla, Francesca; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Scleractinian coral skeletons are made mainly of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite. The mineral deposition occurs in a biological confined environment, but it is still a theme of discussion to what extent the calcification occurs under biological or environmental control. Hence, the shape, size and organization of skeletal crystals from the cellular level through the colony architecture, were attributed to factors as diverse as mineral supersaturation levels and organic mediation of crystal growth. The skeleton contains an intra-skeletal organic matrix (OM) of which only the water soluble component was chemically and physically characterized. In this work that OM from the skeleton of the Balanophyllia europaea, a solitary scleractinian coral endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is studied in vitro with the aim of understanding its role in the mineralization of calcium carbonate. Mineralization of calcium carbonate was conducted by overgrowth experiments on coral skeleton and in calcium chloride solutions containing different ratios of water soluble and/or insoluble OM and of magnesium ions. The precipitates were characterized by diffractometric, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that both soluble and insoluble OM components influence calcium carbonate precipitation and that the effect is enhanced by their co-presence. The role of magnesium ions is also affected by the presence of the OM components. Thus, in vitro, OM influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology, aggregation and polymorphism as a function of its composition and of the content of magnesium ions in the precipitation media. This research, although does not resolve the controversy between environmental or biological control on the deposition of calcium carbonate in corals, sheds a light on the role of OM, which appears mediated by the presence of magnesium ions. PMID:21799830

  19. Mixed Matrix Carbon Molecular Sieve and Alumina (CMS-Al2O3) Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yingjun; Wang, David K; Birkett, Greg; Martens, Wayde; Duke, Mikel C; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C

    2016-07-29

    This work shows mixed matrix inorganic membranes prepared by the vacuum-assisted impregnation method, where phenolic resin precursors filled the pore of α-alumina substrates. Upon carbonisation, the phenolic resin decomposed into several fragments derived from the backbone of the resin matrix. The final stages of decomposition (>650 °C) led to a formation of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) structures, reaching the lowest average pore sizes of ~5 Å at carbonisation temperatures of 700 °C. The combination of vacuum-assisted impregnation and carbonisation led to the formation of mixed matrix of CMS and α-alumina particles (CMS-Al2O3) in a single membrane. These membranes were tested for pervaporative desalination and gave very high water fluxes of up to 25 kg m(-2) h(-1) for seawater (NaCl 3.5 wt%) at 75 °C. Salt rejection was also very high varying between 93-99% depending on temperature and feed salt concentration. Interestingly, the water fluxes remained almost constant and were not affected as feed salt concentration increased from 0.3, 1 and 3.5 wt%.

  20. Bulk-volume behavior of pressure-densified amorphous polymers and free-volume behavior by positron annihilation lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, K.; Ougizawa, T.; Inoue, T.; Hirata, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the nature of amorphous polymers, the free volume contribution on the bulk volume change was investigated on the basis of the relationship between the bulk volume behavior by PVT (pressure-volume-temperature) measurement and the free volume behavior by PALS (positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy) measurement. A densified glass, prepared by cooling at constant rate from the melt state temperature to room temperature under 200 MPa, showed smaller bulk volume and free volume than non-densified glass. And the densified glass showed not only the same glass transition temperature (Tg) as non-densified glass but also another transition at lower temperature around (Tg-30 C). In this glass-glass transition, both the bulk volume and free volume of densified glass recovered to those of non-densified glass. Moreover the densified glass showed different thermal behavior from the glass which was enthalpy-relaxed under atmospheric pressure. From those results, it was considered that the free volume behavior largely related to the behavior of amorphous polymers. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  2. Densified ultra-light cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro

    2015-01-01

    be used as a “clean technology” in the production of cement-based materials for structural applications with a low carbon footprint. This paper describes the principles of this concept coupled with experimental results on the basic properties of this enhanced type of cement-based materials with combined...

  3. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui

    2017-11-20

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  4. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui; Olivos-Suarez, Alma I.; Osadchii, Dmitrii; Romero, Maria Jose Valero; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  5. Pre-form ceramic matrix composite cavity and method of forming and method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Philip Harold; Delvaux, John McConnell; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-06-09

    A pre-form CMC cavity and method of forming pre-form CMC cavity for a ceramic matrix component includes providing a mandrel, applying a base ply to the mandrel, laying-up at least one CMC ply on the base ply, removing the mandrel, and densifying the base ply and the at least one CMC ply. The remaining densified base ply and at least one CMC ply form a ceramic matrix component having a desired geometry and a cavity formed therein. Also provided is a method of forming a CMC component.

  6. Carbon capture from natural gas using multi-walled CNTs based mixed matrix membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abid; Farrukh, Sarah; Hussain, Arshad; Ayoub, Muhammad

    2017-12-05

    Most of the polymers and their blends, utilized in carbon capture membranes, are costly, but cellulose acetate (CA) being inexpensive is a lucrative choice. In this research, pure and mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) have been fabricated to capture carbon from natural gas. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been utilized in the fabrication of membranes to modify the chain flexibility of polymers. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) provide mechanical strength, thermal stability, an extra free path for CO 2 molecules and augment CO 2 /CH 4 selectivity. Membranes of pure CA, CA/PEG blend of different PEG concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%) and CA/PEG/MWCNTs blend of 10% PEG with different MWCNTs concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%) were prepared in acetone using solution casting techniques. Fabricated membranes were characterized using SEM, TGA and tensile testing. Permeation results revealed remarkable improvement in CO 2 /CH 4 selectivity. In single gas experiments, CO 2 /CH 4 selectivity is enhanced 8 times for pure membranes containing 10% PEG and 14 times for MMMs containing 10% MWCNTs. In mix gas experiments, the CO 2 /CH 4 selectivity is increased 13 times for 10% PEG and 18 times for MMMs with 10% MWCNTs. Fabricated MMMs have a tensile strength of 13 MPa and are more thermally stable than CA membranes.

  7. A Numerical Study on Electrical Percolation of Polymer-Matrix Composites with Hybrid Fillers of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical percolation of polymer-matrix composites (PMCs containing hybrid fillers of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and carbon black (CB is estimated by studying the connection possibility of the fillers using Monte Carlo simulation. The 3D simulation model of CB-CNT hybrid filler is established, in which CNTs are modeled by slender capped cylinders and CB groups are modeled by hypothetical spheres with interspaces because CB particles are always agglomerated. The observation on the effects of CB and CNT volume fractions and dimensions on the electrical percolation threshold of hybrid filled composites is then carried out. It is found that the composite electrical percolation threshold can be reduced by increasing CNT aspect ratio, as well as increasing the diameter ratio of CB groups to CNTs. And adding CB into CNT composites can decrease the CNT volume needed to convert the composite conductivity, especially when the CNT volume fraction is close to the threshold of PMCs with only CNT filler. Different from previous linear assumption, the nonlinear relation between CB and CNT volume fractions at composite percolation threshold is revealed, which is consistent with the synergistic effect observed in experiments. Based on the nonlinear relation, the estimating equation for the electrical percolation threshold of the PMCs containing CB-CNT hybrid fillers is established.

  8. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajhosseini, M.; Payami, A.; Ghaffarian, S. R.; Rezadoust, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  9. Mixed Matrix Composite Membranes Containing POSS Molecules for Carbon Dioxide Removal Application

    KAUST Repository

    Rini, Eki Listya

    2011-05-10

    CO2 removal by membrane processes is considerably potential for several applications such as natural gas and synthesis gas purification, enhanced oil recovery application, and carbon dioxide capture in combat against global warming. Dense polymeric membranes are commonly utilized for these type of gas separation applications. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of dense polymeric membranes, which commonly characterize by the low gas permeability versus high gas selectivity trade–off or vice versa, is less desirable. In order to meet the increased demand of CO2 removal, a strategy to improve the gas separation performance of a polymeric membrane is investigated in this study. With this regard, mixed matrix membranes in which inorganic non porous fillers are incorporated into a polymeric matrix were prepared to achieve the aforementioned objective. The mixed matrix membranes were prepared from Pebax® block copolymers and PEG POSS® molecules. These hybrid membranes were formed as both dense and multilayer composite membranes. The dense transparent membranes with well–dispersed fillers could be obtained by variation of the solvent mixture. The DSC analyses showed that incorporation of PEG POSS® into Pebax® matrix altered the thermal properties of the matrix. The multilayer composite membranes were then prepared from a PTMSP gutter layer deposited on a PAN porous support and an adjacent hybrid Pebax®/PEG POSS® as the top layer. These hybrid multilayer composite membranes exhibited an enhanced CO2 selectiv4 ity by a factor of two relative to the pure Pebax®. In these hybrid systems, the CO2 separation was presumably enhanced by the high ether oxides content from PEG POSS® that has high affinities for CO2. For particular composition of Pebax® and PEG POSS® concentrations, the PTMSP gutter layer harnessed the CO2 selectivity without losing the CO2 permeation rate. At the same time, these membrane, however, suffered severe adhesion between the gutter layer

  10. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  11. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  12. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  13. Some Properties of Densified Eastern Redcedar as Function of Heat and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Onur; Hiziroglu, Salim

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate some of the properties of densified eastern redcedar as function of temperature and pressure. Surface quality, adhesive bondline shear strength, hardness, and color changes of the samples compressed using different temperature levels ranging from 100 °C to 180 °C were investigated. Based on the findings in this work, surface roughness of compressed specimens decreased with increased temperature. Overall adhesive bondline shear strength of the samples decreased as compared to that of control specimens as a result of compression. It appears that densified samples exposed to a temperature of 180 °C had significantly darker surface than those of the others, based on color measurement. Data found in this work provide some basic information for more efficient use of underutilized species such as eastern redcedar. PMID:29112127

  14. Some Properties of Densified Eastern Redcedar as Function of Heat and Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Ulker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate some of the properties of densified eastern redcedar as function of temperature and pressure. Surface quality, adhesive bondline shear strength, hardness, and color changes of the samples compressed using different temperature levels ranging from 100 °C to 180 °C were investigated. Based on the findings in this work, surface roughness of compressed specimens decreased with increased temperature. Overall adhesive bondline shear strength of the samples decreased as compared to that of control specimens as a result of compression. It appears that densified samples exposed to a temperature of 180 °C had significantly darker surface than those of the others, based on color measurement. Data found in this work provide some basic information for more efficient use of underutilized species such as eastern redcedar.

  15. Large scale production of densified hydrogen to the triple point and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; E Fesmire, J.; Jumper, K. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent demonstration of advanced liquid hydrogen storage techniques using Integrated Refrigeration and Storage technology at NASA Kennedy Space Center led to the production of large quantities of densified liquid and slush hydrogen in a 125,000 L tank. Production of densified hydrogen was performed at three different liquid levels and LH2 temperatures were measured by twenty silicon diode temperature sensors. Overall densification performance of the system is explored, and solid mass fractions are calculated. Experimental data reveal hydrogen temperatures dropped well below the triple point during testing, and were continuing to trend downward prior to system shutdown. Sub-triple point temperatures were seen to evolve in a time dependent manner along the length of the horizontal, cylindrical vessel. The phenomenon, observed at two fill levels, is detailed herein. The implications of using IRAS for energy storage, propellant densification, and future cryofuel systems are discussed.

  16. Polyurethane elastomer as a matrix material for short carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Tayfun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Short carbon fibers (CF with different surface sized (epoxy (EP and polyurethane (PU were used as reinforcing agent in thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU based composites. Composites containing 5, 10, 15, and 20 weight % sized and desized CFs were prepared by using melt-mixing method. The surface characteristics of CFs were examined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Tensile testing, shore hardness test, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and melt flow index (MFI test were performed for determining final composite properties. The dispersion of CFs in TPU matrix was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Tensile strength, Youngs’ modulus and Shore hardness of TPU were enhanced by the addition of sized CFs. About two-fold improvement for tensile strength and ten-fold improvement for Youngs’ modulus were observed with the incorporation of 20 wt% EP-CF and PU-CF in TPU. The storage modulus of PU-CF containing composites was higher than those of TPU and other composites. No remarkable change was observed in MFI value of TPU after CF loadings. Processing conditions in this work was suitable for composite production. Sized CFs exhibited better dispersion with regard to desized CF due to the stronger adhesion of TPU matrix to fiber surface.

  17. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using co-densified multilayer configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-06-17

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A method of manufacturing a lossy dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer and then densifying together. The systems and methods provide advantages because the lossy dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  18. Obtention and dynamical mechanical behavior of polymer matrix carbon fire reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, Nelson Marques

    2001-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres have been extensively used in the nuclear, aeronautics, automotive and leisure industry. This is due to their superior performance when compared to conventional materials in terms of specific strength and specific modulus (3 to 4 times higher than that of mild steels). However, these materials are anisotropic, requiring characterisation for each process and particular application. In the present work, the evaluation of epoxy resin reinforced with unidirectional and continuous carbon fibres was carried out. The composites materials were obtained by filament winding, with three different cure cycles, with two types of carbon fibres (6000 and 12000 filaments per strand) and with fibres volumetric fraction around 60 %. The evaluation of the composites was undertaken using following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA); thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These techniques allowed the evaluation and comparison of storage modulus, internal energy dissipation, glass transition region and glass transition temperature - Tg, cure cycling. Besides, void volumetric fraction was measured. The results indicate that the DMA is a good alternative technique to DSC and TGA. It provides an indication of the quality of the produced composite, both thermal and mechanical. The technique can assist the quality control of composite components by measuring mechanical and thermal properties - modulus and Tg. The DMA technique was sensitive to cure cycling evaluation. Regarding the obtained composites, the results showed the need for the development of specific cure cycle for each application, establishing a compromise between properties such as storage modulus and internal energy dissipation, and involved costs. The results demonstrated differences between the storage modulus and internal energy dissipation for the two types of used fibres. (author)

  19. Reinforcing effect of plasma modified halloysite nanotubes in a carbon black filled natural rubber-butadien rubber matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poikelispaa, Minna; Das, Amit; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Vuorinen, Jyrki

    2011-01-01

    Rubber composites are generally produced by the direct incorporation of fillers like carbon black and/or silica into the rubber matrix. The incorporation of different types of nanofillers is the subject of recent research with the aim of preparing composites with special compositions and properties.

  20. Structural Foaming at the Nano-, Micro-, and Macro-Scales of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    structural porosity at MNM scales could be introduced into the matrix, the carbon fiber reinforcement, and during prepreg lamination processing, without...areas, including fibers. Furthermore, investigate prepreg thickness and resin content effects on the thermomechanical performance of laminated ...Accomplishment 4) 5 Develop constitutive models for nano- foamed and micro- foamed PMC systems from single ply prepreg to multilayer laminated

  1. Characterization of the matrix glass transition in carbon-epoxy laminates using the CSD test geometry. [centro-symmetric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternstein, S. S.; Yang, P.

    1983-01-01

    A new test geometry, referred to as centro-symmetric deformation (CSD), is proposed for characterizing the viscoelastic behavior of the matrix of carbon-epoxy laminates. The sample consists of a thin disk, typically 6-14 plies thick, having a nominal diameter of 30 mm. The disk is freely supported on a circular anvil; the load is applied to the center of the disk using an 8-mm-diameter ball bearing nosepiece. The CSD test geometry provides viscoelastic dispersion data which are independent of the angular orientation of the sample. The test geometry is sufficiently sensitive to matrix changes to allow its use for postcuring, humidity, crosslink density, and other matrix change studies. Test results are presented for a carbon-epoxy laminate.

  2. Investigation of different carbon nanotube reinforcements for fabricating bulk AlMg5 matrix nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallip, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar.kallip@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Leparoux, Marc [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); AlOgab, Khaled A. [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), National Centers for Advanced Materials, P O Box 6086, Riyadh, 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Clerc, Steve; Deguilhem, Guillaume [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Arroyo, Yadira [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Electron Microscopy Center, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Kwon, Hansang [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Pukyong National University, Department of Materials System Engineering, 365 Sinseon-ro, Busan 608-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    AlMg5-based metal matrix composites were successfully fabricated using high energy planetary ball-milling and hot pressing. The influence of 6 types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different properties was investigated for reinforcement. Over 3 fold increase in hardness and ultimate tensile strength was achieved with maximum values of 200 HV{sub 20} and 720 MPa respectively by varying CNT content from 0.5 to 5 vol%. The state, the dispersion as well as the reactivity of the different CNTs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction and microscopy. The CNTs were considered to be dispersed homogeneously, but were shortened due to high energy milling. No significant differences in mechanical performances could be observed depending either on the nature or on the agglomeration initial state of the investigated CNTs. The milling time has to be however adjusted to the CNT content as higher concentrations require a longer milling time for achieving dispersion of the nano-reinforcement. - Highlights: • CNTs sustained the milling process and became homogeneously dispersed. • 3 times strengthening over unreinforced alloy achieved. • Flexible processing route for dispersing wide range of nanoparticulate materials.

  3. In-vitro study on calcium carbonate crystal growth mediated by organic matrix extracted from fresh water pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yufei; Qiao Li; Feng Qingling

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of studying the mediation of organic matrix on the crystallization of calcium carbonate, water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM) were extracted from aragonite pearls and vaterite pearls respectively. Then, in-vitro calcium carbonate crystallization experiments under the control of these six organic matrices were carried out in the present study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the morphology of CaCO 3 and Raman spectroscopy as a powerful technique was used to distinguish the crystal polymorph. Influences of the six kinds of organic matrices on the calcium carbonate crystal growth are proposed. ASM of vaterite pearls can induce vaterite to crystallize and WSM of aragonite pearls mediates to produce aragonite crystals. The single AIM membranes of the two pearls have no pronounced effect on the CaCO 3 crystallization. Additionally, the crystal size obtained with the additive of WSM of the two kinds of pearls is smaller than that with the additive of ASM. Moreover, self-assembly phenomenon in the biomineralization process and the distorted morphology calcite are observed. Current results demonstrate important aspects of matrix protein-controlled crystallization, which is beneficial to the understanding of nacre biomineralization mechanism. Further study of the precise control of these matrix proteins on CaCO 3 crystal growth is being processed. - Highlights: ► WSM, ASM and AIM are extracted from aragonite pearls and vaterite pearls. ► ASM of vaterite pearl induces vaterite. ► WSM of aragonite pearl mediates to produce aragonite. ► WSM can fine control crystal size smaller than that with the additive of ASM. ► Self-assembly and the distorted calcite existed in the mineralization process.

  4. Carbon nanotubes as adsorbent of solid-phase extraction and matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chensong; Xu, Songyun; Zou, Hanfa; Guo, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Baochuan

    2005-02-01

    A method with carbon nanotubes functioning both as the adsorbent of solid-phase extraction (SPE) and the matrix for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to analyze small molecules in solution has been developed. In this method, 10 microL suspensions of carbon nanotubes in 50% (vol/vol) methanol were added to the sample solution to extract analytes onto surface of carbon nanotubes because of their dramatic hydrophobicity. Carbon nanotubes in solution are deposited onto the bottom of tube with centrifugation. After removing the supernatant fluid, carbon nanotubes are suspended again with dispersant and pipetted directly onto the sample target of the MALDI-MS to perform a mass spectrometric analysis. It was demonstrated by analysis of a variety of small molecules that the resolution of peaks and the efficiency of desorption/ionization on the carbon nanotubes are better than those on the activated carbon. It is found that with the addition of glycerol and sucrose to the dispersant, the intensity, the ratio of signal to noise (S/N), and the resolution of peaks for analytes by mass spectrometry increased greatly. Compared with the previously reported method by depositing sample solution onto thin layer of carbon nanotubes, it is observed that the detection limit for analytes can be enhanced about 10 to 100 times due to solid-phase extraction of analytes in solution by carbon nanotubes. An acceptable result of simultaneously quantitative analysis of three analytes in solution has been achieved. The application in determining drugs spiked into urine has also been realized.

  5. Effects of fiber length on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Tiesong; Jia Dechang; He Peigang; Wang Meirong; Liang Defu

    2008-01-01

    A kind of sheet-like carbon fiber preform was developed using short fibers (2, 7 and 12 mm, respectively) as starting materials and used to strengthen a geopolymer. Mechanical properties, fracture behavior, microstructure and toughening mechanisms of the as-prepared composites were investigated by three-point bending test, optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the short carbon fibers disperse uniformly in geopolymer matrix. The C f /geopolymer composites exhibit apparently improved mechanical properties and an obvious noncatastrophic failure behavior. The composite reinforced by the carbon fibers of 7 mm in length shows a maximum flexural strength as well as the highest work of facture, which are nearly 5 times and more than 2 orders higher than that of the geopolymer matrix, respectively. The predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fiber bridging and pulling-out effect based on the weak fiber/matrix interface as well as the sheet-like carbon fiber preform

  6. Fabrication of Polyimide-Matrix/Carbon and Boron-Fiber Tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    process. The multilayer tape is then heated to imidize the matrix material and remove most of the remaining solvent, and is pressed to consolidate the multiple layers into a dense tape. For tests, specimens of HYCARB tapes and laminated composite panels made from HYCARB tape were prepared as follows: HYCARB tapes were fabricated as described above. Each panel was made by laying down ten layers of tape, containing, variously, one, two, or three boron-fiber plies and the remainder carbon- fiber-only plies (see figure). Each panel was made by laying down ten layers of tape. Each panel was then cured by heating to a temperature of 225 C for 15 minutes, then pressing at 200 psi (A1.4 MPa) while heating to 371 C, holding at 371 C for 1 hour, then continuing to hold pressure during cooling. Control specimens that were otherwise identical except that they did not contain boron fibers also were prepared. In room-temperature flexural tests, the HYCARB specimens performed comparably to the control specimens; in room-temperature, open-hole compression tests, the HYCARB specimens performed slightly better, by amounts that increased with boron content.

  7. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  8. Comparative performance of conventional OPC concrete and HPC designed by densified mixture design algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trong-Phuoc; Hwang, Chao-Lung; Yang, Shu-Ti

    2017-12-01

    This experimental study evaluated the performance of normal ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete and high-performance concrete (HPC) that were designed by the conventional method (ACI) and densified mixture design algorithm (DMDA) method, respectively. Engineering properties and durability performance of both the OPC and HPC samples were studied using the tests of workability, compressive strength, water absorption, ultrasonic pulse velocity, and electrical surface resistivity. Test results show that the HPC performed good fresh property and further showed better performance in terms of strength and durability as compared to the OPC.

  9. Performance Analysis of Cofiring Densified Refuse Derived Fuel in a Military Boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Use of Waste Oils to Improve Densified Refuse-Derived Fuel 79 Study of the State of the Art of Dioxin from Corbustion Sour ,-es 81 Numerical...very large hammermills for shredu-,nt ii -et re C strean . Tne suitability of this technique has beer . : , 1:d aeauie of its undesirable proper- ,V.>- ir...oe iut- fraction while reducing the hrsepower requiie:: ,. ht uuty shredders have -c-en used as a pfre -. . :-r,der-s have not beer perfected wnich

  10. Intercomparison of the GOS approach, superposition T-matrix method, and laboratory measurements for black carbon optical properties during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Cenlin; Takano, Yoshi; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Yang, Ping; Li, Qinbin; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive intercomparison of the geometric-optics surface-wave (GOS) approach, the superposition T-matrix method, and laboratory measurements for optical properties of fresh and coated/aged black carbon (BC) particles with complex structures. GOS and T-matrix calculations capture the measured optical (i.e., extinction, absorption, and scattering) cross sections of fresh BC aggregates, with 5–20% differences depending on particle size. We find that the T-matrix results tend to be lower than the measurements, due to uncertainty in theoretical approximations of realistic BC structures, particle property measurements, and numerical computations in the method. On the contrary, the GOS results are higher than the measurements (hence the T-matrix results) for BC radii 100 nm. We find good agreement (differences 100 nm. We find small deviations (≤10%) in asymmetry factors computed from the two methods for most BC coating structures and sizes, but several complex structures have 10–30% differences. This study provides the foundation for downstream application of the GOS approach in radiative transfer and climate studies. - Highlights: • The GOS and T-matrix methods capture laboratory measurements of BC optical properties. • The GOS results are consistent with the T-matrix results for BC optical properties. • BC optical properties vary remarkably with coating structures and sizes during aging.

  11. Modelling the carbonation of cementitious matrixes by means of the unreacted-core model, UR-CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellote, M.; Andrade, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE). The model is based on the principles of the 'unreacted-core' systems, typical of chemical engineering processes, in which the reacted product remains in the solid as a layer of inert ash, adapted for the specific case of carbonation. Development of the model has been undertaken in three steps: 1) Establishment of the controlling step in the global carbonation rate, by using data of fractional conversion of different phases of the cementitious matrixes, obtained by the authors through neutron diffraction data experiments, and reported in [M. Castellote, C. Andrade, X. Turrillas, J. Campo, G. Cuello, Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction, Cem. Concr. Res. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2008.07.002]. 2) Then, the model has been adapted and applied to the cementitious materials using different concentrations of CO 2 , with the introduction of the needed assumptions and factors. 3) Finally, the model has been validated with laboratory data at different concentrations (taken from literature) and for long term natural exposure of concretes. As a result, the model seems to be reliable enough to be applied to cementitious materials, being able to extrapolate the results from accelerated tests in any conditions to predict the rate of carbonation in natural exposure, being restricted, at present stage, to conditions with a constant relative humidity

  12. Coating magnesium hydroxide on surface of carbon microspheres and interface binding with poly (ethylene terephthalate) matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Baoxia [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Niu, Mei, E-mail: niumei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Bai, Jie; Song, Yinghao; Peng, Yun [College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Magnesium hydroxide (MH) as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs by liquid phase deposition method. • An organic layer of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was then introduced on the surface of MH@CMSs. • The formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties. - Abstract: In this account, magnesium hydroxide (MH) employed as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs using liquid phase deposition, then was modified by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to form FMH@CMSs. To investigate the interface binding forces, a series of PET composites was prepared by melt compounding with MH@CMSs or FMH@CMSs. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the morphology, chemical structure, and effect of functionalization of CMSs. The coating degree and thermal stability were investigated by thermogravimetry analysis. The results showed that CMSs were coated by an inorganic shell layer of MH as a capsule wall. On the other hand, MH@CMSs were coated with an organic layer of APTS. When compared to MH@CMSs, the interface binding forces between FMH@CMSs and PET matrix were significantly improved, and the tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET was higher than that of MH@CMSs/PET. At 1 wt% mass fraction of FMH@CMSs, the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of PET composites increased from 21% to 27.6% following a V-0 rating. The tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET increased by 66.2% to reach 47.20 MPa, a value nearly similar to that of PET. Overall, the formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties, which would broaden their scope of application.

  13. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. I. Assessment of crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, D.J.; Chalmers, J.M.; Mackenzie, M.W.; Gaskin, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The crystallinity of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix polymer in the Aromatic Polymer Composite APC-2 has been estimated using a combination of techniques based on wide angle x-ray diffraction and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Crystallinity varies systematically with cooling rate and annealing time over the range 20 to 40%. The occurrence of oriented crystal growth of the PEEK relative to the carbon fiber can be monitored by x-ray diffraction. 8 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%

  15. Novel hierarchically porous carbon materials obtained from natural biopolymer as host matrixes for lithium-sulfur battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Xiao, Min; Wang, Shuanjin; Han, Dongmei; Song, Shuqin; Chen, Guohua; Meng, Yuezhong

    2014-08-13

    Novel hierarchically porous carbon materials with very high surface areas, large pore volumes and high electron conductivities were prepared from silk cocoon by carbonization with KOH activation. The prepared novel porous carbon-encapsulated sulfur composites were fabricated by a simple melting process and used as cathodes for lithium sulfur batteries. Because of the large surface area and hierarchically porous structure of the carbon material, soluble polysulfide intermediates can be trapped within the cathode and the volume expansion can be alleviated effectively. Moreover, the electron transport properties of the carbon materials can provide an electron conductive network and promote the utilization rate of sulfur in cathode. The prepared carbon-sulfur composite exhibited a high specific capacity and excellent cycle stability. The results show a high initial discharge capacity of 1443 mAh g(-1) and retain 804 mAh g(-1) after 80 discharge/charge cycles at a rate of 0.5 C. A Coulombic efficiency retained up to 92% after 80 cycles. The prepared hierarchically porous carbon materials were proven to be an effective host matrix for sulfur encapsulation to improve the sulfur utilization rate and restrain the dissolution of polysulfides into lithium-sulfur battery electrolytes.

  16. Large Scale Production of Densified Hydrogen Using Integrated Refrigeration and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, William U.; Swanger, Adam Michael; Jumper, Kevin M.; Fesmire, James E.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Johnson, Wesley L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent demonstration of advanced liquid hydrogen storage techniques using Integrated Refrigeration and Storage (IRAS) technology at NASA Kennedy Space Center led to the production of large quantities of solid densified liquid and slush hydrogen in a 125,000 L tank. Production of densified hydrogen was performed at three different liquid levels and LH2 temperatures were measured by twenty silicon diode temperature sensors. System energy balances and solid mass fractions are calculated. Experimental data reveal hydrogen temperatures dropped well below the triple point during testing (up to 1 K), and were continuing to trend downward prior to system shutdown. Sub-triple point temperatures were seen to evolve in a time dependent manner along the length of the horizontal, cylindrical vessel. Twenty silicon diode temperature sensors were recorded over approximately one month for testing at two different fill levels (33 67). The phenomenon, observed at both two fill levels, is described and presented detailed and explained herein., and The implications of using IRAS for energy storage, propellant densification, and future cryofuel systems are discussed.

  17. Compact toroidal energy storage device with relativistically densified electrons through the use of travelling magnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A new concept for a small compact multimegajoule energy storage device utilizing relativistically densified electron beam circulating in a torus is presented. The electron cloud is produced through inductive charge injection by a travelling magnetic wave circulating the torus. Parameters are given for two representative toroidal energy storage devices, consisting of 1 m and 32 m in radius respectively, which could store more than 4 x 10 17 electrons and 30' MJ in energy. The concept utilizes the idea that large electric and magnetic fields can be produced by a partially space-charge neutralized intense relativistic electron beam which could become many orders of magnitude greater than the externally applied field confining the beam. In the present approach, the electron cloud densification can be achieved gradually by permitting multiple traversals of the magnetic wave around the torus. The magnetic mirror force acts on the orbital magnetic electron dipole moment and completely penetrates the entire electron cloud. As the electrons gain relativistic energies, the beam can be continuously densified at the front of the travelling wave, where the magnetic field is rising with time. The use of travelling magnetic wave to accelerate an electron cloud and the use of large electric field at the thusly accelerated cloud form the basis for a high beam intensity and hence high energy storage. Technical considerations and several potential applications, which include the driving of a powerful gyrotron, are discussed

  18. Re-thinking china's densified biomass fuel policies: Large or small scale?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Ming; Li, Dingkai; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Current policies and strategies related to the utilization of densified biomass fuel (DBF) in China are mainly focused on medium- or large-scale manufacturing modes, which cannot provide feasible solutions to solve the household energy problems in China's rural areas. To simplify commercial processes related to the collection of DBF feedstock and the production and utilization of fuel, a novel village-scale DBF approach is proposed. Pilot demonstration projects have shown the feasibility and flexibility of this new approach in realizing sustainable development in rural China. Effective utilization of DBF in rural China will lead to gains for global, regional, and local energy savings, environmental protection, sustainable development, and related social benefits. It could also benefit other developing countries for better utilization of biomass as a viable household energy source. This proposal therefore delivers the possibility of reciprocal gains, and as such deserves the attention of policy makers and various stakeholders. - Highlights: •A field survey of Chinese densified biomass fuel (DBF) development is conducted. •The current situation and problems related to China's DBF industry are analyzed. •A novel and viable village-scale DBF utilization mode is proposed. •Further actions are suggested to boost the utilization of DBF in rural China.

  19. Fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites processed by a hybrid technique based on chemical vapor infiltration, slurry impregnation and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnant, J.; Pailler, R.; Le Petitcorps, Y.; Maille, L.; Guette, A.; Marthe, J.

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of multidirectional continuous carbon and silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) by a new short time hybrid process was studied. This process is based, first, on the deposition of fiber interphase and coating by chemical vapor infiltration, next, on the introduction of silicon nitride powders into the fibrous preform by slurry impregnation and, finally, on the densification of the composite by liquid phase spark plasma sintering (LP-SPS). The homogeneous introduction of the ceramic charges into the multidirectional fiber pre-forms was realized by slurry impregnation from highly concentrated and well-dispersed aqueous colloid suspensions. The chemical degradation of the carbon fibers during the fabrication was prevented by adapting the sintering pressure cycle. The composites manufactured are dense. Microstructural analyses were conducted to explain the mechanical properties achieved. One main important result of this study is that LP-SPS can be used in some hybrid processes to densify fiber reinforced CMC. (authors)

  20. Effectively enhanced load transfer by interfacial reactions in multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced Al matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Yamaguchi, Tatsuya; Kikuchi, Keiko; Nomura, Naoyuki; Kawasaki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The thermal expansion response of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced Al matrix composites was employed to discuss the improvement of the load transfer at the interface between the MWCNTs and the Al matrix. An aluminum carbide (Al_4C_3) nanostructure at the end of the MWCNTs, incorporated in the Al matrix, was produced by appropriate heat-treatment. The stress contrast around the Al_4C_3 observed in the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image revealed the evidence of a trace of friction, which would lead to the enhancement of the anchor effect from the Al matrix. This anchor effect of Al_4C_3 may hinder the local interfacial slippage and constrain the deformation of the Al matrix. As a result, the thermal expansion behavior became linear and reversible under cyclic thermal load. It is concluded that the formation of Al_4C_3 could effectively enhance the load transfer in MWCNT/Al composites. The yield strength of MWCNT/Al composites was substantially increased under the appropriate quantity of Al_4C_3 produced at the MWCNT-Al interface by precisely controlled heat-treatment.

  1. Self-sensing and thermal energy experimental characterization of multifunctional cement-matrix composites with carbon nano-inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, A.; Pisello, A. L.; Sambuco, Sara; Ubertini, F.; Asdrubali, F.; Materazzi, A. L.; Cotana, F.

    2016-04-01

    The recent progress of Nanotechnology allowed the development of new smart materials in several fields of engineering. In particular, innovative construction materials with multifunctional enhanced properties can be produced. The paper presents an experimental characterization on cement-matrix pastes doped with Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nano-fibers, Carbon Black and Graphene Nano-platelets. Both electro-mechanical and thermo-physical investigations have been carried out. The conductive nano-inclusions provide the cementitious matrix with piezo-resistive properties allowing the detection of external strain and stress changes. Thereby, traditional building materials, such as concrete and cementitious materials in general, would be capable of self-monitoring the state of deformation they are subject to, giving rise to diffuse sensing systems of structural integrity. Besides supplying self-sensing abilities, carbon nano-fillers may change mechanical, physical and thermal properties of cementitious composites. The experimental tests of the research have been mainly concentrated on the thermal conductivity and the optical properties of the different nano-modified materials, in order to make a critical comparison between them. The aim of the work is the characterization of an innovative multifunctional composite capable of combining self-monitoring properties with proper mechanical and thermal-energy efficiency characteristics. The potential applications of these nano-modified materials cover a wide range of possibilities, such as structural elements, floors, geothermal piles, radiant systems and more.

  2. Recycling and characterization of carbon fibers from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites by a novel super-heated-steam method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Woo; Lee, Hye-Min; An, Jeong-Hun; Chung, Dong-Chul; An, Kay-Hyeok; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2017-12-01

    In order to manufacture high quality recycled carbon fibers (R-CFs), carbon fiber-reinforced composite wastes were pyrolysed with super-heated steam at 550 °C in a fixed bed reactor for varying reaction times. The mechanical and surface properties of the R-CFs were characterized with a single fiber tensile test, interface shear strength (IFSS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface analysis showed that there was no matrix char residue on the fiber surfaces. The tensile strength and IFSS values of the R-CFs were 90% and 115% compared to those of virgin carbon fibers (V-CFs), respectively. The recycling efficiency of the R-CFs from the composites were strongly dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, reaction time, and super-heated steam feeding rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukov, D.I.; Stepashkin, A.A.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers

  4. Dynamic tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuan; Li Yulong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The dynamic tensile behavior of 2D C/SiC composites was experimentally investigated by means of SHTB. Both the fracture surface and bundle fracture surfaces of composites were observed. The strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface was concluded as the dominant contributor to the strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength. Highlights: → The tensile strength increases with strain rate. → The tensile failure strain remains independent of strain rate. → Macro-structural morphology reveals rough fracture surface under dynamic loading. → SEM morphology reveals integrated bundle pull-out under dynamic loading. → Strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface leads to that of the tensile strength. - Abstract: An investigation has been undertaken to determine the dynamic and quasi-static tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (2D-C/SiC) composites by means of the split Hopkinson tension bar and an electronic universal test machine respectively. The results indicate that the tensile strength of 2D C/SiC composites is increased at high strain rate. Furthermore, coated specimens show not only a 15% improvement in tensile strength but heightened strain rate sensitivity compared with uncoated ones. It is also shown that the tensile failure strain is strain rate insensitive and remains around 0.4%. Optical macrograph of failed specimens under dynamic loading revealed jagged fracture surfaces characterized by delamination and crack deviation, together with obvious fiber pull-out/splitting, in contrast with the smooth fracture surfaces under quasi-static loading. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph of fracture surface under dynamic loading clearly displayed integrated bundle pull-out which implies suppressed in-bundle debonding and enhanced in-bundle interfacial strengthening, in contrast with extensive in-bundle debonding under quasi-static loading. Thus we conclude that, with 2D C

  5. Carbon dioxide selective mixed matrix composite membrane containing ZIF-7 nano-fillers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Tao; Pan, Yichang; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Lai, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Mixed matrix materials made from selective inorganic fillers and polymers are very attractive for the manufacturing of gas separation membranes. But only few of these materials could be manufactured into high-performance asymmetric or composite

  6. sp2 carbon allotropes in elastomer matrix: From master curves for the mechanical reinforcement to lightweight materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galimberti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents high surface area sp2 carbon allotropes as important tools to design and prepare lightweight materials. Composites were prepared based on either carbon black (CB or carbon nanotubes (CNT or hybrid CB/CNT filler systems, with either poly(1,4-cis-isoprene or poly(styrene-co-butadiene as the polymer matrix. A correlation was established between the specific interfacial area (i.a., i.e. the surface made available by the filler per unit volume of composite, and the initial modulus of the composite (G′γmin, determined through dynamic mechanical shear tests. Experimental points could be fitted with a common line, a sort of master curve, up to about 30.2 and 9.8 mass% as CB and CNT content, respectively. The equation of such master curve allowed to correlate modulus and density of the composite. Thanks to the master curve, composites with the same modulus and lower density could be designed by substituting part of CB with lower amount of the carbon allotrope with larger surface area, CNT. This work establishes a quantitative correlation as a tool to design lightweight materials and paves the way for large scale application in polymer matrices of innovative sp2 carbon allotropes.

  7. Oxidation Kinetics and Strength Degradation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results and oxidation modeling will be presented to discuss carbon fiber susceptibility to oxidation, the oxidation kinetics regimes and composite strength degradation and failure due to oxidation. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation rates of carbon fiber and of a pyro-carbon interphase. The analysis was used to separately obtain activation energies for the carbon constituents within a C/SiC composite. TGA was also conducted on C/SiC composite material to study carbon oxidation and crack closure as a function of temperature. In order to more closely match applications conditions C/SiC tensile coupons were also tested under stressed oxidation conditions. The stressed oxidation tests show that C/SiC is much more susceptible to oxidation when the material is under an applied load where the cracks are open and allow for oxygen ingress. The results help correlate carbon oxidation with composite strength reduction and failure.

  8. The mechanism of cesium immobilization in densified silica-fume blended cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Nes, G.; Katz, A.; Peled, Y.; Zeiri, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The role of silica-fume agglomerates, found in densified silica-fume (DSF) pastes, in the immobilization mechanism of Cs ions was studied. Samples of cementitious pastes containing two different forms of silica fume - DSF and raw silica fume (RSF) - were prepared. Leaching experiments showed that both additives reduced the leachability of the metal ion, but the effect of the DSF paste was much stronger. Scanning Electron Microscopy, together with Differential Thermal Analysis, proved that no agglomerated particles were present in the RSF pastes and that the extent of pozzolanic reactivity was higher. We therefore believe that unreacted silica within the DSF agglomerates adsorbs Cs ions and consequently increases their immobilization. Furthermore, this work suggests that during the pozzolanic reaction, a hydrated rim develops around the agglomerate that acts as an additional diffusion barrier for the Cs ions, resulting in an increased efficiency of Cs immobilization

  9. Mechanical properties of nickel-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes and their embedded gold matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haiyang; Zha Xinwei

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nickel coating on the mechanical behaviors of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and their embedded gold matrix composites under axial tension are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The results show that the Young's moduli and tensile strength of SWCNTs obviously decrease after nickel coating. For armchair SWCNTs, the decreased ratio of the Young's moduli of SWCNTs with smaller radius is larger than that of SWCNTs with larger radius. A comparison is made between the response to Young's modulus of a composite with parallel embedded nanotube and the response of a composite with vertically embedded nanotube. The results show that the uncoated SWCNT can enhance the Young's modulus of composite under the condition of parallel embedment, but such improvement disappears under the condition of vertical embedment because the interaction between SWCNT and gold matrix is too weak for effective load transfer. However, the nickel-coated SWCNT can indeed significantly improve the composite behavior.

  10. Effect of gamma radiation on the magnetic properties of a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic with a polysulfone matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodin, Yu.P.; Arkhipov, A.A.; Korkhov, V.P.; Pudnik, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the present article, the authors report results of a study of the change in the magnetic susceptibility of a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic based on a thermoplastic matrix -- aromatic polysulfone -- in relation to the absorbed dose of γ-radiation. The study results show that the change in the magnetic susceptibility of specimens which have absorbed different doses of gamma radiation correlates with the change in their mechanical properties, thermal behavior, and structural changes. A method is described for measuring susceptibility which can be used successfully to study the structure and properties of polymer materials and composites based on them. 3 refs., 3 figs

  11. Mechanical Properties of Domestic T700 Grade Carbon Fibers/QY9611 BMI Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Guoli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The morphologies,surface energies and surface chemical properties of the domestic T700 grade carbon fiber and the T700S carbon fiber were characterized by using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, inverse gas chromatography(IGC and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPSrespectively.The mechanical properties of the two carbon fibers/QY9611 composites were also discussed. The results indicate that the surface properties of carbon fibers have an important influence on the interfacial properties of composites. The interfacial properties of domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611 composite at room temperature/dry conditions are superior to T700S/QY9611 composite. The toughness of domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611composite is outstanding as well. The value of CAI has reached the level of foreign advanced composite IM7/5250-4. After hydrothermal treatment,the interfacial strength of domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611 composite is equal to that of T700S/QY9611 composite. It shows that domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611 composite has good hydrothermal-resistant properties.

  12. Low percolation transitions in carbon nanotube networks dispersed in a polymer matrix: dielectric properties, simulations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Ricardo; Silva, Jaime; Vaia, Richard; Sencadas, Vítor; Costa, Pedro; Gomes, João; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2009-01-21

    The low concentration behaviour and the increase of the dielectric constant in carbon nanotubes/polymer nanocomposites near the percolation threshold are still not well understood. In this work, a numerical model has been developed which focuses on the effect of the inclusion of conductive fillers in a dielectric polymer matrix on the dielectric constant and the dielectric strength. Experiments have been carried out in carbon nanotubes/poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanocomposites in order to compare to the simulation results. This work shows how the critical concentration is related to the formation of capacitor networks and that these networks give rise to high variations in the electrical properties of the composites. Based on numerical studies, the dependence of the percolation transition on the preparation of the nanocomposite is discussed. Finally, based on numerical and experimental results, both ours and from other authors, the causes of anomalous percolation behaviour of the dielectric constant are identified.

  13. Three-dimensional hierarchical porous tubular carbon as a host matrix for long-term lithium-selenium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min; Lu, Shiyu; Chen, Yuming; Liu, Ting; Han, Jin; Shen, Bolei; Wu, Xiaoshuai; Bao, Shu-Juan; Jiang, Jian; Xu, Maowen

    2017-11-01

    Lithium-selenium (Li-Se) batteries are of great interest as a representative family of electrochemical energy storage systems because of their high theoretical volumetric capacity and considerable electronic conductivity. However, the main drawback of Se electrodes is the rapid capacity fading caused by the dissolution of polyselenides upon cycling. Here, we report a simple, economical, and effective method for the synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous carbon with a hollow tubular structure as a host matrix for loading Se and trapping polyselenides. The as-obtained porous tubular carbon shows a superior specific surface area of 1786 m2 g-1, a high pore volume of 0.79 cm3 g-1, and many nanostructured pores. Benefiting from the unique structural characteristics, the resulting hierarchical porous carbon/Se composite exhibits a high capacity of 515 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C. More importantly, a remarkable cycling stability over 900 cycles at 2 C with a capacity fading rate of merely 0.02% per cycle can be achieved. The 3D hollow porous tubular carbon can be also used for other high-performance electrodes of electrochemical energy storage.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON NANOFIBERS/ ZrO 2 CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duszová, A.; Morgiel, J.; Bastl, Zdeněk; Mihály, J.; Dusza, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2013), s. 459-463 ISSN 1733-3490 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : carbon nanofibers * nanocomposites * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.763, year: 2013

  15. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumamoto Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP. To change the locational states of submicron fibers, two kinds of fabrication processes were applied in preparing specimen by hand lay-up method. Submicron fibers were simply added into epoxy resin with ethanol after they were stirred by a dispersion process using homogenizer to be located far from the interface between reinforcement and matrix. In contrast, submicron fibers were attached onto the carbon fibers by injecting from a spray nozzle accompanying with ethanol to be located near the interface, after they were tentatively contained in ethanol. The plain-woven CFRP plates were fabricated by hand lay-up method and cured at 80 degree-C for 1 hour and then at 150 degree-C for 3 hours. After curing, the plain-woven CFRP plates were cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were determined by tensile lap-shear test and End-notched flexure(ENF test, respectively. When submicron fibers were located far from the interface between carbon fibers and epoxy resin, tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were improved 30% and 18% compared with those of unmodified case. The improvement ratio in modified case was rather low (about few percentages in the case where submicron fibers were located near the interface. The result suggested that crack propagation should be prevented when submicron fibers were existed far from the interface due to the effective stress state around the crack tip.

  16. Novel nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous coralloid carbon materials as host matrixes for lithium–sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Shuyuan; Ma, Zhipeng; Du, Zhiling; Li, Chunying; Song, Jianjun; Wang, Guiling; Shao, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous coralloid carbon/sulfur composites were prepared • Nitrogen atoms were introduced to improve electrochemical properties • The intriguing structural features benefited discharge capacity and cycling stability - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous coralloid carbon/sulfur composites (N-HPCC/S) served as attractive cathode materials for lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries were fabricated for the first time. The nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous coralloid carbon (N-HPCC) with an appropriate nitrogen content (1.29 wt%) was synthesized via a facile hydrothermal approach, combined with subsequent carbonization–activation. The N-HPCC/S composites prepared by a simple melt–diffusion method displayed an excellent electrochemical performance. With a high sulfur content (58 wt%) in the total electrode weight, the N-HPCC/S cathode delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1626.8 mA h g −1 and remained high up to 1086.3 mA h g −1 after 50 cycles at 100 mA g −1 , which is about 1.86 times as that of activated carbon. Particularly, the reversible discharge capacity still maintained 607.2 mA h g −1 after 200 cycles even at a higher rate of 800 mA g −1 . The enhanced electrochemical performance was attributed to the synergetic effect between the intriguing hierarchically porous coralloid structure and appropriate nitrogen doping, which could effectively trap polysulfides, alleviate the volume expansion, enhance the electronic conductivity and improve the surface interaction between the carbon matrix and polysulfides

  17. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  18. Magnetic properties of Fe3C nanograins embedded in carbon matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.H.; Han, T.C.; Huang, J.C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetron dc cosputtering of a composite target of graphite disk plus iron rods was used in manufacturing carbon films with Fe 3 C nanograin inclusions. Both temperature- and field-dependent magnetizations, M(T) and M(H), were measured for samples of various carbon concentrations (from 37% to 85%). M(T) were measured in both conditions of zero-field cooling and a field cooling at H=100 Oe. Experimental results of χ(T), obtained from M(T), of zero-field cooling, were theoretically fitted by using Wolhfarth's model of noninteracting particles with log-normal distribution function of particle size

  19. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  20. Carbon dioxide selective mixed matrix composite membrane containing ZIF-7 nano-fillers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Mixed matrix materials made from selective inorganic fillers and polymers are very attractive for the manufacturing of gas separation membranes. But only few of these materials could be manufactured into high-performance asymmetric or composite membranes. We report here the first mixed matrix composite membrane made of commercially available poly (amide-b-ethylene oxide) (Pebax®1657, Arkema) mixed with the nano-sized zeolitic imidazole framework ZIF-7. This hybrid material has been successfully deposited as a thin layer (less than 1μm) on a porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) support. An intermediate gutter layer of PTMSP was applied to serve as a flat and smooth surface for coating to avoid polymer penetration into the porous support. Key features of this work are the preparation and use of ultra-small ZIF-7 nano-particles (around 30-35nm) and the membrane processability of Pebax®1657. SEM pictures show that excellent adhesion and almost ideal morphology between the two phases has been obtained simply by mixing the as-synthesized ZIF-7 suspension into the Pebax®1657 dope, and no voids or clusters can be observed. The performance of the composite membrane is characterized by single gas permeation measurement of CO2, N2 and CH4. Both, permeability (PCO2 up to 145barrer) and gas selectivity (CO2/N2 up to 97 and CO2/CH4 up to 30) can be increased at low ZIF- loading. The CO2/CH4 selectivity can be further increased to 44 with the filler loading of 34wt%, but the permeability is reduced compared to the pure Pebax®1657 membrane. Polymer chain rigidification at high filler loading is supposed to be a reason for the reduced permeability. The composite membranes prepared in this work show better performance in terms of permeance and selectivity when compared with asymmetric mixed matrix membranes described in the recent literature. Overall, the ZIF 7/Pebax mixed matrix membranes show a high performance for CO2 separation from methane and other gas streams. They are easy to

  1. A Supply-Chain Analysis Framework for Assessing Densified Biomass Solid Fuel Utilization Policies in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Densified Biomass Solid Fuel (DBSF is a typical solid form of biomass, using agricultural and forestry residues as raw materials. DBSF utilization is considered to be an alternative to fossil energy, like coal in China, associated with a reduction of environmental pollution. China has abundant biomass resources and is suitable to develop DBSF. Until now, a number of policies aimed at fostering DBSF industry have been proliferated by policy makers in China. However, considering the seasonality and instability of biomass resources, these inefficiencies could trigger future scarcities of biomass feedstocks, baffling the resilience of biomass supply chains. Therefore, this review paper focuses on DBSF policies and strategies in China, based on the supply chain framework. We analyzed the current developing situation of DBSF industry in China and developed a framework for policy instruments based on the supply chain steps, which can be used to identify and assess the deficiencies of current DBSF industry policies, and we proposed some suggestions. These findings may inform policy development and identify synergies at different steps in the supply chain to enhance the development of DBSF industry.

  2. Engineering a novel material: Nanometric titanium carbide particles in a matrix of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    BADIE, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    New physics studies at ISOLDE are motivated by new beams available, especially beams of exotic nuclei located at the frontier of the nuclear chart. Such beams are often short lived (in the order of milliseconds) and decay before they can be extracted from the target material, where typical diffusion times are in the order of seconds or more. Novel nanostructured and nanocomposite target materials have been developed to increase the release efficiency by reducing the diffusion paths and so the diffusion times, allowing ISOLDE to deliver new and more intense beams of exotic nuclei. 35Ca (25 ms half-life) was attempted by developing a titanium carbide and carbon black nanocomposite, but such isotope could not be extracted. A different production method with different precursors - titanium oxide and multiwall carbon nanotubes - is here proposed and expected to yield a target material which will increase the release rates of such isotope. A novel material, very porous, consisting of titanium carbide particles disp...

  3. Optimal Design for Hybrid Ratio of Carbon/Basalt Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Hong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The optimum hybrid ratio range of carbon/basalt hybrid fiber reinforced resin composites was studied. Hybrid fiber composites with nine different hybrid ratios were prepared before tensile test.According to the structural features of plain weave, the unit cell's performance parameters were calculated. Finite element model was established by using SHELL181 in ANSYS. The simulated values of the sample stiffness in the model were approximately similar to the experimental ones. The stress nephogram shows that there is a critical hybrid ratio which divides the failure mechanism of HFRP into single failure state and multiple failure state. The tensile modulus, strength and limit tensile strain of HFRP with 45% resin are simulated by finite element method. The result shows that the tensile modulus of HFRP with 60% hybrid ratio increases by 93.4% compared with basalt fiber composites (BFRP, and the limit tensile strain increases by 11.3% compared with carbon fiber composites(CFRP.

  4. Solid Lubrication of Laser Deposited Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel Matrix Nanocomposites Preprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    thickness 440C stainless steel (SS) and the deposited composites had a square geometry in order to assure a uniform laser heat distribution during the...tested against (a) 440C stainless steel counterface with Pmax=0.6 GPa and (b) Si3N4 counterface with Pmax=0.8 GPa. Fig. 4. (a) Pure Ni and (c...decrease in friction coefficients compared to pure Ni. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tribology , friction, wear, solid lubricant, carbon nanotubes, metal

  5. Effects of alumina nanoparticles on dynamic impact responses of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Halil B. Kaybal; Hasan Ulus; Okan Demir; Ömer S. Şahin; Ahmet Avcı

    2018-01-01

    The influence of alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles addition upon low-velocity impact behaviors of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced laminated epoxy nanocomposites have been investigated. For this purpose, different amounts of Al2O3 nanoparticles ranging from 1 to 5 wt% were added to the epoxy resin in order to observe the effect of nanoparticle loadings. CF reinforced epoxy based laminated nanocomposites were produced using Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Method (VARIM). The low velocity impact (LVI) t...

  6. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min

  7. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  8. Separating DDTs in edible animal fats using matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction with activated carbon filter, Toyobo-KF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Naoto

    2006-09-01

    A technique is presented for the economical, routine, and quantitative analysis of contamination by dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs) [pp'-DDT, pp'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene, and pp'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloreothane in beef tallow and chicken fat samples, based on their separation using matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) extraction with Toyobo-KF, an activated carbon fiber. Toyobo-KF is a newly applied MSPD sorbent, and it is followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a photodiode array detector. The resulting analytical performance parameters [recoveries of spiked DDTs (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 microg/g) > or = 81%, with relative standard deviations of < or = 8% (n = 5), and quantitation limits < or = 0.03 microg/g], with minimal handling and cost-efficiency, indicate that the present MSPD-HPLC method may be a useful tool for routine monitoring of DDT contamination in meat.

  9. Electrochemical study of oxidation process of promethazine using sensor based on carbon nanotubes paste containing immobilized DNA on inorganic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Marco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the voltammetric behavior and the oxidation process of promethazine (PHZ in electrochemical sensor based on carbon nanotubes paste containing DNA immobilized on the inorganic matrix prepared by sol-gel process (SiO2/Al2O3/Nb2O5. The method of Laviron verified that the system is irreversible and high speed of electron transfer between the electrode and DNA. The study of the oxidation of PHZ and influence of pH showed slope of 0.054 V / pH (near the nernstian system: 0.0592 V / pH suggesting that it involves the transfer of two protons and two electrons.

  10. 1D and 2D oxidized carbon nanomaterials on epoxy matrix: performance of composites over the same processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Galicia, Lourdes; Martinez-Hernandez, Ana Laura; Fuentes-Ramirez, Rosalba; Velasco-Santos, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide were evaluated as reinforcements of an epoxy resin. The composites were synthesized at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 wt% under the same processing conditions. Nanocomposites with graphene oxide at 0.5 wt% present the highest mechanical properties, reaching up to ~180%, and ~760% of improvement in tensile strength and tensile toughness with respect to neat epoxy. Nevertheless, composites with oxidized nanotubes exhibit a tendency to improve mechanical properties as load increases. Storage moduli diminish due to cross-linking density reduction in all nanocomposites. Difference in thermal degradation are not observed in composites in comparison with matrix. Dimension play an important role in mechanical properties, because each nanoreinforcement has different performance with the concentration.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites synthesized via equal-channel angular pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hassan [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahedi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.jahedi@unh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Meratian, Mahmoud [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Knezevic, Marko [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    In this work, 2 vol% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composites of superior microstructural homogeneity are successfully synthesized using Bc equal-channel angular extrusion (ECAP) route. The key step in arriving at high level of homogeneous distribution of CNTs within Al was preparation of the powder using simultaneous attrition milling and ultra-sonication processes. Microstructure as revealed by electron microscopy and absence of Vickers hardness gradients across the material demonstrate that the material reached the homogeneous state in terms of CNT distribution, porosity distribution, and grain structure after eight ECAP passes. To facilitate comparison of microstructure and hardness, samples of Al were processed under the same ECAP conditions. Significantly, the composite containing only 2 vol% exhibits 20% increase in hardness relative to the Al samples.

  12. Chirality dependence of dipole matrix element of carbon nanotubes in axial magnetic field: A third neighbor tight binding approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2014-02-01

    We have studied the electronic structure and dipole matrix element, D, of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under magnetic field, using the third nearest neighbor tight binding model. It is shown that the 1NN and 3NN-TB band structures show differences such as the spacing and mixing of neighbor subbands. Applying the magnetic field leads to breaking the degeneracy behavior in the D transitions and creates new allowed transitions corresponding to the band modifications. It is found that |D| is proportional to the inverse tube radius and chiral angle. Our numerical results show that amount of filed induced splitting for the first optical peak is proportional to the magnetic field by the splitting rate ν11. It is shown that ν11 changes linearly and parabolicly with the chiral angle and radius, respectively.

  13. Impact of foamed matrix components on foamed concrete properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. N.

    2018-03-01

    The improvement of the matrix foam structure by means of foam stabilizing additives is aimed at solving the technology-oriented problems as well as at the further improvement of physical and mechanical properties of cellular-concrete composites. The dry foam mineralization is the mainstream of this research. Adding the concrete densifiers, foam stabilizers and mineral powders reduces the drying shrinkage, which makes the foam concrete products technologically effective.

  14. Large-Area High-Performance Flexible Pressure Sensor with Carbon Nanotube Active Matrix for Electronic Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nela, Luca; Tang, Jianshi; Cao, Qing; Tulevski, George; Han, Shu-Jen

    2018-03-14

    Artificial "electronic skin" is of great interest for mimicking the functionality of human skin, such as tactile pressure sensing. Several important performance metrics include mechanical flexibility, operation voltage, sensitivity, and accuracy, as well as response speed. In this Letter, we demonstrate a large-area high-performance flexible pressure sensor built on an active matrix of 16 × 16 carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (CNT TFTs). Made from highly purified solution tubes, the active matrix exhibits superior flexible TFT performance with high mobility and large current density, along with a high device yield of nearly 99% over 4 inch sample area. The fully integrated flexible pressure sensor operates within a small voltage range of 3 V and shows superb performance featuring high spatial resolution of 4 mm, faster response than human skin (<30 ms), and excellent accuracy in sensing complex objects on both flat and curved surfaces. This work may pave the road for future integration of high-performance electronic skin in smart robotics and prosthetic solutions.

  15. Preparation, characterization, and surface conductivity of nanocomposites with hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres as fillers in polymethylmethacrylate matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Qingshan; Zhou, Bing; Bhargava, Gaurang

    2017-08-01

    Hollow graphitized carbon nanosphere (CNS) materials with inner diameter of 20 to 50 nm and shell thickness of 10 15 nm were synthesized from the polymerization of resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) in the presence of a well-characterized iron polymeric complex (IPC). The CNS with unique nanostructures was used to fabricate CNS-polymer composites by dispersing CNS as fillers in the polymer matrix. Aggregation of CNS in polymer composites is usually a challenging issue. In this work, we employed in situ polymerization method and melt-mixing method to fabricate CNS-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composites and compared their difference in terms of CNS dispersion in the composites and surface electrical conductivity. Four probes technique was utilized to measure the surface electrical conductivity of the CNS-PMMA composites. The measurements on four points and four silver painted lines on the thin film of CNS-PMMA composites were compared. The in situ polymerization method was found more efficient for better CNS dispersion in PMMA matrix and lower percolation conductivity threshold compared to the melt-mixing method. The enhanced electrical conductivity for CNS-PMMA composites may be attributed to the stronger covalent CNS-PMMA bonding between the surface functional groups and the MMA moieties.

  16. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to thick-section components required modification of the conventional process conditions, and the means by which the large amount of molten metal is introduced into the fiber preform. Modification of the low-temperature, ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process used to apply interface coatings to the fiber preform was also required to accommodate the high preform thickness. The thick-section CMC processing developed in this work proved to be invaluable for component development, fabrication, and testing in two complementary efforts. In a project for the Army, involving SiC/SiC blisk development, nominally 0.8 in. thick x 8 in. diameter (approx. 2 cm thick x 20 cm diameter) components were successfully infiltrated. Blisk hubs were machined using diamond-embedded cutting tools and successfully spin-tested. Good ply uniformity and extremely low residual porosity (41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  17. Encapsulated Vanadium-Based Hybrids in Amorphous N-Doped Carbon Matrix as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bei; Balogun, Muhammad-Sadeeq; Luo, Lei; Luo, Yang; Qiu, Weitao; Song, Shuqin; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Yexiang

    2017-11-01

    Recently, researchers have made significant advancement in employing transition metal compound hybrids as anode material for lithium-ion batteries and developing simple preparation of these hybrids. To this end, this study reports a facile and scalable method for fabricating a vanadium oxide-nitride composite encapsulated in amorphous carbon matrix by simply mixing ammonium metavanadate and melamine as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. By tuning the annealing temperature of the mixture, different hybrids of vanadium oxide-nitride compounds are synthesized. The electrode material prepared at 700 °C, i.e., VM-700, exhibits excellent cyclic stability retaining 92% of its reversible capacity after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.5 A g -1 and attractive rate performance (220 mAh g -1 ) under the current density of up to 2 A g -1 . The outstanding electrochemical properties can be attributed to the synergistic effect from heterojunction form by the vanadium compound hybrids, the improved ability of the excellent conductive carbon for electron transfer, and restraining the expansion and aggregation of vanadium oxide-nitride in cycling. These interesting findings will provide a reference for the preparation of transition metal oxide and nitride composites as well. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Substrate Effect on Carbon/Ceramic Mixed Matrix Membrane Prepared by a Vacuum-Assisted Method for Desalination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjun Song

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of various membrane substrates and coating conditions on the formation of carbon/ceramic mixed matrix membranes for desalination application. The substrates were impregnated with phenolic resin via a vacuum-assisted method followed by carbonization under an inert gas. Substrates with pore sizes of 100 nm required a single impregnation step only, where short vacuum times (<120 s resulted in low quality membranes with defects. For vacuum times of ≥120 s, high quality membranes with homogeneous impregnation were prepared leading to high salt rejection (>90% and high water fluxes (up to 25 L m−2 h−1. The increase in water flux as a function of the vacuum time confirms the vacuum etching effect resulting from the vacuum-assisted method. Substrates with pore sizes of 140 nm required two impregnation steps. These pores were too large for the ceramic inter-particle space to be filled with phenolic resin via a single step. In the second impregnation step, increasing the concentration of the phenolic resin resulted in membranes with lower water fluxes. These results indicate that thicker films were formed by increasing the phenolic resin concentration. In the case of substrates with pores of 600 nm, these pores were too large and inter-particle space filling with phenolic resin was not attained.

  19. Test firing and emissions analysis of densified RDF (d-RDF) in a small power boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.; Chehaske, J.T.; Meadows, F.; Owens, H.J.; Yoest, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    A test program to determine the feasibility of burning densified refuse-derived fuel in a small power boiler has been successfully completed. The first phase of the contract entailed assembly and assessment of information on d-RDF combustion from other studies, compilation of existing and proposed regulations for the seven sponsoring Great Lakes states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin, location of d-RDF and waste paper pellet manufacturers in the region, and fuel supply/test site selection. The second phase entailed conducting test burns with two types of d-RDF composed of municipal solid waste (MSW) and one type of d-RDF composed of waste cardboard. The tests were conducted at a small boiler located at Dordt College in Sioux Center, Iowa. The boiler is not equipped with any pollution control equipment and the emission measurements therefore represent those from an uncontrolled source. Results demonstrated that a particulate control system is required to meet the standard set by Iowa for less than 0.6 lbs particulate matter per million BTU heat input. With the planned addition of a baghouse system for control, the facility should meet all existing State limits for emissions levels. Air toxics concentrations including metals, dioxins, furans, and PCBs were low relative to other municipal waste combustors and will be further reduced after installation of baghouse filter equipment. The key remaining concerns relate to the acceptable level of HCl emissions which are a strong function of the plastic content of fuel raw material and SO 2 which varies widely with fuel raw material composition

  20. Delignified and Densified Cellulose Bulk Materials with Excellent Tensile Properties for Sustainable Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Marion; Widner, Daniel; Segmehl, Jana S; Casdorff, Kirstin; Keplinger, Tobias; Burgert, Ingo

    2018-02-07

    Today's materials research aims at excellent mechanical performance in combination with advanced functionality. In this regard, great progress has been made in tailoring the materials by assembly processes in bottom-up approaches. In the field of wood-derived materials, nanocellulose research has gained increasing attention, and materials with advanced properties were developed. However, there are still unresolved issues concerning upscaling for large-scale applications. Alternatively, the sophisticated hierarchical scaffold of wood can be utilized in a top-down approach to upscale functionalization, and one can profit at the same time from its renewable nature, CO 2 storing capacity, light weight, and good mechanical performance. Nevertheless, for bulk wood materials, a wider multipurpose industrial use is so far impeded by concerns regarding durability, natural heterogeneity as well as limitations in terms of functionalization, processing, and shaping. Here, we present a novel cellulose bulk material concept based on delignification and densification of wood resulting in a high-performance material. A delignification process using hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid was optimized to delignify the entire bulk wooden blocks and to retain the highly beneficial structural directionality of wood. In a subsequent step, these cellulosic blocks were densified in a process combining compression and lateral shear to gain a very compact cellulosic material with entangled fibers while retaining unidirectional fiber orientation. The cellulose bulk materials obtained by different densification protocols were structurally, chemically, and mechanically characterized revealing superior tensile properties compared to native wood. Furthermore, after delignification, the cellulose bulk material can be easily formed into different shapes, and the delignification facilitates functionalization of the bioscaffold.

  1. Optimization of palm kernel shell torrefaction to produce energy densified bio-coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Adi, Ag Mohammad; Suhada, Nurul; Malek, Nur Hanina; Saringat, Muhammad Ilmam; Azdarpour, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Around 70% of bio-coal yield was achieved from PKS torrefaction at 300 °C. • The higher heating value of optimized bio-coal was 24.5 MJ/kg. • Around 94% of thermal yield was achieved with 70% mass yield. • The grindability of optimized bio-coal was comparable with coal. - Abstract: Biomass torrefaction is a thermal process, which is similar to a mild form of pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200 to 320 °C to produce energy densified solid fuel. The torrefied biomass is almost equivalent to coal and is termed as bio-coal. During torrefaction, highly volatile fraction of biomass including moisture and hemicellulose are released as vapors, providing energy enriched solid fuel, which is hydrophobic and brittle. In this study, bio-coal is produced from palm kernel shell (PKS) in a batch feeding reactor. The operating variables such as temperature, residence time and swiping gas flow rate are optimized. Around 73% yield of bio-coal with calorific value of 24.5 MJ/kg was achieved at optimum temperature 300 °C with residence time of 20 min and nitrogen gas flow rate of 300 mL/min. The thermal yield was calculated to be maximum of 94% for the bio-coal produced at 300 °C. The temperature and residence time of torrefaction are found to be the most sensitive parameters in terms of product yield, calorific value and thermal yield of bio-coal

  2. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  3. Exploring the alignment of carbon nanotubes dispersed in a liquid crystal matrix using coplanar electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpati, D.; Massey, M. K.; Kotsialos, A.; Qaiser, F.; Pearson, C.; Tiburzi, G.; Zeze, D. A.; Petty, M. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Coleman, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of a liquid crystalline host medium to align single-walled carbon nanotubes in an electric field using an in-plane electrode configuration. Electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes orient in the field with a resulting increase in the DC conductivity in the field direction. Current versus voltage measurements on the composite show a nonlinear behavior, which was modelled by using single-carrier space-charge injection. The possibility of manipulating the conductivity pathways in the same sample by applying the electrical field in different (in-plane) directions has also been demonstrated. Raman spectroscopy indicates that there is an interaction between the nanotubes and the host liquid crystal molecules that goes beyond that of simple physical mixing

  4. Bending wave propagation of carbon nanotubes in a bi-parameter elastic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.-X.; Li, X.-F.; Tang, G.-J.

    2012-01-01

    This article studies transverse waves propagating in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in a surrounding medium. The CNTs are modeled as a nonlocal elastic beam, whereas the surrounding medium is modeled as a bi-parameter elastic medium. When taking into account the effect of rotary inertia of cross-section, a governing equation is acquired. A comparison of wave speeds using the Rayleigh and Euler-Bernoulli theories of beams with the results of molecular dynamics simulation indicates that the nonlocal Rayleigh beam model is more adequate to describe flexural waves in CNTs than the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli model. The influences of the surrounding medium and rotary inertia on the phase speed for single-walled and double-walled CNTs are analyzed. Obtained results turn out that the surrounding medium plays a dominant role for lower wave numbers, while rotary inertia strongly affects the phase speed for higher wave numbers.

  5. Bending wave propagation of carbon nanotubes in a bi-parameter elastic matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.-X. [School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410075 (China); Li, X.-F., E-mail: xfli25@yahoo.com.cn [School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410075 (China); Tang, G.-J. [College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2012-02-15

    This article studies transverse waves propagating in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in a surrounding medium. The CNTs are modeled as a nonlocal elastic beam, whereas the surrounding medium is modeled as a bi-parameter elastic medium. When taking into account the effect of rotary inertia of cross-section, a governing equation is acquired. A comparison of wave speeds using the Rayleigh and Euler-Bernoulli theories of beams with the results of molecular dynamics simulation indicates that the nonlocal Rayleigh beam model is more adequate to describe flexural waves in CNTs than the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli model. The influences of the surrounding medium and rotary inertia on the phase speed for single-walled and double-walled CNTs are analyzed. Obtained results turn out that the surrounding medium plays a dominant role for lower wave numbers, while rotary inertia strongly affects the phase speed for higher wave numbers.

  6. Tunneling currents between carbon nanotubes inside the 3-dimensional potential of a dielectric matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tsagarakis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the tunneling currents between CNTs dispersed in a dielectric matrix as is normally the case in a tensile stress or toxic gas sensors. Due to the randomness of the immersion process the CNTs are at random angles and configurations between them, thus producing a 3-dimensional potential (3-D. We have produced a method that solves the Laplace equation for this type of problem and uses the WKB formulation to calculate the transmission coefficient between CNTs. We have then shown that the tunneling currents between a pair of CNTs depend critically on their relative angle and configuration. In particular we have shown that the tunneling currents do not occur only along a CNT tip to CNT tip configuration but other more efficient paths exist which give a current higher by two orders of magnitude from what a simple 1D theory would give. On the other hand the tunneling current between non-coplanar CNTs is negligible. We conclude that such phenomena cannot be analyzed by a simple 1-dimensional WKB theory and the percolation threshold necessary for conduction may be lower than the one such a theory would predict.

  7. On the behavior of isolated and embedded carbon nano-tubes in a polymeric matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian-Koloor, Seyed Mostafa; Moshrefzadeh-Sani, Hadi; Mehrdad Shokrieh, Mahmood; Majid Hashemianzadeh, Seyed

    2018-02-01

    In the classical micro-mechanical method, the moduli of the reinforcement and the matrix are used to predict the stiffness of composites. However, using the classical micro-mechanical method to predict the stiffness of CNT/epoxy nanocomposites leads to overestimated results. One of the main reasons for this overestimation is using the stiffness of the isolated CNT and ignoring the CNT nanoscale effect by the method. In the present study the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was used to consider the influence of CNT length on the stiffness of the nanocomposites through the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. The results indicated that, due to the nanoscale effects, the reinforcing efficiency of the embedded CNT is not constant and decreases with decreasing its length. Based on the results, a relationship was derived, which predicts the effective stiffness of an embedded CNT in terms of its length. It was shown that using this relationship leads to predict more accurate elastic modulus of nanocomposite, which was validated by some experimental counterparts.

  8. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  9. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  10. Interfacial (Fiber-matrix) Properties of High-strength Mortar (150 MPa) from Fiber Pullout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1996-01-01

     The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial z......-strength DSP mortar has significantly improved interfacial properties compared to ordinary strength mortar. These results are important in the understanding of the role of steel fibers in improving the tensile properties of high-strength, brittle, cement-matrix composites....... The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial...

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel coated multi walled carbon nanotube reinforced stainless steel 316L matrix composites by laser sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesha, P.; Mohankumar, G. C.

    2018-04-01

    Electroless Ni coated Multi-walled Carbon nanotubes reinforced with Stainless Steel 316L matrix composite was developed by Direct Metal Laser Sintering process (DMLS). Homogeneous mixture of Stainless Steel 316L powder and carbon nanotubes in different vol. % was obtained by using double cone blender machine. Characterization of electroless Ni coated carbon nanotubes was done by using X-ray diffraction, FESEM and EDS. Test samples were fabricated at different laser scan speeds. Effect of process parameters and CNT vol. % content on solidification microstructure and mechanical properties of test samples was investigated by using Optical microscopy, FESEM, and Hounsfield tensometer. Experimental results reveal DMLS process parameters affect the density and microstructure of sintered parts. Dense parts with minimum porosity when processed at low laser scan speeds and low CNT vol. %. Tensile fractured surface of test specimens evidences the survival of carbon nanotubes under high temperature processing condition.

  12. Change in the structure and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic with a polysulfone matrix under the effect of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, A.A.; Korkhov, V.P.; Pudnik, V.V.; Rodin, Yu.P.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the results of studying the change in the structure and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic with a thermoplastic matrix -- aromatic polysulfone -- as a function of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation. In view of the presence in the polysulfone macromolecules and in carbon fibers of a large number of aromatic rings and double bonds providing high radiation resistance of the composite, irradiation was carried out up to large values of absorbed doses (10 9 rad). Specimens of orthogonally reinforced composite KTMU-1 with a thickness of 1.3 mm made from aromatic polysulfone PSF-150 and carbon ribbon that absorbed various gamma radiation dosages were used. It was found that structural transformations under the effect of gamma radiation did not have a substantial effect on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Structural changes in irreversibly densified fused silica: implications for the chemical resistance of high level nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.; Liebermann, R.C.; Gwanmesia, G.D.; Yanbin Wang

    1990-01-01

    Energetic photons and energetic particles create changes in the structure of nuclear waste glasses. These can be observed as changes in the average bulk physical properties. For example, exposure of fused silica to high doses of neutron bombardment leads to a maximum average compaction of 3%. However, this does not reveal the true extent of the densification that takes place at a microscopic level. Recent advances in high pressure technology have yielded large samples of fused silica which have been permanently densified under pressure and whose bulk density has been increased by 20%. These specimens have an overall structure that replicates the microstructure of a radiation damaged glass. Measurements have been made for the first time of the structural changes in this pressure densified vitreous silica using neutron diffraction and infrared absorption spectrometry. Extensive alterations in intermediate range order have been observed with consequent anticipated changes in chemical reactivity. The resistance of high level waste glasses to leaching by groundwater must be considered in light of these experimental findings. (author)

  14. Analysis of malachite green in aquatic products by carbon nanotube-based molecularly imprinted - matrix solid phase dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Ligang

    2015-10-01

    A simple method based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) using molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as sorbents for selective extraction of malachite green (MG) from aquatic products was developed. The MIPs were prepared by using carbon nanotube as support, MG as template, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as crosslinker and methylene chloride as solvent. The MIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The isothermal adsorption, kinetics absorption and selective adsorption experiments were carried out. We optimized the extraction conditions as follows: the ratio of MIPs to sample was 2:3, the dispersion time was 15min, washing solvent was 4mL 50% aqueous methanol and elution solvent was 3mL methanol-acetic acid (98: 2, v/v). Once the MSPD process was completed, the MG extracted from aquatic products was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The detection limit of MG was 0.7μgkg(-1). The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day were obtained in the range of 0.9%-4.7% and 3.4%-9.8%, respectively. In order to evaluate the applicability and reliability of the proposed method, it was applied to determine MG in different aquatic products samples including fish, shrimp, squid and crabs. The satisfied recoveries were in the range of 89.2%-104.6%. The results showed that this method is faster, simpler and makes extraction and purification in the same system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fully Screen-Printed, Large-Area, and Flexible Active-Matrix Electrochromic Displays Using Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Lau, Christian; Liu, Yihang; Wu, Fanqi; Gui, Hui; Liu, Qingzhou; Ma, Yuqiang; Wan, Haochuan; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-11-22

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are ideal semiconductors for printed electronics due to their advantageous electrical and mechanical properties, intrinsic printability in solution, and desirable stability in air. However, fully printed, large-area, high-performance, and flexible carbon nanotube active-matrix backplanes are still difficult to realize for future displays and sensing applications. Here, we report fully screen-printed active-matrix electrochromic displays employing carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. Our fully printed backplane shows high electrical performance with mobility of 3.92 ± 1.08 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , on-off current ratio I on /I off ∼ 10 4 , and good uniformity. The printed backplane was then monolithically integrated with an array of printed electrochromic pixels, resulting in an entirely screen-printed active-matrix electrochromic display (AMECD) with good switching characteristics, facile manufacturing, and long-term stability. Overall, our fully screen-printed AMECD is promising for the mass production of large-area and low-cost flexible displays for applications such as disposable tags, medical electronics, and smart home appliances.

  16. Matrix remodeling between cells and cellular interactions with collagen bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    When cells are surrounded by complex environment, they continuously probe and interact with it by applying cellular traction forces. As cells apply traction forces, they can sense rigidity of their local environment and remodel the matrix microstructure simultaneously. Previous study shows that single human carcinoma cell (MDA-MB-231) remodeled its surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) and the matrix remodeling was reversible. In this study we examined the matrix microstructure between cells and cellular interaction between them using quantitative confocal microscopy. The result shows that the matrix microstructure is the most significantly remodeled between cells consisting of aligned, and densified collagen fibers (collagen bundle)., the result shows that collagen bundle is irreversible and significantly change micromechanics of ECM around the bundle. We further examined cellular interaction with collagen bundle by analyzing dynamics of actin and talin formation along with the direction of bundle. Lastly, we analyzed dynamics of cellular protrusion and migrating direction of cells along the bundle.

  17. Electrolyte loss mechanism of molten carbonate fuel cells. 2.; Application to the cell with matrix electrolyte layer; Yoyu tansan`engata nenryo denchi ni okeru denkaishitsu loss kiko ni tsuite. 2.; Matrix gata denkaishitsuso wo yusuru denchi eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonai, A; Murata, K [Toshiba Research and Development Center, Kawasaki (Japan)

    1993-11-01

    A single cell of molten carbonate fuel cell using a matrix electrolyte layer fabricated by using the doctor blade process has been operated for several thousand hours, measured of electrolyte loss amount, and analyzed by using a new electrolyte loss mechanism. The result may be summarized as follows: according to a result of measuring the matrix layer pore distribution, the average pore size has increased little by little; pores with diameters greater than 2 {mu}m at which no electrolyte retention becomes possible remain at nearly constant ratio up to 1800 hours, but increased after 2500 hours; the pore capacity in ports with the largest electrolyte retaining diameter of 2 {mu}m or less showed slight decrease with time in the anode, and an initial decrease followed by flatness, and then a sharp decrease after 1800 hours in the matrix layer; the electrolyte loss measurement values have remained nearly constant for 25 hours to 1800 hours, but increased sharply thereafter; and the electrolyte loss in this single cell due to pore capacity decrease in pores as power generating parts with diameters smaller than 2 {mu}m was explained quantitatively by a new electrolyte loss mechanism. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Development of bimetal-grown multi-scale carbon micro-nanofibers as an immobilizing matrix for enzymes in biosensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Amit R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Saurakhiya, Neelam; Deva, Dinesh [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Kanpur, 208016 (India); Sharma, Ashutosh [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); DST Unit on Nanosciences, Kanpur, 208016 (India); Verma, Nishith, E-mail: nishith@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Center for Environmental Science and Engineering, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2013-10-15

    This study describes the development of a novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are grown on activated carbon microfibers (ACFs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Cu and Fe as the metal catalysts. The transition metal-fiber composite is used as the working electrode of a biosensor applied to detect glucose in liquids. In such a bi-nanometal-grown multi-scale web of ACF/CNF, Cu nanoparticles adhere to the ACF-surface, whereas Fe nanoparticles used to catalyze the growth of nanofibers attach to the CNF tips. By ultrasonication, Fe nanoparticles are dislodged from the tips of the CNFs. Glucose oxidase (GOx) is subsequently immobilized on the tips by adsorption. The dispersion of Cu nanoparticles at the substrate surface results in increased conductivity, facilitating electron transfer from the glucose solution to the ACF surface during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. The prepared Cu-ACF/CNF/GOx electrode is characterized for various surface and physicochemical properties by different analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical tests show that the prepared electrode has fast response current, electrochemical stability, and high electron transfer rate, corroborated by CV and calibration curves. The prepared transition metal-based carbon electrode in this study is cost-effective, simple to develop, and has a stable immobilization matrix for enzymes. - Graphical abstract: A novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode is synthesized for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers are grown on activated carbon microfibers by

  19. Development of bimetal-grown multi-scale carbon micro-nanofibers as an immobilizing matrix for enzymes in biosensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, Amit R.; Saurakhiya, Neelam; Deva, Dinesh; Sharma, Ashutosh; Verma, Nishith

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the development of a novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are grown on activated carbon microfibers (ACFs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Cu and Fe as the metal catalysts. The transition metal-fiber composite is used as the working electrode of a biosensor applied to detect glucose in liquids. In such a bi-nanometal-grown multi-scale web of ACF/CNF, Cu nanoparticles adhere to the ACF-surface, whereas Fe nanoparticles used to catalyze the growth of nanofibers attach to the CNF tips. By ultrasonication, Fe nanoparticles are dislodged from the tips of the CNFs. Glucose oxidase (GOx) is subsequently immobilized on the tips by adsorption. The dispersion of Cu nanoparticles at the substrate surface results in increased conductivity, facilitating electron transfer from the glucose solution to the ACF surface during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. The prepared Cu-ACF/CNF/GOx electrode is characterized for various surface and physicochemical properties by different analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical tests show that the prepared electrode has fast response current, electrochemical stability, and high electron transfer rate, corroborated by CV and calibration curves. The prepared transition metal-based carbon electrode in this study is cost-effective, simple to develop, and has a stable immobilization matrix for enzymes. - Graphical abstract: A novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode is synthesized for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers are grown on activated carbon microfibers by

  20. Propagation of PAMAM dendrimers on the carbon fiber surface by in situ polymerization: a novel methodology for fiber/matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.L.; Gao, B.; Zhang, J.; Cui, H.Z.; Li, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The manuscript has the following obvious new contributions. • A facile strategy to generating dendrimers onto carbon fibers to functionalize conventional carbon fibers was reported. The density and type of the functional groups on the fiber surface can be easily adjusted by changing the reaction conditions. • The hierarchical reinforcement formed using this novel method improved the composite interface bonding through supplying sufficient chemical bonding and strong mechanical interlocking. • We can generate dendrimers with different side groups (unsaturated groups or hydroxyl groups, and others) and chain length to meet the requirements according to different matrices and applications. - Abstract: A facile strategy for generating dendrimers onto carbon fibers, in order to functionalize them, was reported. Dendrimers were propagated on the surface of carbon fibers by in situ polymerization with Michael addition. The changes in morphology, surface composition and surface energy, which were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM), dynamic contact angle analysis test (DCAT) and x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), were related to the interfacial performance of model composites. In addition, the level of fiber-matrix adhesion was determined by the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) test. Experimental results indicated that some dendritic polymer was successfully grown on the fiber surface through the chemical reaction, and this significantly enhanced the interfacial bonding of the carbon fiber composites.

  1. Effect of polymer type on characterization and filtration performances of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)-COOH-based polymeric mixed matrix membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengur-Tasdemir, Reyhan; Mokkapati, Venkata R S S; Koseoglu-Imer, Derya Y; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2018-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for the fabrication of mixed matrix polymeric membranes that can enhance filtration perfomances of the membranes by modifying membrane surface properties. In this study, detailed characterization and filtration performances of MWCNTs functionalized with COOH group, blended into polymeric flat-sheet membranes were investigated using different polymer types. Morphological characterization was carried out using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurements. For filtration performance tests, protein, dextran, E. coli suspension, Xanthan Gum and real activated sludge solutions were used. Experimental data and analyses revealed that Polyethersulfone (PES) + MWCNT-COOH mixed matrix membranes have superior performance abilities compared to other tested membranes.

  2. FePO4 nanoparticles embedded in a large mesoporous carbon matrix as a high-capacity and high-rate cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lian; Wu, Ping; Xie, Kongwei; Li, Jianping; Xu, Bin; Cao, Gaoping; Chen, Yu; Tang, Yawen; Zhou, Yiming; Lu, Tianhong; Yang, Yusheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Self-made nano-CaCO 3 templated LMC as a novel supporting matrix for FePO 4 cathode. ► The 3D porous structure of LMC is well retained in LMC–FePO 4 nanohybrid. ► Its reaction kinetics of lithium insertion/extraction is significantly improved. ► Markedly higher capacities and rate capability by virtue of its structure superiority. -- Abstract: By using large mesoporous carbon (LMC) as a novel host matrix, LMC–FePO 4 nanohybrid has been synthesized through a facile homogeneous precipitation process and subsequent annealing approach. When evaluated as a cathode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), the LMC–FePO 4 nanohybrid exhibits higher specific capacities, improved rate capability, and better cycling performance by virtue of its unique structural characteristics

  3. In situ analysis of plant tissue underivatized carbohydrates and on-probe enzymatic degraded starch by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry by using carbon nanotubes as matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2008-12-15

    Underivatized carbohydrates of tulip bulb and leaf tissues were characterized in situ by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) by using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as matrix. Two sample preparation methods--(i) depositing CNTs on the fresh tissue slices placed on the probe and (ii) locating semitransparent tissues on a dried layer of CNTs on the probe--were examined. Furthermore, practicability of in situ starch analysis by MALDI-TOF MS was examined by detection of glucose originated from on-probe amyloglucosidase-catalyzed degradation of starch on the tissue surface. Besides, CNTs could efficiently desorb/ionize natural mono-, di-, and oligosaccharides extracted from tulip bulb tissues as well as glucose resulting from starch enzymatic degradation in vitro. These results were compared with those obtained by in situ MALDI-TOF MS analysis of similar tissues. Positive ion mode showed superior signal reproducibility. CNTs deposited under semitransparent tissue could also desorb/ionize neutral carbohydrates, leading to nearly complete elimination of matrix cluster signals but with an increase in tissue-originated signals. Furthermore, several experiments were carried out to compare the efficiency of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, nor-harmane, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, and CNTs as matrices for MALDI of neutral carbohydrates from the intact plant tissue surface and for enzymatic tissue starch degradation; these results are discussed in brief. Among matrices studied, the lowest laser power was needed to acquire carbohydrate signals with high signal-to-noise ratio and resolution when CNTs were used.

  4. Embedding nano-Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} in hierarchical porous carbon matrixes derived from water soluble polymers for ultra-fast lithium ion batteries anodic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Chun-Kai; Bao, Qi; Huang, Yao-Hui; Duh, Jenq-Gong, E-mail: jgd@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-07-15

    Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/hierarchical porous carbon matrixes composites are successfully prepared by a facile and fast polymers assisted sol–gel method, aiming to promote both electronic and ionic conductivity. As indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, three less expensive cost and available water soluble polymers (e.g. PAA, CMC, and SA) can homogeneously react with Li–Ti–O precursor to incorporate into interior of nano-scale lithium titanate and provide a continues conductive network after pyrolysis. In addition, the results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy also prove that the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} nanoparticles are firmly embedded in porous carbon matrix with no obvious agglomeration. EIS measurement and cyclic voltammetry further reveal that the facilitated electrode kinetics and better ionic transport of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/hierarchical porous carbon matrixes composites than that of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. The c-CMC-LTO exhibits a superior capacity of 92 mAh g{sup −1} and retains its initial value with no obviously capacity decay over 200 cycles under an ultra-high C rate (50 C). - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustrations of the formation process of embedding LTO into Carbon matrixes derived from water soluable polymers (upper) and the electrochemical reaction paths in LTO/Carbon composites during charging/discharging processes (lower). - Highlights: • Hierarchical porous carbon matrixes were used to improve the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anodes. • Carbon matrixes could suppress the agglomeration of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} nanoparticles. • meso-nanoporous carbon structure was beneficial for filtration of electrolyte. • The c-CMC-LTO exhibited superior high rate capability and cycling durability.

  5. The Oxidation Kinetics of Continuous Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ., May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental observations and results suggest two primary regimes as a function of temperature, i.e., diffusion and reaction controlled kinetics. Thermogravimetric analysis of carbon fiber in flowing oxygen gave an activation energy of 64.1 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 500 to 600 C and an apparent activation energy of 7.6 kJ/mol for temperatures from 600 to 1400 C. When C/SiC composite material was unstressed, matrix effects at temperatures from 900 to 1400 C protected the internal fibers. When under stress, self-protection was not observed. Increasing the stress from 10 to 25 ksi caused a 67 to 82 percent reduction in times to failure at temperatures from 750 to 1500 C. Based on experimental results, observation, and theory, a finite difference model was developed, which simulates the diffusion of oxygen into a matrix crack that is bridged by carbon fibers. The model allows the influence of important variables on oxidation kinetics to be studied systematically, i.e., temperature, reaction rate constant, diffusion coefficient, environment, and sample geometry.

  6. Defect-rich TiO2-δ nanocrystals confined in a mooncake-shaped porous carbon matrix as an advanced Na ion battery anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hanna; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hehe; Li, Jiadong; Peng, Zhiguang; Tang, Yougen; Shao, Minhua

    2017-06-01

    Inferior electronic conductivity and sluggish sodium ion diffusion are still two big challenges for TiO2 anode material for Na ion batteries (SIBs). Herein, we synthesize TiO2/C composites by the pyrolysis of MIL-125(Ti) precursor and successfully introduce defects to TiO2/C composite by a simple magnesium reduction. The as-prepared defect-rich TiO2-δ/C composite shows mooncake-shaped morphology consisting of TiO2-δ nanocrystals with an average particle size of 5 nm well dispersed in the carbon matrix. When used as a SIBs anode, the defect-rich TiO2-δ/C composite exhibits a high reversible capacity of 330.2 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 at the voltage range of 0.001-3.0 V and long-term cycling stability with negligible decay after 5000 cycles. Compared with other four TiO2/C samples, the electrochemical performance of defect-rich TiO2-δ/C is highly improved, which may benefit from the enhanced electronic/ionic conductivities owing to the defect-rich features, high surface area rendering shortened electronic and ionic diffusion path, and the suppress of the TiO2 crystal aggregation during sodiation and desodiation process by the carbon matrix.

  7. Microfractographic analysis of delamination growth in fatigue loaded - carbon fibre/thermosetting matrix composites; Mikrofraktographische Analyse des Delaminationswachstums in zyklisch belasteten Kohlenstoffaser/Duroplastharz-Verbundwerkstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heutling, F.; Franz, H.E. [Daimler-Benz AG, Muenchen (Germany); Friedrich, K. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Composite Materials Ltd.

    1998-05-01

    Carbon-fibre-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are known to be considerably less sensitive to fatigue loading than aluminium (Al) alloys, for instance. However, even in the presence of small delaminations, the damage tolerance of structural components may be considerably reduced. The scope of the present contribution is to investigate fatigue phenomena in CFRP materials (with thermosetting matrix) by means of microfractography. The microfractographic features of the fracture surfaces mirror the processes of deformation and fracture at the delamination front. The fatigue fracture behaviour of a CFRP laminate subjected to cyclic mixed-mode loading is determined by matrix-controlled failure mechanisms. Under pure mode-II loading conditions, rollers in addition to fatigue striations appear in the fibre imprints whose formation mechanism was explained by means of high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The ratio between the local tensile and shear stress components influences the propagation direction of secondary cracks originating at the fibres. The local fracture propagations in these secondary cracks can be recognised through the fatigue striations appearing on the surface of the matrix. A comparison with static mixed-mode loading reveals that in both cases the crack propagation follows the path of the local maximum main stress. Applying mathematical relationships derived from the theory of elasticity permitted developing a mixed-mode loading model which makes it possible to predict the crack processes and hence to explain the formation of typical fracture-morphological features. (orig.) 26 refs.

  8. Biomineralization of calcium carbonate in the cell wall of Lithothamnion crispatum (Hapalidiales, Rhodophyta): correlation between the organic matrix and the mineral phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado Filho, Gilberto Menezes; Leal, Rachel Nunes; Werckmann, Jacques; Rossi, André Linhares; Campos, Andrea Porto Carreiro; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Farina, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    Over the past few decades, progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of coralline algae mineralization. However, the relationship between the mineral phase and the organic matrix in coralline algae has not yet been thoroughly examined. The aim of this study was to describe the cell wall ultrastructure of Lithothamnion crispatum, a cosmopolitan rhodolith-forming coralline algal species collected near Salvador (Brazil), and examine the relationship between the organic matrix and the nucleation and growth/shape modulation of calcium carbonate crystals. A nanostructured pattern was observed in L. crispatum along the cell walls. At the nanoscale, the crystals from L. crispatum consisted of several single crystallites assembled and associated with organic material. The crystallites in the bulk of the cell wall had a high level of spatial organization. However, the crystals displayed cleavages in the (104) faces after ultrathin sectioning with a microtome. This organism is an important model for biomineralization studies as the crystallographic data do not fit in any of the general biomineralization processes described for other organisms. Biomineralization in L. crispatum is dependent on both the soluble and the insoluble organic matrix, which are involved in the control of mineral formation and organizational patterns through an organic matrix-mediated process. This knowledge concerning the mineral composition and organizational patterns of crystals within the cell walls should be taken into account in future studies of changing ocean conditions as they represent important factors influencing the physico-chemical interactions between rhodoliths and the environment in coralline reefs. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  9. Modeling and optimizing the design of matrix treatments in carbonate reservoirs with self-diverting acid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgakova, G T; Kharisov, R Ya; Sharifullin, A R; Pestrikov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Application of a self-diverting-acid based on viscoelastic surfactant (SDVA) is a promising technology for improving the efficacy of acid treatment in oil and gas-bearing carbonate reservoirs. In this study, we present a mathematical model for assessing SDVA flow and reaction with carbonate rock using the SDVA rheological characteristics. The model calculates the technological parameters for acidizing operations and the prediction of well productivity after acid treatment, in addition to technical and economic optimization of the acidizing process by modeling different acid treatment options with varying volumes, injection rates, process fluids stages and initial economic scenarios

  10. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  11. Studies on Preparation and Characterization of Aluminum Nitride-Coated Carbon Fibers and Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Hye Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work; the effects of an aluminum nitride (AlN ceramic coating on the thermal conductivity of carbon fiber-reinforced composites were studied. AlN were synthesized by a wet-thermal treatment (WTT method in the presence of copper catalysts. The WTT method was carried out in a horizontal tube furnace at above 1500 °C under an ammonia (NH3 gas atmosphere balanced by a nitrogen using aluminum chloride as a precursor. Copper catalysts pre-doped enhance the interfacial bonding of the AlN with the carbon fiber surfaces. They also help to introduce AlN bonds by interrupting aluminum oxide (Al2O3 formation in combination with oxygen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM; and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the carbon fiber surfaces and structures at each step (copper-coating step and AlN formation step. In conclusion; we have demonstrated a synthesis route for preparing an AlN coating on the carbon fiber surfaces in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  12. Phonon vibrational frequencies of all single-wall carbon nanotubes at the lambda point: reduced matrix calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufang; Wu, Yanzhao; Feng, Min; Wang, Hui; Jin, Qinghua; Ding, Datong; Cao, Xuewei

    2008-12-01

    With a simple method-the reduced matrix method, we simplified the calculation of the phonon vibrational frequencies according to SWNTs structure and their phonon symmetric property and got the dispersion properties of all SWNTs at Gamma point in Brillouin zone, whose diameters lie between 0.6 and 2.5 nm. The calculating time is shrunk about 2-4 orders. A series of the dependent relationships between the diameters of SWNTs and the frequencies of Raman and IR active modes are given. Several fine structures including "glazed tile" structures in omega approximately d figures are found, which might predict a certain macro-quantum phenomenon of the phonons in SWNTs.

  13. Novel uses of rice-husk-ash (a natural silica-carbon matrix) in low-cost water purification applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Chetan; Patil, Rajshree; Kausley, Shankar; Ahmad, Dilshad

    2013-06-01

    Rice-husk-ash is used as the base material for developing novel compositions to deal with the challenge of purifying drinking water in low-income households in India. For example, rice-husk-ash cast in a matrix of cement and pebbles can be formed into a filtration bed which can trap up to 95% of turbidity and bacteria present in water. This innovation was proliferated in villages across India as a do-it-yourself rural water filter. Another innovation involves embedding silver nanoparticles within the rice husk ash matrix to create a bactericidal filtration bed which has now been commercialized in India as a low-cost for-profit household water purifier. Other innovations include the impregnation of rice-husk-ash with iron hydroxide for the removal of arsenic from water and the impregnation of rice-husk ash with aluminum hydroxide for the removal of fluoride ions from water which together have the potential to benefit over 100 million people across India who are suffering from the health effects of drinking groundwater contaminated with arsenic and fluoride.

  14. Versatile and biomass synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon matrix with high iron content and tunable reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongmao; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Pittman, Charles U.; Jiang Dongping; Che Wen; Gai Zheng; Howe, Jane Y.; More, Karren L.; Antonyraj, Arockiasamy

    2012-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon (FeNPs-C) have enormous potential for environmental applications. Reported is a biomass-based method for FeNP-C synthesis that involves pyrolysis of bleached wood fiber pre-mixed with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. This method allows synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles with tunable chemical reactivity by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The FeNP-C synthesized at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C (FeNP-C-500) reacts violently (pyrophoric) when exposed to air, while FeNP-C prepared at 800 °C (FeNP-C-800) remains stable in ambient condition for at least 3 months. The FeNPs in FeNP-C-800 are mostly below 50 nm in diameter and are surrounded by carbon. The immediate carbon layer (within 5–15 nm radius) on the FeNPs is graphitized. Proof-of-concept environmental applications of FeNPs-C-800 were demonstrated by Rhodamine 6G and arsenate (V) removal from water. This biomass-based method provides an effective way for iron-based nanoparticle fabrication and biomass utilization.

  15. Effective enhancement of gas separation performance in mixed matrix membranes using core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingzhong; Pan, Xinglong; Li, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jianqiang; Guo, Qikai

    2017-02-01

    Novel core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons (MWCNT@GONRs) nanohybrids were successfully prepared using a modified chemical longitudinal unzipping method. Subsequently, the MWCNT@GONRs nanohybrids were used as fillers to enhance the gas separation performance of polyimide based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). It is found that MMMs concurrently exhibited higher gas selectivity and higher gas permeability compared to pristine polyimide. The high gas selectivity could be attributed to the GONRs shell, which provided a selective barrier and large gas adsorbed area, while the high gas permeability resulted from the hollow structured MWCNTs core with smooth internal surface, which acted as a rapid transport channel. MWCNT@GONRs could be promising candidates to improve gas separation performance of MMMs due to the unique microstructures, ease of synthesis and low filling loading.

  16. Experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes and computer aided design of electron guns for microwave power devices, exploring these cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, Y.A.; Petrosyan, A.I.; Penzyakov, V.V.; Pimenov, V.G.; Rogovin, V.I.; Shesterkin, V.I.; Kudryashov, V.P.; Semyonov, V.C.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes (MCFECs), which has led to the stable operation of the cathodes with current emission values up to 100 mA, is described. A method of computer aided design of TWT electron guns (EGs) with MCFEC, based on the results of the MCFEC emission experimental study, is presented. The experimental MCFEC emission characteristics are used to define the field gain coefficient K and the cathode effective emission area S eff . The EG program computes the electric field upon the MCFEC surface, multiplies it by the K value and uses the Fowler Nordheim law and the S eff value to calculate the MCFEC current; the electron trajectories are computed as well. copyright 1997 American Vacuum Society

  17. Influence of Thin-Film Adhesives in Pullout Tests Between Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2018-01-01

    Strips of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) were bonded together using multiple thin film adhesives and their mechanical strengths were evaluated under pullout test configuration. Tensile and lap shear tests were conducted to confirm the deformation of SMAs at room temperature and to evaluate the adhesive strength between the NiTi strips and the PMC. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the interfacial bonding after failure. Simple equations on composite tensile elongation were used to fit the experimental data on tensile properties. ABAQUS models were generated to show the effects of enhanced bond strength and the distribution of stress in SMA and PMC. The results revealed that the addition of thin film adhesives increased the average adhesive strength between SMA and PMC while halting the room temperature shape memory effect within the pullout specimen.

  18. Porous Hybrid Composites of Few-Layer MoS2 Nanosheets Embedded in a Carbon Matrix with an Excellent Supercapacitor Electrode Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongmei; Liu, Chao; Wang, Ting; Chen, Jing; Mao, Zhengning; Zhao, Jin; Hou, Wenhua; Yang, Gang

    2015-12-22

    Porous hierarchical architectures of few-layer MoS2 nanosheets dispersed in carbon matrix are prepared by a microwave-hydrothermal method followed by annealing treatment via using glucose as C source and structure-directing agent and (NH4 )2 MoS4 as both Mo and S sources. It is found that the morphology and size of the secondary building units (SBUs), the size and layer number of MoS2 nanosheets as well as the distribution of MoS2 nanosheets in carbon matrix, can be effectively controlled by simply adjusting the molar ratio of (NH4 )2 MoS4 to glucose, leading to the materials with a low charge-transfer resistance, many electrochemical active sites and a robust structure for an outstanding energy storage performance including a high specific capacitance (589 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) ), a good rate capability (364 F g(-1) at 20 A g(-1) ), and an excellent cycling stability (retention 104% after 2000 cycles) for application in supercapacitors. The exceptional rate capability endows the electrode with a high energy density of 72.7 Wh kg(-1) and a high power density of 12.0 kW kg(-1) simultaneously. This work presents a facile and scalable approach for synthesizing novel heterostructures of MoS2 -based electrode materials with an enhanced rate capability and cyclability for potential application in supercapacitor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Oxygen vacancy rich Cu2O based composite material with nitrogen doped carbon as matrix for photocatalytic H2 production and organic pollutant removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lele; Xu, Xinxin; Yan, Jiaming; Shi, Fa-Nian; Huo, Yuqiu

    2018-02-06

    A nitrogen doped carbon matrix supported Cu 2 O composite material (Cu/Cu2O@NC) was fabricated successfully with a coordination polymer as precursor through calcination. In this composite material, Cu 2 O particles with a size of about 6-10 nm were dispersed evenly in the nitrogen doped carbon matrix. After calcination, some coordinated nitrogen atoms were doped in the lattice of Cu 2 O and replace oxygen atoms, thus generating a large number of oxygen vacancies. In Cu/Cu2O@NC, the existence of oxygen vacancies has been confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Under visible light irradiation, Cu/Cu2O@NC exhibits excellent H 2 production with the rate of 379.6 μmol h -1 g -1 . Its photocatalytic activity affects organic dyes, such as Rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO). In addition to photocatalysis, Cu/Cu2O@NC also exhibits striking catalytic activity in reductive conversion of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol with in presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ). The conversion efficiency reaches almost 100% in 250 s with the quantity of Cu/Cu2O@NC as low as 5 mg. The outstanding H 2 production and organic pollutants removal are attributed to the oxygen vacancy. We expect that Cu/Cu2O@NC will find its way as a new resource for hydrogen energy as well as a promising material in water purification.

  20. Specific Cα-C Bond Cleavage of β-Carbon-Centered Radical Peptides Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Keishiro; Yamakoshi, Mariko; Sakamoto, Kenya; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2018-04-01

    Radical-driven dissociation (RDD) of hydrogen-deficient peptide ions [M - H + H]·+ has been examined using matrix-assisted laser dissociation/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry (MALDI-ISD MS) with the hydrogen-abstracting matrices 4-nitro-1-naphthol (4,1-NNL) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA). The preferential fragment ions observed in the ISD spectra include N-terminal [a] + ions and C-terminal [x]+, [y + 2]+, and [w]+ ions which imply that β-carbon (Cβ)-centered radical peptide ions [M - Hβ + H]·+ are predominantly produced in MALDI conditions. RDD reactions from the peptide ions [M - Hβ + H]·+ successfully explains the fact that both [a]+ and [x]+ ions arising from cleavage at the Cα-C bond of the backbone of Gly-Xxx residues are missing from the ISD spectra. Furthermore, the formation of [a]+ ions originating from the cleavage of Cα-C bond of deuterated Ala(d3)-Xxx residues indicates that the [a]+ ions are produced from the peptide ions [M - Hβ + H]·+ generated by deuteron-abstraction from Ala(d3) residues. It is suggested that from the standpoint of hydrogen abstraction via direct interactions between the nitro group of matrix and hydrogen of peptides, the generation of the peptide radical ions [M - Hβ + H]·+ is more favorable than that of the α-carbon (Cα)-centered radical ions [M - Hα + H]·+ and the amide nitrogen-centered radical ions [M - HN + H]·+, while ab initio calculations indicate that the formation of [M - Hα + H]·+ is energetically most favorable. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. A Mixed Matrix Membrane of Poly (4-methyl-1-pentyne Filled with MIL 53 Particles and Its Application in Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abedini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of poly (4-metyl-1-pentyne as mixed matrix membrane (MMM mixed with MIL 53 particles was studied to separate mixtures of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. MIL 53 particles was added to the polymer matrix with 10, 20 and 30 weight percentages. The adsorption of CO2 and N2 gases by MIL 53 was evaluated and the adsorption data was analyzed by Langmuir equation. Structure and thermal/mechanical properties of prepared membranes were characterized by means of FTIR, SEM, TGA and elongation test. Moreover, the gas permeation properties of membranes were studied by measuring the permeation of pure CO2 and N2. Furthermore, for accurate understanding of the gas permeation properties of the membranes, diffusion and solution coefficient of gases in neat membrane and MMMs were calculated using modified time-lag method. The results from TGA analysis showed that the degradation temperature of MMMs was enhanced and increased to 348ºC for membrane containing 30 wt% of MIL 53. The SEM images also illustrated a relatively uniform dispersion of particles with proper polymer/filler interfaces in the polymer matrix. The gas permeation results revealed that the permeability of both gases (especially CO2 increased with increasing MIL 53 loading, in which the permeability of CO2 increased from 98.74 Barrer in neat membrane to 217.65 Barrer in MMM containing 30 wt% filler. Moreover, calculation of CO2/N2 selectivity depicted that the selectivity enhanced from 16.66 to 22.70. Finally, the performance of MMMs was compared with Robeson’s upper bound in CO2/N2 separation and results showed that the MMM having 30 wt% of MIL 53 took over the Robeson bound.

  2. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoyan; Hou, Shihua; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Cong; Ji, Yanhong

    2015-09-18

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and glucose oxidase (GOD) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD)₄/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01-8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  3. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs and glucose oxidase (GOD onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD4/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01–8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  4. Shifts in bryophyte carbon isotope ratio across an elevation × soil age matrix on Mauna Loa, Hawaii: do bryophytes behave like vascular plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mashuri; Sack, Lawren

    2011-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of vascular plant leaf tissue is determined by isotope discrimination, primarily mediated by stomatal and mesophyll diffusion resistances and by photosynthetic rate. These effects lead to predictable trends in leaf δ(13)C across natural gradients of elevation, irradiance and nutrient supply. Less is known about shifts in δ(13)C for bryophytes at landscape scale, as bryophytes lack stomata in the dominant gametophyte phase, and thus lack active control over CO(2) diffusion. Twelve bryophyte species were sampled across a matrix of elevation and soil ages on Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island. We tested hypotheses based on previous findings for vascular plants, which tend to have less negative δ(13)C at higher elevations or irradiances, and for leaves with higher leaf mass per area (LMA). Across the matrix, bryophytes spanned the range of δ(13)C values typical of C(3) vascular plants. Bryophytes were remarkably similar to vascular plants in exhibiting less negative δ(13)C with increasing elevation, and with lower overstory cover; additionally δ(13)C was related to bryophyte canopy projected mass per area, a trait analogous to LMA in vascular plants, also correlated negatively with overstory cover. The similarity of responses of δ(13)C in bryophytes and vascular plants to environmental factors, despite differing morphologies and diffusion pathways, points to a strong direct role of photosynthetic rate in determining δ(13)C variation at the landscape scale.

  5. Preliminary results with a torsion microbalance indicate that carbon dioxide and exposed carbonic anhydrase in the organic matrix are the basis of calcification on the skeleton surface of living corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Sandeman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is altering the calcification of corals, but the mechanism is still unclear. To explore what controls calcification, small pieces from the edges of thin plates of Agaricia agaricites were suspended from a torsion microbalance into gently stirred, temperaturecontrolled, seawater. Net calcification rates were monitored while light, temperature and pH were manipulated singly. The living coral pieces were sensitive to changes in conditions, especially light, and calcification was often suspended for one or two hours or overnight. The mean calcification rate increased from 0.06 in the dark to 0.10 mg.h-1.cm-2 (T test, n=8, p<0.01 in low light (15 μmol.s-1.m-2 and showed a positive linear relationship with temperature. With a reduction of mean pH from 8.2 to 7.6 the mean calcification rate in the light (65 μmol.s-1.m-2 increased from 0.19 to 0.28 mg.h-1.cm-2 (T test, n=8, p<0.05 indicating a dependency on carbon dioxide. After waterpiking and exposure of the skeletal surface/organic matrix to seawater, calcification showed an astonishing initial increase of more than an order of magnitude then decreased following a non-linear generalised Michaelis-Menten growth curve and reached a steady rate. Calcification rate of the freshly waterpiked coral was not influenced by light and was positively correlated with temperature. For a mean pH reduction from 8.1 to 7.6 the mean calcification rate increased from 0.18 to 0.32 mg.h-1.cm-2 (T test, n=11, p<0.02 again indicating a dependency on carbon dioxide. Calcification ceased in the presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor azolamide. Staining confirmed the presence of carbonic anhydrase, particularly on the ridges of septae. After immersion of waterpiked corals in seawater for 48 hours weight gain and loss became linear and positively correlated to temperature. When the mean pH was reduced from 8.2 to 7.5 the mean rate of weight gain decreased from 0.25 to 0.13 mg.h-1.cm-2 (T test, n=6

  6. Separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas by mixed matrix membranes using dual phase microporous polymeric constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizkardes, Ali K; Kusuma, Victor A; Dahe, Ganpat; Roth, Elliot A; Hill, Lawrence J; Marti, Anne; Macala, Megan; Venna, Surendar R; Hopkinson, David

    2016-09-27

    This study presents the fabrication of a new mixed matrix membrane using two microporous polymers: a polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1 and a benzimidazole linked polymer, BILP-101, and their CO 2 separation properties from post-combustion flue gas. 17, 30 and 40 wt% loadings of BILP-101 into PIM-1 were tested, resulting in mechanically stable films showing very good interfacial interaction due to the inherent H-bonding capability of the constituent materials. Gas transport studies showed that BILP-101/PIM-1 membranes exhibit high CO 2 permeability (7200 Barrer) and selectivity over N 2 (15). The selected hybrid membrane was further tested for CO 2 separation using actual flue gas from a coal-fired power plant.

  7. A strategy to achieve enhanced electromagnetic interference shielding at low concentration with a new generation of conductive carbon black in a chlorinated polyethylene elastomeric matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subhadip; Ganguly, Sayan; Rahaman, Mostafizur; Aldalbahi, Ali; Chaki, Tapan K; Khastgir, Dipak; Das, Narayan Ch

    2016-09-21

    The fabrication of scalable and affordable conductive Ketjen carbon black (K-CB)-elastomer composites for adjustable electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding remains a difficult challenge. Herein, chlorinated polyethylene (CPE)-K-CB composites have been developed by single step solution mixing to achieve high EMI shielding performance associated with absorption dominance potency by conductive dissipation as well as the reflection of electromagnetic waves. The dispersion of K-CB inside the CPE matrix has been corroborated by electron micrographs and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The K-CB filler and CPE polymer interaction has been investigated through the bound rubber content (Bdr) and the dynamic mechanical properties. The relatively low loading of K-CB with respect to other conventional carbon fillers contributes to a promising low percolation threshold (9.6 wt% K-CB) and a reasonably high EMI shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) value of 38.4 dB (at 30 wt% loading) in the X-band region (8.2 to 12.4 GHz). Classical percolation theory reveals that the electrical conduction behavior through the composite system is quasi-two dimensional in nature. Our belief lies in the promotion of scalable production of flexible and cost-effective K-CB-CPE composites of superior EMI SE to avoid electromagnetic radiation pollution.

  8. Fabrication of 3D lawn-shaped N-doped porous carbon matrix/polyaniline nanocomposite as the electrode material for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuling; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu; Fu, Gang; Jin, Meng; Lei, Yao; Yang, Peishu; Yan, Maofa

    2017-02-01

    A facile approach to acquire electrode materials with prominent electrochemical property is pivotal to the progress of supercapacitors. 3D nitrogen-doped porous carbon matrix (PCM), with high specific surface area (SSA) up to 2720 m2 g-1, was obtained from the carbonization and activation of the nitrogen-enriched composite precursor (graphene/polyaniline). Then 3D lawn-shaped PCM/PANI composite was obtained by the simple in-situ polymerization. The morphology and structure of these resulting composites were characterized by combining SEM and TEM measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy analyses and Raman spectroscope. The element content of all samples was evaluated using CHN analysis. The results of electrochemical testing indicated that the PCM/PANI composite displays a higher capacitance value of 527 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 compared to 338 F g-1 for pure PANI, and exhibits appreciable rate capability with a retention of 76% at 20 A g-1 as well as fine long-term cycling performance (with 88% retention of specific capacitance after 1000 cycles at 10 A g-1). Simultaneously, the excellent capacitance performance coupled with the facile synthesis of PCM/PANI indicates it is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  9. Characterization of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites subjected to simultaneous application of electric current pulse and low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    2011-12-01

    The use of composite materials in aerospace, electronics, and wind industries has become increasingly common, and these composite components are required to carry mechanical, electrical, and thermal loads simultaneously. A unique property of carbon fiber composites is that when an electric current is applied to the specimen, the mechanical strength of the specimen increases. Previous studies have shown that the higher the electric current, the greater the increase in impact strength. However, as current passes through the composite, heat is generated through Joule heating. This Joule heating can cause degradation of the composite and thus a loss in strength. In order to minimize the negative effects of heating, it is desired to apply a very high current for a very short duration of time. This thesis investigated the material responses of carbon fiber composite plates subjected to electrical current pulse loads of up to 1700 Amps. For 32 ply unidirectional IM7/977-3 specimens, the peak impact load and absorbed energy increased slightly with the addition of a current pulse at the time of an impact event. In 16 ply cross-ply IM7/977-2 specimens, the addition of the current pulse caused detrimental effects due to electrical arcing at the interface between the composite and electrodes. Further refinement of the experimental setup should minimize the risk of electrical arcing and should better elucidate the effects of a current pulse on the impact strength of the specimens.

  10. Amperometric catechol biosensor based on laccase immobilized on nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (N-OMC)/PVA matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Meiqing; Wang, Hefeng; Huang, Di; Han, Zhijun; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    A functionalized nitrogen-containing ordered mesoporous carbon (N-OMC), which shows good electrical properties, was synthesized by the carbonization of polyaniline inside a SBA-15 mesoporous silica template. Based on this, through entrapping laccase onto the N-OMC/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film a facilely fabricated amperometric biosensor was developed. Laccase from Trametes versicolor was assembled on a composite film of a N-OMC/PVA modified Au electrode and the electrochemical behavior was investigated. The results indicated that the N-OMC modified electrode exhibits electrical properties towards catechol. The optimum experimental conditions of a biosensor for the detection of catechol were studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the sensitivity of the biosensor was 0.29 A*M −1 with a detection limit of 0.31 μM and a linear detection range from 0.39 μM to 8.98 μM for catechol. The calibration curve followed the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the apparent Michaelis–Menten (K M app ) was 6.28 μM. This work demonstrated that the N-OMC/PVA composite provides a suitable support for laccase immobilization and the construction of a biosensor. (papers)

  11. Obtention and dynamical mechanical behavior of polymer matrix carbon fire reinforced composites; Obtencao e comportamento mecanodinamico de compositos com matriz polimerica reforcada com fibras de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, Nelson Marques

    2001-07-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres have been extensively used in the nuclear, aeronautics, automotive and leisure industry. This is due to their superior performance when compared to conventional materials in terms of specific strength and specific modulus (3 to 4 times higher than that of mild steels). However, these materials are anisotropic, requiring characterisation for each process and particular application. In the present work, the evaluation of epoxy resin reinforced with unidirectional and continuous carbon fibres was carried out. The composites materials were obtained by filament winding, with three different cure cycles, with two types of carbon fibres (6000 and 12000 filaments per strand) and with fibres volumetric fraction around 60 %. The evaluation of the composites was undertaken using following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA); thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These techniques allowed the evaluation and comparison of storage modulus, internal energy dissipation, glass transition region and glass transition temperature - Tg, cure cycling. Besides, void volumetric fraction was measured. The results indicate that the DMA is a good alternative technique to DSC and TGA. It provides an indication of the quality of the produced composite, both thermal and mechanical. The technique can assist the quality control of composite components by measuring mechanical and thermal properties - modulus and Tg. The DMA technique was sensitive to cure cycling evaluation. Regarding the obtained composites, the results showed the need for the development of specific cure cycle for each application, establishing a compromise between properties such as storage modulus and internal energy dissipation, and involved costs. The results demonstrated differences between the storage modulus and internal energy dissipation for the two types of used fibres. (author)

  12. Biomimetic synthesis of hollow calcium carbonate with the existence of the agar matrix and bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jianhua, E-mail: fjh2008@126.com; Wu, Gang; Qing, Chengsong

    2016-01-01

    Proteins play important roles in the process of biomineralization. Vaterite and calcite have been synthesized by the reaction of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCl{sub 2} in the bovine serum albumin (BSA) and agar system. The samples have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The shape of CaCO{sub 3} crystal has been analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that calcite is a single product in the absence of BSA, but the product is a mixture of calcite and vaterite in the presence of BSA. The spheral shell of CaCO{sub 3} crystal was obtained when the concentration of BSA increased to 9.0 mg/mL. - Highlights: • Biomimetic synthesis of hollow calcium carbonate • Calcification mechanisms in the presence of both protein and polysaccharides • Biomineralization under the action of protein and polysaccharides.

  13. Virtual electrochemical nitric oxide analyzer using copper, zinc superoxide dismutase immobilized on carbon nanotubes in polypyrrole matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madasamy, Thangamuthu; Pandiaraj, Manickam; Balamurugan, Murugesan; Karnewar, Santosh; Benjamin, Alby Robson; Venkatesh, Krishna Arun; Vairamani, Kanagavel; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Karunakaran, Chandran

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we have designed and developed a novel and cost effective virtual electrochemical analyzer for the measurement of NO in exhaled breath and from hydrogen peroxide stimulated endothelial cells using home-made potentiostat. Here, data acquisition system (NI MyDAQ) was used to acquire the data from the electrochemical oxidation of NO mediated by copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD). The electrochemical control programs (graphical user-interface software) were developed using LabVIEW 10.0 to sweep the potential, acquire the current response and process the acquired current signal. The Cu,ZnSOD (SOD1) immobilized on the carbon nanotubes in polypyrrole modified platinum electrode was used as the NO biosensor. The electrochemical behavior of the SOD1 modified electrode exhibited the characteristic quasi-reversible redox peak at the potential, +0.06 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The biological interferences were eliminated by nafion coated SOD1 electrode and then NO was measured selectively. Further, this biosensor showed a wide linear range of response over the concentration of NO from 0.1 μM to 1 mM with a detection limit of 0.1 μM and high sensitivity of 1.1 μA μM(-1). The electroanalytical results obtained here using the developed virtual electrochemical instrument were also compared with the standard cyclic voltammetry instrument and found in agreement with each other. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative evaluation of electrical conductivity of hydroxyapatite ceramics densified through ramp and hold, spark plasma and post sinter Hot Isostatic Pressing routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchi Suresh, M., E-mail: suresh@arci.res.in; Biswas, P.; Mahender, V.; Johnson, Roy, E-mail: royjohnson@arci.res.in

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite ceramics synthesized through sonochemical route were processed and densified through ramp & hold (R&H) and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) routes. The effect of processing route on the relative density and electrical conductivity were studied. Further, the samples were Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) under argon pressure at elevated temperature to further densify the sample. All these samples processed under different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and AC Conductivity. The samples have exhibited hydroxyapatite phase; however, microstructures exhibited distinctly different grain morphologies and grain sizes. AC impedance spectroscopic measurement was carried out on hydroxyapatite samples processed through different routes and the corresponding spectra were analyzed by the analogy to equivalent circuit involving resistors and capacitors. SPS sintered sample after HIPing has exhibited the highest conductivity. This can be attributed to the higher density in combination with finer grain sizes. Activation energy based on Arrhenius equation is calculated and the prominent conduction mechanism is proposed. - Highlights: • Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) of SPS and R&H processed samples has resulted into densities near to theoretical densities • No change in the crystal structure is observed in SPS and R&H samples before and after HIP treatment • SPS processed and HIP treated samples resulted into higher conductivities with smaller grain sizes and grain boundary area.

  15. The stage-classified matrix models project a significant increase in biomass carbon stocks in China's forests between 2005 and 2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huifeng; Wang, Shaopeng; Guo, Zhaodi; Xu, Bing; Fang, Jingyun

    2015-06-25

    China's forests are characterized by young age, low carbon (C) density and a large plantation area, implying a high potential for increasing C sinks in the future. Using data of provincial forest area and biomass C density from China's forest inventories between 1994 and 2008 and the planned forest coverage of the country by 2050, we developed a stage-classified matrix model to predict biomass C stocks of China's forests from 2005 to 2050. The results showed that total forest biomass C stock would increase from 6.43 Pg C (1 Pg = 10(15) g) in 2005 to 9.97 Pg C (95% confidence interval: 8.98 ~ 11.07 Pg C) in 2050, with an overall net C gain of 78.8 Tg C yr(-1) (56.7 ~ 103.3 Tg C yr(-1); 1 Tg = 10(12) g). Our findings suggest that China's forests will be a large and persistent biomass C sink through 2050.

  16. The stage-classified matrix models project a significant increase in biomass carbon stocks in China’s forests between 2005 and 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huifeng; Wang, Shaopeng; Guo, Zhaodi; Xu, Bing; Fang, Jingyun

    2015-01-01

    China’s forests are characterized by young age, low carbon (C) density and a large plantation area, implying a high potential for increasing C sinks in the future. Using data of provincial forest area and biomass C density from China’s forest inventories between 1994 and 2008 and the planned forest coverage of the country by 2050, we developed a stage-classified matrix model to predict biomass C stocks of China’s forests from 2005 to 2050. The results showed that total forest biomass C stock would increase from 6.43 Pg C (1 Pg = 1015 g) in 2005 to 9.97 Pg C (95% confidence interval: 8.98 ~ 11.07 Pg C) in 2050, with an overall net C gain of 78.8 Tg C yr−1 (56.7 ~ 103.3 Tg C yr−1; 1 Tg = 1012 g). Our findings suggest that China’s forests will be a large and persistent biomass C sink through 2050. PMID:26110831

  17. Development and Characterization of Defect-Free Matrimid® Mixed-Matrix Membranes Containing Activated Carbon Particles for Gas Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fynn Weigelt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs for gas separation in the form of thick films were prepared via the combination of the polymer Matrimid® 5218 and activated carbons (AC. The AC particles had a mean particle size of 1.5 μm and a mean pore diameter of 1.9 nm. The films were prepared by slow solvent evaporation from casting solutions in chloroform, which had a varying polymer–AC ratio. It was possible to produce stable films with up to a content of 50 vol % of AC. Thorough characterization experiments were accomplished via differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the morphology of the MMMs was also investigated via scanning electron microscopy. The gas transport properties were revealed by employing time-lag measurements for different pure gases as well as sorption balance experiments for the filler particles. It was found that defect free Matrimid® MMMs with AC were prepared and the increase of the filler content led to a higher effective permeability for different gases. The single gas selectivity αij of different gas pairs maintained stable values with the increase of AC content, regardless of the steep increase in the effective permeability of the pure gases. Estimation of the solubilities and the diffusivities of the Matrimid®, AC, and MMMs allowed for the explanation of the increasing permeabilities of the MMMs, with the increase of AC content by modelling.

  18. Glassy carbon electrode modified with gold nanoparticles and hemoglobin in a chitosan matrix for improved pH-switchable sensing of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Shi, Liang; Gong, Jin; Fang, Yu-Ting; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying; Zeng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) has been demonstrated to endow electrochemical sensors with pH-switchable response because of the presence of carboxyl and amino groups. Hb was deposited in a chitosan matrix on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) that was previously coated with clustered gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) by electrodeposition. The switching behavior is active (“on”) to the negatively charged probe [Fe(CN) 6 3− ] at pH 4.0, but inactive (“off”) to the probe at pH 8.0. This switch is fully reversible by simply changing the pH value of the solution and can be applied for pH-controlled reversible electrochemical reduction of H 2 O 2 catalyzed by Hb. The modified electrode was tested for its response to the different electroactive probes. The response to these species strongly depends on pH which was cycled between 4 and 8. The effect is also attributed to the presence of pH dependent charges on the surface of the electrode which resulted in either electrostatic attraction or repulsion of the electroactive probes. The presence of Hb, in turn, enhances the pH-controllable response, and the electrodeposited Au-NPs improve the capability of switching. This study reveals the potential of protein based pH-switchable materials and also provides a simple and effective strategy for fabrication of switchable chemical sensors as exemplified in a pH-controllable electrode for hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  19. Integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation forward osmosis process using thin-film composite mixed matrix membrane with functionalized carbon nanotube blended polyethersulfone support layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Gyu; Son, Moon; Choi, Heechul

    2017-10-01

    Thin-film composite mixed matrix membrane (TFC MMM) with functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT) blended in polyethersulfone (PES) support layer was synthesized via interfacial polymerization and phase inversion. This membrane was firstly tested in lab-scale integrating seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation forward osmosis (FO) process. Water flux of TFC MMM was increased by 72% compared to that of TFC membrane due to enhanced hydrophilicity. Although TFC MMM showed lower water flux than TFC commercial membrane, enhanced reverse salt flux selectivity (RSFS) of TFC MMM was observed compared to TFC membrane (15% higher) and TFC commercial membrane (4% higher), representing membrane permselectivity. Under effluent organic matter (EfOM) fouling test, 16% less normalized flux decline of TFC MMM was observed compared to TFC membrane. There was 8% less decline of TFC MMM compared to TFC commercial membrane due to fCNT effect on repulsive foulant-membrane interaction enhancement, caused by negatively charged membrane surface. After 10 min physical cleaning, TFC MMM displayed higher recovered normalized flux than TFC membrane (6%) and TFC commercial membrane (4%); this was also supported by visualized characterization of fouling layer. This study presents application of TFC MMM to integrated seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation FO process for the first time. It can be concluded that EfOM fouling of TFC MMM was suppressed due to repulsive foulant-membrane interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Heterogeneous adsorption behavior of landfill leachate on granular activated carbon revealed by fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonmin; Hur, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous adsorption behavior of landfill leachate on granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The equilibrium adsorption of two leachates on GAC was well described by simple Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. More nonlinear isotherm and a slower adsorption rate were found for the leachate with the higher values of specific UV absorbance and humification index, suggesting that the leachate containing more aromatic content and condensed structures might have less accessible sites of GAC surface and a lower degree of diffusive adsorption. Such differences in the adsorption behavior were found even within the bulk leachate as revealed by the dissimilarity in the isotherm and kinetic model parameters between two identified PARAFAC components. For both leachates, terrestrial humic-like fluorescence (C1) component, which is likely associated with relatively large sized and condensed aromatic structures, exhibited a higher isotherm nonlinearity and a slower kinetic rate for GAC adsorption than microbial humic-like (C2) component. Our results were consistent with size exclusion effects, a well-known GAC adsorption mechanism. This study demonstrated the promising benefit of using EEM-PARAFAC for GAC adsorption processes of landfill leachate through fast monitoring of the influent and treated leachate, which can provide valuable information on optimizing treatment processes and predicting further environmental impacts of the treated effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New bio-active, antimicrobial and adherent coatings of nanostructured carbon double-reinforced with silver and silicon by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duta, L.; Ristoscu, C.; Stan, G. E.; Husanu, M. A.; Besleaga, C.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Lazar, V.; Bleotu, C.; Miculescu, F.; Mihailescu, N.; Axente, E.; Badiceanu, M.; Bociaga, D.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2018-05-01

    We report on Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) deposition of Carbon thin films, simple or reinforced with intended concentrations of Ag and Si. A KrF∗ (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) excimer laser was used for irradiation. The effect of a post-deposition thermal treatment in vacuum was studied. Besides detailed morphological, compositional, structural and pull-out adherence characterizations, the potential of the carbonaceous films for medical applications was investigated in vitro by anti-biofilm and cytocompatibility assays. The microscopic images evidenced no delaminations. Micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed a graphitization tendency depending on preparation conditions, thermal treatment and reinforcing agents' presence. Adherence values improved considerably after thermal treatment. In vitro biological evaluation showed that the films containing ∼1.85 at.% Ag were non-cytotoxic for MG63 cells, while eliciting a limited antimicrobial activity. The increase of Ag content to 3.6 at.% results in a significant enhancement of antimicrobial activity, whilst maintaining the cytotoxic action and adherence characteristics at acceptable levels. We propose a new class of metamaterials based on C reinforced with Ag and Si obtained by MAPLE for medical applications, i.e. the prevention and treatment of various infections associated with biofilms developed on implants and other medical equipments.

  2. Binary Hierarchical Porous Graphene/Pyrolytic Carbon Nanocomposite Matrix Loaded with Sulfur as a High-Performance Li-S Battery Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Gao, Qiuming; Qian, Weiwei; Xiao, Hong; Li, Zeyu; Ma, Li; Tian, Xuehui

    2018-06-06

    A N,O-codoped hierarchical porous nanocomposite consisting of binary reduced graphene oxide and pyrolytic carbon (rGO/PC) from chitosan is fabricated. The optimized rGO/PC possesses micropores with size distribution concentrated around 1.1 nm and plenty of meso/macropores. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area is 480.8 m 2 g -1 , and it possesses impressively large pore volume of 2.14 cm 3 g -1 . On the basis of the synergistic effects of the following main factors: (i) the confined space effect in the hierarchical porous binary carbonaceous matrix; (ii) the anchor effects by strong chemical bonds with codoped N and O atoms; and (iii) the good flexibility and conductivity of rGO, the rGO/PC/S holding 75 wt % S exhibits high performance as Li-S battery cathode. Specific capacity of 1625 mA h g -1 can be delivered at 0.1 C (1 C = 1675 mA g -1 ), whereas 848 mA h g -1 can be maintained after 300 cycles at 1 C. Even at high rate of 5 C, 412 mA h g -1 can be restrained after 1000 cycles.

  3. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  4. Inferences of Present and Past Changes at Isolated Enclaves and Matrix of Savannas by Carbon Isotopes in a Transitional Forest-Savanna Area in Northern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto-Santos, F. R.; Luizao, F. J.; Camargo, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The evolutionary history of savannas influenced by short term climate cycles, during the Quaternary Period, could prompt variations in forest cover often related to movements of the forest-savanna boundary. In this study we investigated current and past changes in the structure of vegetation and the origins of savannas of different natures in a biogeographically and climatic transitional forest-savanna area in northern Amazonia. Variations in the isotopic composition of soil organic matter (δ13C) from surface soils (0-10 cm) along forest-savanna boundaries, detected by a sigmoidal non-linear function, were used to identify current changes in vegetation, while past changes were inferred by discontinuities in the evolution of δ13C with soil depth using piecewise regression associated with radiocarbon dating (14C). By comparing small isolated savanna enclaves inside a strictly protected nature reserve (ESEC Maracá) with its outskirts unprotected continuous savanna matrix, we found that origins and the patterns of dynamics were distinct between these areas and did not respond in the same way to climate change and fire events, either in the last decades or during the Holocene. The stability of the present boundaries of the surrounding savanna matrix reflects the resilience of the transitional forests under a recent intensified fire regime and favorable climate, while the deep forest soil isotopic signal indicated a forest shrinkage of at least 70 m occurring since its origin in early Holocene until 780 years BP associated with a climate drier than the current one. Contrarily, the protected enclaves inside ESEC Maracá, remained stable since the middle Holocene, suggesting a non-anthropogenic origin related to soil edaphic conditions, but with recent dynamics of advancing forest by 8 m century-1 favored by current climate and lacking fire events. A detailed understanding of the origins of savannas of distinct natures and the way they are affected by climate and fire

  5. Design and development of a highly stable hydrogen peroxide biosensor on screen printed carbon electrode based on horseradish peroxidase bound with gold nanoparticles in the matrix of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkuaram, Tanin; Ponchio, Chatchai; Kangkasomboon, Thippayawadee; Katikawong, Panadda; Veerasai, Waret

    2007-04-15

    The design and development of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) on a polyvinyl chloride substrate as a disposable sensor is described. Six configurations were designed on silk screen frames. The SPCEs were printed with four inks: silver ink as the conducting track, carbon ink as the working and counter electrodes, silver/silver chloride ink as the reference electrode and insulating ink as the insulator layer. Selection of the best configuration was done by comparing slopes from the calibration plots generated by the cyclic voltammograms at 10, 20 and 30 mM K(3)Fe(CN)(6) for each configuration. The electrodes with similar configurations gave similar slopes. The 5th configuration was the best electrode that gave the highest slope. Modifying the best SPCE configuration for use as a biosensor, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was selected as a biomaterial bound with gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the matrix of chitosan (HRP/AuNP/CHIT). Biosensors of HRP/SPCE, HRP/CHIT/SPCE and HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE were used in the amperometric detection of H(2)O(2) in a solution of 0.1M citrate buffer, pH 6.5, by applying a potential of -0.4V at the working electrode. All the biosensors showed an immediate response to H(2)O(2). The effect of HRP/AuNP incorporated with CHIT (HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE) yielded the highest performance. The amperometric response of HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE retained over 95% of the initial current of the 1st day up to 30 days of storage at 4 degrees C. The biosensor showed a linear range of 0.01-11.3mM H(2)O(2), with a detection limit of 0.65 microM H(2)O(2) (S/N=3). The low detection limit, long storage life and wide linear range of this biosensor make it advantageous in many applications, including bioreactors and biosensors.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Networks Reinforced by Silver Nanowires with Improved Optical Transparency and Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martine, Patricia; Fakhimi, Azin; Lin, Ling; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2015-03-01

    We have fabricated highly transparent and conductive free-standing nanocomposite thin film electrodes by adding silver nanowires (AgNWs) to dry-spun Multiwall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) aerogels. This nanocomposite exhibits desirable properties such as high optical transmittance, excellent flexibility and enhanced electrical conductivity. The incorporation of the AgNWs to the MWNT aerogels was accomplished by using a spray coating method. The optical transparency and sheet resistance of the nanocomposite was tuned by adjusting the concentration of AgNWs, back pressure and nozzle distance of the spray gun to the MWNT aerogel during deposition. As the solvent evaporated, the aerogel MWNT bundles densified via surface tension which caused the MWNT bundles to collapse. This adjustable process was responsible in forming well defined apertures that increased the nanocomposite's transmittance up to 90 percent. Via AgNWs percolation and random interconnections between separate MWNT bundles in the aerogel matrix, the sheet resistance decreased from 1 K ohm/sq to less than 100 ohm/sq. Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute

  7. Insight into the heterogeneous adsorption of humic acid fluorescent components on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenghu; Liu, Yangzhi; Cen, Qiulin; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption behavior of commercial humic acid (HA) on pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor (EEM- PARAFAC) analysis. The kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics and mechanisms of adsorption of HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs were the focus of the present study. Three humic-like fluorescent components were distinguished, including one carboxylic-like fluorophore C1 (λ ex /λ em = (250, 310) nm/428nm), and two phenolic-like fluorophores, C2 (λ ex /λ em = (300, 460) nm/552nm) and C3 (λ ex /λ em = (270, 375) nm/520nm). The Lagergren pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption kinetics of the HA fluorescent components. In addition, both the Freundlich and Langmuir models can be suitably employed to describe the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs with significantly high correlation coefficients (R 2 > 0.94, Padsorption affinity (K d ) and nonlinear adsorption degree from the HA fluorescent components to MWCNTs was clearly observed. The adsorption mechanism suggested that the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction played an important role in the interaction between HA fluorescent components and the three MWCNTs. Furthermore, the values of the thermodynamic parameters, including the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), showed that the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components on MWCNTs was spontaneous and exothermic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-phase highly densified SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} compacts produced by high-pressure sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Altair Soria; Souza, Ricson Rocha de; Sousa, Vania Caldas de, E-mail: altair@if.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The development of high-performance lead-free piezoelectric ceramics is an important scientific and technological challenge, as environmental and health issues have imposed restrictions to the use of lead zirconate titanates, the most employed material in ferroelectric devices [1]. Strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT),SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}, is an interesting alternative ferroelectric material as its polarization can be modified at low voltages and it shows limited polarization switching fatigue. However, the production of highly densified single-phase bulk SBT by conventional sintering procedures is strongly compromised by stoichiometric changes due to bismuth loss. In this work, high-pressure sintering has been exploited as an alternative procedure to obtain SBT highly-densified single-phase compacts. Using toroidal-type high-pressure chambers, samples were produced by reaction sintering of BiTaO{sub 4} and SrCO{sub 3} powders, mixed in the stoichiometric ratio corresponding to SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}, at pressures of 2.5 GPa and 7.7 GPa, and temperatures up to 1250°C, during 10 min. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy associated to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to follow the phase composition and the microstructure evolution as a function of the processing conditions. A single-phase SBT compact, with a relative density of 93% and a homogeneous microstructure, was produced by sintering at 2.5 GPa/900°C [2]. References: [1] K. Panda, J. Mater. Sci. 44, 5049-5062 (2009). [2] Ricson R.Souza, Rejane K. Kirchner, Jose R. Jurado, Altair S. Pereira, Vania C. Sousa. Journal of Solid State Chemistry 233, 259-268 (2016). (author)

  9. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  10. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  11. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  12. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  13. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  14. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB 6 , SrB 6 , BaB 6 and the ternary hexaborides Ca x Sr 1−x B 6 , Ca x Ba 1−x B 6 , Sr x Ba 1−x B 6 (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB 6 (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials

  15. Carbon composites composites with carbon fibers, nanofibers, and nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Deborah D L

    2017-01-01

    Carbon Composites: Composites with Carbon Fibers, Nanofibers, and Nanotubes, Second Edition, provides the reader with information on a wide range of carbon fiber composites, including polymer-matrix, metal-matrix, carbon-matrix, ceramic-matrix and cement-matrix composites. In contrast to other books on composites, this work emphasizes materials rather than mechanics. This emphasis reflects the key role of materials science and engineering in the development of composite materials. The applications focus of the book covers both the developing range of structural applications for carbon fiber composites, including military and civil aircraft, automobiles and construction, and non-structural applications, including electromagnetic shielding, sensing/monitoring, vibration damping, energy storage, energy generation, and deicing. In addition to these new application areas, new material in this updated edition includes coverage of cement-matrix composites, carbon nanofibers, carbon matrix precursors, fiber surface ...

  16. Effect of distribution, interface property and density of hydrogel-embedded vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on the properties of a flexible solid state supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Xietao; Zhu, Yihao; Ni, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhaohui

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we fabricate a robust flexible solid-state supercapacitor (FSC) device by embedding a conductive poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel into aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. We carefully investigate the effect of distribution, interface properties and densification of CNTs in the gel matrix on the electrochemical properties of an FSC. The total electrochemical capacitance of the device is measured to be 227 mF cm‑3 with a maximum energy density of 0.02 mWh cm‑3, which is dramatically enhanced compared with a similar device composed of non-parallel CNTs. Additionally, controllable in situ electrochemical oxidation greatly improved the compatibility between the hydrophobic CNTs and the hydrophilic hydrogel, which decreased the resistance of the device and introduced extra pseudocapacitance. After such oxidation treatment the energy storage ability further doubled to 430 mF cm‑3 with a maximum energy density of 0.04 mWh cm‑3 . The FSCs based on densified CNT arrays exhibited a much higher volumetric capacitance of 1140 mF cm‑3 and a larger energy density of 0.1 mWh cm‑3, with a large power density of 14 mW cm‑3. All devices show excellent stability of capacitance after at least 10 000 charge–discharge cycles with a loss of less than 2%. These easy-to-assemble hybrid arrays thus potentially provide a new method for manufacturing wearable devices and implantable medical devices.

  17. In situ synthesis of TiB2-TiC particulates locally reinforced medium carbon steel-matrix composites via the SHS reaction of Ni-Ti-B4C system during casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Huang, L.; Jiang, Q.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication of medium carbon steel-matrix composites locally reinforced with in situ TiB 2 -TiC particulates using self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction of Ni-Ti-B 4 C system during casting was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that the exotherm of 1042 deg. C initiated by heat release of the solid state reaction in the differential thermal analysis (DTA) curve is an incomplete reaction in Ni-Ti-B 4 C system. As-cast microstructures of the in situ processed composites reveal a relatively uniform distribution of TiB 2 -TiC particulates in the locally reinforced regions. Furthermore, the particulate size and micro-porosity in the locally reinforced regions are significantly decreased with the increasing of the Ni content in the preforms. For a Ni content of 30 and 40 wt.%, near fully dense composites locally reinforced with in situ TiB 2 and TiC particulates can be fabricated. Although most of fine TiB 2 and TiC particulates which form by the reaction-precipitation mechanism during SHS reaction are present in the locally reinforced region, some large particulates which form by the nucleation-growth mechanism during solidification are entrapped inside the Fe-rich region located in the reinforcing region or inside the matrix region nearby the interface between matrix and reinforcing region. The hardness of the reinforcing region in the composite is significantly higher than that of the unreinforced medium carbon steel. Furthermore, the hardness values of the composites synthesized from 30 to 40 wt.% Ni-Ti-B 4 C systems are higher than those of the composites synthesized from 10 to 20 wt.% Ni-Ti-B 4 C systems

  18. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Imaging of Femoral Neck Bone: Reduced Heterogeneity of Mineral-to-Matrix and Carbonate-to-Phosphate and more Variable Crystallinity in Treatment-Naïve Fracture Cases compared to Fracture-Free Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L.

    2012-01-01

    After age 60 hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and non-fractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck’s axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed Tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared to controls. While our treatment-naïve patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone’s toughness as a material. PMID:22865771

  19. Fourier transform infrared imaging of femoral neck bone: reduced heterogeneity of mineral-to-matrix and carbonate-to-phosphate and more variable crystallinity in treatment-naive fracture cases compared with fracture-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L

    2013-01-01

    After the age of 60 years, hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced bone mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and nonfractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck's axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared with controls. Although our treatment-naive patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone's toughness as a material. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  20. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  1. Coralline-Like N-Doped Hierarchically Porous Carbon Derived from Enteromorpha as a Host Matrix for Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shengnan; Imtiaz, Sumair; Sun, Dan; Xin, Ying; Li, Qian; Huang, Taizhong; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Huang, Yunhui

    2017-12-22

    Coralline-like N-doped hierarchically porous carbon (CNHPC) was prepared through a hydrothermal carbonization process using a sea pollutant enteromorpha as the starting material. The addition of a small amount of glucose during carbonization improved the yield of carbon, and the inherent N contents, especially for pyrrolic N and pyridinic N atoms. After loading 40 wt. % sulfur, the CNHPC/S composite, as a cathode in a Li-S battery, exhibited an initial discharge capacity of 1617 mAh g -1 (96.5 % of theoretical capacity) at 0.1 C and a capacity loss of 0.05 % per charge-discharge cycle after 500 cycles at 0.5 C with a stable Coulombic efficiency of 100 % in carbonate based electrolyte. Such a great performance can be attributed to the coralline-like hierarchically porous infrastructure and inherently abundant N doping. Given the conversion of waste pollutants into valuable energy-storage materials and the easy process, this work features a promising approach to prepare C/S cathodes for Li-S batteries. The special structural and textural characteristics of CNHPC might be attractive to other practical applications such as supercapacitors and catalysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xingzhi

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this monograph is to report on recent developments in the field of matrix inequalities, with emphasis on useful techniques and ingenious ideas. Among other results this book contains the affirmative solutions of eight conjectures. Many theorems unify or sharpen previous inequalities. The author's aim is to streamline the ideas in the literature. The book can be read by research workers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  3. Atomic-absorption determination of mercury in geological materials by flame and carbon-rod atomisation after solvent extraction and using co-extracted silver as a matrix modifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1983-01-01

    Based on modifications and expansion of the original Tindall's solvent extraction flame atomic-absorption procedure, an atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of mercury in geological materials. The sample is digested with nitric and hydrochloric acids in a boiling water-bath. The solution is made ammoniacal and potassium iodide and silver nitrate are added. The mercury is extracted into isobutyl methyl ketone as the tetraiodomercurate(ll). Added silver is co-extracted with mercury and serves as a matrix modifier in the carbon-rod atomiser. The mercury in the isobutyl methyl ketone extract may be determined by either the flame- or the carbon-rod atomisation method, depending on the concentration level. The limits of determination are 0.05-10 p.p.m. of mercury for the carbon-rod atomisation and 1 -200 p.p.m. of mercury for the flame atomisation. Mercury values for reference samples obtained by replicate analyses are in good agreement with those reported by other workers, with relative standard deviations ranging from 2.3 to 0.9%. Recoveries of mercury spiked at two levels were 93-106%. Major and trace elements commonly found in geological materials do not interfere.

  4. Microstructure of Matrix in UHTC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael I.; Chavez-Garia Jose; Doxtad, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Approaches to controlling the microstructure of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) are described.. One matrix material has been infiltrated into carbon weaves to make composite materials. The microstructure of these composites is described.

  5. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  6. Symmetrized density matrix renormalization group algorithm for low-lying excited states of conjugated carbon systems: Application to 1,12-benzoperylene and polychrysene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodhan, Suryoday; Ramasesha, S.

    2018-05-01

    The symmetry adapted density matrix renormalization group (SDMRG) technique has been an efficient method for studying low-lying eigenstates in one- and quasi-one-dimensional electronic systems. However, the SDMRG method had bottlenecks involving the construction of linearly independent symmetry adapted basis states as the symmetry matrices in the DMRG basis were not sparse. We have developed a modified algorithm to overcome this bottleneck. The new method incorporates end-to-end interchange symmetry (C2) , electron-hole symmetry (J ) , and parity or spin-flip symmetry (P ) in these calculations. The one-to-one correspondence between direct-product basis states in the DMRG Hilbert space for these symmetry operations renders the symmetry matrices in the new basis with maximum sparseness, just one nonzero matrix element per row. Using methods similar to those employed in the exact diagonalization technique for Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) models, developed in the 1980s, it is possible to construct orthogonal SDMRG basis states while bypassing the slow step of the Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization procedure. The method together with the PPP model which incorporates long-range electronic correlations is employed to study the correlated excited-state spectra of 1,12-benzoperylene and a narrow mixed graphene nanoribbon with a chrysene molecule as the building unit, comprising both zigzag and cove-edge structures.

  7. An in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of the controlled doping of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes in a conducting polymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 159, 21-22 (2009), s. 2245-2248 ISSN 0379-6779 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400601; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA ČR GC203/07/J067 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : PEDOT/PSS * carbon nanotubes * nanocomposites * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.901, year: 2009

  8. Sintering behavior of porous electrolyte supporting matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells; Yoyu tansan`en nenryo denchi denkaishitsu hojiso no shoketsu kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonai, A; Murata, K [Toshiba Research and Development Center, Kawasaki (Japan)

    1993-11-01

    Considerations were given on pore distribution in lithium aluminate that supports electrolyte in molten carbonate fuel cells under cell operating condition, and its sintering mechanism by measuring time-based change in the linear contraction. The following findings were obtained: Pore capacity in the lithium aluminate layer has decreased in 1000-hour operation, creating pores with diameters greater than 2 {mu}m in which no carbonates have been filled; the cross-leak in reaction gases and ion resistance in the electrolyte retaining layer have increased resulting in degraded cell performance; the lithium aluminate layer has generated initial quick densification as a result of melting of the carbonates, with the more the liquid phase, the larger the linear contraction; and pores with diameters greater than 2 {mu}m are thought to have been generated as the densification of the lithium aluminate due to dissolution and reprecipitation progresses. The densification can be explained well if this is regarded to consist of a slow densification process in association with sintering of lithium aluminate particles, and progress in a sintering mechanism where solid phase has solubility against liquid phase. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  10. Matrix pentagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4) matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  11. Matrix pentagons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4 matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  12. Microwave absorption in X and Ku band frequency of cotton fabric coated with Ni–Zn ferrite and carbon formulation in polyurethane matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, K.K.; Abbas, S.M.; Goswami, T.H.; Abhyankar, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study highlights various microwave properties, i.e. reflection, transmission, absorption and reflection loss, of the coated cotton fabric [formulation: Ni–Zn ferrite (Ni 0.5 Zn 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 ) and carbon black (acetylene black) at concentrations of 30, 40, 50, 60 and70 g of ferrite and 5 g carbon in each 100 ml polyurethane] evaluated at 8–18 GHz frequency. The uniform density of filling materials in coated fabrics (dotted marks in SEM micrograph) indicates homogeneous dispersion of conducting fillers in polyurethane and the density of filling material cluster increases with increase in ferrite concentration. SEM images also show uniform coating of conducting fillers/resin system over individual fibers and interweave spaces. The important parameters governing the microwave properties of coated fabrics i.e. permittivity and permeability, S-parameters, reflection loss, etc. were studied in a HVS free space microwave measurement system. The lossy character of coated fabric is found to increase with increase of ferrite content; the ferrite content decreases the impedance and increases the permittivity and permeability values. The 1.6–1.8 mm thick coated fabric sample (40 wt% ferrite, 3 wt% carbon and 57 wt% PU) has shown about 40% absorption, 20% transmission and 40% reflectance in X (8.2–12.4 GHz) and Ku (12–18 GHz) frequency bands. The reflection loss at 13.5 GHz has shown the highest peak value (22.5 dB) due to coated sample optical thickness equal to λ/4 and more than 7.5 dB in entire Ku band. Owing to its thin and flexible nature, the coated fabric can be used as apparel in protecting human being from hazardous microwaves and also as radar camouflage covering screen in defense. - Highlights: • Ni–Zn ferrite (Ni 0.5 Zn 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 ) with acetylene black found effective coating for microwave absorption. • Coating formulation containing 40 wt% ferrite, 3 wt% carbon and 57 wt% PU offered 40% absorption, 20% transmission and 40% reflection

  13. Microwave absorption in X and Ku band frequency of cotton fabric coated with Ni–Zn ferrite and carbon formulation in polyurethane matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, K.K., E-mail: krishna62@rediffmail.com [Defence Materials and Stores Research and Development Establishment, Kanpur PO, GT Road, Kanpur 208013 (India); Abbas, S.M.; Goswami, T.H. [Defence Materials and Stores Research and Development Establishment, Kanpur PO, GT Road, Kanpur 208013 (India); Abhyankar, A.C. [Defence Institute of Advanced Technology( DIAT), Giri Nagar, Pune 411025 (India)

    2014-08-01

    The present study highlights various microwave properties, i.e. reflection, transmission, absorption and reflection loss, of the coated cotton fabric [formulation: Ni–Zn ferrite (Ni {sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and carbon black (acetylene black) at concentrations of 30, 40, 50, 60 and70 g of ferrite and 5 g carbon in each 100 ml polyurethane] evaluated at 8–18 GHz frequency. The uniform density of filling materials in coated fabrics (dotted marks in SEM micrograph) indicates homogeneous dispersion of conducting fillers in polyurethane and the density of filling material cluster increases with increase in ferrite concentration. SEM images also show uniform coating of conducting fillers/resin system over individual fibers and interweave spaces. The important parameters governing the microwave properties of coated fabrics i.e. permittivity and permeability, S-parameters, reflection loss, etc. were studied in a HVS free space microwave measurement system. The lossy character of coated fabric is found to increase with increase of ferrite content; the ferrite content decreases the impedance and increases the permittivity and permeability values. The 1.6–1.8 mm thick coated fabric sample (40 wt% ferrite, 3 wt% carbon and 57 wt% PU) has shown about 40% absorption, 20% transmission and 40% reflectance in X (8.2–12.4 GHz) and Ku (12–18 GHz) frequency bands. The reflection loss at 13.5 GHz has shown the highest peak value (22.5 dB) due to coated sample optical thickness equal to λ/4 and more than 7.5 dB in entire Ku band. Owing to its thin and flexible nature, the coated fabric can be used as apparel in protecting human being from hazardous microwaves and also as radar camouflage covering screen in defense. - Highlights: • Ni–Zn ferrite (Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) with acetylene black found effective coating for microwave absorption. • Coating formulation containing 40 wt% ferrite, 3 wt% carbon and 57 wt% PU offered 40% absorption, 20

  14. A-few-second synthesis of silicon nanoparticles by gas-evaporation and their self-supporting electrodes based on carbon nanotube matrix for lithium secondary battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowase, Takayuki; Hori, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Kei; Momma, Toshiyuki; Noda, Suguru

    2017-09-01

    Rapid gas-evaporation method is proposed and developed, which yields Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) in a few seconds at high yields of 20%-60% from inexpensive and safe bulk Si. Such rapid process is realized by heating the Si source to a temperature ≥2000 °C, much higher than the melting point of Si (1414 °C). The size of SiNPs is controlled at tens to hundreds nanometers simply by the Ar gas pressure during the evaporation process. Self-supporting films are fabricated simply by co-dispersion and filtration of the SiNPs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without using binders nor metal foils. The half-cell tests showed the improved performances of the SiNP-CNT composite films as anode when coated with graphitic carbon layer. Their performances are evaluated with various SiNP sizes and Si/CNT ratios systematically. The SiNP-CNT film with a Si/CNT mass ratio of 4 realizes the balanced film-based capacities of 618 mAh/gfilm, 230 mAh/cm3, and 0.644 mAh/cm2 with a moderate Si-based performance of 863 mAh/gSi at the 100th cycle.

  15. SM50 repeat-polypeptides self-assemble into discrete matrix subunits and promote appositional calcium carbonate crystal growth during sea urchin tooth biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yelin; Satchell, Paul G; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    The two major proteins involved in vertebrate enamel formation and echinoderm sea urchin tooth biomineralization, amelogenin and SM50, are both characterized by elongated polyproline repeat domains in the center of the macromolecule. To determine the role of polyproline repeat polypeptides in basal deuterostome biomineralization, we have mapped the localization of SM50 as it relates to crystal growth, conducted self-assembly studies of SM50 repeat polypeptides, and examined their effect on calcium carbonate and apatite crystal growth. Electron micrographs of the growth zone of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin teeth documented a series of successive events from intravesicular mineral nucleation to mineral deposition at the interface between tooth surface and odontoblast syncytium. Using immunohistochemistry, SM50 was detected within the cytoplasm of cells associated with the developing tooth mineral, at the mineral secreting front, and adjacent to initial mineral deposits, but not in muscles and ligaments. Polypeptides derived from the SM50 polyproline alternating hexa- and hepta-peptide repeat region (SM50P6P7) formed highly discrete, donut-shaped self-assembly patterns. In calcium carbonate crystal growth studies, SM50P6P7 repeat peptides triggered the growth of expansive networks of fused calcium carbonate crystals while in apatite growth studies, SM50P6P7 peptides facilitated the growth of needle-shaped and parallel arranged crystals resembling those found in developing vertebrate enamel. In comparison, SM50P6P7 surpassed the PXX24 polypeptide repeat region derived from the vertebrate enamel protein amelogenin in its ability to promote crystal nucleation and appositional crystal growth. Together, these studies establish the SM50P6P7 polyproline repeat region as a potent regulator in the protein-guided appositional crystal growth that occurs during continuous tooth mineralization and eruption. In addition, our studies highlight the role of species

  16. Amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with gold-silver bimetallic nanotubes in a chitosan matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Penghao; Gao, Xia; Wang, Lisha; Wu, Qi; Chen, Zhichun; Lin, Xianfu

    2014-01-01

    We report on an amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid (AA) that is based on highly dense gold-silver nanotubes in a chitosan film on a glassy carbon electrode. The nanotubes were synthesized by a poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-mediated polyol method employing a replacement reaction with silver nanowires as templates, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Under the optimal conditions, the sensor exhibits good electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of AA, and this enables the determination of AA in the 5 μM to 2 mM concentration range, with a detection limit at 2 μM (at an S/N of 3). The response time is 2 s. The sensor displays good reproducibility, selectivity, sensitivity, and long-term stability. (author)

  17. Hierarchical silicon nanowires-carbon textiles matrix as a binder-free anode for high-performance advanced lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Xianfu; Chen, Haitian; Wang, Zhuoran; Chen, Di; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Zhou, Chongwu; Shen, Guozhen

    2013-01-01

    Toward the increasing demands of portable energy storage and electric vehicle applications, the widely used graphite anodes with significant drawbacks become more and more unsuitable. Herein, we report a novel scaffold of hierarchical silicon nanowires-carbon textiles anodes fabricated via a facile method. Further, complete lithium-ion batteries based on Si and commercial LiCoO2 materials were assembled to investigate their corresponding across-the-aboard performances, demonstrating their enhanced specific capacity (2950 mAh g−1 at 0.2 C), good repeatability/rate capability (even >900 mAh g−1 at high rate of 5 C), long cycling life, and excellent stability in various external conditions (curvature, temperature, and humidity). Above results light the way to principally replacing graphite anodes with silicon-based electrodes which was confirmed to have better comprehensive performances. PMID:23572030

  18. Functional, textural and sensory properties of dry pasta supplemented with lyophilized tomato matrix or with durum wheat bran extracts produced by supercritical carbon dioxide or ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualone, Antonella; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Summo, Carmine; Caponio, Francesco; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Flagella, Zina; Marrese, Pier Paolo; Piro, Gabriella; Perrotta, Carla; De Bellis, Luigi; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore

    2016-12-15

    A study was carried out to produce functional pasta by adding bran aqueous extract (BW) and bran oleoresin (BO) obtained using ultrasound and supercritical CO2, respectively, or a powdery lyophilized tomato matrix (LT). The bioactive compounds, hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant activity (HAA and LAA) in vitro, were evaluated. BW supplementation did not improve antioxidant activity, whilst LT pasta showed unconventional taste and odor. BO pasta had good levels of tocochromanols (2551μg/100g pasta f.w.) and carotenoids (40.2μg/100g pasta f.w.), and the highest HAA and LAA. The oleoresin altered starch swelling and gluten network, as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, therefore BO pasta had structural characteristics poor compared with the control (4.8% vs. 3.2% cooking loss), although this difference did not affect significantly overall sensory judgment (74 vs. 79 for BO and control, respectively). BO supplementation was most effective for increasing antioxidant activity without jeopardizing pasta quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of the activated carbon nature and the aqueous matrix in the pesticides adsorption; Influencia de la naturaleza del carbon activo y la matriz acuosa en la adsorcion de plaguicidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, N.; Ormad, M. P.; Lanao, M.; Mosteo, R.; Ovelleiro, J. L.

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this research work is to study the effectiveness of the activated carbon adsorption to remove 44 organic pesticides controlled systematically in waters of the Ebro river basin. The treatment is carried out with solutions of 5000 ng L{sup -}1 of pesticides using powered activated carbon (PAC) which origin is mineral or vegetal. Pesticides removal percentages around 25-45% are achieved using 10 mg L{sup -}1 of PAC and with a residence time of 10 minutes. In general, the adsorption capacity of the vegetal PAC is higher than of the mineral one when experiments are carried out with pesticides dissolved in distilled water. However, the presence of organic matter in natural water decreases the adsorption power of the vegetal PAC, being the behaviour of both PAC similar. (Author) 11 refs.

  20. Effect of Carbonate Matrix on δ15N Analysis Tested for Simple Bulk Combustion on Coupled Elemental Analyzer-GC-IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, D.; Grossman, E. L.; Maupin, C. R.; Roark, B.; O'Dea, A.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N) have been extensively used to reconstruct trophic structure, anthropogenic nutrient loading, ecosystem dynamics, and nutrient cycling in terrestrial and marine systems. Extending similar efforts to deep time is critical to investigate sources and fluxes of nutrients in past oceans, and explore causes of biotic turnover. To test the fidelity of N-isotope analyses of biogenic carbonate samples by simple bulk combustion, we performed two sets of experiments involving varying proportions of reagent CaCO3 (0, 2, 35 mg) and three organic standards (3.7-47.2 µg) viz. USGS40 (δ15NAir = -4.52‰), USGS41 (δ15NAir = +47.57‰), and in-house standard Rice (δ15NAir = +1.18‰). At high N contents (15-47.2 µg), δ15N values for CaCO3-amended samples are consistently either 0.5‰ higher (USGS40, -4.5‰), equivalent (Rice, 1.2‰), or 0.5‰ lower (USGS41, 47.6‰) relative to unamended samples. The difference thus depends on the δ15N of the standard relative to air. With decreasing N content (10-15 µg), δ15N values for CaCO3-amended samples diverge from expected values, with 35 mg CaCO3 samples diverging at the highest N content and 0 mg CaCO3 samples at the lowest (10 µg). The latter matches the lower sample-size limit for accurate measurement under the experimental conditions. At very low sample size (3.7-10 µg), all unamended standards show decreasing δ15N with decreasing N content, presumably because of non-linearity in instrument electronics and ion source behavior. The δ15N values of amended USGS41 also decrease with decreasing N content, but those of amended USGS40 and Rice samples increase, with samples containing more CaCO3 (35 versus 2 mg) showing greater deviation from expected values. Potential causes for deviation in δ15N values with CaCO3 amendments include N2 contamination from tin capsules and reagent CaCO3, and incomplete combustion due to energy consumption during CaCO3 decomposition. While tin capsules and reagent Ca

  1. Designing an optimum pulsed magnetic field by a resistance/self-inductance/capacitance discharge system and alignment of carbon nanotubes embedded in polypyrrole matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemikia, Kaveh; Bonabi, Fahimeh; Asadpoorchallo, Ali; Shokrzadeh, Majid

    2015-02-01

    In this work, an optimized pulsed magnetic field production apparatus is designed based on a RLC (Resistance/Self-inductance/Capacitance) discharge circuit. An algorithm for designing an optimum magnetic coil is presented. The coil is designed to work at room temperature. With a minor physical reinforcement, the magnetic flux density can be set up to 12 Tesla with 2 ms duration time. In our design process, the magnitude and the length of the magnetic pulse are the desired parameters. The magnetic field magnitude in the RLC circuit is maximized on the basis of the optimal design of the coil. The variables which are used in the optimization process are wire diameter and the number of coil layers. The coil design ensures the critically damped response of the RLC circuit. The electrical, mechanical, and thermal constraints are applied to the design process. A locus of probable magnetic flux density values versus wire diameter and coil layer is provided to locate the optimum coil parameters. Another locus of magnetic flux density values versus capacitance and initial voltage of the RLC circuit is extracted to locate the optimum circuit parameters. Finally, the application of high magnetic fields on carbon nanotube-PolyPyrrole (CNT-PPy) nano-composite is presented. Scanning probe microscopy technique is used to observe the orientation of CNTs after exposure to a magnetic field. The result shows alignment of CNTs in a 10.3 Tesla, 1.5 ms magnetic pulse.

  2. Eraser-based eco-friendly fabrication of a skin-like large-area matrix of flexible carbon nanotube strain and pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahatiya, Parikshit; Badhulika, Sushmee

    2017-03-03

    This paper reports a new type of electronic, recoverable skin-like pressure and strain sensor, produced on a flexible, biodegradable pencil-eraser substrate and fabricated using a solvent-free, low-cost and energy efficient process. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film, the strain sensing element, was patterned on pencil eraser with a rolling pin and a pre-compaction mechanical press. This induces high interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which enables the sensor to achieve recoverability under ambient conditions. The eraser serves as a substrate for strain sensing, as well as acting as a dielectric for capacitive pressure sensing, thereby eliminating the dielectric deposition step, which is crucial in capacitive-based pressure sensors. The strain sensing transduction mechanism is attributed to the tunneling effect, caused by the elastic behavior of the MWCNTs and the strong mechanical interlock between MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which restricts slippage of MWCNTs on the eraser thereby minimizing hysteresis. The gauge factor of the strain sensor was calculated to be 2.4, which is comparable to and even better than most of the strain and pressure sensors fabricated with more complex designs and architectures. The sensitivity of the capacitive pressure sensor was found to be 0.135 MPa -1 .To demonstrate the applicability of the sensor as artificial electronic skin, the sensor was assembled on various parts of the human body and corresponding movements and touch sensation were monitored. The entire fabrication process is scalable and can be integrated into large areas to map spatial pressure distributions. This low-cost, easily scalable MWCNT pin-rolled eraser-based pressure and strain sensor has huge potential in applications such as artificial e-skin in flexible electronics and medical diagnostics, in particular in surgery as it provides high spatial resolution without a complex nanostructure architecture.

  3. A non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with cuprous oxide and nitrogen-doped graphene in a nafion matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Bin-Bin; Wei, Xian-Wen; Wu, Fang-Hui; Chen, Le; Yuan, Guo-Zan; Wu, Kong-Lin; Dong, Chao; Ye, Yin

    2014-01-01

    We have modified a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with copper(I) oxide nanoparticles (NPs), nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) and Nafion to obtain a novel sensing platform for the non-enzymatic detection of hydrogen peroxide. The deposition of the Cu 2 O NPs on N-graphene was accomplished by single-step chemical reduction. The nanocomposite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy which revealed the successful attachment of monodispersed Cu 2 O NPs to the N-graphene. Electrochemical studies revealed that the composite possesses excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of H 2 O 2 in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution at a working potential of −0.60 V. Nafion obviously enhances the stability of the modified GCE and repels any negatively charged species. Compared to a conventional Cu 2 O/Nafion-modified GCE, the modified GCE presented here exhibits (a) a higher catalytic activity for the reduction of H 2 O 2 (1.94 times), (b) a wider linear range (from 5.0 μM to 3.57 mM), (c) a lower detection limit (0.8 μM at an S/N of 3), (d) higher sensitivity (26.67 μA mM −1 ) and (e) a shorter response time (2 s). Moreover, the new GCE exhibits good selectivity and stability. These properties make the new hybrid electrode a promising tool for to the development of electrochemical sensors, molecular bioelectronic devices, biosensors, and biofuel cells. (author)

  4. Synthesis of Y2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 composite coatings on carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composite by an electro-plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuping; Lin, Xiang; Chen, Weiwei; Cheng, Huanwu; Wang, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper the Y2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 composite coating was successfully synthesized on carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composite by an electro-plasma process. The deposition process, microstructures and oxidation resistance of the coatings with different SiO2 concentrations were systematically investigated. A relatively dense microstructure was observed for the Y2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 composite coating with the SiO2 concentration above 5 g/L. The coating exhibited very good oxidation resistance at 1273 K with the mass loss rate as low as ∼30 wt.%, compared to 100 wt.% of the substrate. The formation of the ceramic composites was discussed in detail based on the electrochemical mechanism and the deposition dynamics in order to explain the effect of the plasma discharge. We believe that the electro-plasma process will find wide applications in preparing ceramics and coatings in industries.

  5. Uncertainty assessment of source attribution of PM(2.5) and its water-soluble organic carbon content using different biomass burning tracers in positive matrix factorization analysis--a case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Renjian; Wu, Yunfei; Zhang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tang, Yixi; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-02-01

    Daily PM2.5 samples were collected at an urban site in Beijing during four one-month periods in 2009-2010, with each period in a different season. Samples were subject to chemical analysis for various chemical components including major water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), element carbon (EC), trace elements, anhydrosugar levoglucosan (LG), and mannosan (MN). Three sets of source profiles of PM2.5 were first identified through positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis using single or combined biomass tracers - non-sea salt potassium (nss-K(+)), LG, and a combination of nss-K(+) and LG. The six major source factors of PM2.5 included secondary inorganic aerosol, industrial pollution, soil dust, biomass burning, traffic emission, and coal burning, which were estimated to contribute 31±37%, 39±28%, 14±14%, 7±7%, 5±6%, and 4±8%, respectively, to PM2.5 mass if using the nss-K(+) source profiles, 22±19%, 29±17%, 20±20%, 13±13%, 12±10%, and 4±6%, respectively, if using the LG source profiles, and 21±17%, 31±18%, 19±19%, 11±12%, 14±11%, and 4±6%, respectively, if using the combined nss-K(+) and LG source profiles. The uncertainties in the estimation of biomass burning contributions to WSOC due to the different choices of biomass burning tracers were around 3% annually and up to 24% seasonally in terms of absolute percentage contributions, or on a factor of 1.7 annually and up to a factor of 3.3 seasonally in terms of the actual concentrations. The uncertainty from the major source (e.g. industrial pollution) was on a factor of 1.9 annually and up to a factor of 2.5 seasonally in the estimated WSOC concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Matrix parameters and storage conditions of manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinfurtner, Karlheinz [Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), Schmallenberg (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The literature study presents an overview of storage conditions for manure and information about important matrix parameters of manure such as dry matter content, pH value, total organic carbon, total nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen. The presented results show that for matrix parameters a dissimilarity of cattle and pig manure can be observed but no difference within the species for different production types occurred with exception of calves. A scenario for western and central European countries is derived. (orig.)

  7. High conductivity carbon nanotube wires from radial densification and ionic doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Jack; Jarosz, Paul R.; Schauerman, Chris M.; Moses, Brian T.; Landi, Brian J.; Cress, Cory D.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2010-11-01

    Application of drawing dies to radially densify sheets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into bulk wires has shown the ability to control electrical conductivity and wire density. Simultaneous use of KAuBr4 doping solution, during wire drawing, has led to an electrical conductivity in the CNT wire of 1.3×106 S/m. Temperature-dependent electrical measurements show that conduction is dominated by fluctuation-assisted tunneling, and introduction of KAuBr4 significantly reduces the tunneling barrier between individual nanotubes. Ultimately, the concomitant doping and densification process leads to closer packed CNTs and a reduced charge transfer barrier, resulting in enhanced bulk electrical conductivity.

  8. Efficiency criterion for teleportation via channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Wei Zha

    Full Text Available In this paper, three kinds of coefficient matrixes (channel matrix, measurement matrix, collapsed matrix associated with the pure state for teleportation are presented, the general relation among channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix is obtained. In addition, a criterion for judging whether a state can be teleported successfully is given, depending on the relation between the number of parameter of an unknown state and the rank of the collapsed matrix. Keywords: Channel matrix, Measurement matrix, Collapsed matrix, Teleportation

  9. Extended biorthogonal matrix polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Shehata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials for commutative matrices were first introduced by Varma and Tasdelen in [22]. The main aim of this paper is to extend the properties of the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials of Varma and Tasdelen and certain generating matrix functions, finite series, some matrix recurrence relations, several important properties of matrix differential recurrence relations, biorthogonality relations and matrix differential equation for the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k and K(A,B n (x, k are discussed. For the matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k, various families of bilinear and bilateral generating matrix functions are constructed in the sequel.

  10. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  12. The Matrix Cookbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices.......Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices....

  13. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  14. Triangularization of a Matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of linear algebra is devoted to reducing a matrix (via similarity or unitary similarity) to another that has lots of zeros. The simplest such theorem is the Schur triangularization theorem. This says that every matrix is unitarily similar to an upper triangular matrix. Our aim here is to show that though it is very easy to prove it ...

  15. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  16. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  17. Parallelism in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallopoulos, Efstratios; Sameh, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended as a research monograph that could also be used in graduate courses for the design of parallel algorithms in matrix computations. It assumes general but not extensive knowledge of numerical linear algebra, parallel architectures, and parallel programming paradigms. The book consists of four parts: (I) Basics; (II) Dense and Special Matrix Computations; (III) Sparse Matrix Computations; and (IV) Matrix functions and characteristics. Part I deals with parallel programming paradigms and fundamental kernels, including reordering schemes for sparse matrices. Part II is devoted to dense matrix computations such as parallel algorithms for solving linear systems, linear least squares, the symmetric algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the singular-value decomposition. It also deals with the development of parallel algorithms for special linear systems such as banded ,Vandermonde ,Toeplitz ,and block Toeplitz systems. Part III addresses sparse matrix computations: (a) the development of pa...

  18. Neutrino mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed

  19. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  20. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  1. Patience of matrix games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for image win–lose–draw games (i.e. image matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than image are never needed. We also construct an explicit image win–lose game such that the unique optimal...

  2. Matrix comparison, Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Borlund, Pia

    2007-01-01

    The present two-part article introduces matrix comparison as a formal means for evaluation purposes in informetric studies such as cocitation analysis. In the first part, the motivation behind introducing matrix comparison to informetric studies, as well as two important issues influencing such c...

  3. Unitarity of CKM Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Saleem, M

    2002-01-01

    The Unitarity of the CKM matrix is examined in the light of the latest available accurate data. The analysis shows that a conclusive result cannot be derived at present. Only more precise data can determine whether the CKM matrix opens new vistas beyond the standard model or not.

  4. Fuzzy risk matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowski, Adam S.; Mannan, M. Sam

    2008-01-01

    A risk matrix is a mechanism to characterize and rank process risks that are typically identified through one or more multifunctional reviews (e.g., process hazard analysis, audits, or incident investigation). This paper describes a procedure for developing a fuzzy risk matrix that may be used for emerging fuzzy logic applications in different safety analyses (e.g., LOPA). The fuzzification of frequency and severity of the consequences of the incident scenario are described which are basic inputs for fuzzy risk matrix. Subsequently using different design of risk matrix, fuzzy rules are established enabling the development of fuzzy risk matrices. Three types of fuzzy risk matrix have been developed (low-cost, standard, and high-cost), and using a distillation column case study, the effect of the design on final defuzzified risk index is demonstrated

  5. Fuzzy vulnerability matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Jorge H.; Rivera, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The so-called vulnerability matrix is used in the evaluation part of the probabilistic safety assessment for a nuclear power plant, during the containment event trees calculations. This matrix is established from what is knows as Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement. This matrix is usually established with numerical values obtained with traditional arithmetic using the set theory. The representation of this matrix with fuzzy numbers is much more adequate, due to the fact that the Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement are better represented with linguistic variables, such as 'highly probable', 'probable', 'impossible', etc. In the present paper a methodology to obtain a Fuzzy Vulnerability Matrix is presented, starting from the recommendations on the Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement. (author)

  6. The nuclear reaction matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenciglowa, E.M.; Kung, C.L.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Osnes, E.; and Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1976-01-01

    Different definitions of the reaction matrix G appropriate to the calculation of nuclear structure are reviewed and discussed. Qualitative physical arguments are presented in support of a two-step calculation of the G-matrix for finite nuclei. In the first step the high-energy excitations are included using orthogonalized plane-wave intermediate states, and in the second step the low-energy excitations are added in, using harmonic oscillator intermediate states. Accurate calculations of G-matrix elements for nuclear structure calculations in the Aapprox. =18 region are performed following this procedure and treating the Pauli exclusion operator Q 2 /sub p/ by the method of Tsai and Kuo. The treatment of Q 2 /sub p/, the effect of the intermediate-state spectrum and the energy dependence of the reaction matrix are investigated in detail. The present matrix elements are compared with various matrix elements given in the literature. In particular, close agreement is obtained with the matrix elements calculated by Kuo and Brown using approximate methods

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  8. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2005-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, and maximal tori.

  9. Elementary matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Eves, Howard

    1980-01-01

    The usefulness of matrix theory as a tool in disciplines ranging from quantum mechanics to psychometrics is widely recognized, and courses in matrix theory are increasingly a standard part of the undergraduate curriculum.This outstanding text offers an unusual introduction to matrix theory at the undergraduate level. Unlike most texts dealing with the topic, which tend to remain on an abstract level, Dr. Eves' book employs a concrete elementary approach, avoiding abstraction until the final chapter. This practical method renders the text especially accessible to students of physics, engineeri

  10. Finned Carbon-Carbon Heat Pipe with Potassium Working Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    This elemental space radiator heat pipe is designed to operate in the 700 to 875 K temperature range. It consists of a C-C (carbon-carbon) shell made from poly-acrylonitride fibers that are woven in an angle interlock pattern and densified with pitch at high process temperature with integrally woven fins. The fins are 2.5 cm long and 1 mm thick, and provide an extended radiating surface at the colder condenser section of the heat pipe. The weave pattern features a continuous fiber bath from the inner tube surface to the outside edges of the fins to maximize the thermal conductance, and to thus minimize the temperature drop at the condenser end. The heat pipe and radiator element together are less than one-third the mass of conventional heat pipes of the same heat rejection surface area. To prevent the molten potassium working fluid from eroding the C C heat pipe wall, the shell is lined with a thin-walled, metallic tube liner (Nb-1 wt.% Zr), which is an integral part of a hermetic metal subassembly which is furnace-brazed to the inner surface of the C-C tube. The hermetic metal liner subassembly includes end caps and fill tubes fabricated from the same Nb-1Zr alloy. A combination of laser and electron beam methods is used to weld the end caps and fill tubes. A tungsten/inert gas weld seals the fill tubes after cleaning and charging the heat pipes with potassium. The external section of this liner, which was formed by a "Uniscan" rolling process, transitions to a larger wall thickness. This section, which protrudes beyond the C-C shell, constitutes the "evaporator" part of the heat pipe, while the section inside the shell constitutes the condenser of the heat pipe (see figure).

  11. Hacking the Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Matrix Organization Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively).......This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively)....

  13. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, H.; Falsetta, M.L.; Klein, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Many infectious diseases in humans are caused or exacerbated by biofilms. Dental caries is a prime example of a biofilm-dependent disease, resulting from interactions of microorganisms, host factors, and diet (sugars), which modulate the dynamic formation of biofilms on tooth surfaces. All biofilms have a microbial-derived extracellular matrix as an essential constituent. The exopolysaccharides formed through interactions between sucrose- (and starch-) and Streptococcus mutans-derived exoenzymes present in the pellicle and on microbial surfaces (including non-mutans) provide binding sites for cariogenic and other organisms. The polymers formed in situ enmesh the microorganisms while forming a matrix facilitating the assembly of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that encompass a series of microenvironments and are firmly attached to teeth. The metabolic activity of microbes embedded in this exopolysaccharide-rich and diffusion-limiting matrix leads to acidification of the milieu and, eventually, acid-dissolution of enamel. Here, we discuss recent advances concerning spatio-temporal development of the exopolysaccharide matrix and its essential role in the pathogenesis of dental caries. We focus on how the matrix serves as a 3D scaffold for biofilm assembly while creating spatial heterogeneities and low-pH microenvironments/niches. Further understanding on how the matrix modulates microbial activity and virulence expression could lead to new approaches to control cariogenic biofilms. PMID:24045647

  14. Solid-state, polymer-based fiber solar cells with carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dianyi; Zhao, Mingyan; Li, Yan; Bian, Zuqiang; Zhang, Luhui; Shang, Yuanyuan; Xia, Xinyuan; Zhang, Sen; Yun, Daqin; Liu, Zhiwei; Cao, Anyuan; Huang, Chunhui

    2012-12-21

    Most previous fiber-shaped solar cells were based on photoelectrochemical systems involving liquid electrolytes, which had issues such as device encapsulation and stability. Here, we deposited classical semiconducting polymer-based bulk heterojunction layers onto stainless steel wires to form primary electrodes and adopted carbon nanotube thin films or densified yarns to replace conventional metal counter electrodes. The polymer-based fiber cells with nanotube film or yarn electrodes showed power conversion efficiencies in the range 1.4% to 2.3%, with stable performance upon rotation and large-angle bending and during long-time storage without further encapsulation. Our fiber solar cells consisting of a polymeric active layer sandwiched between steel and carbon electrodes have potential in the manufacturing of low-cost, liquid-free, and flexible fiber-based photovoltaics.

  15. Matrix Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the Indo-French Workshop on Matrix Information Geometries (MIG): Applications in Sensor and Cognitive Systems Engineering, which was held in Ecole Polytechnique and Thales Research and Technology Center, Palaiseau, France, in February 23-25, 2011. The workshop was generously funded by the Indo-French Centre for the Promotion of Advanced Research (IFCPAR).  During the event, 22 renowned invited french or indian speakers gave lectures on their areas of expertise within the field of matrix analysis or processing. From these talks, a total of 17 original contribution or state-of-the-art chapters have been assembled in this volume. All articles were thoroughly peer-reviewed and improved, according to the suggestions of the international referees. The 17 contributions presented  are organized in three parts: (1) State-of-the-art surveys & original matrix theory work, (2) Advanced matrix theory for radar processing, and (3) Matrix-based signal processing applications.  

  16. Assembling of carbon nanotubes film responding to significant reduction wear and friction on steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Xue, Yong; Qiang, Li; Gao, Kaixong; Liu, Qiao; Yang, Baoping; Liang, Aiming; Zhang, Junyan

    2017-11-01

    Friction properties of carbon nanotubes have been widely studied and reported, however, the friction properties of carbon nanotubes related on state of itself. It is showing superlubricity under nanoscale, but indicates high shear adhesion as aligned carbon nanotube film. However, friction properties under high load (which is commonly in industry) of carbon nanotube films are seldom reported. In this paper, carbon nanotube films, via mechanical rubbing method, were obtained and its tribology properties were investigated at high load of 5 to 15 N. Though different couple pairs were employed, the friction coefficients of carbon nanotube films are nearly the same. Compared with bare stainless steel, friction coefficients and wear rates under carbon nanotube films lubrication reduced to, at least, 1/5 and 1/(4.3-14.5), respectively. Friction test as well as structure study were carried out to reveal the mechanism of the significant reduction wear and friction on steel surface. One can conclude that sliding and densifying of carbon nanotubes at sliding interface contribute to the sufficient decrease of friction coefficients and wear rates.

  17. 2016 MATRIX annals

    CERN Document Server

    Praeger, Cheryl; Tao, Terence

    2018-01-01

    MATRIX is Australia’s international, residential mathematical research institute. It facilitates new collaborations and mathematical advances through intensive residential research programs, each lasting 1-4 weeks. This book is a scientific record of the five programs held at MATRIX in its first year, 2016: Higher Structures in Geometry and Physics (Chapters 1-5 and 18-21); Winter of Disconnectedness (Chapter 6 and 22-26); Approximation and Optimisation (Chapters 7-8); Refining C*-Algebraic Invariants for Dynamics using KK-theory (Chapters 9-13); Interactions between Topological Recursion, Modularity, Quantum Invariants and Low-dimensional Topology (Chapters 14-17 and 27). The MATRIX Scientific Committee selected these programs based on their scientific excellence and the participation rate of high-profile international participants. Each program included ample unstructured time to encourage collaborative research; some of the longer programs also included an embedded conference or lecture series. The artic...

  18. Matrix interdiction problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  19. Dynamic Matrix Rank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Frandsen, Peter Frands

    2009-01-01

    We consider maintaining information about the rank of a matrix under changes of the entries. For n×n matrices, we show an upper bound of O(n1.575) arithmetic operations and a lower bound of Ω(n) arithmetic operations per element change. The upper bound is valid when changing up to O(n0.575) entries...... in a single column of the matrix. We also give an algorithm that maintains the rank using O(n2) arithmetic operations per rank one update. These bounds appear to be the first nontrivial bounds for the problem. The upper bounds are valid for arbitrary fields, whereas the lower bound is valid for algebraically...... closed fields. The upper bound for element updates uses fast rectangular matrix multiplication, and the lower bound involves further development of an earlier technique for proving lower bounds for dynamic computation of rational functions....

  20. MATLAB matrix algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez López, César

    2014-01-01

    MATLAB is a high-level language and environment for numerical computation, visualization, and programming. Using MATLAB, you can analyze data, develop algorithms, and create models and applications. The language, tools, and built-in math functions enable you to explore multiple approaches and reach a solution faster than with spreadsheets or traditional programming languages, such as C/C++ or Java. MATLAB Matrix Algebra introduces you to the MATLAB language with practical hands-on instructions and results, allowing you to quickly achieve your goals. Starting with a look at symbolic and numeric variables, with an emphasis on vector and matrix variables, you will go on to examine functions and operations that support vectors and matrices as arguments, including those based on analytic parent functions. Computational methods for finding eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices are detailed, leading to various matrix decompositions. Applications such as change of bases, the classification of quadratic forms and ...

  1. Elementary matrix algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Hohn, Franz E

    2012-01-01

    This complete and coherent exposition, complemented by numerous illustrative examples, offers readers a text that can teach by itself. Fully rigorous in its treatment, it offers a mathematically sound sequencing of topics. The work starts with the most basic laws of matrix algebra and progresses to the sweep-out process for obtaining the complete solution of any given system of linear equations - homogeneous or nonhomogeneous - and the role of matrix algebra in the presentation of useful geometric ideas, techniques, and terminology.Other subjects include the complete treatment of the structur

  2. Complex matrix model duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.W.

    2010-11-01

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super- Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich- Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  3. Complex matrix model duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.W.

    2010-11-15

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super- Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich- Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  4. Ethical Matrix Manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mepham, B.; Kaiser, M.; Thorstensen, E.; Tomkins, S.; Millar, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ethical matrix is a conceptual tool designed to help decision-makers (as individuals or working in groups) reach sound judgements or decisions about the ethical acceptability and/or optimal regulatory controls for existing or prospective technologies in the field of food and agriculture.

  5. Combinatorial matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mitjana, Margarida

    2018-01-01

    This book contains the notes of the lectures delivered at an Advanced Course on Combinatorial Matrix Theory held at Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona. These notes correspond to five series of lectures. The first series is dedicated to the study of several matrix classes defined combinatorially, and was delivered by Richard A. Brualdi. The second one, given by Pauline van den Driessche, is concerned with the study of spectral properties of matrices with a given sign pattern. Dragan Stevanović delivered the third one, devoted to describing the spectral radius of a graph as a tool to provide bounds of parameters related with properties of a graph. The fourth lecture was delivered by Stephen Kirkland and is dedicated to the applications of the Group Inverse of the Laplacian matrix. The last one, given by Ángeles Carmona, focuses on boundary value problems on finite networks with special in-depth on the M-matrix inverse problem.

  6. Visualizing Matrix Multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugulis, Peteris; Sondore, Anita

    2018-01-01

    Efficient visualizations of computational algorithms are important tools for students, educators, and researchers. In this article, we point out an innovative visualization technique for matrix multiplication. This method differs from the standard, formal approach by using block matrices to make computations more visual. We find this method a…

  7. Challenging the CSCW matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth Vergmann; Gynther, Karsten; Christensen, Ove

    2014-01-01

    useful information, we question whether the axis of time and space comprising the matrix pertains to relevant defining properties of the tools, technology or learning environments to which they are applied. Subsequently we offer an example of an Adobe Connect e-learning session as an illustration...

  8. Photoelastic response of permanently densified oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Mauro, John C.; Thirion, Lynn M.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2017-05-01

    The stress-induced birefringence (photoelastic response) in oxide glasses has important consequences for several applications, including glass for flat panel displays, chemically strengthened cover glass, and advanced optical glasses. While the effect of composition on the photoelastic response is relatively well documented, the effect of pressure has not been systematically studied. In this work, we evaluate the effect of hot isostatic compression on the photoelastic response of ten oxide glasses within two commonly used industrial glass families: aluminosilicates and boroaluminosilicates. Hot isostatic compression generally results in decreasing modifier-oxygen bond lengths and increasing network-former coordination numbers. These structural changes should lead to an increase in the stress optic coefficient (C) according to the model of Zwanziger et al., which can successfully predict the composition and structure dependence of C. However, in compressed glasses, we observe the opposite trend, viz., a decrease in the stress optic coefficient as a result of pressurization. We discuss this result based on measured changes in refractive index and elastic moduli within the context of atomic and lattice effects, building on the pioneering work of Mueller. We propose that the pressure-induced decrease in C is a result of changes in the shear modulus due to underlying topological changes in the glass network.

  9. Indentation Behavior of Permanently Densified Oxide Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Tobias Kjær; Januchta, Kacper; Kapoor, Saurabh

    -induced changes in density, structure, and indentation behavior of a range of oxide glasses, including silicates, borates, and phosphates. The effect of compression on the structure is analyzed through both Raman and NMR spectroscopy, while the mechanical properties are investigated using Vickers micro......Hot isostatic compression can be used as a post treatment method to tune the properties of glass materials as well as to obtain improved understanding of the pressure-induced structural changes and densification mechanisms, e.g., during sharp contact loading. Here, we review the pressure......-indentation. The magnitude of the changes in all macroscopic properties (e.g., density, hardness, and crack resistance) is found to correlate well with the magnitude and type of structural change induced by hot compression. We show that the structural changes depend largely on the type of network former, the coordination...

  10. CNTs Modified and Enhanced Cu Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Wen-zhong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The composite powders of 2%-CNTs were prepared by wet ball milling and hydrogen annealing treatment-cold pressing sintering was used to consolidate the ball milled composite powders with different modifications of the CNTs. The results show that the length of the CNTs is shortened, ports are open, and amorphous carbon content is increased by ball milling. And after a mixed acid purification, the impurity on the surface of the CNTs is completely removed,and a large number of oxygen-containing reactive groups are introduced; the most of CNTs can be embedded in the Cu matrix and the CNTs have a close bonding with the Cu matrix, forming the lamellar composite structure, then, ultrafine-grained composite powders can be obtained by hydrogen annealing treatment. Shortening and purification of the CNTs are both good for dispersion and bonding of CNTs in the Cu matrix, and the tensile strength and hardness of the composites after shortening and purification reaches the highest, and is 296MPa and 139.8HV respectively, compared to the matrix, up to 123.6% in tensile strength and 42.9% in hardness, attributed to the fine grain strengthening and load transferring.

  11. Paths correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Weixian; Zhou, Xiaojun; Lu, Yingcheng; Xu, Jiang

    2015-09-15

    Both the Jones and Mueller matrices encounter difficulties when physically modeling mixed materials or rough surfaces due to the complexity of light-matter interactions. To address these issues, we derived a matrix called the paths correlation matrix (PCM), which is a probabilistic mixture of Jones matrices of every light propagation path. Because PCM is related to actual light propagation paths, it is well suited for physical modeling. Experiments were performed, and the reflection PCM of a mixture of polypropylene and graphite was measured. The PCM of the mixed sample was accurately decomposed into pure polypropylene's single reflection, pure graphite's single reflection, and depolarization caused by multiple reflections, which is consistent with the theoretical derivation. Reflection parameters of rough surface can be calculated from PCM decomposition, and the results fit well with the theoretical calculations provided by the Fresnel equations. These theoretical and experimental analyses verify that PCM is an efficient way to physically model light-matter interactions.

  12. Partially separable t matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakawa, T.; Okuno, H.; Ishikawa, S.; Sawada, T.

    1982-01-01

    The off-shell t matrix is expressed as a sum of one nonseparable and one separable terms so that it is useful for applications to more-than-two body problems. All poles are involved in this one separable term. Both the nonseparable and the separable terms of the kernel G 0 t are regular at the origin. The nonseparable term of this kernel vanishes at large distances, while the separable term behaves asymptotically as the spherical Hankel function. These properties make our expression free from defects inherent in the Jost or the K-matrix expressions, and many applications are anticipated. As the application, a compact expression of the many-level formula is presented. Also the application is suggested to the breakup threebody problem based on the Faddeev equation. It is demonstrated that the breakup amplitude is expressed in a simple and physically interesting form and we can calculate it in coordinate space

  13. Exactly soluble matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju Viswanathan, R.

    1991-09-01

    We study examples of one dimensional matrix models whose potentials possess an energy spectrum that can be explicitly determined. This allows for an exact solution in the continuum limit. Specifically, step-like potentials and the Morse potential are considered. The step-like potentials show no scaling behaviour and the Morse potential (which corresponds to a γ = -1 model) has the interesting feature that there are no quantum corrections to the scaling behaviour in the continuum limit. (author). 5 refs

  14. Inside the NIKE matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Barbara; Schlegelmilch, Bodo B.; Ambos, Björn

    2013-01-01

    This case describes how Nike, a consumer goods company with an ever expanding portfolio and a tremendous brand value, manages the tradeoff between local responsiveness and global integration. In particular, the case highlights Nike's organizational structure that consists of a global matrix organization that is replicated at a regional level for the European market. While this organizational structure allows Nike to respond to local consumer tastes it also ensures that the company benefits f...

  15. A matrix contraction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Michael; Grant, John

    2018-03-01

    We consider a stochastic process in which independent identically distributed random matrices are multiplied and where the Lyapunov exponent of the product is positive. We continue multiplying the random matrices as long as the norm, ɛ, of the product is less than unity. If the norm is greater than unity we reset the matrix to a multiple of the identity and then continue the multiplication. We address the problem of determining the probability density function of the norm, \

  16. Matrix String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkgraaf, R; Verlinde, Herman L

    1997-01-01

    Via compactification on a circle, the matrix model of M-theory proposed by Banks et al suggests a concrete identification between the large N limit of two-dimensional N=8 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and type IIA string theory. In this paper we collect evidence that supports this identification. We explicitly identify the perturbative string states and their interactions, and describe the appearance of D-particle and D-membrane states.

  17. An experimental and numerical investigation into the single-fibre fragmentation test : stress transfer by a locally yielding matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, P.W.J.; Hogeweg, B.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Single-fibre fragmentation tests on carbon/epoxy microcomposites were performed using carbon fibres with surface treatment levels varying from 0 to 200% of the commercial fibre surface treatment, i.e. 100%. Polarized light microscopy showed substantial local matrix yielding near the fibre-matrix

  18. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2016-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe the basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, maximal tori, homogeneous spaces, and roots. This second edition includes two new chapters that allow for an easier transition to the general theory of Lie groups. From reviews of the First Edition: This book could be used as an excellent textbook for a one semester course at university and it will prepare students for a graduate course on Lie groups, Lie algebras, etc. … The book combines an intuitive style of writing w...

  19. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tunable Graphitic Carbon Nano-Onions Development in Carbon Nanofibers for Multivalent Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Haiqing L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel porous graphitic carbon nanofiber material using a synthesis strategy combining electrospinning and catalytic graphitization. RF hydrogel was used as carbon precursors, transition metal ions were successfully introduced into the carbon matrix by binding to the carboxylate groups of a resorcinol derivative. Transition metal particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the carbon matrix, which are used as in-situ catalysts to produce graphitic fullerene-like nanostructures surrounding the metals. The success design of graphitic carbons with enlarged interlayer spacing will enable the multivalent ion intercalation for the development of multivalent rechargeable batteries.

  1. Standard Errors for Matrix Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Derives the asymptotic standard errors and intercorrelations for several matrix correlations assuming multivariate normality for manifest variables and derives the asymptotic standard errors of the matrix correlations for two factor-loading matrices. (SLD)

  2. Selection of a carbon-14 fixation form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.

    1982-09-01

    This report summarizes work on the selection of a disposal form for carbon-14 produced during the production of nuclear power. Carbon compounds were screened on the basis of solubility, thermal stability, resistance to oxidation, cost and availability, compatibility with the selected disposal matrix, leach resistance when incorporated in concrete, and compatibility with capture technologies. Carbonates are the products of the various technologies presently considered for carbon-14 capture. The alkaline earth carbonates exhibit the greatest thermal stabilities, lowest solubilities, lowest raw material cost, and greatest raw material availabilities. When reactions with cement and its impurities are considered, calcium and strontium carbonates are the only alkaline earth carbonates resistant to hydrolysis and reaction with sulfate. Leaching tests of barium, calcium, lead, potassium, and strontium carbonates in concrete showed calcium carbonate concrete to be slightly superior to the other alkaline earth carbonates, and greatly superior to a soluble carbonate, potassium carbonate, and lead carbonate. None of the additives to the concrete reduced the carbonate leaching. Acidic CO 2 -containing waters were found to greatly increase carbonate leaching from concrete. Sea water was found to leach less carbon from carbonate concretes than either distilled water or Columbia River water, which showed nearly equivalent leaching. Based on our work, calcium, barium, and strontium carbonates in concrete are the most suitable waste forms for carbon-14, with calcium carbonate concrete slightly superior to the others. If the waste form is to be exposed to natural waters, sea water will have the lowest leach rate. 6 figures, 7 tables

  3. A glassy carbon electrode modified with a composite consisting of reduced graphene oxide, zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles in a chitosan matrix for studying the direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase and for enzymatic sensing of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhenjiang; Sheng, Liying; Xie, Cuicui; Meng, Alan; Zhao, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe the fabrication of a nanocomposite consisting of reduced graphene oxide, zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles by microwave-assisted synthesis. The composite was further reduced in-situ with hydrazine hydrate and then placed, along with the enzyme glucose oxidase, on a glassy carbon electrode. The synergistic effect of the materials employed in the nanocomposite result in excellent electrocatalytic activity. The Michaelis-Menten constant of the adsorbed GOx is 0.25 mM, implying a remarkable affinity of the GOx for glucose. The amperometric response of the modified GCE is linearly proportional to the concentration of glucose in 0.1 to 12.0 mM concentration range, and the detection limit is 10.6 µM. The biosensor is highly selective, well reproducible and stable. (author)

  4. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramatnejad, K.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, Y.; Rabiee Golgir, H.; Wang, M.; Jiang, L.; Silvain, J.-F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0-10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm2. The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films.

  5. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keramatnejad, K.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, Y.; Rabiee Golgir, H.; Wang, M.; Lu, Y. F., E-mail: ylu2@unl.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States); Jiang, L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Silvain, J.-F. [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB-CNRS) 87, Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer F-33608 Pessac Cedex (France)

    2015-10-21

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0–10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm{sup 2}. The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films.

  6. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keramatnejad, K.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, Y.; Rabiee Golgir, H.; Wang, M.; Lu, Y. F.; Jiang, L.; Silvain, J.-F.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0–10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm 2 . The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films

  7. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, Ramani, E-mail: rvg@barc.gov.in [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Roy, Mainak, E-mail: mainak73@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Thomas, Susy [High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Patra, A.K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sathiyamoorthy, D. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Carbon–carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon–carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix–resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d{sub 002} spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp{sup 2}-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d{sub 002} values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ∼85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  8. The cellulose resource matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  9. Random matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Deift, Percy

    2009-01-01

    This book features a unified derivation of the mathematical theory of the three classical types of invariant random matrix ensembles-orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic. The authors follow the approach of Tracy and Widom, but the exposition here contains a substantial amount of additional material, in particular, facts from functional analysis and the theory of Pfaffians. The main result in the book is a proof of universality for orthogonal and symplectic ensembles corresponding to generalized Gaussian type weights following the authors' prior work. New, quantitative error estimates are derive

  10. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  11. Matrix Encryption Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhakim Chillali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In classical cryptography, the Hill cipher is a polygraphic substitution cipher based on linear algebra. In this work, we proposed a new problem applicable to the public key cryptography, based on the Matrices, called “Matrix discrete logarithm problem”, it uses certain elements formed by matrices whose coefficients are elements in a finite field. We have constructed an abelian group and, for the cryptographic part in this unreliable group, we then perform the computation corresponding to the algebraic equations, Returning the encrypted result to a receiver. Upon receipt of the result, the receiver can retrieve the sender’s clear message by performing the inverse calculation.

  12. Matrix string partition function

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Ivan K; Kostov, Ivan K.; Vanhove, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate quasiclassically the Ramond partition function of Euclidean D=10 U(N) super Yang-Mills theory reduced to a two-dimensional torus. The result can be interpreted in terms of free strings wrapping the space-time torus, as expected from the point of view of Matrix string theory. We demonstrate that, when extrapolated to the ultraviolet limit (small area of the torus), the quasiclassical expressions reproduce exactly the recently obtained expression for the partition of the completely reduced SYM theory, including the overall numerical factor. This is an evidence that our quasiclassical calculation might be exact.

  13. Matrix algebra for linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Marvin H J

    2013-01-01

    Matrix methods have evolved from a tool for expressing statistical problems to an indispensable part of the development, understanding, and use of various types of complex statistical analyses. This evolution has made matrix methods a vital part of statistical education. Traditionally, matrix methods are taught in courses on everything from regression analysis to stochastic processes, thus creating a fractured view of the topic. Matrix Algebra for Linear Models offers readers a unique, unified view of matrix analysis theory (where and when necessary), methods, and their applications. Written f

  14. Attenuation of Chemical Reactivity of Shale Matrixes following Scale Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Jew, A. D.; Kohli, A. H.; Alalli, G.; Kiss, A. M.; Kovscek, A. R.; Zoback, M. D.; Brown, G. E.; Maher, K.; Bargar, J.

    2017-12-01

    Introduction of fracture fluids into shales initiates a myriad of fluid-rock reactions that can strongly influence migration of fluid and hydrocarbon through shale/fracture interfaces. Due to the extremely low permeability of shale matrixes, studies on chemical reactivity of shales have mostly focused on shale surfaces. Shale-fluid interactions inside within shale matrixes have not been examined, yet the matrix is the primary conduit through which hydrocarbons and potential contaminants are transmitted. To characterize changes in matrix mineralogy, porosity, diffusivity, and permeability during hydraulic stimulation, we reacted Marcellus (high clay and low carbonate) and Eagle Ford (low clay and high carbonate) shale cores with fracture fluids for 3 weeks at elevated pressure and temperature (80 oC, and 77 bars). In the carbonate-poor Marcellus system, fluid pH increased from 2 to 4, and secondary Fe(OH)3 precipitates were observed in the fluid. Sulfur X-ray fluorescence maps show that fluids had saturated and reacted with the entire 1-cm-diameter core. In the carbonate-rich Eagle Ford system, pH increased from 2 to 6 due to calcite dissolution. When additional Ba2+ and SO42- were present (log10(Q/K)=1.3), extensive barite precipitation was observed in the matrix of the Eagle Ford core (and on the surface). Barite precipitation was also observed on the surface of the Marcellus core, although to a lesser extent. In the Marcellus system, the presence of barite scale attenuated diffusivity in the matrix, as demonstrated by sharply reduced Fe leaching and much less sulfide oxidation. Systematic studies in homogeneous solution show that barite scale precipitation rates are highly sensitive to pH, salinity, and the presence of organic compounds. These findings imply that chemical reactions are not confined to shale/fluid interfaces but can penetrate into shale matrices, and that barite scale formation can clog diffusion pathways for both fluid and hydrocarbon.

  15. Characterization of supercapacitors matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Monzer Al, E-mail: Monzer.Al.Sakka@vub.ac.b [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); FEMTO-ST Institute, ENISYS Department, FCLAB, UFC-UTBM, bat.F, 90010 Belfort (France); Gualous, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid.Gualous@unicaen.f [Laboratoire LUSAC, Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, Rue Louis Aragon - BP 78, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Van Mierlo, Joeri [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-30

    This paper treats supercapacitors matrix characterization. In order to cut off transient power peaks and to compensate for the intrinsic limitations in embedded sources, the use of supercapacitors as a storage system is quite suitable, because of their appropriate electrical characteristics (huge capacitance, small series resistance, high specific energy, high specific power), direct storage (energy ready for use), and easy control by power electronic conversion. This use requires supercapacitors modules where several cells connected in serial and/or in parallel, thus a bypass system to balance the charging or the discharging of supercapacitors is required. In the matrix of supercapacitors, six elements of three parallel BCAP0350 supercapacitors in serial connections have been considered. This topology permits to reduce the number of the bypass circuits and it can work in degraded mode. Actually, it allows the system to have more reliability by providing power continually to the load even when there are one or more cells failed. Simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  16. Characterization of supercapacitors matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Monzer Al; Gualous, Hamid; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    2010-01-01

    This paper treats supercapacitors matrix characterization. In order to cut off transient power peaks and to compensate for the intrinsic limitations in embedded sources, the use of supercapacitors as a storage system is quite suitable, because of their appropriate electrical characteristics (huge capacitance, small series resistance, high specific energy, high specific power), direct storage (energy ready for use), and easy control by power electronic conversion. This use requires supercapacitors modules where several cells connected in serial and/or in parallel, thus a bypass system to balance the charging or the discharging of supercapacitors is required. In the matrix of supercapacitors, six elements of three parallel BCAP0350 supercapacitors in serial connections have been considered. This topology permits to reduce the number of the bypass circuits and it can work in degraded mode. Actually, it allows the system to have more reliability by providing power continually to the load even when there are one or more cells failed. Simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  17. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  19. Hansen solubility parameters for a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Launay, Helene; Hansen, Charles M.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the physical affinity between an epoxy matrix and oxidized, unsized carbon fibers has been evaluated using Hansen solubility (cohesion) parameters (HSP). A strong physical compatibility has been shown, since their respective HSP are close. The use of a glassy carbon substrate...... as a model for unsized carbon fiber has been demonstrated as appropriate for the study of interactions between the materials in composite carbon fiber-epoxy systems. The HSP of glassy carbon are similar to those of carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  1. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  2. A matrix big bang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Sethi, Savdeep; Verlinde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The light-like linear dilaton background represents a particularly simple time-dependent 1/2 BPS solution of critical type-IIA superstring theory in ten dimensions. Its lift to M-theory, as well as its Einstein frame metric, are singular in the sense that the geometry is geodesically incomplete and the Riemann tensor diverges along a light-like subspace of codimension one. We study this background as a model for a big bang type singularity in string theory/M-theory. We construct the dual Matrix theory description in terms of a (1+1)-d supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a time-dependent world-sheet given by the Milne orbifold of (1+1)-d Minkowski space. Our model provides a framework in which the physics of the singularity appears to be under control

  3. A matrix big bang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Verlinde, Erik [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-15

    The light-like linear dilaton background represents a particularly simple time-dependent 1/2 BPS solution of critical type-IIA superstring theory in ten dimensions. Its lift to M-theory, as well as its Einstein frame metric, are singular in the sense that the geometry is geodesically incomplete and the Riemann tensor diverges along a light-like subspace of codimension one. We study this background as a model for a big bang type singularity in string theory/M-theory. We construct the dual Matrix theory description in terms of a (1+1)-d supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a time-dependent world-sheet given by the Milne orbifold of (1+1)-d Minkowski space. Our model provides a framework in which the physics of the singularity appears to be under control.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinases outside vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Puertas, Laura; Goulas, Theodoros; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2017-11-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family belongs to the metzincin clan of zinc-dependent metallopeptidases. Due to their enormous implications in physiology and disease, MMPs have mainly been studied in vertebrates. They are engaged in extracellular protein processing and degradation, and present extensive paralogy, with 23 forms in humans. One characteristic of MMPs is a ~165-residue catalytic domain (CD), which has been structurally studied for 14 MMPs from human, mouse, rat, pig and the oral-microbiome bacterium Tannerella forsythia. These studies revealed close overall coincidence and characteristic structural features, which distinguish MMPs from other metzincins and give rise to a sequence pattern for their identification. Here, we reviewed the literature available on MMPs outside vertebrates and performed database searches for potential MMP CDs in invertebrates, plants, fungi, viruses, protists, archaea and bacteria. These and previous results revealed that MMPs are widely present in several copies in Eumetazoa and higher plants (Tracheophyta), but have just token presence in eukaryotic algae. A few dozen sequences were found in Ascomycota (within fungi) and in double-stranded DNA viruses infecting invertebrates (within viruses). In contrast, a few hundred sequences were found in archaea and >1000 in bacteria, with several copies for some species. Most of the archaeal and bacterial phyla containing potential MMPs are present in human oral and gut microbiomes. Overall, MMP-like sequences are present across all kingdoms of life, but their asymmetric distribution contradicts the vertical descent model from a eubacterial or archaeal ancestor. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. SAXS study on activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bota, A.; Heringer, D.; Mihalffy, T.

    1999-01-01

    SAXS fractal analysis of activated carbons is presented. It gives very useful information about the structural changes of the carbon skeleton. From the fact, that the sequence of the activation and the heat treatment affect the fractal behaviours more drastically than the particle size distribution of the structural units, it follows that all changes in the pore and matrix structure may reduce principally to the bonding of the crystallite units. (K.A.)

  7. Effects of carbon doping on the microstructural, micro/nano-mechanical, and mesenchymal stromal cells biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation properties of alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnamurithy, Genasan; Yahya, Noor Azlin; Mehrali, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that carbon (C) doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3) nanocomposite (C −0.012wt%) had greater wear resistance and lower surface grains pull out percentage when compared with monolithic Al2O3. In the present study, we investigated the physicochemical, micro- and nanomechanical, cell...... attachment, in vitro biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation properties of Al2O3 doped carbon (0.012wt%) nanocomposite (Al2O3/C). Data were compared to values obtained for monolithic alumina (Al2O3). The calcined Al2O3/C nanocomposite was densified using cold isostatic pressing and followed...... of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Osteogenic protein and gene expression indicated Al2O3/C had a significant osteogenic potential (p...

  8. Phenomenology of the CKM matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The way in which an exact determination of the CKM matrix elements tests the standard Model is demonstrated by a two-generation example. The determination of matrix elements from meson semileptonic decays is explained, with an emphasis on the respective reliability of quark level and meson level calculations. The assumptions involved in the use of loop processes are described. Finally, the state of the art of the knowledge of the CKM matrix is presented. 19 refs., 2 figs

  9. On matrix fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Wasan Ajeel Ahmood

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objec...

  10. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  11. Matrix transformations and sequence spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, S.

    1983-06-01

    In most cases the most general linear operator from one sequence space into another is actually given by an infinite matrix and therefore the theory of matrix transformations has always been of great interest in the study of sequence spaces. The study of general theory of matrix transformations was motivated by the special results in summability theory. This paper is a review article which gives almost all known results on matrix transformations. This also suggests a number of open problems for further study and will be very useful for research workers. (author)

  12. Multivariate Matrix-Exponential Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2010-01-01

    be written as linear combinations of the elements in the exponential of a matrix. For this reason we shall refer to multivariate distributions with rational Laplace transform as multivariate matrix-exponential distributions (MVME). The marginal distributions of an MVME are univariate matrix......-exponential distributions. We prove a characterization that states that a distribution is an MVME distribution if and only if all non-negative, non-null linear combinations of the coordinates have a univariate matrix-exponential distribution. This theorem is analog to a well-known characterization theorem...

  13. A matrix model for WZW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-01-01

    We study a U(N) gauged matrix quantum mechanics which, in the large N limit, is closely related to the chiral WZW conformal field theory. This manifests itself in two ways. First, we construct the left-moving Kac-Moody algebra from matrix degrees of freedom. Secondly, we compute the partition function of the matrix model in terms of Schur and Kostka polynomials and show that, in the large N limit, it coincides with the partition function of the WZW model. This same matrix model was recently shown to describe non-Abelian quantum Hall states and the relationship to the WZW model can be understood in this framework.

  14. Degradation of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Constant-Load Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halbig, Michael

    2000-01-01

    .... Thermogravimetric analysis of the oxidation of fully exposed carbon fiber (T300) and of C/SiC coupons will be presented as well as a model that predicts the oxidation patterns and kinetics of carbon fiber tows oxidizing in a nonreactive matrix.

  15. Carbon doped ZnO: Synthesis, characterization and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, D.K.; Mohapatra, J.; Sharma, M.K.; Chattarjee, R.; Singh, S.K.; Varma, Shikha; Behera, S.N.; Nayak, Sanjeev K.; Entel, P.

    2013-01-01

    A novel thermal plasma in-flight technique has been adopted to synthesize nanocrystalline ZnO and carbon doped nanocrystalline ZnO matrix. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on these samples show the average particle sizes to be around 32 nm for ZnO and for carbon doped ZnO. An enhancement of saturation magnetization in nanosized carbon doped ZnO matrix by a factor of 3.8 has been found in comparison to ZnO nanoparticles at room temperature. Raman measurement clearly indicates the presence of Zn–C complexes surrounded by ZnO matrix in carbon doped ZnO. This indicates that the ferromagnetic signature in carbon doped ZnO arises from the creation of defects or the development of oxy-carbon clusters, in the carbon doped ZnO system. Theoretical studies based on density functional theory also support the experimental analyses. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnO and carbon doped ZnO matrix by inflight thermal plasma reactor. ► Enhancement of ferromagnetism in nanosized carbon doped ZnO in comparison to ZnO nanoparticles. ► Raman measurement indicates the presence of Zn–C complexes surrounded by ZnO matrix. ► Ferromagnetic signature in carbon doped ZnO arises from the development of oxy-carbon clusters. ► DFT supports experimental evidence of ferromagnetism in C doped ZnO nanoparticles.

  16. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components in carbon dioxide at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Fei; Peng, Li-na; He, Guo-qiang; Li, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Four-direction C/C composite was fabricated using carbon fibres and coal tar pitches. •Large-sized bulk matrix was prepared using same process as matrix of C/C composites. •A and E a of C/C, bulk matrix and fibres in CO 2 were determined, respectively. •Pressure exponent n was 0.62 in C/C–CO 2 . -- Abstract: Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the oxidation kinetics of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components (fibres and matrix) in a CO 2 atmosphere at high temperature. The ablation processes were restricted to reaction-limited oxidation. The mass loss rate was estimated for the four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components within the temperature of range of 600–1400 °C. The pressure exponent for the reaction of carbon/carbon composites and CO 2 was 0.62, and the pre-exponential factor and activation energy for the reactions of CO 2 and the carbon/carbon composites, carbon fibres and matrix were determined, respectively

  17. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  18. Pyrolytic carbon black composite and method of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Bi, Zhonghe

    2016-09-13

    A method of recovering carbon black includes the step of providing a carbonaceous source material containing carbon black. The carbonaceous source material is contacted with a sulfonation bath to produce a sulfonated material. The sulfonated material is pyrolyzed to produce a carbon black containing product comprising a glassy carbon matrix phase having carbon black dispersed therein. A method of making a battery electrode is also disclosed.

  19. Cathode spot movements along the carbon fibres in carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chengyu; Qiao Shengru; Yang Zhimao; Ding Bingjun

    2007-01-01

    The cathode spot movements on a polyacrilonitrile (PAN)-based carbon felt reinforced C/C composite and a three dimensional PAN-based carbon fibre reinforced C/C composite (3D-C/C) were investigated by a scanning electron microscope and a digital high-speed video camera. It was found that the carbon fibres have a higher ability to withstand the vacuum arc erosion than the carbon matrix. The cathode spot walks on the matrix, rather than on the carbon fibres. The cathode spot motion is controlled by the architecture of carbon fibres in C/C. The cathode spots move along the carbon fibres by a step-by-step manner rather than a random walk. The cathode spot tracks spread over a wide zone on the 3D-C/C surface parallel to the carbon fibre. The average arc spreading velocity is estimated to be about 0.9 m s -1 and the transient arc spreading velocity is in the range of 0.54-4.5 m s -1

  20. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Yarborough, Kenneth D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  1. R&D of MCFC matrix for long term operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Takashi; Fujita, Yoji; Urushibata, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Akira [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Hyogo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Long term operation is an essential subject in the commercialization of the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC). Material stability is important for the development of the MCFC. particularly for long term operation. In this paper, the specification and the stabilization of MCFC matrix arc investigated, with the aim of producing 40000 hours of operation. It is common knowledge that matrix thickness has a large influence on shorting time, as shorting is caused by the dissolution of the nickel oxide cathodes. Therefore, the optimum thickness of a matrix designed for 40000 hours operation without the nickel shorting was sought. The influences of different electrolytes and matrix specifications on the shorting time were measured with accelerated cell tests. The internal resistance of the matrix was also estimated. Gamma( {gamma} )-lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}) powder with a sub-micron particle diameter is commonly used for a raw material of matrix to retain molten carbonate electrolytes. This is because most researchers found that {gamma}-LiA1O{sub 2} was the most stable material in the MCFC environment among the three allotropic forms alpha ( {alpha} ), beta ( {beta} ), and {gamma}. However. two problems with the stability of {gamma} -LiAlO{sub 2} are being vigorously discussed. especially in Japan: particle growth causes decreasing electrolyte retention, and the transformation of {gamma} to {alpha}. This transformation contradicts the accepted opinion that {gamma} is the most stable form. In this paper, the particle growth and the phase transformation of LiAlO{sub 2} are examined with post-test analyses. The influence of matrix degradation on cell performance is also considered.

  2. Heat capacity and phonon mean free path in the biocarbon matrix of beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfen'eva, L. S.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Misiorek, H.; Wlosewicz, D.; Jezowski, A.

    2011-08-01

    The heat capacity at constant pressure C p of the biocarbon matrix prepared at a beech wood carbonization temperature of 1000°C has been measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. It has been shown that, in the temperature range 90-180 K, the heat capacity is C ˜ T 0.8 and, at T = 190-300 K, it is C p ˜ T 1.2. The phonon mean free path l( T) in the biocarbon matrix has been calculated using the obtained dependences C p ( T), our previous results on the phonon thermal conductivity of the carbon framework of this biocarbon matrix, and data available in the literature on the sound velocity in the matrix. It has been demonstrated that, in the temperature range 200-300 K, the mean value of l is ˜ 15 Å, which is close to the sizes of nanocrystallites ("carbon fragments") of ˜ 12Å, obtained earlier from X-ray diffraction data for the carbon matrix under consideration. These nanocrystallites participate in the formation of the carbon framework of the beech wood biocarbon matrix.

  3. Effect of Carbon Content on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of NbC-Ni Based Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuigen Huang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to correlate the overall carbon content in NbC-Ni, NbC-Ni-VC and NbC-Ni-Mo starting powders with the resulting microstructure, hardness, and fracture toughness of Ni-bonded NbC cermets. A series of NbC-Ni, NbC-Ni-VC and NbC-Ni-Mo cermets with different carbon content were prepared by conventional liquid phase sintering for 1 h at 1420 °C in vacuum. Microstructural analysis of the fully densified cermets was performed by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA to assess the effect of carbon and VC or Mo additions on the NbC grain growth and morphology. A decreased carbon content in the starting powder mixtures resulted in increased dissolution of Nb, V, and Mo in the Ni binder and a decreased C/Nb ratio in the NbC based carbide phase. The Vickers hardness (HV30 and Palmqvist indentation toughness were found to decrease significantly with an increasing carbon content in the Mo-free cermets, whereas an antagonistic correlation between hardness and toughness was obtained as a function of the Mo-content in Mo-modified NbC cermets. To obtain optimized mechanical properties, methods to control the total carbon content of NbC-Ni mixtures were proposed and the prepared cermets were investigated in detail.

  4. Strategy BMT Al-Ittihad Using Matrix IE, Matrix SWOT 8K, Matrix SPACE and Matrix TWOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nofrizal Nofrizal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to formulate and select BMT Al-Ittihad Rumbai strategy to face the changing of business environment both from internal environment such as organization resources, finance, member and external business such as competitor, economy, politics and others. This research method used Analysis of EFAS, IFAS, IE Matrix, SWOT-8K Matrix, SPACE Matrix and TWOS Matrix. our hope from this research it can assist BMT Al-Ittihad in formulating and selecting strategies for the sustainability of BMT Al-Ittihad in the future. The sample in this research is using purposive sampling technique that is the manager and leader of BMT Al-IttihadRumbaiPekanbaru. The result of this research shows that the position of BMT Al-Ittihad using IE Matrix, SWOT-8K Matrix and SPACE Matrix is in growth position, stabilization and aggressive. The choice of strategy after using TWOS Matrix is market penetration, market development, vertical integration, horizontal integration, and stabilization (careful.

  5. How to Study a Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  6. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Machining of Metal Matrix Composites provides the fundamentals and recent advances in the study of machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Each chapter is written by an international expert in this important field of research. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites gives the reader information on machining of MMCs with a special emphasis on aluminium matrix composites. Chapter 1 provides the mechanics and modelling of chip formation for traditional machining processes. Chapter 2 is dedicated to surface integrity when machining MMCs. Chapter 3 describes the machinability aspects of MMCs. Chapter 4 contains information on traditional machining processes and Chapter 5 is dedicated to the grinding of MMCs. Chapter 6 describes the dry cutting of MMCs with SiC particulate reinforcement. Finally, Chapter 7 is dedicated to computational methods and optimization in the machining of MMCs. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and materials researchers, manu...

  8. Quantum mechanics in matrix form

    CERN Document Server

    Ludyk, Günter

    2018-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to quantum mechanics with the matrix method. Heisenberg's matrix mechanics is described in detail. The fundamental equations are derived by algebraic methods using matrix calculus. Only a brief description of Schrödinger's wave mechanics is given (in most books exclusively treated), to show their equivalence to Heisenberg's matrix  method. In the first part the historical development of Quantum theory by Planck, Bohr and Sommerfeld is sketched, followed by the ideas and methods of Heisenberg, Born and Jordan. Then Pauli's spin and exclusion principles are treated. Pauli's exclusion principle leads to the structure of atoms. Finally, Dirac´s relativistic quantum mechanics is shortly presented. Matrices and matrix equations are today easy to handle when implementing numerical algorithms using standard software as MAPLE and Mathematica.

  9. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  10. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tehrani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD, in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.

  11. A Novel Strategy for Carbon Capture and Sequestration by rHLPD Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qinghua; Gupta, Surojit; Tang, Ling; Quinn, Sean [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Atakan, Vahit [Solidia Technologies, Inc., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Riman, Richard E., E-mail: riman@rci.rutgers.edu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing is an energy-intensive process for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) due to the regeneration of amine in stripping towers at high temperature (100–120°C) and the subsequent pressurization of CO{sub 2} for geological sequestration. In this paper, we introduce a novel method, reactive hydrothermal liquid phase densification (rHLPD), which is able to solidify (densify) monolithic materials without using high temperature kilns. Then, we integrate MEA-based CCS processing and mineral carbonation by using rHLPD technology. This integration is designated as rHLPD-carbon sequestration (rHLPD-CS) process. Our results show that the CO{sub 2} captured in the MEA-CO{sub 2} solution was sequestered by the mineral (wollastonite CaSiO{sub 3}) carbonation at a low operating temperature (60°C) and simultaneously monolithic materials with a compressive strength of ~121 MPa were formed. This suggests that the use of rHLPD-CS technology eliminates the energy consumed for CO{sub 2}-MEA stripping and CO{sub 2} compression and also sequesters CO{sub 2} to form value-added products, which have a potential to be utilized as construction and infrastructure materials. In contrast to the high energy requirements and excessive greenhouse gas emissions from conventional Portland cement manufacturing, our calculations show that the integration of rHLPD and CS technologies provides a low energy alternative to production of traditional cementitious-binding materials.

  12. A Novel Strategy of Carbon Capture and Sequestration by rHLPD Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eric Riman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoethanolamine (MEA scrubbing is an energy intensive process for Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS due to the regeneration of amine in stripping towers at high temperature (100-120 ºC and the subsequent pressurization of CO2 for geologic sequestration. In this paper, we introduce a novel method, reactive hydrothermal liquid phase densification (rHLPD, which is able to solidify (densify monolithic materials without using high temperature kilns. Then we integrate MEA-based CCS processing and mineral carbonation by using rHLPD technology. This integration is designated as rHLPD-Carbon Sequestration (rHLPD-CS process. Our results show that the CO2 captured in the MEA-CO2 solution was sequestered by the mineral (wollastonite CaSiO3 carbonation at a low operating temperature (60 ºC and simultaneously monolithic materials with a compressive strength of ~121 MPa were formed. This suggests that the use of rHLPD-CS technology eliminates the energy consumed for CO2-MEA stripping and CO2 compression and also sequesters CO2 to form value-added products, which have a potential to be utilized as construction and infrastructure materials. In contrast to the high energy requirements and excessive greenhouse gas emissions from conventional Portland cement manufacturing, our calculations show that the integration of rHLPD and CS technologies provides a low energy alternative to production of traditional cementitious binding materials.

  13. Use of waste materials in rubber matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajtášová Mariana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the use of waste materials as ecological fillers into rubber matrix. Waste materials were used as partial replacement of the commercial filler – carbon black, designated as N339. These prepared rubber compounds were characterized on the basis of the rheology and vulcanization characteristics – minimum torque (ML, maximum torque (MH, optimum time of vulcanization (t(c90, processing safety of compound (ts, rate coefficient of vulcanization (Rv. In the case of the prepared vulcanizates, physical-mechanical properties (tensile strength, tensibility and hardness and dynamic-mechanical properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, loss angle tan δ were investigated. Using the dependency of loss angle on temperature, the selected properties for tyre tread vulcanizates were evaluated, including traction on snow and ice, traction on the wet surface and rolling resistance.

  14. Containment Code Validation Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Yu-Shan; Mathew, P.M.; Glowa, Glenn; Dickson, Ray; Liang, Zhe; Leitch, Brian; Barber, Duncan; Vasic, Aleks; Bentaib, Ahmed; Journeau, Christophe; Malet, Jeanne; Studer, Etienne; Meynet, Nicolas; Piluso, Pascal; Gelain, Thomas; Michielsen, Nathalie; Peillon, Samuel; Porcheron, Emmanuel; Albiol, Thierry; Clement, Bernard; Sonnenkalb, Martin; Klein-Hessling, Walter; Arndt, Siegfried; Weber, Gunter; Yanez, Jorge; Kotchourko, Alexei; Kuznetsov, Mike; Sangiorgi, Marco; Fontanet, Joan; Herranz, Luis; Garcia De La Rua, Carmen; Santiago, Aleza Enciso; Andreani, Michele; Paladino, Domenico; Dreier, Joerg; Lee, Richard; Amri, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) formed the CCVM (Containment Code Validation Matrix) task group in 2002. The objective of this group was to define a basic set of available experiments for code validation, covering the range of containment (ex-vessel) phenomena expected in the course of light and heavy water reactor design basis accidents and beyond design basis accidents/severe accidents. It was to consider phenomena relevant to pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR), pressurised water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) designs of Western origin as well as of Eastern European VVER types. This work would complement the two existing CSNI validation matrices for thermal hydraulic code validation (NEA/CSNI/R(1993)14) and In-vessel core degradation (NEA/CSNI/R(2001)21). The report initially provides a brief overview of the main features of a PWR, BWR, CANDU and VVER reactors. It also provides an overview of the ex-vessel corium retention (core catcher). It then provides a general overview of the accident progression for light water and heavy water reactors. The main focus is to capture most of the phenomena and safety systems employed in these reactor types and to highlight the differences. This CCVM contains a description of 127 phenomena, broken down into 6 categories: - Containment Thermal-hydraulics Phenomena; - Hydrogen Behaviour (Combustion, Mitigation and Generation) Phenomena; - Aerosol and Fission Product Behaviour Phenomena; - Iodine Chemistry Phenomena; - Core Melt Distribution and Behaviour in Containment Phenomena; - Systems Phenomena. A synopsis is provided for each phenomenon, including a description, references for further information, significance for DBA and SA/BDBA and a list of experiments that may be used for code validation. The report identified 213 experiments, broken down into the same six categories (as done for the phenomena). An experiment synopsis is provided for each test. Along with a test description

  15. The matrix of inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  16. Measuring methods of matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Valkiainen, M.

    1988-03-01

    In Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of at large depths in crystalline bedrock. The radionuclides which are dissolved in the groundwater may be able to diffuse into the micropores of the porous rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the flowing water in the fractures. This phenomenon is called matrix diffusion. A review over matrix diffusion is presented in the study. The main interest is directed to the diffusion of non-sorbing species. The review covers diffusion experiments and measurements of porosity, pore size, specific surface area and water permeability

  17. Maximal quantum Fisher information matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Yuan, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    We study the existence of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix in the multi-parameter quantum estimation, which bounds the ultimate precision limit. We show that when the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix exists, it can be directly obtained from the underlying dynamics. Examples are then provided to demonstrate the usefulness of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix by deriving various trade-off relations in multi-parameter quantum estimation and obtaining the bounds for the scalings of the precision limit. (paper)

  18. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  19. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Propulsion Structures Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dickens, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program has successfully demonstrated cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology in a scramjet engine test. This demonstration represented the world s largest cooled nonmetallic matrix composite panel fabricated for a scramjet engine and the first cooled nonmetallic composite to be tested in a scramjet facility. Lightweight, high-temperature, actively cooled structures have been identified as a key technology for enabling reliable and low-cost space access. Tradeoff studies have shown this to be the case for a variety of launch platforms, including rockets and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Actively cooled carbon and CMC structures may meet high-performance goals at significantly lower weight, while improving safety by operating with a higher margin between the design temperature and material upper-use temperature. Studies have shown that using actively cooled CMCs can reduce the weight of the cooled flow-path component from 4.5 to 1.6 lb/sq ft and the weight of the propulsion system s cooled surface area by more than 50 percent. This weight savings enables advanced concepts, increased payload, and increased range. The ability of the cooled CMC flow-path components to operate over 1000 F hotter than the state-of-the-art metallic concept adds system design flexibility to space-access vehicle concepts. Other potential system-level benefits include smaller fuel pumps, lower part count, lower cost, and increased operating margin.

  20. Silver matrix composites reinforced with galvanically silvered particles

    OpenAIRE

    J. Śleziona; J. Wieczorek,

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents the possibility of the application of metalic layers drifted with the use of the galvanic methods on the ceramic particles surface. The application of the layers was aimed at obtaining the rewetting of the reinforcing particles with the liquid silver in the course of the producing of silver matrix composites with the use of mechanical stirring method. To enable introducing of the iron powder and glass carbon powder to liquid silver the solution of covering the powd...

  1. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  2. GoM Diet Matrix

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set was taken from CRD 08-18 at the NEFSC. Specifically, the Gulf of Maine diet matrix was developed for the EMAX exercise described in that center...

  3. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objective of this article is to discuss the Laplace transform method based on operational matrices of fractional derivatives for solving several kinds of linear fractional differential equations. Moreover, we present the operational matrices of fractional derivatives with Laplace transform in many applications of various engineering systems as control system. We present the analytical technique for solving fractional-order, multi-term fractional differential equation. In other words, we propose an efficient algorithm for solving fractional matrix equation.

  4. Electromagnetic matrix elements in baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.; Moinester, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Some simple symmetry relations between matrix elements of electromagnetic operators are investigated. The implications are discussed for experiments to study hyperon radiative transitions and polarizabilities and form factors. (orig.)

  5. The R-matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, P; Baye, D

    2010-01-01

    The different facets of the R-matrix method are presented pedagogically in a general framework. Two variants have been developed over the years: (i) The 'calculable' R-matrix method is a calculational tool to derive scattering properties from the Schroedinger equation in a large variety of physical problems. It was developed rather independently in atomic and nuclear physics with too little mutual influence. (ii) The 'phenomenological' R-matrix method is a technique to parametrize various types of cross sections. It was mainly (or uniquely) used in nuclear physics. Both directions are explained by starting from the simple problem of scattering by a potential. They are illustrated by simple examples in nuclear and atomic physics. In addition to elastic scattering, the R-matrix formalism is applied to inelastic and radiative-capture reactions. We also present more recent and more ambitious applications of the theory in nuclear physics.

  6. Random matrix improved subspace clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Couillet, Romain; Kammoun, Abla

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a spectral method for statistical subspace clustering. The method is built upon standard kernel spectral clustering techniques, however carefully tuned by theoretical understanding arising from random matrix findings. We show

  7. Characteristics of hot-pressed fiber-reinforced ceramics with SiC matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Tadahiko; Kodama, Hironori; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Akihiro; Iijima, Shiroo

    1989-11-01

    Silicon carbide ceramics’ matrix composites with SiC or C filaments were fabricated through hot pressing, and the effects of the filament pullout on their fracture toughness were experimentally investigated. The C-rich coating layers on the SiC filaments were found to have a significant effect on the frictional stress at the filament/matrix interfaces, through assising the filamet pullout from the matrix. Although the coating layers were apt to burn out in the sintering process of SiC matrix compposites, a small addition of carbon to the raw materials was found to be effective for the retention of the layers on the fibers, thus increasing the fracture toughness of the composites. The fracture toughness of the C filament/SiC matrix composite increased with temperature due to the larger interfacial frictional stress at higher temperatures, because of the higher thermal expansion of the filament in the radial direction than that of the matrix.

  8. Nutrient depletion in Bacillus subtilis biofilms triggers matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Seminara, Agnese; Suaris, Melanie; Angelini, Thomas E; Brenner, Michael P; Weitz, David A

    2014-01-01

    Many types of bacteria form colonies that grow into physically robust and strongly adhesive aggregates known as biofilms. A distinguishing characteristic of bacterial biofilms is an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix that encases the cells and provides physical integrity to the colony. The EPS matrix consists of a large amount of polysaccharide, as well as protein filaments, DNA and degraded cellular materials. The genetic pathways that control the transformation of a colony into a biofilm have been widely studied, and yield a spatiotemporal heterogeneity in EPS production. Spatial gradients in metabolites parallel this heterogeneity in EPS, but nutrient concentration as an underlying physiological initiator of EPS production has not been explored. Here, we study the role of nutrient depletion in EPS production in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. By monitoring simultaneously biofilm size and matrix production, we find that EPS production increases at a critical colony thickness that depends on the initial amount of carbon sources in the medium. Through studies of individual cells in liquid culture we find that EPS production can be triggered at the single-cell level by reducing nutrient concentration. To connect the single-cell assays with conditions in the biofilm, we calculate carbon concentration with a model for the reaction and diffusion of nutrients in the biofilm. This model predicts the relationship between the initial concentration of carbon and the thickness of the colony at the point of internal nutrient deprivation. (paper)

  9. Carbon fibers and composites modified by intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherzynska, B.; Blazewicz, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe ability to intercalation of laboratory prepared carbon composites and their constituents. In work the following materials were tested; pinch-based fibres of P-120 and K-1100 manufacturer's designations, carbon matrix and resulting composites. To prepare a matrix of composites, phenol-formaldehyde resin (Z) and pinch-based precursor (PAK) were used. After initial carbonization, the carbon matrix was heated to 2150 o C i to improve ability to the future intercalation. Three kinds of composites (P/Z, K/Z and K/PAK), with two directional reinforcement (2D), were prepared. All carbon samples were intercalated with copper chloride(II). To study the structure of all materials, before and after intercalation, X-ray diffraction method was used. It enabled to measure microstructure parameters (L c and L a ), interplanar distance (d 002 ) thickness of an intercalation layer (d i ). Before intercalation, graphite fibers are characterized by well developed graphite structure of three-dimensional order, different than carbon turbostratic structures. Graphite fibres show a tendency to intercalation, however this process proceeds harder than in a synthetic graphite, which is testified by diffraction spectra with visible complex stages of intercalation. Comparison of two kinds of graphite fibres show s that their structure significantly affects intercalation process. In the case of composite matrix, a better structure ordering was observed for carbon obtained from PAK than for carbon originating from Z precursor. During production of composites, after the heat treatment (2150 o C), carbon obtained from pyrolysis of Z precursor crystallises on the fibre surface, building a well-developed structure of matrix. The same process occurs during carbonization of pinch-based precursor in presence of graphite fibres. In both cases the composites contain well crystallized graphite phases. The study of carbon composite intercalation shows that the process

  10. Matrix Effects in XRF Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, A.T.; Gabr, N.A.; El-Aryan, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research treats the matrix effect on XRF measurements. The problem is treated by preparing general oxide program, which contains many samples that represent all materials in cement factories, then by using T rail Lachance m ethod to correct errors of matrix effect. This work compares the effect of using lithium tetraborate or sodium tetraborate as a fluxing agent in terms of accuracy and economic cost

  11. Matrix analysis of electrical machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, N N

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Analysis of Electrical Machinery, Second Edition is a 14-chapter edition that covers the systematic analysis of electrical machinery performance. This edition discusses the principles of various mathematical operations and their application to electrical machinery performance calculations. The introductory chapters deal with the matrix representation of algebraic equations and their application to static electrical networks. The following chapters describe the fundamentals of different transformers and rotating machines and present torque analysis in terms of the currents based on the p

  12. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  13. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  14. Damage analysis of fiber reinforced resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Hu Kaiwei; Mu Jingyang; Bai Shuxin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the damage modes of the carbon fiber and the glass fiber reinforced epoxy or bakelite resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser under different power densities were analyzed, and the changes of the microstructure and the tensile strength of the composites were also researched. When the resin matrix composites were radiated at a power density more than 0.1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix would be decomposed and the tensile properties of the radiated samples were lost over 30% while the carbon fiber hardly damaged and the glass fiber melted. When the power density of the laser was raised to 1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix burned violently and the carbon fiber cloth began to split with some carbon fiber being fractured, therefore, the fracture strength of the radiated sample lost over 80%. The higher the power density of radiation was, the more serious the damage of the sample was. It was also found that the difference of the matrixes had little effect on the damage extent of the composites. The influence of the radiation density on the temperature of the radiated surface of the carbon/resin composite was numerically calculated by ANSYS finite element software and the calculation results coincided with the damage mode of the radiated composites. (authors)

  15. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  16. EISPACK, Subroutines for Eigenvalues, Eigenvectors, Matrix Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbow, Burton S.; Cline, A.K.; Meyering, J.

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: EISPACK3 is a collection of 75 FORTRAN subroutines, both single- and double-precision, that compute the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of nine classes of matrices. The package can determine the Eigen-system of complex general, complex Hermitian, real general, real symmetric, real symmetric band, real symmetric tridiagonal, special real tridiagonal, generalized real, and generalized real symmetric matrices. In addition, there are two routines which use the singular value decomposition to solve certain least squares problem. The individual subroutines are - Identification/Description: BAKVEC: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by FIGI; BALANC: Balance a real general matrix; BALBAK: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by BALANC; BANDR: Reduce sym. band matrix to sym. tridiag. matrix; BANDV: Find some vectors of sym. band matrix; BISECT: Find some values of sym. tridiag. matrix; BQR: Find some values of sym. band matrix; CBABK2: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by CBAL; CBAL: Balance a complex general matrix; CDIV: Perform division of two complex quantities; CG: Driver subroutine for a complex general matrix; CH: Driver subroutine for a complex Hermitian matrix; CINVIT: Find some vectors of complex Hess. matrix; COMBAK: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by COMHES; COMHES: Reduce complex matrix to complex Hess. (elementary); COMLR: Find all values of complex Hess. matrix (LR); COMLR2: Find all values/vectors of cmplx Hess. matrix (LR); CCMQR: Find all values of complex Hessenberg matrix (QR); COMQR2: Find all values/vectors of cmplx Hess. matrix (QR); CORTB: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by CORTH; CORTH: Reduce complex matrix to complex Hess. (unitary); CSROOT: Find square root of complex quantity; ELMBAK: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by ELMHES; ELMHES: Reduce real matrix to real Hess. (elementary); ELTRAN: Accumulate transformations from ELMHES (for HQR2); EPSLON: Estimate unit roundoff

  17. Metal Matrix Composites Reinforced by Nano-Particles—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Casati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites reinforced by nano-particles are very promising materials, suitable for a large number of applications. These composites consist of a metal matrix filled with nano-particles featuring physical and mechanical properties very different from those of the matrix. The nano-particles can improve the base material in terms of wear resistance, damping properties and mechanical strength. Different kinds of metals, predominantly Al, Mg and Cu, have been employed for the production of composites reinforced by nano-ceramic particles such as carbides, nitrides, oxides as well as carbon nanotubes. The main issue of concern for the synthesis of these materials consists in the low wettability of the reinforcement phase by the molten metal, which does not allow the synthesis by conventional casting methods. Several alternative routes have been presented in literature for the production of nano-composites. This work is aimed at reviewing the most important manufacturing techniques used for the synthesis of bulk metal matrix nanocomposites. Moreover, the strengthening mechanisms responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of nano-reinforced metal matrix composites have been reviewed and the main potential applications of this new class of materials are envisaged.

  18. Specification of matrix cleanup goals in fractured porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, David J; Kueper, Bernard H

    2013-01-01

    Semianalytical transient solutions have been developed to evaluate what level of fractured porous media (e.g., bedrock or clay) matrix cleanup must be achieved in order to achieve compliance of fracture pore water concentrations within a specified time at specified locations of interest. The developed mathematical solutions account for forward and backward diffusion in a fractured porous medium where the initial condition comprises a spatially uniform, nonzero matrix concentration throughout the domain. Illustrative simulations incorporating the properties of mudstone fractured bedrock demonstrate that the time required to reach a desired fracture pore water concentration is a function of the distance between the point of compliance and the upgradient face of the domain where clean groundwater is inflowing. Shorter distances correspond to reduced times required to reach compliance, implying that shorter treatment zones will respond more favorably to remediation than longer treatment zones in which back-diffusion dominates the fracture pore water response. For a specified matrix cleanup goal, compliance of fracture pore water concentrations will be reached sooner for decreased fracture spacing, increased fracture aperture, higher matrix fraction organic carbon, lower matrix porosity, shorter aqueous phase decay half-life, and a higher hydraulic gradient. The parameters dominating the response of the system can be measured using standard field and laboratory techniques. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  19. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  20. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber to reinforce epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Feng; Lu, Chunxiang; Li, Yonghong; Guo, Jinhai; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Lu, Huibin; He, Shuqing; Yang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → CNTs were uniformly grown onto the carbon fibers. → No obvious mechanical properties of carbon fiber were observed after CNT growth. → The IFSS of multiscale epoxy composite was measured by single fiber pull-out tests. → Observing fractography of composite, the fracture modes of CNTs were discussed. -- Abstract: The multiscale carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber was prepared by a newly developed aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were carried out to characterize this multiscale material. Compared with the original carbon fibers, the fabrication of this hybrid fiber resulted in an almost threefold increase of BET surface area to reach 2.22 m 2 /g. Meanwhile, there was a slight degradation of fiber tensile strength within 10%, while the fiber modulus was not significantly affected. The interfacial shearing strength of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite with carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix was determined from the single fiber pull-out tests of microdroplet composite. Due to an efficient increase of load transfer at the fiber/matrix interfaces, the interracial shear strength of composite reinforced by carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber is almost 94% higher than that of one reinforced by the original carbon fiber. Based on the fractured morphologies of the composites, the interfacial reinforcing mechanisms were discussed through proposing different types of carbon nanotube fracture modes along with fiber pulling out from epoxy composites.

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  2. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  3. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  4. A survey of matrix theory and matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Written for advanced undergraduate students, this highly regarded book presents an enormous amount of information in a concise and accessible format. Beginning with the assumption that the reader has never seen a matrix before, the authors go on to provide a survey of a substantial part of the field, including many areas of modern research interest.Part One of the book covers not only the standard ideas of matrix theory, but ones, as the authors state, ""that reflect our own prejudices,"" among them Kronecker products, compound and induced matrices, quadratic relations, permanents, incidence

  5. Octonionic matrix representation and electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanyal, B. C. [Kumaun University, S. S. J. Campus, Almora (India)

    2014-12-15

    Keeping in mind the important role of octonion algebra, we have obtained the electromagnetic field equations of dyons with an octonionic 8 x 8 matrix representation. In this paper, we consider the eight - dimensional octonionic space as a combination of two (external and internal) four-dimensional spaces for the existence of magnetic monopoles (dyons) in a higher-dimensional formalism. As such, we describe the octonion wave equations in terms of eight components from the 8 x 8 matrix representation. The octonion forms of the generalized potential, fields and current source of dyons in terms of 8 x 8 matrix are discussed in a consistent manner. Thus, we have obtained the generalized Dirac-Maxwell equations of dyons from an 8x8 matrix representation of the octonion wave equations in a compact and consistent manner. The generalized Dirac-Maxwell equations are fully symmetric Maxwell equations and allow for the possibility of magnetic charges and currents, analogous to electric charges and currents. Accordingly, we have obtained the octonionic Dirac wave equations in an external field from the matrix representation of the octonion-valued potentials of dyons.

  6. Inorganic Polymer Matrix Composite Strength Related to Interface Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bridge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin transfer molding of an inorganic polymer binder was successfully demonstrated in the preparation of ceramic fiber reinforced engine exhaust valves. Unfortunately, in the preliminary processing trials, the resulting composite valves were too brittle for in-engine evaluation. To address this limited toughness, the effectiveness of a modified fiber-matrix interface is investigated through the use of carbon as a model material fiber coating. After sequential heat treatments composites molded from uncoated and carbon coated fibers are compared using room temperature 3-point bend testing. Carbon coated Nextel fiber reinforced geopolymer composites demonstrated a 50% improvement in strength, versus that of the uncoated fiber reinforced composites, after the 250 °C postcure.

  7. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  8. Fabrication of fiber composites with a MAX phase matrix by reactive melt infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, F; Krenkel, W

    2011-01-01

    Due to the inherent brittleness of ceramics it is very desirable to increase the damage tolerance of ceramics. The ternary MAX phases are a promising group of materials with high fracture toughness. The topic of this study is the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) with a matrix containing MAX phases, to achieve a damage tolerant structural composite material. For this purpose carbon fiber reinforced preforms with a carbon-titanium carbide matrix (C/C-TiC) were developed and infiltrated with silicon by a pressureless reactive melt infiltration. Finally liquid silicon caused the formation of SiC, TiSi 2 and Ti 3 SiC 2 in the matrix of the composite.

  9. Parallel R-matrix computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggarty, J.W.

    1999-06-01

    For almost thirty years, sequential R-matrix computation has been used by atomic physics research groups, from around the world, to model collision phenomena involving the scattering of electrons or positrons with atomic or molecular targets. As considerable progress has been made in the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, new data, obtained from more complex calculations, is of current interest to experimentalists. Performing such calculations, however, places considerable demands on the computational resources to be provided by the target machine, in terms of both processor speed and memory requirement. Indeed, in some instances the computational requirements are so great that the proposed R-matrix calculations are intractable, even when utilising contemporary classic supercomputers. Historically, increases in the computational requirements of R-matrix computation were accommodated by porting the problem codes to a more powerful classic supercomputer. Although this approach has been successful in the past, it is no longer considered to be a satisfactory solution due to the limitations of current (and future) Von Neumann machines. As a consequence, there has been considerable interest in the high performance multicomputers, that have emerged over the last decade which appear to offer the computational resources required by contemporary R-matrix research. Unfortunately, developing codes for these machines is not as simple a task as it was to develop codes for successive classic supercomputers. The difficulty arises from the considerable differences in the computing models that exist between the two types of machine and results in the programming of multicomputers to be widely acknowledged as a difficult, time consuming and error-prone task. Nevertheless, unless parallel R-matrix computation is realised, important theoretical and experimental atomic physics research will continue to be hindered. This thesis describes work that was undertaken in

  10. Numerical methods in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Björck, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Matrix algorithms are at the core of scientific computing and are indispensable tools in most applications in engineering. This book offers a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of modern methods in matrix computation. It uses a unified approach to direct and iterative methods for linear systems, least squares and eigenvalue problems. A thorough analysis of the stability, accuracy, and complexity of the treated methods is given. Numerical Methods in Matrix Computations is suitable for use in courses on scientific computing and applied technical areas at advanced undergraduate and graduate level. A large bibliography is provided, which includes both historical and review papers as well as recent research papers. This makes the book useful also as a reference and guide to further study and research work. Åke Björck is a professor emeritus at the Department of Mathematics, Linköping University. He is a Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  11. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  12. Supersymmetry in random matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieburg, Mario

    2010-01-01

    I study the applications of supersymmetry in random matrix theory. I generalize the supersymmetry method and develop three new approaches to calculate eigenvalue correlation functions. These correlation functions are averages over ratios of characteristic polynomials. In the first part of this thesis, I derive a relation between integrals over anti-commuting variables (Grassmann variables) and differential operators with respect to commuting variables. With this relation I rederive Cauchy- like integral theorems. As a new application I trace the supermatrix Bessel function back to a product of two ordinary matrix Bessel functions. In the second part, I apply the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles of real symmetric and Hermitian self-dual matrices. This extends the approach for unitarily rotation invariant matrix ensembles. For the k-point correlation functions I derive supersymmetric integral expressions in a unifying way. I prove the equivalence between the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and the superbosonization formula. Moreover, I develop an alternative mapping from ordinary space to superspace. After comparing the results of this approach with the other two supersymmetry methods, I obtain explicit functional expressions for the probability densities in superspace. If the probability density of the matrix ensemble factorizes, then the generating functions exhibit determinantal and Pfaffian structures. For some matrix ensembles this was already shown with help of other approaches. I show that these structures appear by a purely algebraic manipulation. In this new approach I use structures naturally appearing in superspace. I derive determinantal and Pfaffian structures for three types of integrals without actually mapping onto superspace. These three types of integrals are quite general and, thus, they are applicable to a broad class of matrix ensembles. (orig.)

  13. Supersymmetry in random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieburg, Mario

    2010-05-04

    I study the applications of supersymmetry in random matrix theory. I generalize the supersymmetry method and develop three new approaches to calculate eigenvalue correlation functions. These correlation functions are averages over ratios of characteristic polynomials. In the first part of this thesis, I derive a relation between integrals over anti-commuting variables (Grassmann variables) and differential operators with respect to commuting variables. With this relation I rederive Cauchy- like integral theorems. As a new application I trace the supermatrix Bessel function back to a product of two ordinary matrix Bessel functions. In the second part, I apply the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles of real symmetric and Hermitian self-dual matrices. This extends the approach for unitarily rotation invariant matrix ensembles. For the k-point correlation functions I derive supersymmetric integral expressions in a unifying way. I prove the equivalence between the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and the superbosonization formula. Moreover, I develop an alternative mapping from ordinary space to superspace. After comparing the results of this approach with the other two supersymmetry methods, I obtain explicit functional expressions for the probability densities in superspace. If the probability density of the matrix ensemble factorizes, then the generating functions exhibit determinantal and Pfaffian structures. For some matrix ensembles this was already shown with help of other approaches. I show that these structures appear by a purely algebraic manipulation. In this new approach I use structures naturally appearing in superspace. I derive determinantal and Pfaffian structures for three types of integrals without actually mapping onto superspace. These three types of integrals are quite general and, thus, they are applicable to a broad class of matrix ensembles. (orig.)

  14. Polychoric/Tetrachoric Matrix or Pearson Matrix? A methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguez Lara, Sergio Alexis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of product-moment correlation of Pearson is common in most studies in factor analysis in psychology, but it is known that this statistic is only applicable when the variables related are in interval scale and normally distributed, and when are used in ordinal data may to produce a distorted correlation matrix . Thus is a suitable option using polychoric/tetrachoric matrices in item-level factor analysis when the items are in level measurement nominal or ordinal. The aim of this study was to show the differences in the KMO, Bartlett`s Test and Determinant of the Matrix, percentage of variance explained and factor loadings in depression trait scale of Depression Inventory Trait - State and the Neuroticism dimension of the short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire -Revised, regarding the use of matrices polychoric/tetrachoric matrices and Pearson. These instruments was analyzed with different extraction methods (Maximum Likelihood, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis, Unweighted Least Squares and Principal Components, keeping constant the rotation method Promin were analyzed. Were observed differences regarding sample adequacy measures, as well as with respect to the explained variance and the factor loadings, for solutions having as polychoric/tetrachoric matrix. So it can be concluded that the polychoric / tetrachoric matrix give better results than Pearson matrices when it comes to item-level factor analysis using different methods.

  15. Effect of oxygen and hydrogen on microstructure of pyrolytic carbon deposited from thermal decomposition of methane and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Biyun; Zhang, Shouyang; He, LiQun; Gu, Shengyue

    2018-05-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is the most extensive industrial preparation of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. Precursor affects the CVI process considerably. In the present study, using carbon fiber bundles as preforms, methane and ethanol as precursors, the C/C composites were densified by decomposition of various gases in CVI. The thickness and texture of deposited pyrolytic carbon (PyC) were characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM). The microstructure of PyC was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The morphologies of PyC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composition of PyC was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adding hydrogen in methane precursor resulted in a sharp decrease in the deposition rate and texture of PyC. Mixture of methane and ethanol as the precursor improved the deposition rate and texture remarkably. Besides, O element in ethanol was not remained as a constitution of PyC, and it was removed before the formation of PyC.

  16. Towards Google matrix of brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepelyansky, D.L., E-mail: dima@irsamc.ups-tlse.f [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (IRSAMC), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); LPT - IRSAMC, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Zhirov, O.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-12

    We apply the approach of the Google matrix, used in computer science and World Wide Web, to description of properties of neuronal networks. The Google matrix G is constructed on the basis of neuronal network of a brain model discussed in PNAS 105 (2008) 3593. We show that the spectrum of eigenvalues of G has a gapless structure with long living relaxation modes. The PageRank of the network becomes delocalized for certain values of the Google damping factor {alpha}. The properties of other eigenstates are also analyzed. We discuss further parallels and similarities between the World Wide Web and neuronal networks.

  17. Towards Google matrix of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepelyansky, D.L.; Zhirov, O.V.

    2010-01-01

    We apply the approach of the Google matrix, used in computer science and World Wide Web, to description of properties of neuronal networks. The Google matrix G is constructed on the basis of neuronal network of a brain model discussed in PNAS 105 (2008) 3593. We show that the spectrum of eigenvalues of G has a gapless structure with long living relaxation modes. The PageRank of the network becomes delocalized for certain values of the Google damping factor α. The properties of other eigenstates are also analyzed. We discuss further parallels and similarities between the World Wide Web and neuronal networks.

  18. Inverse Interval Matrix: A Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří; Farhadsefat, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2011), s. 704-719 E-ISSN 1081-3810 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/1957; GA ČR GC201/08/J020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : interval matrix * inverse interval matrix * NP-hardness * enclosure * unit midpoint * inverse sign stability * nonnegative invertibility * absolute value equation * algorithm Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.808, year: 2010 http://www.math.technion.ac.il/iic/ ela / ela -articles/articles/vol22_pp704-719.pdf

  19. Symmetries and Interactions in Matrix String Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacquebord, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    This PhD-thesis reviews matrix string theory and recent developments therein. The emphasis is put on symmetries, interactions and scattering processes in the matrix model. We start with an introduction to matrix string theory and a review of the orbifold model that flows out of matrix string theory

  20. Carbon Nanotube Composite SHM Sensor using Additive Manufacturing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a piezoelectric sensors made of carbon nanotube and lead zirconium titanate (PZT) nanopower dispersed in a polymer matrix. These sensors will...

  1. Synthesis of carbon fibre-reinforced, silicon carbide composites by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    carbon fibre (Cf) reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites which are ... eral applications, such as automotive brakes, high-efficiency engine systems, ... The PIP method is based on the use of organo metallic pre-ceramic precursors.

  2. Shock behaviour of 3D carbon-carbon composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereil, P.-L.; Allix, O.; Gratton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The compressive response of a 3D carbon-carbon composite under shock wave was studied in a plate-impact configuration. Two directions of impact were achieved until a nominal value of longitudinal stress of 2.5 GPa. The measured wave profiles are consistent with previous results on 3D composites and confirm the behaviour of such materials under impact. It is shown that the initial loading is decomposed in two waves. The first one is transmitted by the longitudinal fibres, the second one corresponds to the propagation of a shock wave in the 'matrix'. Macroscopic characteristics of this material are provided. (orig.)

  3. Dimensional Behavior of Matrix Graphite Compacts during Heat Treatments for HTGR Fuel Element Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2015-01-01

    The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K. This carbonization step is followed by the final high temperature heat treatment where the carbonized compacts are heat treated at 2073-2173 K in vacuum for a relatively short time (about 2 hrs). In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions, which has a strong influence on the further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the dimensional changes of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed, keeping other process parameters constant, such as the binder content, carbonization time, temperature and atmosphere (two hours ant 1073K and N2 atmosphere). In this work, the dimensional variations of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed

  4. Carbon/carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, J.; Orly, P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites are singular materials from their components, their manufacturing process as well as their characteristics. This paper gives a global overview of these particularities and applications which make them now daily used composites. (authors)

  5. Definition of the size of nanoclusters of silver and palladium in carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volobuev, V.S.; Bashmakov, I.A.; Lukashevich, S.M.; Tolkacheva, E.A.; Tikhonova, T.F.; Lukashevich, M.G.; Kaputskij, F.N.

    2008-01-01

    Size of palladium and silver nanoclusters is carbon matrix prepared by heart treatment of metal-polymer precursor has been determined by means of XR diffractions study. It was shown that the cluster size increases with increasing annealing temperature from 700 to 900 degree Celsius by factor two. No structuring of carbon matrix was observed under clusters forming. (authors)

  6. Matrix theory selected topics and useful results

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1989-01-01

    Matrices and operations on matrices ; determinants ; elementary operations on matrices (continued) ; eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of normal matrices ; functions of a matrix ; positive definiteness, various polar forms of a matrix ; special matrices ; matrices with quaternion elements ; inequalities ; generalised inverse of a matrix ; domain of values of a matrix, location and dispersion of eigenvalues ; symmetric functions ; integration over matrix variables ; permanents of doubly stochastic matrices ; infinite matrices ; Alexander matrices, knot polynomials, torsion numbers.

  7. Complete removal of uranyl nitrate from tissue matrix using supercritical fluid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Senthil Vadivu, E.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    The removal of uranyl nitrate from tissue matrix has been studied with supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol alone as well as complexing reagents dissolved in methanol. A systematic study of various complexing agents led to the development of an extraction procedure for the quantitative recovery of uranium from tissue matrix with supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol containing small quantities of acetylacetone. The drying time and temperature employed in loading of uranyl nitrate onto tissue paper were found to influence the extraction efficiency significantly

  8. Parallel Sparse Matrix - Vector Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Dammann, Bernd

    This technical report contains a case study of a sparse matrix-vector product routine, implemented for parallel execution on a compute cluster with both pure MPI and hybrid MPI-OpenMP solutions. C++ classes for sparse data types were developed and the report shows how these class can be used...

  9. Unravelling the nuclear matrix proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear matrix (NM) model posits the presence of a protein/RNA scaffold that spans the mammalian nucleus. The NM proteins are involved in basic nuclear function and are a promising source of protein biomarkers for cancer. Importantly, the NM proteome is operationally defined as the proteins...

  10. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  11. Hyper-systolic matrix multiplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippert, Th.; Petkov, N.; Palazzari, P.; Schilling, K.

    A novel parallel algorithm for matrix multiplication is presented. It is based on a 1-D hyper-systolic processor abstraction. The procedure can be implemented on all types of parallel systems. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights reserved.

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Myasthenia Gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helgeland, G.; Petzold, A.F.S.; Luckman, S.P.; Gilhus, N.E.; Plant, G.T.; Romi, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease with weakness in striated musculature due to anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies or muscle specific kinase at the neuromuscular junction. A subgroup of patients has periocular symptoms only; ocular MG (OMG). Matrix

  13. Concept for Energy Security Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisel, Einari; Hamburg, Arvi; Härm, Mihkel; Leppiman, Ando; Ots, Märt

    2016-01-01

    The following paper presents a discussion of short- and long-term energy security assessment methods and indicators. The aim of the current paper is to describe diversity of approaches to energy security, to structure energy security indicators used by different institutions and papers, and to discuss several indicators that also play important role in the design of energy policy of a state. Based on this analysis the paper presents a novel Energy Security Matrix that structures relevant energy security indicators from the aspects of Technical Resilience and Vulnerability, Economic Dependence and Political Affectability for electricity, heat and transport fuel sectors. Earlier publications by different authors have presented energy security assessment methodologies that use publicly available indicators from different databases. Current paper challenges viability of some of these indicators and introduces new indicators that would deliver stronger energy security policy assessments. Energy Security Matrix and its indicators are based on experiences that the authors have gathered as high-level energy policymakers in Estonia, where all different aspects of energy security can be observed. - Highlights: •Energy security should be analysed in technical, economic and political terms; •Energy Security Matrix provides a framework for energy security analyses; •Applicability of Matrix is limited due to the lack of statistical data and sensitivity of output.

  14. The COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    COMPADRE contains demographic information on hundreds of plant species. The data in COMPADRE are in the form of matrix population models and our goal is to make these publicly available to facilitate their use for research and teaching purposes. COMPADRE is an open-access database. We only request...

  15. A two-matrix alternative

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, 15 December (2013), s. 836-841 ISSN 1537-9582 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : two-matrix alternative * solution * algorithm Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2013 http://www.math.technion.ac.il/iic/ ela / ela -articles/articles/vol26_pp836-841.pdf

  16. Regularization in Matrix Relevance Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Petra; Bunte, Kerstin; Stiekema, Han; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas; Biehl, Michael

    A In this paper, we present a regularization technique to extend recently proposed matrix learning schemes in learning vector quantization (LVQ). These learning algorithms extend the concept of adaptive distance measures in LVQ to the use of relevance matrices. In general, metric learning can

  17. Electrostatic dry powder prepregging of carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throne, James L.; Sohn, Min-Seok

    1990-01-01

    Ultrafine, 5-10 micron polymer-matrix resin powders are directly applied to carbon fiber tows by passing then in an air or nitrogen stream through an electrostatic potential; the particles thus charged will strongly adhere to grounded carbon fibers, and can be subsequently fused to the fiber in a continuously-fed radiant oven. This electrostatic technique derived significant end-use mechanical property advantages from the obviation of solvents, binders, and other adulterants. Additional matrix resins used to produce prepregs to date have been PMR-15, Torlon 40000, and LaRC TPI.

  18. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, William Kirby [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  20. Effect of the type of radiation on the degradation behavior of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber cloth; matrix; epoxy or polyimide resin) were irradiated with neutrons and 60 Co γ-rays at room temperature or at 5 K. Three-point bend tests were then carried out at 77 K. Comparison of the neutron and γ-ray irradiation effects shows that the radiation sensitivity of the glass/epoxy and glass/polyimide composites is 1.8-2.6 times higher to neutrons than to γ-rays, indicating a higher sensitivity of the epoxy and polyimide matrix resins to recoil protons than to γ-rays. Absorbed dose calculations, on the other hand, show that the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition in polymer matrix composites is inhomogeneous for neutrons, although almost homogeneous for γ-rays. In addition, the neutron irradiation of boron-containing E-glass fiber composites produces additional radiation damage due to a 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the glass fibers, thus significantly enhancing a decrease in the composite strength. These facts indicate that as far as polymer matrix composites are concerned, the irradiation effects of neutrons will be rather difficult to simulate with different types of radiation such as protons and carbon ions from an ion accelerator. Thus, it may be prudent that such simulation irradiation be carried out mainly for pure resins to be used as matrix in polymer matrix composites. (author)

  1. Characterization on C/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites with Novel Fiber Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, J. Douglas; McCue, Terry; Verrilli, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are attractive candidate materials in the aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, low density and higher temperature capabilities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is pursuing the use of CMC components in advanced Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) propulsion applications. Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) is the primary material of interest for a variety of RLV propulsion applications. These composites offer high- strength carbon fibers and a high modulus, oxidation-resistant matrix. For comparison, two types of carbon fibers were processed with novel types of interface coatings (multilayer and pseudoporous). For RLV propulsion applications, environmental durability will be critical. The coatings show promise of protecting the carbon fibers from the oxidizing environment. The strengths and microstructures of these composite materials are presented.

  2. Omentin-1 prevents cartilage matrix destruction by regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Liu, Baoyi; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, BenJie; Liu, Yupeng; Zhang, Yao; Li, Borui; Tian, Fengde

    2017-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and pathological progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Omentin-1 is a newly identified anti-inflammatory adipokine. Little information regarding the protective effects of omentin-1 in OA has been reported before. In the current study, our results indicated that omentin-1 suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at both the mRNA and protein levels in human chondrocytes. Importantly, administration of omentin-1 abolished IL-1β-induced degradation of type II collagen (Col II) and aggrecan, the two major extracellular matrix components in articular cartilage, in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, omentin-1 ameliorated the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) by blocking the JAK-2/STAT3 pathway. Our results indicate that omentin-1 may have a potential chondroprotective therapeutic capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. q-Virasoro constraints in matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedelin, Anton [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca and INFN, sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala university,Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Zabzine, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala university,Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-03-20

    The Virasoro constraints play the important role in the study of matrix models and in understanding of the relation between matrix models and CFTs. Recently the localization calculations in supersymmetric gauge theories produced new families of matrix models and we have very limited knowledge about these matrix models. We concentrate on elliptic generalization of hermitian matrix model which corresponds to calculation of partition function on S{sup 3}×S{sup 1} for vector multiplet. We derive the q-Virasoro constraints for this matrix model. We also observe some interesting algebraic properties of the q-Virasoro algebra.

  4. Immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is discussed for the immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrices, which were obtained by radiation polymerization of hydrophilic monomers. In this method, the immobilized enzyme matrix was prepared by enzyme absorbtion in the porous polymer matrix and drying treatment. The enzyme activity of the immobilized enzyme matrix varied with monomer concentration, cooling rate of the monomer solution, and hydrophilicity of the polymer matrix, takinn the change of the nature of the porous structure in the polymer matrix. The leakage of the enzymes from the polymer matrix was not observed in the repeated batch enzyme reactions

  5. Carbonate aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  6. Minimal solution for inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikuie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The fuzzy matrix equations $Ailde{X}=ilde{Y}$ is called a singular fuzzy matrix equations while the coefficients matrix of its equivalent crisp matrix equations be a singular matrix. The singular fuzzy matrix equations are divided into two parts: consistent singular matrix equations and inconsistent fuzzy matrix equations. In this paper, the inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations is studied and the effect of generalized inverses in finding minimal solution of an inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations are investigated.

  7. The gravitational S-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the hypothesized existence of an S-matrix for gravity, and some of its expected general properties. We first discuss basic questions regarding existence of such a matrix, including those of infrared divergences and description of asymptotic states. Distinct scattering behavior occurs in the Born, eikonal, and strong gravity regimes, and we describe aspects of both the partial wave and momentum space amplitudes, and their analytic properties, from these regimes. Classically the strong gravity region would be dominated by formation of black holes, and we assume its unitary quantum dynamics is described by corresponding resonances. Masslessness limits some powerful methods and results that apply to massive theories, though a continuation path implying crossing symmetry plausibly still exists. Physical properties of gravity suggest nonpolynomial amplitudes, although crossing and causality constrain (with modest assumptions) this nonpolynomial behavior, particularly requiring a polynomial bound in c...

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases in lung biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parks William C

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite much information on their catalytic properties and gene regulation, we actually know very little of what matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs do in tissues. The catalytic activity of these enzymes has been implicated to function in normal lung biology by participating in branching morphogenesis, homeostasis, and repair, among other events. Overexpression of MMPs, however, has also been blamed for much of the tissue destruction associated with lung inflammation and disease. Beyond their role in the turnover and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins, MMPs also process, activate, and deactivate a variety of soluble factors, and seldom is it readily apparent by presence alone if a specific proteinase in an inflammatory setting is contributing to a reparative or disease process. An important goal of MMP research will be to identify the actual substrates upon which specific enzymes act. This information, in turn, will lead to a clearer understanding of how these extracellular proteinases function in lung development, repair, and disease.

  9. Structural properties of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, W; Fernandez-Catalan, C; Tschesche, H; Grams, F; Nagase, H; Maskos, K

    1999-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in extracellular matrix degradation. Their proteolytic activity must be precisely regulated by their endogenous protein inhibitors, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Disruption of this balance results in serious diseases such as arthritis, tumour growth and metastasis. Knowledge of the tertiary structures of the proteins involved is crucial for understanding their functional properties and interference with associated dysfunctions. Within the last few years, several three-dimensional MMP and MMP-TIMP structures became available, showing the domain organization, polypeptide fold and main specificity determinants. Complexes of the catalytic MMP domains with various synthetic inhibitors enabled the structure-based design and improvement of high-affinity ligands, which might be elaborated into drugs. A multitude of reviews surveying work done on all aspects of MMPs have appeared in recent years, but none of them has focused on the three-dimensional structures. This review was written to close the gap.

  10. Random matrix improved subspace clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Couillet, Romain

    2017-03-06

    This article introduces a spectral method for statistical subspace clustering. The method is built upon standard kernel spectral clustering techniques, however carefully tuned by theoretical understanding arising from random matrix findings. We show in particular that our method provides high clustering performance while standard kernel choices provably fail. An application to user grouping based on vector channel observations in the context of massive MIMO wireless communication networks is provided.

  11. Coherence matrix of plasmonic beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We consider monochromatic electromagnetic beams of surface plasmon-polaritons created at interfaces between dielectric media and metals. We theoretically study non-coherent superpositions of elementary surface waves and discuss their spectral degree of polarization, Stokes parameters, and the for...... of the spectral coherence matrix. We compare the polarization properties of the surface plasmonspolaritons as three-dimensional and two-dimensional fields concluding that the latter is superior....

  12. The Biblical Matrix of Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Grigore PIROŞCĂ; Angela ROGOJANU

    2012-01-01

    The rationale of this paper is a prime pattern of history of economic thought in the previous ages of classic ancient times of Greek and Roman civilizations using a methodological matrix able to capture the mainstream ideas from social, political and religious events within the pages of Bible. The economic perspective of these events follows the evolution of the seeds of economic thinking within the Fertile Crescent, focused on the Biblical patriarchic heroes’ actions, but a...

  13. Microstructure study of PAN-pitch-based carbon-carbon composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.J.; Chen, Z.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have been used to characterize the normal surface and flank surface microstructure of a two-dimensional polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based fiber reinforced mesophase pitch-based matrix carbon-carbon (C-C) composite. Optical and SEM results indicate that the mesophase pitch appears generally well bonded to the fibers, as well as internal pores and cracks exist in both interbundle and intrabundle regions. TEM shows that matrix platelets were highly parallel to the fiber axis. Numerous microcracks, parallel to the fiber axis, were formed along fiber-matrix interface and within the matrix. The selected-area diffraction (SAD) patterns show that a random orientation of basal planes in the transverse fiber of flank surface and the domain near the fiber surface exhibited a better alignment

  14. The Euclid Statistical Matrix Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Tilves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stataphobia, a term used to describe the fear of statistics and research methods, can result from a lack of improper training in statistical methods. Poor statistical methods training can have an effect on health policy decision making and may play a role in the low research productivity seen in developing countries. One way to reduce Stataphobia is to intervene in the teaching of statistics in the classroom; however, such an intervention must tackle several obstacles, including student interest in the material, multiple ways of learning materials, and language barriers. We present here the Euclid Statistical Matrix, a tool for combatting Stataphobia on a global scale. This free tool is comprised of popular statistical YouTube channels and web sources that teach and demonstrate statistical concepts in a variety of presentation methods. Working with international teams in Iran, Japan, Egypt, Russia, and the United States, we have also developed the Statistical Matrix in multiple languages to address language barriers to learning statistics. By utilizing already-established large networks, we are able to disseminate our tool to thousands of Farsi-speaking university faculty and students in Iran and the United States. Future dissemination of the Euclid Statistical Matrix throughout the Central Asia and support from local universities may help to combat low research productivity in this region.

  15. High performance passive matrix electrochromic display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    A matrix addressable electrochromic display (ECD) based on solid polymer electrolyte screen-printed on the surface of nano structured WO 3 +0.1TiO 2 electrodes, in which all pixels were insulted by negative photoresist material has been developed. Five types of nano structured films produced by a sol-gel method were investigated to enhance the electrochemical, optical, and mechanical properties of electrochromic tungsten oxide films. The film based on WO 3-x +0.1TiO 2-y sol-gel solution mixed with 32 mol.% oxalic acid was found to be stable and has excellent characteristics in coloring/bleaching kinetics. The ECD used nano structured electrochromic tungsten trioxide layer protected by SiO 2 -CeO 2 -Li 2 O thin film solid electrolyte, screen-printed solid polymer electrolyte mixed with white TiO 2 pigment (P25), and metallic counter electrode covered with carbon layer, has exhibited fast switching, excellent memory effect and substantially free from image diffusion and cross talk effects. (author)

  16. Forest Carbon Sequestration Subsidy and Carbon Tax as Part of China’s Forestry Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Forestry is an effective strategy for climate change mitigation. However, forestry activities not only sequester carbon but also release CO2. It is therefore important to formulate carbon subsidy and carbon taxation policies on the basis of the price of carbon. In this study, a forestry-based Computable General Equilibrium (CGE model was built by using input-output data of China in 2014 to construct a Social Accounting Matrix (SAM. The model simulates different carbon price scenarios and was used to explore the effects of carbon subsidy and carbon taxation policies on the forestry economy. The main results can be summarized as follows: When the carbon price is low, the implementation of the policy increases forestry output and causes forest product prices to rise. When the carbon price is high, the carbon tax will produce an inhibitory effect, and output and prices will decline. With the constant rise of the carbon price, value addition will decrease, with flow to other industries. For the carbon sequestration policy, there is a reasonable carbon price range bound. In light of these results, relevant policies are proposed.

  17. HTGR fuel rods: carbon-carbon composites designed for high weight and low strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of the process for fabricating fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) by injection and carbonization of a thermoplastic matrix that bonds close-packed beds of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles together is reviewed for the fresh-fuel cycle, and a variant process involving a thermosetting matrix that would allow free-standing carbonization of refabricated fuel is discussed. Previous attempts to fabricate such injection-bonded fuel rods from undiluted thermosetting binders filled with powdered graphite were unsuccessful, because of damage to coatings on fuel particles that resulted from strong particle-to-matrix bonding in conjunction with large matrix shrinkage on carbonization and subsequent irradiation. These problems have now been overcome through the use of a diluted thermosetting matrix with a low-char-yield additive (fugitive), which produces a more porous char similar to that from the pitch-based thermoplastic used in fabrication of fresh fuel. A 1-to-1 dilution of resin with fugitive produced the optimum binder for injection and carbonization, where the fired matrix in such rods contained about 20 wt% binder char and 80 wt% powdered graphite. Thermosetting fuel rods diluted with various amounts of fugitive to give binder chars that range from 12 to 48 wt% of the fired matrix have been subjected to irradiation screening tests, and rods with no more than 32 wt% binder char appear to perform about as well under irradiation as do pitch-based rods. However, particle damage does begin to occur in those lightly diluted rods in which the less-stable binder char constitutes more than 32 wt% of the fired matrix. (author)

  18. Redesigning Triangular Dense Matrix Computations on GPUs

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali; Ltaief, Hatem; Keyes, David E.

    2016-01-01

    A new implementation of the triangular matrix-matrix multiplication (TRMM) and the triangular solve (TRSM) kernels are described on GPU hardware accelerators. Although part of the Level 3 BLAS family, these highly computationally intensive kernels

  19. Transfer-matrix approach for modulated structures with defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyrko, T.

    2000-01-01

    We consider scattering of electrons by defects in a periodically modulated, quasi-one-dimensional structure, within a tight-binding model. Combining a transfer matrix method and a Green function method we derive a formula for a Landauer conductance and show its equivalence to the result of Kubo linear response theory. We obtain explicitly unperturbed lattice Green functions from their equations of motion, using the transfer matrices. We apply the presented formalism in computations of the conductance of several multiband modulated structures with defects: (a) carbon nanotubes (b) two-dimensional (2D) superlattice (c) modulated leads with 1D wire in the tunneling regime. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  20. Nano-scaled carbon fillers and their functional polymer composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes Ghislandi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The manufacturing of low density conductive plastics, that could replace metals in many applications, is a challenging target that has been pursued by several technological segments. The incorporation of carbon nanofillers, namely carbon nanotubes and graphene, into a polymer matrix is a recent and

  1. Morphological and compositional engineering of Ni/carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ni/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite films were deposited on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a Ni plating bath containing homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersion additive. Incorporation of MWCNTs into Ni matrix was greatly enhanced by the application ...

  2. Matrix polyelectrolyte capsules based on polysaccharide/MnCO₃ hybrid microparticle templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingrong; Ai, Hua; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-06-15

    An efficient strategy for biomacromolecule encapsulation based on spontaneous deposition into polysaccharide matrix-containing capsules is introduced in this study. First, hybrid microparticles composed of manganese carbonate and ionic polysaccharides including sodium hyaluronate (HA), sodium alginate (SA) and dextran sulfate sodium (DS) with narrow size distribution were synthesized to provide monodisperse templates. Incorporation of polysaccharide into the hybrid templates was successful as verified by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Matrix polyelectrolyte microcapsules were fabricated through layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes (PEs) onto the hybrid particles, followed by removal of the inorganic part of the cores, leaving polysaccharide matrix inside the capsules. The loading and release properties of the matrix microcapsules were investigated using myoglobin as a model biomacromolecule. Compared to matrix-free capsules, the matrix capsules had a much higher loading capacity up to four times; the driving force is mostly due to electrostatic interactions between myoglobin and the polysaccharide matrix. From our observations, for the same kind of polysaccharide, a higher amount of polysaccharide inside the capsules usually led to better loading capacity. The release behavior of the loaded myoglobin could be readily controlled by altering the environmental pH. These matrix microcapsules may be used as efficient delivery systems for various charged water-soluble macromolecules with applications in biomedical fields. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analytic matrix elements with shifted correlated Gaussians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.......Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics....

  4. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong.

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: 'quenched' matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our 'quenched' matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints

  5. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  6. Carbon-On-Carbon Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Buchanan, Larry (Inventor); Banzon, Jr., Jose T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The presently disclosed technology relates to carbon-on-carbon (C/C) manufacturing techniques and the resulting C/C products. One aspect of the manufacturing techniques disclosed herein utilizes two distinct curing operations that occur at different times and/or using different temperatures. The resulting C/C products are substantially non-porous, even though the curing operation(s) substantially gasify a liquid carbon-entrained filler material that saturates a carbon fabric that makes up the C/C products.

  7. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and ...

  8. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  9. Confocal microscopy imaging of the biofilm matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens...... the concentration of solutes and the diffusive properties of the biofilm matrix....

  10. Matrix algebra for higher order moments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A large part of statistics is devoted to the estimation of models from the sample covariance matrix. The development of the statistical theory and estimators has been greatly facilitated by the introduction of special matrices, such as the commutation matrix and the duplication matrix, and the

  11. MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Lund, Ole

    1999-01-01

    MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints. Sub-title Abstract Summary : MatrixPlot is a program for making high-quality matrix plots, such as mutual information plots of sequence alignments and distance matrices of sequences with known three-dimensional coordinates. The user can add information...

  12. Ellipsoids and matrix-valued valuations

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Monika

    2003-01-01

    We obtain a classification of Borel measurable, GL(n) covariant, symmetric-matrix-valued valuations on the space of n-dimensional convex polytopes. The only ones turn out to be the moment matrix corresponding to the classical Legendre ellipsoid and the matrix corresponding to the ellipsoid recently discovered by E. Lutwak, D. Yang, and G. Zhang.

  13. Construction of covariance matrix for experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tingjin; Zhang Jianhua

    1992-01-01

    For evaluators and experimenters, the information is complete only in the case when the covariance matrix is given. The covariance matrix of the indirectly measured data has been constructed and discussed. As an example, the covariance matrix of 23 Na(n, 2n) cross section is constructed. A reasonable result is obtained

  14. Matrix modification with silver for the electrothermal atomization of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    Silver as a matrix modifier is shown to improve the carbon-rod atomization of both arsenic and selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to nickel, the efficiency of silver is greater for arsenic and about the same for selenium. Silver fulfils two functions in its reaction, namely stabilization during the ashing stage and enhancement of absorbance in the final atomization. ?? 1981.

  15. Defects in Ceramic Matrix Composites and Their Impact on Elastic Properties (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    SiC (CG Nicalon™) fiber, coated with boron nitride, in a matrix of sil- icon , nitrogen and carbon manufactured by multiple itera- tions of a polymer...For the dry fibers defect, Eq. (1) for E1d is modified to include the effect of the stress-discontinuity in the fibers direction utilizing a5

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium from tissue paper matrix using organic extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, A.S.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Direct extraction of dried uranyl nitrate from tissue paper matrix was carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol solutions of extractants such as tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and di-n-hexyl octanamide (DHOA)). The effects of temperature, pressure, extractant and nitric acid concentration on the extraction of uranyl ion were investigated. (author)

  17. High performance carbon–carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection ... advanced composites for a wide range of applications. The majority of products still ... CVD is a very slow process and it takes months together to get dense carbon–carbon composites. Porous structures ...

  18. Standard test method for translaminar fracture toughness of laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of translaminar fracture toughness, KTL, for laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials of various ply orientations using test results from monotonically loaded notched specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to room temperature laboratory air environments. 1.3 Composite materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by type of polymer matrix or fiber, provided that the specimen sizes and the test results meet the requirements of this test method. This test method was developed primarily from test results of various carbon fiber – epoxy matrix laminates and from additional results of glass fiber – epoxy matrix, glass fiber-polyester matrix pultrusions and carbon fiber – bismaleimide matrix laminates (1-4, 6, 7). 1.4 A range of eccentrically loaded, single-edge-notch tension, ESE(T), specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but planar size may be variable and adjusted, with asso...

  19. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  20. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  1. The COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gomez, Roberto; Jones, Owen; Archer, C. Ruth

    2015-01-01

    growth or decline, such data furthermore help us understand how different biomes shape plant ecology, how plant populations and communities respond to global change, and how to develop successful management tools for endangered or invasive species. 2. Matrix population models summarize the life cycle......1. Schedules of survival, growth and reproduction are key life history traits. Data on how these traits vary among species and populations are fundamental to our understanding of the ecological conditions that have shaped plant evolution. Because these demographic schedules determine population...

  2. Hexagonal response matrix using symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Y.

    1991-01-01

    A response matrix for use in core calculations for nuclear reactors with hexagonal fuel assemblies is presented. It is based on the incoming currents averaged over the half-surface of a hexagonal node by applying symmetry theory. The boundary conditions of the incoming currents on the half-surface of the node are expressed by a complete set of orthogonal vectors which are constructed from symmetrized functions. The expansion coefficients of the functions are determined by the boundary conditions of incoming currents. (author)

  3. Distributively generated matrix near rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.J.

    1993-04-01

    It is known that if R is a near ring with identity then (I,+) is abelian if (I + ,+) is abelian and (I,+) is abelian if (I*,+) is abelian [S.J. Abbasi, J.D.P. Meldrum, 1991]. This paper extends these results. We show that if R is a distributively generated near ring with identity then (I,+) is included in Z(R), the center of R, if (I + ,+) is included in Z(M n (R)), the center of matrix near ring M n (R). Furthermore (I,+) is included in Z(R) if (I*,+) is included in Z(M n (R)). (author). 5 refs

  4. Geometric phase from dielectric matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    2005-10-01

    The dielectric property of the anisotropic optical medium is found by considering the polarized photon as two component spinor of spherical harmonics. The Geometric Phase of a polarized photon has been evaluated in two ways: the phase two-form of the dielectric matrix through a twist and the Pancharatnam phase (GP) by changing the angular momentum of the incident polarized photon over a closed triangular path on the extended Poincare sphere. The helicity in connection with the spin angular momentum of the chiral photon plays the key role in developing these phase holonomies. (author)

  5. Matrix regularization of 4-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2012-01-01

    We consider products of two 2-manifolds such as S^2 x S^2, embedded in Euclidean space and show that the corresponding 4-volume preserving diffeomorphism algebra can be approximated by a tensor product SU(N)xSU(N) i.e. functions on a manifold are approximated by the Kronecker product of two SU(N) matrices. A regularization of the 4-sphere is also performed by constructing N^2 x N^2 matrix representations of the 4-algebra (and as a byproduct of the 3-algebra which makes the regularization of S...

  6. Random Matrix Theory and Econophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Bernd

    2000-03-01

    Random Matrix Theory (RMT) [1] is used in many branches of physics as a ``zero information hypothesis''. It describes generic behavior of different classes of systems, while deviations from its universal predictions allow to identify system specific properties. We use methods of RMT to analyze the cross-correlation matrix C of stock price changes [2] of the largest 1000 US companies. In addition to its scientific interest, the study of correlations between the returns of different stocks is also of practical relevance in quantifying the risk of a given stock portfolio. We find [3,4] that the statistics of most of the eigenvalues of the spectrum of C agree with the predictions of RMT, while there are deviations for some of the largest eigenvalues. We interpret these deviations as a system specific property, e.g. containing genuine information about correlations in the stock market. We demonstrate that C shares universal properties with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. Furthermore, we analyze the eigenvectors of C through their inverse participation ratio and find eigenvectors with large ratios at both edges of the eigenvalue spectrum - a situation reminiscent of localization theory results. This work was done in collaboration with V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E Stanley and is related to recent work of Laloux et al.. 1. T. Guhr, A. Müller Groeling, and H.A. Weidenmüller, ``Random Matrix Theories in Quantum Physics: Common Concepts'', Phys. Rep. 299, 190 (1998). 2. See, e.g. R.N. Mantegna and H.E. Stanley, Econophysics: Correlations and Complexity in Finance (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1999). 3. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Universal and Nonuniversal Properties of Cross Correlations in Financial Time Series'', Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1471 (1999). 4. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Random Matrix Theory

  7. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  8. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  9. Fungal nanoscale metal carbonates and production of electrochemical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianwei; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2017-09-01

    Fungal biomineralization of carbonates results in metal removal from solution or immobilization within a solid matrix. Such a system provides a promising method for removal of toxic or valuable metals from solution, such as Co, Ni, and La, with some carbonates being of nanoscale dimensions. A fungal Mn carbonate biomineralization process can be applied for the synthesis of novel electrochemical materials. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinek, Marek [Warszawa, PL; Kostecki, Robert [Lafayette, CA

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Integrins and extracellular matrix in mechanotransduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramage L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay RamageQueen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UKAbstract: Integrins are a family of cell surface receptors which mediate cell–matrix and cell–cell adhesions. Among other functions they provide an important mechanical link between the cells external and intracellular environments while the adhesions that they form also have critical roles in cellular signal-transduction. Cell–matrix contacts occur at zones in the cell surface where adhesion receptors cluster and when activated the receptors bind to ligands in the extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix surrounds the cells of tissues and forms the structural support of tissue which is particularly important in connective tissues. Cells attach to the extracellular matrix through specific cell-surface receptors and molecules including integrins and transmembrane proteoglycans. Integrins work alongside other proteins such as cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules, selectins, and syndecans to mediate cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions and communication. Activation of adhesion receptors triggers the formation of matrix contacts in which bound matrix components, adhesion receptors, and associated intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling molecules form large functional, localized multiprotein complexes. Cell–matrix contacts are important in a variety of different cell and tissue properties including embryonic development, inflammatory responses, wound healing, and adult tissue homeostasis. This review summarizes the roles and functions of integrins and extracellular matrix proteins in mechanotransduction.Keywords: ligand binding, α subunit, ß subunit, focal adhesion, cell differentiation, mechanical loading, cell–matrix interaction

  12. Form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambui Mutoru, J.; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Irreversible thermodynamics establishes form of multicomponent diffusion coefficients. → Phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors affect sign of diffusion coefficients. → Negative diagonal elements of diffusion coefficients matrix can occur in non-ideal mixtures. → Eigenvalues of the matrix of Fickian diffusion coefficients may not be all real. - Abstract: The form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix in thermodynamically stable mixtures is established based on the form of phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors. While phenomenological coefficients form a symmetric positive definite matrix, the determinant of thermodynamic factors matrix is positive. As a result, the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix has a positive determinant, but its elements - including diagonal elements - can be negative. Comprehensive survey of reported diffusion coefficients data for ternary and quaternary mixtures, confirms that invariably the determinant of the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix is positive.

  13. Charge Resolution of the Silicon Matrix of the ATIC Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepin, V. I.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; hide

    2002-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CRT particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2001. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. The silicon matrix of the ATIC spectrometer is designed to resolve individual elements from proton to iron. To provide this resolution careful calibration of each pixel of the silicon matrix is required. Firstly, for each electronic channel of the matrix the pedestal value was subtracted taking into account its drift during the flight. The muon calibration made before the flight was used then to convert electric signals (in ADC channel number) to energy deposits in each pixel. However, the preflight muon calibration was not accurate enough for the purpose, because of lack of statistics in each pixel. To improve charge resolution the correction was done for the position of Helium peak in each pixel during the flight . The other way to set electric signals in electronics channels of the Si-matrix to one scale was correction for electric channel gains accurately measured in laboratory. In these measurements it was found that small different nonlinearities for different channels are present in the region of charge Z > 20. The correction for these non-linearities was not done yet. In linear approximation the method provides practically the same resolution as muon calibration plus He-peak correction. For searching a pixel with the signal of primary particle an indication from the cascade in the calorimeter was used. For this purpose a trajectory was reconstructed using weight centers of energy deposits in BGO layers. The point of intersection

  14. Carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The document identifies the main sources of carbon monoxide (CO) in the general outdoor atmosphere, describes methods of measuring and monitoring its concentration levels in the United Kingdom, and discusses the effects of carbon monoxide on human health. Following its review, the Panel has put forward a recommendation for an air quality standard for carbon monoxide in the United Kingdom of 10 ppm, measured as a running 8-hour average. The document includes tables and graphs of emissions of CO, in total and by emission source, and on the increase in blood levels of carboxyhaemoglobin with continuing exposure to CO. 11 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Interpolation of rational matrix functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Joseph A; Rodman, Leiba

    1990-01-01

    This book aims to present the theory of interpolation for rational matrix functions as a recently matured independent mathematical subject with its own problems, methods and applications. The authors decided to start working on this book during the regional CBMS conference in Lincoln, Nebraska organized by F. Gilfeather and D. Larson. The principal lecturer, J. William Helton, presented ten lectures on operator and systems theory and the interplay between them. The conference was very stimulating and helped us to decide that the time was ripe for a book on interpolation for matrix valued functions (both rational and non-rational). When the work started and the first partial draft of the book was ready it became clear that the topic is vast and that the rational case by itself with its applications is already enough material for an interesting book. In the process of writing the book, methods for the rational case were developed and refined. As a result we are now able to present the rational case as an indepe...

  16. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Gary T [Austin, TX; Oyenekan, Babatunde A [Katy, TX

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  17. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  18. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  19. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Kawasaki, Akira; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al 4 C 3 . Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al 4 C 3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials. (paper)

  20. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.