WorldWideScience

Sample records for dense ion populations

  1. Ion Beam Driven Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.

    2008-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a 1-mm beam spot size, and 2-ns pulse length. As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense ion beams can deliver precise and uniform beam energy deposition, in a relatively large sample size, and can heat any solid-phase target material. The range of the beams in solid targets is less than 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using reduced density porous targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial experiments will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  2. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T., E-mail: ma8@llnl.gov; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Turnbull, D.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L.; Galtier, E.; Hastings, J.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Chapman, D. A. [Plasma Physics Group, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Falcone, R. W. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fortmann, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; White, T. G. [University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Vorberger, J. [Max Planck Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nötthnizer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); and others

    2014-05-15

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ∼3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4Å{sup −1}. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  3. Measurement of Electron-Ion Relaxation in Warm Dense Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. Data are compared with various theoretical models.

  4. Ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.

    2010-08-01

    As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition to a relatively large sample. The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating and diagnosing warm dense matter (WDM) targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and a suite of target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher temperature and pressure in the WDM targets. Future experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  5. Magnetoacoustic solitons in dense astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated by using three fluid quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The quantum mechanical effects of electrons and positrons are taken into account due to their Fermionic nature (to obey Fermi statistics) and quantum diffraction effects (Bohm diffusion term) in the model. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for low amplitude magnetoacoustic soliton in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is found that positron concentration has significant impact on the phase velocity of magnetoacoustic wave and on the formation of single pulse nonlinear structure. The numerical results are also illustrated by taking into account the plasma parameters of the outside layers of white dwarfs and neutron stars/pulsars.

  6. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  7. Ion structure in dense plasmas: MSA versus HNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, K; Vorberger, J; Gericke, D O [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.wuensch@warwick.ac.uk

    2009-05-29

    We present results for the ionic structure in dense, moderately to strongly coupled plasmas using two models: the mean spherical approximation (MSA) and the hypernetted chain (HNC) approach. While the first method allows for an analytical solution, the latter has to be solved iteratively. Independent of the coupling strength, the results show only small differences when the ions are considered to form an unscreened one-component plasma (OCP) system. If the electrons are treated as a polarizable background, the different ways to incorporate the screening yield, however, large discrepancies between the models, particularly for more strongly coupled plasmas.

  8. Ion-ion correlation effects in opacities of ultra-dense and hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauvan, P.; Minguez, E. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales U.P.M., Jose Gutierrez Abascal, Madrid (Spain); Angelo, P.; Derfoul, H.; Ceccotti, T.; Poquerusse, A.; Gharbi, I.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E. [Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, Universite Paris 6, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2000-07-01

    The present work is devoted to the study of opacities for ultra-dense, hot, low Z (Z{<=}15) plasmas. The required photo-excitation and photo-ionisation cross sections are determined by the JIMENA code which allows the postprocessing of atomic data (dipole transition moments and line profiles) taking care of ion-ion correlations. These atomic data are computed with the radiative property code IDEFIX. The strong ion-ion correlation effects predicted by the simulations reinforce the impact of the experiment designed for this purpose. (authors)

  9. Warm Dense Matter Experiments Driven by Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.

    2009-11-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. We present results from warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at NDCX-I. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K^+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to a spot size ˜ 1 mm, and compressed pulse length ˜ 2 ns. The uncompressed beam flux is >=500 kW/cm^2, and the compressed pulse flux is > 5 MW/cm^2. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. Future plans include construction of the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-4 MeV lithium ion beam. We have developed a target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, and high-speed gated cameras. We compare measurements of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters with model predictions. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher flux on target.

  10. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  11. Animal reservoirs for visceral leishmaniasis in densely populated urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Soraia A; Silva, Fabiana L; Carvalho Neta, Alcina C; Bueno, Regina; Guerra, Rita M S N C; Abreu-Silva, Ana L; Santos, Renato L

    2008-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease of major public health and veterinary importance, affecting 88 countries with up to 2 million cases per year. This review emphasizes the animal reservoirs and spreading of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in urban areas, particularly in two Brazilian metropolitan areas, namely São Luis and Belo Horizonte, where the disease has become endemic in the past few years. Urbanization of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil during the last decades has created favorable epidemiological conditions for maintenance of the disease, with dense human populations sharing a tropical environment with abundant populations of the mammalian reservoir and the invertebrate vector, facilitating transmission of the disease.

  12. Inference of population structure using dense haplotype data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel John Lawson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of genome-wide dense variation data provides an opportunity to investigate ancestry in unprecedented detail, but presents new statistical challenges. We propose a novel inference framework that aims to efficiently capture information on population structure provided by patterns of haplotype similarity. Each individual in a sample is considered in turn as a recipient, whose chromosomes are reconstructed using chunks of DNA donated by the other individuals. Results of this "chromosome painting" can be summarized as a "coancestry matrix," which directly reveals key information about ancestral relationships among individuals. If markers are viewed as independent, we show that this matrix almost completely captures the information used by both standard Principal Components Analysis (PCA and model-based approaches such as STRUCTURE in a unified manner. Furthermore, when markers are in linkage disequilibrium, the matrix combines information across successive markers to increase the ability to discern fine-scale population structure using PCA. In parallel, we have developed an efficient model-based approach to identify discrete populations using this matrix, which offers advantages over PCA in terms of interpretability and over existing clustering algorithms in terms of speed, number of separable populations, and sensitivity to subtle population structure. We analyse Human Genome Diversity Panel data for 938 individuals and 641,000 markers, and we identify 226 populations reflecting differences on continental, regional, local, and family scales. We present multiple lines of evidence that, while many methods capture similar information among strongly differentiated groups, more subtle population structure in human populations is consistently present at a much finer level than currently available geographic labels and is only captured by the haplotype-based approach. The software used for this article, ChromoPainter and fineSTRUCTURE, is

  13. X-ray emission of exotic ions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Dachicourt, R.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2017-03-01

    Hollow ion X-ray emission has been observed in experiments studying interaction of heavy ion beams with solids and their occurrence has been ascribed to charge exchange processes occurring when highly charged ions interact with a metal surface. In high temperature high-density plasmas, like, e.g., high intensity laser produced plasmas or high current Z-pinches, numerous researchers have reported about "exotic" X-ray transitions of hollow ions: K0LX →K1LX-1+hνhollow. Although atomic structure calculations seem to confirm that measured line positions correspond to transitions in hollow ions, line identification is difficult and the observed high intensity remains a mystery (by orders of magnitude) up to present days.

  14. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Z.

    2016-06-01

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  15. A strong diffusive ion mode in dense ionized matter predicted by Langevin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabey, P; Richardson, S; White, T G; Fletcher, L B; Glenzer, S H; Hartley, N J; Vorberger, J; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G

    2017-01-30

    The state and evolution of planets, brown dwarfs and neutron star crusts is determined by the properties of dense and compressed matter. Due to the inherent difficulties in modelling strongly coupled plasmas, however, current predictions of transport coefficients differ by orders of magnitude. Collective modes are a prominent feature, whose spectra may serve as an important tool to validate theoretical predictions for dense matter. With recent advances in free electron laser technology, X-rays with small enough bandwidth have become available, allowing the investigation of the low-frequency ion modes in dense matter. Here, we present numerical predictions for these ion modes and demonstrate significant changes to their strength and dispersion if dissipative processes are included by Langevin dynamics. Notably, a strong diffusive mode around zero frequency arises, which is not present, or much weaker, in standard simulations. Our results have profound consequences in the interpretation of transport coefficients in dense plasmas.

  16. Sound Wave in Hot Dense Matter Created in Heavy Ion Collision

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, X.; Yang, Z.

    2005-01-01

    A model to study the sound wave in hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions by jet is proposed.The preliminary data of jet shape analysis of PHENIX Collaboration for all centralities and two directions is well explained in this model. Then the wavelength of the sound wave, the natural frequency of the hot dense matter and the speed of sound wave are estimated from the fit.

  17. Charge exchange between two nearest neighbour ions immersed in a dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvan, P.; Angelo, P.; Derfoul, H.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Devdariani, A.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    1999-04-01

    In dense plasmas the quasimolecular model is relevant to describe the radiative properties: two nearest neighbor ions remain close to each other during a time scale of the order of the emission time. Within the frame of a quasistatic approach it has been shown that hydrogen-like spectral line shapes can exhibit satellite-like features. In this work we present the effect on the line shapes of the dynamical collision between the two ions exchanging transiently their bound electron. This model is suitable for the description of the core, the wings and the red satellite-like features. It is post-processed to the self consistent code (IDEFIX) giving the adiabatic transition energies and the oscillator strengths for the transient molecule immersed in a dense free electron bath. It is shown that the positions of the satellites are insensitive to the dynamics of the ion-ion collision. Results for fluorine Lyβ are presented.

  18. Ionization Energies of Ions in Hot and Dense Plasma: Beryllium-Like Ions for Z = 26 - 36

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-Qiang; WU Jian-Hua; YUAN Jian-Min

    2008-01-01

    Ionization energies of beryllium-like ions for Z = 26 - 36 in hot and dense plasmas (ne = 1022 - 1024 cm-3,kT = 500- 2000 eV) are obtained by using an approach developed for electronic structure and transition property of ions in hot and dense plasmas based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock model.Influence of the plasma environment is considered by introducing a correction to the one-electron potential to account for the screening of the ionized electrons. This correction is calculated from the ionized electron micro-space distribution, which is obtained based on an average atom model for the temperature and density-dependent average ionization of atoms in plasmas. Comparison between the present and the ion sphere models is made to display the significance of the ionized electron micro-space distribution.

  19. The ion potential in warm dense matter: wake effects due to streaming degenerate electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazano, Tlekkabul

    2014-01-01

    The effective dynamically screened potential of a classical ion in a stationary flowing quantum plasma at finite temperature is investigated. This is a key quantity for thermodynamics and transport of dense plasmas in the warm dense matter regime. To compute this potential a linear response description of the electrons via the Mermin dielectric function is utilized with electron-electron collisions taken into account via a relaxation time approximation. The ion potential strongly deviates from the static Yukawa potential exhibiting the familiar oscillatory structure with attractive minima (wake potential). This potential is analyzed in detail for high-density plasmas with values of the Brueckner parameter in the range $0.1 \\le r_s \\le 1$, for a broad range of plasma temperature and electron streaming velocity. It is shown that wake effects become weaker with increasing temperature of the electrons. Finally, we obtain the minimal electron streaming velocity for which attraction between ions occurs. This veloci...

  20. Numerical study of ion acoustic shock waves in dense quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanif, M.; Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ali, S.; Mukhtar, Q., E-mail: qaisarm@ncp.edu.pk [National Center for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15

    Two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of ion acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized dense quantum plasma, whose constituents are the electrons and ions. For this purpose, we employ the standard finite difference Lax Wendroff and relaxation methods, to examine the quantum effects on the profiles of shock potential, the electron/ion number densities, and velocity even for quantum parameter at H = 2. The effects of the latter vanish in a weakly non-linear limit while obeying the KdV theory. It is shown that the evolution of the wave depends sensitively on the plasma density and the quantum parameter. Numerical results reveal that the kinks or oscillations are pronounced for large values of quantum parameter, especially at H = 2. Our results should be important to understand the shock wave excitations in dense quantum plasmas, white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  1. A thin column of dense plasma for space-charge neutralization of intense ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Greenway, W.; Sefkow, A. B.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    Typical ion driven warm dense matter experiment requires a plasma density of 10^14/cm^3 to meet the challenge of np>nb, where np, and nb are the number densities of plasma and beam, respectively. Plasma electrons neutralize the space charge of an ion beam to allow a small spot of about 1-mm radius. In order to provide np>nb for initial warm, dense matter experiments, four cathodic arc plasma sources have been fabricated, and the aluminum plasma is focused in a focusing solenoid (8T field). A plasma probe with 37 collectors was developed to measure the radial plasma profile inside the solenoid. Results show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter ˜7mm along the solenoid axis. The magnetic mirror effect, plasma condensation, and the deformation of the magnetic field due to eddy currents are under investigation. Data on plasma parameters and ion beam neutralization will be presented.

  2. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in a degenerate dense plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Masud; A A Mamun

    2013-07-01

    Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) waves in a degenerate dense plasma (with all the constituents being degenerate, for both the non-relativistic or ultrarelativistic cases) have been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. The linear dispersion relation and Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation have been derived, and the numerical solutions of KdV equation have been analysed to identify the basic features of electrostatic solitary structures that may form in such a degenerate dense plasma. The implications of our results in compact astrophysical objects, particularly, in white dwarfs and neutron stars, have been briefly discussed.

  3. Ion potential in warm dense matter: wake effects due to streaming degenerate electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-02-01

    The effective dynamically screened potential of a classical ion in a stationary flowing quantum plasma at finite temperature is investigated. This is a key quantity for thermodynamics and transport of dense plasmas in the warm-dense-matter regime. This potential has been studied before within hydrodynamic approaches or based on the zero temperature Lindhard dielectric function. Here we extend the kinetic analysis by including the effects of finite temperature and of collisions based on the Mermin dielectric function. The resulting ion potential exhibits an oscillatory structure with attractive minima (wakes) and, thus, strongly deviates from the static Yukawa potential of equilibrium plasmas. This potential is analyzed in detail for high-density plasmas with values of the Brueckner parameter in the range 0.1≤r(s)≤1 for a broad range of plasma temperature and electron streaming velocity. It is shown that wake effects become weaker with increasing temperature of the electrons. Finally, we obtain the minimal electron streaming velocity for which attraction between ions occurs. This velocity turns out to be less than the electron Fermi velocity. Our results allow for reliable predictions of the strength of wake effects in nonequilibrium quantum plasmas with fast streaming electrons showing that these effects are crucial for transport under warm-dense-matter conditions, in particular for laser-matter interaction, electron-ion temperature equilibration, and stopping power.

  4. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, S M; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Chen, M; Yu, L L; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 1022 W/cm2. The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition ...

  5. A dense transparent polymeric single ion conductor for lithium ion batteries with remarkable long-term stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiyun; Chen, Yazhou; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zeng, Danli; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2016-12-01

    We report an outstanding electrochemical performance of a gel type lithium ion battery with long cycle life enabled by a dense transparent polymeric single ion conductor. The polymer electrolyte was synthesized by a side chain grafting method with 4-amino-4'-trifluoromethyl bis(benzene sulfonyl)imide grafted on side chains of poly(ethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) with a grafting ratio of 50%. Blending lithiated iononmers with poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) via a solution cast method results in a dense transparent film. The fabricated blend polymer electrolyte film has an ionic conductivity of 0.104 mS cm-1 at room temperature, a tensile strength of 15.5 MPa and percent elongation at break of 5%. A gel type single ion conductive polymeric lithium ion battery was assembled using the blend film as the separator as well as the electrolyte, LiFePO4/C mixed with ionomers as the cathode and a lithium foil as the anode. The battery delivers a reversible discharge capacity of 100 mAh g-1 at 1 C under room temperature for 1000 cycles without obvious decay. The stable cyclic imide and comb-like structure of the polymer is largely responsible for the excellent battery performance. The side chain grafted single ion conducting polymer electrolyte is well suited for large-scale production.

  6. going children in a densely populated township in Lilongwe, Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    beverages is implicated among the factors that fuel childhood obesity. Despite the growing ... help in guiding interventions and public health nutrition policies. Aim. We aimed to ... consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SBs), such as carbonated ..... of population-based prevention of childhood obesity. A set of tools for.

  7. Coping with Climate Change in A densely Populated Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzema, H.P.; Loon-Steensma, Van J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The expected effects of climate change and economic and population growth have motivated the Netherlands government to reformulate its policies on flood protection and water management. Flood protection and drainage are needed to make this low-lying country habitable and suitable for agriculture and

  8. Accelerator and Ion Beam Tradeoffs for Studies of Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Barnard, John J; Callahan, Debra; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Olson, Craig; Rose, David; Santhanam, Parthiban; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    One approach to heat a target to "Warm Dense Matter" conditions (similar, for example, to the interiors of giant planets or certain stages in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets), is to use intense ion beams as the heating source. By consideration of ion beam phase space constraints, both at the injector, and at the final focus, and consideration of simple equations of state, approximate conditions at a target foil may be calculated. Thus target temperature and pressure may be calculated as a function of ion mass, ion energy, pulse duration, velocity tilt, and other accelerator parameters. We examine the variation in target performance as a function of various beam and accelerator parameters, in the context of several different accelerator concepts, recently proposed for WDM studies.

  9. Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a dense relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shamy, E. F.

    2015-03-01

    The complex pattern and propagation characteristics of nonlinear periodic ion-acoustic waves, namely, ion-acoustic cnoidal waves, in a dense relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma consisting of relativistic degenerate electrons and nondegenerate cold ions are investigated. By means of the reductive perturbation method and appropriate boundary conditions for nonlinear periodic waves, a nonlinear modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived and its cnoidal wave is analyzed. The various solutions of nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal and solitary waves are presented numerically with the Sagdeev potential approach. The analytical solution and numerical simulation of nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal waves of the nonlinear modified KdV equation are studied. Clearly, it is found that the features (amplitude and width) of nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are proportional to plasma number density, ion cyclotron frequency, and direction cosines. The numerical results are applied to high density astrophysical situations, such as in superdense white dwarfs. This research will be helpful in understanding the properties of compact astrophysical objects containing cold ions with relativistic degenerate electrons.

  10. Measurement of the Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation Rate in a Dense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Shurter, R. P.; Goodwin, P. M.; Benage, J. F., Jr.

    2008-11-01

    Current theoretical approaches to temperature relaxation, which can be categorized as binary-collision and many-body approaches, disagree. Existing experimental evidence infers a lower relaxation rate compared to the binary-collision approach, but is insufficient to determine which approach is correct. We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature relaxation rate between ions and electrons in a dense, strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (Te 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps time-scale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with an ion-ion coupling parameter γii 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines).

  11. Ion beam and neutron output from a sub-kilojoule dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsworth, J. L., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We are seeking to gain a better fundamental understanding of the ion beam acceleration and neutron production dense plasma focus (DPF) device. Experiments were performed on a kilojoule level, fast rise time DPF located at LLNL. Ion beam spectra and neutron yield were measured for deuterium pinches. Visible light images of the pinch are used to determine the pinch length. In addition, an RF probe was placed just outside the cathode to measure fluctuations in E{sub z} up to 6 GHz, which is within the range of the lower hybrid frequencies. We find these oscillations arise at a characteristic frequency near 4 GHz during the pinch. Comparisons of the neutron yield and ion beam characteristics are presented. The neutron yield is also compared to scaling laws.

  12. Visualizing expanding warm dense matter heated by laser-generated ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Woosuk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    This PowerPoint presentation concluded with the following. We calculated the expected heating per atom and temperatures of various target materials using a Monte Carlo simulation code and SESAME EOS tables. We used aluminum ion beams to heat gold and diamond uniformly and isochorically. A streak camera imaged the expansion of warm dense gold (5.5 eV) and diamond (1.7 eV). GXI-X recorded all 16 x-ray images of the unheated gold bar targets proving that it could image the motion of the gold/diamond interface of the proposed target.

  13. Time- and space- resolved pyrometry of dense plasmas heated by laser accelerated ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Roycroft, Rebecca; McCary, Eddie; Wagner, Craig; Jiao, Xuejing; Kupfer, Rotem; Gauthier, D. Cort; Bang, Woosuk; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Bradley, Paul A.; Hamilton, Christopher; Santiago Cordoba, Miguel A.; Vold, Erik L.; Yin, Lin; Fernandez, Juan C.; Alibright, Brian J.; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven ion sources have a variety of possible applications, including the rapid heating of matter to dense plasma states of several eV. Recent experiments at LANL and The University of Texas have explored ion heating in the context of mixing at high-Z / low-Z plasma interfaces, using different laser-based ion acceleration schemes. Quasi-monoenergetic and highly directed Al ions from ultra-thin foils were used in one set of experiments, while TNSA accelerated protons from an F/40 focused petawatt laser were used in the other. Using spatially and temporally resolved streaked optical pyrometry we have gained insight into the degree and uniformity of heating from various configurations of ion source and sample target. Here we present data and analysis from three experimental runs along with hydrodynamic modeling of the heated targets and geometric considerations. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE- NA0002008 and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program under the auspices of the U.S. DOE NNSAS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-0.

  14. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  15. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, Peter A; Lidia, Steven M; Persaud, Arun; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H; Waldron, William L; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnard, John J; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P; Davidson, Ronald C; Gilson, Erik P; Kaganovich, Igor D

    2015-01-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r < 1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 10^10 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminium perovskite using the fully integrated accel...

  16. Ion probe beam experiments and kinetic modeling in a dense plasma focus Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Ellsworth, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; McLean, H., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Rusnak, B., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Sears, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, 418 Washington St SE, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) emits multiple-MeV ions in a ∼cm length. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood. We are exploring the origins of these large gradients using measurements of an ion probe beam injected into a DPF during the pinch phase and the first kinetic simulations of a DPF Z-pinch. To probe the accelerating fields in our table top experiment, we inject a 4 MeV deuteron beam along the z-axis and then sample the beam energy distribution after it passes through the pinch region. Using this technique, we have directly measured for the first time the acceleration of an injected ion beam. Our particle-in-cell simulations have been benchmarked on both a kJ-scale DPF and a MJ-scale DPF. They have reproduced experimentally measured neutron yields as well as ion beams and EM oscillations which fluid simulations do not exhibit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for accelerator and neutron source applications.

  17. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  18. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Peter A., E-mail: PASeidl@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Barnard, John J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Davidson, Ronald C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Friedman, Alex [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Gilson, Erik P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenway, Wayne G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Grote, David P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Kaganovich, Igor D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 10{sup 10} ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li{sup +} ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  19. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Bergeson; Lyon, M

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, ...

  20. Scheme for implementing quantum dense coding with four-particle decoherence-free states in an ion trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiao-Juan; Cao Shuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Liao Xiang-Ping

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimentally feasible scheme for implementing quantum dense coding of trapped-ion system in decoherence-free states.As the phase changes due to time evolution of components with different eigenenergies of quantum superposition are completely frozen,quantum dense coding based on this model would be perfect.The scheme is insensitive to heating of vibrational mode and Bell states can be exactly distinguished via detecting the ionic state.

  1. Electron-ion and ion-ion potentials for modeling warm-dense-matter: applications to laser-heated or shock-compressed Al and Si

    CERN Document Server

    Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2012-01-01

    The pair-interactions U_{ij}(r) determine the thermodynamics and linear transport properties of matter via the pair-distribution functions (PDFs), i.e., g_{ij}(r). Great simplicity is achieved if U_{ij}(r) could be directly used to predict material properties via classical simulations, avoiding many-body wavefunctions. Warm dense matter (WDM) is encountered in quasi-equilibria where the electron temperature $T_e$ differs from the ion temperature T_i, as in laser-heated or in shock-compressed matter. The electron PDFs g_{ee}(r) as perturbed by the ions are used to evaluate fully non-local exchange-correlation corrections to the free energy, using Hydrogen as an example. Electron-ion potentials for ions with a bound core are discussed with Al and Si as examples, for WDM with T_e \

  2. Complexation induced phase separation: preparation of composite membranes with a nanometer thin dense skin loaded with metal ions

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos Vazquez de la Parra, Luis Francisco

    2015-04-21

    We present the development of a facile phase-inversion method for forming asymmetric membranes with a precise high metal ion loading capacity in only the dense layer. The approach combines the use of macromolecule-metal intermolecular complexes to form the dense layer of asymmetric membranes with nonsolvent-induced phase separation to form the porous support. This allows the independent optimization of both the dense layer and porous support while maintaining the simplicity of a phase-inversion process. Moreover, it facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude—from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. This simple and scalable process provides a new platform for building multifunctional membranes with a high loading of well-dispersed metal ions in the dense layer.

  3. Complexation-induced phase separation: preparation of composite membranes with a nanometer-thin dense skin loaded with metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-05-13

    We present the development of a facile phase-inversion method for forming asymmetric membranes with a precise high metal ion loading capacity in only the dense layer. The approach combines the use of macromolecule-metal intermolecular complexes to form the dense layer of asymmetric membranes with nonsolvent-induced phase separation to form the porous support. This allows the independent optimization of both the dense layer and porous support while maintaining the simplicity of a phase-inversion process. Moreover, it facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. This simple and scalable process provides a new platform for building multifunctional membranes with a high loading of well-dispersed metal ions in the dense layer.

  4. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  6. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  7. Electron-ion and ion-ion potentials for modeling warm dense matter: Applications to laser-heated or shock-compressed Al and Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2012-09-01

    The pair interactions Uij(r) determine the thermodynamics and linear transport properties of matter via the pair-distribution functions (PDFs), i.e., gij(r). Great simplicity is achieved if Uij(r) could be directly used to predict material properties via classical simulations, avoiding many-body wave functions. Warm dense matter (WDM) is encountered in quasiequilibria where the electron temperature Te differs from the ion temperature Ti, as in laser-heated or in shock-compressed matter. The electron PDFs gee(r) as perturbed by the ions are used to evaluate fully nonlocal exchange-correlation corrections to the free energy, using hydrogen as an example. Electron-ion potentials for ions with a bound core are discussed with Al and Si as examples, for WDM with Te≠Ti, and valid for times shorter than the electron-ion relaxation time. In some cases the potentials develop attractive regions and then become repulsive and "Yukawa-like" for higher Te. These results clarify the origin of initial phonon hardening and rapid release. Pair potentials for shock-heated WDM show that phonon hardening would not occur in most such systems. Defining meaningful quasiequilibrium static transport coefficients consistent with the dynamic values is addressed. There seems to be no meaningful "static conductivity" obtainable by extrapolating experimental or theoretical σ(ω,Ti,Te) to ω→0, unless Ti→Te as well. Illustrative calculations of quasistatic resistivities R(Ti,Te) of laser-heated as well as shock-heated aluminum and silicon are presented using our pseudopotentials, pair potentials, and classical integral equations. The quasistatic resistivities display clear differences in their temperature evolutions, but are not the strict ω→0 limits of the dynamic values.

  8. A Multi-Step Assessment Scheme for Seismic Network Site Selection in Densely Populated Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenkers, Katrin; Husen, Stephan; Kraft, Toni

    2015-10-01

    We developed a multi-step assessment scheme for improved site selection during seismic network installation in densely populated areas. Site selection is a complex process where different aspects (seismic background noise, geology, and financing) have to be taken into account. In order to improve this process, we developed a step-wise approach that allows quantifying the quality of a site by using, in addition to expert judgement and test measurements, two weighting functions as well as reference stations. Our approach ensures that the recording quality aimed for is reached and makes different sites quantitatively comparable to each other. Last but not least, it is an easy way to document the decision process, because all relevant parameters are listed, quantified, and weighted.

  9. Radiolysis of ammonia-containing ices by energetic, heavy and highly charged ions inside dense astrophysical environments

    CERN Document Server

    Pilling, S; da Silveira, E F; Balanzat, E; Rothard, H; Domaracka, A; Boduch, P

    2009-01-01

    Deeply inside dense molecular clouds and protostellar disks, the interstellar ices are protected from stellar energetic UV photons. However, X-rays and energetic cosmic rays can penetrate inside these regions triggering chemical reactions, molecular dissociation and evaporation processes. We present experimental studies on the interaction of heavy, highly charged and energetic ions (46 MeV Ni^13+) with ammonia-containing ices in an attempt to simulate the physical chemistry induced by heavy ion cosmic rays inside dense astrophysical environments. The measurements were performed inside a high vacuum chamber coupled to the heavy ion accelerator GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen, France.\\textit{In-situ} analysis is performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) at different fluences. The averaged values for the dissociation cross section of water, ammonia and carbon monoxide due to heavy cosmic ray ion analogs are ~2x10^{-13}, 1.4x10^{-13} and 1.9x10^{-13} cm$^2$, respectiv...

  10. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Q., E-mail: qji@lbl.gov; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Persaud, A.; Schenkel, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ∼1 eV using intense, short pulses (∼1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He{sup +} ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li{sup +} ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li{sup +} ions from a hot plate type ion source. He{sup +} beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies.

  11. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeson, Scott; Lyon, Mary

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed. This research is supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9950-12- 0308) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-1404488).

  12. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed.

  13. Highly sensitive detection of copper ions by densely grafting fluorescein inside polyethyleneimine core-silica shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yali; Zheng, Xingwang

    2015-12-21

    In this work, polyethyleneimine (PEI) core-silica shell nanoparticles were synthesized and used for densely grafting fluorescent receptor units inside the core of these particles to result in multi-receptor units collectively sensing a target. Herein, copper ion quenching of the fluorescence intensity of a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) system was selected as a model to confirm our proof-of-concept strategy. Our results showed that, compared to free FITC in solution, a 10-fold enhancement of the Stern-Volmer constant value for Cu(2+) quenching of the fluorescence intensity of the grafted state of FITC in PEI core-silica shell nanoparticles was achieved. Furthermore, compared to a previous collective sensing scheme by densely grafting fluorescent receptor units on a silica nanoparticle surface, the proposed scheme, which grafted fluorescent receptor units inside a polymer nano-core, was simple, highly efficient and presented higher sensitivity.

  14. Pump-probe studies of radiation induced defects and formation of warm dense matter with pulsed ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Gua, H.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Minior, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report results from the 2nd generation Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment at Berkeley Lab. NDCX-II is a pulsed, linear induction accelerator designed to drive thin foils to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ~ 1 eV using intense, short pulses of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. Tunability of the ion beam enables pump-probe studies of radiation effects in solids as a function of excitation density, from isolated collision cascades to the onset of phase-transitions and WDM. Ion channeling is an in situ diagnostic of damage evolution during ion pulses with a sensitivity of channeled ions tracks lattice disorder evolution with a resolution of ~ 1 ns using fast current measurements. We will discuss pump-probe experiments with pulsed ion beams and the development of diagnostics for WDM and multi-scale (ms to fs) access to the materials physics of collision cascades e.g. in fusion reactor materials. Work performed under auspices of the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Tsunami inundation modelling based on detailed roughness maps of densely populated areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gayer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An important part within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS project was the detailed numerical investigation of the impact of tsunamis in densely populated coastal areas of Indonesia. This work, carried out by the German Research Centre Geesthacht (GKSS, in co-operation with DHI-WASY, also provides the basis for the preparation of high resolution hazard and risk maps by the German Aerospace Center (DLR.

    In this paper a method is described of how to prepare very detailed roughness maps for scenario computations performed with the MIKE 21 Flow Model FM in three highly resolved (~10 m priority regions, namely Kuta (Bali, Padang (West-Sumatra, and Cilacap (southern coast of Java. Roughness values are assigned to 43 land use classes, e.g. different types of buildings, rural and urban sub-areas, by using equivalent coefficients found in literature or by performing numerical experiments.

    Comparisons of simulations using differentiated roughness maps with simulations using constant values (a widely used approach are presented and it is demonstrated that roughness takes considerable influence on run-up and inundation.

    Out of all simulations, the results of the worst case scenarios for each of the three priority areas are discussed. Earthquakes with magnitudes of MW=8.5 or higher lead to considerable inundation in all study sites. A spatially distinguished consideration of roughness has been found to be necessary for detailed modelling onshore.

  16. Tsunami inundation modelling based on detailed roughness maps of densely populated areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, G.; Leschka, S.; Nöhren, I.; Larsen, O.; Günther, H.

    2010-08-01

    An important part within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) project was the detailed numerical investigation of the impact of tsunamis in densely populated coastal areas of Indonesia. This work, carried out by the German Research Centre Geesthacht (GKSS), in co-operation with DHI-WASY, also provides the basis for the preparation of high resolution hazard and risk maps by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). In this paper a method is described of how to prepare very detailed roughness maps for scenario computations performed with the MIKE 21 Flow Model FM in three highly resolved (~10 m) priority regions, namely Kuta (Bali), Padang (West-Sumatra), and Cilacap (southern coast of Java). Roughness values are assigned to 43 land use classes, e.g. different types of buildings, rural and urban sub-areas, by using equivalent coefficients found in literature or by performing numerical experiments. Comparisons of simulations using differentiated roughness maps with simulations using constant values (a widely used approach) are presented and it is demonstrated that roughness takes considerable influence on run-up and inundation. Out of all simulations, the results of the worst case scenarios for each of the three priority areas are discussed. Earthquakes with magnitudes of MW=8.5 or higher lead to considerable inundation in all study sites. A spatially distinguished consideration of roughness has been found to be necessary for detailed modelling onshore.

  17. Ion transport in thin cell electrodeposition: modelling three-ion electrolytes in dense branched morphology under constant voltage and current conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States) and Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: marshalg@mail.retina.ar; Molina, F.V. [INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Soba, A. [Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2005-05-30

    Electrochemical deposition (ECD) and spatially coupled bipolar electrochemistry (SCBE) experiments in thin-layer cells are known to produce complex ion transport patterns concomitantly with the growth of dendrite-like structures. Here we present a macroscopic model of ECD and SCBE with a three-ion electrolyte in conditions of dense branched morphology. The model describes ion transport and deposit growth through the one-dimensional Nernst-Planck equations for ion transport, the Poisson equation for the electric field and, for ECD, a growth law for deposit evolution. We present numerical simulations for typical electrochemical deposition experiments: dense branched morphology in ECD and the incubation period in SCBE. In ECD the model predicts cation, anion and proton concentration profiles, electric field variations and deposit growth speed, that are in qualitative agreement with experiments; the predicted evolution and collision of the deposit and proton fronts reveal a time scaling close to those observed in experiments. In SCBE, the model predicts that the inverse of the incubation time scales linearly with the applied voltage. Such behaviour was observed in experiments.

  18. Dense ion clouds of 0.1 − 2 keV ions inside the CPS-region observed by Astrid-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Norberg

    Full Text Available Data from the Astrid-2 satellite taken between April and July 1999 show several examples of dense ion clouds in the 0.1–2 keV energy range inside the inner mag-netosphere, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. These inner magnetospheric ion clouds are found predomi-nantly in the early morning sector, suggesting that they could have originated from substorm-related ion injections on the night side. However, their location and density show no cor-relation with Kp, and their energy-latitude dispersion is not easily reproduced by a simple particle drift model. There-fore, these ion clouds are not necessarily caused by substorm-related ion injections. Alternative explanations for the ion clouds are the direct solar wind injections and up-welling ions from the other hemisphere. These explanations do not, however, account for all of the observations.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; storm and substorms

  19. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  20. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Faenov, A. Ya., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Evans, R. G. [Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG (United Kingdom); Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Uschmann, I. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronic, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, Jena, D-07743 (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  1. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  2. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  3. Time-evolution of dense hadronic matter in high energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Niita, Koji

    1997-05-01

    Time evolution of hadronic resonance matter in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of cascade models. We investigate the role of higher baryonic resonances during the time evolution of hot and dense hadronic matter at AGS energies. Although final hadronic spectrum can reproduced well with and without higher baryonic resonances, the inclusion of higher resonances is shown to prevent the temperature from going beyond 200 MeV. (author)

  4. The production of dense lead-ion beams for the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; MacCaferri, R; Molinari, G; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Tranquille, G

    2000-01-01

    To reach the design luminosity for lead-ions in the LHC, the present Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) has to be converted into a Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Since the present ECR lead-ion source does not provide sufficient intensity, the main goal of LEIR is to act as a low-energy (4.2MeV/u) accumulator where the ion beam is stacked and cooled (with the help of an electron-cooler) to reach the required intensity and emittances. An experimental program has been carried out at LEAR in recent years in order to test the cooling and stacking process with the present electron-cooler. A variety of results have been reported at previous conferences. This paper will focus on the electron cooling aspects resulting from the afore mentioned experiments. Taking into account the experience

  5. Electron-ion relaxation in a dense plasma. [supernovae core physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, J. E.; Buchler, J.-R.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic physics of the thermonuclear runaway in highly degenerate carbon-oxygen cores is investigated to determine if and how a detonation wave is generated. An expression for the electron-ion relaxation time is derived under the assumption of large degeneracy and extreme relativity of the electrons in a two-temperature plasma. Since the nuclear burning time proves to be several orders of magnitude shorter than the relaxation time, it is concluded that in studying the structure of the detonation wave the electrons and ions must be treated as separate fluids.

  6. Pedestrian injuries in the most densely populated city in Nigeria-an epidemic calling for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solagberu, Babatunde A; Balogun, Rufai A; Mustafa, Ibrahim A; Ibrahim, Nasiru A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Ajani, Abdulwahab O; Idowu, Olufemi E; Osuoji, Roland I

    2015-01-01

    Since the first pedestrian road fatality of 1896, pedestrians still remain vulnerable, with fatalities in Africa being 55% of global statistics. Many previous reports from Nigeria have emphasized passengers and drivers over pedestrians; this study was done in the most densely populated Nigerian city with no previous publication exclusively dedicated to pedestrians-the megacity has been projected by the World Bank to be the third largest in the world by 2015 (after Tokyo and Mumbai), so the study results would aid injury control and reduce morbidity and mortality. This is a one-year prospective study on pedestrians attending the surgical emergency room of the busiest referral hospital in Lagos, Nigeria, detailing age, sex, occupation, regions injured, injury mechanism, incident vehicles, highway collisions, and immediate outcomes. Some 702 pedestrians were seen, including 494 (70%) males with overall peak incidence in the third decade, but the peak incidence among females is lower and in the first decade. Common injuries sustained were to the head (40%), lower limbs (35%), upper limbs (9%), multiple regions (6%), pelvis (3%), and others (7%). Gender differences also were noted-the predominant injury location in males was the head, followed by lower limbs; the opposite was true for females, though both regional injuries were fewer in females than in males. Students were 20% of the entire pedestrians, with nearly half of them injured by a motorcycle. The mechanism of injury included crossing a highway (63%), walking along the pavement (17%), standing by a bus stop (12%), at a shop/house (5%), and others (3%). However, 76% injuries occurred on highways, 22% on inner city roads, and 2% elsewhere. Vehicles included motorcycles (33%), cars (27%), buses (22%), trucks (6%), tricycles (2.4%), and other (9%). Overall fatality was 10% and about half were due to being knocked down by buses and cars. This study suggests a high incidence and significant underreporting of

  7. Continuous measurement of carbon black in a densely populated area of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Oscar; Ortinez, Abraham; Castro, Telma; Espinosa, Maria; Saavedra, Isabel; Alvarez, Harry; Basaldud, Roberto; Paramo, Víctor; Martínez, Amparo

    2015-04-01

    The black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of burning fossil fuels and is an important short-lived climate forcer because it absorbs solar radiation altering the Earth's radiative budget and climate. It is also an atmospheric pollutant that promotes reactions of other compounds in the atmosphere. Despite its importance for health and climate, in Mexico there are very few studies on ambient concentrations of BC in urban areas and virtually no information of continuous measurements over long periods (more than a month of measurements). So, in order to develop more efficient local and regional mitigation strategies and policies that allow reducing ambient concentrations of BC, it is necessary to know BC seasonal evolution, contribution to radiative budget and impacts on health. This study shows continuous measurements (from July 2013 to July 2014) of BC to perform an analysis of seasonal variations. The selected monitoring site is located at Iztapalapa, a densely populated area with high traffic on the southeastern part of Mexico City. BC concentrations were obtained by two aethalometers (Magee Scientific Company, models AET31 and AET42) placed 15 meters above the ground. The aethalometers operate in the wavelength range of 370-950 nm and use a standard value of mass absorption coefficient MAC = 10.8 m2/g to calculate BC environmental concentration. To correct the aethalometers readings to the conditions of Mexico City, it was employed MAC = to 6.7 m2/g, which was determined for PM2.5 with a carbon analyzer (UIC, Inc.) and represents the mass absorption coefficient of soot emitted in Mexico City. The average value of the corrected concentration of BC in Mexico City during the period from July 2013 to July 2014 was 5.39 ± 1.89 μg/m3 (1.6 higher than readings recorded by aethalometers), which is greater than that measured in Shanghai in 2014 (annual average 2.33 μg/m3) and those reported for some U.S. cities; the value implies a potential danger to the health of

  8. Effects of Dense Matter on Hadron Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Fái, G; Lévai, Peter; Zhang, Y; Papp, Gabor; Barnafoeldi, Gergely; Fai, George; Levai, Peter; Zhang, Yi

    2000-01-01

    The intrinsic transverse momentum distribution of partons in the nucleon can be used to explain a large amount of high-$p_T$ hadron and photon production data in high-energy nucleon-nucleon collisions at energies $\\sqrt{s} \\approx 20$ to 1800 GeV. However, proton-nucleus experiments at energies $\\approx 30$ GeV show an extra enhancement (Cronin effect) in the yield of photons and mesons compared to a simple extrapolation of the proton-proton data. This enhancement is due to the effect of the dense hadronic matter encountered by the projectile proton in the nuclear environment. We discuss the origin and the properties of the nuclear enhancement.

  9. Multivariate spatial analysis of a heavy rain event in a densely populated delta city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Santiago; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; Bruni, Guenda; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Delta cities account for half of the world's population and host key infrastructure and services for the global economic growth. Due to the characteristic geography of delta areas, these cities face high vulnerability to extreme weather and pluvial flooding risks, that are expected to increase as climate change drives heavier rain events. Besides, delta cities are subjected to fast urban densification processes that progressively make them more vulnerable to pluvial flooding. Delta cities need to be adapted to better cope with this threat. The mechanism leading to damage after heavy rains is not completely understood. For instance, current research has shown that rain intensities and volumes can only partially explain the occurrence and localization of rain-related insurance claims (Spekkers et al., 2013). The goal of this paper is to provide further insights into spatial characteristics of the urban environment that can significantly be linked to pluvial-related flooding impacts. To that end, a study-case has been selected: on October 12 to 14 2013, a heavy rain event triggered pluvial floods in Rotterdam, a densely populated city which is undergoing multiple climate adaptation efforts and is located in the Meuse river Delta. While the average yearly precipitation in this city is around 800 mm, local rain gauge measurements ranged from aprox. 60 to 130 mm just during these three days. More than 600 citizens' telephonic complaints reported impacts related to rainfall. The registry of those complaints, which comprises around 300 calls made to the municipality and another 300 to the fire brigade, was made available for research. Other accessible information about this city includes a series of rainfall measurements with up to 1 min time-step at 7 different locations around the city, ground-based radar rainfall data (1 Km^2 spatial resolution and 5 min time-step), a digital elevation model (50 cm of horizontal resolution), a model of overland-flow paths, cadastral

  10. Stresses and Temperature Stability of Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing Filters Prepared by Reactive Ion-Assisted E-Gun Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao-Tsang; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ measurement of the temperature stability of narrow-band-pass filters on different types of substrate, for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) filters in optical-fiber transmission systems. The DWDM filters were designed as all-dielectric Fabry-Perot filters and fabricated by reactive ion-assisted deposition. Ta2O5 and SiO2 were used as high- and low-refractive-index layers, respectively, for constructing the DWDM filters. The accuracy and stability of the coating process were evaluated for fabricating the DWDM filters for the temperature stability of the center wavelength. The center wavelength shift was determined to be greatly dependent on the coefficient of thermal expansion of the substrate on which the filter is deposited.

  11. Vector mesons in dense matter and dilepton production in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, Elvira

    2008-02-15

    The vector meson spectral functions are calculated to the first order in the nuclear matter density assuming the dominant contribution comes from the couplings of the vector mesons to nucleons and nucleon resonances. An attempt is made to reproduce the HADES dilepton production data with the in-medium spectral functions of the vector mesons using the Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (RQMD) transport model developed earlier for modelling heavy-ion collisions. The results are sensitive to the in-medium broadening of nucleon resonances. A generally good agreement with the HADES data is achieved for selfconsistent treatment of the nucleon resonance broadening and the vector meson spectral functions. (orig.)

  12. Weakly nonlinear ion-acoustic excitations in a relativistic model for dense quantum plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behery, E E; Haas, F; Kourakis, I

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of linear and nonlinear ionic-scale electrostatic excitations propagating in a magnetized relativistic quantum plasma is studied. A quantum-hydrodynamic model is adopted and degenerate statistics for the electrons is taken into account. The dispersion properties of linear ion acoustic waves are examined in detail. A modified characteristic charge screening length and "sound speed" are introduced, for relativistic quantum plasmas. By employing the reductive perturbation technique, a Zakharov-Kuznetzov-type equation is derived. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability profile of weakly nonlinear slightly supersonic electrostatic pulses is also discussed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the basic characteristics of electrostatic excitations is investigated. The entire analysis is valid in a three-dimensional as well as in two-dimensional geometry. A brief discussion of possible applications in laboratory and space plasmas is included.

  13. Assembling metal oxide nanocrystals into dense, hollow, porous nanoparticles for lithium-ion and lithium-oxygen battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jun; Wu, Yingqiang; Park, Jin-Bum; Lee, Joong Kee; Zhao, Fengyu; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2013-10-01

    New dense hollow porous (DHP) metal oxide nanoparticles that are smaller than 100 nm and composed of Co3O4, FeOx, NiO and MnOx were prepared by densely assembling metal oxide nanocrystals based on the hard-template method using a carbon colloid as a sacrificial core. These nanoparticles are quite different from the traditional particles as their hollow interior originates from the stacking of nanocrystals rather than a spherical shell. The DHP nanoparticles preserve the intriguing properties of nanocrystals and possess desirable surface area and pore volume that enhance the active surface, which ultimately benefits applications such as lithium-ion batteries. The DHP Co3O4 nanoparticles demonstrated an enhanced capacity of 1168 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1vs. 590 mA h g-1 of powders and stable cycling performance greater than 250 cycles when used as an anode material. Most importantly, the electrochemical performance of DHP Co3O4 nanoparticles in a lithium-O2 battery was also investigated for the first time. A low charge potential of ~4.0 V, a high discharge voltage near 2.74 V and a long cycle ability greater than 100 cycles at a delivered capacity of 2000 mA h g-1 (current density, 200 mA g-1) were observed. The performances were considerably improved compared to recent results of mesoporous Co3O4, Co3O4 nanoparticles and a composite of Co3O4/RGO and Co3O4/Pd. Therefore, it would be promising to investigate such properties of DHP nanoparticles or other hollow metal (oxide) particles for the popular lithium-air battery.New dense hollow porous (DHP) metal oxide nanoparticles that are smaller than 100 nm and composed of Co3O4, FeOx, NiO and MnOx were prepared by densely assembling metal oxide nanocrystals based on the hard-template method using a carbon colloid as a sacrificial core. These nanoparticles are quite different from the traditional particles as their hollow interior originates from the stacking of nanocrystals rather than a spherical shell. The DHP

  14. Assembling metal oxide nanocrystals into dense, hollow, porous nanoparticles for lithium-ion and lithium-oxygen battery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jun; Wu, Yingqiang; Park, Jin-Bum; Lee, Joong Kee; Zhao, Fengyu; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2013-11-01

    New dense hollow porous (DHP) metal oxide nanoparticles that are smaller than 100 nm and composed of Co3O4, FeOx, NiO and MnOx were prepared by densely assembling metal oxide nanocrystals based on the hard-template method using a carbon colloid as a sacrificial core. These nanoparticles are quite different from the traditional particles as their hollow interior originates from the stacking of nanocrystals rather than a spherical shell. The DHP nanoparticles preserve the intriguing properties of nanocrystals and possess desirable surface area and pore volume that enhance the active surface, which ultimately benefits applications such as lithium-ion batteries. The DHP Co3O4 nanoparticles demonstrated an enhanced capacity of 1168 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)vs. 590 mA h g(-1) of powders and stable cycling performance greater than 250 cycles when used as an anode material. Most importantly, the electrochemical performance of DHP Co3O4 nanoparticles in a lithium-O2 battery was also investigated for the first time. A low charge potential of ∼4.0 V, a high discharge voltage near 2.74 V and a long cycle ability greater than 100 cycles at a delivered capacity of 2000 mA h g(-1) (current density, 200 mA g(-1)) were observed. The performances were considerably improved compared to recent results of mesoporous Co3O4, Co3O4 nanoparticles and a composite of Co3O4/RGO and Co3O4/Pd. Therefore, it would be promising to investigate such properties of DHP nanoparticles or other hollow metal (oxide) particles for the popular lithium-air battery.

  15. Nonlinear Absorption-Gain Response and Population Dynamics in a Laser-Driven Four-Level Dense Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; LIU Ji-Bing; LUO Jin-Ming; XIE Xiao-Tao

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the response of nonlinear absorption and population dynamics in optically dense media of four-level atoms driven by a single-mode probe laser, via taking the density-dependent near dipoledipole (NDD) interactions into consideration. The influence of the NDD effects on the absorption of the probe field and population dynamics is predicted via numerical calculations. It is shown that the NDD effects can reduce gradually to transient absorption with the increase of the strengths of the NDD interactions, and transient amplification can be achieved. In the steady-state limit, the probe field exhibits transparency for strong NDD interactions. Alternatively, the population entirely remains at the ground state due to the NDD effects.

  16. Properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsene, Ionut Cristian

    2009-07-01

    In this thesis we tried to characterize a few aspects of the rich field of relativistic heavy ion collisions at intermediate and high energies. In chapter 2 we used two different microscopic string models, UrQMD and QGSM, to study the formation and evolution of the locally equilibrated matter in the central zone of heavy ion collisions at energies spanning from sq root sNN approx 4 GeV up to 17.3 GeV. The calculations were performed both in the cubic central cell of fixed volume V = 5 centre dot 5 centre dot 5 fm3 and for the instantly expanding volume of homogeneous energy density. To decide whether or not equilibrium is reached we used a traditional approach based on the fulfillment of the conditions of kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrium. Both models favor the formation of equilibrated matter for a period of about 10 fm/c in which the matter expands isentropically with constant entropy per baryon. The square of the speed of sound c{sub s}2 has been found to vary in UrQMD from 0.13 at AGS to 0.15 at SPS energies and in QGSM from 0.11 at AGS to 0.15 at SPS. In both models the rise in c{sub s}2 slows down at sq rootsNN approx 9 GeV. Chapter 3 describes the HYDJET++ model as a superposition of the soft, hydrotype state and the hard state resulting from multi-parton fragmentation. Both states are treated independently. The hard part is an NN collision generator called PYQUEN which modifies the 'standard' jet event obtained with the PYTHIA generator and includes radiative and collisional energy loss for partons. Initial state effects like shadowing are included also. The soft part is the thermal hadronic state generated on the chemical and thermal freeze-out hypersurfaces obtained from the parametrization of relativistic hydrodynamics. We found that this model gives a good description of soft observables at top RHIC energy, like the p{sub T} spectrum, elliptic flow and HBT correlations. The hard part of the model describes well the high-p{sub T

  17. Properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsene, Ionut Cristian

    2009-07-01

    In this thesis we tried to characterize a few aspects of the rich field of relativistic heavy ion collisions at intermediate and high energies. In chapter 2 we used two different microscopic string models, UrQMD and QGSM, to study the formation and evolution of the locally equilibrated matter in the central zone of heavy ion collisions at energies spanning from sq root sNN approx 4 GeV up to 17.3 GeV. The calculations were performed both in the cubic central cell of fixed volume V = 5 centre dot 5 centre dot 5 fm3 and for the instantly expanding volume of homogeneous energy density. To decide whether or not equilibrium is reached we used a traditional approach based on the fulfillment of the conditions of kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrium. Both models favor the formation of equilibrated matter for a period of about 10 fm/c in which the matter expands isentropically with constant entropy per baryon. The square of the speed of sound c{sub s}2 has been found to vary in UrQMD from 0.13 at AGS to 0.15 at SPS energies and in QGSM from 0.11 at AGS to 0.15 at SPS. In both models the rise in c{sub s}2 slows down at sq rootsNN approx 9 GeV. Chapter 3 describes the HYDJET++ model as a superposition of the soft, hydrotype state and the hard state resulting from multi-parton fragmentation. Both states are treated independently. The hard part is an NN collision generator called PYQUEN which modifies the 'standard' jet event obtained with the PYTHIA generator and includes radiative and collisional energy loss for partons. Initial state effects like shadowing are included also. The soft part is the thermal hadronic state generated on the chemical and thermal freeze-out hypersurfaces obtained from the parametrization of relativistic hydrodynamics. We found that this model gives a good description of soft observables at top RHIC energy, like the p{sub T} spectrum, elliptic flow and HBT correlations. The hard part of the model describes well the high-p{sub T

  18. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size

  19. A system for household enumeration and re-identification in densely populated slums to facilitate community research, education, and advocacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana R Thomson

    Full Text Available We devised and implemented an innovative Location-Based Household Coding System (LBHCS appropriate to a densely populated informal settlement in Mumbai, India.LBHCS codes were designed to double as unique household identifiers and as walking directions; when an entire community is enumerated, LBHCS codes can be used to identify the number of households located per road (or lane segment. LBHCS was used in community-wide biometric, mental health, diarrheal disease, and water poverty studies. It also facilitated targeted health interventions by a research team of youth from Mumbai, including intensive door-to-door education of residents, targeted follow-up meetings, and a full census. In addition, LBHCS permitted rapid and low-cost preparation of GIS mapping of all households in the slum, and spatial summation and spatial analysis of survey data.LBHCS was an effective, easy-to-use, affordable approach to household enumeration and re-identification in a densely populated informal settlement where alternative satellite imagery and GPS technologies could not be used.

  20. Emission of Low-Energy Photons by Electrons at Electron-Positron and Electron-Ion Colliders with Dense Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D; Serbo, V G; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.011003

    2009-01-01

    Usually, the emission of low-energy photons in electron-positron (or electron-ion) bunch collisions is calculated with the same approach as for synchrotron radiation (beamstrahlung). However, for soft photons (E_gamma < E_c where E_c is a critical photon energy), when the coherence length of the radiation becomes comparable to the bunch length, the beamstrahlung approximation becomes invalid. In this paper, we present results of our calculation for this region based on approximation of classical currents. We consider several colliders with dense bunches. The number of low-energy photons dN_gamma emitted by N_e electrons per bunch crossing in the energy interval dE_gamma is dN_gamma = alpha g N_e dE_gamma/E_gamma, where alpha is the fine-structure constant, and the function g, which depends on the bunch parameters, typically is of order unity for modern colliders. In particular, for the ILC, we find that E_c = 83 keV and g=5.5 at a vanishing beam axis displacement, and g=0.88, E_c=0.24 keV for KEKB. We also...

  1. Atoms in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  2. Identifying signatures of natural selection in Tibetan and Andean populations using dense genome scan data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Bigham

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude hypoxia (reduced inspired oxygen tension due to decreased barometric pressure exerts severe physiological stress on the human body. Two high-altitude regions where humans have lived for millennia are the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau. Populations living in these regions exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. Although these responses have been well characterized physiologically, their underlying genetic basis remains unknown. We performed a genome scan to identify genes showing evidence of adaptation to hypoxia. We looked across each chromosome to identify genomic regions with previously unknown function with respect to altitude phenotypes. In addition, groups of genes functioning in oxygen metabolism and sensing were examined to test the hypothesis that particular pathways have been involved in genetic adaptation to altitude. Applying four population genetic statistics commonly used for detecting signatures of natural selection, we identified selection-nominated candidate genes and gene regions in these two populations (Andeans and Tibetans separately. The Tibetan and Andean patterns of genetic adaptation are largely distinct from one another, with both populations showing evidence of positive natural selection in different genes or gene regions. Interestingly, one gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, EGLN1 (also known as PHD2, shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. However, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Our results indicate that several key HIF-regulatory and targeted genes are responsible for adaptation to high altitude in Andeans and Tibetans, and several different chromosomal regions are implicated in the putative response to selection. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaption and provide a basis for future genotype/phenotype association

  3. Constructing Dense SiO x @Carbon Nanotubes versus Spinel Cathode for Advanced High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Ming, Hai

    2017-02-09

    A newly designed dense SiOx@carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite with a high conductivity of 3.5 S cm−1 and tap density of 1.13 g cm−3 was prepared, in which the CNTs were stripped by physical energy crushing and then coated on SiOx nanoparticles. The composite exhibits high capacities of 835 and 687 mAh g−1 at current densities of 100 and 200 mA g−1, which can be finely persevered over 100 cycles. Benefiting from this promising anode, two new full cells of SiOx@CNTs/LiMn2O4 and SiOx@CNTs/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with high energy densities of 2273 and 2747 Wh kganode−1 (i. e. 413 and 500 Wh kgcathode−1), respectively, were successfully assembled and can cycle more than 400 cycles. Even with further cycling at the elevated temperature of 45 °C, the cells can still deliver relatively high capacities of 568 and 465 mAh ganode−1, respectively, over 100 cycles. Such desired high-energy lithium-ion batteries with working voltages over 4.0 V can be widely developed for diverse applications (e. g. in handheld devices, electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles). The easy extension of the presented synthetic strategy and the configuration of high-energy battery system would be significant in materials synthesis and energy-storage devices.

  4. Pro-apoptotic Bax molecules densely populate the edges of membrane pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwana, Tomomi; Olson, Norman H; Kiosses, William B; Peters, Bjoern; Newmeyer, Donald D

    2016-06-03

    How the pro-apoptotic Bax protein permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane is not fully understood. Previously, using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we showed that activated Bax forms large, growing pores. Whether formed in liposomes or in mitochondrial outer membranes, Bax-induced pores exhibit the same morphology, with negative curvature flanking the edges and with no visible protein structure protruding from the membranes. Here we used cryo-EM to show that gold-labeled Bax molecules, after activation by Bid, became localized strictly at pore edges. This argues that Bax acts at short range to deform the membrane. Also, Bax molecules populated the walls of both small and large pores at the same density, implying that Bax is continuously recruited to the pores as they widen. Moreover, because all Bax molecules became oligomerized after membrane insertion, we infer that Bax oligomers are present at pore edges. We suggest that oligomerization may promote pore enlargement.

  5. Risk from lava flow inundations in densely populated areas: the case of Etna volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Negro, C.; Cappello, A.; Bilotta, G.; Ganci, G.; Herault, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ever-expanding use of areas near the volcano increases the potential impact of future eruptions on the regional economy and on the health and safety of the inhabitants. The increasing exposure of a larger population, which has almost tripled in the area around Mt. Etna during the last 150 years, is often derived from a poor assessment of the volcanic hazard, allowing inappropriate land use in vulnerable areas. Therefore, a correct assessment is an essential component in reducing the losses due to volcanic disasters. A detailed map showing areas that are likely to be inundated by future lava flows is extremely useful, allowing people living nearby to judge for themselves the relation between potentially dangerous areas and their daily lives. Here we quantify the lava flow risk at Etna volcano using a GIS-based methodology that integrates the hazard with the exposure of elements at stake. The hazard, showing the long-term probability related to lava flow inundation, is obtained combining three different kinds of information: the spatiotemporal probability for the future opening of new eruptive vents, the event probability associated with classes of expected eruptions, and the overlapping of lava flow paths simulated by the MAGFLOW model. Data including all elements at stake were gathered from different web portals and organized in four thematic layers: population, strategic buildings, other buildings and networks, and land use. The total exposure is given by a weighted linear combination of the four thematic layers, where weights are calculated using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The resulting risk map shows the likely damage caused by a lava flow eruption, allowing rapidly visualizing the areas in which there would be the greatest amount of losses in case of a flank eruption occurs at Etna.

  6. The small Blue Straggler star population in the dense Galactic Globular Cluster NGC 6752

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbi, E; Sills, A; Rood, & R T

    2004-01-01

    We have used high resolution WFPC2-HST and wide field ground-based observations to construct a catalog of blue straggler stars (BSS) which spans the entire radial extent of the globular cluster NGC 6752. The BSS sample is the most extensive ever obtained for this cluster. Though NGC 6752 is a high density cluster with a large binary population, we found that its BSS content is surprisingly low: the specific number of BSS is among the lowest ever measured in a cluster. The BSS distribution is highly peaked in the cluster center, shows a rapid decrease at intermediate radii, and finally rises again at larger distances. This distribution closely resembles those observed in M3 and 47Tuc by Ferraro et al. (1993), Ferraro et al. (2003c). To date, BSS surveys covering the central regions with HST and the outer regions with wide field CCD ground-based observations have been performed for only these three clusters. Despite the different dynamical properties, a bimodal radial distribution has been found in each. A deta...

  7. Completeness of the dog registry and estimation of the dog population size in a densely populated area of Rome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Antonino; Sala, Marcello; Panetta, Valentina; Battisti, Sabrina; Meoli, Roberta; Rombolà, Pasquale; Spallucci, Valentina; Eleni, Claudia; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In most European countries, registration and identification of dogs is compulsory. In Italy, the national dog registry is composed of regional dog registries. Although dog registries have been established for many years, the issue related to completeness of data has not been addressed so far. The objective of this study was twofold: first to assess the completeness of data of the dog registry through telephone interview of a sample of dog owners drawn from the dog registry, then to estimate the total owned dog population in 4 boroughs of Rome. For the second objective, a capture-recapture method was applied using data from the dog registry and data from a face-to-face questionnaire submitted to people waiting in the sitting room of 5 points of access for booking and payment of primary and specialist care. Different scenarios are proposed to verify the assumptions of the estimation procedure and potential biases are discussed. The completeness of data of the dog registry was 88.9% (95% CI: 85.8-91.9%) and the owned-dog population was estimated at 26,244 dogs (95% CI: 24,110-28,383). The dog registry is an important source of information especially when it is properly updated and completeness of data is known.

  8. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of U(VI) ions on densely crosslinked poly(methacrylic acid) from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezeroglu, C.; Keceli, G. [Istanbul Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Avcilar Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    In this study, densely crosslinked poly(methacrylie acid) was used to adsorb uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. For this purpose, the crosslinked copolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDM) and methacrylic acid (MA) containing 25% (w/w) methacrylic acid (MA) was synthesized by using dibenzoyl peroxide-N,N-dimethylaniline (BPO-DMA) initiator system at room temperature. The adsorption of uranium(Vl) ions on the copolymer sample (0.02 g copolymer/5 mL solution of U(VI) ions) was carried out in a batch reactor. The parameters which effect the uranium adsorption process, such as, contact time. pH of solution, initial uranium(VI) concentration and temperature were investigated. It was observed that an increase in these parameters enhanced the removal of U(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The adsorption data were modelled by the Freundlich. Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The adsorption capacity of the crosslinked copolymer and free energy change were calculated by using D-R isotherms. Thermodynamic parameters ({delta}H , {delta}S and {delta}G ) were determined for the adsorption of U(VI) ions from aqueous solutions by the crosslinked copolymer bearing methacrylic acid functional groups. Experimental adsorption data were analyzed using sorption kinetic models of the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. It was observed that pseudo-second order kinetic model provided a high goodness of fit with experimental data for the adsorption of U(VI) ions on the crosslinked copolymer bearing methacrylic acid functional groups. The densely crosslinked poly(methacrylic acid) might be of interest in large scale uranium removals from aqueous solution, since it had high uranyl sorption capacities ranging from 0.16 to 2.37 mmol/g copolymer at pH 2.7 (293 K). (orig.)

  9. Electrostatic analyzer measurements of ionospheric thermal ion populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    We define the observational parameter regime necessary for observing low-altitude ionospheric origins of high-latitude ion upflow/outflow. We present measurement challenges and identify a new analysis technique which mitigates these impediments. To probe the initiation of auroral ion upflow, it is necessary to examine the thermal ion population at 200-350 km, where typical thermal energies are tenths of eV. Interpretation of the thermal ion distribution function measurement requires removal of payload sheath and ram effects. We use a 3-D Maxwellian model to quantify how observed ionospheric parameters such as density, temperature, and flows affect in situ measurements of the thermal ion distribution function. We define the viable acceptance window of a typical top hat electrostatic analyzer in this regime and show that the instrument's energy resolution prohibits it from directly observing the shape of the particle spectra. To extract detailed information about measured particle population, we define two intermediate parameters from the measured distribution function, then use a Maxwellian model to replicate possible measured parameters for comparison to the data. Liouville's theorem and the thin-sheath approximation allow us to couple the measured and modeled intermediate parameters such that measurements inside the sheath provide information about plasma outside the sheath. We apply this technique to sounding rocket data to show that careful windowing of the data and Maxwellian models allows for extraction of the best choice of geophysical parameters. More widespread use of this analysis technique will help our community expand its observational database of the seed regions of ionospheric outflows.

  10. Research on spectral factors towards determining nocturnal ground irradiance under overcast sky conditions in densely populated regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petržala, Jaromír; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2017-03-01

    Light pollution is closely correlated with the meteorological factors, specifically cloudiness that is one of the major amplifiers of night sky radiances in urban regions. Although the decisive effects of cloud deck on artificial nighttime skyglow have been recognized experimentally, the radiative transfer modelling in a heterogeneous nocturnal environment illuminated from many light sources is a non-trivial problem that is difficult to solve both theoretically and numerically. A satisfactorily accurate evaluation of ground-reaching diffuse light is, however, an important issue as some optical properties (e.g. horizontal irradiance) are usually difficult to obtain with common instruments. Overcast sky represents a special class of situations in which clouds can act as amplifiers of the light pollution of the city. In this paper we proceeded with a simple two-stream approach to solve the scalar radiative transfer equation (RTE) under overcast conditions. The technique we are using allows for a rapid prediction of ground irradiances in densely populated regions assuming various emission functions. We have shown that the classical RTE concept can be adopted in determining the diffuse irradiance, while the model abilities are illustrated in a set of numerical experiments for low and high turbidity states.

  11. Design and testing of the high speed signal densely populated ATLAS calorimeter trigger board dedicate to jet identification

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira De Souza, Julio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Abstract—The ATLAS experiment has planned a major upgrade in view of the enhanced luminosity of the beam delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2021. As part of this, the trigger at Level-1 based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit fine-granularity readout using a new system of Feature Extractors (three in total), which each uses different physics objects for the trigger selection. The contribution focusses on the jet Feature EXtractor (jFEX) prototype. Up to a data volume of 2 TB/s has to be processed to provide jet identification (including large area jets) and measurements of global variables within few hundred nanoseconds latency budget. Such requirements translate into the use of large Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) with the largest number of Multi Gigabit Transceivers (MGTs) available on the market. The jFEX board prototype hosts four large FPGAs from the Xilinx Ultrascale family with 120 MGTs each, connected to 24 opto-electrical devices, resulting in a densely populated hi...

  12. Ants in Tropical Urban Habitats: The Myrmecofauna in a Densely Populated Area of Bogor, West Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKHMAD RIZALI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ants are the most abundant animals in tropical habitats and have been widely studied in natural and semi-natural tropical systems. However, species in urban tropical habitats remain poorly studied, despite their abundance and potentially important roles in urban ecosystems and pest dynamics. We investigated the ant fauna of Bogor and its surroundings to contribute to the characterization of the myrmecofauna of one of Southeast Asia’s most densely populated regions. Ants were collected both by hand collection and from honey baits in the most common habitats: garbage dumps, households, and home gardens. In total, 94 species were recorded, over two thirds of which occurred in home gardens, which underlines the importance of vegetated habitats for urban planning to support complex ant assemblages. Twelve sampled species are well-known as tramp species that occur primarily in human-dominated landscapes. The two tramp species Anoplolepis gracilipes and Paratrechina longicornis dominated ant assemblages in all locations and most habitat types. The assemblages of tramp species were affected by habitat type, whereas that of non tramp species were not. Forty-five species were also recorded in the Bogor Botanical Garden and five species are also known to be common in cacao agroforests. Hence, research in urban tropical habitats can increase our knowledge of the occurrence of ant species, allowing us to better assess the biodiversity and conservation potential of semi-natural habitats.

  13. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF PALMS (ARECACEAE IN A FOREST FRAGMENT OF LOWLAND DENSE HUMID FOREST IN SOUTH BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cappelatti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the state of Rio Grande do Sul, the Dense Humid Forest is reduced to less than 5% of its original cover. However, it still has the highest richness of palms in this state, which constitute an important and economically relevant group. Environmental and demographic aspects of plant populations in forest fragments are of great importance for their management and conservation. We conducted a study on the spatial distribution and age structure of five palm species in a forest fragment at the municipality of Três Cachoeiras, in the north coast of Rio Grande do Sul. We delimited 25 10×10 m plots and counted the number of individuals in the stages of seedling, juvenile and adult for each palm species. Aggregation Indices were calculated with software SADIEShell. We performed variation partitioning analyses among species distribution and environmental variables canopy openness and soil moisture. A total of 1,443 plants were counted and the most abundant species was Euterpe edulis. The average density was of 57.72 ind. 100 m-2. Three species showed a pattern of “inverse J”, which indicated that they have a potential for regenerating in that palm community. The predominant spatial pattern was aggregated (Ia>1 and canopy openness did not influence species abundances. Only the distribution of Bactris setosa and Geonoma gamiova, both understory species, was explained by soil moisture, suggesting that other abiotic or biotic factors may be influencing the spatial arrangement of the canopy species.

  14. Deeply Embedded Protostellar Population in the Central Molecular Zone Suggested by H$_2$O Masers and Dense Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xing; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Longmore, Steven N; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), usually referring to the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy, contains a dozen of massive ($\\sim10^5$ $M_\\odot$) molecular clouds. Are these clouds going to actively form stars like Sgr B2? How are they affected by the extreme physical conditions in the CMZ, such as strong turbulence? Here we present a first step towards answering these questions. Using high-sensitivity, high angular resolution radio and (sub)millimeter observations, we studied deeply embedded star formation in six massive clouds in the CMZ, including the 20 and 50 km s$^{-1}$ clouds, Sgr B1 off (as known as dust ridge clouds e/f), Sgr C, Sgr D, and G0.253-0.016. The VLA water maser observations suggest a population of deeply embedded protostellar candidates, many of which are new detections. The SMA 1.3 mm continuum observations reveal peaks in dust emission associated with the masers, suggesting the existence of dense cores. While our findings confirm that clouds such as G0.253-0.016 lack internal compact substructu...

  15. Stereospecific growth of densely populated rutile mesoporous TiO2 nanoplate films: a facile low temperature chemical synthesis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Go-Woon; Ambade, Swapnil B.; Cho, Young-Jin; Mane, Rajaram S.; Shashikala, V.; Yadav, Jyotiprakash; Gaikwad, Rajendra S.; Lee, Soo-Hyoung; Jung, Kwang-Deog; Han, Sung-Hwan; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2010-03-01

    We report for the first time, using a simple and environmentally benign chemical method, the low temperature synthesis of densely populated upright-standing rutile TiO2 nanoplate films onto a glass substrate from a mixture of titanium trichloride, hydrogen peroxide and thiourea in triply distilled water. The rutile TiO2 nanoplate films (the phase is confirmed from x-ray diffraction analysis, selected area electron diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman shift) are 20-35 nm wide and 100-120 nm long. The chemical reaction kinetics for the growth of these upright-standing TiO2 nanoplate films is also interpreted. Films of TiO2 nanoplates are optically transparent in the visible region with a sharp absorption edge close to 350 nm, confirming an indirect band gap energy of 3.12 eV. The Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area, Barret-Joyner-Halenda pore volume and pore diameter, obtained from N2 physisorption studies, are 82 m2 g - 1, 0.0964 cm3 g - 1 and 3.5 nm, respectively, confirming the mesoporosity of scratched rutile TiO2 nanoplate powder that would be ideal for the direct fabrication of nanoscaled devices including upcoming dye-sensitized solar cells and gas sensors.

  16. Applications of Extensive Green-roof Systems in Contributing to Sustainable Development in Densely Populated Cities: a Hong Kong Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Developed cities such as Hong Kong are usually densely populated. Since the land is limited, high-rise buildings are constructed. When the building height becomes higher, air flow is reduced and heat is trapped among high-rise buildings. Air temperature will be greatly increased and air pollution becomes a serious problem. This creates a walled building problem. To reduce air temperature caused by the wall-effects, various methods have been developed in the previous studies. One typical method is the use of green roof systems. The application of extensive green roofs on the existing building rooftops has been recommended in Hong Kong since 2001. The advantage of this practice is that no additional floor area is required and it can also improve urban greenery. Although a green roof system has been introduced and adopted in Hong Kong since 2001, the emphasis is mainly given to the application of intensive green roofs for podium garden instead of extensive green roofs. It is considered valuable and necessary of the extensive green roofs for the buildings. This paper investigates the current practice of using extensive green roofs in Hong Kong. The constraints in applying extensive green roofs are investigated, which leads to studying the solutions for mitigating these constraints and improving the future development of the implementation.

  17. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bang, W; Bradley, P A; Vold, E L; Boettger, J C; Fernández, J C

    2015-01-01

    In a recent experiment on the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 eV and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable on Trident, with a finite energy spread of (delta E)/E ~ 20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140 MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  18. Electron and ion dynamics study of iron in warm dense matter regime by time-resolved XAS measurements and from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogitsu, T.; Fernandez-Paãella, A.; Correa, A.; Engelhorn, K.; Barbrel, B.; Prendergast, D. G.; Pemmaraju, D.; Beckwith, M.; Kraus, D.; Hamel, S.; Cho, B. I.; Jin, L.; Wong, J.; Heinman, P.; Collins, G. W.; Falcone, R.; Ping, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of the electron-phonon coupling of warm dense iron upon femtosecond laser excitation by time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). The dynamics of iron in electron-ion non-equilibrium conditions was studied using ab-initio density-functional-theory (DFT) simulations combined with the Two Temperature Model (TTM) where spatial inhomogeneity of electron (and ion) temperature(s) due to short ballistic electron transport length in iron was explicitly taken into consideration. Detailed comparison between our simulation results and experiments indicates that the ion temperature dependence on specific heat and on electron-phonon coupling also plays a relevant role in modeling the relaxation dynamics of electrons and ions. These results are the first experimental evidence of the suppression of the electron-phonon coupling factor of a transition metal at electron temperatures ranging 5000- 10000 K. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program.

  19. Greatly Increasing Trapped Ion Populations for Mobility Separations Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-10-18

    The initial use of traveling waves (TW) for ion mobility (IM) separations using a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) employed an ion funnel trap (IFT) to accumulate ions from a continuous electrospray ionization source, and limited to injected ion populations of ~106 charges due to the onset of space charge effects in the trapping region. Additional limitations arise due to the loss of resolution for the injection of ions over longer periods (e.g. in extended pulses). In this work a new SLIM ‘flat funnel’ (FF) module has been developed and demonstrated to enable the accumulation of much larger ion populations and their injection for IM separations. Ion current measurements indicate a capacity of ~3.2×108 charges for the extended trapping volume, over an order of magnitude greater than the IFT. The orthogonal ion injection into a funnel shaped separation region can greatly reduce space charge effects during the initial IM separation stage, and the gradually reduced width of the path allows the ion packet to be increasingly compressed in the lateral dimension as the separation progresses, allowing e.g. efficient transmission through conductance limits or compatibility with subsequent ion manipulations. This work examined the TW, RF, and DC confining field SLIM parameters involved in ion accumulation, injection, transmission and separation in the FF IM module using both direct ion current and MS measurements. Wide m/z range ion transmission is demonstrated, along with significant increases in signal to noise (S/N) ratios due to the larger ion populations injected. Additionally, we observed a reduction in the chemical background, which was attributed to more efficient desolvation of solvent related clusters over the extended ion accumulation periods. The TW SLIM FF IM module is anticipated to be especially effective as a front end for long path SLIM IM separation modules.

  20. Greatly Increasing Trapped Ion Populations for Mobility Separations Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Webb, Ian K; Hamid, Ahmed M; Norheim, Randolph V; Prost, Spencer A; Sandoval, Jeremy A; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2016-10-07

    The initial use of traveling waves (TW) for ion mobility (IM) separations using structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) employed an ion funnel trap (IFT) to accumulate ions from a continuous electrospray ionization source and was limited to injected ion populations of ∼10(6) charges due to the onset of space charge effects in the trapping region. Additional limitations arise due to the loss of resolution for the injection of ions over longer periods, such as in extended pulses. In this work a new SLIM "flat funnel" (FF) module has been developed and demonstrated to enable the accumulation of much larger ion populations and their injection for IM separations. Ion current measurements indicate a capacity of ∼3.2 × 10(8) charges for the extended trapping volume, over an order of magnitude greater than that of the IFT. The orthogonal ion injection into a funnel shaped separation region can greatly reduce space charge effects during the initial IM separation stage, and the gradually reduced width of the path allows the ion packet to be increasingly compressed in the lateral dimension as the separation progresses, allowing efficient transmission through conductance limits or compatibility with subsequent ion manipulations. This work examined the TW, rf, and dc confining field SLIM parameters involved in ion accumulation, injection, transmission, and IM separation in the FF module using both direct ion current and MS measurements. Wide m/z range ion transmission is demonstrated, along with significant increases in the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) due to the larger ion populations injected. Additionally, we observed a reduction in the chemical background, which was attributed to more efficient desolvation of solvent related clusters over the extended ion accumulation periods. The TW SLIM FF IM module is anticipated to be especially effective as a front end for long path SLIM IM separation modules.

  1. Relativistic degenerate effects of electrons and positrons on modulational instability of quantum ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas with two polarity ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁路; 王云良; 路彦珍

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of quantum ion acoustic wave (QIAW) is investigated in a four-component plasma com-posed of warm classical positive ions and negative ions, as well as inertialess relativistically degenerate electrons and positrons. A nonlinear Schr ¨odinger equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation method, which governs the dynamics of QIAW packets. The modulation instability analysis of QIAWs is considered based on the typical parameters of the white dwarf. The results exhibit that both in weakly relativistic limit and in ultrarelativistic limit, the modulational instability regions are sensitively dependent on the ratios of temperature and number density of negative ions to those of positive ions respectively, and on relativistically degenerate effect as well.

  2. Thermalization of dense hadronic matter in Au + Au collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Somnath; De, Sudipan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2016-11-01

    The conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium of baryons (nonstrange, strange) and mesons (strange) are presented for central Au + Au collisions at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) energies using the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The net particle density, longitudinal-to-transverse pressure anisotropy, and inverse slope parameters of the energy spectra of nonstrange and strange hadrons are calculated inside a cell in the central region within rapidity window |y |evolution of the entropy densities at FAIR energies are found to be very similar to the ideal hydrodynamic behavior at top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy.

  3. Squeezing of Ion Populations and Peaks in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations and Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations using Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin M.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-11-02

    In this work, we report an approach for spatial and temporal gas phase ion population manipulation, and demonstrate its application for the collapse of the ion distributions in ion mobility (IM) separations into tighter packets providing higher sensitivity measurements in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS). We do this for ions moving from a conventionally traveling wave (TW)-driven region to a region where the TW is intermittently halted or ‘stuttered’. This approach causes the ion packets spanning a number of TW-created traveling traps (TT) to be redistributed into fewer TT, resulting in spatial compression. The degree of spatial compression is controllable and determined by the ratio of stationary time of the TW in the second region to its moving time. This compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach has been implemented using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) in conjunction with MS. CRIMP with the SLIM-MS platform is shown to provide increased peak intensities, reduced peak widths, and improved S/N ratios with MS detection. CRIMP also provides a foundation for extremely long path length and multi-pass IM separations in SLIM providing greatly enhanced IM resolution by reducing the detrimental effects of diffusional peak broadening due to increasing peak widths.

  4. Squeezing of Ion Populations and Peaks in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations and Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Using Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya V B; Hamid, Ahmed M; Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Webb, Ian K; Baker, Erin S; Prost, Spencer A; Norheim, Randolph V; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2016-12-06

    In this work we report an approach for spatial and temporal gas-phase ion population manipulation, wherein we collapse ion distributions in ion mobility (IM) separations into tighter packets providing higher sensitivity measurements in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS). We do this for ions moving from a conventional traveling wave (TW)-driven region to a region where the TW is intermittently halted or "stuttered". This approach causes the ion packets spanning a number of TW-created traveling traps (TT) to be redistributed into fewer TT, resulting in spatial compression. The degree of spatial compression is controllable and determined by the ratio of stationary time of the TW in the second region to its moving time. This compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach has been implemented using "structures for lossless ion manipulations" (SLIM) in conjunction with MS. CRIMP with the SLIM-MS platform is shown to provide increased peak intensities, reduced peak widths, and improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios with MS detection. CRIMP also provides a foundation for extremely long path length and multipass IM separations in SLIM providing greatly enhanced IM resolution by reducing the detrimental effects of diffusional peak broadening and increasing peak widths.

  5. Dense Breasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also appear white on mammography, they can be hidden by or within dense breast tissue. Other imaging ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  6. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally-unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of ...

  7. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2

  8. New analytical solutions for propagation of small but finite amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Ali, M. Hossain

    2016-01-01

    The theoretical and numerical studies have been investigated on the nonlinear propagation of electrostatic ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in an un-magnetized Thomas-Fermi plasma system consisting of electron, positrons, and positive ions for both of ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic degenerate electrons. Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation is derived from the model equations by using the well-known reductive perturbation method. This equation is solved by employing the generalized Riccati equation mapping method. The hyperbolic functions type solutions to the K-dV equation are only considered for describing the effect of plasma parameters on the propagation of electrostatic IAWs for both of ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic degenerate electrons. The obtained results may be helpful in proper understanding the features of small but finite amplitude localized IAWs in degenerate plasmas and provide the mathematical foundation in plasma physics.

  9. The formation of the ion seed population at quasi-parallel shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johlander, Andreas; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Retino, Alessandro; Dandouras, Iannis; Yordanova, Emiliya; André, Mats

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasma are known to be capable of accelerating particles to very high energies through Fermi acceleration. However, this process requires an injection of a suprathermal ion seed population. The process of how the ion seed population is formed is still not fully understood. In this work, we studied the formation of the ion seed population as a result of solar wind ions being reflected off short large amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMS) in the quasi-parallel bow shock of Earth. For our analysis, we used field and particle data from the four Cluster satellites. In order to follow the ion dynamics at fast temporal scales we used ion subspin data from times when the separation of the satellites was ~ 100 km. We have found that SLAMS nearly specularly reflect solar wind ions through magnetic mirroring. We have also performed test particle simulations of ions encountering a SLAMS using field data from the satellites. The simulations show that solar wind ions with lower energy are more likely to be reflected off the SLAMS while high energy ions pass through the SLAMS, which is consistent with observational ion data. Additionally, high energy ions are observed upstream of the shock. These are most likely ions that were reflected off a SLAMS and energy conservation in the solar wind frame causes an increase of energy in the spacecraft frame.

  10. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of dense cell populations for metabolic studies and bioreactor engineering: a synergistic partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, B E; Gillies, R J

    1991-01-01

    Commercial exploitation of the fruits of recombinant DNA and cell fusion technologies is significantly limited by the lack of fundamental metabolic information on the cell lines of interest, whether these are plant, animal, insect, or microbial cells. NMR can help to provide this information and thereby improve bioreactor design and operation. However, in the case of on-line NMR of dense cell culture devices for metabolic studies, these devices are inherently heterogeneous bioreactors. To ensure that the metabolic information generated is reliable, a number of precautions should be taken. These are the same precautions that should be taken to ensure that commercial bioreactors operate in a reaction-controlled regime. Therefore, reactor engineering methodologies, particularly diffusion and reaction analyses and reaction monitoring by whole-cell NMR must go hand in hand, each extending, complementing, and validating the other.

  12. Incineration of Pre-Treated Municipal Solid Waste (MSW for Energy Co-Generation in a Non-Densely Populated Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Trulli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The planning actions in municipal solid waste (MSW management must follow strategies aimed at obtaining economies of scale. At the regional basin, a proper feasibility analysis of treatment and disposal plants should be based on the collection and analysis of data available on production rate and technological characteristics of waste. Considering the regulations constraint, the energy recovery is limited by the creation of small or medium-sized incineration plants, while separated collection strongly influences the heating value of the residual MSW. Moreover, separated collection of organic fraction in non-densely populated area is burdensome and difficult to manage. The paper shows the results of the analysis carried out to evaluate the potential energy recovery using a combined cycle for the incineration of mechanically pre-treated MSW in Basilicata, a non-densely populated region in Southern Italy. In order to focalize the role of sieving as pre-treatment, the evaluation on the MSW sieved fraction heating value was presented. Co-generative (heat and power production plant was compared to other MSW management solutions (e.g., direct landfilling, also considering the environmental impact in terms of greenhouse gases (GHGs emissions.

  13. Identifying Societal Preferences for River Restoration in a Densely Populated Urban Environment: Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Central Brussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wendy Y.; Liekens, Inge; Broekx, Steven

    2017-08-01

    One of the major challenges facing river restoration in densely populated urban areas has been the disparity between the expectations of policy-makers and societal preferences. This study aimed to elicit public preferences and elucidate underlying sources of preference heterogeneity, using the Zenne River in central Brussels, Belgium, as a case study. A discrete choice experiment was administered to a representative sample of the Brussels population. Five attributes were specified, including water quality, ecological status, hydromorphological features of channels, recreational opportunities, and monetary cost. Our econometric analysis based on mixed logit models revealed that overall public would like to have a more natural river (open and naturalized channel, good water quality, and with rich species diversity), while achieving good water quality was the most preferred attribute. Respondents categorized as male, non-Belgian citizen, or not being a member of an environmental organization constituted an inclination to prefer the status quo. Belgian citizens showed a pronounced preference for good biodiversity, and being a member of an environmental organization could moderate the strong preference for good water quality. This study provided insights into the relative attractiveness of key attributes pertaining to river restoration, in general, and served as a useful input to the ongoing discussion concerning the future plan for the Zenne River in Brussels, specifically. Possible implications also exist for other urban river restorations in the rest of Europe, where the Water Framework Directive has become a major impetus for the expansion of freshwater ecosystem restoration from rural and peri-urban areas to densely populated urban areas. Particularly, the cultural heterogeneity of societal preferences should be tested and accounted for to compare the welfare impacts of river restoration and to facilitate benefit transfer, within and between river basins, in the

  14. Holocene phreatomagmatic eruptions alongside the densely populated northern shoreline of Lake Kivu, East African Rift: timing and hazard implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Sam; Smets, Benoît; Fontijn, Karen; Rukeza, Montfort Bagalwa; De Marie Fikiri Migabo, Antoine; Milungu, Albert Kyambikwa; Namogo, Didier Birimwiragi; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) represents the most active zone of volcanism in the western branch of the East African Rift System. While the VVP's two historically active volcanoes, Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo, have built scoria cones and lava flows in the adjacent lava fields, several small phreatomagmatic eruptive centers lie along Lake Kivu's northern shoreline, highlighting the potential for explosive magma-water interaction. Their presence in the densely urbanized Sake-Goma-Gisenyi area necessitates an assessment of their eruptive mechanisms and chronology. Some of these eruptive centers possess multiple vents, and depositional contacts suggest distinct eruptive phases within a single structure. Depositional facies range from polymict tuff breccia to tuff and loose lapilli, often impacted by blocks and volcanic bombs. Along with the presence of dilute pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits, indicators of magma-water interaction include the presence of fine palagonitized ash, ash aggregates, cross-bedding, and ballistic impact sags. We estimate that at least 15 phreatomagmatic eruptions occurred in the Holocene, during which Lake Kivu rose to its current water level. Radiocarbon dates of five paleosols in the top of volcanic tuff deposits range between ˜2500 and ˜150 cal. year bp and suggest centennial- to millennial-scale recurrence of phreatomagmatic activity. A vast part of the currently urbanized zone on the northern shoreline of Lake Kivu was most likely impacted by products from phreatomagmatic activity, including PDC events, during the Late Holocene, highlighting the need to consider explosive magma-water interaction as a potential scenario in future risk assessments.

  15. The kinetics of the population and spectral gain for a relativistic hydrogenlike ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Magunov, A.I.; Tkachev, A.N.; Iakovlenko, S.I. (Institut Obshchei Fiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-07-01

    The kinetics of the population and spectral gain for an H-like Ti-XXII ion is calculated with allowance for fine level splitting. Allowance for the relativistic effects in the kinetics of relaxation and broadening of the spectral lines of an H-like ion leads to a sharp increase in the gain. For a Ti XXII ion, x43 amounted to 100/cm. 11 refs.

  16. Energy loss and charge state distribution of calcium ions in dense moderately coupled carbon plasma; Energieverlust und Ladungsverteilung von Calciumionen in dichtem, schwach gekoppeltem Kohlenstoffplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortner, Alex

    2015-07-15

    In this thesis the interaction of swift calcium ions (Energy: 3.5 MeV/u) with a dense and moderately coupled carbon plasma (Coupling parameter: Γ=0.1-0.5) is investigated. The plasma state is generated by heating a thin carbon foil volumetrically by thermal X-ray radiation. The thermal X-ray radiation itself is generated by the conversion of a high energy laser beam in a hohlraum cavity. Compared to earlier ion stopping experiments the electron density and the plasma coupling parameter could be increased by an order of magnitude. This work provides the first time experimental energy loss and charge state distribution data in this moderately coupled interaction regime. The thesis consists of a theoretical part where the ion beam plasma interaction is studied for a broad range of plasma parameters and an experimental part where the ion beam interaction with the hohlraum plasma target is measured. All the described experiments were carried out at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This facility offers the unique possibility to combine a heavy ion beam from an accelerator with a high energy laser beam in one interaction chamber. An intense laser pulse (150 J of laser energy in 1 ns at λ{sub L}=527 nm) is focused inside a 600 μm diameter spherical cavity and generates a hot gold plasma that emits X-rays. The absorbed and reemitted radiation establishes a spatially uniform temperature distribution in the cavity and serves as an intense, isotropic X-ray source with a quasi-thermal spectral distribution. These thermal X-rays with a radiation temperature of T{sub r}=98±6 eV then propagate into a secondary cylindrical hohlraum (diameter: 1000 μm, length: 950 μm) where they volumetrically heat two thin carbon foils to the plasma state. The radiation temperature in the secondary hohlraum is T{sub r}=33±5 eV. This indirect laser heating scheme has the advantage that the whole sample volume is instantaneously heated and that the plasma is

  17. Energy loss and charge state distribution of calcium ions in dense moderately coupled carbon plasma; Energieverlust und Ladungsverteilung von Calciumionen in dichtem, schwach gekoppeltem Kohlenstoffplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortner, Alex

    2015-07-15

    In this thesis the interaction of swift calcium ions (Energy: 3.5 MeV/u) with a dense and moderately coupled carbon plasma (Coupling parameter: Γ=0.1-0.5) is investigated. The plasma state is generated by heating a thin carbon foil volumetrically by thermal X-ray radiation. The thermal X-ray radiation itself is generated by the conversion of a high energy laser beam in a hohlraum cavity. Compared to earlier ion stopping experiments the electron density and the plasma coupling parameter could be increased by an order of magnitude. This work provides the first time experimental energy loss and charge state distribution data in this moderately coupled interaction regime. The thesis consists of a theoretical part where the ion beam plasma interaction is studied for a broad range of plasma parameters and an experimental part where the ion beam interaction with the hohlraum plasma target is measured. All the described experiments were carried out at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This facility offers the unique possibility to combine a heavy ion beam from an accelerator with a high energy laser beam in one interaction chamber. An intense laser pulse (150 J of laser energy in 1 ns at λ{sub L}=527 nm) is focused inside a 600 μm diameter spherical cavity and generates a hot gold plasma that emits X-rays. The absorbed and reemitted radiation establishes a spatially uniform temperature distribution in the cavity and serves as an intense, isotropic X-ray source with a quasi-thermal spectral distribution. These thermal X-rays with a radiation temperature of T{sub r}=98±6 eV then propagate into a secondary cylindrical hohlraum (diameter: 1000 μm, length: 950 μm) where they volumetrically heat two thin carbon foils to the plasma state. The radiation temperature in the secondary hohlraum is T{sub r}=33±5 eV. This indirect laser heating scheme has the advantage that the whole sample volume is instantaneously heated and that the plasma is

  18. Calculations for populations of selected isotopes in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Majumder, A

    2000-01-01

    We compute the populations of isotopes of Boron, Carbon and Nitrogen measured experimentally in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. A two component soluble statistical model is used to find the initial populations of different nuclei at a finite temperature. These initial populations are both in particle stable and particle unstable states. The particle unstable states then decay. The final populations after these decays are computed and compared with experimental data.

  19. Spatial Ecology of the Critically Endangered Fijian Crested Iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an Extremely Dense Population: Implications for Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne F.; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S.; Keogh, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs. PMID:24019902

  20. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne F; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S; Keogh, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs.

  1. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F Morrison

    Full Text Available The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs.

  2. Density and field effect on electron-ion collision cross-sections in hot dense plasma; Etude de l'influence de l'environnement plasma sur les sections efficaces d'excitation collisionnelle electron-ion dans un plasma chaud et dense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2003-03-15

    Collisional excitation cross-sections are essential for the modeling of the properties of non equilibrium plasmas. There has been a lot of work on electron impact excitation of isolated ions, but in dense plasmas, neighboring particles are expected to widely disturb these electron transitions in atoms. Plasma modeling through a radially perturbed potential has already been done but is not satisfactory as it does not account for levels degeneracy breaking and its consequences. Introduction of a quasistatic electric micro-field of neighboring ions allows us to break spherical symmetry. Our original theoretical study has given birth to a numerical code that accurately computes collisional strengths and rates (in the Distorted Waves approach) in atoms submitted to a realistic micro-field. Hydrogen- and helium-like aluminium is studied. Stark mixing widely increases rates of transitions from high l levels and forbidden transitions are field-enhanced by many orders of magnitude until they reach allowed ones. Eventually, we conduct an elementary stationary collisional radiative study to investigate field-enhancement effects on corresponding line shapes. In cases we study (aluminium, hydrogen- and helium-like) we find a relatively weak increase of K-shell line broadening.

  3. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M F; Vranjes, J

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0)exp[-(vph-vf0)2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0vph.

  4. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, M F

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0) exp[-(vph-vf0)^2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0 < vph.

  5. Depletion of the excited state population in negative ions using laser photodetachment in a gas filled RF quadrupole ion guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, A. O. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Hanstorp, D. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Forstner, Dr. Oliver [University of Vienna, Austria; Gibson, N. [Denison University, Granville, Ohio; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Liu, Yuan [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The depopulation of excited states in beams of negatively charged carbon and silicon ions was demonstrated using collisional detachment and laser photodetachment in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion guide filled with helium. The high-lying, loosely bound {sup 2}D excited state in C{sup -} was completely depleted through collisional detachment alone, which was quantitatively determined within 6%. For Si{sup -} the combined signal from the population in the {sup 2}P and {sup 2}D excited states was only partly depleted through collisions in the cooler. The loosely bound {sup 2}P state was likely to be completely depopulated, and the more tightly bound {sup 2}D state was partly depopulated through collisions. 98(2)% of the remaining {sup 2}D population was removed by photodetachment in the cooler using less than 2 W laser power. The total reduction of the excited population in Si{sup -}, including collisional detachment and photodetachment, was estimated to be 99(1)%. Employing this novel technique to produce a pure ground state negative ion beam offers possibilities of enhancing selectivity, as well as accuracy, in high-precision experiments on atomic as well as molecular negative ions.

  6. Risk assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and trace metals in River Nile up- and downstream of a densely populated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Wael A; Mahmoud, Hamada M

    2017-02-01

    Cairo city is the largest populated area along the whole course of River Nile with a wide range of anthropogenic activities. Efforts to restore fish habitat and recreational use of the river have raised concerns about its water, sediment and biota quality. This study provides a baseline data on the levels of PCBs and trace metals in River Nile along Cairo sector and implements the formulation of monitoring activities of the river's pollution status. Water, sediment and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) samples were collected during summer season, 2013 from two sites, up- and downstream, for detection and determination of 11 PCB congeners (PCBs 28, 44, 52, 70, 101, 105, 118, 138, 152, 180 and 192) as well as six trace metals (Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Pb and Fe). Evidences of long- or short-term exposures to these contaminants as well as its accumulation tendency were assessed by integrating the obtained analytical results of biotic and abiotic components of this aquatic ecosystem. All calculated lifetime cancer risk values for PCBs showed unacceptable risk of cancer for human consumers at both normal and subsistence fish consumption rates. The calculated hazard index for total PCBs indicates that fish are not safe for human consumption except in site 1 at normal consumption rate. Meanwhile, trace metals do not pose unacceptable risks at both consumption rates except for Pb in site 1 at subsistence consumption rate.

  7. Charge exchange process with low energy multicharged ions: n, l populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetioui, A.; Rozet, J.P.; Vernhet, D.; Wohrer, K.; Bouisset, P.; Touati, A.; Stephan, C.

    1985-11-01

    Theoretical models for low energy charge exchange collisions of highly charged ions are reviewed in connection with population final states. A simple experimental method is presented which provides the most populated n level, the percentage of p substates and the mean l value. Results are reported for 10 keV/q Al S collisions on H2 and He. (orig.).

  8. Effects of watershed land-cover on the biogeochemical properties of estuarine tidal flat sediments: A test in a densely-populated subtropical island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akiko; Touyama, Shouji; Kuwae, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Osamu; Sakamaki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of watershed land cover on the biogeochemical properties of estuarine tidal flat sediment were examined in estuarine tidal flats of 16 watersheds in a densely populated, subtropical island of Japan. Despite the small sizes of the watersheds (human nutrient inputs significantly increase algae-derived deposits in estuaries with relatively more developed watersheds. The δ13C of particulate organic matter (POM) was negatively related to watershed forest cover. This suggests that terrestrially derived-origin POM deposits are substantial in the estuaries connected to watersheds with relatively high forest cover. However, the chemical properties of tidal flat sediment were not related to chemical indicators of POM in the base flow. We hypothesize that substantial terrestrially derived POM is discharged to estuaries of high-forest-cover watersheds during high flow, and this partially controls the chemical properties of estuarine sediments. Our results demonstrate that the chemical properties of estuarine tidal flats are associated with watershed land cover, and that the dominant processes controlling estuarine sediment properties differ among watersheds depending on land cover composition.

  9. Stereospecific growth of densely populated rutile mesoporous TiO{sub 2} nanoplate films: a facile low temperature chemical synthesis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Go-Woon; Cho, Young-Jin; Mane, Rajaram S; Shashikala, V; Yadav, Jyotiprakash; Gaikwad, Rajendra S; Jung, Kwang-Deog; Joo, Oh-Shim [Clean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Ambade, Swapnil B; Lee, Soo-Hyoung [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Nanomaterials Processing Research Center, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sung-Hwan, E-mail: shlee66@jbnu.ac.kr, E-mail: joocat@kist.re.kr [Inorganic Nanomaterials Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-12

    We report for the first time, using a simple and environmentally benign chemical method, the low temperature synthesis of densely populated upright-standing rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoplate films onto a glass substrate from a mixture of titanium trichloride, hydrogen peroxide and thiourea in triply distilled water. The rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoplate films (the phase is confirmed from x-ray diffraction analysis, selected area electron diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman shift) are 20-35 nm wide and 100-120 nm long. The chemical reaction kinetics for the growth of these upright-standing TiO{sub 2} nanoplate films is also interpreted. Films of TiO{sub 2} nanoplates are optically transparent in the visible region with a sharp absorption edge close to 350 nm, confirming an indirect band gap energy of 3.12 eV. The Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area, Barret-Joyner-Halenda pore volume and pore diameter, obtained from N{sub 2} physisorption studies, are 82 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, 0.0964 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} and 3.5 nm, respectively, confirming the mesoporosity of scratched rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoplate powder that would be ideal for the direct fabrication of nanoscaled devices including upcoming dye-sensitized solar cells and gas sensors.

  10. The Out-of-the-Delta Hypothesis: dense human populations in low-lying river deltas served as agents for the evolution of a deadly pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eBoucher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholera is a diarrheal disease that has changed the history of mankind, devastating the world with seven pandemics from 1817 to the present day. Although there is little doubt in the causative agent of these pandemics being Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup, where, when, and how this pathogen emerged is not well understood. V. cholerae is a ubiquitous coastal species that likely existed for tens of thousands of years. However, the evolution of a strain capable of causing a large-scale epidemic is likely more recent historically. Here, we propose that the unique human and physical geography of low-lying river deltas made it possible for an environmental bacterium to evolve into a deadly human pathogen. Such areas are often densely populated and salt intrusion in drinking water frequent. As V. cholerae is most abundant in brackish water, its favored environment, it is likely that coastal inhabitants would regularly ingest the bacterium and release it back in the environment. This creates a continuous selection pressure for V. cholerae to adapt to life in the human gut.

  11. Reference values assessment in a Mediterranean population for small dense low-density lipoprotein concentration isolated by an optimized precipitation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Cidón B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bárbara Fernández-Cidón,1–3 Ariadna Padró-Miquel,1 Pedro Alía-Ramos,1 María José Castro-Castro,1 Marta Fanlo-Maresma,4 Dolors Dot-Bach,1 José Valero-Politi,1 Xavier Pintó-Sala,4 Beatriz Candás-Estébanez1 1Clinical Laboratory, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; 2Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biomedicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Pharmacotherapy, Pharmacogenetics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Institut d’Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; 4Cardiovascular Risk Unit, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Background: High serum concentrations of small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sd-LDL-c particles are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Their clinical application has been hindered as a consequence of the laborious current method used for their quantification. Objective: Optimize a simple and fast precipitation method to isolate sd-LDL particles and establish a reference interval in a Mediterranean population. Materials and methods: Forty-five serum samples were collected, and sd-LDL particles were isolated using a modified heparin-Mg2+ precipitation method. sd-LDL-c concentration was calculated by subtracting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c from the total cholesterol measured in the supernatant. This method was compared with the reference method (ultracentrifugation. Reference values were estimated according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine recommendations. sd-LDL-c concentration was measured in serums from 79 subjects with no lipid metabolism abnormalities. Results: The Passing–Bablok regression equation is y = 1.52 (0.72 to 1.73 + 0.07x (−0.1 to 0.13, demonstrating no significant statistical differences

  12. Shit and piss : An environmental history of the meaning and management of human excrement in densely populated areas and urban regions, with a focus on agriculture and public health issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steinig, Wenzel

    2016-01-01

    This thesis analyses individual and societal relations to human excrement by looking at historical and contemporary examples of symbolics and management systems of human shit and piss. It furthermore connects urban culture to a particular type of perception of the meaning of human waste. End-of-pipe, large scale sewerage solutions for densely populated areas and cities are analysed for their historical origins and contemporary ramifications, and contrasted with examples of classical, mediaeva...

  13. 性能化设计在小型人员密集场所中的应用%Application of performance-based design in small densely populated places

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘米达

    2011-01-01

    针对人员密集场所的建筑特点、火灾隐患现状,采用论述的方法,分析了小型人员密集场所的基本情况及普遍存在的火灾隐患,总结了应用性能化消防设计指导小型人员密集场所火灾隐患整改的意义,并通过多因数分析,结合消防监督工作实践,介绍了当前性能化消防设计的思路,以提高小型人员密集场所综合防御火灾的能力和经营者的消防意识,从而避免出现群死群伤的恶性火灾事故.%Based on the building characteristics of densely populated places and the current situation of fire hazards, analyses were made of the general situation of small densely-populated places and common fire hazards.The significance of fire hazards rectification at small densely populated places directed by the performance-based fire fighting design was summarized.Meanwhile, based on multi-factor analysis and fire fighting supervising practice, current thought of performance-based fire fighting design was introduced to improve comprehensive abilities of fire prevention in small densely populated places and strengthen operators' awareness of fire fighting so that fatal fire accidents of heavy group casualties can be avoided.

  14. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  15. Impact assessment of biomass-based district heating systems in densely populated communities. Part II: Would the replacement of fossil fuels improve ambient air quality and human health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Olga; Bi, Xiaotao; Lau, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    To determine if replacing fossil fuel combustion with biomass gasification would impact air quality, we evaluated the impact of a small-scale biomass gasification plant (BRDF) at a university campus over 5 scenarios. The overall incremental contribution of fine particles (PM2.5) is found to be at least one order of magnitude lower than the provincial air quality objectives. The maximum PM2.5 emission from the natural gas fueled power house (PH) could adversely add to the already high background concentration levels. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions from the BRDF with no engineered pollution controls for NOx in place exceeded the provincial objective in all seasons except during summer. The impact score, IS, was the highest for NO2 (677 Disability Adjusted Life Years, DALY) when biomass entirely replaced fossil fuels, and the highest for PM2.5 (64 DALY) and CO (3 DALY) if all energy was produced by natural gas at PH. Complete replacement of fossil fuels by one biomass plant can result in almost 28% higher health impacts (708 DALY) compared to 513 DALY when both the current BRDF and the PH are operational mostly due to uncontrolled NO2 emissions. Observations from this study inform academic community, city planners, policy makers and technology developers on the impacts of community district heating systems and possible mitigation strategies: a) community energy demand could be met either by splitting emissions into more than one source at different locations and different fuel types or by a single source with the least-impact-based location selection criteria with biomass as a fuel; b) advanced high-efficiency pollution control devices are essential to lower emissions for emission sources located in a densely populated community; c) a spatial and temporal impact assessment should be performed in developing bioenergy-based district heating systems, in which the capital and operational costs should be balanced with not only the benefit to greenhouse gas emission

  16. Population densities of hydrogenlike ions in a non-Maxwellian plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbourn, J M

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of non-Maxwellian electron energy distributions on the population densities of excited atomic levels for hydrogenlike ions. We model the electron energy distribution function by two Maxwellian finite elements, one approximating the bulk distribution with temperature T(b) and the other the tail distribution with temperature T(t). We present results for various T(b)/T(t) ratios for Si XIV.

  17. Time-Dependent Cylindrical and Spherical Solitary Structures and Double Layers of Dust Ion-Acoustic Waves in Ultra-Relativistic Dense Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Akhter; M.M.Hossain; A.A.Mamun

    2013-01-01

    Cylindrical and spherical (nonplanar) solitary waves (SWs) and double layers (DLs) in a multi-ion plasma system (containing inertial positively as well as negatively charged ions,non-inertial degenerate electrons,and negatively charged static dust) are studied by employing the standard reductive perturbation method.The modified Gardner (MG) equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust ion-acoustic (DIA) waves is derived,and its nonplanar SWs and DLs solutions are numerically analyzed.The parametric regimes for the existence of SWs,which are associated with both positive and negative potential,and DLs which are associated with negative potential,are obtained.The basic features of nonplanar DIA SWs,and DLs,which are found to be different from planar ones,are also identified.

  18. Dense topological spaces and dense continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldwoah, Khaled A.

    2013-09-01

    There are several attempts to generalize (or "widen") the concept of topological space. This paper uses equivalence relations to generalize the concept of topological space via the concept of equivalence relations. By the generalization, we can introduce from particular topology on a nonempty set X many new topologies, we call anyone of these new topologies a dense topology. In addition, we formulate some simple properties of dense topologies and study suitable generalizations of the concepts of limit points, closeness and continuity, as well as Jackson, Nörlund and Hahn dense topologies.

  19. Venusian ion populations and bow shock as seen by the ASPERA-4 ion instrument on Venus Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Whittaker, I.; Guymer, G.; Barabash, S.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction We examine ion populations at Venus. Previous models use magnetic crossing points to derive the bow shock position. The current work uses data from the ASPERA-4 (Analyser of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms) [1] instrument to measure ion populations and derive a bow shock position at Venus. Instrumentation The ASPERA-4 instrument flies onboard Venus Express (VEX) and is comprised of five different detectors (Barabash et al 2006 [1]). A neutral particle detector and analyser, an electron spectrometer and the Ion Mass Analyser (IMA) (ref). This paper uses the IMA instrument for all its data and an explanation of the specifications is required. The instrument is a top hat electrostatic analyser; it runs through voltages to scan look angles and also acceptance energies. In one look direction it scans through 96 different energy values before changing to the next. A full scan of all look directions and energies takes 192 seconds. Data Collection All data is weighed dependant upon its probability of the spacecraft measuring at a particular point and when fitted produces a value of 1.24 RV, somewhat closer distance for the sub solar point than previous authors - see figure 1. We separate the data according to slow or fast solar wind and not the similarities and differences in the results derived. The inbound and outbound bow shock crossings were taken by inspection of 106 orbits between November 2006 and February 2007. Any orbits where the crossing point was not clear or with data missing were ignored. The occupational probability is found from orbital mechanics. By setting up a grid and deriving the amount of time it takes to cross each square the probability as a whole can then be determined. Ion distribution plots Two dimensional maps of the ions are produced and the bow shock model overplotted to verify its accuracy, as shown in figure 3. The test of the bow shock is to place it upon real data and examine the fit. To do this ion distribution plots are

  20. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2015-11-01

    Exotic x-ray emission from dense matter is identified as the complex high intensity satellite emission from autoionizing states of highly charged ions. Among a vast amount of possible transitions, double K-hole hollow ion (HI) x-ray emission K0L X → K1L X-1 + hν hollow is of exceptional interest due to its advanced diagnostic potential for matter under extreme conditions where opacity and radiation fields play important roles. Transient ab initio simulations identify intense short pulse radiation fields (e.g., those emitted by x-ray free electron lasers) as possible driving mechanisms of HI x-ray emission via two distinct channels: first, successive photoionization of K-shell electrons, second, photoionization followed by resonant photoexciation among various ionic charge states that are simultaneously present in high density matter. We demonstrated that charge exchange of intermixing inhomogenous plasmas as well as collisions driven by suprathermal electrons are possible mechanisms to populate HIs to observable levels in dense plasmas, particularly in high current Z-pinch plasmas and high intensity field-ionized laser produced plasmas. Although the HI x-ray transitions were repeatedly identified in many other cases of dense optical laser produced plasmas on the basis of atomic structure calculations, their origin is far from being understood and remains one of the last holy grails of high intensity laser-matter interaction.

  1. Population Redistribution among Multiple Electronic States of Molecular Nitrogen Ions in Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Wu, Chengyin; Lu, Ruifeng; Li, Ziting; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yu, Chao; Wang, Zhanshan; Jiang, Hongbing; Gong, Qihuang; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on the population distributions in the ground and excited states of tunnel ionized N2 molecules at various driver wavelengths in the near- and mid-infrared range. Our results reveal that efficient couplings (i.e., population exchanges) between the ground state and the excited states occur in strong laser fields. The couplings result in the population inversion between the ground and the excited states at the wavelengths near 800 nm, which is verified by our experiment by observing the amplification of a seed at ~391 nm. The result provides insight into the mechanism of free-space nitrogen ion lasers generated in remote air with strong femtosecond laser pulses.

  2. Strange hadrons and antiprotons as probes of hot and dense nuclear matter in relativistic heavy-ion collisions; Seltsame Hadronen und Antiprotonen als Proben heisser und dichter Kernmaterie in relativistischen Schwerionenkollisionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Henry

    2010-09-15

    Strange particles play an important role as probes of relativistic heavy-ion collisions where hot and dense matter is studied. The focus of this thesis is on the production of strange particles within a transport model of Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) type. Current data of the HADES Collaboration concerning K{sup {+-}} and {phi} spectra provide the appropriate experimental framework. Moreover, the double-strange hyperon {xi}{sup -} is analyzed below the free NN production threshold. Hadron multiplicities, transversemomentum and rapidity spectra are compared with recent experimental data. Further important issues are in-medium mass shifts, the nuclear equation of state as well as the mean field of nucleons. Besides the study of AA collisions a comparison with recent ANKE data regarding the {phi} yield in pA collisions is done. Transparency ratios are determined and primarily investigated for absorption of {phi} mesons by means of the BUU transport code. Thereby, secondary {phi} production channels, isospin asymmetry and detector acceptance are important issues. A systematic analysis is presented for different system sizes. The momentum integrated Boltzmann equations describe dense nuclear matter on a hadronic level appearing in the Big Bang as well as in little bangs, in the context of kinetic off-equilibrium dynamics. This theory is applied to antiprotons and numerically calculated under consideration of various expansion models. Here, the evolution of proton- and antiproton densities till freeze-out is analyzed for ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions within a hadrochemic resonance gas model acting as a possible ansatz for solving the ''antiproton puzzle''. Furthermore, baryonic matter and antimatter is investigated in the early universe and the adiabatic path of cosmic matter is sketched in the QCD phase diagram. (orig.)

  3. Exact solutions for the populations of the n-level ion

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We present a matrix solution to the full equations of statistical equilibrium that give the energy level populations of collisionally-excited ions in photoionised gaseous nebulae. The rationale for such a calculation is to maintain a parity between improvements in the quantum-mechanically evaluated values for collision strengths and transition probabilities from the Iron and Opacity Projects on the one hand, and 3D photoionisation codes such as MOCASSIN and astrophysical software for producing nebular diagnostics such as the Nebular package for IRAF, on the other. We have taken advantage of the fact that mathematics programs such as MATLAB and Mathematica have proven to be very adept at symbolic manipulation providing a route to exact solutions for the n-level ion. In particular, we have avoided the substitution of estimated values. We provide the matrix solution for the 5-level ion as an example and show how the equations faithfully reduce to the exact solution for the 3-level ion. Through the forbidden line...

  4. Identification of specific sensory neuron populations for study of expressed ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie; Elmslie, Keith

    2013-12-24

    Sensory neurons transmit signals from various parts of the body to the central nervous system. The soma for these neurons are located in the dorsal root ganglia that line the spinal column. Understanding the receptors and channels expressed by these sensory afferent neurons could lead to novel therapies for disease. The initial step is to identify the specific subset of sensory neurons of interest. Here we describe a method to identify afferent neurons innervating the muscles by retrograde labeling using a fluorescent dye DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate). Understanding the contribution of ion channels to excitation of muscle afferents could help to better control excessive excitability induced by certain disease states such as peripheral vascular disease or heart failure. We used two approaches to identify the voltage dependent ion channels expressed by these neurons, patch clamp electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. While electrophysiology plus pharmacological blockers can identify functional ion channel types, we used immunocytochemistry to identify channels for which specific blockers were unavailable and to better understand the ion channel distribution pattern in the cell population. These techniques can be applied to other areas of the nervous system to study specific neuronal groups.

  5. DPIS for warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  6. Comparison of accelerated ion populations observed upstream of the bow shocks at Venus and Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Foreshock ions are compared between Venus and Mars at energies of 0.6~20 keV using the same ion instrument, the Ion Mass Analyser, on board both Venus Express and Mars Express. Venus Express often observes accelerated protons (2~6 times the solar wind energy that travel away from the Venus bow shock when the spacecraft location is magnetically connected to the bow shock. The observed ions have a large field-aligned velocity compared to the perpendicular velocity in the solar wind frame, and are similar to the field-aligned beams and intermediate gyrating component of the foreshock ions in the terrestrial upstream region. Mars Express does not observe similar foreshock ions as does Venus Express, indicating that the Martian foreshock does not possess the intermediate gyrating component in the upstream region on the dayside of the planet. Instead, two types of gyrating protons in the solar wind frame are observed very close to the Martian quasi-perpendicular bow shock within a proton gyroradius distance. The first type is observed only within the region which is about 400 km from the bow shock and flows tailward nearly along the bow shock with a similar velocity as the solar wind. The second type is observed up to about 700 km from the bow shock and has a bundled structure in the energy domain. A traversal on 12 July 2005, in which the energy-bunching came from bundling in the magnetic field direction, is further examined. The observed velocities of the latter population are consistent with multiple specular reflections of the solar wind at the bow shock, and the ions after the second reflection have a field-aligned velocity larger than that of the de Hoffman-Teller velocity frame, i.e., their guiding center has moved toward interplanetary space out from the bow shock. To account for the observed peculiarity of the Martian upstream region, finite gyroradius effects of the solar wind protons compared to the radius of the bow shock curvature and

  7. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region.

  8. Dense with Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ingkanisorn, W. Patricia; Mancini, Christine; Arai, Andrew E.

    2005-09-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a low encoding strength phase-cycled meta-DENSE readout and a two fold SENSE acceleration ( R = 2) is described. This combination reduces total breath-hold times for increased patient comfort during cardiac regional myocardial contractility studies. Images from phantoms, normal volunteers, and a patient are provided to demonstrate the SENSE-DENSE combination of methods. The overall breath-hold time is halved while preserving strain map quality.

  9. Quantum dense key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, I P; Castelletto, S; Rastello, M L; Bovino, F A; Colla, A M; Castagnoli, G C

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a new protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than BB84 one. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  10. Chemotaxis in densely populated tissue determines germinal center anatomy and cell motility: a new paradigm for the development of complex tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared B Hawkins

    Full Text Available Germinal centers (GCs are complex dynamic structures that form within lymph nodes as an essential process in the humoral immune response. They represent a paradigm for studying the regulation of cell movement in the development of complex anatomical structures. We have developed a simulation of a modified cyclic re-entry model of GC dynamics which successfully employs chemotaxis to recapitulate the anatomy of the primary follicle and the development of a mature GC, including correctly structured mantle, dark and light zones. We then show that correct single cell movement dynamics (including persistent random walk and inter-zonal crossing arise from this simulation as purely emergent properties. The major insight of our study is that chemotaxis can only achieve this when constrained by the known biological properties that cells are incompressible, exist in a densely packed environment, and must therefore compete for space. It is this interplay of chemotaxis and competition for limited space that generates all the complex and biologically accurate behaviors described here. Thus, from a single simple mechanism that is well documented in the biological literature, we can explain both higher level structure and single cell movement behaviors. To our knowledge this is the first GC model that is able to recapitulate both correctly detailed anatomy and single cell movement. This mechanism may have wide application for modeling other biological systems where cells undergo complex patterns of movement to produce defined anatomical structures with sharp tissue boundaries.

  11. Depletion of the excited state population in negative ions using laser photodetachment in a gas-filled RF quadrupole ion guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, A O; Hanstorp, D [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Forstner, O [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gibson, N D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023 (United States); Gottwald, T; Wendt, K [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Havener, C C; Liu, Y, E-mail: Dag.Hanstorp@physics.gu.s [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6368 (United States)

    2010-06-14

    The depopulation of excited states in beams of negatively charged carbon and silicon ions was demonstrated using collisional detachment and laser photodetachment in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion guide filled with helium. The high-lying, loosely bound {sup 2}D excited state in C{sup -} was completely depleted through collisional detachment alone, which was quantitatively determined within 6%. For Si{sup -} the combined signal from the population in the {sup 2}P and {sup 2}D excited states was only partly depleted through collisions in the cooler. The loosely bound {sup 2}P state was likely to be completely depopulated, and the more tightly bound {sup 2}D state was partly depopulated through collisions. 98(2)% of the remaining {sup 2}D population was removed by photodetachment in the cooler using less than 2 W laser power. The total reduction of the excited population in Si{sup -}, including collisional detachment and photodetachment, was estimated to be 99(1)%. Employing this novel technique to produce a pure ground state negative ion beam offers possibilities of enhancing selectivity, as well as accuracy, in high-precision experiments on atomic as well as molecular negative ions.

  12. Investigating Global Ion and Neutral Atom Populations with IBEX and Voyager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinski, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to investigate pickup ion (PUI) production in the solar wind and heliosheath (the region between the termination shock and the heliopause) and compute the distributed energetic neutral atom fluxes throughout the helioshpere. The simulations were constrained by comparing the model output against observations from Ulysses, New Horizons, Voyager 1 and 2, and IBEX space probes. As evidenced by the number of peer reviewed journal publications resulting from the project (13 plus three submitted) and their citation rate (156 citations over three years), the project has made a lasting contribution to the field. The outcome is a significant improvement of our understanding of the pickup ion production and distribution in the distant heliosphere. The team has accomplished the entire set of tasks A-H set forth in the proposal. Namely, the transport modeling framework has been augmented with two populations of pickup ions (PUIs), the boundary conditions for the plasma and interstellar neutral hydrogen were verified against Ulysses and New Horizons PUI and an optimal set of velocity diffusion parameters established. The multi-component fluxes of PUIs were computed and isotropic velocity distributions generated for each cell in the computer simulation that covered the heliosphere from 1.5 AU to the heliopause. The distributions were carefully compared with in situ measurements at 3 AU (Ulysses), 12 AU (New Horizons), and 80-90 AU (Voyager 1 and 2) as well as those inferred from ENA fluxes measured by Cassini and IBEX (Wu et al., 2016). Some examples of modeldata comparison are shown in Figure 1. We have used coupled MHD-plasma and kinetic-neutral code to investigate the likely range of plasma and magnetic field parameters in the local interstellar medium (LISM), based on the assumption that the shape of the IBEX ribbon could be used to determine the orientation of the interstellar magnetic field. While the magnetic field is believed to be

  13. Benchmarking of the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing for quantitative and qualitative assessment of cDNA populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomopoulos, Spyros; Wang, Yu Chang; Djambazian, Haig; Badescu, Dunarel; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2016-08-24

    To assess the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencing platform, cDNAs from the External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC) RNA Spike-In mix were sequenced. This mix mimics mammalian mRNA species and consists of 92 polyadenylated transcripts with known concentration. cDNA libraries were generated using a template switching protocol to facilitate the direct comparison between different sequencing platforms. The MinION performance was assessed for its ability to sequence the cDNAs directly with good accuracy in terms of abundance and full length. The abundance of the ERCC cDNA molecules sequenced by MinION agreed with their expected concentration. No length or GC content bias was observed. The majority of cDNAs were sequenced as full length. Additionally, a complex cDNA population derived from a human HEK-293 cell line was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500, PacBio RS II and ONT MinION platforms. We observed that there was a good agreement in the measured cDNA abundance between PacBio RS II and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.82, isoforms with length more than 700bp) and between Illumina HiSeq 2500 and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.75). This indicates that the ONT MinION can sequence quantitatively both long and short full length cDNA molecules.

  14. Modelling dense relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness they are no......Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness...... they are not naturally suited for kernel K-means. We propose a generative Bayesian model for dense matrices which generalize kernel K-means to consider off-diagonal interactions in matrices of interactions, and demonstrate its ability to detect structure on both artificial data and two real data sets....

  15. Derivatization patterns among starch chain populations assessed by ion-exchange chromatography: a model system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Sun; Huber, Kerry C

    2015-05-20

    Reaction patterns of wheat starch derivatized with a fluorescent probe (model reaction system) were investigated over the course of a reaction period (0.5, 4, 12, or 24h). Debranched derivatives were fractionated into three populations (Unbound, Bound-1, Bound-2) based on charge density via anion-exchange chromatography, with each ion-exchanged fraction further analyzed by size-exclusion chromatography (refractive index [RI] and fluorescence [FL] detection) to assess proportions and patterns of reaction on amylose (AM) and amylopectin (AP) long (LC), medium (MC), and short (SC) branch chains. Approximately 11-12% of the total chains accounted for 63-75% of the FL recovered in the two bound fractions. FL peaks representing AM, AP-LC, AP-MC, AP-SC, and intermediate material (eluted with AM based on molecular size, but reacted more akin to AP-LC) were monitored over the reaction period. Fractionation behaviors varied amongst starch chains, attributable to the impact of the granule structure on molecular reaction patterns.

  16. Dynamics of the Rydberg state population of slow highly charged ions impinging a solid surface at arbitrary collision geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljković, N. N.; Majkić, M. D.; Božanić, D. K.; Dojčilović, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the population dynamics of the intermediate Rydberg states of highly charged ions (core charge Z\\gg 1, principal quantum number {n}{{A}}\\gg 1) interacting with solid surfaces at arbitrary collision geometry. The recently developed resonant two-state vector model for the grazing incidence (2012 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45 215202) is extended to the quasi-resonant case and arbitrary angle of incidence. According to the model, the population probabilities depend both on the projectile parallel and perpendicular velocity components, in a complementary way. A cascade neutralization process for {{{Xe}}}Z+ ions, for Z=15{--}45, interacting with a conductive-surface is considered by taking into account the population dynamics. For an arbitrary collision geometry and given range of ionic velocities, a micro-staircase model for the simultaneous calculation of the kinetic energy gain and the charge state of the ion in front of the surface is proposed. The relevance of the obtained results for the explanation of the formation of nanostructures on solid surfaces by slow highly charged ions for normal incidence geometry is briefly discussed.

  17. A variant in the ABO gene explains the variation in soluble E-selectin levels-results from dense genotyping in two independent populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Karakas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated soluble (s E-selectin levels have been associated with various cardiovascular diseases. Recently, genetic variants in the ABO blood group have been related to E-selectin levels in a small cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes. We evaluated whether this association is reproducible in two large samples of Caucasians. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data of the present study was drawn from the population-based MONICA/KORA Augsburg study (n = 1,482 and the patients-based LURIC study (n = 1,546. A high-density genotyping array (50K IBC Chip containing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from E-selectin candidate genes selected on known biology of E-selectin metabolism, mouse genetic studies, and human genetic association studies, was used for genotyping. Linear regression analyses with adjustment for age and sex (and survey in KORA were applied to assess associations between gene variants and sE-selectin concentrations. A number of 12 SNPs (in KORA and 13 SNPs (in LURIC, all from the ABO blood group gene, were significantly associated with the log-transformed concentration of E-selectin. The strongest association was observed for rs651007 with a change of log-transformed sE-selectin per one copy of the minor allele of -0.37 ng/ml (p = 1.87×10(-103 in KORA and -0.35 ng/ml (p = 5.11×10(-84 in LURIC. Inclusion of rs651007 increased the explained sE-selectin variance by 0.256 in KORA and 0.213 in LURIC. All SNPs had minor allele frequencies above 20% showing a substantial gene variation. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings in two independent samples indicate that the genetic variants at the ABO locus affect sE-selectin levels. Since distinct genome-wide association studies linked the ABO gene with myocardial infarction (MI in the presence of coronary atherosclerosis and with coronary artery disease, these findings may not only enhance our understanding of adhesion molecule biology, but may also provide a focus for several

  18. Dense matter at RAON: Challenges and possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujeong; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Gaitanos, T.; Kim, Youngman

    2016-11-01

    Dense nuclear matter is ubiquitous in modern nuclear physics because it is related to many interesting microscopic and macroscopic phenomena such as heavy ion collisions, nuclear structure, and neutron stars. The on-going rare isotope science project in Korea will build up a rare isotope accelerator complex called RAON. One of the main goals of RAON is to investigate rare isotope physics including dense nuclear matter. Using the relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (RBUU) transport code, we estimate the properties of nuclear matter that can be created from low-energy heavyion collisions at RAON.We give predictions for the maximum baryon density, the isospin asymmetry and the temperature of nuclear matter that would be formed during 197Au+197Au and 132Sn+64Ni reactions. With a large isospin asymmetry, various theoretical studies indicate that the critical densities or temperatures of phase transitions to exotic states decrease. Because a large isospin asymmetry is expected in the dense matter created at RAON, we discuss possibilities of observing exotic states of dense nuclear matter at RAON for large isospin asymmetry.

  19. Warm dense crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  20. Dense Suspension Splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-03-01

    Upon impact onto a solid surface at several meters-per-second, a dense suspension plug splashes by ejecting liquid-coated particles. We study the mechanism for splash formation using experiments and a numerical model. In the model, the dense suspension is idealized as a collection of cohesionless, rigid grains with finite surface roughness. The grains also experience lubrication drag as they approach, collide inelastically and rebound away from each other. Simulations using this model reproduce the measured momentum distribution of ejected particles. They also provide direct evidence supporting the conclusion from earlier experiments that inelastic collisions, rather than viscous drag, dominate when the suspension contains macroscopic particles immersed in a low-viscosity solvent such as water. Finally, the simulations reveal two distinct routes for splash formation: a particle can be ejected by a single high momentum-change collision. More surprisingly, a succession of small momentum-change collisions can accumulate to eject a particle outwards. Supported by NSF through its MRSEC program (DMR-0820054) and fluid dynamics program (CBET-1336489).

  1. Dense Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure.If the axion mass energy is $mc^2= 10^{-4}$ eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about $10^{-14} M_\\odot$. We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If $mc^2 = 10^{-4}$ eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mas...

  2. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  3. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  4. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  5. Hyperons in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-28

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V{sub low} {sub k}) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V{sub low} {sub k} potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three

  6. The Effect Of Core Polarization On The Population Of The Rydberg States Of ArVIII Ions Escaping Solid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galijas, S. M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Majkic, M. D.; Bunjac, A. B.

    2010-07-01

    The appearance of maxima at nA = nmax in the population distributions for the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions ArVIII escaping solid surfaces at intermediate velocities ( v ˜1 a.u.) is discussed. Within the framework of the time-symmetrized two-state vector model, in which the state of a single active electron is described by two wave functions 1 ? and 2 ? , the regular maxima appear as a consequence of the electron tunneling through the potential barrier created between the ionic core and the polarized solid. The pronounced peaks (resonances) in the population distributions are addressed to the electron tunneling in the vicinity of the potential barrier top. The appropriate etalon equation method is used in the calculation of the function 1 ? ; the effect of core polarization is expressed via the function ?2.

  7. Resolving Ultrafast Heating of Dense Cryogenic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Harmand, M.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300 fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ˜0.9 ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  8. Oscillating propagators in heavy-dense QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlund, Oscar; Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2016-10-11

    Using Monte Carlo simulations and extended mean field theory calculations we show that the $3$-dimensional $\\mathbb{Z}_3$ spin model with complex external fields has non-monotonic correlators in some regions of its parameter space. This model serves as a proxy for heavy-dense QCD in $(3+1)$ dimensions. Non-monotonic correlators are intrinsically related to a complex mass spectrum and a liquid-like (or crystalline) behavior. A liquid phase could have implications for heavy-ion experiments, where it could leave detectable signals in the spatial correlations of baryons.

  9. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: a single-molecule study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci K; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-05-23

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins.

  10. Conductive dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremets, M.; Troyan, I.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen at ambient pressures and low temperatures forms a molecular crystal which is expected to display metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature Tc of 200-400 K. The superconductor may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures, and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. Recent experiments performed at low temperatures T 220 GPa, new Raman modes arose, providing evidence for the transformation to a new opaque and electrically conductive phase IV. Above 260 GPa, in the next phase V, hydrogen reflected light well. Its resistance was nearly temperature-independent over a wide temperature range, down to 30 K, indicating that the hydrogen was metallic. Releasing the pressure induced the metallic phase to transform directly into molecular hydrogen with significant hysteresis at 200 GPa and 295 K. These data were published in our paper: M. I. Eremets and I. A. Troyan "Conductive dense hydrogen." Nature Materials 10: 927-931. We will present also new results on hydrogen: phase diagram with phases IV and V determined in P,T domain up to 300 GPa and 350 K. We will also discuss possible structures of phase IV based on our Raman and infrared measurements up to 300 GPa.

  11. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  12. Heavy mesons in dense matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Gamermann, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; LlanesEstrada, FJ; Pelaez,

    2011-01-01

    Charmed mesons in dense matter are studied within a unitary coupled-channel approach which takes into account Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in this dense medium, and discuss their implications on hidden c

  13. Frontiers and challenges in warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Desjarlais, Michael; Redmer, Ronald; Trickey, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) occupies a loosely defined region of phase space intermediate between solid, liquid, gas, and plasma, and typically shares characteristics of two or more of these phases. WDM is generally associated with the combination of strongly coupled ions and moderately degenerate electrons, and careful attention to quantum physics and electronic structure is essential. The lack of a small perturbation parameter greatly limits approximate attempts at its accurate description. Since WDM resides at the intersection of solid state and high energy density physics, many high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments pass through this difficult region of phase space. Thus, understanding and modeling WDM is key to the success of experiments on diverse facilities. These include the National Ignition Campaign centered on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), pulsed-power driven experiments on the Z machine, ion-beam-driven WDM experiments on the NDCX-II, and fundamental WDM research at the Linear Coherent...

  14. X-ray scattering as a probe for warm dense mixtures and high-pressure miscibility

    CERN Document Server

    Wünsch, K; Gregori, G; Gericke, D O

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the abilities of elastic x-ray scattering to yield information on dense matter with multiple ion species and on the microscopic mixing in dense materials. Based on partial structure factors from ab initio simulations, a novel approach for the elastic scattering feature is applied to dense hydrogen-beryllium and hydrogen-helium mixtures. The scattering signal differs significantly between single species, real microscopic mixtures, and two separate fluids in the scattering volume.

  15. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .1. Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    Novel densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes were obtained by using functional branched prepolymers. Two types of soluble prepolymers were prepared from di- and trifunctional alkoxysilane monomers via cohydrolysis/condensation and for both final crosslinking occurred via hydrosilylation. The prepoly

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation of Opacities of Hot and Dense Au Plasma in the Unresolved Transition Array Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程新路; 杨莉; 张红; 杨向东

    2002-01-01

    The opacity, and its Planck and Rosseland mean values, of the hot and dense Au plasma in local thermodynamicsequilibrium are studied by the Monte Carlo method based on the unresolved transition array (UTA) approxima-tion. The average ion model and the Saha equation are used to determine the atomic level populations. Theresult gives a more detailed structure for frequency-dependent opacity than the popularly used super transitionarray or UTA in the photon energy range of 500eV to 2000eV. The Monte Carlo method can give a result betterthan that of the UTA, with almost the same computation effort.

  17. Design and Application of a New Recoil Water Device for the Dense Fixed-bed Ion-exchange Column in Uranium Hydrometallurgy%铀水冶密实固定床离子交换塔新型反冲出水装置的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷林; 丁德馨; 雷泽勇

    2011-01-01

    A new recoil water device was designed and processed after analysing the existing problem of the installation now using the dense fixed-bed ion-exchange column in uranium hydrometallurgy,which can reduce pressure in container effectively and decrease the leakage and the breakage rate of resin.%通过对现有铀水冶密实固定床离子交换塔的反冲出水装置所存在的问题进行分析,提出一种新型反冲出水装置,可有效降低塔内和反冲出水装置所承受压力,达到减少装置泄漏和树脂破损率的目的.

  18. Monitoring intracellular calcium ion dynamics in hair cell populations with Fluo-4 AM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateri J Spinelli

    Full Text Available We optimized Fluo-4 AM loading of chicken cochlea to report hair-bundle Ca(2+ signals in populations of hair cells. The bundle Ca(2+ signal reported the physiological state of the bundle and cell; extruding cells had very high bundle Fluo-4 fluorescence, cells with intact bundles and tip links had intermediate fluorescence, and damaged cells with broken tip links had low fluorescence. Moreover, Fluo-4 fluorescence in the bundle correlated with Ca(2+ entry through transduction channels; mechanically activating transduction channels increased the Fluo-4 signal, while breaking tip links with Ca(2+ chelators or blocking Ca(2+ entry through transduction channels each caused bundle and cell-body Fluo-4 fluorescence to decrease. These results show that when tip links break, bundle and soma Ca(2+ decrease, which could serve to stimulate the hair cell's tip-link regeneration process. Measurement of bundle Ca(2+ with Fluo-4 AM is therefore a simple method for assessing mechanotransduction in hair cells and permits an increased understanding of the interplay of tip links, transduction channels, and Ca(2+ signaling in the hair cell.

  19. Monitoring intracellular calcium ion dynamics in hair cell populations with Fluo-4 AM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Kateri J; Gillespie, Peter G

    2012-01-01

    We optimized Fluo-4 AM loading of chicken cochlea to report hair-bundle Ca(2+) signals in populations of hair cells. The bundle Ca(2+) signal reported the physiological state of the bundle and cell; extruding cells had very high bundle Fluo-4 fluorescence, cells with intact bundles and tip links had intermediate fluorescence, and damaged cells with broken tip links had low fluorescence. Moreover, Fluo-4 fluorescence in the bundle correlated with Ca(2+) entry through transduction channels; mechanically activating transduction channels increased the Fluo-4 signal, while breaking tip links with Ca(2+) chelators or blocking Ca(2+) entry through transduction channels each caused bundle and cell-body Fluo-4 fluorescence to decrease. These results show that when tip links break, bundle and soma Ca(2+) decrease, which could serve to stimulate the hair cell's tip-link regeneration process. Measurement of bundle Ca(2+) with Fluo-4 AM is therefore a simple method for assessing mechanotransduction in hair cells and permits an increased understanding of the interplay of tip links, transduction channels, and Ca(2+) signaling in the hair cell.

  20. Radiative Recombination and Photoionization Data for Tungsten Ions. Electron Structure of Ions in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina B. Trzhaskovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies of tungsten ions in plasmas are presented. New calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization cross-sections, as well as radiative recombination and radiated power loss rate coefficients have been performed for 54 tungsten ions for the range W6+–W71+. The data are of importance for fusion investigations at the reactor ITER, as well as devices ASDEX Upgrade and EBIT. Calculations are fully relativistic. Electron wave functions are found by the Dirac–Fock method with proper consideration of the electron exchange. All significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The radiative recombination rates and the radiated power loss rates are determined provided the continuum electron velocity is described by the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution. The impact of the core electron polarization on the radiative recombination cross-section is estimated for the Ne-like iron ion and for highly-charged tungsten ions within an analytical approximation using the Dirac–Fock electron wave functions. The effect is shown to enhance the radiative recombination cross-sections by ≲20%. The enhancement depends on the photon energy, the principal quantum number of polarized shells and the ion charge. The influence of plasma temperature and density on the electron structure of ions in local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas is investigated. Results for the iron and uranium ions in dense plasmas are in good agreement with previous calculations. New calculations were performed for the tungsten ion in dense plasmas on the basis of the average-atom model, as well as for the impurity tungsten ion in fusion plasmas using the non-linear self-consistent field screening model. The temperature and density dependence of the ion charge, level energies and populations are considered.

  1. The ionization fraction in dense clouds

    CERN Document Server

    De Boisanger, C B; Van Dishoeck, E F

    1995-01-01

    We present submillimeter observations of various molecular ions toward two dense clouds, NGC 2264 IRS1 and W 3 IRS5, in order to investigate their ionization fraction. Analysis of the line intensity ratios by the way of statistical equilibrium calculations allows determination of the physical parameters: n(H2)~(1-2)e6 cm-3 and T(kin)~50-100 K. Column densities and abundances are also derived. Together, the abundances of the observed ions provide a lower limit to the ionization fraction, which is (2-3)e-9 in both clouds. In order to better constrain the electron abundance, a simple chemical model is built which calculates the steady state abundances of the major positive ions, using the observed abundances wherever available. With reasonable assumptions, good agreement within a factor of two with the observations can be achieved. The calculated electron fraction is x(e)= (1.0-3.3)e-8 in the case of NGC 2264 and x(e)=(0.5-1.1)e-8 for W 3 IRS5. In the first case, the high abundance of N2H+ requires a rather high...

  2. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kie Sang, E-mail: k.s.jeong@yonsei.ac.kr; Lee, Su Houng, E-mail: suhoung@yonsei.ac.kr

    2016-01-15

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  3. Thermodynamic and dynamical properties of dense ICF plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabdullin Maratbek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In present work, thermodynamic expressions were obtained through potentials that took into consideration long-range many-particle screening effects as well as short-range quantum-mechanical effects and radial distribution functions (RDFs. Stopping power of the projectile ions in dense, non-isothermal plasma was considered. One of the important values that describe the stopping power of the ions in plasma is the Coulomb logarithm. We investigated the stopping power of ions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF plasma and other energetic characteristics of fuel. Calculations of ions energy losses in the plasma for different values of the temperature and plasma density were carried out. A comparison of the calculated data of ion stopping power and energy deposition with experimental and theoretical results of other authors was also performed.

  4. Charmonium propagation through a dense medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeliovich B.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation of a colourless c̄c dipole propagating with a large momentum through a hot medium originates from two sources, Debye screening (melting, and inelastic collisions with surrounding scattering centres (absorption. The former never terminates completely production of a bound charmonium in heavy ion collisions, even at very high temperatures. The latter, is controlled my the magnitude of the dipole cross section, related to the transport coefficient, which is the rate of transverse momentum broadening in the medium. A novel procedure of Lorentz boosting of the Schrödinger equation is developed, which allows to calculate the charmonium survival probability employing the path-integral technique, incorporating both melting and absorption. A novel mechanism of charmonium regeneration in a dense medium is proposed.

  5. Population dynamics of the ions SVI, ClVII and ArVIII interacting with solid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: hekata@ff.bg.ac.yu; Majkic, M.D.; Galijas, S.M.D.; Mitrovic, S.B. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2008-08-30

    We used the recently developed time-symmetrized, two-state vector model to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states (n{sub A}>>1,l{sub A}=0-3, m{sub A}=0) of multiply charged ions SVI, ClVII and ArVIII, with polarized core charges Z=6, 7 and 8, respectively, escaping solid surfaces at low velocities. Within the framework of the model, the two wave functions are used to describe the system at intermediate stages; the corresponding probabilities and rates are based on the calculation of the mixed flux. The simple analytical formulae derived for the neutralization rates enable us to analyze the localization of the process and to calculate the neutralization distances. In the pointlike core approximation, the rates are comparable with the available coupled-angular-mode results. The neutralization distances follow the classical predictions for all considered Rydberg states with exception of the states with critical quantum numbers n{sub A}=n{sub c}, mainly populated via tunneling mechanism; the corresponding values are larger than it is predicted by the classical overbarrier model. Inclusion of core polarization significantly reduces the neutralization distances.

  6. Constructing dense genetic linkage maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Jong, de A.G.; Ooijen, van J.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a novel combination of techniques for the construction of dense genetic linkage maps. The construction of such maps is hampered by the occurrence of even small proportions of typing errors. Simulated annealing is used to obtain the best map according to the optimality criterion:

  7. Method for dense packing discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  8. Unconditional Continuous Variable Dense Coding

    CERN Document Server

    Ralph, T C

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which unconditional dense coding can be achieved using continuous variable entanglement. We consider the effect of entanglement impurity and detector efficiency and discuss experimental verification. We conclude that the requirements for a strong demonstration are not as stringent as previously thought and are within the reach of present technology.

  9. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities

  10. Theory of the equation of state of hot dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T W; Surh, M; Yang, L H

    1999-07-23

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are adapted to treat dense plasmas for temperatures exceeding the electronic Fermi temperature. Extended electronic states are obtained in a plane wave basis by using pseudopotentials for the ion cores in the local density approximation to density functional theory. The method reduces to conventional first principles molecular dynamics at low temperatures with the expected high level of accuracy. The occurrence of thermally excited ion cores at high temperatures is treated by means of final state pseudopotentials. The method is applied to the shock compression Hugoniot equation of state for aluminum. Good agreement with experiment is found for temperatures ranging from zero through 105K.

  11. Comparação dos sistemas de cultivo nativo e adensado de erva mate, Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil., quanto à ocorrência e flutuação populacional de insetos Occurrence and population fluctuation of insects on native and dense cropping systems of maté, Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa R. Borges

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in order to compare the occurrence of insects in two maté cultivation systems, native and high tree density. It was performed from August/2000 to September/2001, in a private property in São Mateus do Sul county, in Paraná State, Brazil. Visual inspections of trees and light traps were used to evaluate insect populations in both areas. For Hedypathes betulinus (Klug (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, only six adults were observed in the dense area. Based on presence of sawdust at the basis of the trunk, it was obtained that the number of attacked trees did not surpass 11% in either area. For Gyropsylla spegazziniana (Lizer y Trelles (Hemiptera, Psyllidae, the number of galls per tree was counted and it was observed that the population peak occurred from November to January. For Hylesia spp. (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae and Thelosia camina Schaus (Lepidoptera, Eupterotidae, the presence of caterpillars on the trees was noticed from September to February, with the population peak in November and December. Adults of Hylesia spp. were more numerous in February and March. Two species that were not previously recorded for Brazil on maté were identified: Hylesia paulex Dognin (83% and Hylesia remex Dyer (17%, collected with light traps. The maté caterpillar, T. camina was not collected with these traps. Nymphs and adults of Ceroplastes grandis Hempel (Hemiptera, Coccidae were observed along the year on the branches, with population peak between April and June for the nymphs and from September to November for the adults. It should be considered that despite higher insect incidence in the dense area compared to the native area, the first presents higher yield, and that with a good pest management program the insect problems can be minimized.

  12. Structural Transitions in Dense Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lambiotte, R; Bhat, U; Redner, S

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an evolving network model in which a new node attaches to a randomly selected target node and also to each of its neighbors with probability $p$. The resulting network is sparse for $p<\\frac{1}{2}$ and dense (average degree increasing with number of nodes $N$) for $p\\geq \\frac{1}{2}$. In the dense regime, individual networks realizations built by this copying mechanism are disparate and not self-averaging. Further, there is an infinite sequence of structural anomalies at $p=\\frac{2}{3}$, $\\frac{3}{4}$, $\\frac{4}{5}$, etc., where the dependences on $N$ of the number of triangles (3-cliques), 4-cliques, undergo phase transitions. When linking to second neighbors of the target can occur, the probability that the resulting graph is complete---where all nodes are connected---is non-zero as $N\\to\\infty$.

  13. Holographic Renormalization in Dense Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong Park

    2014-01-01

    describes a dense medium at finite temperature, is investigated in this paper. In a dense medium, two different thermodynamic descriptions are possible due to an additional conserved charge. These two different thermodynamic ensembles are classified by the asymptotic boundary condition of the bulk gauge field. It is also shown that in the holographic renormalization regularity of all bulk fields can reproduce consistent thermodynamic quantities and that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is nothing but the renormalized thermal entropy of the dual field theory. Furthermore, we find that the Reissner-Nordström AdS black brane is dual to a theory with conformal matter as expected, whereas a charged black brane with a nontrivial dilaton profile is mapped to a theory with nonconformal matter although its leading asymptotic geometry still remains as AdS space.

  14. Radiative properties of dense nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Fedorov, Andrei G; Luo, Zhongyang; Ni, Mingjiang

    2012-09-01

    The radiative properties of dense nanofluids are investigated. For nanofluids, scattering and absorbing of electromagnetic waves by nanoparticles, as well as light absorption by the matrix/fluid in which the nanoparticles are suspended, should be considered. We compare five models for predicting apparent radiative properties of nanoparticulate media and evaluate their applicability. Using spectral absorption and scattering coefficients predicted by different models, we compute the apparent transmittance of a nanofluid layer, including multiple reflecting interfaces bounding the layer, and compare the model predictions with experimental results from the literature. Finally, we propose a new method to calculate the spectral radiative properties of dense nanofluids that shows quantitatively good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Dilatons for Dense Hadronic Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2009-01-01

    The idea that the explicit breaking of scale invariance by the trace anomaly of QCD can be rephrased as a spontaneous breaking has been recently exploited to capture the low-energy strong interaction dynamics of dense (and also hot) matter in terms of two dilaton fields, the "soft" (chi_s) and the "hard" (chi_h) fields, in the frame work of the hidden local gauge symmetry. In the Freund-Nambu model, the spontaneous symmetry breaking of scale symmetry is induced by an explicitly breaking term, while the spontaneous symmetry breaking is possible in the flat potential model which is scale symmetric. We discuss the interplay of the soft and hard dilatons using the spontaneously broken scale symmetry schemes and uncover a novel structure of dense matter hitherto unexplored.

  16. Evolution of Binaries in Dense Stellar Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the field, the binaries in dense stellar systems are frequently not primordial, and could be either dynamically formed or significantly altered from their primordial states. Destruction and formation of binaries occur in parallel all the time. The destruction, which constantly removes soft binaries from a binary pool, works as an energy sink and could be a reason for cluster entering the binary-burning phase. The true binary fraction is greater than observed, as a result, the observable binary fraction evolves differently from the predictions. Combined measurements of binary fractions in globular clusters suggest that most of the clusters are still core-contracting. The formation, on other hand, affects most the more evolutionary advanced stars, which significantly enhances the population of X-ray sources in globular clusters. The formation of binaries with a compact objects proceeds mainly through physical collisions, binary-binary and single-binary encounters; however, it is the dynamical for...

  17. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  18. Compound ion salt, a novel low-sodium salt substitute: from animal study to community-based population trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Jun-Xiang; Shi, Rui; Yang, Ning; Song, Dong-Lin; Pang, Wei; Li, Yu-Ming

    2009-09-01

    Salt restriction, an important approach for primary and secondary prevention of hypertension, is undermined by unsatisfactory adherence. A salt-restriction study tested the efficacy and safety of a compound ion salt (CISalt) with low sodium content in an animal model and in a community-based population. In part 1, 8-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were fed 1% CISalt in the study group and 8% or 1% normal salt (NSalt) in controls (n = 10 each) for 12 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) and urinary electrolytes were measured every 3 weeks. After 12 weeks, collagen deposition in the heart and kidney and the levels of angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO) in plasma and renal cortex were measured. In part 2, a single-blind, randomized, 6-month controlled trial with CISalt was conducted in 248 persons (age >or=65 years) in 10 rural communities. Plasma renin activity and Ang II were included in blood and urinary measures at baseline and 6 months. Reduced BP urinary protein excretion and reduced collagen in the heart and kidneys were significantly different in animals fed CISalt compared to controls. In human studies, at 6 months, mean systolic BP (SBP) was decreased by 9.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.1 to 6.1, P < 0.001) and diastolic BP (DBP) by 5.3 mm Hg (95% CI: 7.9 to 2.6, P < 0.001), respectively, compared to controls; urinary sodium excretion also decreased by 67.4 mmol/24 h (95% CI: 84.8 to 50.0, P < 0.001), and plasma renin activity was slightly increased by 0.19 ng/ml/h (95% CI: 0.04-0.33, P = 0.013). No adverse cardiovascular events were reported. In these studies, CISalt lowered BP and showed end-organ protection in hypertensive animals and BP reduction in humans. CISalt appears to be a safe and acceptable strategy to reduce BP.

  19. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  20. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Subedi, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Boeglin, W; Chen, J -P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J -O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; De Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Širca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X -C; Zhu, L; 10.1126/science.1156675

    2009-01-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, where a proton is knocked-out of the nucleus with high momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in 12C the neutron-proton pairs are nearly twenty times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  1. Dilatons in Dense Baryonic Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the role of dilaton, which is supposed to be representing a special feature of scale symmetry of QCD, trace anomaly, in dense baryonic matter. The idea that the scale symmetry breaking of QCD is responsible for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is presented along the similar spirit of Freund-Nambu model. The incorporation of dilaton field in the hidden local symmetric parity doublet model is briefly sketched with the possible role of dilaton at high density baryonic matter, the emergence of linear sigma model in dilaton limit.

  2. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  3. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of the charge dynamics of heavy ions penetrating solid and gaseous targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostiy, S.

    2007-01-15

    This thesis presents the study of the slowing down process of fast heavy ions inside matter. In the framework of this research, the influence of the target density on the stopping process is investigated. Experiments on the interaction of {sup 48}Ca{sup 6+}-{sup 48}Ca{sup 10+} and {sup 26}Mg{sup 5+} ion beams with initial energies of 11.4 MeV/u and 5.9 MeV/u with solid and gaseous targets have been carried out. A novel diagnostic method, X-ray spectroscopy of K-shell projectile radiation, is used to determine the ion charge state in relation to its velocity during the penetration of fast heavy ions inside the stopping material. A spatially resolved analysis of the projectile and target radiation in solids is achieved for the first time. The application of low-density silica aerogels as stopping media provided a stretching of the ion stopping length by 20 - 100 times in comparison with solid quartz. The Doppler Effect observed on the projectile K-shell spectra is used to calculate the ion velocity in dependence on the ion penetration depth in the target material. A comparative analysis of K{sub {alpha}} spectra of fast heavy ions is performed in solid (silica aerogels) and gaseous targets (Ar and Ne gases) at the same ion energy. It is shown that the dominant role of collisions in dense matter leads to an increase of the effective ionization cross section at high ion velocity and suppression of the electron capture to the projectile ion excited states at low ion velocity. As a result, an increase of the ion charge state in dense matter is observed. The experimentally detected effects are interpreted with numerical calculations of the projectile population kinetics, which are in good agreement with measurements. (orig.)

  5. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Equilibration dynamics and conductivity of warm dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate subpicosecond dynamics of warm dense hydrogen at the XUV free-electron laser facility (FLASH) at DESY (Hamburg). Ultrafast impulsive electron heating is initiated by a ≤300-fs short x-ray burst of 92-eV photon energy. A second pulse probes the sample via x-ray scattering at jitter-free variable time delay. We show that the initial molecular structure dissociates within (0.9±0.2) ps, allowing us to infer the energy transfer rate between electrons and ions. We evaluate Saha and Thomas-Fermi ionization models in radiation hydrodynamics simulations, predicting plasma parameters that are subsequently used to calculate the static structure factor. A conductivity model for partially ionized plasma is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory coupled to molecular dynamic simulations and agrees with the experimental data. Our results provide important insights and the needed experimental data on transport properties of dense plasmas.

  7. The equilibrium of dense plasma in a gravity field

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilev, B V

    2000-01-01

    The equilibrium of dense plasma in a gravity field and problem of a gravity-induced electric polarization in this matter are discussed. The calculation for metals performed before shows that both - the gravity-induced compressive strain and the gravity-induced electric field - are inversely proportional to their Young moduli. The calculation for high dense plasma, where Young modulus is equal to zero, shows that there is another effect: each cell of this plasma inside a celestial body in own gravity field obtains the small positive electric charge. It happens as heavy ions sag on to light electron clouds. A celestial body stays electrically neutral as a whole, because the negative electric charge concentrates on its surface. The gravity-induced positive volume charge is very small, its order of magnitude equals to $10^{-18}e$ per atom only. But it is sufficient for the complete conterbalancing of the gravity force.

  8. The electron-atom interaction in partially ionized dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omarbakiyeva, Yu A; Ramazanov, T S; Roepke, G [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: yultuz@physics.kz

    2009-05-29

    The electron-atom interaction is considered in dense partially ionized plasmas. The separable potential is constructed from scattering data using effective radius theory. Parameters of the interaction potential were obtained from phase shifts, scattering length and effective radius. The binding energy of the electron in the H{sup -} ion is determined for the singlet channel on the basis of the reconstructed separable potential. In dense plasmas, the influence of the Pauli exclusion principle on the phase shifts and the binding energy is considered. Due to the Pauli blocking, the binding energy vanishes at the Mott density. At that density the behavior of the phase shifts is drastically changed. This leads to modifications of macroscopic properties such as composition and transport coefficients.

  9. Origin and Properties of Quiet-time 0.11-1.28 MeV Nucleon-1 Heavy-ion Population near 1 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Ebert, R. W.; Farahat, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Ultra-Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer near 1 au, we surveyed the composition and spectra of heavy ions (He-through-Fe) during quiet times from 1998 January 1 to 2015 December 31 at suprathermal energies between ∼0.11 and ∼1.28 MeV nucleon‑1. The selected time period covers the maxima of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the extended solar minimum in between. We find the following. (1) The number of quiet hours in each year correlates well with the sunspot number, year 2009 was the quietest for about 82% of the time. (2) The composition of the quiet-time suprathermal heavy-ion population (3He, C-through-Fe) correlates well with the level of solar activity, exhibiting SEP-like composition signatures during solar maximum, and CIR- or solar wind-like composition during solar minimum. (3) The heavy-ion (C–Fe) spectra exhibit suprathermal tails at energies of 0.11–0.32 MeV nucleon‑1 with power-law spectral indices ranging from 1.40 to 2.97. Fe spectra soften (steepen, i.e., spectral index increases) smoothly with increasing energies compared with Fe, indicating a rollover behavior of Fe at higher energies (0.45–1.28 MeV nucleon‑1). (4) Spectral indices of Fe and O do not appear to exhibit clear solar cycle dependence. (2) and (3) imply that during IP quiet times and at energies above ∼0.1 MeV nucleon‑1, the IP medium is dominated by material from prior solar and interplanetary events. We discuss the implications of these extended observations in the context of the current understanding of the suprathermal ion population near 1 au.

  10. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  11. Neutrino Oscillations in Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A. E.

    2017-03-01

    A modification of the electroweak theory, where the fermions with the same electroweak quantum numbers are combined in multiplets and are treated as different quantum states of a single particle, is proposed. In this model, mixing and oscillations of particles arise as a direct consequence of the general principles of quantum field theory. The developed approach enables one to calculate the probabilities of the processes taking place in the detector at long distances from the particle source. Calculations of higher-order processes, including computation of the contributions due to radiative corrections, can be performed in the framework of the perturbation theory using the regular diagram technique. As a result, the analog to the Dirac-Schwinger equation of quantum electrodynamics describing neutrino oscillations and its spin rotation in dense matter can be obtained.

  12. Heavy Hadrons in Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tolos, Laura; Hidalgo-Duque, Carlos; Nieves, Juan; Romanets, Olena; Salcedo, Lorenzo Luis; Torres-Rincon, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    We study the behavior of dynamically-generated baryon resonances with heavy-quark content within a unitarized coupled-channel theory in matter that fulfills heavy-quark spin symmetry constraints. We analyze the implications for the formation of charmed mesic nuclei and the propagation of heavy mesons in heavy-ion collisions from RHIC to FAIR.

  13. Diagnostics for heavy ion beam driven Warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pavel; Bieniosek, Frank; Lidia, Steve; Seidl, Peter; Waldron, Will

    2009-11-01

    A set of diagnostic has been developed for the WDM experiments at Berkeley. The diagnostics are aimed at the in-situ measurement of temperature, expansion velocity and pressure of a WDM sample.A specially developed two-channel pyrometer probes color temperatures at 750 nm,1000 nm and 1400 nm, with 75 ps temporal resolution. The system has a broad dynamic range with a lower limit ˜2000 K and upper limit ˜100000 K. The pyrometer design is based on custom spectrally selective beam splitters and can be upgraded up to seven channels. Continuous target emission from 450 nm to 850 nm is recorder by a custom spectrometer, consisting of a high dynamic range Hamamatsu streak camera and a holographic grating. The system is calibrated absolutely with a tungsten ribbon lamp (NIST traceable). The various sweeping times of the streak unit allows for temporal resolution varying from 1 ps to 1 us. The spectrometer has a lower sensitivity than the pyrometer and applied in experiments with higher temperatures. Hydrodynamic expansion velocity of a target's free surface is measured by a commercially available all- fiber Doppler shift laser interferometer (VISAR). The installed delay etalon allows for velocity detection with 2 m/s precision and 0.5 ns resolution.

  14. Understanding neutron production in the deuterium dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelbe, Brian, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk; Chittenden, Jeremy, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    The deuterium Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) can produce copious amounts of MeV neutrons and can be used as an efficient neutron source. However, the mechanism by which neutrons are produced within the DPF is poorly understood and this limits our ability to optimize the device. In this paper we present results from a computational study aimed at understanding how neutron production occurs in DPFs with a current between 70 kA and 500 kA and which parameters can affect it. A combination of MHD and kinetic tools are used to model the different stages of the DPF implosion. It is shown that the anode shape can significantly affect the structure of the imploding plasma and that instabilities in the implosion lead to the generation of large electric fields at stagnation. These electric fields can accelerate deuterium ions within the stagnating plasma to large (>100 keV) energies leading to reactions with ions in the cold dense plasma. It is shown that the electromagnetic fields present can significantly affect the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the resulting neutron production.

  15. 5G Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Xiaohu; Tu, Song; Mao, Guoqiang; Wang, Cheng-xiang; Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Traditional ultra-dense wireless networks are recommended as a complement for cellular networks and are deployed in partial areas, such as hotspot and indoor scenarios. Based on the massive multiple-input multi-output (MIMO) antennas and the millimeter wavecommunication technologies, the 5G ultra-dense cellular network is proposed to deploy in overall cellular scenarios. Moreover, a distribution network architecture is presented for 5G ultra-dense cellular networks. Furthermore, the backhaul ...

  16. Interference Coordination for Dense Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of ubiquitous and super-fast connectivity for the upcoming years will be in large part fulfilled by the addition of base stations and spectral aggregation. The resulting very dense networks (DenseNets) will face a number of technical challenges. Among others, the interference emerges ...... simply react to an identified interference problem. As an example, we propose two algorithms to apply time domain and frequency domain small cell interference coordination in a DenseNet....

  17. HOW GOOD IS A DENSE SHOP SCHEDULE?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礴; 俞文(鱼此)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study a class of simple and easy-to-construct shop schedules, known as dense schedules. We present tight bounds on the maximum deviation in makespan of dense flow-shop and job-shop schedules from their optimal ones. For dense open-shop schedules, we do the same for the special case of four machines and thus add a stronger supporting case for proving a standing conjecture.

  18. Breaking Dense Structures: Proving Stability of Densely Structured Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Möhlmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstraction and refinement is widely used in software development. Such techniques are valuable since they allow to handle even more complex systems. One key point is the ability to decompose a large system into subsystems, analyze those subsystems and deduce properties of the larger system. As cyber-physical systems tend to become more and more complex, such techniques become more appealing. In 2009, Oehlerking and Theel presented a (de-composition technique for hybrid systems. This technique is graph-based and constructs a Lyapunov function for hybrid systems having a complex discrete state space. The technique consists of (1 decomposing the underlying graph of the hybrid system into subgraphs, (2 computing multiple local Lyapunov functions for the subgraphs, and finally (3 composing the local Lyapunov functions into a piecewise Lyapunov function. A Lyapunov function can serve multiple purposes, e.g., it certifies stability or termination of a system or allows to construct invariant sets, which in turn may be used to certify safety and security. In this paper, we propose an improvement to the decomposing technique, which relaxes the graph structure before applying the decomposition technique. Our relaxation significantly reduces the connectivity of the graph by exploiting super-dense switching. The relaxation makes the decomposition technique more efficient on one hand and on the other allows to decompose a wider range of graph structures.

  19. Modeling the jet quenching in hot and dense QCD matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhtin, I P; Petrushanko, S V; Snigirev, A M; Arsene, I; Tywoniuk, K

    2009-01-01

    One of the important perturbative ("hard") probes of hot and dense QCD matter is the medium-induced energy loss of energetic partons, so called "jet quenching", which is predicted to be very different in cold nuclear matter and in QGP, and leads to a number of phenomena which are already seen in the RHIC data on the qualitative level. The inclusion of jet quenching and other important collective effects, such as radial and elliptic flows, in the existing Monte-Carlo models of relativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed. Some issues on the corresponding physical observables at RHIC and LHC energies obtained with HYDJET++ model are presented.

  20. Magnetic Sublevel Population Studied for H- and He-like Uranium in Relativistic Ion-Atom Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A.; Stoehlker, T. [GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Bednarz, G. [Cracow University, Institute of Physics (Poland); Bosch, F. [GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Fritzsche, S. [University of Kassel (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Kansas State University (United States); Ionescu, D. C.; Klepper, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kraemer, A.; Liesen, D.; Ma, X.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P. H. [GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Sierpowski, D. [Cracow University, Institute of Physics (Poland); Stachura, Z. [INP (Poland); Steck, M.; Toleikis, S. [GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Warczak, A. [Cracow University, Institute of Physics (Poland)

    2003-03-15

    An experimental study for K-shell excitation of helium-like uranium in relativistic collisions with low-Z gaseous target is presented. Within this experiment information about the population of the magnetic sublevels has been obtained via a photon angular differential study of the decay photons associated with the excitation process. The preliminary results presented show, for the particular case of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} level, a surprisingly strong population of the magnetic sublevels with {mu}={+-}1.

  1. The mean excitation energy of atomic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A method for calculation of the mean excitation energies of atomic ions is presented, making the calculation of the energy deposition of fast ions to plasmas, warm, dense matter, and complex biological systems possible. Results are reported to all ions of helium, lithium, carbon, neon, aluminum...

  2. Optimal probabilistic dense coding schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögler, Roger A.; Neves, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    Dense coding with non-maximally entangled states has been investigated in many different scenarios. We revisit this problem for protocols adopting the standard encoding scheme. In this case, the set of possible classical messages cannot be perfectly distinguished due to the non-orthogonality of the quantum states carrying them. So far, the decoding process has been approached in two ways: (i) The message is always inferred, but with an associated (minimum) error; (ii) the message is inferred without error, but only sometimes; in case of failure, nothing else is done. Here, we generalize on these approaches and propose novel optimal probabilistic decoding schemes. The first uses quantum-state separation to increase the distinguishability of the messages with an optimal success probability. This scheme is shown to include (i) and (ii) as special cases and continuously interpolate between them, which enables the decoder to trade-off between the level of confidence desired to identify the received messages and the success probability for doing so. The second scheme, called multistage decoding, applies only for qudits ( d-level quantum systems with d>2) and consists of further attempts in the state identification process in case of failure in the first one. We show that this scheme is advantageous over (ii) as it increases the mutual information between the sender and receiver.

  3. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  4. Star formation in dense clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Philip C

    2011-01-01

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion, and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star IMF from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosi...

  5. Radiosensitivity of pimonidazole-unlabelled intratumour quiescent cell population to γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams and boron neutron capture reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Hirayama, R; Matsumoto, Y; Uzawa, A; Suzuki, M; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the radiosensitivity of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells unlabelled with pimonidazole to accelerated carbon ion beams and the boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR). Methods EL4 tumour-bearing C57BL/J mice received 5-bromo-29-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumour proliferating (P) cells. After the administration of pimonidazole, tumours were irradiated with c-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams or reactor neutron beams with the prior administration of a 10B-carrier. Responses of intratumour Q and total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cells was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. Results Following c-ray irradiation, the pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radiosensitivity compared with the whole tumour cell fraction, more remarkably in the Q than total cell populations. However, a significantly greater decrease in radiosensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction, evaluated using a delayed assay or a decrease in radiation dose rate, was more clearly observed among the Q than total cells. These changes in radiosensitivity were suppressed following carbon ion beam and neutron beam-only irradiaton. In the BNCR, the use of a 10B-carrier, especially L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B, enhanced the sensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cells more clearly in the Q than total cells. Conclusion The radiosensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction depends on the quality of radiation delivered and characteristics of the 10B-carrier used in the BNCR. Advances in knowledge The pimonidazole-unlabelled subfraction of Q tumour cells may be a critical target in tumour control. PMID:23255546

  6. Radiosensitivity of pimonidazole-unlabelled intratumour quiescent cell population to γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams and boron neutron capture reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Hirayama, R; Matsumoto, Y; Uzawa, A; Suzuki, M; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2013-01-01

    To detect the radiosensitivity of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells unlabelled with pimonidazole to accelerated carbon ion beams and the boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR). EL4 tumour-bearing C57BL/J mice received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumour proliferating (P) cells. After the administration of pimonidazole, tumours were irradiated with γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams or reactor neutron beams with the prior administration of a (10)B-carrier. Responses of intratumour Q and total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cells was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. Following γ-ray irradiation, the pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radiosensitivity compared with the whole tumour cell fraction, more remarkably in the Q than total cell populations. However, a significantly greater decrease in radiosensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction, evaluated using a delayed assay or a decrease in radiation dose rate, was more clearly observed among the Q than total cells. These changes in radiosensitivity were suppressed following carbon ion beam and neutron beam-only irradiaton. In the BNCR, the use of a (10)B-carrier, especially L-para-boronophenylalanine-(10)B, enhanced the sensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cells more clearly in the Q than total cells. The radiosensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction depends on the quality of radiation delivered and characteristics of the (10)B-carrier used in the BNCR. The pimonidazole-unlabelled subfraction of Q tumour cells may be a critical target in tumour control.

  7. Thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Holst, Bastian; Desjarlais, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    We study the thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. New results are presented for the pair distribution functions, the equation of state, the Hugoniot curve, and the reflectivity. We compare with available experimental data and predictions of the chemical picture. Especially, we discuss the nonmetal-to-metal transition which occurs at about 40 GPa in the dense fluid.

  8. Heavy meson production in hot dense matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Gamermann, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; Nieves, JM; Oset, E; Vacas, MJV

    2010-01-01

    The properties of charmed mesons in dense matter are studied using a unitary coupled-channel approach in the nuclear medium which takes into account Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in this dense nuclear env

  9. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based mode...

  10. Ab initio thermodynamic results for warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) - an exotic state where electrons are quantum degenerate and ions may be strongly correlated - is ubiquitous in dense astrophysical plasmas and highly compressed laboratory systems including inertial fusion. Accurate theoretical predictions require precision thermodynamic data for the electron gas at high density and finite temperature around the Fermi temperature. First such data have been obtained by restricted path integral Monte Carlo (restricted PIMC) simulations and transformed into analytical fits for the free energy. Such results are also key input for novel finite temperature density functional theory. However, the RPIMC data of Ref. 1 are limited to moderate densities, and even there turned out to be surprisingly inaccurate, which is a consequence of the fermion sign problem. These problems were recently overcome by the development of alternative QMC approaches in Kiel (configuration PIMC and permutation blocking PIMC) and Imperial College (Density matrix QMC). The three methods have their strengths and limitations in complementary parameter regions and provide highly accurate thermodynamic data for the electronic contributions in WDM. While the original results were obtained for small particle numbers, recently accurate finite size corrections were derived allowing to compute ab initio thermodynamic data with an unprecedented accuracy of better than 0.3 percent. This provides the final step for the use as benchmark data for experiments and models of Warm dense matter. Co-authors: T. Schoof, S. Groth, T. Dornheim, F. D. Malone, M. Foulkes, and T. Sjostroem, Funded by: DFG via SFB-TR24 and project BO1366-10.

  11. Dense image correspondences for computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ce

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental building-block of many new computer vision systems: dense and robust correspondence estimation. Dense correspondence estimation techniques are now successfully being used to solve a wide range of computer vision problems, very different from the traditional applications such techniques were originally developed to solve. This book introduces the techniques used for establishing correspondences between challenging image pairs, the novel features used to make these techniques robust, and the many problems dense correspondences are now being used to solve. The book provides information to anyone attempting to utilize dense correspondences in order to solve new or existing computer vision problems. The editors describe how to solve many computer vision problems by using dense correspondence estimation. Finally, it surveys resources, code, and data necessary for expediting the development of effective correspondence-based computer vision systems.   ·         Provides i...

  12. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  13. Dense magnetized plasma numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, L [INFIP-CONICET, and Physics Department (FCEN-UBA), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bernal, L, E-mail: bilbao@df.uba.a [Physics Department (FCEYN-UNMDP), Complejo Universitario, Funes y Pena, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The scope for developing the present numerical method was to perform parametric studies for optimization of several configurations in magnetized plasmas. Nowadays there exist several efficient numerical codes in the subject. However, the construction of one's own computational codes brings the following important advantages: (a) to get a deeper knowledge of the physical processes involved and the numerical methods used to simulate them and (b) more flexibility to adapt the code to particular situations in a more efficient way than would be possible for a closed general code. The code includes ion viscosity, thermal conduction (electrons and ions), magnetic diffusion, thermonuclear or chemical reaction, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and equation of state (from the ideal gas to the degenerate electron gas). After each calculation cycle, mesh vertices are moved arbitrarily over the fluid. The adaptive method consists of shifting mesh vertices over the fluid in order to keep a reasonable mesh structure and increase the spatial resolution where the physical solution demands. The code was a valuable tool for parametric study of different physical problems, mainly optimization of plasma focus machine, detonation and propagation of thermonuclear reactions and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the boundary layer of the terrestrial magnetopause.

  14. First experimental demonstration of magnetic-field assisted fast heating of a dense plasma core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Sawada, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Yuki; Law, King Fai Farley; Morita, Hitoki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Abe, Yuki; Yao, Akira; Hata, Masayasu; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Morace, Alessio; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Firex Project Team

    2016-10-01

    Fast heating of a dense plasma core by an energetic electron beam is being studied on GEKKO-LFEX laser facility. Here, we introduce a laser-driven kilo-tesla external magnetic field to guide the diverging electron beam to the dense plasma core. This involve placing a spherical target in the magnetic field, compressing it with the GEKKO-XII laser beams and then using the LFEX laser beams injected into the dense plasma to generate the electron beam which do the fast heating. Cu-Ka emission is used to visualize transport or heating processes of a dense plasma. X-ray spectrum from a highly ionized Cu ions indicates several keV of the temperature increment induced by the LFEX.

  15. A comparison of two atomic models for the radiative properties of dense hot low Z plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E. E-mail: minguez@denim.upm.es; Sauvan, P.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Florido, R.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R

    2003-11-01

    In this work, two different atomic models (ANALOP based on parametric potentials and IDEFIX based on the dicenter model) are used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot dense, low Z plasmas, and the results are compared to each other. In addition, the ANALOP code has been used to compute free-bound cross sections for hydrogen-like ions.

  16. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He+ ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C+ ion impurities in He+ ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C+ ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He+ ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He+ ions) and 100% H+ ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04-2.0% H+ ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 1024 ions m-2), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He+ ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C+ ion impurities in He+ ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C+ ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H+ ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H+ ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04-2.0% H+ ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications.

  17. Molecular Dynamics for Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to the neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions on the nuclear structure. First we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that the pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With increase of density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei change to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we dis...

  18. Kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graedel, T.E.; Langer, W.D.; Frerking, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    A detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds has been developed to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature, and other topics of interest. The full computation involves 328 individual reactions (expanded to 1067 to study carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry); photodegradation processes are unimportant in these dense clouds and are excluded.

  19. Renormalization shielding and eikonal analysis on the atomic collision in dense partially ionized hydrogen plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Soo [Department of Applied Mathematics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The renormalization plasma screening effects on the electron-ion collision are investigated in dense partially ionized hydrogen plasmas. The Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal methods with the effective interaction potential are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and eikonal cross section for the electron-ion collision. It is found that the influence of renormalization screening strongly suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the eikonal cross section, especially, for small impact parameter regions. In addition, the renormalization screening effect reduces the total eikonal cross section in all energy domains. The variation of the renormalization effects on the electron-ion collision in dense partially ionized hydrogen plasmas is also discussed.

  20. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19, prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15% by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag12+ at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 1012 ions/cm2 induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 1013 ions/cm2 has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  1. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Manju; Kashyap, Subhash C.; Gupta, Hem C. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Dimri, Mukesh C. [Ajay Kumar Garg Engineering College, Ghaziabad - 201009 (India); Asokan, K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15%) by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag{sup 12+}) at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  2. Relationship between cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and high-risk human papillomavirus in areas with dense floating population%流动人口密集地区宫颈上皮内瘤变与高危型人乳头瘤病毒关系调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉梅; 李柳翠; 梁翠霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relevant factors and relationship between cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and high-risk human papillomavirus happened in the areas with dense floating population.Methods The basic data of the patients infected by HPV16,HPV18,and HPV31 subgroups from the gynecological clinic were collected,and the relevant data were completed reviewing their electronic medical records or through telephone follow-up.Results The HPV infection frequency was 217 in the 198 patients.Among them,61.75% were infected by HPV16,25.35% by HPV18,and 12.90% by HPV31.In the 198 patients,16.16% had sex life in too young age or had more than one sex mate,32.83% had been pregnant,delivered,or aborted more than once,90.40% got vaginal infection,81.82% had chronic cervicitis,and 26 patients (13.13%),including 22 cases infected by HPV16 and having higher malignancy degree,had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical carcinoma.Conclusions Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia closely relates to high-risk HPV16 infection in the areas with dense floating population.Low immunity caused by chronic cervicitis and cervical and vaginal infections,was the main factors for high risk HPV infection.%目的 了解流动人口密集地区宫颈上皮内瘤变与高危型人乳头瘤病毒间的关系及相关因素.方法 对妇科门诊所有感染HPV16、HPV18、HPV31亚型患者的基本资料进行初步登记,再通过查阅电子病历或电话回访逐一完善相关资料.结果 从198例高危HPV感染患者中检出的217频次的阳性结果中发现:HPV16感染比率最多,占61.75%,HPV18其次,占25.35%,HPV31位居第三,占12.90%.198例患者中过早或多伴侣性生活的占16.16%,多孕、多产和多次人流占32.83%、感染性阴道炎占90.40%、慢性宫颈炎占81.82%;在198例高危HPV感染者中共发现了宫颈上皮内瘤变及宫颈浸润癌26例,26例宫颈上皮内瘤变及宫颈浸润癌患者中22例感染HPV16,

  3. Injection of photoelectrons into dense argon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F

    2010-01-01

    The injection of photoelectrons in a gaseous or liquid sample is a widespread technique to produce a cold plasma in a weakly--ionized system in order to study the transport properties of electrons in a dense gas or liquid. We report here the experimental results of photoelectron injection into dense argon gas at the temperatureT=142.6 K as a function of the externally applied electric field and gas density. We show that the experimental data can be interpreted in terms of the so called Young-Bradbury model only if multiple scattering effects due to the dense environment are taken into account when computing the scattering properties and the energetics of the electrons.

  4. Kinetic equation for strongly interacting dense Fermi systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lipavsky, P; Spicka, V

    2001-01-01

    We review the non-relativistic Green's-function approach to the kinetic equations for Fermi liquids far from equilibrium. The emphasis is on the consistent treatment of the off-shell motion between collisions and on the non-instant and non-local picture of binary collisions. The resulting kinetic equation is of the Boltzmann type, and it represents an interpolation between the theory of transport in metals and the theory of moderately dense gases. The free motion of particles is renormalised by various mean field and mass corrections in the spirit of Landau's quasiparticles in metals. The collisions are non-local in the spirit of Enskog's theory of non-ideal gases. The collisions are moreover non-instant, a feature which is absent in the theory of gases, but which is shown to be important for dense Fermi systems. In spite of its formal complexity, the presented theory has a simple implementation within the Monte-Carlo simulation schemes. Applications in nuclear physics are given for heavy-ion reactions and th...

  5. Simulations of nonequilibrium warm dense gold produced by ultrafast heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, B.; Recoules, V.; Torrent, M.; Chen, Z.; Sametoglu, V.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Kirkwood, S. E.; Reid, M.; Mazevet, S.; Ng, A.

    2013-03-01

    The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with metals produces nonequilibrium states consisting of hot electrons and cold ions. These can last for many picoseconds before relaxing to a thermodynamic equilibrium. Recent experiments using a chirped pulse probe technique provided AC conductivity data of gold at a sufficient time resolution to observe this relaxation process. We developed an ab-initio model that characterizes thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter states in nonequilibrium. Our theoretical scheme combines a standard two temperature model with temperature dependent material parameters and an energy transfer rate that are obtained by means of ab-initio simulations. This enables us to give a prediction for the temperature evolution during the relaxation process. Additionally, we derive the AC conductivity of the nonequilibrium states from our simulations using the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is used to test our model against measurements. We observe agreement with experiment using an energy relaxation rate, that is smaller than predicted, giving us reason to revisit its determination. We can furthermore provide thermodynamical and structural data of nonequilibrium warm dense gold which are not accessible in experiment.

  6. Novel Topological Effects in Dense QCD in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer, E J

    2015-01-01

    We show that in dense QCD an axion field can be dynamically generated as the phase of the dual chiral density wave condensate that forms in the presence of a magnetic field. The coupling of the axion with the external magnetic field leads to several macroscopically observable effects. They are the generation of an anomalous uniform electric charge proportional to the magnetic field, the induction of a nondissipative anomalous Hall current, a linear magnetoelectric effect, and the formation of an axion polariton due to the fluctuations of the axion field at finite temperature. Connection to topological insulators, as well as possible observable signatures in heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars are all highlighted.

  7. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo (Dept. of Physics, Nagoya Univ. (Japan))

    1992-03-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.).

  8. Dense plasma focus (DPF) accelerated non radio isotopic radiological source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusnak, Brian; Tang, Vincent

    2017-01-31

    A non-radio-isotopic radiological source using a dense plasma focus (DPF) to produce an intense z-pinch plasma from a gas, such as helium, and which accelerates charged particles, such as generated from the gas or injected from an external source, into a target positioned along an acceleration axis and of a type known to emit ionizing radiation when impinged by the type of accelerated charged particles. In a preferred embodiment, helium gas is used to produce a DPF-accelerated He2+ ion beam to a beryllium target, to produce neutron emission having a similar energy spectrum as a radio-isotopic AmBe neutron source. Furthermore, multiple DPFs may be stacked to provide staged acceleration of charged particles for enhancing energy, tunability, and control of the source.

  9. HNCO in massive galactic dense cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, I.; Henkel, C.; Mao, R. Q.

    2000-09-01

    We surveyed 81 dense molecular cores associated with regions of massive star formation and Sgr A in the JK-1K-1 = 505-404 and 10010-909 lines of HNCO. Line emission was detected towards 57 objects. Selected subsamples were also observed in the 101-000, 404-303, 707-606, 15015-14014, 16016-15015 and 21021-20020 lines, covering a frequency range from 22 to 461 GHz. HNCO lines from the K-1 = 2,3 ladders were detected in several sources. Towards Orion-KL, K-1 = 5 transitions with upper state energies Eu/k ~ 1100 and 1300 K could be observed. Five HNCO cores were mapped. The sources remain spatially unresolved at 220 and 461 GHz (10010-909 and 21010-20020 transitions) with beam sizes of 24'' and 18\\arcsec, respectively. The detection of hyperfine structure in the 101-000 transition is consistent with optically thin emission under conditions of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). This is corroborated by a rotational diagram analysis of Orion-KL that indicates optically thin line emission also for transitions between higher excited states. At the same time a tentative detection of interstellar HN13CO (the 100,10-90,9 line at 220 GHz toward G 310.12-0.20) suggests optically thick emission from some rotational transitions. Typical HNCO abundances relative to H2 as derived from a population diagram analysis are ~ 10-9. The rotational temperatures reach ~ 500 K. The gas densities in regions of HNCO K-1=0 emission should be n>~ 106 cm-3 and in regions of K-1>0 emission about an order of magnitude higher even for radiative excitation. HNCO abundances are found to be enhanced in high-velocity gas. HNCO integrated line intensities correlate well with those of thermal SiO emission. This indicates a spatial coexistence of the two species and may hint at a common production mechanism, presumably based on shock chemistry. Based on the observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile and on observations with the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope (HHT). The HHT

  10. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buonanno

    Full Text Available An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs, modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV. An increase (P<0.05 in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons.

  11. High conductivity of dense tetragonal Li7La3Zr2O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenstine, Jeff; Rangasamy, Ezhiyl; Allen, Jan L.; Sakamoto, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Hot-pressing at 1050 °C lead to near theoretical density (∼98% relative density) tetragonal LLZO. The total conductivity value for dense tetragonal LLZO is ∼2.3 × 10-5 S cm-1. This is the highest reported value for tetragonal LLZO. This vast improvement in total conductivity is a result of the higher density achieved as a result of hot-pressing compared to conventional solid-state sintering. The value of the Li-ion lattice conductivity for dense tetragonal LLZO is 1.1 × 10-4 S cm-1. The microstructure of dense tetragonal LLZO consist of twins within the grains. It is suggested that the presence of twin boundaries adds a significant contribution to the total resistance.

  12. Energy-resolved angular distributions and the population partition of excited state Rh atoms ejected from ion bombarded Rh [l brace]001[r brace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, C.; Postawa, Z.; El-Maazawi, M.; Rosencrance, S.; Garrison, B.J.; Winograd, N. (Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States))

    1994-10-01

    The energy-resolved angular distributions of Rh atoms ejected from Rh [l brace]001[r brace] by bombardment with 5.0 keV Ar[sup +] ions have been measured for the ground state ([ital a] [sup 4][ital F][sub 9/2]) and the two lowest lying excited state ([ital a] [sup 4][ital F][sub 7/2],[ital a] [sup 4][ital F][sub 5/2]). Simultaneous measurements on these electronic states provide us an opportunity to examine the influence of electronic interactions on desorbed particles. The experimental results show that there is a sequential variation in the angular distributions as the excitation energy increases. These variations are attributed to the interaction between the substrate electrons and the excited state atom as it is being ejected from the surface. Since the measurements are performed using multiphoton ionization via a single intermediate state, the population partition among the three lowest states is obtained as well. The excitation probabilities of the [ital a] [sup 4][ital F][sub 7/2] and [ital a] [sup 4][ital F][sub 5/2] states are compared with those predicted from the expression exp([minus][ital A]/[ital av][sub [perpendicular

  13. Crater formation by single ions, cluster ions and ion "showers"

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Timko, Helga; Nordlund, Kai; Calatroni, Sergio; Taborelli, Mauro; Wuensch, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The various craters formed by giant objects, macroscopic collisions and nanoscale impacts exhibit an intriguing resemblance in shapes. At the same time, the arc plasma built up in the presence of sufficiently high electric fields at close look causes very similar damage on the surfaces. Although the plasma–wall interaction is far from a single heavy ion impact over dense metal surfaces or the one of a cluster ion, the craters seen on metal surfaces after a plasma discharge make it possible to link this event to the known mechanisms of the crater formations. During the plasma discharge in a high electric field the surface is subject to high fluxes (~1025 cm-2s-1) of ions with roughly equal energies typically of the order of a few keV. To simulate such a process it is possible to use a cloud of ions of the same energy. In the present work we follow the effect of such a flux of ions impinging the surface in the ‘‘shower’’ manner, to find the transition between the different mechanisms of crater formati...

  14. DNS of turbulent flows of dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, L.; Cinnella, P.; Gloerfelt, X.; Grasso, F.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dense gas effects on compressible turbulence is investigated by means of numerical simulations of the decay of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence (CHIT) and of supersonic turbulent flows through a plane channel (TCF). For both configurations, a parametric study on the Mach and Reynolds numbers is carried out. The dense gas considered in these parametric studies is PP11, a heavy fluorocarbon. The results are systematically compared to those obtained for a diatomic perfect gas (air). In our computations, the thermodynamic behaviour of the dense gases is modelled by means of the Martin-Hou equation of state. For CHIT cases, initial turbulent Mach numbers up to 1 are analyzed using mesh resolutions up to 5123. For TCF, bulk Mach numbers up to 3 and bulk Reynolds numbers up to 12000 are investigated. Average profiles of the thermodynamic quantities exhibit significant differences with respect to perfect-gas solutions for both of the configurations. For high-Mach CHIT, compressible structures are modified with respect to air, with weaker eddy shocklets and stronger expansions. In TCF, the velocity profiles of dense gas flows are much less sensitive to the Mach number and collapse reasonably well in the logarithmic region without any special need for compressible scalings, unlike the case of air, and the overall flow behaviour is midway between that of a variable-property liquid and that of a gas.

  15. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  16. Denseness of Numerical Radius Attaining Holomorphic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HanJu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the density of numerical radius attaining holomorphic functions on certain Banach spaces using the Lindenstrauss method. In particular, it is shown that if a complex Banach space is locally uniformly convex, then the set of all numerical attaining elements of is dense in .

  17. Denseness of Numerical Radius Attaining Holomorphic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ju Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the density of numerical radius attaining holomorphic functions on certain Banach spaces using the Lindenstrauss method. In particular, it is shown that if a complex Banach space X is locally uniformly convex, then the set of all numerical attaining elements of A(BX:X is dense in A(BX:X.

  18. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  19. APT: Action localization Proposals from dense Trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, J.C.; Jain, M.; Gati, E.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Xie, X.; Jones, M.W.; Tam, G.K.L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is on action localization in video with the aid of spatio-temporal proposals. To alleviate the computational expensive video segmentation step of existing proposals, we propose bypassing the segmentations completely by generating proposals directly from the dense trajectories used to repr

  20. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, Henny J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting perovskite-related oxides allow separation of oxygen from an air supply at elevated temperatures (>700 °C). By combining air separation and catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas into a ceramic membrane reactor,

  1. Improvements in accuracy of dense OPC models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallingal, Chidam; Oberschmidt, James; Viswanathan, Ramya; Abdo, Amr; Park, OSeo

    2008-10-01

    Performing model-based optical proximity correction (MBOPC) on layouts has become an integral part of patterning advanced integrated circuits. Earlier technologies used sparse OPC, the run times of which explode when the density of layouts increases. With the move to 45 nm technology node, this increase in run time has resulted in a shift to dense simulation OPC, which is pixel-based. The dense approach becomes more efficient at 45nm technology node and beyond. New OPC model forms can be used with the dense simulation OPC engine, providing the greater accuracy required by smaller technology nodes. Parameters in the optical model have to be optimized to achieve the required accuracy. Dense OPC uses a resist model with a different set of parameters than sparse OPC. The default search ranges used in the optimization of these resist parameters do not always result in the best accuracy. However, it is possible to improve the accuracy of the resist models by understanding the restrictions placed on the search ranges of the physical parameters during optimization. This paper will present results showing the correlation between accuracy of the models and some of these optical and resist parameters. The results will show that better optimization can improve the model fitness of features in both the calibration and verification set.

  2. Building a dense surface map incrementally from semi-dense point cloud and RGB images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-shan LI; Rong XIONG; Shoudong HUANG; Yi-ming HUANG

    2015-01-01

    Building and using maps is a fundamental issue for bionic robots in fi eld applications. A dense surface map, which offers rich visual and geometric information, is an ideal representation of the environment for indoor/outdoor localization, navigation, and recognition tasks of these robots. Since most bionic robots can use only small light-weight laser scanners and cameras to acquire semi-dense point cloud and RGB images, we propose a method to generate a consistent and dense surface map from this kind of semi-dense point cloud and RGB images. The method contains two main steps: (1) generate a dense surface for every single scan of point cloud and its corresponding image(s) and (2) incrementally fuse the dense surface of a new scan into the whole map. In step (1) edge-aware resampling is realized by segmenting the scan of a point cloud in advance and resampling each sub-cloud separately. Noise within the scan is reduced and a dense surface is generated. In step (2) the average surface is estimated probabilistically and the non-coincidence of different scans is eliminated. Experiments demonstrate that our method works well in both indoor and outdoor semi-structured environments where there are regularly shaped ob jects.

  3. Neutrophils drive accelerated tumor progression in the collagen-dense mammary tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mendoza, María G; Inman, David R; Ponik, Suzanne M; Jeffery, Justin J; Sheerar, Dagna S; Van Doorn, Rachel R; Keely, Patricia J

    2016-05-11

    High mammographic density has been correlated with a 4-fold to 6-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer, and is associated with increased stromal deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen I. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for high breast tissue density are not completely understood. We previously described accelerated tumor formation and metastases in a transgenic mouse model of collagen-dense mammary tumors (type I collagen-α1 (Col1α1)(tm1Jae) and mouse mammary tumor virus - polyoma virus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyVT)) compared to wild-type mice. Using ELISA cytokine arrays and multi-color flow cytometry analysis, we studied cytokine signals and the non-malignant, immune cells in the collagen-dense tumor microenvironment that may promote accelerated tumor progression and metastasis. Collagen-dense tumors did not show any alteration in immune cell populations at late stages. The cytokine signals in the mammary tumor microenvironment were clearly different between wild-type and collagen-dense tumors. Cytokines associated with neutrophil signaling, such as granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulated factor (GM-CSF), were increased in collagen-dense tumors. Depleting neutrophils with anti-Ly6G (1A8) significantly reduced the number of tumors, and blocked metastasis in over 80 % of mice with collagen-dense tumors, but did not impact tumor growth or metastasis in wild-type mice. Our study suggests that tumor progression in a collagen-dense microenvironment is mechanistically different, with pro-tumor neutrophils, compared to a non-dense microenvironment.

  4. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z=1.6

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, A; Tamburri, S; Lonoce, I; Ciocca, F

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the mass assembly history of ultramassive (Mstar > 10^11Msun) dense (Sigma = Mstar/(2*pi*Re^2) > 2500 Msun/pc^2) early-type galaxies (ETGs) over the last 9 Gyr. We have traced the evolution of the number density rho of ultramassive dense ETGs and have compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass Mstar) and dynamical (velocity dispersion sigma_e) parameters over the redshift range 0 = 1.4, or that, if a significant fraction of them evolves in size, new ultramassive dense ETGs must form at z < 1.5 to maintain their number density almost constant. The difficulty into identify good progenitors for these new dense ETGs at z < 1.5, and the stellar populations properties of local ultramassive dense ETGs point toward the first hypothesis.

  5. Dissipationless Hall Current in Dense Quark Matter in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer, E J

    2016-01-01

    We show the realization of axion electrodynamics within the Dual Chiral Density Wave phase of dense quark matter in the presence of a magnetic field. The system exhibits an anomalous dissipantionless Hall current perpendicular to the magnetic field and an anomalous electric charge density. Connection to topological insulators and 3D optical lattices, as well as possible implications for heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars are outlined.

  6. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  7. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  8. Optical diagnostic of warm dense matter at NDCXI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pavel; Bieniosek, Frank; Barnard, John; Henestroza, Enrique; Lidia, Steve; More, Dick

    2010-11-01

    This work is related to recently warm dense matter experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) accelerator, which delivers a 30-mA, 350-keV K^+ ion beam. Using the recently-developed technique of neutralized drift compression, the beam is simultaneously compressed longitudinally by a factor of 50, and focused transversely down to a 1 mm spot. The beam pulse is used to pulse heat various target materials, including Al, W, C, Pt and Si, above 3000 K driving samples into two-phase, liquid-vapor states. The next generation accelerator, NDCX-II, is being built and scheduled to be accomplished in 2012. This new machine will, utilize 2 MeV Li+ ions, to heat 2 micrometer thick metal targets up to 1,5 eV in 0.5 ns. This will allow us investigate near critical points properties of matter. The talk will focus on diagnostics aspects of WDM at NDCX. The fielded diagnostics include a specially developed three-channel optical pyrometer which probes color temperatures of the target at 750 nm, 1000 nm and 1500 nm, with 75 ps temporal resolution. Continuous target emission from 450 nm to 850 nm is recorded by a custom spectrometer, consisting of a high dynamic range Hamamatsu streak camera and a holographic grating. Free expansion of the sample is measured by a VISAR. Future diagnostics for the NDX-II user facility will be also discussed.

  9. Intense neutron pulse generation in dense Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritskii, V. M.; Glusko, Yu. A.; Mesyats, G. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    1989-12-01

    The problem of intense neutron pulse generation with fast dense Z-pinches (ZP) is analyzed for a modified approach. The analysis pertains to the interaction of a High Power Deuterium Beam (HPDB) with hot (Te≂1 keV) deuterium target formed by a ZP. The considerable decrease of the Coulomb ion-electron scattering cross-sections gives a corresponding increase of the deuterium range and neutron yield in the hot target. The generation of HPDB and ZP formation takes place at the same terawatt accelerator, by using in series with the ZP a plasma opening switch (POS), which is at the same time the Ion Plasma Filled Diode (IPFD). During the front of the current pulse the stable z-pinch implosion heats the ZP up to the keV temperature range with several kJ of energy input. Near the end of the current front the energy flow is being switched to HPDB generation due to the opening of the POS. The HPDB is focused ballistically at the axis of the ZP and transported along it in the azimutal magnetic field, producing a neutron burst. The analysis of ZP formation and heating, HPDB generation, its transport and neutron production is given.

  10. Dense Output for Strong Stability Preserving Runge–Kutta Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2016-12-10

    We investigate dense output formulae (also known as continuous extensions) for strong stability preserving (SSP) Runge–Kutta methods. We require that the dense output formula also possess the SSP property, ideally under the same step-size restriction as the method itself. A general recipe for first-order SSP dense output formulae for SSP methods is given, and second-order dense output formulae for several optimal SSP methods are developed. It is shown that SSP dense output formulae of order three and higher do not exist, and that in any method possessing a second-order SSP dense output, the coefficient matrix A has a zero row.

  11. Colloquium: Nonlinear Collective Interactions in Dense Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, P K

    2010-01-01

    The current understanding of some important collective processes in dense quantum plasmas is presented. After reviewing the basic properties of dense quantum plasmas with degenerate electrons, we present model equations (e.g. the quantum hydrodynamic and effective nonlinear Schr\\"odinger-Poisson equations) that describe collective nonlinear phenomena at nanoscales. The effects of the electron degeneracy arise due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle for overlapping electron wave functions that result in a nonlinear quantum electron pressure and tunneling/diffusion of electrons through a nonlinear quantum Bohm potential. Since degenerate electrons have $1/2-$spin due to their Fermionic nature, there also appear a spin electron current and a spin force acting on the electrons due to the Bohr magnetization. The present nonlinear equations do not include strong electron correlations and electron-exchange interactions. The quantum effects caused by the electron degeneracy produce n...

  12. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells.

  13. Strategies for Dense Optical CDMA Communication Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-bao; LIN Jin-tong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper,we have formulated a strategy that the limited available code sequences in pure Direct-Sequence(DS)or Frequency-Hopping(FH)system can be reused to realize dense optical CDMA:the strategy of novel hybrid DS/FH system.In which,the case that there are n users employing the same FH pattern but different DS code patterns is considered.On the condition that the impact of channel noises is neglected,the upper bound probability of error is evaluated based on the stationary random process theory.The results show that the hybrid system is suitable for Dense Optical CDMA(DOCDMA)communication.Moreover,the problems such as the link-impairment,dispersion of group velocity,etc.in the pure(DS or FH)system can be solved effectively.

  14. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  15. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  16. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X......-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation...

  17. Accelerating Dense Linear Algebra on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    and matrix-vector operations on GPUs. Such operations form the backbone of level 1 and level 2 routines in the Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS) library and are therefore of great importance in many scientific applications. The target hardware is the most recent NVIDIA Tesla 20-series (Fermi...... architecture). Most of the techniques I discuss for accelerating dense linear algebra are applicable to memory-bound GPU algorithms in general....

  18. Observations of Plasmons in Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P; Lee, R W; Widmann, K; Pollaine, S W; Wallace, R J; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Bornath, T; Thiele, R; Schwarz, V; Kraeft, W; Redmer, R

    2006-09-05

    We present the first collective x-ray scattering measurements of plasmons in solid-density plasmas. The forward scattering spectra of a laser-produced narrow-band x-ray line from isochorically heated beryllium show that the plasmon frequency is a sensitive measure of the electron density. Dynamic structure calculations that include collisions and detailed balance match the measured plasmon spectrum indicating that this technique will enable new applications to determine the equation of state and compressibility of dense matter.

  19. Splashing onset in dense suspension droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Ivo; Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the impact of droplets of dense suspensions onto a solid substrate. We show that a global hydrodynamic balance is unable to predict the splash onset and propose to replace it by an energy balance at the level of the particles in the suspension. We experimentally verify that the resulting, particle-based Weber number gives a reliable, particle size and density dependent splash onset criterion. We further show that the same argument also explains why, in bimodal systems, smaller ...

  20. Dense, Parsec-Scale Clumps near the Great Annihilator

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges-Kluck, E J; Harris, A I; Lamb, J W; Hodges, M W

    2009-01-01

    We report on Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations toward the Einstein source 1E 1740.7-2942, a LMXB commonly known as the "Great Annihilator." The Great Annihilator is known to be near a small, bright molecular cloud on the sky in a region largely devoid of emission in 12-CO surveys of the Galactic Center. The region is of interest because it is interior to the dust lanes which may be the shock zones where atomic gas from HI nuclear disk is converted into molecular gas. We find that the region is populated with a number of dense (n ~ 10^5 cm^-3) regions of excited gas with small filling factors, and estimate that up to 1-3 x 10^5 solar masses of gas can be seen in our maps. The detection suggests that a significant amount of mass is transported from the shock zones to the GC star-forming regions in the form of small, dense bundles.

  1. A method for dense packing discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kallus, Yoav; Gravel, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and ...

  2. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  3. Dense Visual SLAM with Probabilistic Surfel Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhixin; Ye, Mao; Ren, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Visual SLAM is one of the key technologies to align the virtual and real world together in Augmented Reality applications. RGBD dense Visual SLAM approaches have shown their advantages in robustness and accuracy in recent years. However, there are still several challenges such as the inconsistencies in RGBD measurements across multiple frames that could jeopardize the accuracy of both camera trajectory and scene reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a novel map representation called Probabilistic Surfel Map (PSM) for dense visual SLAM. The main idea is to maintain a globally consistent map with both photometric and geometric uncertainties encoded in order to address the inconsistency issue. The key of our PSM is proper modeling and updating of sensor measurement uncertainties, as well as the strategies to apply them for improving both the front-end pose estimation and the back-end optimization. Experimental results on publicly available datasets demonstrate major improvements with our approach over the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, comparing with σ-DVO, we achieve a 40% reduction in absolute trajectory error and an 18% reduction in relative pose error in visual odometry, as well as an 8.5% reduction in absolute trajectory error in complete SLAM. Moreover, our PSM enables generation of a high quality dense point cloud with comparable accuracy as the state-of-the-art approach.

  4. Dense Correspondences across Scenes and Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tau, Moria; Hassner, Tal

    2016-05-01

    We seek a practical method for establishing dense correspondences between two images with similar content, but possibly different 3D scenes. One of the challenges in designing such a system is the local scale differences of objects appearing in the two images. Previous methods often considered only few image pixels; matching only pixels for which stable scales may be reliably estimated. Recently, others have considered dense correspondences, but with substantial costs associated with generating, storing and matching scale invariant descriptors. Our work is motivated by the observation that pixels in the image have contexts-the pixels around them-which may be exploited in order to reliably estimate local scales. We make the following contributions. (i) We show that scales estimated in sparse interest points may be propagated to neighboring pixels where this information cannot be reliably determined. Doing so allows scale invariant descriptors to be extracted anywhere in the image. (ii) We explore three means for propagating this information: using the scales at detected interest points, using the underlying image information to guide scale propagation in each image separately, and using both images together. Finally, (iii), we provide extensive qualitative and quantitative results, demonstrating that scale propagation allows for accurate dense correspondences to be obtained even between very different images, with little computational costs beyond those required by existing methods.

  5. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  6. Solitary and double-layer structures in quantum bi-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmansouri, Mehran; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-06-01

    Weak ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in an unmagnetized quantum plasmas having two-fluid ions and fluid electrons are considered. Using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamics model and then the reductive perturbation technique, a generalized form of nonlinear quantum Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation governing the dynamics of weak ion acoustic solitary waves is derived. The effects of ion population, warm ion temperature, quantum diffraction, and polarity of ions on the nonlinear properties of these IASWs are analyzed. It is found that our present plasma model may support compressive as well as rarefactive solitary structures. Furthermore, formation and characteristics properties of IA double layers in the present bi-ion plasma model are investigated. The results of this work should be useful and applicable in understanding the wide relevance of nonlinear features of localized electro-acoustic structures in laboratory and space plasma, such as in super-dense astrophysical objects [24] and in the Earth's magnetotail region (Parks [43]. The implications of our results in some space plasma situations are discussed.

  7. Effective Field Theories for Hot and Dense Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaschke D.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is divided in two parts. The first one deals with an introduction to the physics of hot, dense many-particle systems in quantum field theory [1, 2]. The basics of the path integral approach to the partition function are explained for the example of chiral quark models. The QCD phase diagram is discussed in the meanfield approximation while QCD bound states in the medium are treated in the rainbow-ladder approximation (Gaussian fluctuations. Special emphasis is devoted to the discussion of the Mott effect, i.e. the transition of bound states to unbound, but resonant scattering states in the continnum under the influence of compression and heating of the system. Three examples are given: (1 the QCD model phase diagram with chiral symmetry ¨ restoration and color superconductivity [3], (2 the Schrodinger equation for heavy-quarkonia [4], and (2 Pions [5] as well as Kaons and D-mesons in the finite-temperature Bethe-Salpeter equation [6]. We discuss recent applications of this quantum field theoretical approach to hot and dense quark matter for a description of anomalous J/ψ supression in heavy-ion collisions [7] and for the structure and cooling of compact stars with quark matter interiors [8]. The second part provides a detailed introduction to the Polyakov-loop Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model [9] for thermodynamics and mesonic correlations [10] in the phase diagram of quark matter. Important relationships of low-energy QCD like the Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner relation are generalized to finite temperatures. The effect of including the coupling to the Polyakov-loop potential on the phase diagram and mesonic correlations is discussed. An outlook is given to effects of nonlocality of the interactions [11] and of mesonic correlations in the medium [12] which go beyond the meanfield description.

  8. 2010 ion run: completed!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After a very fast switchover from protons to lead ions, the LHC has achieved performances that allowed the machine to exceed both peak and integrated luminosity by a factor of three. Thanks to this, experiments have been able to produce high-profile results on ion physics almost immediately, confirming that the LHC was able to keep its promises for ions as well as for protons.   First direct observation of jet quenching. A seminar on 2 December was the opportunity for the ALICE, ATLAS and CMS collaborations to present their first results on ion physics in front of a packed auditorium. These results are important and are already having a major impact on the understanding of the physics processes that involve the basic constituents of matter at high energies. In the ion-ion collisions, the temperature is so high that partons (quarks and gluons), which are usually constrained inside the nucleons, are deconfined to form a highly dense and hot soup known as quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The existence of ...

  9. Microfield dynamics in dense hydrogen plasmas with high-Z impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Weisheit, Jon

    2017-01-01

    We use large-scale classical molecular dynamics to determine microfield properties for several dense plasma mixtures. By employing quantum statistical potentials (QSPs) to regularize the Coulomb interaction, our simulations follow motions of electrons as well as ions for times long enough to track relaxation phenomena involving both types of particles. Coulomb coupling, relative to temperature, of different pairs of species in the hot, dense matter being simulated ranges from weak to strong. We first study the effect of such coupling differences, along with composition and QSP differences, on the roles of electrons and various mixture components in determining probability distributions of instantaneous, total microfields experienced by the ions. Then, we address two important dynamical questions: (1) How is the quasistatic part of the total field to be extracted from the time-dependent simulation data? (2) Under what conditions does the commonly used approximation of ions with fixed Yukawa-like screening by free electrons accurately describe quasistatic fields? We identify a running, short-time average of the total field at each ion as its slowly evolving, quasistatic part. We consider several ways to specify the averaging interval, and note the influence of ion dynamics in this issue. When all species are weakly coupled, the quasistatic fields have probability distributions agreeing well with those we obtain from simulations of Yukawa-screened ions. However, agreement deteriorates as the coupling between high-Z ions increases well beyond unity, principally because the Yukawa model tends to underestimate the true screening of close high-Z pairs. Examples of this fact are given, and some consequences for the high-field portions of probability distributions are discussed.

  10. The influence of the local volume fluctuations on the equation-of-state of hot and dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, David; Fisher, Dima; Barshalom, Avraham; Oreg, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    Generally, equation-of-state (EOS) of hot and dense plasmas is computed under the assumption that there is a constant volume available to every ion/atom in the plasma. In the present paper we combined two recently developed models to evaluate the influence of local density fluctuations around the ions on the corresponding EOS. The first of these is the so-called Ion Ellipsoid Model (IEM). IEM assumes that the local volume of the ion is a 3-dimensional ellipsoidal enclosure. Full description of the model is given in Ref. [1]. From IEM semi-empirical formulas were derived for the ions volume distribution function [1] for 0INFERNO models to calculate opacities and EOS on the same footing. We will describe the model and present preliminary results indicating the effect of the volume fluctuations around the ions on EOS results.

  11. Technologies for trapped-ion quantum information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eltony, Amira M; Shi, Molu; Bylinskii, Alexei; Vuletić, Vladan; Chuang, Isaac L

    2015-01-01

    Scaling-up from prototype systems to dense arrays of ions on chip, or vast networks of ions connected by photonic channels, will require developing entirely new technologies that combine miniaturized ion trapping systems with devices to capture, transmit and detect light, while refining how ions are confined and controlled. Building a cohesive ion system from such diverse parts involves many challenges, including navigating materials incompatibilities and undesired coupling between elements. Here, we review our recent efforts to create scalable ion systems incorporating unconventional materials such as graphene and indium tin oxide, integrating devices like optical fibers and mirrors, and exploring alternative ion loading and trapping techniques.

  12. Technologies for trapped-ion quantum information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltony, Amira M.; Gangloff, Dorian; Shi, Molu; Bylinskii, Alexei; Vuletić, Vladan; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2016-12-01

    Scaling up from prototype systems to dense arrays of ions on chip, or vast networks of ions connected by photonic channels, will require developing entirely new technologies that combine miniaturized ion trapping systems with devices to capture, transmit, and detect light, while refining how ions are confined and controlled. Building a cohesive ion system from such diverse parts involves many challenges, including navigating materials incompatibilities and undesired coupling between elements. Here, we review our recent efforts to create scalable ion systems incorporating unconventional materials such as graphene and indium tin oxide, integrating devices like optical fibers and mirrors, and exploring alternative ion loading and trapping techniques.

  13. Leeuwpan fine coal dense medium plant

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lundt, M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available availability to treat the higher grade coal (the bottom layer of coal) from the no. 2 Seam for a local and export metallurgical market. Following the path of evolution, in 2007, Leeuwpan commissioned the first double stage ultra-fines dense medium cyclone... plant in the coal industry, to form part of its overall DMS plant. It replaced the spirals to treat the -1 mm material. Spirals are still the most commonly and accepted method used by the industry, but it seems as if the pioneering cyclone process...

  14. Interference Alignment in Dense Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Niesen, Urs

    2009-01-01

    We consider arbitrary dense wireless networks, in which $n$ nodes are placed in an arbitrary (deterministic) manner on a square region of unit area and communicate with each other over Gaussian fading channels. We provide inner and outer bounds for the $n\\times n$-dimensional unicast and the $n\\times 2^n$-dimensional multicast capacity regions of such a wireless network. These inner and outer bounds differ only by a factor $O(\\log(n))$, yielding a fairly tight scaling characterization of the entire regions. The communication schemes achieving the inner bounds use interference alignment as a central technique and are surprisingly simple.

  15. Phase transitions in dense 2-colour QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Boz, Tamer; Fister, Leonard; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate 2-colour QCD with 2 flavours of Wilson fermion at nonzero temperature T and quark chemical potential mu, with a pion mass of 700 MeV (m_pi/m_rho=0.8). From temperature scans at fixed mu we find that the critical temperature for the superfluid to normal transition depends only very weakly on mu above the onset chemical potential, while the deconfinement crossover temperature is clearly decreasing with mu. We also present results for the Landau-gauge gluon propagator in the hot and dense medium.

  16. Flavour Oscillations in Dense Baryonic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We suggest that fast neutral meson oscillations may occur in a dense baryonic matter, which can influence the balance of s/¯s quarks in the nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus interactions, if primordial multiplicities of neutral K 0, mesons are sufficiently asymmetrical. The phenomenon can occur even if CP symmetry is fully conserved, and it may be responsible for the enhanced sub-threshold production of multi-strange hyperons observed in the low-energy A+A and p+A interactions.

  17. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  18. Atomistic study of mixing at high Z / low Z interfaces at Warm Dense Matter Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Glosli, James; Rudd, Robert; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team

    2016-10-01

    We use atomistic simulations to study different aspects of mixing occurring at an initially sharp interface of high Z and low Z plasmas in the Warm/Hot Dense Matter regime. We consider a system of Diamond (the low Z component) in contact with Ag (the high Z component), which undergoes rapid isochoric heating from room temperature up to 10 eV, rapidly changing the solids into warm dense matter at solid density. We simulate the motion of ions via the screened Coulomb potential. The electric field, the electron density and ionizations level are computed on the fly by solving Poisson equation. The spatially varying screening lengths computed from the electron cloud are included in this effective interaction; the electrons are not simulated explicitly. We compute the electric field generated at the Ag-C interface as well as the dynamics of the ions during the mixing process occurring at the plasma interface. Preliminary results indicate an anomalous transport of high Z ions (Ag) into the low Z component (C); a phenomenon that is partially related to the enhanced transport of ions due to the generated electric field. These results are in agreement with recent experimental observation on Au-diamond plasma interface. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Evolution of damage fraction due to dense ionizing irradiation on TiO{sub 2} film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avesh [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Mohanty, T., E-mail: tanujajnu@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of damage fraction during dense ionizing irradiation at various fluences using 100 MeV Ag ion is studied. Irradiation induced modification of surface roughness and surface potential of titanium dioxide nanocrystalline thin films are estimated. TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrate were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag ion beam with varying fluences. Ion bombardment generates point and extended defects in TiO{sub 2} thin films due to dense electronic excitation. The surface morphology and surface roughness of irradiated and pristine thin films were measured using atomic force microscopy. The changes in surface potential of pristine as well as Ag ion beam irradiated thin films were measured from contact potential difference between TiO{sub 2} thin film (one electrode) of unknown work function and Au (reference electrode) of known work function using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The defect size and damage fraction are calculated from exponential fitting of variation of both contact surface potential difference and roughness exponent with fluence.

  20. Tracing dense and diffuse neutral hydrogen in the halo of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Vanessa A; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M

    2016-01-01

    We have combined observations of Galactic high-velocity HI from two surveys: a very sensitive survey from the Green Bank 140ft Telescope with limited sky coverage, and the less sensitive but complete Galactic All Sky Survey from the 64m Parkes Radio Telescope. The two surveys preferentially detect different forms of neutral gas due to their sensitivity. We adopt a machine learning approach to divide our data into two populations that separate across a range in column density: 1) a narrow line-width population typical of the majority of bright high velocity cloud components, and 2) a fainter, broad line-width population that aligns well with that of the population found in the Green Bank survey. We refer to these populations as dense and diffuse gas respectively, and find that diffuse gas is typically located at the edges and in the tails of high velocity clouds, surrounding dense components in the core. A fit to the average spectrum of each type of gas in the Galactic All Sky Survey data reveals the dense pop...

  1. Dense spermatozoa in stallion ejaculates contain lower concentrations of mRNAs encoding the sperm specific calcium channel 1, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3, aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha than less dense spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, N H; Forrest, D W; Love, C C; Varner, D D

    2014-07-15

    Stallions are unique among livestock in that, like men, they commonly receive medical treatment for subfertility. In both species, about 15% of individuals have normal semen parameters but are subfertile, indicating a need for novel analyses of spermatozoa function. One procedure for improving fertilizing capability of stallions and men is isolation of dense spermatozoa from an ejaculate for use in artificial insemination. In the current study, dense and less dense spermatozoa were purified by density gradient centrifugation from individual ejaculates from seven reproductively normal adult stallions. The RNA isolated from the spermatozoa seemed to be naturally fragmented to an average length of 250 bases, consistent with reports of spermatozoa RNA from other species. The DNAse treatment of RNA prepared from spermatozoa removed any genomic DNA contamination, as assessed by PCR with intron spanning primers for the protamine 1 (PRM1) gene. Concentrations of seven mRNAs in spermatozoa, correlated with the fertility of men and bulls, were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in dense and less dense spermatozoa. Concentrations of four mRNAs were two- to four-fold lower in dense spermatozoa compared with less dense spermatozoa: Encoding the spermatozoa-specific calcium channel (P 0.1). These results identify new differences in mRNA concentrations in populations of spermatozoa with dissimilar densities.

  2. Nonlinear magnetosonic waves in dense plasmas with non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Rehman, Aman-ur- [Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-11-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic waves in the perpendicular direction to the ambient magnetic field is studied in dense plasmas for non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons pressure. The sources of nonlinearities are the divergence of the ions and electrons fluxes, Lorentz forces on ions and electrons fluids and the plasma current density in the system. The Korteweg-de Vries equation for magnetosonic waves propagating in the perpendicular direction of the magnetic field is derived by employing reductive perturbation method for non-relativistic as well as ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons pressure cases in dense plasmas. The plots of the magnetosonic wave solitons are also shown using numerical values of the plasma parameters such a plasma density and magnetic field intensity of the white dwarfs from literature. The dependence of plasma density and magnetic field intensity on the magnetosonic wave propagation is also pointed out in dense plasmas for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons pressure cases.

  3. Predicting diffusivities in dense fluid mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DARIVA

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation, as corrected by Speedy, together with the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA perturbation theory of liquids is employed in correlating and predicting self-diffusivities of dense fluids. Afterwards this theory is used to estimate mutual diffusion coefficients of solutes at infinite dilution in sub and supercritical solvents. We have also investigated the behavior of Fick diffusion coefficients in the proximity of a binary vapor-liquid critical point since this subject is of great interest for extraction purposes. The approach presented here, which makes use of a density and temperature dependent hard-sphere diameter, is shown to be excellent for predicting diffusivities in dense pure fluids and fluid mixtures. The calculations involved highly nonideal mixtures as well as systems with high molecular asymmetry. The predicted diffusivities are in good agreement with the experimental data for the pure and binary systems. The methodology proposed here makes only use of pure component information and density of mixtures. The simple algebraic relations are proposed without any binary adjustable parameters and can be readily used for estimating diffusivities in multicomponent mixtures.

  4. The symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Kie Sang

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case ...

  5. Redesigning Triangular Dense Matrix Computations on GPUs

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali

    2016-08-09

    A new implementation of the triangular matrix-matrix multiplication (TRMM) and the triangular solve (TRSM) kernels are described on GPU hardware accelerators. Although part of the Level 3 BLAS family, these highly computationally intensive kernels fail to achieve the percentage of the theoretical peak performance on GPUs that one would expect when running kernels with similar surface-to-volume ratio on hardware accelerators, i.e., the standard matrix-matrix multiplication (GEMM). The authors propose adopting a recursive formulation, which enriches the TRMM and TRSM inner structures with GEMM calls and, therefore, reduces memory traffic while increasing the level of concurrency. The new implementation enables efficient use of the GPU memory hierarchy and mitigates the latency overhead, to run at the speed of the higher cache levels. Performance comparisons show up to eightfold and twofold speedups for large dense matrix sizes, against the existing state-of-the-art TRMM and TRSM implementations from NVIDIA cuBLAS, respectively, across various GPU generations. Once integrated into high-level Cholesky-based dense linear algebra algorithms, the performance impact on the overall applications demonstrates up to fourfold and twofold speedups, against the equivalent native implementations, linked with cuBLAS TRMM and TRSM kernels, respectively. The new TRMM/TRSM kernel implementations are part of the open-source KBLAS software library (http://ecrc.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Res-kblas.aspx) and are lined up for integration into the NVIDIA cuBLAS library in the upcoming v8.0 release.

  6. Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Media

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2014-01-01

    We study the finite temperature and density effects on beta decay rates to compute their contributions to nucleosynthesis. QED type corrections to beta decay from the hot and dense background are estimated in terms of the statistical corrections to the self-mass of an electron. For this purpose, we re-examine the hot and dense background contributions to the electron mass and compute its effect to the beta decay rate, helium yield, energy density of the universe as well as the change in neutrino temperature from the first order contribution to the self-mass of electrons during these processes. We explicitly show that the thermal contribution to the helium abundance at T = m of a cooling universe 0.045 % is higher than the corresponding contribution to helium abundance of a heating universe 0.031% due to the existence of hot fermions before the beginning of nucleosynthesis and their absence after the nucleosynthesis, in the early universe. Thermal contribution to helium abundance was a simple quadratic functio...

  7. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P; Doeppner, T; Landen, L; Lee, R W; Wallace, R; Weber, S; Lee, H J; Kritcher, A L; Falcone, R; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Meyerhofer, D D; Gregori, G; Fortmann, C; Schwarz, V; Redmer, R

    2007-10-02

    Compton scattering has been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, while in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.

  8. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P; Doeppner, T; Landen, O L; Lee, R W; Wallace, R J; Weber, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, H J; Kritcher, A L; Falcone, R [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Meyerhofer, D D [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Fortmann, C; Schwarz, V; Redmer, R [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)], E-mail: glenzer1@llnl.gov

    2008-05-15

    Compton scattering techniques have been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, while in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.

  9. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  10. Wireless Fractal Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yixue; Chen, Min; Hu, Long; Song, Jeungeun; Volk, Mojca; Humar, Iztok

    2017-04-12

    With the ever-growing number of mobile devices, there is an explosive expansion in mobile data services. This represents a challenge for the traditional cellular network architecture to cope with the massive wireless traffic generated by mobile media applications. To meet this challenge, research is currently focused on the introduction of a small cell base station (BS) due to its low transmit power consumption and flexibility of deployment. However, due to a complex deployment environment and low transmit power of small cell BSs, the coverage boundary of small cell BSs will not have a traditional regular shape. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the coverage boundary of an ultra-dense small cell network and give its main features: aeolotropy of path loss fading and fractal coverage boundary. Simple performance analysis is given, including coverage probability and transmission rate, etc., based on stochastic geometry theory and fractal theory. Finally, we present an application scene and discuss challenges in the ultra-dense small cell network.

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  12. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  13. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, R. [D-203, Samruddhi Residency, Motera, Ahmedabad-380009, Gujarat (India); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

    2013-07-15

    We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Z{sub i} = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (κ = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (κ = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ≈ 4×10{sup 8} V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter κ = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

  14. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, Ronald

    1997-04-01

    plasmas in a narrow density range above 10 20 cm -3 for alkali-atom plasmas and 10 22 cm -3 for hydrogen plasma, respectively. Furthermore, the thermopower can change its sign in the same region which indicates that a nonmetal-to-metal transition occurs also in dense, low-temperature plasmas. The magnetic susceptibility and the Korringa relation are calculated for expanded fluid metals along the coexistence line within the partially ionized plasma model. The various contributions to the total susceptibility are derived from an extended RPA which takes into account local-field corrections as well as the influence of localized electron states. The metal-nonmetal transition indicated by an enhancement of the electronic paramagnetic volume susceptibility is strongly connected with the occurrence of charged clusters. Static structure factors are determined for expanded cesium and mercury within the MHNC scheme via effective ion-ion potentials which are derived from the polarization function within an extended RPA. The optical properties of dense plasmas, the shift and broadening of spectral lines, can also be derived within the Green's function technique. Some new results for the spectral line shape are discussed.

  15. Decay of Langmuir wave in dense plasmas and warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S; Moon, Sung Joon

    2010-01-01

    The decays of the Langmuir waves in dense plasmas are computed using the dielectric function theory widely used in the solid state physics. Four cases are considered: a classical plasma, a Maxwellian plasma, a degenerate quantum plasma, and a partially degenerate plasma. The result is considerably different from the conventional Landau damping theory.

  16. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack C.; Besecker, Charles J.; Chen, Hancun; Robinson, Earil T.

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  17. Stellar interactions in dense and sparse star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, C.; Pfalzner, S.; Eckart, A.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Stellar encounters potentially affect the evolution of the protoplanetary discs in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). However, the role of encounters in other cluster environments is less known. Aims: We investigate the effect of the encounter-induced disc-mass loss in different cluster environments. Methods: Starting from an ONC-like cluster we vary the cluster size and density to determine the correlation of the collision time scale and disc-mass loss. We use the nbody6++ code to model the dynamics of these clusters and analyse the disc-mass loss due to encounters. Results: We find that the encounter rate strongly depends on the cluster density but remains rather unaffected by the size of the stellar population. This dependency translates directly into the effect on the encounter-induced disc-mass loss. The essential outcome of the simulations are: i) even in clusters of four times lower density than the ONC, the effect of encounters is still apparent; ii) the density of the ONC itself marks a threshold: in less dense and less massive clusters it is the massive stars that dominate the encounter-induced disc-mass loss, whereas in denser and more massive clusters the low-mass stars play the major role for the disc-mass removal. Conclusions: It seems that in the central regions of young dense star clusters - the common sites of star formation - stellar encounters do affect the evolution of the protoplanetary discs. With higher cluster density low-mass stars become more heavily involved in this process. These results can also be applied to extreme stellar systems: in the case of the Arches cluster one would expect stellar encounters to destroy the discs of most of the low- and high-mass stars in several hundred thousand years, whereas intermediate mass stars are able to retain their discs to some extent even under these harsh environmental conditions.

  18. Fate of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to X-rays or carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, S; Pignalosa, D; Nasonova, E; Arrizabalaga, O; Helm, A; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2014-01-15

    The risk of radiation exposure during embryonic development is still a major problem in radiotoxicology. In this study we investigated the response of the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) line D3 to two radiation qualities: sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions. We analyzed clonogenic cell survival, proliferation, induction of chromosome aberrations as well as the capability of cells to differentiate to beating cardiomyocytes up to 3 days after exposure. Our results show that, for all endpoints investigated, carbon ions are more effective than X-rays at the same radiation dose. Additionally, in long term studies (≥8 days post-irradiation) chromosomal damage and the pluripotency state were investigated. These studies reveal that pluripotency markers are present in the progeny of cells surviving the exposure to both radiation types. However, only in the progeny of X-ray exposed cells the aberration frequency was comparable to that of the control population, while the progeny of carbon ion irradiated cells harbored significantly more aberrations than the control, generally translocations. We conclude that cells surviving the radiation exposure maintain pluripotency but may carry stable chromosomal rearrangements after densely ionizing radiation.

  19. Unified Concept of Effective One Component Plasma for Hot Dense Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clérouin, Jean; Arnault, Philippe; Ticknor, Christopher; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2016-03-18

    Orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations are used to benchmark two popular models for hot dense plasmas: the one component plasma (OCP) and the Yukawa model. A unified concept emerges where an effective OCP (EOCP) is constructed from the short-range structure of the plasma. An unambiguous ionization and the screening length can be defined and used for a Yukawa system, which reproduces the long-range structure with finite compressibility. Similarly, the dispersion relation of longitudinal waves is consistent with the screened model at vanishing wave number but merges with the OCP at high wave number. Additionally, the EOCP reproduces the overall relaxation time scales of the correlation functions associated with ionic motion. In the hot dense regime, this unified concept of EOCP can be fruitfully applied to deduce properties such as the equation of state, ionic transport coefficients, and the ion feature in x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  20. The Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Method Applied to Warm Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstadt, Daniel; Newnam, Charles E.; Wilson, Brian G.

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure, EOS and transport properties of warm electrons in an amorphous or disordered configuration of ions is not well described by either solid-state or plasma models. Such warm, dense systems share the characteristic of the solid state that multi-center scattering effects are of paramount importance in forming bands of valence states. Theoretical treatment of the EOS of warm, dense matter therefore requires a way to include significant occupation of higher energy and angular momentum channel continuum states. We are extending the Green's function Kohn-Korringa-Rostoker code MECCA as an all-electron (non-pseudo potential) method that treats arbitrary mixtures of atoms on an ab-initio basis over a broad range of conditions, from cold, solid matter up to hot plasmas at extreme (ICF) compression. Specific examples of Aluminum and Boron-Nitride will be discussed.

  1. Preionization Techniques in a kJ-Scale Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povilus, Alexander; Shaw, Brian; Chapman, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Cooper, Christopher; Falabella, Steve; Prasad, Rahul; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a type of z-pinch device that uses a high current, coaxial plasma gun with an implosion phase to generate dense plasmas. These devices can accelerate a beam of ions to MeV-scale energies through strong electric fields generated by instabilities during the implosion of the plasma sheath. The formation of these instabilities, however, relies strongly on the history of the plasma sheath in the device, including the evolution of the gas breakdown in the device. In an effort to reduce variability in the performance of the device, we attempt to control the initial gas breakdown in the device by seeding the system with free charges before the main power pulse arrives. We report on the effectiveness of two techniques developed for a kJ-scale DPF at LLNL, a miniature primer spark gap and pulsed, 255nm LED illumination. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Advances towards pB11 Fusion with the Dense Plasma Focus

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Eric J

    2007-01-01

    The prospects for achieving net energy production with pB11 fuel have recently considerably brightened. Studies have shown that the multi-GG field potentially obtainable with modest dense plasma focus devices have the effect of reducing the flow of energy from the ions to the electrons and thus suppressing bremsstrahlung radiation that cools the plasma. We report here on new simulations that indicate that net energy production may be achievable in high-magnetic-field devices at peak currents as low as 2.3 MA. While these simulations only model the dense plasmoid formed in the focus, new simulation techniques can allow a full particle-in-cell simulation of DPF functioning over the wide range of time and space scales needed. Such simulations will be of great value in the next round of experiments that will use pB11 fuel.

  3. Dense plasma focus research at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka (Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kisoda, A.; Yamada, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Yamanaka, C.

    1983-09-01

    Research using a 50 kV/50 kJ deuterium plasma focus with 1.25 MA maximum current is summarized. Plasma dynamics in implosion phase of dense plasma focus were investigated by 2nsec ruby laser holographic interferometry and shadowgraphy. Radial pinch velocity of the plasma column and ionizing front velocity are 20 million cm/sec. Rayleigh-Taylor instability is observed in the early stage of the implosion phase. Effects of CO2 laser light on a dense plasma focus are discussed. High energy deuteron intensity, energy spectrum, and angular distribution were measured from radioactivity induced in graphite, aliminum and copper in ion dominant low pressure mode and neutron dominant high pressure mode.

  4. A unified concept of effective one component plasma for hot dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Clérouin, Jean; Ticknor, Christopher; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations are used to benchmark two popular models for hot dense plasmas: the one component plasma (OCP) and the Yukawa model. A unified concept emerges where an effective OCP (eOCP) is constructed from the short-range structure of the plasma. An unambiguous ionization and the screening length can be defined and used for a Yukawa system, which reproduces the long range structure with finite compressibility. Similarly, the dispersion relation of longitudinal waves is consistent with the screened model at vanishing wavenumber but merges with the OCP at high wavenumber. Additionally, the eOCP reproduces the overall relaxation timescales of the correlation functions associated with ionic motion. In the hot dense regime, this unified concept of eOCP can be fruitfully applied to deduce properties such as the equation of state, ionic transport coefficients, and the ion feature in x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  5. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-31

    plasma were identified using a downstream quadrupole mass spectrometer. In these experimento it is a simple matter to establish H+(H 2 0):f as the...pressure as predicted by the Thomson t2rnary mechanism whicK hzr been suownr to be valid experimentally at hiTh rrsurs (,han and Peron, 1:EI4 hereafter t...of NO , NO2 ions in various gases and the ternary recombination coefficients of these ions in the higher pres:;ure ( Thomson ) re"ie. Equation (5) cr>n

  6. Sound scattering in dense granular media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA XiaoPing; LAURENT J; KHIDAS Y; LANGLOIS V

    2009-01-01

    The sound propagation in a dense granular medium is basically characterized by the ratio of wave-length to the grain size. Two types of wave transport are distinguished: one corresponds to coherent waves in the long wavelength limit, the other to short-wavelength scattered waves by the inhomoge-neous contact force networks. These multiply scattered elastic waves are shown to exhibit a diffusive characteristics of transport over long distances of propagation. Determination of the transport mean free path l* and the inelastic absorption (Q~(-1)) allows the inference of the structural properties of the material such as the heterogeneity and internal dissipation. The relevance of our experiments for seismological applications is discussed. Moreover, we apply the correlation technique of the configu-ration-specific sound scattering to monitoring the dynamic behaviour of the granular medium (irre-versible rearrangements) under strong vibration, shearing and thermal cycling, respectively.

  7. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Ravindra Kumar

    2009-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the physics and applications of the interaction of high intensity laser light with matter. It traces the crucial advances that have occurred over the past few decades in laser technology and nonlinear optics and then discusses physical phenomena that occur in intense laser fields and their modeling. After a description of the basic phenomena like multiphoton and tunneling ionization, the physics of plasma formed in dense matter is presented. Specific phenomena are chosen for illustration of the scientific and technological possibilities – simulation of astrophysical phenomena, relativistic nonlinear optics, laser wakefield acceleration, laser fusion, ultrafast real time X-ray diffraction, application of the particle beams produced from the plasma for medical therapies etc. A survey of the Indian activities in this research area appears at the end.

  8. Carbon nitride frameworks and dense crystalline polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Salamat, Ashkan; Bojdys, Michael J.; Needs, Richard J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-09-01

    We used ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to investigate polymorphism in C3N4 carbon nitride as a function of pressure. Our calculations reveal new framework structures, including a particularly stable chiral polymorph of space group P 43212 containing mixed s p2 and s p3 bonding, that we have produced experimentally and recovered to ambient conditions. As pressure is increased a sequence of structures with fully s p3 -bonded C atoms and three-fold-coordinated N atoms is predicted, culminating in a dense P n m a phase above 250 GPa. Beyond 650 GPa we find that C3N4 becomes unstable to decomposition into diamond and pyrite-structured CN2.

  9. Plasmon resonance in warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, R; Bornath, T; Fortmann, C; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Wierling, A; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G

    2008-02-21

    Collective Thomson scattering with extreme ultraviolet light or x-rays is shown to allow for a robust measurement of the free electron density in dense plasmas. Collective excitations like plasmons appear as maxima in the scattering signal. Their frequency position can directly be related to the free electron density. The range of applicability of the standard Gross-Bohm dispersion relation and of an improved dispersion relation in comparison to calculations based on the dielectric function in random phase approximation is investigated. More important, this well-established treatment of Thomson scattering on free electrons is generalized in the Born-Mermin approximation by including collisions. We show that, in the transition region from collective to non-collective scattering, the consideration of collisions is important.

  10. Properties of industrial dense gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, E. M.; Forney, L. J.

    Hazardous gases and vapors are often discharged into the atmosphere from industrial plants during catastrophic events (e.g. Union Carbide incident in Bhopal, India). In many cases the discharged components are more dense than air and settle to the ground surface downstream from the stack exit. In the present paper, the buoyant plume model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass. 19, 585-590.) has been altered to predict the properties of hazardous discharges. In particular, the plume impingement point, radius and concentration are predicted for typical stack exit conditions, wind speeds and temperature profiles. Asymptotic expressions for plume properties at the impingement point are also derived for a constant crosswind and neutral temperature profile. These formulae are shown to be useful for all conditions.

  11. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non

  12. Dense QCD: a Holographic Dyonic Salt

    CERN Document Server

    Rho, Mannque; Zahed, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    Dense QCD at zero temperature with a large number of colors is a crystal. We show that in the holographic dual description, the crystal is made out of pairs of dyons with $e=g=\\pm 1$ charges in a salt-like arrangement. We argue that with increasing density the dyon masses and topological charges equalize, turning the salt-like configuration to a bcc of half-instantons. The latter is dual to a cubic crystal of half-skyrmions. We estimate the transition from an fcc crystal of instantons to a bcc crystal of dyons to about 3 times nuclear matter density with a dyon binding energy of about 180 MeV.

  13. Dynamic structure of dense krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Salacuse, J. J.; Schommers, W.; Ram, J.

    1984-07-01

    We have made molecular-dynamics computer simulations of dense krypton gas (10.6×1027 atoms/m3 and 296 K) using reasonably realistic pair potentials. Comparisons are made with the recent experimental data[P. A. Egelstaff et al., Phys. Rev. A 27, 1106 (1983)] for the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) over the range 0.4

  14. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  15. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.

  16. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  17. Ionic structures and transport properties of hot dense W and U plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-10-01

    We have combined the average-atom model with the hyper-netted chain approximation (AAHNC) to describe the electronic and ionic structure of uranium and tungsten in the hot dense matter regime. When the electronic structure is described within the average-atom model, the effects of others ions on the electronic structure are considered by the correlation functions. And the ionic structure is calculated though using the hyper-netted chain (HNC) approximation. The ion-ion pair potential is calculated using the modified Gordon-Kim model based on the electronic density distribution in the temperature-depended density functional theory. And electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently. On the basis of the ion-ion pair potential, we perform the classical (CMD) and Langevin (LMD) molecular dynamics to simulate the ionic transport properties, such as ionic self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients, through the ionic velocity correlation functions. Due that the free electrons become more and more with increasing the plasma temperature, the influence of the electron-ion collisions on the transport properties become more and more important.

  18. Average-atom model for two-temperature states and ionic transport properties of aluminum in the warm dense matter regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Fu, Yongsheng; Bredow, Richard; Kang, Dongdong; Redmer, Ronald; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    The average-atom model combined with the hyper-netted chain approximation is an efficient tool for electronic and ionic structure calculations for warm dense matter. Here we generalize this method in order to describe non-equilibrium states with different electron and ion temperature as produced in laser-matter interactions on ultra-short time scales. In particular, the electron-ion and ion-ion correlation effects are considered when calculating the electron structure. We derive an effective ion-ion pair-potential using the electron densities in the framework of temperature-depended density functional theory. Using this ion-ion potential we perform molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the ionic transport properties such as the ionic diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity through the ionic velocity autocorrelation functions.

  19. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  20. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  1. meta-DENSE complex acquisition for reduced intravoxel dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2004-08-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a meta-DENSE readout and RF phase cycling to suppress the STEAM anti-echo is described for reducing intravoxel dephasing signal loss. This RF phase cycling scheme, when combined with existing meta-DENSE suppression of the T1 recovering signal, yields higher quality DENSE myocardial strain maps. Phantom and human images are provided to demonstrate the technique, which is capable of acquiring phase contrast displacement encoded images at low encoding gradient strengths providing better spatial resolution and less signal loss due to intravoxel dephasing than prior methods.

  2. Statistical mechanics of reacting dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, F.J.

    1978-11-22

    A review of the quantum statistical theory of strongly coupled many component plasmas is given. The theoretical development is shown to consist of six separate parts. Compensation between bound and scattering state contributions to the partition function and use of the shifted Debye energy levels are important aspects of the analysis. The results are valid when the electrons are moderately coupled to the heavy ions, i.e., ..lambda../sub e..cap alpha../* < 1, but no restriction is placed on the coupling between heavy ions. Another restriction is that lambda/lambda/sub D/ < 1, i.e., the thermal deBroglie wavelength is less than the Debye length. Numerical calculations of PV/N/sub 0/kT and C/sub V/ are given for a Rubidium plasma.

  3. Time-dependent calculations of hydrogen spectral line shapes in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchawa, Wiesław

    2001-04-01

    A new formalism has been elaborated for calculations of hydrogen line profiles emitted by dense plasmas. Calculated line shapes are broadened, shifted and asymmetrical. The formalism is very general and yields full line shapes, shifts and widths at relatively small number of assumptions. For this purpose a new basis of the appropriate subspace of the Hilbert space has been built. This basis gives an accurate description of the quadratic Stark effect and the interaction of the emitter with field gradients. A computer simulation has been used to determine the emitter perturbations by electrons and ions. Final results have been compared with experimental and theoretical findings of other authors.

  4. Stopping of deuterium in warm dense deuterium from Ehrenfest time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magyar, R.J.; Shulenburger, L.; Baczewski, A.D. [Sandia National Laboratories - Multi-scale Physics 1444 MS 1322, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In these proceedings, we show that time-dependent density functional theory is capable of stopping calculations at the extreme conditions of temperature and pressure seen in warm dense matter. The accuracy of the stopping curves tends to be up to about 20% lower than empirical models that are in use. However, TDDFT calculations are free from fitting parameters and assumptions about the model form of the dielectric function. This work allows the simulation of ion stopping in many materials that are difficult to study experimentally. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Pseudo-Potentials in Dense and He-like Hot temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Claude; Rahal, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    Extending our former derivations in dense and high temperature plasmas of hydrogenic effective interactions mimiking the Heisenberg uncertainty principle [1,2], we worked out in a canonical ensemble, effective interactions in He-like plasmas where an orbital 1s electron remains strongly tighted to the He-like ions. The plasma electrons are then taken into account through appropriate Slater sums obtained in the most economical hydrogenic extension of the He-like bound and scattered states with angular orbital momentum lClementi and C. Roetti, Atomic Data and Nucl. Data Tables, 14,177(1974)

  6. Stark profiles of forbidden and allowed transitions in a dense, laser produced helium plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'akobi, B.; George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Hawryluk, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of experimental and theoretical Stark profiles of the allowed 2(1)P-3(1)D helium line at 6678 A and of the forbidden 2(1)P-3(1)P component at 6632 A in a dense plasma were carried out. The plasma was produced by optical breakdown of helium by means of a repetitive, high power CO2 laser. The allowed line shows good agreement with conventional theory, but discrepancies are found around the centre of the forbidden component. When normally neglected ion motions are taken into consideration, the observed discrepancies are partially removed. Tables of the Stark profiles for the pair of lines are given.

  7. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  8. Population aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of population aging in China, the most densely populated country in the world. Statistics indicate that by the end of 1998, 83.75 million out of the 1.248 billion Chinese people will be over 65 years old. According to the UN standards, China will soon become an aging society. The aging population poses several challenges to the country with the greatest challenge being the increasing social responsibility to care for the aged. With the undeveloped legislative framework to protect the interests of the aged and the serious drawbacks in the pension system to cater only to the income part and not the service part of the aged, China is not yet ready for the advent of aging. Violation of the rights of senior citizens is still very rampant despite enactment of the law on Protection of the Rights of the Elderly in 1996. Moreover, China is not economically ready to become an aging society. China faces this challenge by adopting a three-pronged approach to solve the problem namely: family support, establishment of nursing homes, and creating a social security framework that addresses the needs of the society suited to the Chinese condition. It is believed that with the growing economy of the country and the rising income of its people, a comprehensive social security net will be created to take care of the aged.

  9. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    We present results of our study on eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3-160 {\\micron}) imaging observations with \\textit{AKARI} telescope and molecular line (HCN and N$_2$H$^+$) mapping observations with \\textit{KVN} telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to mm continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosity of $\\sim0.3-4.4$ L$_{\\odot}$. The other six cores are found to remain as starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3-6 K towards the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an over-dominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory mot...

  10. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Daranlot, Julien; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimetre-wavelength transitions so its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms each involving two radical-radical reactions are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction down to 56 K. The effect of the measured rate constants for this reaction and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase format...

  11. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  12. Design and Construction of a Microwave Plasma Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Çınar, Kamil

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the designing and constructing a microwave ion source. The ions are generated in a thermal and dense hydrogen plasma by microwave induction. The plasma is generated by using a microwave source with a frequency of 2.45 GHz and a power of 700 W. The generated microwave is pulsing with a frequency of 50 Hz. The designed and constructed microwave system generates hydrogen plasma in a pyrex plasma chamber. Moreover, an ion extraction unit is designed and constructed in order to extract the ions from the generated hydrogen plasma. The ion beam extraction is achieved and ion currents are measured. The plasma parameters are determined by a double Langmuir probe and the ion current is measured by a Faraday cup. The designed ion extraction unit is simulated by using the dimensions of the designed and constructed ion extraction unit in order to trace out the trajectories of the extracted ions.

  13. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: Velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z = 1.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, A.; Saracco, P.; Tamburri, S.; Lonoce, I.; Ciocca, F.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the stellar mass assembly history of ultramassive (M⋆ ≳ 1011M⊙) dense (Σ = M⋆/2πRe2> 2500M⊙ pc-2) early-type galaxies (ETGs, elliptical and spheroidal galaxies) selected on basis of visual classification over the last 9 Gyr. Methods: We traced the evolution of the comoving number density ρ of ultramassive dense ETGs and compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass M⋆) and dynamical (velocity dispersion σe) parameters over the redshift range 0 advantage of the COSMOS spectroscopic survey to probe the intermediate redshift range [0.2-1.0]. We derived the number density of ultramassive dense local ETGs from the SDSS sample taking all of the selection bias affecting the spectroscopic sample into account. To compare the dynamical and structural parameters, we collected a sample of 11 ultramassive dense ETGs at 1.2 measurements are available. For four of these ETGs (plus one at z = 1.91), we present previously unpublished estimates of velocity dispersion, based on optical VLT-FORS2 spectra. We probe the intermediate redshift range (0.2 ≲ z ≲ 0.9) and the local Universe with different ETGs samples. Results: We find that the comoving number density of ultramassive dense ETGs evolves with z as ρ(z) ∝ (1 + z)0.3 ± 0.8 implying a decrease of ~25% of the population of ultramassive dense ETGs since z = 1.6. By comparing the structural and dynamical properties of high-z ultramassive dense ETGs over the range 0 ≲ z < 1.6 in the [Re, M⋆, σe] plane, we find that all of the ETGs of the high-z sample have counterparts with similar properties in the local Universe. This implies either that the majority (~70%) of ultramassive dense ETGs already completed the assembly and shaping at ⟨ z ⟩ = 1.4, or that, if a significant portion of dense ETGs evolves in size, new ultramassive dense ETGs must form at z < 1.5 to maintain their number density at almost constant. The difficulty in identify good progenitors for these

  14. Permutation Matrix Method for Dense Coding Using GHZ States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Rui-Bo; CHEN Li-Bing; WANG Fa-Qiang; SU Zhi-Kun

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method called the permutation matrix method to perform dense coding using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. We show that this method makes the study of dense coding systematically and regularly. It also has high potential to be realized physically.

  15. Mining connected global and local dense subgraphs for bigdata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Shen, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The problem of discovering connected dense subgraphs of natural graphs is important in data analysis. Discovering dense subgraphs that do not contain denser subgraphs or are not contained in denser subgraphs (called significant dense subgraphs) is also critical for wide-ranging applications. In spite of many works on discovering dense subgraphs, there are no algorithms that can guarantee the connectivity of the returned subgraphs or discover significant dense subgraphs. Hence, in this paper, we define two subgraph discovery problems to discover connected and significant dense subgraphs, propose polynomial-time algorithms and theoretically prove their validity. We also propose an algorithm to further improve the time and space efficiency of our basic algorithm for discovering significant dense subgraphs in big data by taking advantage of the unique features of large natural graphs. In the experiments, we use massive natural graphs to evaluate our algorithms in comparison with previous algorithms. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our algorithms for the two problems and their efficiency. This work is also the first that reveals the physical significance of significant dense subgraphs in natural graphs from different domains.

  16. Phase Structure and Transport Properties of Dense Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We provide a summary of our current knowledge of the phase structure of very dense quark matter. We concentrate on the question how the ground state at asymptotically high density -- color-flavor-locked (CFL) matter -- is modified as the density is lowered. We discuss the nature of the quasi-particle excitations, and present work on the transport properties of dense QCD matter.

  17. Finding dense locations in symbolic indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for many applications such as overloaded area detection, security control, crowd management, indoor navigation, and so on. Indoor tracking data can be enormous and are not immediately ready for finding dense locations. This paper...

  18. LCA of selective waste collection systems in dense urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Alfredo; Gabarrell, Xavier; Rieradevall, Joan

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents research concerning the environmental analysis of the selective collection management of municipal solid waste. The main goal of this study is to quantify and to compare, by means of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), the potential environmental impacts of three selective collection systems modelled on densely populated urban areas. These systems are: the mobile pneumatic, the multi-container and the door-to-door. Impact assessment method based on CML 2 baseline 2000 is applied to the different systems. The study separates and analyzes the collection systems in substages: two urban substages and one inter-city substage. At the urban level, the multi-container system has the least environmental impact of all systems. The mobile pneumatic system has greater environmental impacts in terms of global warming, fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification and eutrophication. In this system, the pipes and the pneumatic transport have the greatest impacts. The door-to-door system has a greatest environmental impact in terms of abiotic depletion, ozone layer depletion and human toxicity. An overall evaluation of the three substages, with a sensitivity analysis, indicates that the mobile pneumatic system at an inter-city distance of 20 km shows the greatest environmental impacts and the greatest energy demand. Inter-city transport is key; the results show that from an inter-city distance of 11 km onwards, this becomes the substage which most contributes to global warming impact and energy demand, in all the systems.

  19. Stellar interactions in dense and sparse star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Olczak, C; Eckart, A

    2009-01-01

    Stellar encounters potentially affect the evolution of the protoplanetary discs in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). However, the role of encounters in other cluster environments is less known. We investigate the effect of the encounter-induced disc-mass loss in different cluster environments. Starting from an ONC-like cluster we vary the cluster size and density to determine the correlation of collision time scale and disc-mass loss. We use the NBODY6++ code to model the dynamics of these clusters and analyze the effect of star-disc encounters. We find that the disc-mass loss depends strongly on the cluster density but remains rather unaffected by the size of the stellar population. The essential outcome of the simulations are: i) Even in clusters four times sparser than the ONC the effect of encounters is still apparent. ii) The density of the ONC itself marks a threshold: in less dense and less massive clusters it is the massive stars that dominate the encounter-induced disc-mass loss whereas in denser and m...

  20. The Neutron Star Mass-Radius Relation and the Equation of State of Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, Andrew W; Brown, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of dense matter has been a long-sought goal of nuclear physics. Equations of state generate unique mass versus radius (M-R) relations for neutron stars, the ultra-dense remnants of stellar evolution. In this work, we determine the neutron star mass-radius relation and, based on recent observations of both transiently accreting and bursting sources, we show that the radius of a 1.4 solar mass neutron star lies between 10.4 and 12.9 km, independent of assumptions about the composition of the core. We show, for the first time, that these constraints remain valid upon removal from our sample of the most extreme transient sources or of the entire set of bursting sources; our constraints also apply even if deconfined quark matter exists in the neutron star core. Our results significantly constrain the dense matter EOS and are, furthermore, consistent with constraints from both heavy-ion collisions and theoretical studies of neutron matter. We predict a relatively weak dependence of the s...

  1. Spherical configuration of a super-dense hot compact object with particular EoS

    CERN Document Server

    Tito, E P

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state (EoS) $P = P (\\rho, ...)$ -- pressure as a function of density and other thermodynamical quantities -- is what generates particularities of mass--radius distribution $M (R)$ for super--dense compact stellar bodies, the remnants of cosmic cataclysms. In view of recent nuclear experiments, we propose one particular EoS, which admits the critical state characterized by density $\\rho_c$ and temperature $T_c$, and which under certain conditions permits a radial distribution of the super--dense matter in "liquid" phase. We establish such conditions and demonstrate that a stable configuration is indeed possible (only) for temperatures smaller than the critical one. Using Tolman--Oppenheimer--Volkoff equations for hydrostatic equilibrium, we derive the mass--radius relation for the super--dense compact objects with masses smaller than the Sun, $M \\ll M_{\\odot}$. The obtained results are within the constraints established by both heavy--ion collision experiments and theoretical studies of neutron...

  2. Interband and intraband electron kinetics in non-thermal warm dense gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan Brown, Shaughnessy; Chen, Zhijiang; Curry, Chandra; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Ng, Andrew; Reid, Matthew; Tsui, Ying Y.; Glenzer, Siegfried H.

    2015-11-01

    Single-state warm dense matter may be produced via isochoric heating of thin metal foils using ultrafast high-power lasers. Previous experiments have confirmed that electron temperatures exceed ion temperatures during the initial picoseconds following excitation; however, electron kinetics in non-thermal states preceding establishment of a well-defined electron thermal distribution remain little understood. X-ray and optical probing techniques provide necessary resolution to investigate these electronic properties. Here, we will present a study of electron kinetics in warm dense gold produced by irradiating free-standing 30 nm Au foils with a 400 nm FWHM, 45 fs Ti:Sapphire laser system at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The temporal evolutions of AC conductivity for 400 nm and 800 nm laser pulses are simultaneously determined with sub-100 fs resolution, providing insight into the 5 d-6 s/ p interband and 6 s / p intraband transitions respectively. Our results suggest that Auger decay and three-body recombination play important roles in electron thermalization of warm dense gold.

  3. Ultrabright x-ray laser scattering for dynamic warm dense matter physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Doppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Galtier, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nagler, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Heimann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fortmann, C. [QuantumWise A/S, Koebenhavn (Denmark); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mao, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Turnbull, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapman, D. A. [AWE plc, Reading (United Kingdom); Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Gericke, D. O. [AWE plc, Reading (United Kingdom); Vorberger, J. [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); White, T. [Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gregori, G. [Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Wei, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Barbrel, B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Falcone, R. W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kao, C. -C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nuhn, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Welch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zastrau, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany); Neumayer, P. [GSI Helmhltzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hastings, J. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-03-23

    In megabar shock waves, materials compress and undergo a phase transition to a dense charged-particle system that is dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. This complex state, known as warm dense matter, exists in planetary interiors and many laboratory experiments (for example, during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions). Here, we apply record peak brightness X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (ångström) scale lengths and to determine their physical properties. Our in situ measurements characterize the compressed lattice and resolve the transition to warm dense matter, demonstrating that short-range repulsion between ions must be accounted for to obtain accurate structure factor and equation of state data. Additionally, the unique properties of the X-ray laser provide plasmon spectra that yield the temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micrometre-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments.

  4. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  5. Dense and Cellular Zirconia Produced by Gel Casting with Agar: Preparation and High Temperature Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Tulliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified gel-casting process was developed to produce both dense and highly porous (40% volume yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP using agar, a natural polysaccharide, as gelling agent. A fugitive phase, made of commercial polyethylene spheres, was added to the ceramic suspension before gelling to produce cellular ceramic structures. The characterization of the microstructural features of both dense and cellular ceramics was carried out by FEG SEM analysis of cross-sections produced by focused ion beam. The mechanical properties of the components were characterized at room temperature by nanoindentation tests in continuous stiffness measurement mode, by investigating the direct effect of the presence of residual microporosity. The presence of a diffuse residual microporosity from incomplete gel deaeration resulted in a decay of the bending strength and of the elastic modulus. The mechanical behavior of both dense and cellular zirconia (in terms of elastic modulus, flexural strength, and deformation at rupture was investigated by performing four-point bending tests at the temperature of 1500°C.

  6. Ion channels in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Angulo, Iván; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea; Camacho, Javier

    2010-08-01

    Ion channels play essential roles in human physiology and toxicology. Cardiac contraction, neural transmission, temperature sensing, insulin release, regulation of apoptosis, cellular pH and oxidative stress, as well as detection of active compounds from chilli, are some of the processes in which ion channels have an important role. Regulation of ion channels by several chemicals including those found in air, water and soil represents an interesting potential link between environmental pollution and human diseases; for instance, de novo expression of ion channels in response to exposure to carcinogens is being considered as a potential tool for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Non-specific binding of several drugs to ion channels is responsible for a huge number of undesirable side-effects, and testing guidelines for several drugs now require ion channel screening for pharmaceutical safety. Animal toxins targeting human ion channels have serious effects on the population and have also provided a remarkable tool to study the molecular structure and function of ion channels. In this review, we will summarize the participation of ion channels in biological processes extensively used in toxicological studies, including cardiac function, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Major findings on the adverse effects of drugs on ion channels as well as the regulation of these proteins by different chemicals, including some pesticides, are also reviewed. Association of ion channels and toxicology in several biological processes strongly suggests these proteins to be excellent candidates to follow the toxic effects of xenobiotics, and as potential early indicators of life-threatening situations including chronic degenerative diseases.

  7. The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation for dust ion-acoustic solitons in pair-ion plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hafeez Ur-Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Using the reductive perturbation method,we have derived the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation to study the nonlinear properties of electrostatic collisionless dust ion-acoustic solitons in pair-ion (p-i) plasmas.We have chosen the fluid model for the positive ions,the negative ions,and a fraction of static charged (both positively and negatively) dust particles.Numerical solutions of these dust ion-acoustic solitons are plotted and their characteristics are discussed.It is found that only the amplitudes of the electrostatic dust ion-acoustic solitons vary when the dust is introduced in the pair-ion plasma.It is also noticed that the amplitude and the width of these solitons both vary when the thermal energy of the positive or negative ions is varied.It is shown that potential hump structures are formed when the temperature of the negative ions is higher than that of the positive ions,and potential dip structures are observed when the temperature of the positive ions supersedes that of the negative ions.As the pair-ion plasma mimics the electron-positron plasma,thus our results might be helpful in understanding the nonlinear dust ion acoustic solitary waves in super dense astronomical bodies.

  8. Beam Steering, Focusing and Compression for Warm-Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anders, A.; Cohen, R. H.; Coleman, J. E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B. G.; Roy, P. K.; Sefkow, A. B.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Axial compression leading to ˜100X current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching, but still short of, the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We present measurements from the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: (1) axial compression and radial focusing; (2) spatial and temporal distribution of energy deposition at the target plane; and (3) centroid motion of the beam spot through the pulse.

  9. Graphle: Interactive exploration of large, dense graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huttenhower Curtis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide variety of biological data can be modeled as network structures, including experimental results (e.g. protein-protein interactions, computational predictions (e.g. functional interaction networks, or curated structures (e.g. the Gene Ontology. While several tools exist for visualizing large graphs at a global level or small graphs in detail, previous systems have generally not allowed interactive analysis of dense networks containing thousands of vertices at a level of detail useful for biologists. Investigators often wish to explore specific portions of such networks from a detailed, gene-specific perspective, and balancing this requirement with the networks' large size, complex structure, and rich metadata is a substantial computational challenge. Results Graphle is an online interface to large collections of arbitrary undirected, weighted graphs, each possibly containing tens of thousands of vertices (e.g. genes and hundreds of millions of edges (e.g. interactions. These are stored on a centralized server and accessed efficiently through an interactive Java applet. The Graphle applet allows a user to examine specific portions of a graph, retrieving the relevant neighborhood around a set of query vertices (genes. This neighborhood can then be refined and modified interactively, and the results can be saved either as publication-quality images or as raw data for further analysis. The Graphle web site currently includes several hundred biological networks representing predicted functional relationships from three heterogeneous data integration systems: S. cerevisiae data from bioPIXIE, E. coli data using MEFIT, and H. sapiens data from HEFalMp. Conclusions Graphle serves as a search and visualization engine for biological networks, which can be managed locally (simplifying collaborative data sharing and investigated remotely. The Graphle framework is freely downloadable and easily installed on new servers, allowing any

  10. Dense surface reconstruction with shadows in MIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bingxiong; Sun, Yu; Qian, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of internal organ surfaces provides useful information for better control and guidance of the operations of surgical tools for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The current reconstruction techniques using stereo cameras are still challenging due to the difficulties in correspondence matching in MIS, since there is very limited texture but significant specular reflection on organ surfaces. This paper proposes a new approach to overcome the problem by introducing weakly structured light actively casting surgical tool shadows on organ surfaces. The contribution of this paper is twofold: first, we propose a robust approach to extract shadow edges from a sequence of shadowed images; second, we develop a novel field surface interpolation (FSI) approach to obtain an accurate and dense disparity map. Our approach does not rely on texture information and is able to reconstruct accurate 3-D information by exploiting shadows from surgical tools. One advantage is that the point correspondences are directly calculated and no explicit stereo matching is required, which ensures the efficiency of the method. Another advantage is the minimum hardware requirement because only stereo cameras and a separated single-point light source are required. We evaluated the proposed approach using both phantom models and ex vivo images. Based on the experimental results, we achieved the precision of the recovered 3-D surfaces within 0.7 mm for phantom models and 1.2 mm for ex vivo images. The comparison of disparity maps indicates that with the addition of shadows, the proposed method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art stereo algorithms for MIS.

  11. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  12. Birefringence control for ion-exchanged channel glass waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayräs, P; Conti, G N; Honkanen, S; Peyghambarian, N

    1998-12-20

    We show that at 1.55-mum wavelength the waveguide birefringence of ion-exchanged channel waveguides in glass can be broadly tuned by a potassium and silver double-ion exchange. Two different potassium and silver double-ion-exchange processes are used to make surface waveguides with negligible waveguide birefringence. This process is crucially important in the manufacture of devices for dense wavelength-division multiplexing systems. The dependence of the waveguide birefringence on the channel width is also reported.

  13. Production of High-Intensity, Highly Charged Ions

    OpenAIRE

    S. GamminoINFN, LNS, Catania

    2014-01-01

    In the past three decades, the development of nuclear physics facilities for fundamental and applied science purposes has required an increasing current of multicharged ion beams. Multiple ionization implies the formation of dense and energetic plasmas, which, in turn, requires specific plasma trapping configurations. Two types of ion source have been able to produce very high charge states in a reliable and reproducible way: electron beam ion sources (EBIS) and electron cyc...

  14. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reach, W.R.; Pound, M.W.; Wilner, D.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Lee, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have surveyed high-latitude molecular clouds (MBM 12, 7, 55, 40) in spectral lines that are believed to be dense-gas' tracers due to the high H[sub 2] volume density required for collisional excitation. An extensive CS (2-1) line map of MBM 12 revealed emission that is not confined to clumps. Less than 20% of the integrated line emission from the cloud originates in clearly identified clumps with size between 0.2 pc and 0.02 pc in the integrated line map. The bulk of the emission originates from a relatively smooth horseshoe' structure about 0.1 pc wide and 1 pc long. The CS (2-1) map correlates with the published Bell Labs [sup 13] CO map, with significant [sup 13] CO emission even where the CS emission is undetectable. Within the central core, the C[sup 18]O(1-0) and CS(2-1) lines are positively correlated with significant scatter. There is some indication of higher CS/[sup 13]CO in the cores than the horseshoe'. The observed correlations suggest that both the diffuse CS and [sup 13]CO originate from either numerous, unresolved clumps, or the diffuse parts of the cloud. High-spatial-resolution observations of HCO[sup +] from MBM 12 obtained with the BIMA Hat Creek array demonstrated that the main core emission is primarily on spatial scales greater than 0.004 pc. It appears that the authors have resolved most of the spatial structure of the dense-gas' tracers and have found that the emission is primarily diffuse. To understand the excitation mechanism of the CS rotational levels, a multitransitional study of the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 lines is being performed. The CS excitation may be governed by electron collisions in regions with H[sub 2] column densities an order of magnitude lower than the critical density' of [approx gt] 2 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup -3]. If electron collisions are populating the CS levels, then the CS and [sup 13]CO lines can both be produced in the outer parts of the cloud, explaining their positive correlation

  15. The propagation and deposition of fast muons in dense DT mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xue-Mei; Shen Bai-Fei; Zhang Xiao-Mei; Jin Zhang-Ying; Wang Feng-Chao

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of the fast muon population mainly due to collisional effect in a dense deuterium-tritium (DT for short) mixture is investigated and analysed within the framework of the relativistic Fokker-Planck equation. Without the approximation that the muons propagate straightly in the DT mixture, the muon penetration length, the straggling length, and the mean transverse dispersion radius are calculated for different initial energies, and especially for different densities of the densely compressed DT mixture in our suggested muon-driven fast ignition (FI). Unlike laser-driven FI requiring super-high temperature, muons can catalyze DT fusion at lower temperatures and may generate an ignition sparkle before the self-heating fusion follows. Our calculation is important for the feasibility and the experimental study of muon-driven FI.

  16. Dense, unspecific connectivity of neocortical parvalbumin-positive interneurons: a canonical microcircuit for inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Adam M; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-09-14

    GABAergic interneurons play a major role in the function of the mammalian neocortex, but their circuit connectivity is still poorly understood. We used two-photon RuBi-Glutamate uncaging to optically map how the largest population of cortical interneurons, the parvalbumin-positive cells (PV+), are connected to pyramidal cells (PCs) in mouse neocortex. We found locally dense connectivity from PV+ interneurons onto PCs across cortical areas and layers. In many experiments, all nearby PV+ cells were connected to every local PC sampled. In agreement with this, we found no evidence for connection specificity, as PV+ interneurons contacted PC pairs similarly regardless of whether they were synaptically connected or not. We conclude that the microcircuit architecture for PV+ interneurons, and probably neocortical inhibition in general, is an unspecific, densely homogenous matrix covering all nearby pyramidal cells.

  17. Essential growth rate for bounded linear perturbation of non-densely defined Cauchy problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, A.; Liu, Z.; Magal, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the essential growth rate of some class of semigroup generated by bounded perturbation of some non-densely defined problem. We extend some previous results due to Thieme [H.R. Thieme, Quasi-compact semigroups via bounded perturbation, in: Advances in Mathematical Population Dynamics--Molecules, Cells and Man, Houston, TX, 1995, in: Ser. Math. Biol. Med., vol. 6, World Sci. Publishing, River Edge, NJ, 1997, pp. 691-711] to a class of non-densely defined Cauchy problems in Lp. In particular in the context the integrated semigroup is not operator norm locally Lipschitz continuous. We overcome the lack of Lipschitz continuity of the integrated semigroup by deriving some weaker properties that are sufficient to give information on the essential growth rate.

  18. Novel laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fournier, P; Kugler, H; Lisi, N; Scrivens, R; Rodríguez, F V; Düsterer, S; Sauerbrey, R; Schillinger, H; Theobald, W; Veisz, L; Tisch, J W G; Smith, R A

    2000-01-01

    Development in the field of high-power laser systems with repetition rates of several Hz and energies of few joules is highly active and opening, giving new possibilities for the design of laser ions sources. Preliminary investigations on the use of four different laser and target configurations are presented: (1) A small CO/sub 2/ laser (100 mJ, 10.6 mu m) focused onto a polyethylene target to produce C ions at 1 Hz repetition rate (CERN). (2) An excimer XeCl laser (6 J, 308 nm) focused onto solid targets (Frascati). (3) A femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser (250 mJ, 800 nm) directed onto a solid targets (Jena). (4) A picosecond Nd: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (0.3 J, 532 nm) focused into a dense medium of atomic clusters and onto solid targets (London). The preliminary experimental results and the most promising schemes will be discussed with respect to the scaling of the production of high numbers of highly charged ions. Different lasers are compared in terms of current density at 1 m distance for each charge state...

  19. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  20. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy L. Ward

    2000-06-30

    . This successfully reduced cracking, however the films retained open porosity. The investigation of this concept will be continued in the final year of the project. Investigation of a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method for defect mending in dense membranes was also initiated. An appropriate metal organic precursor (iron tetramethylheptanedionate) was identified whose deposition can be controlled by access to oxygen at temperatures in the 280-300 C range. Initial experiments have deposited iron oxide, but only on the membrane surface; thus refinement of this method will continue.

  1. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  2. Ion exchange phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  3. Fully variational average atom model with ion-ion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2012-02-01

    An average atom model for dense ionized fluids that includes ion correlations is presented. The model assumes spherical symmetry and is based on density functional theory, the integral equations for uniform fluids, and a variational principle applied to the grand potential. Starting from density functional theory for a mixture of classical ions and quantum mechanical electrons, an approximate grand potential is developed, with an external field being created by a central nucleus fixed at the origin. Minimization of this grand potential with respect to electron and ion densities is carried out, resulting in equations for effective interaction potentials. A third condition resulting from minimizing the grand potential with respect to the average ion charge determines the noninteracting electron chemical potential. This system is coupled to a system of point ions and electrons with an ion fixed at the origin, and a closed set of equations is obtained. Solution of these equations results in a self-consistent electronic and ionic structure for the plasma as well as the average ionization, which is continuous as a function of temperature and density. Other average atom models are recovered by application of simplifying assumptions.

  4. Two views on the Bjorken scenario for ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Maire, Antonin

    2011-01-01

    The sketch describes the Bjorken scenario foreseen for the collision of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions, leading to the creation of strongly-interacting hot and dense deconfined matter, the so-called Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP).

  5. The Key Technique of Manufacture of Dense Chromium Sesquioxide Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMaoqiang; ZHANGShuying; 等

    1998-01-01

    Dense chromium sesquioxide refractories have widely been used in the kilns for making alkai-free and anti-alkali glass fibers due to their excellent re-sistance to molten glasses.Densifications of chromium sesquioxide during sintering can be blocked by evaporation of chromium trioxide derived from oxidation at high temperature,In this paper the mech-anism of sintering chromium oxide and the process-ing technique for making dense chromium sesquiox-ide refractories are discussed .A process in laboratory scale for making dense chromium sesquioxide bricks is demonstrated.

  6. Dense deposit disease in a child with febrile sore throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Conti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense deposit disease or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II is a rare glomerulopathy characterized on renal biopsy by deposition of abnormal electron-dense material in the glomerular basement membrane. The pathophysiologic basis is uncontrolled systemic activation of the alternate pathway of the complement cascade. C3 nephritic factor, an autoantibody directed against the C3 convertase of the alternate pathway, plays a key role. In some patients, complement gene mutations have been identified. We report the case of a child who had persistent microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and hypocomplementemia C3 for over 2 months. Renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of dense deposit disease.

  7. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  8. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  9. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW`s low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much_lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW`s that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW`s can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  10. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy L. Ward

    2002-07-01

    Mixed-conducting ceramics have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, making them extremely attractive as membrane materials for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. While the conductivity of these materials can be quite high at elevated temperatures (typically 800-1000 C), much higher oxygen fluxes, or, alternatively, equivalent fluxes at lower temperatures, could be provided by supported thin or thick film membrane layers. Based on that motivation, the objective of this project was to explore the use of ultrafine aerosol-derived powder of a mixed-conducting ceramic material for fabrication of supported thick-film dense membranes. The project focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) because of the desirable permeability and stability of that material, as reported in the literature. Appropriate conditions to produce the submicron SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder using aerosol pyrolysis were determined. Porous supports of the same composition were produced by partial sintering of a commercially obtained powder that possessed significantly larger particle size than the aerosol-derived powder. The effects of sintering conditions (temperature, atmosphere) on the porosity and microstructure of the porous discs were studied, and a standard support fabrication procedure was adopted. Subsequently, a variety of paste and slurry formulations were explored utilizing the aerosol-derived SCFO powder. These formulations were applied to the porous SCFO support by a doctor blade or spin coating procedure. Sintering of the supported membrane layer was then conducted, and additional layers were deposited and sintered in some cases. The primary characterization methods were X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and room-temperature nitrogen permeation was used to assess defect status of the membranes.We found that non-aqueous paste/slurry formulations incorporating

  11. Fermion mass and the pressure of dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; 10.1063/1.2714447

    2008-01-01

    We consider a simple toy model to study the effects of finite fermion masses on the pressure of cold and dense matter, with possible applications in the physics of condensates in the core of neutron stars and color superconductivity.

  12. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Prakasam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes.

  13. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .2. Thermal and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Stenekes, R.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of two densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxane systems were investigated in relation to the molecular structure. The networks were prepared from functional branched prepolymers and crosslinked via a hydrosilylation curing reaction. The prepolymers having only viny

  14. RESEARCH ON DENSITY STABILITY OF AIR DENSE MEDIUM FLUIDIZED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆振福; 陈清如

    1994-01-01

    In this papcr on thc basis of studying the distribution of fine coal in the dense medium fluidized bed, the optimal size range of fine coal, which constitutes a fluidized bed together with the dense medium, has been found. In the separating process the fine coal will continuously accumulate in fluidized bed, thus inevitably reducing the density of the bed. In order to keep bed density stable, the authors adopted such measures as split-flow of used medium and complement of fresh dense medium. The experiment results in both lab and pilot systems of the air-dense medium fluidized bed show that these measures are effective and satisfactory. Then authors also have established some relative dynamic mathematical models for it.

  15. Automated Motion Estimation for 2D Cine DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Andrew D.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2013-01-01

    Cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) is a magnetic resonance (MR) method that directly encodes tissue displacement into MR phase images. This technique has successfully interrogated many forms of tissue motion, but is most commonly used to evaluate cardiac mechanics. Currently, motion analysis from cine DENSE images requires manually delineated anatomical structures. An automated analysis would improve measurement throughput, simplify data interpretation, and potentially access important physiological information during the MR exam. In this article, we present the first fully automated solution for the estimation of tissue motion and strain from 2D cine DENSE data. Results using both simulated and human cardiac cine DENSE data indicate good agreement between the automated algorithm and the standard semi-manual analysis method. PMID:22575669

  16. A Green Method for Processing Polymers using Dense Gas Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan B. Yoganathan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dense CO2 can be used as an environmentally-benign polymer processing medium because of its liquid-like densities and gas-like mass transfer properties.In this work, polymer bio-blends of polycarbonate (PC, a biocompatible polymer, and polycaprolactone (PCL, a biodegradable polymer were prepared. Dense CO2 was used as a reaction medium for the melt-phase PC polymerization in the presence of dense CO2-swollen PCL particles and this method was used to prepare porous PC/PCL blends. To extend the applicability of dense CO2 to the biomedical industry and polymer blend processing, the impregnation of ibuprofen into the blend was conducted and subsequent dissolution characteristics were observed.

  17. Complete multiple round quantum dense coding with quantum logical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChunYan; LI XiHan; DENG FuGuo; ZHOU Ping; ZHOU HongYu

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete multiple round quantum dense coding scheme for improving the source capacity of that introduced recently by Zhang et al. The receiver resorts to two qubits for storing the four local unitary operations in each round.

  18. Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, George [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-01-14

    The Topical Collaboration for Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense matter brought together researchers from a variety of nuclear science specialties and a number of institutions to address nuclear physics and neutrino physics problems associated with dense matter and the origin of the elements. See attached final technical reports for (1) the UCSD award and (2) a copy of the report for the whole TC

  19. MICROSPRAY SIMULATION OF DENSE GAS DISPERSION IN COMPLEX TERRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Anfossi, D.; Tinarelli, G.; S. Trini Castelli; Commanay, J.; Nibart, M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: An extended validation of the new Lagrangian particle model MicroSpray version for dense gas simulation is proposed. MicroSpray simulates the dense gas dispersion in situations characterized by the presence of buildings, other obstacles, complex terrain, and possible occurrence of low wind speed conditions. Its performances are compared to a chlorine railway accident (Macdona), to a field experiment (Kit Fox) and to an atmospheric CFD model.

  20. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang, E-mail: lqiu@cumt.edu.cn; Li, Song; Zhang, Chi [China University of Mining and Technology, School of Sciences (China); Ye, Bin [China University of Mining and Technology, School of Information and Electrical Engineering (China)

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  1. Inherited susceptibility determines the distribution of dense low-density lipoprotein subfraction profiles in familial combined hyperlipidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredie, S.J.H.; Demacker, P.N.M.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H. [Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a heritable lipid disorder, in which dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction profiles due to a predominance of small dense LDL particles are frequently observed. These small dense LDL particles are associated with cardiovascular disease. Using segregation analysis, we investigated to what extent these LDL subfraction profiles are genetically determined; also, the mode of inheritance was studied. Individual LDL subfraction profiles were determined by density gradient ultracentrifugation in 623 individuals of 40 well-defined Dutch FCH families. The individual LDL subfraction profile was defined as a quantitative trait by the continuous variable K, a reliable estimate of the relative contribution of each LDL subfraction to the overall profile. Variation in parameter K due to age, sex, and hormonal status was taken into account by introducing liability classes. Segregation analysis was performed by fitting a series of class D regressive models were compared using log-likelihoot ratio tests. Our data show that 60% of the variability of parameter K could be explained by lipid and lipoprotein levels and that a major autosomal locus, recessively inherited, with a population frequency of .42 {+-} .07, and an additional polygenic component of .25 best explained the clustering of atherogenic dense LDL subfraction profiles in these FCH families. Therefore, dense LDL subfraction profiles, associated with elevated lipid levels, appear to have a genetic basis in FCH.

  2. Modeling warm dense matter experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR code and the move toward exascale computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koniges Alice

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR, has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related computational changes on general modeling codes in fusion.

  3. Analyzing ion distributions around DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Richard; Maddocks, John H; Pasi, Marco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    We present a new method for analyzing ion, or molecule, distributions around helical nucleic acids and illustrate the approach by analyzing data derived from molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis is based on the use of curvilinear helicoidal coordinates and leads to highly localized ion densities compared to those obtained by simply superposing molecular dynamics snapshots in Cartesian space. The results identify highly populated and sequence-dependent regions where ions strongly interact with the nucleic and are coupled to its conformational fluctuations. The data from this approach is presented as ion populations or ion densities (in units of molarity) and can be analyzed in radial, angular and longitudinal coordinates using 1D or 2D graphics. It is also possible to regenerate 3D densities in Cartesian space. This approach makes it easy to understand and compare ion distributions and also allows the calculation of average ion populations in any desired zone surrounding a nucleic acid without requiring references to its constituent atoms. The method is illustrated using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations for two different DNA oligomers in the presence of 0.15 M potassium chloride. We discuss the results in terms of convergence, sequence-specific ion binding and coupling with DNA conformation.

  4. Wheat Landraces Are Better Qualified as Potential Gene Pools at Ultraspaced rather than Densely Grown Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissavet G. Ninou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative relationship between the yield potential of a genotype and its competitive ability may constitute an obstacle to recognize outstanding genotypes within heterogeneous populations. This issue was investigated by growing six heterogeneous wheat landraces along with a pure-line commercial cultivar under both dense and widely spaced conditions. The performance of two landraces showed a perfect match to the above relationship. Although they lagged behind the cultivar by 64 and 38% at the dense stand, the reverse was true with spaced plants where they succeeded in out-yielding the cultivar by 58 and 73%, respectively. It was concluded that dense stand might undervalue a landrace as potential gene pool in order to apply single-plant selection targeting pure-line cultivars, attributable to inability of plants representing high yielding genotypes to exhibit their capacity due to competitive disadvantage. On the other side, the yield expression of individuals is optimized when density is low enough to preclude interplant competition. Therefore, the latter condition appears ideal to identify the most promising landrace for breeding and subsequently recognize the individuals representing the most outstanding genotypes.

  5. Beyond basin resonance: characterizing wave propagation using a dense array and the ambient seismic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Pierre; Denolle, Marine; Hirata, Naoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2016-08-01

    Seismic wave resonance in sedimentary basins is a well-recognized seismic hazard; however, concentrated areas of earthquake damage have been observed near basin edges, where wave propagation is particularly complex and difficult to understand with sparse observations. The Tokyo metropolitan area is densely populated, subject to strong shaking from a diversity of earthquake sources, and sits atop the deep Kanto sedimentary basin. It is also instrumented with two seismic arrays: the dense MEtropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net) within the basin, and the High sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) surrounding it. In this study, we explore the 3-D seismic wavefield within and throughout the Kanto basin, including near and across basin boundaries, using cross-correlations of all components of ambient seismic field between the stations of these two arrays. Dense observations allow us to observe clearly the propagation of three modes of both Rayleigh and Love waves. They also show how the wavefield behaves in the vicinity of sharp basin edges with reflected/converted waves and excitation of higher modes.

  6. Nonplanar Ion-Acoustic Solitons in Electron-Positron-Ion Quantum Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. A. Khan; S. Mahmood; Arshad M. Mirza

    2009-01-01

    @@ The propagation of nonplanar quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in a dense, unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma are studied by using the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) model The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations are used taking into account the quantum diffraction and quantum statistics corrections. The analytical and numerical solutions of KdV equation reveal that the nonplanar ion-acoustic solitons are modified significantly with quantum corrections and positron concentration, and behave differently in different geometries.

  7. Submitochondrial location of ruthenium red-sensitive calcium-ion transport and evidence for its enrichment in a specific population of rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygrave, F L; Heaney, T P; Ramachandran, C

    1978-09-15

    1. Seven fractions sedimenting at between 3000 and 120000g-min were prepared from a rat liver homogenate by differential centrifugation in buffered iso-osmotic sucrose. The following measurements were carried out on each of these fractions: Ruthenium Red-sensitive Ca(2+) transport in the absence and in the presence of P(i) as well as in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide to prevent P(i) cycling, succinate-supported respiration in the absence and in the presence of ADP, the DeltaE and -59 DeltapH components of the protonmotive force, cytochrome oxidase, uncoupler-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase, alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, P(i) content and the effect on the ;resting' rate of respiration of repeated additions of a fixed Ca(2+) concentration. 2. Ca(2+) transport either in the presence or in the absence of added P(i) and in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide exhibits significantly higher rates in the fraction sedimenting at 8000g-min. By contrast, respiration in the presence or in the absence of added ADP and the values for DeltaE and -59 DeltapH were similar in those fractions sedimenting between 4000 and 20000g-min, indicating that the driving force for Ca(2+) transport was similar in each of these fractions. 3. Experiments designed to determine the capacity of the individual fractions for Ca(2+), as measured by the effect of repeated additions of Ca(2+) on the resting rate of respiration, showed that fraction 2, i.e. that sedimenting at 8000g-min, also exhibited the greatest tolerance towards the uncoupling action of the ion. 4. Of the three enzyme activity profiles, only that of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase was similar to that of Ca(2+) transport. Because previous workers have assigned this enzyme to loci in the inner peripheral membrane [Werner & Neupert (1972) Eur. J. Biochem.25, 379-396], it is concluded that the Ruthenium Red-sensitive Ca(2+)- transport system also is located in this domain of the inner membrane. The relation of these findings

  8. Attractive interaction between ions inside a quantum plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    We construct the model of a quantum spherically symmetric plasma structure based on radial oscillations of ions. We suppose that ions are involved in ion-acoustic waves. We find the exact solution of the Schrodinger equation for an ion moving in the self-consistent oscillatory potential of an ion-acoustic wave. The system of ions is secondly quantized and its ground state is constructed. Then we consider the interaction between ions by the exchange of an acoustic wave. It is shown that this interaction can be attractive. We describe the formation of pairs of ions inside a plasma structure and demonstrate that such a plasmoid can exist in dense astrophysical medium. The application of our results for terrestrial plasmas is also discussed.

  9. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  10. The connecticut experiment: the role of ultrasound in the screening of women with dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Jean; Steenbergen, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of screening breast ultrasound to improve breast cancer detection in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts. Six Connecticut radiology practices with 12 total sites participated in a retrospective chart review. The total number of screening mammograms, screening ultrasounds broken down by BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) codes, and the number of positive and negative biopsies were collected from November 2009 through November 2010. Demographic data on the patients with positive biopsies as well as cancer staging were also collected. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value, and Negative Predictive Value were calculated. A total of 72,030 screening mammograms and 8,647 screening ultrasounds were performed at the research sites during the study period. Relevant research indicates that 41% of the female population has dense breasts. In this study, 12% (8,647/72,030) underwent follow-up breast ultrasound screening. A total of 86% (7,451/8,647) of the ultrasounds were BIRADS 1 or 2, 9% (767/8,647) were BIRADS 3, 5% (429/8,647) were BIRADS 4 or 5. Of those 429 recommended to undergo biopsy 418 were performed and 28 cancers were found. There was one false negative. Screening breast ultrasound in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts has a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 6.7% (28/418), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of 99.9% (7,450/7,451), sensitivity of 96.6% (28/29), and a specificity of 94.9% (7,450/7,851). Screening ultrasound had an additional yield of 3.25 per 1,000 cancers in women with dense breasts and normal mammograms and no additional risk factors. As with all screening tests, time, cost, and false positive risk must be considered.

  11. Value of Sonography in Screening Women with Dense Breasts in Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel Shokrollahi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women and the main cause of death due to malignancy in women between 40-44 years of age.This cancer is responsible for 33% of all cancers in women and 20% of all deaths due to cancer in women."nMammography is the main modality for screening and diagnosis of breast lesions, but in dense breasts it has low sensitivity (about 48% with low possibility for visualization of mass lesions or calcifications, and this results in fading abnormal findings and increasing the risk of malignancy. This defect is compensated by ultrasonography."nSonography also elegantly shows hidden areas, which are covered by normal breast tissue in mammography, and also shows the pictures real time without overlap."nPresence of any palpable mass in clinical exam was an excluding criterion for patients from the study. Any lesion as a cystic or solid mass or echo change or calcification was recorded in the database. If a lesion had a malignant picture, FNA or core biopsy was done for it and the sample was sent for pathologic report."nThis study showed that correlation with sonography is mandatory in women who have dense breasts in mammography, even if it is a low-grade dense breast. If this correlation was not done, breast cancers present in 1.5% of the studied population would be missed."nSo due to the high false negativity of mammography in dense breasts, in the time being, sonography is considered as the second line screening method and complementary modality for mammography. It not only increases the diagnostic accuracy, but also as the only real time imaging modality, it can be used for localization and precise biopsy of breast lesions. Also, it can be used without any limitation as a cheap and harmless way for follow up imaging in short intervals for suspected patients.

  12. [The influence of ecological hygiene environmental factors on the distributIon of respiratory diseases in population of Primorskiĭ Kraĭ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, P F; Izmaĭlova, O A; Gorborukova, T V; Anan'ev, V Iu

    2012-01-01

    Conducted Ecological hygienic assessment of the incidence of respiratory diseases in bioclimatic zones has been performed. The study of the incidence was conducted with the use of the classical methods of analysis of data such as descriptive statistics, chi-square test, correlation and regression analysis. The study found that respiratory diseases occupy 30%, 47% and 61% in the structure of the incidence in adults, adolescents and children correspondingly. Constructed predictive models describe the tendency of increasing incidence in adolescents and children. The morbidity of environmentally dependent respiratory pathology in residents of different regions of Primorye Territory was found to be dependent on the characteristics of bioclimatic zones and combinations of parameters forming these areas. Factors of bioclimatic character: living in an area of high humidity, temperature swings and the weather travel have the most influence on the level of respiratory diseases in childhood. Iindices of morbidity rate in adolescent achieve those in adult population, that indicates on the immaturity of the adaptation system of adolescent organism to adverse environmental factors.

  13. Asymmetric polymeric membranes containing a metal-rich dense layer with a controlled thickness and method of making same

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2016-01-21

    A structure, and methods of making the structure are provided in which the structure can include: a membrane having a first layer and a second layer, the first layer comprising polymer chains formed with coordination complexes with metal ions, and the second layer consisting of a porous support layer formed of polymer chains substantially, if not completely, lacking the presence of metal ions. The structure can be an asymmetric polymeric membrane containing a metal-rich layer as the first layer. In various embodiments the first layer can be a metal-rich dense layer. The first layer can include pores. The polymer chains of the first layer can be closely packed. The second layer can include a plurality of macro voids and can have an absence of the metal ions of the first layer.

  14. A 1D Model of Radial Ion Motion Interrupted by Ion–Neutral Interactions in a Cometary Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigren, E.; Eriksson, A. I.

    2017-04-01

    Because ion–neutral reaction cross sections are energy dependent, the distance from a cometary nucleus within which ions remain collisionally coupled to the neutrals is dictated not only by the comet’s activity level but also by the electromagnetic fields in the coma. Here we present a 1D model simulating the outward radial motion of water group ions with radial acceleration by an ambipolar electric field interrupted primarily by charge transfer processes with H2O. We also discuss the impact of plasma waves. For a given electric field profile, the model calculates key parameters, including the total ion density, n I , the H3O+/H2O+ number density and flux ratios, R dens and R flux, and the mean ion drift speed, , as a function of cometocentric distance. We focus primarily on a coma roughly resembling that of the ESA Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko near its perihelion in 2015 August. In the presence of a weak ambipolar electric field in the radial direction the model results suggest that the neutral coma is not sufficiently dense to keep the mean ion flow speed close to that of the neutrals by the spacecraft location (∼200 km from the nucleus). In addition, for electric field profiles giving n I and within limits constrained by measurements, the R dens values are significantly higher than values typically observed. However, when including the ion motion in large-amplitude plasma waves in the model, results more compatible with observations are obtained. We suggest that the variable and often low H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios observed may reflect nonradial ion trajectories strongly influenced by electromagnetic forces and/or plasma instabilities, with energization of the ion population by plasma waves.

  15. Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  16. Adaptation dynamics in densely clustered chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pontius

    Full Text Available In many sensory systems, transmembrane receptors are spatially organized in large clusters. Such arrangement may facilitate signal amplification and the integration of multiple stimuli. However, this organization likely also affects the kinetics of signaling since the cytoplasmic enzymes that modulate the activity of the receptors must localize to the cluster prior to receptor modification. Here we examine how these spatial considerations shape signaling dynamics at rest and in response to stimuli. As a model system, we use the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli, a canonical system for the study of how organisms sense, respond, and adapt to environmental stimuli. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation is mediated by two enzymes that localize to the clustered receptors and modulate their activity through methylation-demethylation. Using a novel stochastic simulation, we show that distributive receptor methylation is necessary for successful adaptation to stimulus and also leads to large fluctuations in receptor activity in the steady state. These fluctuations arise from noise in the number of localized enzymes combined with saturated modification kinetics between the localized enzymes and the receptor substrate. An analytical model explains how saturated enzyme kinetics and large fluctuations can coexist with an adapted state robust to variation in the expression levels of the pathway constituents, a key requirement to ensure the functionality of individual cells within a population. This contrasts with the well-mixed covalent modification system studied by Goldbeter and Koshland in which mean activity becomes ultrasensitive to protein abundances when the enzymes operate at saturation. Large fluctuations in receptor activity have been quantified experimentally and may benefit the cell by enhancing its ability to explore empty environments and track shallow nutrient gradients. Here we clarify the mechanistic relationship of these large

  17. The JCMT dense gas survey in dense molecular clouds: an HCO+/HCN comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Smith, Samantha; Richer, John; Buckle, Jane; Salji, Carl; Hatchell, Jennifer; Drabek, Emily

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a large-scale survey of the very dense molecular gas in Perseus, Orion A and B, Serpens and Ophiuchus using HCO+ and HCN (J = 4 - 3) transitions. We have used this emission to trace the structure and kinematics of gas at the extremely high densities found in pre- and protostellar cores; as well as tracing outflows powered by these early star-forming cores. We present a comparison of the HCO+/HCN data, highlighting regions where there is a marked discrepancy in the spectra of the two emission lines. This is particularly noticeable in some of the more powerful outflows driven by Class 0 sources, where the HCN is greatly enhanced in the linewings in comparison with HCO+. We also use the HCO+ to positively identify protostellar outflows and their driving sources. We present a statistical analysis of the outflow properties that we derive from this tracer. We show that our results are comparable to those obtained from similar outflow analyses using 12CO.

  18. Experimental Studies of the Transport Parameters of Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouffani, Khalid [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to establish fundamental properties of matter and energy under extreme physical conditions. Although high energy density physics (HEDP) research spans a wide range of plasma conditions, there is one unifying regime that is of particular importance and complexity: that of warm dense matter, the transitional state between solid state condensed matter and energetic plasmas. Most laboratory experimental conditions, including inertial confinement implosion, fall into this regime. Because all aspects of laboratory-created high-energy-density plasmas transition through the warm dense matter regime, understanding the fundamental properties to determine how matter and energy interact in this regime is an important aspect of major research efforts in HEDP. Improved understanding of warm dense matter would have significant and wide-ranging impact on HEDP science, from helping to explain wire initiation studies on the Sandia Z machine to increasing the predictive power of inertial confinement fusion modeling. The central goal or objective of our proposed research is to experimentally determine the electrical resistivity, temperature, density, and average ionization state of a variety of materials in the warm dense matter regime, without the use of theoretical calculations. Since the lack of an accurate energy of state (EOS) model is primarily due to the lack of experimental data, we propose an experimental study of the transport coefficients of warm dense matter.

  19. Dense Molecular Gas: A Sensitive Probe of Stellar Feedback Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-01-01

    We show that the mass fraction of GMC gas (n>100 cm^-3) in dense (n>>10^4 cm^-3) star-forming clumps, observable in dense molecular tracers (L_HCN/L_CO(1-0)), is a sensitive probe of the strength and mechanism(s) of stellar feedback. Using high-resolution galaxy-scale simulations with pc-scale resolution and explicit models for feedback from radiation pressure, photoionization heating, stellar winds, and supernovae (SNe), we make predictions for the dense molecular gas tracers as a function of GMC and galaxy properties and the efficiency of stellar feedback. In models with weak/no feedback, much of the mass in GMCs collapses into dense sub-units, predicting L_HCN/L_CO(1-0) ratios order-of-magnitude larger than observed. By contrast, models with feedback properties taken directly from stellar evolution calculations predict dense gas tracers in good agreement with observations. Changing the strength or timing of SNe tends to move systems along, rather than off, the L_HCN-L_CO relation (because SNe heat lower-de...

  20. AmBe Radiological Source Replacement Using Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian; Povilus, Alexander; Chapman, Steven; Podpaly, Yuri; Cooper, Christopher; Higginson, Drew; Link, Anthony; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a compact plasma gun that produces high energy ion beams up to several MeV through strong potential gradients formed from m=0 plasma instabilities. These ion beams can be used to replace radiological sources for a variety of applications. Americium-beryllium (AmBe) neutron sources are commonly used for oil well logging. An optimized DPF produces high energy helium ion beams of 2+ MeV which can interact with a beryllium target to produce neutrons. The alpha-Be interaction produces a neutron energy spectrum similar to the neutrons produced by the AmBe reaction. To demonstrate this concept experimentally a 2 kJ DPF is used to produce a beam of alpha particles which interacts with a beryllium target. We report on the improvements made to the DPF platform using He gas and the observation of 3.0 ×104 peak neutrons generated per shot. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Progress in beam focusing and compression for warm-dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A. X.; Cohen, R. H.; Coleman, J. E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P. K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm-dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30-mA K + ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to ˜50-fold current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to our Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment and associated beam diagnostics that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including (1) greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp using a new bunching module with approximately twice the available volt seconds (Vs); (2) improved centroid control via beam steering dipoles to mitigate aberrations in the bunching module; (3) time-dependent focusing elements to correct considerable chromatic aberrations; and (4) plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be >10 13 cm -3.

  2. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  3. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Piotr M; Dufour, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H$_2$-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  4. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, P. M.; Blouin, S.; Dufour, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H2-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for the interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  5. Laboratory measurements of the resistivity of warm dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Nicola; Robinson, Alex; Hakel, Peter; Gregori, Ginaluca; Rajeev, Pattathil; Woolsey, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory in which we interrogate the microphysics of the low energy electron distributions associated with an anisotropic return current. Through experimental measurements of the polarization of the Ly- α doublet emission (2s1 / 2-2p1 / 2,3/2 transitions) of sulphur, we determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to warm dense conditions by an ultra-intense laser at relativistic intensities, I ~ 5 ×1020 Wcm-2. We describe a method of exploiting classical x-ray scattering to separately measure both the π- and σ- polarizations of Ly-α1 spectral emission in a single shot. These measurements make it possible to explore fundamental material properties such as resistivity in warm and hot dense plasmas through matching plasma physics modelling to atomic physics calculations of the experimentally measured large, positive, polarisation.

  6. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Saiz, E.; Riley, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Gregori, G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; Clarke, R.J.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.M.; Spindloe, C. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX (United Kingdom); Gericke, D.O.; Vorberger, J.; Wunsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Barbrel, B.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Laser Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique - Universite Paris-6, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Freeman, R.R.; Weber, R.L.; Van Woerkom, L. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.; Neumayer, P.; Price, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Khattak, F.Y. [Department of Physics, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat-26000, NWFP (Pakistan); Pelka, A.; Roth, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    One of the grand challenges of contemporary physics is understanding strongly interacting quantum systems comprising such diverse examples as ultracold atoms in traps, electrons in high-temperature superconductors and nuclear matter. Warm dense matter, defined by temperatures of a few electron volts and densities comparable with solids, is a complex state of such interacting matter. Moreover, the study of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where it is encountered during the implosion phase, and it also represents laboratory analogues of astrophysical environments found in the core of planets and the crusts of old stars. Here we demonstrate how warm dense matter states can be diagnosed and structural properties can be obtained by inelastic X-ray scattering measurements on a compressed lithium sample. Combining experiments and ab initio simulations enables us to determine its microscopic state and to evaluate more approximate theoretical models for the ionic structure. (authors)

  7. On the Evolution of the Dense Core Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jonathan J Swift Jonathan P

    2008-01-01

    The mass distributions of dense cores in star-forming regions are measured to have a shape similar to the initial mass function of stars. This has been generally interpreted to mean that the constituent cores will form individual stars or stellar systems at a nearly constant star formation efficiency. This article presents a series of numerical experiments evolving distributions of dense cores into stars to quantify the effects of stellar multiplicity, global core fragmentation, and a varying star formation efficiency. We find that the different evolutionary schemes have an overall small effect on the shape of the resultant distribution of stars. Our results imply that at the current level of observational accuracy the comparison between the mass functions of dense cores and stars alone is insufficient to discern between different evolutionary models. Observations over a wide range of mass scales including the high or low-mass tails of these distributions have the largest potential for discerning between diff...

  8. DENSE: Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes in Cardiac Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ding, Shujun; Balaban, Robert S.; Wen, Han

    1999-03-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) was developed for high-resolution myocardial displacement mapping. Pixel phase is modulated by myocardial displacement and data spatial resolution is limited only by pixel size. 2D displacement vector maps were generated for the systolic action in canines with 0.94 × 1.9 mm nominal in-plane resolution and 2.3 mm/π displacement encoding. A radial strain of 0.208 was measured across the free left ventricular wall over 105 ms during systole. DENSE displacement maps require small first-order gradient moments for encoding. DENSE magnitude images exhibit black-blood contrast which allows for better myocardial definition and reduced motion-related artifacts.

  9. Spatial and temporal segmented dense trajectories for gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kaho; Yoshida, Takeshi; Sumi, Kazuhiko; Habe, Hitoshi; Mitsugami, Ikuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Recently, dense trajectories [1] have been shown to be a successful video representation for action recognition, and have demonstrated state-of-the-art results with a variety of datasets. However, if we apply these trajectories to gesture recognition, recognizing similar and fine-grained motions is problematic. In this paper, we propose a new method in which dense trajectories are calculated in segmented regions around detected human body parts. Spatial segmentation is achieved by body part detection [2]. Temporal segmentation is performed for a fixed number of video frames. The proposed method removes background video noise and can recognize similar and fine-grained motions. Only a few video datasets are available for gesture classification; therefore, we have constructed a new gesture dataset and evaluated the proposed method using this dataset. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the original dense trajectories.

  10. Distributed quantum dense coding with two receivers in noisy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tamoghna; Prabhu, R.; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the effect of noisy channels in a classical information transfer through a multipartite state which acts as a substrate for the distributed quantum dense coding protocol between several senders and two receivers. The situation is qualitatively different from the case with one or more senders and a single receiver. We obtain an upper bound on the multipartite capacity which is tightened in the case of the covariant noisy channel. We also establish a relation between the genuine multipartite entanglement of the shared state and the capacity of distributed dense coding using that state, both in the noiseless and the noisy scenarios. Specifically, we find that, in the case of multiple senders and two receivers, the corresponding generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states possess higher dense coding capacities as compared to a significant fraction of pure states having the same multipartite entanglement.

  11. Warm dense matter and Thomson scattering at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeustlin, Roland Rainer

    2010-05-15

    X-ray free electron lasers are powerful tools to investigate moderately to strongly correlated solid density low temperature plasmas, named warm dense matter. These plasmas are of most interest for astrophysics and laser plasma interaction, particularly inertial confinement fusion. This work utilizes the ultrashort soft x-ray pulse duration and high brilliance of the free electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH, to generate warm dense matter and to study its ultrafast processes. The techniques applied are absorption measurement, emission spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. Radiative hydrodynamics and Thomson scattering simulations are used to investigate the impact of temperature and density gradients in the sample and to fit the experimental data. The measurements result in a comprehensive picture of soft x-ray matter interaction related to warm dense matter and yield insight into ultrafast equilibration and relaxation mechanisms, in particular impact ionization and radiative recombination. (orig.)

  12. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: Comparisons among average-atom density functional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Michael S.; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  13. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: comparisons among average-atom density functional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Michael S; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B; Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  14. Quantum-mechanical calculation of ionization potential lowering in dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Son, Sang-Kil; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely-used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kr\\"oll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy ...

  15. The effect of ambipolar resistivity on the formation of dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, S; Hartquist, T W; Barker, A J

    2008-01-01

    We aim to understand the formation of dense cores by magnetosonic waves in regions where the thermal to magnetic pressure ratio is small. Because of the low-ionisation fraction in molecular clouds, neutral and charged particles are weakly coupled. Ambipolar diffusion then plays an important role in the formation process. A quiescent, uniform plasma is perturbed by a fast-mode wave. Using 2D numerical simulations, we follow the evolution of the fast-mode wave. The simulations are done with a multifluid, adaptive mesh refinement MHD code. Initial perturbations with wavelengths that are 2 orders of magnitude larger than the dissipation length are strongly affected by the ion-neutral drift. Only in situations where there are large variations in the magnetic field corresponding to a highly turbulent gas can fast-mode waves generate dense cores. This means that, in most cores, no substructure can be produced. However, Core D of TMC-1 is an exception to this case. Due to its atypically high ionisation fraction, wave...

  16. Ion Behavior and Gas Mixing in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas as sources of highly charged ions (concept

    OpenAIRE

    Melin, G.; Drentje, A. G.; Girard, A; Hitz, D.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: An ECR ion source is basically an ECR heated plasma confinement machine, with hot electrons and cold ions. The main parameters of the ion population have been analyzed, including temperature, losses, and confinement time. The "gas mixing" effect has been studied in this context. An expression is derived for determining the ion temperature from the values of all extracted ion currents. One aim is to study the ion temperature behavior in argon plasmas without and with mixing different...

  17. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos & Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-09-06

    It is now firmly established that neutrinos, which are copiously produced in the hot and dense core of the supernova, play a role in the supernova explosion mechanism and in the synthesis of heavy elements through a phenomena known as r-process nucleosynthesis. They are also detectable in terrestrial neutrino experiments, and serve as a probe of the extreme environment and complex dynamics encountered in the supernova. The major goal of the UW research activity relevant to this project was to calculate the neutrino interaction rates in hot and dense matter of relevance to core collapse supernova. These serve as key input physics in large scale computer simulations of the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis being pursued at national laboratories here in the United States and by other groups in Europe and Japan. Our calculations show that neutrino production and scattering rate are altered by the nuclear interactions and that these modifications have important implications for nucleosynthesis and terrestrial neutrino detection. The calculation of neutrino rates in dense matter are difficult because nucleons in the dense matter are strongly coupled. A neutrino interacts with several nucleons and the quantum interference between scattering off different nucleons depends on the nature of correlations between them in dense matter. To describe these correlations we used analytic methods based on mean field theory and hydrodynamics, and computational methods such as Quantum Monte Carlo. We found that due to nuclear effects neutrino production rates at relevant temperatures are enhanced, and that electron neutrinos are more easily absorbed than anti-electron neutrinos in dense matter. The latter, was shown to favor synthesis of heavy neutron-rich elements in the supernova.

  18. Cloud photogrammetry with dense stereo for fisheye cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekmans, Christoph; Schneider, Johannes; Läbe, Thomas; Lennefer, Martin; Stachniss, Cyrill; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel approach for dense 3-D cloud reconstruction above an area of 10 × 10 km2 using two hemispheric sky imagers with fisheye lenses in a stereo setup. We examine an epipolar rectification model designed for fisheye cameras, which allows the use of efficient out-of-the-box dense matching algorithms designed for classical pinhole-type cameras to search for correspondence information at every pixel. The resulting dense point cloud allows to recover a detailed and more complete cloud morphology compared to previous approaches that employed sparse feature-based stereo or assumed geometric constraints on the cloud field. Our approach is very efficient and can be fully automated. From the obtained 3-D shapes, cloud dynamics, size, motion, type and spacing can be derived, and used for radiation closure under cloudy conditions, for example. Fisheye lenses follow a different projection function than classical pinhole-type cameras and provide a large field of view with a single image. However, the computation of dense 3-D information is more complicated and standard implementations for dense 3-D stereo reconstruction cannot be easily applied. Together with an appropriate camera calibration, which includes internal camera geometry, global position and orientation of the stereo camera pair, we use the correspondence information from the stereo matching for dense 3-D stereo reconstruction of clouds located around the cameras. We implement and evaluate the proposed approach using real world data and present two case studies. In the first case, we validate the quality and accuracy of the method by comparing the stereo reconstruction of a stratocumulus layer with reflectivity observations measured by a cloud radar and the cloud-base height estimated from a Lidar-ceilometer. The second case analyzes a rapid cumulus evolution in the presence of strong wind shear.

  19. Dense zig-zag microstructures in YSZ thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Stender

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The very brittle oxygen ion conductor yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ is a typical solid electrolyte for miniaturized thin film fuel cells. In order to decrease the fuel cell operating temperature, the thickness of yttria stabilized zirconia thin films is reduced. Often, these thin membranes suffer from mechanical failure and gas permeability. To improve these mechanical issues, a glancing angle deposition approach is used to grow yttria stabilized zirconia thin films with tilted columnar structures. Changes of the material flux direction during the deposition result in a dense, zigzag-like structure with columnar crystallites. This structure reduces the elastic modulus of these membranes as compared to columnar yttria stabilized zirconia thin films as monitored by nano-indentation which makes them more adaptable to applied stress.

  20. Calculations on the stopping power of a heterogeneous Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Schnürer, Matthias; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Morales, Roberto; González-Gallego, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is estimated by means of the individual contributions of free electrons and bound electrons existing in this special kind of matter, located between classical and degenerate plasmas. For free electrons, the dielectric formalism, well described in previous works of our research group, is used to estimate free electron stopping power. For bound electrons, mean excitation energy of ions is used. Excitation energies are obtained through atomic calculations of the whole atom or, shell by shell in order to estimate their stopping power. Influence of temperature and density is analyzed in case of an impinging projectile. This influence became important for low projectile velocities and negligible for high ones. Using both analysis, the stopping power of an extended WDM is inferred from a dynamical calculation of energy transferred from the projectile to the plasma, where the Bragg peak and stopping range are calculated. Finally, this theoretical framework is used to stud...

  1. A reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, M.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph; Santos, J. J.; Gremillet, L.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-07-01

    A hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport based on the angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation with a special closure is presented. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the relativistic electrons by plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing their energy distribution evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a monodirectional and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense plasma and hybrid particle-in-cell simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport case.

  2. Ionization-potential depression and dynamical structure factor in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengliang; Röpke, Gerd; Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich; Reinholz, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    The properties of a bound electron system immersed in a plasma environment are strongly modified by the surrounding plasma. The modification of an essential quantity, the ionization energy, is described by the electronic and ionic self-energies, including dynamical screening within the framework of the quantum statistical theory. Introducing the ionic dynamical structure factor as the indicator for the ionic microfield, we demonstrate that ionic correlations and fluctuations play a critical role in determining the ionization potential depression. This is, in particular, true for mixtures of different ions with large mass and charge asymmetry. The ionization potential depression is calculated for dense aluminum plasmas as well as for a CH plasma and compared to the experimental data and more phenomenological approaches used so far.

  3. Electron spectra from ionizing collisions in a dense laser-excited Na beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, E.; Ramos, G.; Smith, W. W.

    2000-06-01

    We report low-energy (Europhysics Letters 23), 567 (1993). At higher, saturating intensity in our dense beam, we see multiple peaks, with the extra peaks attributed to 3p+3d associative ionization(AI)(E.Babenko, C.Tapalian and W.W.Smith, Chem. Phys. Lett. 244), 121 (1995). and superelastic electron scattering from excited states. The main, broad AI peak at 1.1 eV reflects the vibrorotational distribution of the product Na_2^+ dimer ions, consistent with a simple long-range model of the collision process. A broad, low energy peak at 0.35 eV is tentatively attributed to excitation of the dissociative ^2Σ_u^+ state of the Na_2^+ dimer. Analogous spectra were taken when the 3p and 5s states were selectively laser excited.

  4. Layered double hydroxide nanosheet as a two-dimensional support of dense platinum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hyo Gyoung; Cho, Se Hee; Ji, Hong Geun [H and A PharmaChem, R and D center, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hyeon [Dept. of Chemistry, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Transition metal nanoparticles (NPs) with a narrow size distribution have been intensively synthesized on various solid supports for anti-agglomeration, and high catalytic activity and selectivity. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) are currently attracting intense interest in the field of heterogeneous catalysis as catalyst supports. In order to obtain a well-crystallized LDH nanosheet, the as-synthesize d carbonate form of LDH was hydrothermally treated according to a reported procedure, and further reacted by anion-exchange with an aqueous solution of NaNO{sub 3} and acetate buffer to give the nitrate form of LDH. Dense and uniform Pt NPs were synthesized on the exfoliated LDH nanosheets through precursor exchange and thermal reduction of the precursor ions. In this nanocomposite, the Pt Nps were uniformly grown on the surface of the LDH nano sheet and the average size of Pt Nps was 2nm.

  5. Quantum Dense Coding in Multiparticle Entangled States via Local Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建兰; 匡乐满

    2004-01-01

    We study quantum dense coding between two arbitrarily fixed particles in a (N + 2)-particle maximally-entangled states through introducing an auxiliary qubit and carrying out local measurements. It is shown that the transmitted classical information amount through such an entangled quantum channel is usually less than two classical bits. However, the information amount may reach two classical bits of information, and the classical information capacity is independent of the number of the entangled particles under certain conditions. The results offer deeper insight into quantum dense coding via quantum channels of multi-particle entangled states.

  6. Time-dependent models of dense PDRs with complex molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Morata, O.; Herbst, E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of the chemistry of a dense photon-dominated region (PDR) using a time-dependent chemical model. Our major interest is to study the spatial distribution of complex molecules such as hydrocarbons and cyanopolyynes in the cool dense material bordering regions where star formation has taken place. Our standard model uses a homogeneous cloud of density 2x10e4 cm-3 and temperature T=40 K, which is irradiated by a far-ultraviolet radiation field of intermediate intensity, given b...

  7. Dense Subsemigroups of Matrix Semigroups and Semigroups of Linear Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yupaporn Kemprasit

    2002-01-01

    Let V be a vector space over a field F = (F, +, .), F* = F\\{0}, LF(V)the semigroup of all linear transformations of V into itself under composition, and Mn(F) the multiplicative full n × n matrix semigroup over F. In this paper, it is proved that the semigroup Mn(F) has a proper dense subsemigroup if and only if(F*, .) has an element of infinite order. Also, the semigroup LF(V) has a proper dense subsemigroup if and only if dimF V = ∞ or (F*, .) has an element of infinite order.

  8. In-plant evaluation of dense medium process performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.Q. Honaker; A. Patwardhan [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Department of Mining Engineering

    2006-07-15

    The separation density and process efficiency values achieved by dense medium processes are a function of the particle size fractions being treated, hydrodynamics of the separator, and medium rheology. An in-plant evaluation of the dense medium processes being used in an operating preparation plant was conducted in an effort to develop relationships between the actual separation density and the medium density and to quantify the separation efficiency values. The results were found to correlate well with current fundamental and operating principles governing the processes, which are reviewed and discussed.

  9. Solving Dense Generalized Eigenproblems on Multi-threaded Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, José I; Davidović, Davor; Di Napoli, Edoardo; Igual, Francisco D; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S

    2011-01-01

    We compare two approaches to compute a portion of the spectrum of dense symmetric definite generalized eigenproblems: one is based on the reduction to tridiagonal form, and the other on the Krylov-subspace iteration. Two large-scale applications, arising in molecular dynamics and material science, are employed to investigate the contributions of the application, architecture, and parallelism of the method to the performance of the solvers. The experimental results on a state-of-the-art 8-core platform, equipped with a graphics processing unit (GPU), reveal that in real applications, iterative Krylov-subspace methods can be a competitive approach also for the solution of dense problems.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of electrons in dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade; Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Buckman, Stephen; White, Ron

    2014-10-01

    We implement a Monte-Carlo simulation modelling the transport of electrons and positrons in dense gases and liquids, by using a dynamic structure factor that allows us to construct structure-modified effective cross sections. These account for the coherent effects caused by interactions with the relatively dense medium. The dynamic structure factor also allows us to model thermal gases in the same manner, without needing to directly sample the velocities of the neutral particles. We present the results of a series of Monte Carlo simulations that verify and apply this new technique, and make comparisons with macroscopic predictions and Boltzmann equation solutions. Financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  11. Enhanced laser-driven ion acceleration in the relativistic transparency regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henig, Andreas; Kiefer, Daniel; Jung, Daniel; Habs, Dietrich [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Cord; Letzring, Sam; Johnson, Randy; Shimada, Tom; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian; Fernandez, Juan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Rykovanov, Sergey [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Moscow Physics Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wu, Hui-Chun [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Markey, Keith; Zepf, Matt [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Liechtenstein, Vitaly [LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); RRC, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schreiber, Joerg [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Plasma Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Hegelich, Manuel [LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We report on the acceleration of ion beams from ultra-thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils of thickness 50, 30 and 10 nm irradiated by ultra-high contrast laser pulses at intensities of {proportional_to}7 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. An unprecedented maximum energy of 185 MeV (>15 MeV/u) for fully ionized carbon atoms is observed at the optimum thickness of 30 nm. The enhanced acceleration is attributed to self-induced transparency, leading to strong volumetric heating of the classically over-dense electron population in the bulk of the target. Our experimental results are supported by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations.

  12. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  13. Auto transfer to Rydberg states during ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachau, H.; Harel, C. (Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques, Unite Propre de Recherche 260 du CNRS, Universite Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)); Barat, M.; Roncin, P. (Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, Unite associee 281 du CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, Batiment 351, 91405 Orsay (France)); Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Benhenni, M. (IRSAMC, Unite associee 770 du CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France))

    1993-06-05

    Electron capture by slow multiply charged ions colliding on rare-gas targets is known to populate highly excited states of the projectile. On the basis of experimental measurement of energy and angle differential cross-sections we have shown that capture to a resonant doubly excited state may lead to Autoionizing Double Capture (ADC) as well as to True Double Capture (TDC). In this model TDC appears as a two step post-collisional process, the state populated by the collision decays to (or delutes into) a dense adjacent Rydberg series, followed by radiative deexcitation of the inner electron of the (3,n) Rydberg states. We report here new experimental observations in electron spectra measured in [ital N][sup 7+]+[ital He]. Auto transfer to Rydber states has also important consequences on the determination of the lifetime of the autoionizing states, some discrepancies between theoretical width values for low [ital N][sup 5+](4,4) resonant states will be discussed and partially resolved.

  14. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.

    2014-08-26

    charge density and polarizability of the co-ions also appeared to influence permselectivity leading to ion-specific effects; co-ions that are charge dense and have low polarizability tended to result in high membrane permselectivity. This journal is

  15. Production of High-Intensity, Highly Charged Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Gammino, S

    2013-01-01

    In the past three decades, the development of nuclear physics facilities for fundamental and applied science purposes has required an increasing current of multicharged ion beams. Multiple ionization implies the formation of dense and energetic plasmas, which, in turn, requires specific plasma trapping configurations. Two types of ion source have been able to produce very high charge states in a reliable and reproducible way: electron beam ion sources (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS). Multiple ionization is also obtained in laser-generated plasmas (laser ion sources (LIS)), where the high-energy electrons and the extremely high electron density allow step-by-step ionization, but the reproducibility is poor. This chapter discusses the atomic physics background at the basis of the production of highly charged ions and describes the scientific and technological features of the most advanced ion sources. Particular attention is paid to ECRIS and the latest developments, since they now r...

  16. Phenomenology of Heavy Flavors in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Isayev, A A

    2010-01-01

    Some recent experimental results obtained in collisions of heavy nuclei ($\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV) at BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are discussed. The probes of dense matter created in heavy-ion collision by quarkonia, $D$ and $B$ mesons containing heavy charm and beauty quarks are considered. The centrality, rapidity and transverse momentum dependences of the nuclear modification factor and elliptic flow coefficient are presented and their possible theoretical interpretation is provided.

  17. Ion focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-17

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  18. Population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooch, E. G.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases or decreases in the size of populations over space and time are, arguably, the motivation for much of pure and applied ecological research. The fundamental model for the dynamics of any population is straightforward: the net change over time in the abundance of some population is the simple difference between the number of additions (individuals entering the population minus the number of subtractions (individuals leaving the population. Of course, the precise nature of the pattern and process of these additions and subtractions is often complex, and population biology is often replete with fairly dense mathematical representations of both processes. While there is no doubt that analysis of such abstract descriptions of populations has been of considerable value in advancing our, there has often existed a palpable discomfort when the ‘beautiful math’ is faced with the often ‘ugly realities’ of empirical data. In some cases, this attempted merger is abandoned altogether, because of the paucity of ‘good empirical data’ with which the theoretician can modify and evaluate more conceptually–based models. In some cases, the lack of ‘data’ is more accurately represented as a lack of robust estimates of one or more parameters. It is in this arena that methods developed to analyze multiple encounter data from individually marked organisms has seen perhaps the greatest advances. These methods have rapidly evolved to facilitate not only estimation of one or more vital rates, critical to population modeling and analysis, but also to allow for direct estimation of both the dynamics of populations (e.g., Pradel, 1996, and factors influencing those dynamics (e.g., Nichols et al., 2000. The interconnections between the various vital rates, their estimation, and incorporation into models, was the general subject of our plenary presentation by Hal Caswell (Caswell & Fujiwara, 2004. Caswell notes that although interest has traditionally

  19. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, A., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Halvorson, C., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  20. Interaction of ultrarelativistic electron and proton bunches with dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Rukhadze, A A

    2012-01-01

    Here we discuss the possibility of employment of ultrarelativistic electron and proton bunches for generation of high plasma wakefields in dense plasmas due to the Cherenkov resonance plasma-bunch interaction. We estimate the maximum amplitude of such a wake and minimum system length at which the maximum amplitude can be generated at the given bunch parameters.

  1. Dense Matter and Neutron Stars in Parity Doublet Models

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, S; Negreiros, R; Steinheimer, J

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the properties of dense matter and neutron stars. In particular we discuss model calculations based on the parity doublet picture of hadronic chiral symmetry. In this ansatz the onset of chiral symmetry restoration is reflected by the degeneracy of baryons and their parity partners. In this approach we also incorporate quarks as degrees of freedom to be able to study hybrid stars.

  2. Length scales and selforganization in dense suspension flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düring, G.; Lerner, E.; Wyart, M.

    2014-01-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its

  3. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  4. Comprehensive Studies of Ultrafast Laser Excited Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijiang; Mo, Mianzhen; Russell, Brandon; Tsui, Ying; Wang, Xijie; Ng, Andrew; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric excitation of solids by ultrafast laser pulses is an important approach to generate warm dense matter in laboratory. Electrical conductivity, structural dynamics and lattice stabilities are the most important properties in ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter. To investigate these properties, we have developed multiple advanced capabilities at SLAC recently, including the measurement of semi-DC electrical conductivity with ultrafast THz radiation, the study of solid and liquid structural dynamics by ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), and the investigation of lattice stability using frequency domain interferometry (FDI) on both front and rear surfaces. Due to the non-reversible nature in exciting solid to warm dense matter, all these diagnostics are implemented with single-shot approaches, reducing the uncertainties due to shot-to-shot fluctuations. In this talk, we will introduce these novel capabilities and present some highlighted studies in warm dense gold, which was uniformly excited by ultrafast laser pulses at 400nm. We appreciate the supports from DOE FES under FWP #100182.

  5. Rapid haplotype reconstruction in predigrees with dense marker maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windig, J.J.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Reconstruction of marker phases is not straightforward when parents are untyped. In these cases information from other relatives has to be used. In dense marker maps, however, the space of possible haplotype configurations tends to be too large for procedures such as Monte Carlo Markov chains (MCMC)

  6. Mechanics of dense suspensions in turbulent channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picano, F.; Costa, P.; Breugem, W.P.; Brandt, L.

    2015-01-01

    Dense suspensions are usually investigated in the laminar limit where inertial effects are insignificant. When the flow rate is high enough, i.e. at high Reynolds number, the flow may become turbulent and the interaction between solid and liquid phases modifies the turbulence we know in single-phase

  7. On discrete Zariski-dense subgroups of algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Winkelmann, J

    1993-01-01

    We investigate for which linear-algebraic groups (over the complex numbers or any local field) there exists subgroups which are dense in the Zariski topology, but discrete in the Hausdorff topology. For instance, such subgroups exist for every non-solvable complex group.

  8. Tableaux for Logics of Subinterval Structures over Dense Orderings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Goranko, Valentin; Montanari, Angelo;

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we develop tableau-based decision procedures for the logics of subinterval structures over dense linear orderings. In particular, we consider the two difficult cases: the relation of strict subintervals (with both endpoints strictly inside the current interval) and the relation o...

  9. Gas-particle interactions in dense gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of heterogeneous flow structures in gas-particle flows seriously affects gas¿solid contacting and transport processes in dense gas-fluidized beds. A computational study, using a discrete particle method based on Molecular Dynamics techniques, has been carried out to explore the

  10. Dense Focal Plane Arrays for Pushbroom Satellite Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a dense focal plane array feeding an offset toroidal reflector antenna system is studied and discussed in the context of a potential application in multi-beam radiometers for ocean surveillance. We present a preliminary design of the array feed for the 5-m diameter antenna at X...

  11. Manifestation of chiral symmetry restoration in a dense medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, M; Delorme, J

    1999-01-01

    We generalize the concept of correlator mixing to the case of a dense baryonic medium. We study the subsequent modifications of the axial nucleonic coupling constant and the pion decay one. They arise from a two pion exchange current of a new type. We discuss the link to the condensate evolution.

  12. Numerical simulation of the fast dense gas Ludwieg tube experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Guerdone, A.; Collona, P.

    2006-01-01

    The preliminary design of a Ludwieg tube experiment for the verification of the existence of nonclassical rarefaction shock waves in dense vapors is here critically analyzed by means of real gas numerical simulations of the experimental setup. The Flexible Asymmetric Shock Tube (FAST) setup is a den

  13. Dense Descriptors for Optical Flow Estimation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Baghaie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the displacements of intensity patterns between sequential frames is a very well-studied problem, which is usually referred to as optical flow estimation. The first assumption among many of the methods in the field is the brightness constancy during movements of pixels between frames. This assumption is proven to be not true in general, and therefore, the use of photometric invariant constraints has been studied in the past. One other solution can be sought by use of structural descriptors rather than pixels for estimating the optical flow. Unlike sparse feature detection/description techniques and since the problem of optical flow estimation tries to find a dense flow field, a dense structural representation of individual pixels and their neighbors is computed and then used for matching and optical flow estimation. Here, a comparative study is carried out by extending the framework of SIFT-flow to include more dense descriptors, and comprehensive comparisons are given. Overall, the work can be considered as a baseline for stimulating more interest in the use of dense descriptors for optical flow estimation.

  14. Easy Fabrication of Dense Ceramic Membrane for Oxygen Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A combined EDTA-citrate complexing method was developed for the easy preparation of mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting dense ceramic membrane for oxygen separation.The new method takes the advantage of lower calcination temperature for phase formation, lower membrane sintering temperature and higher relative density over the standard ceramic method.

  15. Dry processing versus dense medium processing for preparing thermal coal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Korte, GJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available in the region. In addition to not requiring water, the technique is less expensive than dense medium processing - both in terms of capital cost and operating cost. An added benefit when preparing coal for use in power stations is the lower moisture content...

  16. A comparative study of fast dense stereo vision algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunyoto, H.; Mark, W. van der; Gavrila, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    With recent hardware advances, real-time dense stereo vision becomes increasingly feasible for general-purpose processors. This has important benefits for the intelligent vehicles domain, alleviating object segmentation problems when sensing complex, cluttered traffic scenes. In this paper, we prese

  17. Multi-channel Support for Dense Wireless Sensor Networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durmaz, O.; Dulman, S.O.; Jansen, P.G.; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Havinga, P.J.M.; Lijding, M.E.M.; Meratnia, N.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Wegdam, M.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, most wireless sensor network applications assume the presence of single-channel Medium Access Control (MAC) protocols. When sensor nodes are densely deployed, single-channel MAC protocols may be inadequate due to the higher demand for the limited bandwidth. To overcome this drawback, we

  18. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  19. Self-diffusion in a dense magnetized plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, J.S.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Self-diffusion through dense classical one-component plasmas in a uniform magnetic field is studied by means of renormalized kinetic theory. Extensions of the Landau and the Rostoker equations to plasmas of high density are derived. The coefficient of self-diffusion along the magnetic field is evalu

  20. Cerebellar Granule Cells: Dense, Rich and Evolving Representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-01-01

    For half a century it was assumed that granule cells use ultra-sparse encoding, but now in vivo calcium-imaging studies have shown that large ensembles of granule cells provide dense signals, which themselves evolve and adapt during training.

  1. Formation and liquid permeability of dense colloidal cube packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo, Sonja I R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Philipse, Albert P.

    2015-01-01

    The liquid permeability of dense random packings of cubic colloids with rounded corners is studied for solid hematite cubes and hollow microporous silica cubes. The permeabilities of these two types of packings are similar, confirming that the micropores in the silica shell of the hollow cubes do

  2. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  3. Ion selectivity of graphene nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Rollings, Ryan C.; Kuan, Aaron T.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    As population growth continues to outpace development of water infrastructure in many countries, desalination (the removal of salts from seawater) at high energy efficiency will likely become a vital source of fresh water. Due to its atomic thinness combined with its mechanical strength, porous graphene may be particularly well-suited for electrodialysis desalination, in which ions are removed under an electric field via ion-selective pores. Here, we show that single graphene nanopores prefer...

  4. Long-term visual outcome of dense bilateral congenital cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE He-hua; DENG Da-ming; QIAN Yi-yong; LIN Zhi; CHEN Wei-rong

    2007-01-01

    Background Dense congenital cataracts often cause severe visual impairment. The results of long-term follow-up of dense bilateral congenital cataract in China have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term visual function in children who underwent cataract extraction for dense bilateral congenital cataract in southern part of China.Methods Medical records of children who underwent surgery of dense bilateral congenital cataract between January 1992 and December 2000 at Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University were retroactively reviewed. In 38 children available for current follow-up, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and stereoscopic vision, as well as nystagmus, strabismus, and other complications, were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 107.6 months (range 60 to 167 months).Results The mean age of cataract extraction and secondary intraocular lens implantation were 5.6 months (range 3 to 12 months) and 4.2 years (range 2.4 to 15 years), respectively. The mean BCVA was 0.25 in the better eye and 0.16 in the fellow eye. Stereoscopic vision was absent in all patients, and 3 children had simultaneous perception. Nystagmus was detected in all cases and strabismus in 35 cases. A high correlation was found between timing of cataract extraction and final BCVA of the better eye (r=-0.55, P=0.00). A statistically significant difference was found in BCVA between postand pre-treatment of amblyopia (t=5.65, P=0.00).Conclusions Long-term visual function in children with dense bilateral congenital cataract was poor when cataract surgery was performed at age of 3 months or later. Earlier cataract surgery with adequate optical rehabilitation contributed to better visual outcome.

  5. Enabling the sustainable Faecal Sludge Management service delivery chain-A case study of dense settlements in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akumuntu, Jean Baptiste; Wehn, Uta; Mulenga, Martin; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2017-08-01

    The lack of access to basic sanitation is a global concern and alarmingly prevalent in low- and middle- income countries. In the densely populated settlements of these countries, on-site sanitation systems are usually the only feasible option because dwellers there have no sewers in place to connect to. Using on-site sanitation facilities results in an accumulation of faecal sludge which needs to be properly managed to ensure the well-being of the users as well as the surrounding environment. Unfortunately, often the conditions for faecal sludge management (FSM) within dense settlements are adverse and thus hamper sustainable FSM. We use the normative framework of the FSM enabling environment to gather empirical evidence from densely populated settlements of Kigali city in Rwanda to examine current FSM practices and the extent to which these are being influenced and affected by the setting within which they are taking place. The analysis of the study findings confirms that the existing conditions for FSM in these settlements are inadequate. The specific constraints that hinder the achievement of sustainable FSM include limited government focus on the sanitation sector, high turnover of staff in relevant government institutions, pit sludge management is not placed on the sanitation projects agenda, the existing relevant bylaws are not pro-poor oriented, a lack of clear responsibilities, a lack of relevant local professional training opportunities, unaffordability of FSM services and an inhibition to discuss FSM. Drawing on the involved stakeholders' own perceptions and suggestions, we identify possible approaches to overcome the identified constraints and to allow all actors in the FSM chain to contribute effectively to the management of faecal sludge in densely populated low-income urban settlements. Finally, our study also presents a contribution to the theoretical conceptualisation of the enabling environment for sustainable FSM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Gmb

  6. Weibel instability-mediated collisionless shocks in laser-irradiated dense plasmas:Prevailing role of the electrons in the turbulence generation

    CERN Document Server

    Ruyer, C; Bonnaud, G

    2015-01-01

    We present a particle-in-cell simulation of the generation of a collisionless turbulent shock in a dense plasma driven by an ultra-high-intensity laser pulse. From the linear analysis, we highlight the crucial role of the laser-heated and return-current electrons in triggering a strong Weibel-like instability, giving rise to a magnetic turbulence able to isotropize the target ions.

  7. Thermal properties of hot and dense matter with finite range interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Constantinos; Prakash, Madappa; Lattimer, James M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the thermal properties of hot and dense matter using a model that reproduces the empirical properties of isospin symmetric and asymmetric bulk nuclear matter, optical model fits to nucleon-nucleus scattering data, heavy-ion flow data in the energy range 0.5-2 GeV/A, and the largest well-measured neutron star mass of 2 $\\rm{M}_\\odot$. Results of this model which incorporates finite range interactions through Yukawa type forces are contrasted with those of a zero-range Skyrme model that yields nearly identical zero-temperature properties at all densities for symmetric and asymmetric nucleonic matter and the maximum neutron star mass, but fails to account for heavy-ion flow data due to the lack of an appropriate momentum dependence in its mean field. Similarities and differences in the thermal state variables and the specific heats between the two models are highlighted. Checks of our exact numerical calculations are performed from formulas derived in the strongly degenerate and non-degenerate limits....

  8. Dense-plasma-driven ultrafast formation of FePt organization on silicon substrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ROHIT MEDWAL; NEERU SEHDEV; WANG YING; R S RAWAT; S ANNAPOORNI

    2017-02-01

    This article demonstrates the removal of organic capping and promotion of long-range 2D organization of chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles dispersed on Si$\\langle 100\\rangle$ substrate by means of pulsed H+ energetic ion irradiation using a dense plasma focus (DPF) device. The irradiation of energetic H$^+$ ions on FePt nanoparticles clearly resulted in enhanced structural and magnetic behaviour of the FePt nanoparticles as a function ofplasma focused irradiation shots. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the FePt nanoparticles clearly show a marked enhancement in average particle size from 2.5 nm for nonirradiated sample to about 28nm for four plasma focus shots irradiation. The gradual removal of organic capping over chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles with increasing plasma focus shots exposure is confirmed usingRaman spectroscopy. A uniform 2D organization of bimetallic FePt nanoparticles over 1 cm $\\times$ 1 cm silicon substrate is obtained with three plasma focus shots with better magnetic properties as compared with plasma-untreated FePtnanoparticles.

  9. The first data from the Orion laser: measurements of the spectrum of hot dense aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarty, D. J.; Allan, P.; James, S. F.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; Hill, M. P.; Harris, J. W. O.; Morton, J.; Brookes, M. G.; Shepherd, R.; Dunn, J.; Chen, H.; Von Marley, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chung, H. K.; Lee, R. W.; Brown, G.; Emig, J.

    2016-03-01

    The newly commissioned Orion laser system has been used to study dense plasmas created by a combination of short pulse laser heating and compression by laser driven shocks. Thus the plasma density was systematically varied between 1 and 10g/cc by using aluminium samples buried in plastic foils or diamond sheets. The aluminium was heated to electron temperatures between 500eV and 700eV allowing the plasma conditions to be diagnosed by K- shell emission spectroscopy. The K-shell spectra show the effect of the ionization potential depression as a function of density via the delocalization of n=3 levels and disappearance of n=3 transitions in He-like and H-like aluminium. The data are compared to simulated spectra, which account for the change in the ionization potential by the commonly used Stewart and Pyatt prescription; a simple ion sphere model and an alternative due to Ecker and Kroll suggested by recent X-ray free-electron laser experiments. The experimental data are in reasonable agreement with the model of Stewart and Pyatt, but are in better agreement with a simple ion sphere model. The data indicate that the Ecker and Kröll model overestimates substantially the ionization potential depression in this regime.

  10. Dense branched morphology in electrochemical deposition in a thin cell vertically oriented

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, G. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, F91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Soba, A. [Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marshall, G. [Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cornell Theory Center, and Laboratory for Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Molina, F.V. [INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rosso, M. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, F91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-11-20

    Convection due to electric and gravity forces increase complexity in thin layer electrochemistry (ECD). We describe conditions in a vertical cell with the cathode above the anode in which global convection is eliminated and a dense branched morphology with a smooth front is obtained. It is shown that these conditions allow a theoretical one dimensional modeling notably simplifying the complex analysis of the problem. We report experimental measurements under constant current conditions showing that the deposit, cathodic and proton fronts scale linearly with time, a signature of migration controlled regime. We discuss a theoretical ECD model under galvanostatic conditions with a three ion electrolyte and a growth model, consisting in the one dimensional Nernst-Planck equations for ion transport, the Poisson equation for the electric field and a growth law whose front velocity equals the anion mobility times the local electric field. The model predicts cation, anion and proton concentration profiles, electric field variations and deposit growth speed, that are in good agreement with experiments; the predicted evolution and collision of the deposit and proton fronts reveal a time scaling close to those observed in experiments. (author)

  11. Fabrication of dense wavelength division multiplexing filters with large useful area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Sheng-Hui; Hsu, Jin-Cherng; Kuo, Chien-Cheng

    2006-08-01

    Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexers (DWDM), a kind of narrow band-pass filter, are extremely sensitive to the optical thickness error in each composite layer. Therefore to have a large useful coating area is extreme difficult because of the uniformity problem. To enlarge the useful coating area it is necessary to improve their design and their fabrication. In this study, we discuss how the tooling factors at different positions and for different materials are related to the optical performance of the design. 100GHz DWDM filters were fabricated by E-gun evaporation with ion-assisted deposition (IAD). To improve the coating uniformity, an analysis technique called shaping tooling factor (STF) was used to analyze the deviation of the optical thickness in different materials so as to enlarge the useful coating area. Also a technique of etching the deposited layers with oxygen ions was introduced. When the above techniques were applied in the fabrication of 100 GHz DWDM filters, the uniformity was better than +/-0.002% over an area of 72 mm in diameter and better than +/-0.0006% over 20mm in diameter.

  12. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ellsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  13. Model studies of dense water overflows in the Faroese Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Alan; Davies, Peter; Stashchuk, Nataliya; Vlasenko, Vasiliy

    2014-01-01

    The overflow of dense water from the Nordic Seas through the Faroese Channel system was investigated through combined laboratory experiments and numerical simulations using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology General Circulation Model. In the experimental study, a scaled, topographic representation of the Faroe-Shetland Channel, Wyville-Thomson Basin and Ridge and Faroe Bank Channel seabed bathymetry was constructed and mounted in a rotating tank. A series of parametric experiments was conducted using dye-tracing and drogue-tracking techniques to investigate deep-water overflow pathways and circulation patterns within the modelled region. In addition, the structure of the outflowing dense bottom water was investigated through density profiling along three cross-channel transects located in the Wyville-Thomson Basin and the converging, up-sloping approach to the Faroe Bank Channel. Results from the dye-tracing studies demonstrate a range of parametric conditions under which dense water overflow across the Wyville-Thomson Ridge is shown to occur, as defined by the Burger number, a non-dimensional length ratio and a dimensionless dense water volume flux parameter specified at the Faroe-Shetland Channel inlet boundary. Drogue-tracking measurements reveal the complex nature of flow paths and circulations generated in the modelled topography, particularly the development of a large anti-cyclonic gyre in the Wyville-Thompson Basin and up-sloping approach to the Faroe Bank Channel, which diverts the dense water outflow from the Faroese shelf towards the Wyville-Thomson Ridge, potentially promoting dense water spillage across the ridge itself. The presence of this circulation is also indicated by associated undulations in density isopycnals across the Wyville-Thomson Basin. Numerical simulations of parametric test cases for the main outflow pathways and density structure in a similarly-scaled Faroese Channels model domain indicate excellent qualitative agreement with

  14. Ionic Debye Screening in Dense Liquid Plasmas Observed for Li+p,d Reactions with Liquid Li Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Kasagi; H.Yonemura; Y.Toriyabe; A.Nakagawa; T.Sugawara; WANG Tie-shan

    2009-01-01

    Thick target yields of a particles emitted in the ~6Li(d,a)~4 He and ~7Li(p,a)~4 He reactions were measured for Li target in the solid and liquid phase.Observed reaction rates for the liquid Li are always larger than those for the solid.This suggests that the stopping power of hydrogen ion in the liquid Li metal might be smaller than in the solid.Using the empirically obtained stopping power for the liquid Li,we have deduced the screening potentials of the Li+p and Li+d reactions in both phases.The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 500 eV larger than for the solid.This difference is attributed to the effect of liquefied Li~+ ions.It is concluded that the ionic screening is much stronger than the electronic screening in a low-temperature dense plasmas.

  15. Monte-Carlo approach to calculate the ionization of warm dense matter within particle-in-cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, D; Yu, W; Fritzsche, S

    2016-01-01

    A physical model based on Monte-Carlo approach is proposed to calculate the ionization dynamics of warm dense matters within particle-in-cell simulations, where impact ionization, electron-ion recombination and ionization potential depression (IPD) by surrounding plasmas are taken into consideration self-consistently. When compared with other models, which are applied in the literature for plasmas near thermal equilibrium, the temporal relaxation of ionizations can also be simulated by the proposed model with the final thermal equilibrium determined by the competition between impact ionization and its inverse process, i.e., electron-ion recombination. Our model is general and can be applied for both single elements and alloys with quite different compositions. The proposed model is implemented into a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code, and the average ionization degree of bulk aluminium varying with temperature is calculated, showing good agreement with the data provided by FLYCHK code.

  16. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinches, S. D. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lauber, Ph. W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Boltzmanstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Oliver, H. J. C. [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Shinohara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tani, K. [Nippon Advanced Technology Co., Ltd, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  17. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma ( r / a > 0.5 ) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  18. Karyotypic instability and centrosome aberrations in the progeny of finite life-span human mammary epithelial cells exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hiroko; Garbe, James; Stampfer, Martha R; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Kronenberg, Amy

    2008-07-01

    The human breast is sensitive to radiation carcinogenesis, and genomic instability occurs early in breast cancer development. This study tests the hypothesis that ionizing radiation elicits genomic instability in finite life-span human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and asks whether densely ionizing radiation is a more potent inducer of instability. HMEC in a non-proliferative state were exposed to X rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions followed by delayed plating. Karyotypic instability and centrosome aberrations were monitored in expanded clonal isolates. Severe karyotypic instability was common in the progeny of cells that survived X-ray or iron-ion exposure. There was a lower dose threshold for severe karyotypic instability after iron-ion exposure. More than 90% of X-irradiated colonies and >60% of iron-ion-irradiated colonies showed supernumerary centrosomes at levels above the 95% upper confidence limit of the mean for unirradiated clones. A dose response was observed for centrosome aberrations for each radiation type. There was a statistically significant association between the incidence of karyotypic instability and supernumerary centrosomes for iron-ion-exposed colonies and a weaker association for X-irradiated colonies. Thus genomic instability occurs frequently in finite life-span HMEC exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation and may contribute to radiation-induced breast cancer.

  19. Phase matching alters spatial multiphoton processes in dense atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Leszczyński, Adam; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton processes in dense atomic vapors such as four-wave mixing or coherent blue light generation are typically viewed from single-atom perspective. Here we study the surprisingly important effect of phase matching near two-photon resonances that arises due to spatial extent of the atomic medium within which the multiphoton process occurs. The non-unit refractive index of the atomic vapor may inhibit generation of light in nonlinear processes, significantly shift the efficiency maxima in frequencies and redirect emitted beam. We present these effects on an example of four-wave mixing in dense rubidium vapors in a double-ladder configuration. By deriving a simple theory that takes into account essential spatial properties of the process, we give precise predictions and confirm their validity in the experiment. The model allows us to improve on the geometry of the experiment and engineer more efficient four-wave mixing.

  20. Hausdorff hyperspaces of $R^m$ and their dense subspaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Wieslaw

    2007-01-01

    Let $CLB_H(X)$ denote the hyperspace of closed bounded subsets of a metric space $X$, endowed with the Hausdorff metric topology. We prove, among others, that natural dense subspaces of $CLB_H(R^m)$ of all nowhere dense closed sets, of all perfect sets, of all Cantor sets and of all Lebesgue measure zero sets are homeomorphic to the Hilbert space $\\ell_2$. Moreover, we investigate the hyperspace $CL_H(R)$ of all nonempty closed subsets of the real line $R$ with the Hausdorff (infinite-valued) metric. We show that a nonseparable component of $CL_H(R)$ is homeomorphic to the Hilbert space $\\ell_2(2^{\\aleph_0})$ as long as it does not contain any of the sets $R, [0,\\infty), (-\\infty,0]$.