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Sample records for dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoparticles

  1. Influence of the Au/Ag ratio on the catalytic activity of dendrimer-encapsulated bimetallic nanoparticles in microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, J.; Verboom, W.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au/Ag DENs) were covalently attached to a monolayer-functionalized inner surface of glass microreactors. The influence of the bimetallic alloy structure and of the different metal ratios was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol using NaBH4

  2. Influence of the Au/Ag ratio on the catalytic activity of dendrimer-encapsulated bimetallic nanoparticles in microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au/Ag DENs) were covalently attached to a monolayer-functionalized inner surface of glass microreactors. The influence of the bimetallic alloy structure and of the different metal ratios was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol using

  3. Quasi-elastic light scattering of platinum dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Christina H; Berger, Jacob; Blass, Samuel; Crooks, Richard M; Asherie, Neer

    2011-04-05

    Platinum dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) containing an average 147 atoms were prepared within sixth-generation, hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (G6-OH). The hydrodynamic radii (R(h)) of the dendrimer/nanoparticle composites (DNCs) were determined by quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) at high (pH ∼10) and neutral pH for various salt concentrations and identities. At high pH, the size of the DNC (R(h) ∼4 nm) is close to that of the empty dendrimer. At neutral pH, the size of the DNC approximately doubles (R(h) ∼8 nm) whereas that of the empty dendrimer remains unchanged. Changes in ionic strength also alter the size of the DNCs. The increase in size of the DNC is likely due to electrostatic interactions involving the metal nanoparticle.

  4. Synthesis and Catalytic Evaluation of Dendrimer-Encapsulated Cu Nanoparticles: An Undergraduate Experiment Exploring Catalytic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z. Vivian; Lyon, Jennifer L.; Croley, J. Sawyer; Crooks, Richard M.; Vanden Bout, David A.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2009-01-01

    Copper nanoparticles were synthesized using generation 4 hydroxyl-terminated (G4-OH) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as templates. The synthesis is conducted by coordinating copper ions with the interior amines of the dendrimer, followed by chemical reduction to form dendrimer-encapsulated copper nanoparticles (Cu-DEN). The catalytic…

  5. A Systematic Investigation of p-Nitrophenol Reduction by Bimetallic Dendrimer Encapsulated Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol by NaBH4 is catalyzed by both monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs). We also demonstrate a straightforward and precise method for the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles using poly(amido)amine dendrimers. The resulting dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) are monodisperse, and the size distribution does not vary with different elemental combinations. Random alloys of Pt/Cu, Pd/Cu, Pd/Au, Pt/Au, and Au/Cu DENs were synthesized and evaluated as catalysts for p-nitrophenol reduction. These combinations are chosen in order to selectively tune the binding energy of the p-nitrophenol adsorbate to the nanoparticle surface. Following the Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi (BEP) relation, we show that the binding energy can reasonably predict the reaction rates of p-nitrophenol reduction. We demonstrate that the measured reaction rate constants of the bimetallic DENs is not always a simple average of the properties of the constituent metals. In particular, DENs containing metals with similar lattice constants produce a binding energy close to the average of the two constituents, whereas DENs containing metals with a lattice mismatch show a bimodal distribution of binding energies. Overall, in this work we present a uniform method for synthesizing pure and bimetallic DENs and demonstrate that their catalytic properties are dependent on the adsorbate’s binding energy. PMID:23616909

  6. Efficient electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid using Au@Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyamperumal, Ravikumar; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2013-04-17

    We report electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid using monometallic and bimetallic dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs). The results indicate that the Au147@Pt DENs exhibit better electrocatalytic activity and low CO formation. Theoretical calculations attribute the observed activity to the deformation of nanoparticle structure, slow dehydration of formic acid, and weak binding of CO on Au147@Pt surface. Subsequent experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  7. Bimetallic dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles as catalysts: a review of the research advances

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Xiaohong; Pan, Qinmin; Rempel, Garry L.

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) are important materials, because they have demonstrated improvement in performance compared to the monometallic DENs in many systems when they are used as catalysts. This tutorial review focuses on the recent research advances in bimetallic DENs with respect to their synthesis, characterization, and applications as catalysts. Bimetallic DENs can be made mainly via three routes: co-complexation, sequential loading, and partial displacement...

  8. Dendrimer-encapsulated Pd nanoparticles as catalysts for C-C cross-couplings in flow microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The inner walls of glass microreactors were functionalized with dendrimer-encapsulated Pd nanoparticles. The catalysts were efficient for the Heck–Cassar (copper-free Sonogashira) and Suzuki–Miyaura (SMC) cross-coupling reactions. For the Heck–Cassar reaction between iodobenzene and phenylacetylene,

  9. Dendrimer-encapsulated Pd nanoparticles as catalysts for C-C cross-couplings in flow microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, J.; Verboom, W.

    2015-01-01

    The inner walls of glass microreactors were functionalized with dendrimer-encapsulated Pd nanoparticles. The catalysts were efficient for the Heck–Cassar (copper-free Sonogashira) and Suzuki–Miyaura (SMC) cross-coupling reactions. For the Heck–Cassar reaction between iodobenzene and phenylacetylene,

  10. Site-selective Cu deposition on Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles: correlation of theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carino, Emily V; Kim, Hyun You; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-03-07

    The voltammetry of Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) onto Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) containing an average of 147 Pt atoms (Pt(147)) is correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Specifically, the voltammetric peak positions are in good agreement with the calculated energies for Cu deposition and stripping on the Pt(100) and Pt(111) facets of the DENs. Partial Cu shells on Pt(147) are more stable on the Pt(100) facets, compared to the Pt(111) facets, and therefore, Cu UPD occurs on the 4-fold hollow sites of Pt(100) first. Finally, the structures of Pt DENs having full and partial monolayers of Cu were characterized in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The results of XAS studies are also in good agreement with the DFT-optimized models.

  11. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-07-17

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (k(t)) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt(147) and Pt(55)). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high k(t) conditions with simultaneous detection of H(2)O(2). At low k(t) (0.02 to 0.12 cm s(-1)) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, n(eff), is 3.7 for Pt(147) and 3.4 for Pt(55). As k(t) is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H(2)O(2) detected remains constant, such that n(eff) barely changes over the entire k(t) range explored (0.02 cm s(-1)). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect n(eff), which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in n(eff) for the two sizes of Pt DENs (n(eff) = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt(147) and Pt(55), respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect.

  12. Characterization of Pt@Cu Core@Shell Dendrimer-Encapsulated Nanoparticles Synthesized by Cu Underpotential Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Carino; R Crooks

    2011-12-31

    Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) containing averages of 55, 147, and 225 Pt atoms immobilized on glassy carbon electrodes served as the electroactive surface for the underpotential deposition (UPD) of a Cu monolayer. This results in formation of core@shell (Pt@Cu) DENs. Evidence for this conclusion comes from cyclic voltammetry, which shows that the Pt core DENs catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction before Cu UPD, but that after Cu UPD this reaction is inhibited. Results obtained by in situ electrochemical X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirm this finding.

  13. Characterization of Pt@Cu core@shell dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles synthesized by Cu underpotential deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carino, Emily V; Crooks, Richard M

    2011-04-05

    Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) containing averages of 55, 147, and 225 Pt atoms immobilized on glassy carbon electrodes served as the electroactive surface for the underpotential deposition (UPD) of a Cu monolayer. This results in formation of core@shell (Pt@Cu) DENs. Evidence for this conclusion comes from cyclic voltammetry, which shows that the Pt core DENs catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction before Cu UPD, but that after Cu UPD this reaction is inhibited. Results obtained by in situ electrochemical X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirm this finding.

  14. Preparation of poly(ethylene glycol)-modified poly(amido amine) dendrimers encapsulating gold nanoparticles and their heat-generating ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Chie; Harada, Atsushi; Ura, Tomoaki; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Kono, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    Loading of HAuCl4 in poly(amido amine) G4 dendrimers having poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafts at all chain ends and subsequent reduction with NaBH4 yielded PEG-modified dendrimers encapsulating gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of ca. 2 nm diameter. The Au NPs held in the dendrimers were stable in aqueous solutions and dissolved readily, even after freeze-drying. Despite their small particle size, the heat-generating ability of Au NPs held in the dendrimer was comparable to that of widely used Au NPs with ca. 11 nm diameter under visible light irradiation. The observed excellent colloidal stability, high heat-generating ability and their biocompatible surface confirm that the PEG-modified dendrimers encapsulating Au NPs are a promising tool for photothermal therapy and imaging.

  15. In Situ X-ray Absorption Analysis of ~1.8 nm Dendrimer-Encapsulated Platinum Nanoparticles During Electrochemical CO Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, M.; Myers, V; Frenkel, A; Crooks, R

    2010-01-01

    We report an in situ X-ray absorption-fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopic analysis of {approx}1.8 nm Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) during electrocatalytic oxidation of CO. The results indicate that Pt nanoparticles encapsulated within poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers and immobilized on a carbon electrode retain their electrocatalytic activity and are structurally stable for extended periods during CO oxidation. This is a significant finding, because nanoparticles in this size range are good experimental models for comparison to first-principles calculations if they remain stable.

  16. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  17. Preparation of well-defined dendrimer encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles and their evaluation in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonels, Nathan Charles; Meijboom, Reinout

    2013-11-05

    This study discusses the preparation of various sized dendrimer encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (RuDEN) with the use of the generation 4 (G4), generation 5 (G5), and generation 6 (G6) hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers as templating agents. The size of the nanoparticles ranges from 1.1 to 2.2 nm. These catalysts were fully characterized using UV/vis spectrophotometry, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The RuDEN catalysts were evaluated in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4NP) in the presence of sodium borohydride (BH4(-)) for various concentrations of either. The kinetic data obtained were modeled to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation. The model allows the relation of the apparent rate constant to the total surface area S of the nanoparticle, the kinetic constant k which is related to the rate-determining step, and the adsorption constants K(4NP) and K(BH4) for 4NP and borohydride, respectively. These parameters were calculated for each of the RuDENs, proving the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model to be suitable for the kinetic evaluation of RuDENs in the catalytic reduction of 4NP.

  18. Optimized dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles and enhanced carbon nanotube nanoprobes for amplified electrochemical immunoassay of E. coli in dairy product based on enzymatically induced deposition of polyaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinai; Shen, Jianzhong; Ma, Haile; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Chenyong; Han, En; Yao, Boshui; He, Yunyao

    2016-06-15

    A highly sensitive immunosensor was reported for Escherichia coli assay in dairy product based on electrochemical measurement of polyaniline (PAn) that was catalytically deposited by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labels. Herein, the immunosensor was developed by using poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (PAMAM(Au)) as sensing platform. Importantly, the optimal HAuCl4/PAMAM ratio was investigated to design the efficient PAMAM(Au) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were proven to not only increase the amount of immobilized capture antibody (cAb), but also accelerate the electron transfer process. Moreover, the {dAb-CNT-HRP} nanoprobes were prepared by exploiting the amplification effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for loading detection antibody (dAb) and enormous HRP labels. After a sandwich immunoreaction, the quantitatively captured nanoprobes could catalyze oxidation aniline to produce electroactive PAn for electrochemical measurement. On the basis of signal amplification of the PAMAM(Au)-based immunosensor and the {dAb-CNT-HRP} nanoprobes, the proposed strategy exhibited a linear relationship between the peak current of PAn and the logarithmic value of E. coli concentration ranging from 1.0 × 10(2) to 1.0 × 10(6) cfu mL(-1) with a detection limit of 50 cfu mL(-1) (S/N=3), and the electrochemical detection of E. coli could be achieved in 3h. The electrochemical immunosensor was also used to determine E. coli in dairy product (pure fresh milk, infant milk powder, yogurt in shelf-life and expired yogurt), and the recoveries of standard additions were in the range of 96.8-108.7%. Overall, this method gave a useful protocol for E. coli assay with high sensitivity, acceptable accuracy and satisfying stability, and thus provided a powerful tool to estimate the quality of dairy product.

  19. Structural characterization and catalytic activity of Pt dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles supported over Al2O3 for SCR of NOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, HyunSook; Rao, Komateedi N; Ha, HeonPhil

    2011-07-01

    Pt/Al2O3 and Pt-Mg/Al2O3 nano composites were successfully prepared by dendrimer templated synthesis route. The obtained dendritic nanoparticles were dispersed in alumina support and they were evaluated for SCR of NOx using methane as reductant. Thermal analysis results of uncalcined samples revealed that the oxygen can accelerate the rate of dendrimer shell decomposition. X-ray diffractograms of 500 degrees C calcined samples disclosed the amorphous nature of materials, whereas 1000 degrees C air calcined samples showed enhanced crystallinity as well as diffraction pattern corresponding to Pt and PtO. HRTEM images of Pt40-G4OH dendritic nanoparticles showed uniform particulate distribution with average particle size of 2.4 nm. The STEM results of 0.5 Pt/Al2O3 sample calcined at 500 degrees C exhibited a wide range of particles between 2 and 20 nm. This indicates the huge segregation of platinum metal particles during impregnation and subsequent calcination. Among the synthesized materials 0.5 wt% Pt/Al2O3 sample showed excellent conversion and selectivity for SCR of NOx.

  20. DESIGN AND PHOTOFUNCTIONS OF DENDRIMER-ENCAPSULATED POLY(PHENYLENEETHYNYLENE)S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-lin Jiang; Takafumi Sato; Takuzo Aida

    2001-01-01

    A series of dendrimer-encapsulated poly(phenyleneethynylene)s 4~6 were synthesized. The light-harvesting antenna fimctions of dendrimer frameworks together with the blue-light emitting activities of 4~6 were highlighted.

  1. UV luminescence of dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyeong Seop; Kim, Jun Myung; Sohn, So Hyeong; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Seung Min [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Size-dependent luminescence color is one of the interesting properties of metal nanocrystals, whose sizes are in the dimension of the Fermi wavelength of an electron. Despite the short Fermi wavelength of electrons in gold (-0.7 nm), luminescence of gold nanoclusters has been reported to range from the near-infrared to near-ultraviolet, depending on the number of atoms in the nanoclusters. The photoluminescence of G4-OH (Au) obtained by the excitation of 266 nm showed UV emission in addition to the well-known blue emission. The higher intensity and red-shifted emission of the gold nanoclusters was distinguished from the emission of dendrimers. The UV emission at 352 nm matched the emission energy of Au{sub 4} in the spherical jellium model, rather than the planar Au{sub 8}, which supported the emission of Au{sub 4} formed in G4-OH. Despite the change of [HAuCl{sub 4} ]/[G4-OH], the relative population between Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 8} was similar in G4-OH(Au), which indicated that the closed electronic and geometric structures stabilized the magic number of Au{sub 4}.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(Amidoamine Dendrimers Encapsulatd 198Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ritawidya1,2

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy or internal radiotherapy is one of many methods used for treatment of cancer. This modality requires an agent with radionuclides that emits  or β particle with a proper energy. 198Au (99% β max = 0.96 MeV and t1/2 = 2.69 days is one of radionuclides that has been considered to be effective for the above-mentioned purpose. The purpose of this research was to synthesis and characterize poly(amidoamine (PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles as a new brachytherapy agent. PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles was successfully synthesized by a bottom-up method using sodium borohydride as a reductor. Purification was then performed by a size exclusion chromatography in order to separate large Au nanoparticles that were formed outside the cavity of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers. Prior to the synthesis of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles, the synthetic procedure was first established by using a non-radioactive Au. The PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated Au nanoparticles produced was then characterized by using an UV-Vis spectroscopy, a transmission electron microscopy (TEM, particle size analyzer (PSA, and an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. Characterization results revealed that PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated Au nanoparticles that were prepared from a reaction mixture of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers and Au HAuCl4 with mol ratio of 2.8, was found to be a proper formula. It produced PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated Au nanoparticles with diameter of 1.743 nm, spheris, uniform and drug loading value of 26.34%. This formula was then used in synthesis using radioactive Au, 198Au. Characterization results of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles gave a radiochemical purity of 99.4% and zero charge.

  3. Catalysis in flow microreactors with wall coatings of acidic polymer brushes and dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow microreactors are an invaluable tool to carry out organic reactions owing to their numerous advantages with respect to batch scale synthesis. In particular, supported catalysts enable heterogeneous catalysis to be conducted in an efficient way. In this thesis, the development and

  4. Dendrimer-encapsulated copper as a novel oligonucleotides label for sensitive electrochemical stripping detection of DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huan; Jiang, Xue; Dong, Yang-Jun; Tang, Wan-Xin; Hou, Cong; Zhu, Ning-Ning

    2013-10-15

    This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of a novel electrochemical label for sensitive electrochemical stripping detection of DNA hybridization based on dendrimer-encapsulated copper. The generation 4.5 (G 4.5) carboxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer with a trimesyl core was used as a template for synthesis of Cu²⁺/dendrimer nanocomposites (Cu-DNCs). Ratios of Cu²⁺/dendrimer were optimized in order to obtain stable nanocomposites with maximal copper loading in the interior of a polymeric shell. Cu-DNCs labeled DNA probe was employed for determining a target ssDNA immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) based on a specific hybridization reaction. The hybridization events were monitored by electrochemical detection of Cu anchored on the hybrids after the release in a diluted nitric acid by anodic stripping differential pulse voltammetry (ASDPV). The results showed that only a complementary sequence could form a dsDNA with the Cu-DNCs DNA probe and give an obvious electrochemical signal. The non-complementary sequence exhibited negligible signal change compared with the blank measurement (means: the electrode containing no target DNA incubating in hybridization buffer solution containing Cu-DNCs DNA probe for a certain time). The use of Cu encapsulated-dendrimer as tags and ASDPV for the detection of the released Cu ions could enhance the hybridization signal, and result in the increase of the sensitivity for the target DNA. Under the conditions employed here, the detection limit for measuring the full complementary sequence is down to pM level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metallic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernando

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm, covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  6. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  7. Metallic nanoparticles meet metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, L.; Rossi, K.; Baletto, F.

    2015-11-01

    Metadynamics coupled with classical molecular dynamics has been successfully applied to sample the configuration space of metallic and bimetallic nanoclusters. We implement a new set of collective variables related to the pair distance distribution function of the nanoparticle to achieve an exhaustive isomer sampling. As paradigmatic examples, we apply our methodology to Ag147, Pt147, and their alloy AgshellPtcore at 2:1 and 1:1 chemical compositions. The proposed scheme is able to reproduce the known solid-solid structural transformation pathways, based on the Lipscomb's diamond-square-diamond mechanisms, both in mono and bimetallic nanoparticles. A discussion of the free energy barriers involved in these processes is provided.

  8. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  9. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  10. PREPARATIONS AND APPLICATION OF METAL NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adlim Adlim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Terminology of metal nanoparticles, the uniqueness properties in terms of the surface atom, the quantum dot, and the magnetism are described. The further elaboration was on the synthesis of nanoparticles. Applications of metal nanoparticles in electronic, ceramic medical and catalysis were overviewed. The bibliography includes 81 references with 99% are journal articles.   Keywords: metal nanoparticles

  11. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  12. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Palza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  13. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  14. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadory, Mozhgan

    Improved methods were developed for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles. Laboratory experiments were designed for introducing of nanotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum. An optimal set of conditions for the synthesis of clear yellow colloidal silver was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by borohydride reduction of silver nitrate, a method which produces particles with average size of 12+/-2 nm, determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The plasmon absorbance is at 397 nm and the peak width at half maximum (PWHM) is 70-75 nm. The relationship between aggregation and optical properties was determined along with a method to protect the particles using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). A laboratory experiment was designed in which students synthesize yellow colloidal silver, estimate particle size using visible spectroscopy, and study aggregation effects. The synthesis of the less stable copper nanoparticles is more difficult because copper nanopaticles are easily oxidized. Four methods were used for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including chemical reduction with sodium borohydride, sodium borohydride with potassium iodide, isopropyl alcohol with cetyltrimethylammonium bormide (CTAB) and reducing sugars. The latter method was also the basis for an undergraduate laboratory experiment. For each reaction, the dependence of stability of the copper nanoparticles on reagent concentrations, additives, relative amounts of reactants, and temperature is explored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to characterize the copper nanoparticles. A laboratory experiment to produce copper nanoparticles from household chemicals was developed.

  15. Being two is better than one-catalytic reductions with dendrimer encapsulated copper- and copper-cobalt-subnanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes F; Gschneidtner, Tina; Rasmussen, Ann-Louise; Purdy, Trevor; Hansen, Jon S; Hansen, Thomas H; Husted, Søren; Moth Poulsen, Kasper; Olsson, Eva; Christensen, Jørn B

    2015-06-21

    Copper and copper-cobalt subnanoparticles have been synthesized using 4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone terminated PAMAM-dendrimers as templates. The metal particles were applied in catalytic reduction reactions. While Cu subnanoparticles were only capable of reducing conjugated double bonds, enhancing the Cu particles with Co led to a surprising increase in catalytic activity, reducing also isolated carbon double and triple bonds.

  16. Peptides and metallic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogan, M.J.; Olmedo, I.; Hosta, L.; Guerrero, A.R.; Cruz Ricondo, L.J.; Albericio, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we describe the contribution of peptides to the biomedical applications of metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss strategies for the preparation of peptide-nanoparticle conjugates and the synthesis of the peptides and metallic nanoparticles. An overview of the techniques used for th

  17. Dendrimer-encapsulated naphthalocyanine as a single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform for near-infrared fluorescence imaging and combinatorial anticancer phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taratula, Olena; Schumann, Canan; Duong, Tony; Taylor, Karmin L.; Taratula, Oleh

    2015-02-01

    Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of concurrent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and phototherapies are strongly desired for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, the integration of separate imaging and therapeutic components into nanocarriers results in complex theranostic systems with limited translational potential. A single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform, therefore, was developed for concurrent NIR fluorescence imaging and combinatorial phototherapy with dual photodynamic (PDT) and photothermal (PTT) therapeutic mechanisms. The transformation of a substituted silicon naphthalocyanine (SiNc) into a biocompatible nanoplatform (SiNc-NP) was achieved by SiNc encapsulation into the hydrophobic interior of a generation 5 polypropylenimine dendrimer following surface modification with polyethylene glycol. Encapsulation provides aqueous solubility to SiNc and preserves its NIR fluorescence, PDT and PTT properties. Moreover, an impressive photostability in the dendrimer-encapsulated SiNc has been detected. Under NIR irradiation (785 nm, 1.3 W cm-2), SiNc-NP manifested robust heat generation capability (ΔT = 40 °C) and efficiently produced reactive oxygen species essential for PTT and PDT, respectively, without releasing SiNc from the nanopaltform. By varying the laser power density from 0.3 W cm-2 to 1.3 W cm-2 the therapeutic mechanism of SiNc-NP could be switched from PDT to combinatorial PDT-PTT treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that phototherapy mediated by SiNc can efficiently destroy chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer cells. Remarkably, solid tumors treated with a single dose of SiNc-NP combined with NIR irradiation were completely eradicated without cancer recurrence. Finally, the efficiency of SiNc-NP as an NIR imaging agent was confirmed by recording the strong fluorescence signal in the tumor, which was not photobleached during the phototherapeutic procedure.Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of

  18. Metal nanoparticle inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Ahn, Bok Yeop; Duoss, Eric B.

    2011-04-12

    Stabilized silver particles comprise particles comprising silver, a short-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles, and a long-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles. The short-chain capping agent is a first anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at most 10,000, and the long-chain capping agent is a second anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at least 25,000. The stabilized silver particles have a solid loading of metallic silver of at least 50 wt %.

  19. Introduction to metal-nanoparticle plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Based on a popular article in Laser and Photonics Reviews, this book provides an explanation and overview of the techniques used to model, make, and measure metal nanoparticles, detailing results obtained and what they mean. It covers the properties of coupled metal nanoparticles, the nonlinear optical response of metal nanoparticles, and the phenomena that arise when light-emitting materials are coupled to metal nanoparticles. It also provides an overview of key potential applications and offers explanations of computational and experimental techniques giving readers a solid grounding

  20. Noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V

    2012-01-01

    .... In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes...

  1. Enhanced Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide electrocatalysis onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes-decorated gold nanoparticles and their use in hybrid biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino Neto, S.; Almeida, T. S.; Belnap, D. M.; Minteer, S. D.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of Au nanoparticles synthetized by different protocols and supported on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes containing different functional groups, focusing on their electrochemical performance towards NADH oxidation, ethanol bioelectrocatalysis, and ethanol/O2 biofuel cell. We describe four different synthesis protocols: microwave-assisted heating, water-in-oil, and dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles using acid or thiol species in the extraction step. The physical characterization of the metallic nanoparticles indicated that both the synthetic protocol as well as the type of functional groups on the carbon nanotubes affect the final particle size (varying from 13.4 to 2.4 nm) and their distribution onto the carbon surface. Moreover, the electrochemical data indicated that these two factors also influence their performance toward the electrooxidation of NADH. We observed that the samples containing Au nanoparticles with smaller size leads to higher catalytic currents and also shifts the oxidation potential of the targeted reaction, which varied from 0.13 to -0.06 V vs Ag/AgCl. Ethanol/O2 biofuel cell tests indicated that the hybrid bioelectrodes containing smaller and better distributed Au nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes generates higher power output, confirming that the electrochemical regeneration of NAD+ plays an important role in the overall biofuel cell performance.

  2. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Mendoza, Daniel; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  3. Metal-metal bonding using silver/copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Morita, T.

    2016-08-01

    A method for producing nanoparticles composed of silver and copper and a metal-metal bonding technique using the silver/copper nanoparticles are proposed. The method consists of three steps. First, copper oxide nanoparticles are produced by mixing Cu(NO3)2 aqueous solution and NaOH aqueous solution. Second, copper metal nanoparticles are fabricated by reducing the copper oxide nanoparticles with hydrazine in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). Third, silver/copper nanoparticles are synthesized by reducing Ag+ ions with hydrazine in the presence of the copper metal nanoparticles. Initial concentrations in the final silver/copper particle colloid, composed of 0.0075 M Cu2+, 0.0025 M Ag+, 1.0 g/L PVP, and 0.6 M hydrazine, produced silver/copper nanoparticles with an average size of 49 nm and a crystal size of 16.8 nm. Discs of copper metal were successfully bonded by the silver/copper nanoparticles under annealing at 400 °C and pressurizing at 1.2 MPa for 5 min in not only hydrogen gas but also nitrogen gas. The shear force required to separate the bonded discs was 22.3 MPa for the hydrogen gas annealing and 14.9 MPa for the nitrogen gas annealing (namely, 66.8 % of that for hydrogen gas annealing).

  4. Physiologically important metal nanoparticles and their toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Jayeeta; Ghosh, Sourav; Datta, Poulami; Gomes, Aparna; Gomes, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been setting benchmarks for the last two decades, but the origins of this technology reach back to ancient history. Today, nanoparticles of both metallic and non-metallic origin are under research and development for applications in various fields of biology/therapeutics. Physiologically important metals are of concern because they are compatible with the human system in terms of absorption, assimilation, excretion, and side effects. There are several physiologically inorganic metals that are present in the human body with a wide range of biological activities. Some of these metals are magnesium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum. These metals are synthesized in the form of nanoparticles by different physical and chemical methods. Physiologically important nanoparticles are currently under investigation for their bio-medical applications as well as for therapeutics. Along with the applicative aspects of nanoparticles, another domain that is of great concern is the risk assessment of these nanoparticles to avoid unnecessary hazards. It has been seen that these nanoparticles have been shown to possess toxicity in biological systems. Conventional physical and chemical methods of metal nanoparticle synthesis may be one possible reason for nanoparticle toxicity that can be overcome by synthesis of nanoparticles from biological sources. This review is an attempt to establish metal nanoparticles of physiological importance to be the best candidates for future nanotechnological tools and medicines, owing to the acceptability and safety in the human body. This can only be successful if these particles are synthesized with a better biocompatibility and low or no toxicity.

  5. Enhanced potentiometry by metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyhouzer, T; Valdinger, I; Mandler, D

    2013-09-03

    Measuring the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) requires an interface that is not selective toward specific species but exchanges electrons with all redox couples in the solution. Sluggish electron transfer (ET) kinetics with the species will not reflect the "true" Eh of the solution. Here, we present a novel approach by which adsorbed metal nanoparticles (NPs) are used for enhancing ET exchange rates between redox species and electrode surface and therefore affect significantly the measurement of the open circuit potential (OCP) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The OCP and CV of various organic and inorganic species such as l-dopa, dopac, iron(II), and iodide are measured by bare stainless steel and by stainless steel modified by either Pt or Au NPs. We study the effect of the surface coverage of the stainless steel surface by NPs on the electrochemical response. Moreover, the stainless steel electrode was modified simultaneously by Au and Pt nanoparticles. This improved concurrently the stainless steel response (CV and potentiometry) toward two different species; l-dopa, which shows fast electron transfer on Pt, and catechol, which exhibits fast electron transfer on Au. We believe that this approach could be a first step toward developing a superior electrode for measuring the "true" Eh of complex aquatic systems.

  6. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the 'jammed' nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems 'chemoelectronic'. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also 'green', in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  7. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C.; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the ‘jammed’ nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems ‘chemoelectronic’. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also ‘green’, in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  8. Conduction across Silicon Nanoparticle-Metal Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupca, Matthew; Nayfeh, Munir; Smith, Adam

    2010-03-01

    We deposited a thin film of 1nm diameter silicon nanoparticles between two metallic films. The nanoparticles are created by an electrochemical process and are collected into solution. The particles are then deposited by evaporating the solution through electrospray or spin coating processes. The nanoparticle films of closely packed particles are observed to strongly absorb UV photons and fluoresce in the blue -- a characteristic of individual nanoparticles. We examine the photoconductivity of the films under UV illumination using IV spectroscopy. Our measurements indicate that the photoconductivy exhibits asymmetry and rectification in current flow for two metals which have different work functions. These results suggest that these films of nanoparticles, while retaining their nanoparticle characteristic luminescence, show the Shottky barrier associated with bulk behavior.

  9. Antitumor Activities of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pilar Vinardell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have received much attention recently due to their use in cancer therapy. Studies have shown that different metal oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. In some cases, such anticancer activity has been demonstrated to hold for the nanoparticle alone or in combination with different therapies, such as photocatalytic therapy or some anticancer drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have this activity alone or when loaded with an anticancer drug, such as doxorubicin. Other nanoparticles that show cytotoxic effects on cancer cells include cobalt oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide. The antitumor mechanism could work through the generation of reactive oxygen species or apoptosis and necrosis, among other possibilities. Here, we review the most significant antitumor results obtained with different metal oxide nanoparticles.

  10. Biosynthesis of Metal Nanoparticles: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanostructured materials, especially metallic nanoparticles, has accrued utmost interest over the past decade owing to their unique properties that make them applicable in different fields of science and technology. The limitation to the use of these nanoparticles is the paucity of an effective method of synthesis that will produce homogeneous size and shape nanoparticles as well as particles with limited or no toxicity to the human health and the environment. The biological method of nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively simple, cheap, and environmentally friendly method than the conventional chemical method of synthesis and thus gains an upper hand. The biomineralization of nanoparticles in protein cages is one of such biological approaches used in the generation of nanoparticles. This method of synthesis apart from being a safer method in the production of nanoparticles is also able to control particle morphology.

  11. Radiative heat transfer between metallic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Laroche, Marine; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In this letter, we study the radiative heat transfer between two nanoparticles in the near field and in the far field. We find that the heat transfer is dominated by the electric dipole-dipole interaction for dielectric particles and by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction for metallic nanoparticles. We introduce polarizabilities formulas valid for arbitrary values of the skin depth. While the heat transfer mechanism is different for metallic and dielectric nanoparti...

  12. Radiative heat transfer between metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, we study the radiative heat transfer between two nanoparticles in the near field and in the far field. We find that the heat transfer is dominated by the electric dipole-dipole interaction for dielectric particles and by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction for metallic nanoparticles. We introduce polarizabilities formulas valid for arbitrary values of the skin depth. While the heat transfer mechanism is different for metallic and dielectric nanoparticles, we show that the distance dependence is the same. However, the dependence of the heat flux on the particle radius is different.

  13. Biomolecule-coated metal nanoparticles on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Stephen L; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-07

    Immobilizations of nanoparticles and biomolecules on biocompatible substrates such as titanium are two promising approaches to bringing new functionalities to Ti-based biomaterials. Herein, we used a variety of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to study and better understand metal-thiolate interactions in biofunctionalized metal nanoparticle systems supported on Ti substrates. Using a facile one-step procedure, a series of Au nanoparticle samples with varied biomolecule coatings ((2-mercatopropionyl)glycine (MPG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and biomolecule concentrations are prepared. Ag and Pd systems are also studied to observe change with varying metal composition. The structure and properties of these biomolecule-coated nanoparticles are investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element-specific X-ray techniques, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (Au L(3)-edge), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (Au L(3), Ag L(3), Pd L(3), and S K-edge), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Au 4f, Ag 3d, Pd 3d, and S 2p core level). It was found that, by comparison of SEM and X-ray spectroscopy results, the coating of metal nanoparticles with varying model biomolecule systems can have a significant effect on both surface coverage and organization. This work offers a facile chemical method for bio- and nanofunctionalization of Ti substrates as well as provides a physical picture of the structure and bonding of biocoated metal nanoparticles, which may lead to useful applications in orthopedics and biomedicine.

  14. Solution synthesis of metal silicide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnaney, Joshua M; Schaak, Raymond E

    2015-02-01

    Transition-metal silicides are part of an important family of intermetallic compounds, but the high-temperature reactions that are generally required to synthesize them preclude the formation of colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we show that palladium, copper, and nickel nanoparticles react with monophenylsilane in trioctylamine and squalane at 375 °C to form colloidal Pd(2)Si, Cu(3)Si, and Ni(2)Si nanoparticles, respectively. These metal silicide nanoparticles were screened as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction, and Pd(2)Si and Ni(2)Si were identified as active catalysts that require overpotentials of -192 and -243 mV, respectively, to produce cathodic current densities of -10 mA cm(-2).

  15. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticle synthesis from metal organic frameworks (MOFs): finding the border of metal and metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raja; Pachfule, Pradip; Banerjee, Rahul; Poddar, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co3O4, ZnO, Mn2O3, MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2, whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2. Another point of interest is the fact that we have found a unique relationship between the nanoparticle size and the distance between the secondary building units inside the MOF precursors. Interestingly, the crystallinity of the carbon matrix was also found to be greatly influenced by the environment (N2 and air) during thermolysis. Moreover, these nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix showed promising H2 and CO2 adsorption properties depending on the environment used for the thermolysis of MOFs.Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co3O4, ZnO, Mn2O3, MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2, whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2. Another point of interest is the fact that we have

  16. Extended Dislocations in Plastically Deformed Metallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the sawtooth nature of compressive loading of metallic nanoparticles is observed using a molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic structure evolution confirmed that extended dislocations are the main defects split into two asynchronous partial disloca‐ tions, along with stored and released fault energy. This is considered the essence of sawtooth loading. The size of the nanoparticles relative to the equilibrium width of the extended dislocation is discussed to explain the simulation results.

  17. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios) that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory. PMID:22438731

  18. Alloy metal nanoparticles for multicolor cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Pedro V.; Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is a multigenic complex disease where multiple gene loci contribute to the phenotype. The ability to simultaneously monitor differential expression originating from each locus results in a more accurate indicator of degree of cancerous activity than either locus alone. Metal nanoparticles have been thoroughly used as labels for in vitro identification and quantification of target sequences. We have synthesized nanoparticles with assorted noble metal compositions in an alloy format and functionalized them with thiol-modified ssDNA (nanoprobes). These nanoprobes were then used for the simultaneous specific identification of several mRNA targets involved in cancer development - one pot multicolor detection of cancer expression. The different metal composition in the alloy yield different "colors" that can be used as tags for identification of a given target. Following a non-cross-linking hybridization procedure previously developed in our group for gold nanoprobes, these multicolor nanoprobes were used for the molecular recognition of several different targets including differently spliced variants of relevant genes (e.g. gene products involved in chronic myeloid leukemia BCR, ABL, BCR-ABL fusion product). Based on the spectral signature of mixtures, before and after induced aggregation of metal nanoparticles, the correct identification could be made. Further application to differentially quantify expression of each locus in relation to another will be presented. The differences in nanoparticle stability and labeling efficiency for each metal combination composing the colloids, as well as detection capability for each nanoprobe will be discussed. Additional studies will be conducted towards allele specific expression studies.

  19. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticle synthesis from metal organic frameworks (MOFs): finding the border of metal and metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raja; Pachfule, Pradip; Banerjee, Rahul; Poddar, Pankaj

    2012-01-21

    Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co(3)O(4), ZnO, Mn(2)O(3), MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N(2), whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N(2). Another point of interest is the fact that we have found a unique relationship between the nanoparticle size and the distance between the secondary building units inside the MOF precursors. Interestingly, the crystallinity of the carbon matrix was also found to be greatly influenced by the environment (N(2) and air) during thermolysis. Moreover, these nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix showed promising H(2) and CO(2) adsorption properties depending on the environment used for the thermolysis of MOFs.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and catalysis of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Derrick M.

    The goal of the dissertation work is the understanding of the physical and chemical properties of materials in the nanoscale regime. As discussed in this dissertation, the goal is accomplished by specifically focusing on the investigation of the synthesis and characterization of metal nanoparticles and supported catalysts. The findings have provided us with new and important insights into the physical and chemical properties of metal nanoparticles and supported catalysts. Several new routes allowed us to synthesize copper, gold-platinum, core-shell nanoparticles with monodispersed sizes, controlled shapes and tunable surface properties. For example, we have demonstrated the ability to control the formation of copper nanorods with high monodispersity and ordering by controlled thermal processing. Another of our studies has focused on the exploitation of the synergistic properties of multimetallic nanoparticles by monitoring the CO adsorption on bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticles using infrared spectroscopy. The size correlation between using different microscopic techniques such as TEM and AFM has been established for the size determination of nanoparticles. This correlation is important in understanding their physical or chemical properties of nanoparticles on different substrate surfaces. The quantitative correlation demonstrates the ability of AFM in determining sizes of nanoparticles, which has implications to the understanding of the relative radius of curvature of the tip vs. the particle sizes as well as the surface properties of the particles. The preliminary results using computational modeling to elucidate some of the surface binding and energy properties of nanoparticles provides some guidelines to experimental measurements, and also helps in the explanation of the complex experimental data. Overall, these findings and results have provided new insights into the fundamental factors governing the physical and chemical properties in the synthesis and

  1. Metal nanoparticles in DBS card materials modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelkin, A.; Frolov, G.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years the method of collecting and storing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) on special cellulose membrane (paper) has gained wide popularity. But possible damage of biosamples caused by microorganisms in case of their incomplete drying is a disadvantage of the method. It can be overcome by treating sample-collection membranes with colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles, having antibacterial effect. The team studied antibacterial properties of nonwoven material samples with various coatings (alcohol sols of copper, aluminium, iron, titanium, silver and vanadium nanoparticles). Colloidal solutions of nanoparticles were obtained by means of electroerosion method with further low-temperature plasma condensation. Antibacterial activity of fiberglass and cellulose membrane samples with nanoparticle coatings was studied using B. cereus and plaque bacteria cultures. It was revealed that nanostructured coatings can suppress bacterial activity; in addition they can diffuse from the membrane surface into medium which leads to widening the areas of inhibiting testing cultures’ growth. Thus, membrane materials treatment with alcohol-sols of metal nanoparticles can be seen as promising for conferring antibacterial properties to DBS carriers.

  2. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor); Chen, Gang (Inventor); Poudel, Bed (Inventor); Kumar, Shankar (Inventor); Wang, Wenzhong (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  3. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles: cellulose at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J; Geus, John W; Jenneskens, Leonardus W

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a homogeneous impregnation of the aqueous base metal salt solutions, 2) it acts as an efficacious (carbonaceous) support material for the uniformly dispersed base metal salts, their oxides and the metal nanoparticles derived therefrom, and 3) it contributes as a reducing agent via carbothermal reduction for the conversion of the metal oxide nanoparticles into the metal nanoparticles. Finally, the base metal nanoparticles capable of forming metastable metal carbides catalytically convert the carbonaceous support into a mesoporous graphitic carbon material.

  4. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, João; Doria, Gonçalo; Baptista, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings. PMID:22007307

  5. Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Photoresists for EUV Patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    © 2014SPST. Previous studies of methacrylate based nanoparticle have demonstrated the excellent pattern forming capability of these hybrid materials when used as photoresists under 13.5 nm EUV exposure. HfO2 and ZrO2 methacrylate resists have achieved high resolution (∼22 nm) at a very high EUV sensitivity (4.2 mJ/cm2). Further investigations into the patterning process suggests a ligand displacement mechanism, wherein, any combination of a metal oxide with the correct ligand could generate patterns in the presence of the suitable photoactive compound. The current investigation extends this study by developing new nanoparticle compositions with transdimethylacrylic acid and o-toluic acid ligands. This study describes their synthesis and patterning performance under 248 nm KrF laser (DUV) and also under 13.5 nm EUV exposures (dimethylacrylate nanoparticles) for the new resist compositions.

  6. Biosurfactant Mediated Biosynthesis of Selected Metallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna A. Płaza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Developing a reliable experimental protocol for the synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the challenging topics in current nanotechnology particularly in the context of the recent drive to promote green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become essential in this field. Consequently, recent studies on the use of microorganisms in the synthesis of selected nanoparticles are gaining increased interest as they represent an exciting area of research with considerable development potential. Microorganisms are known to be capable of synthesizing inorganic molecules that are deposited either intra- or extracellularly. This review presents a brief overview of current research on the use of biosurfactants in the biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles and their potential importance.

  7. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Conde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings.

  8. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondinone, Adam J.; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J.; Yeary, Lucas W.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable for sustaining said metal-reducing microbes, an effective concentration of one or more surfactants, a reducible metal oxide component containing one or more reducible metal species, and one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said metal-reducing microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said metal-reducing microbes; and (ii) isolating said metal oxide nanoparticles, which contain a reduced form of said reducible metal oxide component. The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method.

  9. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Mai, Zhijie; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength.

  10. Surface effects in metallic iron nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Linderoth, Søren

    1994-01-01

    Nanoparticles of metallic iron on carbon supports have been studied in situ by use of Mossbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic anisotropy energy constant increases with decreasing particle size, presumably because of the influence of surface anisotropy. Chemisorption of oxygen results in formation...... of a surface layer with magnetic hyperfine fields similar to those of thicker passivation layers, and with a ferromagnetic coupling to the spins in the core of the particles. In contrast, thicker passivation layers have a noncollinear spin structure....

  11. Are Some Neurons Hypersensitive to Metallic Nanoparticles?

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2010-01-01

    Engineered metallic nanomaterial particles (MENAP) represent a significant breakthrough in developing new products for use by consumers and industry. Skin application (e.g., via creams and sprays containing nanoparticles) may provide a key route of potential intake of MENAP and can lead to retrograde transport from nerve endings in the skin to the somatosensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). This paper uses a novel theoretical model (stochastic threshold microdose [STM] model) to chara...

  12. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jatish; Thomas, K George; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2016-10-18

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided.

  13. Exploring the potential of metallic nanoparticles within synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmundson, Matthew C; Capeness, Michael; Horsfall, Louise

    2014-12-25

    The fields of metallic nanoparticle study and synthetic biology have a great deal to offer one another. Metallic nanoparticles as a class of material have many useful properties. Their small size allows for more points of contact than would be the case with a similar bulk compound, making nanoparticles excellent candidates for catalysts or for when increased levels of binding are required. Some nanoparticles have unique optical qualities, making them well suited as sensors, while others display para-magnetism, useful in medical imaging, especially by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many of these metallic nanoparticles could be used in creating tools for synthetic biology, and conversely the use of synthetic biology could itself be utilised to create nanoparticle tools. Examples given here include the potential use of quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles as sensing mechanisms in synthetic biology, and the use of synthetic biology to create nanoparticle-sensing devices based on current methods of detecting metals and metalloids such as arsenate. There are a number of organisms which are able to produce a range of metallic nanoparticles naturally, such as species of the fungus Phoma which produces anti-microbial silver nanoparticles. The biological synthesis of nanoparticles may have many advantages over their more traditional industrial synthesis. If the proteins involved in biological nanoparticle synthesis can be put into a suitable bacterial chassis then they might be manipulated and the pathways engineered in order to produce more valuable nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Silicon nanocrystal-noble metal hybrid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, H.; Fujii, M.; Imakita, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report a novel and facile self-limiting synthesis route of silicon nanocrystal (Si NC)-based colloidally stable semiconductor-metal (gold, silver and platinum) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). For the formation of hybrid NPs, we employ ligand-free colloidal Si NCs with heavily boron (B) and phosphorus (P) doped shells. By simply mixing B and P codoped colloidal Si NCs with metal salts, hybrid NPs consisting of metal cores and Si NC shells are spontaneously formed. We demonstrate the synthesis of highly uniform and size controllable hybrid NPs. It is shown that codoped Si NCs act as a reducing agent for metal salts and also as a protecting layer to stop metal NP growth. The process is thus self-limiting. The development of a variety of Si NC-based hybrid NPs is a promising first step for the design of biocompatible multifunctional NPs with broad material choices for biosensing, bioimaging and solar energy conversion.We report a novel and facile self-limiting synthesis route of silicon nanocrystal (Si NC)-based colloidally stable semiconductor-metal (gold, silver and platinum) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). For the formation of hybrid NPs, we employ ligand-free colloidal Si NCs with heavily boron (B) and phosphorus (P) doped shells. By simply mixing B and P codoped colloidal Si NCs with metal salts, hybrid NPs consisting of metal cores and Si NC shells are spontaneously formed. We demonstrate the synthesis of highly uniform and size controllable hybrid NPs. It is shown that codoped Si NCs act as a reducing agent for metal salts and also as a protecting layer to stop metal NP growth. The process is thus self-limiting. The development of a variety of Si NC-based hybrid NPs is a promising first step for the design of biocompatible multifunctional NPs with broad material choices for biosensing, bioimaging and solar energy conversion. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional TEM images and extinction spectra of Si-metal hybrid NPs are shown in Fig. S1

  15. Surface energy of metal alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takrori, Fahed M.; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of surface energy of alloy nanoparticles experimentally is still a challenge therefore theoretical work is necessary to estimate its value. In continuation of our previous work on the calculation of the surface energy of pure metallic nanoparticles we have extended our work to calculate the surface energy of different alloy systems, namely, Co-Ni, Au-Cu, Cu-Al, Cu-Mg and Mo-Cs binary alloys. It is shown that the surface energy of metallic binary alloy decreases with decreasing particle size approaching relatively small values at small sizes. When both metals in the alloy obey the Hume-Rothery rules, the difference in the surface energy is small at the macroscopic as well as in the nano-scale. However when the alloy deviated from these rules the difference in surface energy is large in the macroscopic and in the nano scales. Interestingly when solid solution formation is not possible at the macroscopic scale according to the Hume-Rothery rules, it is shown it may form at the nano-scale. To our knowledge these findings here are presented for the first time and is challenging from fundamental as well as technological point of views.

  16. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Ziwen; Le, Ngoc D. B.; Gupta, Akash; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed.

  17. Applications of biosynthesized metallic nanoparticles - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröfel, Adam; Kratošová, Gabriela; Šafařík, Ivo; Šafaříková, Mirka; Raška, Ivan; Shor, Leslie M

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive review of the applications of biosynthesized metallic nanoparticles (NPs). The biosynthesis of metallic NPs is the subject of a number of recent reviews, which focus on the various "bottom-up" biofabrication methods and characterization of the final products. Numerous applications exploit the advantages of biosynthesis over chemical or physical NP syntheses, including lower capital and operating expenses, reduced environmental impacts, and superior biocompatibility and stability of the NP products. The key applications reviewed here include biomedical applications, especially antimicrobial applications, but also imaging applications, catalytic applications such as reduction of environmental contaminants, and electrochemical applications including sensing. The discussion of each application is augmented with a critical review of the potential for continued development. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomedical applications of green synthesized Nobel metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zia Ul Haq; Khan, Amjad; Chen, Yongmei; Shah, Noor S; Muhammad, Nawshad; Khan, Arif Ullah; Tahir, Kamran; Khan, Faheem Ullah; Murtaza, Behzad; Hassan, Sadaf Ul; Qaisrani, Saeed Ahmad; Wan, Pingyu

    2017-08-01

    Synthesis of Nobel metal nanoparticles, play a key role in the field of medicine. Plants contain a substantial number of organic constituents, like phenolic compounds and various types of glycosides that help in synthesis of metal nanoparticles. Synthesis of metal nanoparticles by green method is one of the best and environment friendly methods. The major significance of the green synthesis is lack of toxic by-products produced during metal nanoparticle synthesis. The nanoparticles, synthesized by green method show various significant biological activities. Most of the research articles report the synthesized nanoparticles to be active against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Some of these bacteria include Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The synthesized nanoparticles also show significant antifungal activity against Trichophyton simii, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton rubrum as well as different types of cancer cells such as breast cancer cell line. They also exhibit significant antioxidant activity. The activities of these Nobel metal nano-particles mainly depend on the size and shape. The particles of small size with large surface area show good activity in the field of medicine. The synthesized nanoparticles are also active against leishmanial diseases. This research article explores in detail the green synthesis of the nanoparticles and their uses thereof. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Strategic role of selected noble metal nanoparticles in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Birla, Sonal; Yadav, Alka; Santos, Carolina Alves Dos

    2016-09-01

    Noble metals and their compounds have been used as therapeutic agents from the ancient time in medicine for the treatment of various infections. Recently, much progress has been made in the field of nanobiotechnology towards the development of different kinds of nanomaterials with a wide range of applications. Among the metal nanoparticles, noble metal nanoparticles have demonstrated potential biomedical applications. Due to the small size, nanoparticles can easily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. Noble metal nanoparticles inspired the researchers due to their remarkable role in detection and treatment of dreadful diseases. In this review, we have attempted to focus on the biomedical applications of noble metal nanoparticles particularly, silver, gold, and platinum in diagnosis and treatment of dreaded diseases such as cancer, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), and Parkinson disease. In addition, the role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) such as novel antimicrobials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) such as efficient drug carrier, uses of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) in bone allograft, dentistry, etc. have been critically reviewed. Moreover, the toxicity due to the use of metal nanoparticles and some unsolved challenges in the field have been discussed with their possible solutions.

  20. Formation and characterization of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaspell, Garry

    This dissertation contains two parts. The first part is focused on Laser Vaporization Controlled Condensation (LVCC). Silver nanoparticles of controlled size were synthesized by this method in order to produce a Surfaced Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) active material. We have investigated the effects of particle size on SERS enhancement and how the addition of halides can further increase the limits of detection. We have also explored using LVCC to synthesize cobalt oxide nanoparticles. This is significant since a simple chemical route doesn't currently exist. Finally, we have reported the synthesis of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate by this method using cobalt metal, oxygen and nitrogen as starting materials. The second part of this dissertation focuses on synthesizing transition metal doped titanium dioxide and zinc oxide by various novel sol-gel techniques for applications in spintronics. Spintronics is based on the concept of carrying information due to the relative spins of electrons. Utilizing spin up and spin down allows twice as much information to be carried on the flow of the electrons. One of the key requirements for a spintronic material is that it must exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM). Thus, we synthesized 10% cobalt and iron doped titanium dioxide by a novel synthesis which displays RTFM. We have also explored synthesizing 5% cobalt doped zinc oxide by a room temperature process which also displays RTFM. Finally, RTFM 5% cobalt and iron doped zinc oxide were synthesized by a novel process involving microwave irradiation.

  1. Biosynthesis and microscopic study of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quester, Katrin; Avalos-Borja, M; Castro-Longoria, E

    2013-01-01

    Nanobiotechnology, bionanotechnology, and nanobiology are terms that have emerged in reference to the combination of nanotechnology and biology. Through the convergence of these disciplines, the production of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) using biological material as reducing agents is rapidly progressing. In the near future, the application of clean, non-toxic, and eco-friendly nanostructured material will be possible in industry and/or biomedicine. Currently, there is a wide range of organisms that have been reported to be useful in producing NPs. However, the development of finer protocols and the applicability of biosynthesized nanostructures are presently under study. Silver and gold are among the most studied metals due to their potential use in medical treatment. In fact, silver NPs have been evaluated as antimicrobial agents, having been successfully used against several types of fungi and bacteria. However, the use of such material in our daily life must be carefully evaluated. This article summarizes some of the most significant results using organisms to produce metallic NPs as well as the microscopic analyses used to characterize the nanostructured material obtained, providing a valuable database for future research.

  2. Polymer-supported metals and metal oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Sudipta [Thapar University, Department of Biotechnology and Environmental Sciences (India); Guibal, E. [Ecole des Mines d' Ales, Laboratoire Genie de l' Environnement Industriel, BPCI Group (France); Quignard, F. [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier-UMR 5253-CNRS-UMII-ENSCM-UMI, Materiaux Avances pour la Catalyse et la Sante (France); SenGupta, A. K., E-mail: arup.sengupta@lehigh.edu [Lehigh University, Environmental Engineering Program (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles exhibit unique properties in regard to sorption behaviors, magnetic activity, chemical reduction, ligand sequestration among others. To this end, attempts are being continuously made to take advantage of them in multitude of applications including separation, catalysis, environmental remediation, sensing, biomedical applications and others. However, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles lack chemical stability and mechanical strength. They exhibit extremely high pressure drop or head loss in fixed-bed column operation and are not suitable for any flow-through systems. Also, nanoparticles tend to aggregate; this phenomenon reduces their high surface area to volume ratio and subsequently reduces effectiveness. By appropriately dispersing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles into synthetic and naturally occurring polymers, many of the shortcomings can be overcome without compromising the parent properties of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the appropriate choice of the polymer host with specific functional groups may even lead to the enhancement of the properties of nanoparticles. The synthesis of hybrid materials involves two broad pathways: dispersing the nanoparticles (i) within pre-formed or commercially available polymers; and (ii) during the polymerization process. This review presents a broad coverage of nanoparticles and polymeric/biopolymeric host materials and the resulting properties of the hybrid composites. In addition, the review discusses the role of the Donnan membrane effect exerted by the host functionalized polymer in harnessing the desirable properties of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for intended applications.

  3. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J. C.; Gao, N.; Liu, C.; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates. PMID:26679353

  4. Interference between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A. N.; Aude Garcia, C.; Candéias, S.; Casanova, A.; Catty, P.; Charbonnier, P.; Chevallet, M.; Collin-Faure, V.; Cuillel, M.; Douki, T.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Lelong, C.; Luche, S.; Mintz, E.; Moulis, J. M.; Nivière, V.; Ollagnier de Choudens, S.; Rabilloud, T.; Ravanat, J. L.; Sauvaigo, S.; Carrière, M.; Michaud-Soret, I.

    2011-07-01

    The TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are now produced abundantly and widely used in a variety of consumer products. Due to the important increase in the production of TiO2-NPs, potential widespread exposure of humans and environment may occur during both the manufacturing process and final use. Therefore, the potential toxicity of TiO2-NPs on human health and environment has attracted particular attention. Unfortunately, the results of the large number of studies on the toxicity of TiO2-NPs differ significantly, mainly due to an incomplete characterization of the used nanomaterials in terms of size, shape and crystalline structure and to their unknown state of agglomeration/aggregation. The purpose of our project entitled NanoBioMet is to investigate if interferences between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis could be observed and to study the toxicity mechanisms of TiO2-NPs with well-characterized physicochemical parameters, using proteomic and molecular approaches. A perturbation of metal homeostasis will be evaluated upon TiO2-NPs exposure which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, oxidative stress consequences such as DNA damage and lipid peroxidation will be studied. The toxicity of TiO2-NPs of different sizes and crystalline structures will be evaluated both in prokaryotic (E. coli) and eukaryotic cells (A549 human pneumocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes). First results of the project will be presented concerning the dispersion of TiO2-NPs in bacterial medium, proteomic studies on total extracts of macrophages and genotoxicity on pneumocytes.

  5. Interference between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, A N; Catty, P; Charbonnier, P; Cuillel, M; Mintz, E; Moulis, J M; Niviere, V; Choudens, S Ollagnier de [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Metaux UMR 5249 CEA-CNRS-UJF, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Garcia, C Aude; Candeias, S; Chevallet, M; Collin-Faure, V; Lelong, C; Luche, S; Rabilloud, T [Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biophysique des Systemes Integres UMR 5092 CNRS-CEA-UJF, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Casanova, A; Herlin-Boime, N [Laboratoire Edifices Nanometriques URA 2453 CEA-CNRS-IRAMIS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Douki, T; Ravanat, J L; Sauvaigo, S, E-mail: isabelle.michaud-soret@cea.fr [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques UMR E3 CEA-UJF, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-07-06

    The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) are now produced abundantly and widely used in a variety of consumer products. Due to the important increase in the production of TiO{sub 2}-NPs, potential widespread exposure of humans and environment may occur during both the manufacturing process and final use. Therefore, the potential toxicity of TiO{sub 2}-NPs on human health and environment has attracted particular attention. Unfortunately, the results of the large number of studies on the toxicity of TiO{sub 2}-NPs differ significantly, mainly due to an incomplete characterization of the used nanomaterials in terms of size, shape and crystalline structure and to their unknown state of agglomeration/aggregation. The purpose of our project entitled NanoBioMet is to investigate if interferences between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis could be observed and to study the toxicity mechanisms of TiO{sub 2}-NPs with well-characterized physicochemical parameters, using proteomic and molecular approaches. A perturbation of metal homeostasis will be evaluated upon TiO{sub 2}-NPs exposure which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, oxidative stress consequences such as DNA damage and lipid peroxidation will be studied. The toxicity of TiO{sub 2}-NPs of different sizes and crystalline structures will be evaluated both in prokaryotic (E. coli) and eukaryotic cells (A549 human pneumocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes). First results of the project will be presented concerning the dispersion of TiO{sub 2}-NPs in bacterial medium, proteomic studies on total extracts of macrophages and genotoxicity on pneumocytes.

  6. Synthetic Approach to Controlled Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0104 Synthetic Approach to Controlled Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles . So-Jung Park Ewha University-Industry Collaboration...Metal Nanoparticles . 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-4117 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) So-Jung Park 5d...project is to develop synthetic methods to form well-defined colloidal assemblies of metal nanoparticles and to understand their unique optical

  7. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  8. Harmonic nanoparticles: noncentrosymmetric metal oxides for nonlinear optics

    OpenAIRE

    Rogov, Andrii; Mugnier, Yannick; Bonacina, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The combination of nonlinear optics and nanotechnology is an extremely rich scientific domain yet widely unexplored. We present here a review of recent optical investigations on noncentrosymmetric oxide nanoparticles with a large ${{\\chi }^{(2)}}$ response, often referred to as harmonic nanoparticles (HNPs). HNPs feature a series of properties which distinguish them from other photonics nanoprobes (quantum dots, up-conversion nanoparticles, noble metal particles). HNPs emission is inherently ...

  9. Electromagnetic shielding of polymer-matrix composites with metallic nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jalali, M; Dauterstedt, S; Michaud, A; Wuthrich, R

    2011-01-01

    To improve electromagnetic (EM) shielding and especially absorption of carbon fibre reinforced polymer-matrix composites for aircraft applications in high frequencies, the inclusion of metallic nanoparticles of iron, cobalt, nickel...

  10. Handwritten, Soft Circuit Boards and Antennas Using Liquid Metal Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yiliang; Cooper, Christopher; Wang, Meng; Adams, Jacob J; Genzer, Jan; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-12-22

    Soft conductors are created by embedding liquid metal nanoparticles between two elastomeric sheets. Initially, the particles form an electrically insulating composite. Soft circuit boards can be handwritten by a stylus, which sinters the particles into conductive traces by applying localized mechanical pressure to the elastomeric sheets. Antennas with tunable frequencies are formed by sintering nanoparticles in microchannels.

  11. Ultrafast dynamics in unaligned MWCNTs decorated with metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzoni, G.; Ponzoni, S.; Galimberti, G.

    2016-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with metallic nanoparticles have been studied by using transient optical measurements. The fast dynamics due to the short-lived free-charge carriers excited by the pump are not affected by the presence of nanoparticles...

  12. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N;

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...

  13. Single metal nanoparticle absorption spectroscopy and optical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, O. L.; Del Fatti, N.; Vallée, F.; Huntzinger, J. R.; Billaud, P.; Broyer, M.

    2006-02-01

    Optical absorption spectra of small single metal nanoparticles are measured using a far-field technique combining a spatial modulation microscope with a broadband light source. Quantitative determination of the spectral and polarization dependencies of the absorption cross section of individual gold nanoparticles permits precise determination of their geometrical properties in excellent agreement with transmission electron microscopy measurements.

  14. Evaluation of metal nanoparticles for drug delivery systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oluyomi S.Adeyemi; Faoziyat A.Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Diminazene aceturate is a trypanocide with unwanted toxicity and limited efficacy.It was reasoned that conjugating diminazene aceturate to functionalized nanoparticle would lower untoward toxicity while improving selectivity and therapeutic efficacy.Silver and gold nanoparticles were evaluated for their capacities to serve as carriers for diminazene aceturate.The silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized,functionalized and coupled to diminazene aceturate following established protocols.The nanoparticle conjugates were characterized.The free diminazene aceturate and drug conjugated nanoparticles were subsequently evaluated for cytotoxicity in vitro.The characterizations by transmission electron microscopy or UV/Vis spectroscopy revealed that conjugation of diminazene aceturate to silver or gold nanoparticles was successful.Evaluation for cytotoxic actions in vitro demonstrated no significance difference between free diminazene aceturate and the conjugates.Our data suggest that surface modified metal nanoparticles could be optimized for drug delivery systems.

  15. Electronic spin susceptibility of metallic superconductive nano-particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Feng; Chen Zhi-Qian; Li Qing

    2006-01-01

    We have observed the thermodynamic properties of metallic superconductive nano-particles in the grand canonical ensemble; and the level distribution and the level correlation between the discrete electronic energy levels are considered in the calculation of the electronic spin susceptibility of the ensemble numerically. The quantum effect, even-odd effect and other special effects existing in the metallic nano-particles are also studied in this article.

  16. Size Controlled Synthesis of Transition Metal Nanoparticles for Catalytic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Esparza, Angel

    2011-07-07

    Catalysis offers cleaner and more efficient chemical reactions for environmental scientists. More than 90% of industrial processes are performed with a catalyst involved, however research it is still required to improve the catalyst materials. The purpose of this work is to contribute with the development of catalysts synthesis with two different approaches. First, the precise size control of non-noble metals nanoparticles. Second, a new one-pot synthesis method based on a microemulsion system was developed to synthesize size-controlled metal nanoparticles in oxide supports. The one-pot method represents a simple approach to synthesize both support and immobilized nanometer-sized non-noble metal nanoparticles in the same reaction system. Narrow size distribution nickel, cobalt, iron and cobalt-nickel nanoparticles were obtained. High metal dispersions are attainable regardless the metal or support used in the synthesis. Thus, the methodology is adaptable and robust. The sizecontrolled supported metal nanoparticles offer the opportunity to study size effects and metal-support interactions on different catalytic reactions with different sets of metals and supports.

  17. Formation of Metal Selenide and Metal-Selenium Nanoparticles using Distinct Reactivity between Selenium and Noble Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Ho; Choi, Ji Yong; Lee, Young Hwan; Park, Joon T; Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-07-01

    Small Se nanoparticles with a diameter of ≈20 nm were generated by the reduction of selenium chloride with NaBH4 at -10 °C. The reaction with Ag at 60 °C yielded stable Ag2 Se nanoparticles, which subsequently were transformed into M-Se nanoparticles (M=Cd, Zn, Pb) through cation exchange reactions with corresponding ions. The reaction with Pt formed Pt layers that were evenly coated on the surface of the Se nanoparticles, and the dissolution of the Se cores with hydrazine generated uniform Pt hollow nanoparticles. The reaction with Au generated tiny Au clusters on the Se surface, and eventually formed acorn-shaped Au-Se nanoparticles through heat treatment. These results indicate that small Se nanoparticles with diameters of ≈20 nm can be used as a versatile platform for the synthesis of metal selenide and metal-selenium hybrid nanoparticles with complex structures.

  18. Biogenic synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and prospects toward green chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Syed Farooq; Assal, Mohamed E; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-06-07

    The immense importance of nanoparticles and their applications is a strong motivation for exploring new synthetic techniques. However, due to strict regulations that manage the potential environmental impacts greener alternatives for conventional synthesis are the focus of intense research. In the scope of this perspective, a concise discussion about the use of green reducing and stabilizing agents toward the preparation of metal nanoparticles is presented. Reports on the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using plant extracts, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate as green reagents are summarized and discussed, pointing toward an urgent need of understanding the mechanistic aspects of the involved reactions.

  19. Reviewing the Tannic Acid Mediated Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufail Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanoparticles harbour numerous exceptional physiochemical properties absolutely different from those of bulk metal as a function of their extremely small size and large superficial area to volume. Naked metal nanoparticles are synthesized by various physical and chemical methods. Chemical methods involving metal salt reduction in solution enjoy an extra edge over other protocols owing to their relative facileness and capability of controlling particle size along with the attribute of surface tailoring. Although chemical methods are the easiest, they are marred by the use of hazardous chemicals such as borohydrides. This has led to inclination of scientific community towards eco-friendly agents for the reduction of metal salts to form nanoparticles. Tannic acid, a plant derived polyphenolic compound, is one such agent which embodies characteristics of being harmless and environmentally friendly combined with being a good reducing and stabilizing agent. In this review, first various methods used to prepare metal nanoparticles are highlighted and further tannic acid mediated synthesis of metal nanoparticles is emphasized. This review brings forth the most recent findings on this issue.

  20. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maicu, Marina, E-mail: marina.maicu@fep.fraunhofer.de; Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter [Fraunhofer Institut für Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik, FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald [Institut für Festkörperelektronik, IFE, TU Dresden, Helmholtz Straße 18, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Hecker, Dominic [Fraunhofer Institut für Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik, FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden, Germany and Institut für Festkörperelektronik, IFE, TU Dresden, Helmholtz Straße 18, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  1. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N;

    2004-01-01

    on top of an oxidized aluminum gate. We achieve sufficient gate coupling to access more than ten charge states of individual gold nanoparticles (5–15 nm in diameter). The devices are sufficiently stable to permit spectroscopic studies of the electron-in-a-box level spectra within the nanoparticle as its......We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...

  2. Stability of commercial metal oxide nanoparticles in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yongsheng; Westerhoff, Paul; Hristovski, Kiril; Crittenden, John C

    2008-04-01

    The fate of commercial nanoparticles in water is of significant interest to health and regulatory authorities. This research investigated the dispersion and stability of metal oxide nanoparticles in water as well as their removal by potable water treatment processes. Commercial nanoparticles were received as powder aggregates, and in water neither ultrasound nor chemical dispersants could break them up into primary nanoparticles. Lab-synthesized hematite was prepared as a primary nanoparticle (85 nm) suspension; upon drying and 1-month storage, however, hematite formed aggregates that could not be dispersed completely as primary nanoparticles in water. This observation may explain why it is difficult to disperse dry commercial nanoparticles. Except for silica, other nanoparticles rapidly aggregated in tap water due to electric double layer (EDL) compression. The stability of silica in tap water is related to its low Hamaker constant. For all these nanoparticles, at an alum dosage of 60 mg/L, coagulation followed by sedimentation could remove 20-60% of the total nanoparticle mass. Filtration using a 0.45 microm filter was required to remove more than 90% of the nanoparticle mass.

  3. Influence of nanoparticle-graphene separation on the localized surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Saadabad, Reza Masoudian; Shirdel-Havar, Amir Hushang; Havar, Majid Shirdel

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theory to model the interaction of graphene substrate with localized plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles. The influence of a graphene substrate on the surface plasmon resonances is described using an effective background permittivity that is derived from a pseudoparticle concept using the electrostatic method. For this purpose, the interaction of metal nanoparticle with graphene sheet is studied to obtain the optical spectrum of gold nanoparticles deposited on a graphene substrate. Then, we introduce a factor based on dipole approximation to predict the influence of the separation of nanoparticles and graphene on the spectral position of the localized plasmon resonance of the nanoparticles. We applied the theory for a 4 nm radius gold nanosphere placed near 1.5 nm graphene layer. It is shown that a blue shift is emerged in the position of plasmon resonance when the nanoparticle moves away from graphene.

  4. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  5. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis of agarose-metal/semiconductor nanoparticles having superior bacteriocidal activity and their simple conversion to metal-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K R Datta; B Srinivasan; H Balaram; M Eswaramoorthy

    2008-11-01

    Agarose, a naturally occurring biopolymer is used for the stabilization of metal, semiconductor nanoparticles. Ag and Cu nanoparticles stabilized in agarose matrix show excellent antibacterial activity against E. coli bacteria. The well dispersed metal nanoparticles within the agarose composite films can be readily converted to carbon-metal composites of catalytic importance.

  7. Toxicity of heavy metals and metal-containing nanoparticles on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-08-01

    Plants are under the continual threat of changing climatic conditions that are associated with various types of abiotic stresses. In particular, heavy metal contamination is a major environmental concern that restricts plant growth. Plants absorb heavy metals along with essential elements from the soil and have evolved different strategies to cope with the accumulation of heavy metals. The use of proteomic techniques is an effective approach to investigate and identify the biological mechanisms and pathways affected by heavy metals and metal-containing nanoparticles. The present review focuses on recent advances and summarizes the results from proteomic studies aimed at understanding the response mechanisms of plants under heavy metal and metal-containing nanoparticle stress. Transport of heavy metal ions is regulated through the cell wall and plasma membrane and then sequestered in the vacuole. In addition, the role of different metal chelators involved in the detoxification and sequestration of heavy metals is critically reviewed, and changes in protein profiles of plants exposed to metal-containing nanoparticles are discussed in detail. Finally, strategies for gaining new insights into plant tolerance mechanisms to heavy metal and metal-containing nanoparticle stress are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  8. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles : Cellulose at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a

  9. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  10. Density functional theory studies of transition metal nanoparticles in catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rankin, Rees; Zeng, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Periodic Density Functional Theory calculations are capable of providing powerful insights into the structural, energetics, and electronic phenomena that underlie heterogeneous catalysis on transition metal nanoparticles. Such calculations are now routinely applied to single crystal metal surfaces...... and to subnanometer metal clusters. Descriptions of catalysis on truly nanosized structures, however, are generally not as well developed. In this talk, I will illustrate different approaches to analyzing nanocatalytic phenomena with DFT calculations. I will describe case studies from heterogeneous catalysis...

  11. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  12. Physicochemical model of detonation synthesis of nanoparticles from metal carboxylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolochko, B. P.; Chernyshev, A. P.; Ten, K. A.; Pruuel, E. R.; Zhogin, I. L.; Zubkov, P. I.; Lyakhov, N. Z.; Luk'yanchikov, L. A.; Sheromov, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    We have shown previously that when metal carboxylates are subjected to a shock-wave action, diamond nanoparticles and nanoparticles of metals (Ag, Bi, Co, Fe, Pb) are formed and their characteristic size is about 30-200 Å. The metal nanoparticles formed are covered by an amorphous-carbon layer up to 20 Å thick. In this work we put forward a physicochemical model of the formation of diamond and metal nanoparticles from metal carboxylates upon shock-wave action. The energy released upon detonation inside the precursor is lower than in regions not occupied by the stearates. The characteristic time of temperature equalization has been estimated to be on the order of ˜10-3 s, which is greater by a factor of ˜103 than the characteristic reaction time. Due to the adiabatic nature of the processes occurring, the typical temperature of a "particle" will be lower than the temperature of the surrounding medium. In the framework of the model suggested, it has been assumed that the growth of metal clusters should occur by the diffusion mechanism; i.e., the "building material" is supplied through diffusion. The calculation using our previous experimental data on the reaction time and average size of metal particles has shown that the diffusion properties of the medium in which the metal nanoparticles are formed are close to those of the liquid state of the substance. The temperature and pressure under detonation conditions markedly exceed the analogous parameters characteristic of experiments on the thermodestruction of metal carboxylates. The small time of existence of the reaction mixture is compensated by the high mobility and concentration of reagents.

  13. Optical response of a single noble metal nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, Otto; Christofilos, Dimitris; DelFatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2006-04-01

    The characterization of a single metal nanoobject by comparing its theoretical and experimental far-field spectra measured by a spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) technique is discussed in the case of gold and silver nanoparticles. Quantitative determination of the polarization dependent absorption cross-section spectrum of a single nanoparticle is shown to permit its optical identification, i.e., determination of its shape, size and orientation on a surface.

  14. Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into wood substrate and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rector, Kirk D; Lucas, Marcel

    2015-11-04

    Metal nanoparticles were incorporated into wood. Ionic liquids were used to expand the wood cell wall structure for nanoparticle incorporation into the cell wall structure. Nanoparticles of elemental gold or silver were found to be effective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging contrast or sensing agents. Nanoparticles of elemental iron were found to be efficient microwave absorbers and caused localized heating for disrupting the integrity of the lignocellulosic matrix. Controls suggest that the localized heating around the iron nanoparticles reduces losses of cellulose in the form of water, volatiles and CO.sub.2. The ionic liquid is needed during the incorporation process at room temperature. The use of small amounts of ionic liquid combined with the absence of an ionic liquid purification step and a lower energy and water use are expected to reduce costs in an up-scaled pretreatment process.

  15. Synthesis and functionalisation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles including calcium oxide, gold, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) were synthesised using a range of techniques including reduction, co-precipitation and spinning disc technology. SPIOs were primarily synthesised via a co-precipitation method using iron (II) chloride, iron (III) chloride and ammonia; a spinning disc reactor and gaseous ammonia were trialled successfully for scale up, producing spherical particles of 10-40 nm in diameter a...

  16. Optical bistability in a nonlinear-shell-coated metallic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongli; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile; Gao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    We provide a self-consistent mean field approximation in the framework of Mie scattering theory to study the optical bistability of a metallic nanoparticle coated with a nonlinear shell. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle coated with a weakly nonlinear shell exhibits optical bistability in a broad range of incident optical intensity. This optical bistability critically relies on the geometry of the shell-coated nanoparticle, especially the fractional volume of the metallic core. The incident wavelength can also affect the optical bistability. Through an optimization-like process, we find a design with broader bistable region and lower threshold field by adjusting the size of the nonlinear shell, the fractional volume of the metallic core, and the incident wavelength. These results may find potential applications in optical bistable devices such as all-optical switches, optical transistors and optical memories. PMID:26907967

  17. O2 adsorption dependent photoluminescence emission from metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheisi, Amir R; Neygandhi, Chris; Sternig, Andreas K; Carrasco, Esther; Marbach, Hubertus; Thomele, Daniel; Diwald, Oliver

    2014-11-21

    Optical properties of metal oxide nanoparticles are subject to synthesis related defects and impurities. Using photoluminescence spectroscopy and UV diffuse reflectance in conjunction with Auger electron spectroscopic surface analysis we investigated the effect of surface composition and oxygen adsorption on the photoluminescence properties of vapor phase grown ZnO and MgO nanoparticles. On hydroxylated MgO nanoparticles as a reference system, intense photoluminescence features exclusively originate from surface excitons, the radiative deactivation of which results in collisional quenching in an O2 atmosphere. Conversely, on as-prepared ZnO nanoparticles a broad yellow emission feature centered at hνEm = 2.1 eV exhibits an O2 induced intensity increase. Attributed to oxygen interstitials as recombination centers this enhancement effect originates from adsorbate-induced band bending, which is pertinent to the photoluminescence active region of the nanoparticles. Annealing induced trends in the optical properties of the two prototypical metal oxide nanoparticle systems, ZnO and MgO, are explained by changes in the surface composition and underline that particle surface and interface changes that result from handling and processing of nanoparticles critically affect luminescence.

  18. Removal of Metal Nanoparticles Colloidal Solutions by Water Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhovych, Olga; Svietlova, Nataliia; Konotop, Yevheniia; Karaushu, Olena; Hrechishkina, Svitlana

    2016-11-01

    The ability of seven species of aquatic plants ( Elodea canadensis, Najas guadelupensis, Vallisneria spiralis L., Riccia fluitans L., Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes L., and Salvinia natans L.) to absorb metal nanoparticles from colloidal solutions was studied. It was established that investigated aquatic plants have a high capacity for removal of metal nanoparticles from aqueous solution (30-100%) which indicates their high phytoremediation potential. Analysis of the water samples content for elements including the mixture of colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ag + Ag2O) before and after exposure to plants showed no significant differences when using submerged or free-floating hydrophytes so-called pleuston. However, it was found that the presence of submerged hydrophytes in aqueous medium ( E. canadensis, N. guadelupensis, V. spiralis L., and R. fluitans L.) and significant changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments, unlike free-floating hydrophytes ( L. laevigatum, P. stratiotes L., S. natans L.), had occur. Pleuston possesses higher potential for phytoremediation of contaminated water basins polluted by metal nanoparticles. In terms of removal of nanoparticles among studied free-floating hydrophytes, P. stratiotes L. and S. natans L. deserve on special attention.

  19. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated.

  20. Confined Growth of Metal Nanoparticles Within 3D DNA Origami Molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing prescribed shaped metal nanoparticles promises emerging applications in plasmonics, energy, and disease diagnosis. The key to the shape-controllable synthesis is generating local environments encoded with prescribed geometrical information. Here, we describe a general strategy that uses 3D self-assembled DNA origami as mold to confine the casting growth of metal nanoparticle. By transferring the shape information from DNA cavities to metal nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles with prescribed shapes, dimensions, and surface binding features could be rationally designed and synthesized.

  1. Formation of metal nanoparticles in silicon nanopores: Plasmon resonance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisski, S.; Goller, B.; Heck, S. C.; Maier, S. A.; Fujii, M.; Kovalev, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for the formation of noble metal nanoparticle ensembles in nanostructured silicon. The key idea is based on the unique property of the large reduction potential of extended internal hydrogen-terminated porous silicon surfaces. The process of metal nanoparticle formation in porous silicon was experimentally traced using their optical plasmon resonance response. We also demonstrate that bimetallic compounds can be formed in porous silicon and that their composition can be controlled using this technique. Experimental results were found to contradict partially with considerations based on Mie theory.

  2. PROSPECTS OF MODIFICATION OF BALNEOLOGICAL REMEDIES WITH BIOGENEOUS METALLS NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mamuchieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issues of mineral waters modification with biogeneous metals nanoparticles, since they have extremely important meaning for human's organism and their production in green and biologically compliant form is hard to overestimate. Russian scientists discovered low toxicity of these nanomaterials. So the use of biogeneuos metals in form of nanoparticles allows lowering of their toxicity compared with its use in forms of ions.

  3. Level Statistics and Specific Heat of Metallic Nano-Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程南璞; 陈志谦; 陈洪

    2003-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of an ensemble of metallic nano-particles are affected by the level distribution and the level correlation between the discrete electronic energy levels. We numerically calculate the specific heat of metallic nano-particles in the canonical ensemble with an odd or even number of electrons by considering the effects of the level distribution and the level correlation. The behaviour of the specific heat at low and high temperatures, compared with the average nearest-neighbour level spacing, is also investigated.

  4. Chemical sensors based on molecularly modified metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haick, Hossam [Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2007-12-07

    This paper presents a concise, although admittedly non-exhaustive, didactic review of some of the main concepts and approaches related to the use of molecularly modified metal nanoparticles in or as chemical sensors. This paper attempts to pull together different views and terminologies used in sensors based on molecularly modified metal nanoparticles, including those established upon electrochemical, optical, surface Plasmon resonance, piezoelectric and electrical transduction approaches. Finally, this paper discusses briefly the main advantages and disadvantages of each of the presented class of sensors. (review article)

  5. Biosurfactant mediated biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Płaza, Grażyna A; Chojniak, Joanna; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2014-01-01

    ... green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become...

  6. Radiation damping in metal nanoparticle pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Christian; Schmidt, Benjamin; von Plessen, Gero

    2007-02-01

    The radiation damping rate of plasmon resonances in pairs of spherical gold nanoparticles is calculated. The radiative line width of the plasmon resonance indicates significant far-field coupling between the nanoparticles over distances many times the particle diameter. The radiation damping of the coupled particle-plasmon mode alternates between superradiant and subradiant behavior when the particle spacing is varied. At small particle spacings where near-field coupling occurs, the radiation damping rate lies far below that of an isolated particle.

  7. Metal nanoparticles in the presence of lipopolysaccharides trigger the onset of metal allergy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Izumi, Natsumi; Ichihashi, Ko-Ichi; Handa, Takayuki; Nishijima, Nobuo; Uemura, Eiichiro; Sagami, Ko-Ichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Manami; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Ishii, Ken J.; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    Many people suffer from metal allergy, and the recently demonstrated presence of naturally occurring metal nanoparticles in our environment could present a new candidate for inducing metal allergy. Here, we show that mice pretreated with silver nanoparticles (nAg) and lipopolysaccharides, but not with the silver ions that are thought to cause allergies, developed allergic inflammation in response to the silver. nAg-induced acquired immune responses depended on CD4+ T cells and elicited IL-17A-mediated inflammation, similar to that observed in human metal allergy. Nickel nanoparticles also caused sensitization in the mice, whereas gold and silica nanoparticles, which are minimally ionizable, did not. Quantitative analysis of the silver distribution suggested that small nAg (≤10 nm) transferred to the draining lymph node and released ions more readily than large nAg (>10 nm). These results suggest that metal nanoparticles served as ion carriers to enable metal sensitization. Our data demonstrate a potentially new trigger for metal allergy.

  8. Noble Metal Nanoparticle-loaded Mesoporous Oxide Microspheres for Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao

    Noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals have attracted much attention as catalysts due to their unique characteristics, including high surface areas and well-controlled facets, which are not often possessed by their bulk counterparts. To avoid the loss of their catalytic activities brought about by their size and shape changes during catalytic reactions, noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals are usually dispersed and supported finely on solid oxide supports to prevent agglomeration, nanoparticle growth, and therefore the decrease in the total surface area. Moreover, metal oxide supports can also play important roles in catalytic reactions through the synergistic interactions with loaded metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals. In this thesis, I use ultrasonic aerosol spray to produce hybrid microspheres that are composed of noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals embedded in mesoporous metal oxide matrices. The mesoporous metal oxide structure allows for the fast diffusion of reactants and products as well as confining and supporting noble metal nanoparticles. I will first describe my studies on noble metal-loaded mesoporous oxide microspheres as catalysts. Three types of noble metals (Au, Pt, Pd) and three types of metal oxide substrates (TiO2, ZrO2, Al 2O3) were selected, because they are widely used for practical catalytic applications involved in environmental cleaning, pollution control, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical syntheses. By considering every possible combination of the noble metals and oxide substrates, nine types of catalyst samples were produced. I characterized the structures of these catalysts, including their sizes, morphologies, crystallinity, and porosities, and their catalytic performances by using a representative reduction reaction from nitrobenzene to aminobenzene. Comparison of the catalytic results reveals the effects of the different noble metals, their incorporation amounts, and oxide substrates on the catalytic abilities. For this particular

  9. Optical Properties and Biological Applications of Electromagnetically Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan Nathan

    The optical properties of metallic particles change dramatically as the size shrinks to the nanoscale. The familiar mirror-like sheen of bulk metals is replaced by the bright, sharp, colorful plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles. The resonances of plasmonic metal nanoparticles are highly tunable throughout the visible spectrum, depending on the size, shape, local dielectric environment, and proximity to other optical resonances. Fundamental and applied research in the nanoscience community in the past few decades has sought to understand and exploit these phenomena for biological applications. In this work, discrete nanoparticle assemblies were produced through biomolecular interactions and studied at the single particle level with darkfield spectroscopy. Pairs of gold nanoparticles tethered by DNA were utilized as molecular rulers to study the dynamics of DNA bending by the restriction enzyme EcoRV. These results substantiated that nanoparticle rulers, deemed "plasmon rulers", could measure the dynamics of single biomolecules with high throughput, long lifetime, and high temporal resolution. To extend these concepts for live cell studies, a plasmon ruler comprised of peptide-linked gold nanoparticle satellites around a core particle was synthesized and utilized to optically follow cell signaling pathways in vivo at the single molecule level. The signal provided by these plasmon rulers allowed continuous observation of caspase-3 activation at the single molecule level in living cells for over 2 hours, unambiguously identifying early stage activation of caspase-3 in apoptotic cells. In the last section of this dissertation, an experimental and theoretical study of electomagnetic coupling in asymmetric metal nanoparticle dimers is presented. A "heterodimer" composed of a silver particle and a gold particle is observed to have a novel coupling between a plasmon mode (free electron oscillations) and an inter-band absorption process (bound electron transitions). The

  10. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren, E-mail: r.minchin@uq.edu.a [Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2009-11-11

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO{sub 2}, the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO{sub 2} and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  11. STUDY ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYVINYLPYRROLIDONE AND PLATINUM METALS DURING THE FORMATION OF THE COLLOIDAL METAL NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Several PVP-stabilized colloidal platinum metals nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized by FTIR and TEM.Comparing with the pure PVP,carbonyl groups of PVP in the mixture of PVP and the metal precursors or in the PVP-stabilized metal nanoparticles have obvious peak shifts in FTIR spectra.The peak shifts reveal the interaction between PVP and the metal species.The interaction between PVP and metal precursors has effect on the formation of the colloidal metal nanoparticles.Strength of the interaction between PVP and metal nanoparticles has direct influence on the stability and the size of the PVP-stabilized metal nanoparticles.Therein,species of the metal precursors and amount of the stabilizer are main factors on the strength of the interaction.

  12. Improving proton therapy by metal-containing nanoparticles: nanoscale insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Eustache, Pierre; Porcel, Erika; Salado, Daniela; Stefancikova, Lenka; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, Francois; Mowat, Pierre; Biegun, Aleksandra K; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Remita, Hynd; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles to enhance the effect of radiation-based cancer treatments is a growing field of study and recently, even nanoparticle-induced improvement of proton therapy performance has been investigated. Aiming at a clinical implementation of this approach, it is essential to characterize the mechanisms underlying the synergistic effects of nanoparticles combined with proton irradiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of platinum- and gadolinium-based nanoparticles on the nanoscale damage induced by a proton beam of therapeutically relevant energy (150 MeV) using plasmid DNA molecular probe. Two conditions of irradiation (0.44 and 3.6 keV/μm) were considered to mimic the beam properties at the entrance and at the end of the proton track. We demonstrate that the two metal-containing nanoparticles amplify, in particular, the induction of nanosize damages (>2 nm) which are most lethal for cells. More importantly, this effect is even more pronounced at the end of the proton track. This work gives a new insight into the underlying mechanisms on the nanoscale and indicates that the addition of metal-based nanoparticles is a promising strategy not only to increase the cell killing action of fast protons, but also to improve tumor targeting. PMID:27143877

  13. Metal nanoparticles: The protective nanoshield against virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Deshmukh, Shivaji D; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand R; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Re-emergence of resistance in different pathogens including viruses are the major cause of human disease and death, which is posing a serious challenge to the medical, pharmaceutical and biotechnological sectors. Though many efforts have been made to develop drug and vaccines against re-emerging viruses, researchers are continuously engaged in the development of novel, cheap and broad-spectrum antiviral agents, not only to fight against viruses but also to act as a protective shield against pathogens attack. Current advancement in nanotechnology provides a novel platform for the development of potential and effective agents by modifying the materials at nanolevel with remarkable physicochemical properties, high surface area to volume ratio and increased reactivity. Among metal nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles have strong antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral potential to boost the host immunity against pathogen attack. Nevertheless, the interaction of silver nanoparticles with viruses is a largely unexplored field. The present review discusses antiviral activity of the metal nanoparticles, especially the mechanism of action of silver nanoparticles, against different viruses such HSV, HIV, HBV, MPV, RSV, etc. It is also focused on how silver nanoparticles can be used in therapeutics by considering their cytotoxic level, to avoid human and environmental risks.

  14. Facile preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces based on metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Xue-Mei; Cui, Jin-Feng; Sun, Han-Xue; Liang, Wei-Dong; Zhu, Zhao-Qi; An, Jin; Yang, Bao-Ping; La, Pei-Qing; Li, An, E-mail: lian2010@lut.cn

    2014-06-01

    A novel method for fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces was developed by facile coating various metal oxide nanoparticles, including ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, on various substrates followed by treatment with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using ZnO nanoparticles as a model, the changes in the surface chemical composition and crystalline structures of the metal oxide nanoparticles by PDMS treatment were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. The results show that the combination of the improved surface roughness generated from of the nanoparticles aggregation with the low surface-energy of silicon-coating originated from the thermal pyrolysis of PDMS would be responsible for the surface superhydrophobicity. By a simple dip-coating method, we show that the metal oxide nanoparticles can be easily coated onto the surfaces of various textural and dimensional substrates, including glass slide, paper, fabric or sponge, for preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces for different purpose. The present strategy may provide an inexpensive and new route to surperhydrophobic surfaces, which would be of technological significance for various practical applications especially for separation of oils or organic contaminates from water.

  15. Facile preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces based on metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xue-Mei; Cui, Jin-Feng; Sun, Han-Xue; Liang, Wei-Dong; Zhu, Zhao-Qi; An, Jin; Yang, Bao-Ping; La, Pei-Qing; Li, An

    2014-06-01

    A novel method for fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces was developed by facile coating various metal oxide nanoparticles, including ZnO, Al2O3 and Fe3O4, on various substrates followed by treatment with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using ZnO nanoparticles as a model, the changes in the surface chemical composition and crystalline structures of the metal oxide nanoparticles by PDMS treatment were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. The results show that the combination of the improved surface roughness generated from of the nanoparticles aggregation with the low surface-energy of silicon-coating originated from the thermal pyrolysis of PDMS would be responsible for the surface superhydrophobicity. By a simple dip-coating method, we show that the metal oxide nanoparticles can be easily coated onto the surfaces of various textural and dimensional substrates, including glass slide, paper, fabric or sponge, for preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces for different purpose. The present strategy may provide an inexpensive and new route to surperhydrophobic surfaces, which would be of technological significance for various practical applications especially for separation of oils or organic contaminates from water.

  16. Size characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles in commercial sunscreen products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Fong, Andrew; Linder, Sean W.

    2017-07-01

    There is an increase in the usage of engineered metal oxide (TiO2 and ZnO) nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens due to their pleasing esthetics and greater sun protection efficiency. A number of studies have been done concerning the safety of nanoparticles in sunscreen products. In order to do the safety assessment, it is pertinent to develop novel analytical techniques to analyze these nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens. This study is focused on developing analytical techniques that can efficiently determine particle size of metal oxides present in the commercial sunscreens. To isolate the mineral UV filters from the organic matrices, specific procedures such as solvent extraction were identified. In addition, several solvents (hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, and tetrahydrofuran) have been investigated. The solvent extraction using tetrahydrofuran worked well for all the samples investigated. The isolated nanoparticles were characterized by using several different techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, differential centrifugal sedimentation, and x-ray diffraction. Elemental analysis mapping studies were performed to obtain individual chemical and morphological identities of the nanoparticles. Results from the electron microscopy techniques were compared against the bulk particle sizing techniques. All of the sunscreen products tested in this study were found to contain nanosized (≤100 nm) metal oxide particles with varied shapes and aspect ratios, and four among the 11 products were showed to have anatase TiO2.

  17. Local Surface-Plasmons in Nonspherical Metal Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chun-Chong; LU Yong-Hua; WANG Pei; MING Hai

    2007-01-01

    When a small metallic nanoparticleis irradiated by incident light, the oscillating electric field can cause the conduction electrons to oscillate coherently, which excites the local surface plasmons (LSPs). As is well known,excited LSPs can gather the energy of incident light to the surface of metallic nanoparticle. Recently, some nonspherical particles, e.g. tetrahedron, are suggested to obtain stronger localized electric field. We employ the discrete dipole approximation method to calculate the optical response of the tetrahedron nanoparticle, including the extinction and distribution of the electric field around the particle. The influences of some parameters,including the nanoparticle size, incident direction and polarization, are investigated to analyse the response modes and to obtain stronger localized electric field.

  18. [Phytotoxicity of colloidal solutions of metal-containing nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konotop, Ie O; Kovalenko, M S; Ulynets', V Z; Meleshko, A O; Batsmanova, L M; Taran, N Iu

    2014-01-01

    Phytotoxicity of colloidal solutions of metal-containing nanoparticles (Ag, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn) has been investigated using a standard Allium cepa (L.) test system. Toxicity of experimental solutions at the organism level was evaluated in terms of biomass growth of onion roots, and cytotoxicity was estimated by the mitotic index of root meristem cells. The colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Allium cepa (L.) roots due to their ability to penetrate into cells and interact with their components, and thus to inhibit mitosis. According to our results cytotoxicity of test solutions decreases in the following order: Cu > or = Zn > Ag > or = Fe. Solution of Mn-containing nanoparticles revealed physiological activity according to root growth reaction.

  19. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R., E-mail: him-lax3@yahoo.com [Laser Spectroscopy Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580003 (India)

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  20. A theoretical and experimental approach for correlating nanoparticle structure and electrocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rachel M; Yancey, David F; Zhang, Liang; Chill, Samuel T; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2015-05-19

    The objective of the research described in this Account is the development of high-throughput computational-based screening methods for discovery of catalyst candidates and subsequent experimental validation using appropriate catalytic nanoparticles. Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs), which are well-defined 1-2 nm diameter metal nanoparticles, fulfill the role of model electrocatalysts. Effective comparison of theory and experiment requires that the theoretical and experimental models map onto one another perfectly. We use novel synthetic methods, advanced characterization techniques, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to approach this ideal. For example, well-defined core@shell DENs can be synthesized by electrochemical underpotential deposition (UPD), and the observed deposition potentials can be compared to those calculated by DFT. Theory is also used to learn more about structure than can be determined by analytical characterization alone. For example, density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) was used to show that the core@shell configuration of Au@Pt DENs undergoes a surface reconstruction that dramatically affects its electrocatalytic properties. A separate Pd@Pt DENs study also revealed reorganization, in this case a core-shell inversion to a Pt@Pd structure. Understanding these types of structural changes is critical to building correlations between structure and catalytic function. Indeed, the second principal focus of the work described here is correlating structure and catalytic function through the combined use of theory and experiment. For example, the Au@Pt DENs system described earlier is used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. The surface reorganization predicted by theory enhances our understanding of the catalytic measurements. In the case of formic acid oxidation, the deformed nanoparticle structure leads to reduced CO binding energy and therefore

  1. Selective metallization by seeded growth on patterned gold nanoparticle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raza, M.A.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Poelsema, B.; Kooij, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the selective metallization by electroless gold deposition on pre-patterned arrays of seed particles. In the first step, highly selective deposition of seeds (gold nanoparticles) on silicon oxide surfaces is achieved using pure water. In the second step, employing an electroless seeded g

  2. Facile self-assembly and stabilization of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Cecile; Holliman, Peter J; Davies, Matthew L; Watson, Trystan M; Worsley, David A

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes a facile method of self-assembling different metal oxide nanoparticles into nanostructured materials via di-carboxylate linkers (oxalic acid) using TiO2 as an example. In this method, the di-carboxylate linkers react with surface hydroxyls on metal oxide nanoparticles forming covalent, ester-like bonds, which enable the binding of two metal oxide particles, one at either end of the linker and facilitates efficient self-assembly of one group of metal oxide nanoparticles homogeneously distributed onto the surface of another group. The oxalate linkers can then be removed by thermal decomposition. This approach is shown to be effective using differently-sized TiO2 nanoparticles, namely in-house synthesized 3-5nm anatase nanocrystals and Degussa P25 titania particles (mean 21nm particle size). Our data show that the application of a high temperature heat treatment (450°C for 30min), conventionally applied to achieve a stable porous structure by thermal decomposition of the linker molecules and by inducing inter-particle necking, damages the surface area of the nanostructured material. However, here we show that sintering at 300°C for 30min or by flash near infrared radiation sintering for 12s efficiently decomposes the oxalate linkers and stabilizes the nanostructure of the material whilst maintaining its high surface area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surface-mediated light transmission in metal nanoparticle chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, P. Jasper; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    We study theoretically the efficiency of the transmission of optical signals through a linear chain consisting of identical and equidistantly spaced silver metal nanoparticles. Two situations are compared: the transmission efficiency through an isolated chain and through a chain in close proximity o

  4. Subwavelength plasmonic kinks in arrays of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Noskov, Roman E; Kivshar, Yuri S; 10.1364/OE.20.002733

    2012-01-01

    We analyze nonlinear effects in optically driven arrays of nonlinear metallic nanoparticles. We demonstrate that such plasmonic systems are characterized by a bistable response, and they can support the propagation of dissipative switching waves (or plasmonic kinks) connecting the states with different polarization. We study numerically the properties of such plasmonic kinks which are characterized by a subwavelength extent and a tunable velocity.

  5. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Nallappan, Devi; Madhavi, Kondeti; Rahman, Shafiqur; Jun Wei, Lim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities.

  6. Tunable plasmon polaritons in arrays of interacting metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Guillaume; Mariani, Eros

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simple cubic array of metallic nanoparticles supporting extended collective plasmons that arise from the near-field dipolar interaction between localized surface plasmons in each nanoparticle. We develop a fully analytical quantum theory of the strong-coupling regime between these collective plasmons and photons resulting in plasmon polaritons in the nanoparticle array. Remarkably, we show that the polaritonic band gap and the dielectric function of the metamaterial can be significantly modulated by the polarization of light. We unveil how such an anisotropic behavior in the plasmonic metamaterial is crucially mediated by the dipolar interactions between the nanoparticles despite the symmetry of the underlying lattice. Our results thus pave the way towards the realization of tunable quantum plasmonic metamaterials presenting interaction-driven birefringence.

  7. Nonlinear optical properties of metal nanoparticle composites for optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y. E-mail: takeda.yoshihiko@nims.go.jp; Kishimoto, N

    2003-05-01

    Optical absorption and nonlinear optical response were investigated for nanoparticle composites in amorphous SiO{sub 2} fabricated by negative Ta ion implantation at 60 keV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify Ta and the oxide formation in the matrix. Optical absorption clearly indicated a surface plasmon peak at 2.2 eV and the peak resulted from formation of nanoparticles embedded in the matrix. The measured absorption was compared with calculated ones, evaluated by Maxwell-Garnett theory. Nonlinear absorption was measured with a pump-probe method using a femtosecond laser system. The pumping laser transiently bleached the surface plasmon band and lead to the nonlinearity. The transient response recovered in several picoseconds and behaved in terms of electron dynamics in metallic nanoparticles. The Ta nanoparticle composite is one of the promising candidates for nonlinear optical materials with good thermal stability.

  8. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  9. Synthesis of high purity metal oxide nanoparticles for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C.; Kim, W.; Friebele, E. J.; Villalobos, G.; Frantz, J.; Shaw, L. B.; Sadowski, B.; Fontana, J.; Dubinskii, M.; Zhang, J.; Sanghera, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present our recent research results in synthesizing various metal oxide nanoparticles for use as laser gain media (solid state as well as fiber lasers) and transparent ceramic windows via two separate techniques, co-precipitation and flame spray pyrolysis. The nanoparticles were pressed into ceramic discs that exhibited optical transmission approaching the theoretical limit and showed very high optical-to-optical lasing slope efficiency. We have also synthesized sesquioxide nanoparticles using a Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) technique that leads to the synthesis of a metastable phase of sesquioxide which allows fabricating excellent optical quality transparent windows with very fine grain sizes. Finally, we present our research in the synthesis of rare earth doped boehmite nanoparticles where the rareearth ion is encased in a cage of aluminum and oxygen to prevent ion-ion proximity and energy transfer. The preforms have been drawn into fibers exhibiting long lifetimes and high laser efficiencies.

  10. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  11. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Visweswara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities.

  12. Noble metal nanoparticles: Optical forces, electrochemical Ostwald ripening, and photovoltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Peter

    This thesis describes three distinct aspects of the chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. The first chapter introduces the surface plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles. The second chapter presents an electrodynamic model for the calculation of the attractive optical forces that arise when two dielectric particles are irradiated in a light field. These forces show resonances at dipolar plasmon wavelengths, similar to resonances in the near-field electromagnetic intensities. At MW/cm2 intensities, optical forces can be stronger than van der Waals forces. The third chapter investigates the size dependent electrochemical properties of silver nanoparticles. These thermally evaporated silver nanoparticles spontaneously evolve in size when immersed in pure water on conducting substrates. The process is understood through an electrochemical Ostwald ripening mechanism driven by the size dependence of the work function and standard electrode potential. The fourth and fifth chapters consider photo-induced surface reactivity of noble metal particles. First, in the fourth chapter, the light driven deposition of copper onto gold nanoparticle electrodes is presented. The photocurrent is a nonlinear function of laser intensity and increases sharply with cathodic voltage in the underpotential deposition region. The photoreduction is attributed to laser heating (caused by decay of the plasmon oscillation) of the Au nanoparticles, rather than "hot electron" processes. Secondly, in the fifth chapter, the photo-induced oxidation of citrate is studied on silver nanoparticle electrodes. Irradiation of the citrate coated particles is shown to cause the particles to charge negatively from the irreversible transfer of electrons from citrate to the particles. It is hypothesized that the particle plasmon oscillation decays into electron hole pair(s) that causes the photo-oxidation of the surface bound citrate. Both the gold and silver particle systems are simulated using

  13. Antimicrobial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles supported onto natural clinoptilolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrenovic, Jasna; Milenkovic, Jelena; Daneu, Nina; Kepcija, Renata Matonickin; Rajic, Nevenka

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Cu(2)O, ZnO and NiO nanoparticles supported onto natural clinoptilolite was investigated in the secondary effluent under dark conditions. After 24h of contact the Cu(2)O and ZnO nanoparticles reduced the numbers of viable bacterial cells of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in pure culture for four to six orders of magnitude and showed consistent 100% of antibacterial activity against native E. coli after 1h of contact during 48 exposures. The antibacterial activity of NiO nanoparticles was less efficient. The Cu(2)O and NiO nanoparticles showed 100% of antiprotozoan activity against Paramecium caudatum and Euplotes affinis after 1h of contact, while ZnO nanoparticles were less efficient. The morphology and crystallinity of the nanoparticles were not affected by microorganisms. The metal oxide nanoparticles could find a novel application in the disinfection of secondary effluent and removal of pathogenic microorganisms in the tertiary stage of wastewater treatment.

  14. Recent nanoarchitectures in metal nanoparticle-modified electrodes for electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Munetaka

    2010-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the use of metal nanoparticles (NPs) for electroanalysis. To make the best use of the electrocatalytic and electron-conducting characteristics of metal NPs, various nanoarchitectures have been developed for modifying metal NPs on electrode surfaces. In this review, at first recent nanoarchitectures with metal NPs for modifying electrodes are summarized together with the results of electrochemical analysis. Then, the progress of a seed-mediated growth method that we developed for modifying electrode surfaces is shown as an example that the nanoarchitectures of metal NPs are possible without using organic linker molecules. This approach should be effective for further functional modifications of the surfaces of metal NPs as well as the electrochemical analysis with lower charge-transfer resistance.

  15. Characterization, sorption, and exhaustion of metal oxide nanoparticles as metal adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engates, Karen Elizabeth

    Safe drinking water is paramount to human survival. Current treatments do not adequately remove all metals from solution, are expensive, and use many resources. Metal oxide nanoparticles are ideal sorbents for metals due to their smaller size and increased surface area in comparison to bulk media. With increasing demand for fresh drinking water and recent environmental catastrophes to show how fragile water supplies are, new approaches to water conservation incorporating new technologies like metal oxide nanoparticles should be considered as an alternative method for metal contaminant adsorbents from typical treatment methods. This research evaluated the potential of manufactured iron, anatase, and aluminum nanoparticles (Al2O3, TiO2, Fe2O3) to remove metal contaminants (Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn) in lab-controlled and natural waters in comparison to their bulk counterparts by focusing on pH, contaminant and adsorbent concentrations, particle size, and exhaustive capabilities. Microscopy techniques (SEM, BET, EDX) were used to characterize the adsorbents. Adsorption experiments were performed using 0.01, 0.1, or 0.5 g/L nanoparticles in pH 8 solution. When results were normalized by mass, nanoparticles adsorbed more than bulk particles but when surface area normalized the opposite was observed. Adsorption was pH-dependent and increased with time and solid concentration. Aluminum oxide was found to be the least acceptable adsorbent for the metals tested, while titanium dioxide anatase (TiO2) and hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) showed great ability to remove individual and multiple metals from pH 8 and natural waters. Intraparticle diffusion was likely part of the complex kinetic process for all metals using Fe2O3 but not TiO 2 nanoparticles within the first hour of adsorption. Adsorption kinetics for all metals tested were described by a modified first order rate equation used to consider the diminishing equilibrium metal concentrations with increasing metal oxides, showing faster

  16. A general approach to mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Zhao

    2012-04-26

    Catalytic microspheres: A general approach is demonstrated for the facile preparation of mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles (see TEM image in the picture). Among 18 oxide/noble metal catalysts, TiO 2/0.1 mol Pd microspheres showed the highest turnover frequency in NaBH 4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Metal nanoparticles via the atom-economy green approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidindi, Suresh Babu; Sanyal, Udishnu; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2010-05-03

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) of Cu (air-stable), Ag, and Au have been prepared using an atom-economy green approach. Simple mechanical stirring of solid mixtures (no solvent) of a metal salt and ammonia borane at 60 degrees C resulted in the formation of metal NPs. In this reaction, ammonia borane is transformed into a BNH(x) polymer, which protects the NPs formed and halts their growth. This results in the formation of the BNH(x) polymer protected monodisperse NPs. Thus, ammonia borane used in these reactions plays a dual role (reducing agent and precursor for the stabilizing agent).

  18. Polarizability of supported metal nanoparticles: Mehler-Fock approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jesper; Pedersen, Thomas G.

    2012-09-01

    Using toroidal coordinates and the Mehler-Fock transform, we present an analysis of the polarizability of a complex structure allowing for the study of arbitrarily truncated metal spheres including a dielectric substrate. Our analysis is based on an electrostatic approach, i.e., we are in the quasi-static limit, where we solve the Laplace equation for the potential. The derived method is used to analyze the behavior of localized surface plasmon resonances of truncated metal nanospheres including substrate effects. The method is fast, simple, easy to implement, and useful for analysis of experimental work on supported metal nanoparticles, e.g., within the area of plasmonic photovoltaics.

  19. Effect of Metals, Metalloids and Metallic Nanoparticles on Microalgae Growth and Industrial Product Biosynthesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystian Miazek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a source of numerous compounds that can be used in many branches of industry. Synthesis of such compounds in microalgal cells can be amplified under stress conditions. Exposure to various metals can be one of methods applied to induce cell stress and synthesis of target products in microalgae cultures. In this review, the potential of producing diverse biocompounds (pigments, lipids, exopolymers, peptides, phytohormones, arsenoorganics, nanoparticles from microalgae cultures upon exposure to various metals, is evaluated. Additionally, different methods to alter microalgae response towards metals and metal stress are described. Finally, possibilities to sustain high growth rates and productivity of microalgal cultures in the presence of metals are discussed.

  20. Effect of Metals, Metalloids and Metallic Nanoparticles on Microalgae Growth and Industrial Product Biosynthesis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miazek, Krystian; Iwanek, Waldemar; Remacle, Claire; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2015-10-09

    Microalgae are a source of numerous compounds that can be used in many branches of industry. Synthesis of such compounds in microalgal cells can be amplified under stress conditions. Exposure to various metals can be one of methods applied to induce cell stress and synthesis of target products in microalgae cultures. In this review, the potential of producing diverse biocompounds (pigments, lipids, exopolymers, peptides, phytohormones, arsenoorganics, nanoparticles) from microalgae cultures upon exposure to various metals, is evaluated. Additionally, different methods to alter microalgae response towards metals and metal stress are described. Finally, possibilities to sustain high growth rates and productivity of microalgal cultures in the presence of metals are discussed.

  1. Bismuth nanoparticles integration into heavy metal electrochemical stripping sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadevall, Miquel; Ros, Josep; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-08-01

    Between their many applications bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) are showing interest as pre-concentrators in heavy metals detection while being applied as working electrode modifiers used in electrochemical stripping analysis. From the different reported methods to synthesize BiNPs we are focused on the typical polyol method, largely used in these types of metallic and semi-metallic nanoparticles. This study presents the strategy for an easy control of the shape and size of BiNPs including nanocubes, nanosferes and triangular nanostructures. To improve the BiNP size and shape, different reducing agents (ethylene glycol or sodium hypophosphite) and stabilizers (polyvinyl pyrrolidone, PVP, in different amounts) have been studied. The efficiency of BiNPs for heavy metals analysis in terms of detection sensitivity while being used as modifiers of screen-printed carbon electrodes including the applicability of the developed device in real sea water samples is shown. A parallel study between the obtained nanoparticles and their performance in heavy metal sensing has been described in this communication.

  2. Metal nanoparticles triggered persistent negative photoconductivity in silk protein hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogurla, Narendar; Sinha, Arun K.; Naskar, Deboki; Kundu, Subhas C.; Ray, Samit K.

    2016-03-01

    Silk protein is a natural biopolymer with intriguing properties, which are attractive for next generation bio-integrated electronic and photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate the negative photoconductive response of Bombyx mori silk protein fibroin hydrogels, triggered by Au nanoparticles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of Au-silk hydrogels is found to be enhanced with the incorporation of Au nanoparticles over the control sample, due to the increased charge transporting networks within the hydrogel. Au-silk lateral photoconductor devices show a unique negative photoconductive response under an illumination of 325 nm, with excitation energy higher than the characteristic metal plasmon resonance band. The enhanced photoconductance yield in the hydrogels over the silk protein is attributed to the photo-oxidation of amino groups in the β-pleated sheets of the silk around the Au nanoparticles followed by the breaking of charge transport networks. The Au-silk nanocomposite does not show any photoresponse under visible illumination because of the localization of excited charges in Au nanoparticles. The negative photoconductive response of hybrid Au-silk under UV illumination may pave the way towards the utilization of silk for future bio-photonic devices using metal nanoparticle platforms.

  3. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Hendon, Christopher H; Dumesic, James A; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti(0.1)W(0.9)C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading, enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.

  4. Metal Nanoparticles Preparation In Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry W. Rollins

    2004-04-01

    The novel optical, electronic, and/or magnetic properties of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles have resulted in extensive research on new methods for their preparation. An ideal preparation method would allow the particle size, size distribution, crystallinity, and particle shape to be easily controlled, and would be applicable to a wide variety of material systems. Numerous preparation methods have been reported, each with its inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, an ideal method has yet to emerge. The most widely applied methods for nanoparticle preparation include the sonochemical reduction of organometallic reagents,(1&2) the solvothermal method of Alivisatos,(3) reactions in microemulsions,(4-6) the polyol method (reduction by alcohols),(7-9) and the use of polymer and solgel materials as hosts.(10-13) In addition to these methods, there are a variety of methods that take advantage of the unique properties of a supercritical fluid.(14&15) Through simple variations of temperature and pressure, the properties of a supercritical fluid can be continuously tuned from gas-like to liquid-like without undergoing a phase change. Nanoparticle preparation methods that utilize supercritical fluids are briefly reviewed below using the following categories: Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS), Reactive Supercritical Fluid Processing, and Supercritical Fluid Microemulsions. Because of its easily accessible critical temperature and pressure and environmentally benign nature, carbon dioxide is the most widely used supercritical solvent. Supercritical CO2 is unfortunately a poor solvent for many polar or ionic species, which has impeded its use in the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. We have developed a reactive supercritical fluid processing method using supercritical carbon dioxide for the preparation of metal and metal sulfide particles and used it to prepare narrowly distributed nanoparticles of silver (Ag) and silver sulfide

  5. Biosynthesis of Metal Nanoparticles: Novel Efficient Heterogeneous Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Palomo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles the most recent advances described in literature on the preparation of noble metal nanoparticles induced by biological entities. The use of different free or substituted carbohydrates, peptides, proteins, microorganisms or plants have been successfully applied as a new green concept in the development of innovative strategies to prepare these nanoparticles as different nanostructures with different forms and sizes. As a second part of this review, the application of their synthetic ability as new heterogonous catalysts has been described in C–C bond-forming reactions (as Suzuki, Heck, cycloaddition or multicomponent, oxidations and dynamic kinetic resolutions.

  6. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  7. Antimicrobial properties of metal and metal-halide nanoparticles and their potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Jason Robert

    Heavy metals, including silver and copper, have been known to possess antimicrobial properties against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Metal nanoparticles (aggregations of metal atoms 1-200 nm in size) have recently become the subject of intensive study for their increased antimicrobial properties. In the current studies, metal and metal-halide nanoparticles were evaluated for their antibacterial efficacy. Silver (Ag), silver bromide (AgBr), silver iodide (AgI), and copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticles significantly reduced bacterial numbers of the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus within 24 hours and were more effective against P. aeruginosa. CuI nanoparticles were found to be highly effective, reducing both organisms by >4.43 log 10 within 15 minutes at 60 ppm Cu. CuI nanoparticles formulated with different stabilizers (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS; polyvinyl pyrrolidone, PVP) were further tested against representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans ), and a non-enveloped virus (poliovirus). Both nanoparticles caused significant reductions in most of the Gram-negative bacteria within five minutes (>5.09-log10). The Gram-positive bacterial species and C. albicans were more sensitive to the CuI-SDS than the CuI-PVP nanoparticles. In contrast, the acid-fast Mycobacterium smegmatis was more resistant to CuI-SDS than CuI-PVP nanoparticles. Poliovirus was more resistant than the other organisms tested except for Mycobacterium fortuitum, which displayed the greatest resistance to CuI nanoparticles. As an example of a real world antimicrobial application, polymer coatings embedded with various concentrations of CuI nanoparticles were tested for antibacterial efficacy against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Polyester-epoxy powder coatings were found to display superior uniformity, stability and antimicrobial properties against both organisms (>4.92 log 10 after six hours at

  8. Metal nanoparticles in condensed media: preparation and the bulk and surface structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olenin, A Yu; Lisichkin, Georgii V [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31

    The results of studies on the chemical synthesis and biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles in condensed media published after 2000 are analyzed and described systematically. The growth and transformations of the metallic core of nanoparticles as well as the composition and structure of the surface layer are considered and their effects on the nanoparticle size and shape are analyzed.

  9. A general method to incorporate metal nanoparticles in zeolites and zeotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method for producing a zeolite, zeolite-like or zeotype structure with selective formation of metal, metal oxide or metal sulphide nanoparticles and/or clusters inside the zeolite, zeolite-like or zeotype structure.......Disclosed herein is a method for producing a zeolite, zeolite-like or zeotype structure with selective formation of metal, metal oxide or metal sulphide nanoparticles and/or clusters inside the zeolite, zeolite-like or zeotype structure....

  10. Nanoparticle and other metal chelation therapeutics in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Garrett, Matthew R; Men, Ping; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2005-09-25

    Current therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD) such as the anticholinesterase inhibitors and the latest NMDA receptor inhibitor, Namenda, provide moderate symptomatic delay at various stages of disease, but do not arrest disease progression or supply meaningful remission. As such, new approaches to disease management are urgently needed. Although the etiology of AD is largely unknown, oxidative damage mediated by metals is likely a significant contributor since metals such as iron, aluminum, zinc, and copper are dysregulated and/or increased in AD brain tissue and create a pro-oxidative environment. This role of metal ion-induced free radical formation in AD makes chelation therapy an attractive means of dampening the oxidative stress burden in neurons. The chelator desferioxamine, FDA approved for iron overload, has shown some benefit in AD, but like many chelators, it has a host of adverse effects and substantial obstacles for tissue-specific targeting. Other chelators are under development and have shown various strengths and weaknesses. In this review, we propose a novel system of chelation therapy through the use of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles conjugated to chelators show a unique ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), chelate metals, and exit through the BBB with their corresponding complexed metal ions. This method may prove to be a safe and effective means of reducing the metal load in neural tissue thus staving off the harmful effects of oxidative damage and its sequelae.

  11. Adsorption and desorption of bivalent metals to hematite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Valerie A; Hu, Jinxuan; Engates, Karen E; Shipley, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    The use of commercially prepared hematite nanoparticles (37.0 nm) was studied as an adsorbent in the removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. Single-metal adsorption was studied as a function of metal and adsorbent concentrations, whereas binary metal competition was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between the competing metals. Competitive effects indicated that Pb had strong homogenous affinity to the nanohematite surface, and decreased adsorption of Cd, Cu, and Zn occurred when Pb was present in a binary system. Metal adsorption strength to nanohematite at pH 6.0 increased with metal electronegativity: Pb > Cu > Zn ∼ Cd. Equilibrium modeling revealed that the Langmuir-Freundlich composite isotherm adequately described the adsorption and competitive effects of metals to nanohematite, whereas desorption was best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The desorption of metals from nanohematite was found to be pH dependent, with pH 4.0 > pH 6.0 > pH 8.0, and results showed that greater than 65% desorption was achieved at pH 4.0 within three 24-h cycles for all metals.

  12. Dynamic inclusion complexes of metal nanoparticles inside nanocups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Lee, Tung-Chun; Fischer, Peer

    2015-06-01

    Host-guest inclusion complexes are abundant in molecular systems and of fundamental importance in living organisms. Realizing a colloidal analogue of a molecular dynamic inclusion complex is challenging because inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with a well-defined cavity and portal are difficult to synthesize in high yield and with good structural fidelity. Herein, a generic strategy towards the fabrication of dynamic 1:1 inclusion complexes of metal nanoparticles inside oxide nanocups with high yield (>70%) and regiospecificity (>90%) by means of a reactive double Janus nanoparticle intermediate is reported. Experimental evidence confirms that the inclusion complexes are formed by a kinetically controlled mechanism involving a delicate interplay between bipolar galvanic corrosion and alloying-dealloying oxidation. Release of the NP guest from the nanocups can be efficiently triggered by an external stimulus. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Harmonic nanoparticles: noncentrosymmetric metal oxides for nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogov, Andrii; Mugnier, Yannick; Bonacina, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    The combination of nonlinear optics and nanotechnology is an extremely rich scientific domain yet widely unexplored. We present here a review of recent optical investigations on noncentrosymmetric oxide nanoparticles with a large {{χ }(2)} response, often referred to as harmonic nanoparticles (HNPs). HNPs feature a series of properties which distinguish them from other photonics nanoprobes (quantum dots, up-conversion nanoparticles, noble metal particles). HNPs emission is inherently nonlinear and based on the efficient generation of harmonics as opposed to fluorescence or surface plasmon scattering. In addition, the fully coherent signal emitted by HNPs together with their polarization sensitive response and absence of resonant interaction make them appealing for several applications ranging from multi-photon (infrared) microscopy and holography, to cell tracking and sensing.

  14. Topological collective plasmons in bipartite chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Downing, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    We study a bipartite linear chain constituted by spherical metallic nanoparticles, where each nanoparticle supports a localized surface plasmon. The near-field dipolar interaction between the localized surface plasmons gives rise to collective plasmons, which are extended over the whole nanoparticle array. We derive analytically the spectrum and the eigenstates of the collective plasmonic excitations. At the edge of the Brillouin zone, the spectrum is of a pseudo-relativistic nature similar to that present in the electronic band structure of polyacetylene. We find the effective Dirac Hamiltonian for the collective plasmons and show that the corresponding spinor eigenstates represent one-dimensional Dirac-like massive bosonic excitations. Therefore, the plasmonic lattice exhibits similar effects to those found for electrons in one-dimensional Dirac materials, such as the ability for transmission with highly suppressed backscattering due to Klein tunnelling. We also show that the system is governed by a nontriv...

  15. Silver metal nanoparticles study for biomedical and green house applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwel, E.; Simón-Gracia, L.; Guha, M.; Rauwel, P.; Kuunal, S.; Wragg, D.

    2017-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNP) with diameters ranging from 2 to 100nm have received extensive attention during the past decades due to their many potential applications. This paper presents a structural and cytotoxicity study of silver metal nanoparticles targeted towards biomedical applications. Spherical Ag MNPs of diameter from 20 to 50 nm have been synthesized. The encapsulation of Ag MNPs inside pH-sensitive polymersomes has been also studied for the development of biomedical applications. A cytotoxicity study of the Ag MNPs against primary prostatic cancer cell line (PPC-1) has demonstrated a high mortality rate for concentrations ranging from 100 to 200mg/L. The paper will discuss the potential for therapeutic treatments of these Ag MNPs.

  16. Tunable Optical Properties of Metal Nanoparticle Sol-Gel Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Snow, Lanee A.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that the linear and non-linear optical properties of sol-gels containing metal nanoparticles are highly tunable with porosity. Moreover, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous hosts, such as aerogels, and determine rigorous bounds for the average fractional composition of each component, i.e., the porosity of the aerogel, or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Sol-gels containing noble metal nanoparticles were fabricated and a significant blue-shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was observed upon formation of an aerogel, as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping and aggregation this blue-shift does not strictly obey standard effective medium theories. Mitigation of these complications is achieved by avoiding the use of alcohol and by annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere.

  17. Quantum Electrodynamics of Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticles Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ridolfo, A; Fina, N; Saija, R; Savasta, S

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically the quantum optical properties of hybrid molecules composed of an individual quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle. We calculate the resonance fluorescence of this hybrid system. Its incoherent part, the one arising from nonlinear quantum processes, results to be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude as compared to that in the absence of the metallic nanoparticle. Scattering spectra at different excitation powers and nonperturbative calculations of intensity-field correlation functions show that this system can act as a nonlinear ultra-compact two-photon switch for incident photons, where the presence (or absence) of a single incident photon field is sufficient to allow (or prevent) the scattering of subsequent photons. We also find that a small frequency shift of the incident light field may cause changes in the intensity field correlation function of orders of magnitude.

  18. Optimization of a transferred arc reactor for metal nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Matthias; Kruis, Frank Einar

    2016-09-01

    The demand for metal nanoparticles is increasing strongly. Transferred arc synthesis is a promising process in this respect, as it shows high production rates, good quality particles and the ability of up-scaling. The influence of several process parameters on the performance of the process in terms of production rate and particle size is investigated. These parameters are the electrode design and adjustment, the gas flow rate and power input. A novel feeding mechanism allows process operation over an extended time period. It is shown that the process is capable of producing pure metal nanoparticles with variable primary particle sizes and comparatively high production rates. Optimal process conditions for a single transferred arc electrode pair are found, which allow further scale-up by numbering up.

  19. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in the insulating matrix. These nanocomposites have been characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as a function of the implantation dose. The experimental results are compared with a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport through the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by the metallic nanoparticles. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. We conclude in that the conductivity process is due only to percolation (when the conducting elements are in geometric contact) and that the contribution from tunneling conduction is negligible.

  20. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Wagner, Lucas (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO)

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  1. Unveiling the chemistry behind the green synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sónia A O; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Rocha, Sílvia M; Marques, Paula A A P; Pascoal Neto, Carlos; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R

    2014-09-01

    Nanobiotechnology has emerged as a fundamental domain in modern science, and metallic nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the largest classes of NPs studied because of their wide spectrum of possible applications in several fields. The use of plant extracts as reducing and stabilizing agents in their synthesis is an interesting and reliable alternative to conventional methodologies. However, the role of the different components of such extracts in the reduction/stabilization of metal ions has not yet been understood clearly. Here we studied the behavior of the main components of a Eucalyptus globulus Labill. bark aqueous extract during metal-ion reduction followed by advanced chromatographic techniques, which allowed us to establish their specific role in the process. The obtained results showed that phenolic compounds, particularly galloyl derivatives, are mainly responsible for the metal-ion reduction, whereas sugars are essentially involved in the stabilization of the NPs.

  2. Viable photocatalysts under solar-spectrum irradiation: nonplasmonic metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huai-Yong; Xiao, Qi; Jaatinen, Esa; Jia, Jianfeng; Huang, Yiming; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Wu, Haishun

    2014-03-10

    Supported nanoparticles (NPs) of nonplasmonic transition metals (Pd, Pt, Rh, and Ir) are widely used as thermally activated catalysts for the synthesis of important organic compounds, but little is known about their photocatalytic capabilities. We discovered that irradiation with light can significantly enhance the intrinsic catalytic performance of these metal NPs at ambient temperatures for several types of reactions. These metal NPs strongly absorb the light mainly through interband electronic transitions. The excited electrons interact with the reactant molecules on the particles to accelerate these reactions. The rate of the catalyzed reaction depends on the concentration and energy of the excited electrons, which can be increased by increasing the light intensity or by reducing the irradiation wavelength. The metal NPs can also effectively couple thermal and light energy sources to more efficiently drive chemical transformations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Interrogating Circulating Microsomes and Exosomes Using Metal Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi-Ge; Mohamadi, Reza M; Poudineh, Mahla; Kermanshah, Leyla; Ahmed, Sharif; Safaei, Tina Saberi; Stojcic, Jessica; Nam, Robert K; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-02-10

    A chip-based approach for electrochemical characterization and detection of microsomes and exosomes based on direct electro-oxidation of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) that specifically recognize surface markers of these vesicles is reported. It is found that exosomes and microsomes derived from prostate cancer cells can be identified by their surface proteins EpCAM and PSMA, suggesting the potential of exosomes and microsomes for use as diagnostic biomarkers.

  4. Surface plasmons in metallic nanoparticles: fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M A, E-mail: magarcia@icv.csic.es [Department of Electroceramics, Institute for Ceramic and Glass, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain) and IMDEA Nanociencia, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2011-07-20

    The excitation of surface plasmons (SPs) in metallic nanoparticles (NPs) induces optical properties hardly achievable in other optical materials, yielding a wide range of applications in many fields. This review presents an overview of SPs in metallic NPs. The concept of SPs in NPs is qualitatively described using a comparison with simple linear oscillators. The mathematical models to carry on calculations on SPs are presented as well as the most common approximations. The different parameters governing the features of SPs and their effect on the optical properties of the materials are reviewed. Finally, applications of SPs in different fields such as biomedicine, energy, environment protection and information technology are revised. (topical review)

  5. Metal nanoparticles with sharp corners: Universal properties of plasmon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Sturman, B; Gorkunov, M

    2012-01-01

    We predict the simultaneous occurrence of two fundamental phenomena for metal nanoparticles possessing sharp corners: First, the main plasmonic dipolar mode experiences strong red shift with decreasing corner curvature radius; its resonant frequency is controlled by the apex angle of the corner and the normalized (to the particle size) corner curvature. Second, the split-off plasmonic mode experiences strong localization at the corners. Altogether, this paves the way for tailoring of metal nano-structures providing wavelength-selective excitation of localized plasmons and a strong near-field enhancement of linear and nonlinear optical phenomena.

  6. Metal nanoparticles with sharp corners: Universal properties of plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, B.; Podivilov, E.; Gorkunov, M.

    2013-03-01

    We predict the simultaneous occurrence of two fundamental phenomena for metal nanoparticles possessing sharp corners with variable curvature: First, the main dipolar plasmonic mode experiences a strong red shift with increasing corner curvature; for large values of the curvature, the resonant frequency is controlled by the apex angle of the corner. Second, the split-off plasmonic mode experiences a strong localization at the corners. Altogether, this paves the way for the tailoring of metal nanostructures providing a wavelength-selective excitation of localized plasmons and a strong near-field enhancement of linear and nonlinear optical phenomena.

  7. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  8. Functional Application of Noble Metal Nanoparticles In Situ Synthesized on Ramie Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Yao, Ya; Li, Jingliang; Qin, Si; Zhu, Haijin; Kaur, Jasjeet; Chen, Wu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Xungai

    2015-09-01

    Different functions were imparted to ramie fibers through treatment with noble metal nanoparticles including silver and gold nanoparticles. The in situ synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles was achieved by heating in the presence of ramie fibers in the corresponding solutions of precursors. The unique optical property of synthesized noble metal nanoparticles, i.e., localized surface plasmon resonance, endowed ramie fibers with bright colors. Color strength (K/S) of fibers increased with heating temperature. Silver nanoparticles were obtained in alkaline solution, while acidic condition was conducive to gold nanoparticles. The optical properties of treated ramie fibers were investigated using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the morphologies of silver and gold nanoparticles in situ synthesized on fibers. The ramie fibers treated with noble metal nanoparticles showed remarkable catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by sodium borohydride. Moreover, the silver nanoparticle treatment showed significant antibacterial property on ramie fibers.

  9. Preparation of metal oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Cabo, Borja; Rodil, Eva; Soto, Ana; Arce, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.arce@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering (Spain)

    2012-07-15

    In the present study, a facile, rapid, and environmentally friendly method was used for the preparation of metal oxide nanoparticles in an ionic liquid medium. This technique involves mixing and heating the corresponding powder material (cadmium oxide, anatase, and hematite) and the selected ionic liquid (trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride, [P{sub 6,6,6,14}]Cl), without any other precursors or solvents. The confirmation of the existence of nanoparticles in the ionic liquid was carried out using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, and its concentration was determined by X-ray fluorescence. In order to analyze the shape and size distribution, transmission electron microscopy and a ZetaSizer (DLS technique) were used; finding out that the size of the hematite nanoparticles was 10-55 nm. Nevertheless, for the cadmium oxide and the anatase nanoparticles, the size was between 2 and 15 nm. The composition of the prepared nanoparticles was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The structure of solids did not suffer any modification in their transformation to the nanoscale, as concluded from the X-ray powder diffraction analysis.

  10. Green nanochemistry: metal oxide nanoparticles and porous thin films from bare metal powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redel, Engelbert; Petrov, Srebri; Dag, Omer; Moir, Jonathon; Huai, Chen; Mirtchev, Peter; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2012-01-01

    A universal, simple, robust, widely applicable and cost-effective aqueous process is described for a controlled oxidative dissolution process of micrometer-sized metal powders to form high-purity aqueous dispersions of colloidally stable 3-8 nm metal oxide nanoparticles. Their utilization for making single and multilayer optically transparent high-surface-area nanoporous films is demonstrated. This facile synthesis is anticipated to find numerous applications in materials science, engineering, and nanomedicine.

  11. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Sulfide Nanoparticles Based on 2D Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qipeng; Zhao, Meiting; Chen, Junze; Chen, Bo; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Ying; Yang, Jian; Cao, Feifei; Yu, Yifu; Ping, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    A facile in situ synthetic method is developed to synthesize metal sulfide nanoparticles based on 2D M-TCPP (M = Cu, Cd, or Co, TCPP = tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin)) metal-organic framework nanosheets. The obtained CuS/Cu-TCPP composite nanosheet is used as the active material in photoelectrochemical cells, showing notably increased photocurrent due to the improved exciton separation and charge carrier transport.

  12. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudapathy, P., E-mail: pmp@igcar.gov.in; Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603 102 India (India)

    2015-06-24

    Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ∼45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar{sup +} ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  13. Thermoelectric Performance Enhancement by Surrounding Crystalline Semiconductors with Metallic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; King, Glen C.; Park, Yeonjoon; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2011-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy to electricity by thermoelectric (TE) devices may play a key role in future energy production and utilization. However, relatively poor performance of current TE materials has slowed development of new energy conversion applications. Recent reports have shown that the dimensionless Figure of Merit, ZT, for TE devices can be increased beyond the state-of-the-art level by nanoscale structuring of materials to reduce their thermal conductivity. New morphologically designed TE materials have been fabricated at the NASA Langley Research Center, and their characterization is underway. These newly designed materials are based on semiconductor crystal grains whose surfaces are surrounded by metallic nanoparticles. The nanoscale particles are used to tailor the thermal and electrical conduction properties for TE applications by altering the phonon and electron transport pathways. A sample of bismuth telluride decorated with metallic nanoparticles showed less thermal conductivity and twice the electrical conductivity at room temperature as compared to pure Bi2Te3. Apparently, electrons cross easily between semiconductor crystal grains via the intervening metallic nanoparticle bridges, but phonons are scattered at the interfacing gaps. Hence, if the interfacing gap is larger than the mean free path of the phonon, thermal energy transmission from one grain to others is reduced. Here we describe the design and analysis of these new materials that offer substantial improvements in thermoelectric performance.

  14. Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles supported on metal oxides using electroless plating: controlling the dispersion and size of nickel nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijie; Ge, Shaohui; Zhang, Minghui; Li, Wei; Tao, Keyi

    2009-02-15

    Nickel nanoparticles supported on metal oxides were prepared by a modified electroless nickel-plating method. The process and mechanism of electroless plating were studied by changing the active metal (Ag) loading, acidity, and surface area of metal oxides and were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and H(2) chemisorption. The results showed that the dispersion of nickel nanoparticles was dependent on the interface reaction between the metal oxide and the plating solution or the active metal and the plating solution. The Ag loading and acidity of the metal oxide mainly affected the interface reaction to change the dispersion of nickel nanoparticles. The use of ultrasonic waves and microwaves and the change of solvents from water to ethylene glycol in the electroless plating could affect the dispersion and size of nickel nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of diazonium functionalized nanoparticles for deposition on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselevich, María; Williams, Federico J

    2008-10-21

    Silica nanoparticles were surface-functionalized with diazonium groups. The reaction steps leading to the formation of the diazonium functionality were followed with IR and XPS, and the structure of the diazonium-functionalized nanoparticle was confirmed with solid state NMR. Nanoparticle size distribution was determined with DLS, SEM, and TEM. The nanoparticles were then covalently bonded to gold and iron surfaces. Their spatial distribution over the metal surface was analyzed by SEM. Diazonium modification of nanoparticles represents a new method for the covalent attachment of nanoparticles to metal surfaces.

  16. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng XL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Feng,1 Aijie Chen,1 Yanli Zhang,1 Jianfeng Wang,2 Longquan Shao,1 Limin Wei2 1Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano­neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. Keywords: nanomaterials, neurotoxicity, blood–brain barrier, autophagy, ROS

  17. Metal nanoparticles for thin film solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gritti, Claudia

    and used for FTDT simulations, in order to identify the set of parameters (NPs size and array periodicity) which could show LSP resonance in the NIR range. Two techniques are here used to fabricate NPs: electron beam lithography (EBL), to deposit ordered arrays of gold and silver NPs, simple to be compared...... the solar cell structure (GaAs, SiO2, Si3N4, AZO/Cr), in order to investigate the LSP resonance and tune it to exploit it below the energy band gap of the semiconductor. EBL is a difficult technique when working by lift-off on critical size (20-50 nm) nanoparticles. The optimization of the process saw...... a change from ZEP resist to double layer of PMMA and always requires preliminary exposure dose-tests and final particular attention for lift-off step. EBL resulted to be more suitable for silver NPs, since the deposition of gold (on top of an adhesion thin titanium layer) leads to a variation and non...

  18. Microbial preparation of metal-substituted magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Ji Won [ORNL; Roh, Yul [Chonnam National University, Gwangju; Lauf, Robert J [ORNL; Vali, Hojatollah [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Yeary, Lucas W [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    A microbial process that exploits the ability of iron-reducing microorganisms to produce copious amounts of extra-cellular metal (M)-substituted magnetite nanoparticles using akaganeite and dopants of dissolved form has previously been reported. The objectives of this study were to develop methods for producing M-substituted magnetite nanoparticles with a high rate of metal substitution by biological processes and to identify factors affecting the production of nano crystals. The thermophilic and psychrotolerant iron-reducing bacteria had the ability to form M substituted magnetite nano-crystals (MyFe3-yO4) from a doped precursor, mixed-M iron oxyhydroxide, (MxFe1-xOOH, x 0.5, M is Mn, Zn, Ni, Co, and Cr). Within the range of 0.01 x 0.3, using the mixed precursor material enabled the microbial synthesis of more heavily substituted magnetite compared to the previous method, in which the precursor was pure akaganeite and the dopants were present as soluble metal salts. The mixed precursor method was especially advantageous in the case of toxic metals such as Cr and Ni. Also this new method increased the production rate and magnetic properties of the product, while improving crystallinity, size control and scalability.

  19. Metallic nanoparticles reduce the migration of human fibroblasts in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Larissa Fernanda de Araújo; Lins, Marvin Paulo; Viana, Iana Mayane Mendes Nicácio; dos Santos, Jeniffer Estevão; Smaniotto, Salete; Reis, Maria Danielma dos Santos

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles have extremely wide applications in the medical and biological fields. They are being used in biosensors, local drug delivery, diagnostics, and medical therapy. However, the potential effects of nanoparticles on target cell and tissue function, apart from cytotoxicity, are not completely understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on human fibroblasts with respect to their interaction with the extracellular matrix and in cell migration. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that treatment with AgNPs or AuNPs decreased collagen and laminin production at all the concentrations tested (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL). Furthermore, cytofluorometric analysis showed that treatment with AgNPs reduced the percentage of cells expressing the collagen receptor very late antigen 2, α2β1 integrin (VLA-2) and the laminin receptor very late antigen 6, α6β1 integrin (VLA-6). In contrast, AuNP treatment increased and decreased the percentages of VLA-2-positive and VLA-6-positive cells, respectively, as compared to the findings for the controls. Analysis of cytoskeletal reorganization showed that treatment with both types of nanoparticles increased the formation of stress fibres and number of cell protrusions and impaired cell polarity. Fibroblasts exposed to different concentrations of AuNPs and AgNPs showed reduced migration through transwell chambers in the functional chemotaxis assay. These results demonstrated that metal nanoparticles may influence fibroblast function by negatively modulating the deposition of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) and altering the expression of ECM receptors, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell migration.

  20. Facile Solid-State Synthesis Route to Metal Nitride Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxiao DU; Ming LEI; Hui YANG

    2008-01-01

    By a facile and efficient solid-state reaction route using an organic reagent cyanamide (CN2H2) as a precursor with another one being metal oxides, we successfully synthesized seven technologically important metal nitrides including cubic VN, CrN, NbN, hexagonal GaN, AIN, BN, and WN at moderate temperatures. The experimental results show that cyanamide (CN2H2) is a powerfully reducing and nitridizing reagent and the metal oxides are completely converted into the corresponding nitride nanoparticles at lower temperatures than that reported in the conventional methods. It is found that CN2H2 can exhibit some interesting condensation processes, and the final products, highly active carbon nitride species, play a crucial role in the reducing and nitridizing processes.

  1. Optical properties of metallic nanoparticles basic principles and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Trügler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fascinating world of plasmonics and physics at the nanoscale, with a focus on simulations and the theoretical aspects of optics and nanotechnology. A research field with numerous applications, plasmonics bridges the gap between the micrometer length scale of light and the secrets of the nanoworld. This is achieved by binding light to charge density oscillations of metallic nanostructures, so-called surface plasmons, which allow electromagnetic radiation to be focussed down to spots as small as a few nanometers. The book is a snapshot of recent and ongoing research and at the same time outlines our present understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles, ranging from the tunability of plasmonic resonances to the ultrafast dynamics of light-matter interaction. Beginning with a gentle introduction that highlights the basics of plasmonic interactions and plasmon imaging, the author then presents a suitable theoretical framework for the description of metallic nanostructu...

  2. Ferroplasmons: Intense Localized Surface Plasmons in Metal-Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachan, Ritesh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Malasi, Abhinav [ORNL; Ge, Jingxuan [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Yadavali, Sagar P [ORNL; Gangopadhyay, Anup [Washington University, St. Louis; Krishna, Dr. Hare [Washington University, St. Louis; Garcia, Hernando [Southern Illinois University; Duscher, Gerd J M [ORNL; Kalyanaraman, Ramki [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of photons with matter at length scales far below their wavelengths has given rise to many novel phenomena, including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, LSPR with narrow bandwidth (BW) is observed only in a select few noble metals, and ferromagnets are not among them. Here, we report the discovery of LSPR in ferromagnetic Co and CoFe alloy (8% Fe) in contact with Ag in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser dewetting. These plasmons in metal-erromagnetic nanostructures, or ferroplasmons (FP) for short, are in the visible spectrum with comparable intensity and BW to those of the LSPRs from the Ag regions. This finding was enabled by electron energy-loss mapping across individual nanoparticles in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The appearance of the FP is likely due to plasmonic interaction between the contacting Ag and Co nanoparticles. Since there is no previous evidence for materials that simultaneously show ferromagnetism and such intense LSPRs, this discovery may lead to the design of improved plasmonic materials and applications. It also demonstrates that materials with interesting plasmonic properties can be synthesized using bimetallic nanostructures in contact with each other.

  3. Optical Properties and Immunoassay Applications of Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoli Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Noble metal, especially gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles exhibit unique and tunable optical properties on account of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR. In this paper, we mainly discussed the theory background of the enhanced optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Mie theory, transfer matrix method, discrete dipole approximation (DDA method, and finite-difference time domain (FDTD method applied brute-force computational methods for different nanoparticles optical properties. Some important nanostructure fabrication technologies such as nanosphere lithography (NSL and focused ion beam (FIB are also introduced in this paper. Moreover, these fabricated nanostructures are used in the plasmonic sensing fields. The binding signal between the antibody and antigen, amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs-potential Alzheimer's disease (AD biomarkers, and staphylococcal enterotixn B (SEB in nano-Moore per liter (nM concentration level are detected by our designed nanobiosensor. They have many potential applications in the biosensor, environment protection, food security, and medicine safety for health, and so forth, fields.

  4. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  5. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  6. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  7. Photo-induced reduction of Noble metal ions to metal nanoparticles on tubular J-aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kirstein

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium and silver nanoparticles are formed on the surface of tubular J-aggregates of an amphiphilic tetrachlorobenzimidacarbocyanine dye by reduction of the respective metal cations in aqueous solution. Upon addition of the palladium complex Na2PdCl4 to the aggregate solution, the absorption spectrum shows significant changes which is explained by partial destruction of the aggregates. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM images show that the tubular J-aggregates are randomly covered by well-separated Pd nanoparticles of approximately 1–3 nm size. Larger particles and higher particle density along the aggregates are obtained when an auxiliary reducing agent is added to the solution. The presence of the metallic particles leads to efficient fluorescence quenching giving clear evidence for super quenching. In similar experiments using AgNO3, silver nanoparticles are grown which are larger in size but less dense distributed along the aggregates. At least in the case of the silver particles, the spontaneous formation of metal nanoparticles is assumed to be initiated by a photo-induced electron transfer process (PET.

  8. Extracellular synthesis of magnetite and metal-substituted magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y; Vali, H; Phelps, T J; Moon, J W

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a novel microbial process that exploits the ability of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to produce copious amounts of extracellular magentites and metal-substituted magnetite nanoparticles. The Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Theroanaerobacter ethanolicus and Shewanella sp.) have the ability to reduce Fe(III) and various metals in aqueous media and form various sized magnetite and metal-substituted magnetite nano-crystals. The Fe(III)-reducing bacteria formed metalsubstituted magnetites using iron oxide plus metals (e.g., Co, Cr, Mn, Ni) under conditions of relatively low temperature (magnetite particles of well-defined size (typically tens of nanometers) and crystallographic morphology, containing selected dopant metals into the magnetite (Fe(3-y)XyO4) structure (where X = Co, Cr, Mn, Ni). Magnetite yields of up to 20 g/L per day have been observed in 20-L vessels. Water-based ferrofluids were formed with the nanometer sized, magnetite, and metal-substituted biomagnetite particles.

  9. Flame spray synthesis under a non-oxidizing atmosphere: Preparation of metallic bismuth nanoparticles and nanocrystalline bulk bismuth metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Robert N.; Stark, Wendelin J. [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: wendelin.stark@chem.ethz.ch

    2006-10-15

    Metallic bismuth nanoparticles of over 98% purity were prepared by a modified flame spray synthesis method in an inert atmosphere by oxygen-deficient combustion of a bismuth-carboxylate based precursor. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy confirming the formation of pure, crystalline metallic bismuth nanoparticles. Compression of the as-prepared powder resulted in highly dense, nanocrystalline pills with strong electrical conductivity and bright metallic gloss.

  10. Accurate thermoplasmonic simulation of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Da-Miao; Liu, Yan-Nan; Tian, Fa-Lin; Pan, Xiao-Min; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Thermoplasmonics leads to enhanced heat generation due to the localized surface plasmon resonances. The measurement of heat generation is fundamentally a complicated task, which necessitates the development of theoretical simulation techniques. In this paper, an efficient and accurate numerical scheme is proposed for applications with complex metallic nanostructures. Light absorption and temperature increase are, respectively, obtained by solving the volume integral equation (VIE) and the steady-state heat diffusion equation through the method of moments (MoM). Previously, methods based on surface integral equations (SIEs) were utilized to obtain light absorption. However, computing light absorption from the equivalent current is as expensive as O(NsNv), where Ns and Nv, respectively, denote the number of surface and volumetric unknowns. Our approach reduces the cost to O(Nv) by using VIE. The accuracy, efficiency and capability of the proposed scheme are validated by multiple simulations. The simulations show that our proposed method is more efficient than the approach based on SIEs under comparable accuracy, especially for the case where many incidents are of interest. The simulations also indicate that the temperature profile can be tuned by several factors, such as the geometry configuration of array, beam direction, and light wavelength.

  11. Organic nano-floating-gate transistor memory with metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tho, Luu; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-04-01

    Organic non-volatile memory is advanced topics for various soft electronics applications as lightweight, low-cost, flexible, and printable solid-state data storage media. As a key building block, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with a nano-floating gate are widely used and promising structures to store digital information stably in a memory cell. Different types of nano-floating-gates and their various synthesis methods have been developed and applied to fabricate nanoparticle-based non-volatile memory devices. In this review, recent advances in the classes of nano-floating-gate OFET memory devices using metal nanoparticles as charge-trapping sites are briefly reviewed. Details of device fabrication, characterization, and operation mechanisms are reported based on recent research activities reported in the literature.

  12. Laser induced inverse Landau damping in metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Martin E.; Castro, Alberto; Alonso, J. A.; Rubio, Angel

    2002-03-01

    We perform real space time-dependent density functional calculations to study the response of small metallic nanoparticles to femtosecond laser pulses. In particular, we analyze the role of screening effects for different laser pulse intensities and frequencies. Calculations are performed on sodium clusters using both the Jellium model and pseudopitentials Based on our results we predict that, if a pulse of sufficiently high intensity ( > 10^14 W/cm^2) excites a single-particle state of the nanoparticle, the response of the system involves both the single-particle- and the surface-plasmon states. We argue that this creation of plasmons from the decay of single-particle excitations, which can be viewed as the inverse of the well known Landau-damping effect, is related to the time-evolution of the screening of charge fluctuations.

  13. Plasmon polaritons in cubic lattices of spherical metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lamowski, Simon; Mariani, Eros; Weick, Guillaume; Pauly, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically plasmon polaritons in cubic lattices of interacting spherical metallic nanoparticles. Dipolar localized surface plasmons on each nanoparticle couple through the near field dipole-dipole interaction and form collective plasmons which extend over the whole metamaterial. Coupling these collective plasmons in turn to photons leads to plasmon polaritons. We derive within a quantum model general semi-analytical expressions to evaluate both plasmon and plasmon-polariton dispersions that fully account for nonlocal effects in the dielectric function of the metamaterial. Within this model, we discuss the influence of different lattice symmetries and predict related polaritonic gaps within the near-infrared to the visible range of the spectrum that depend on wavevector direction and polarization.

  14. Nonradiative limitations to plasmon propagation in chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Brandstetter-Kunc, Adam; Downing, Charles A; Weinmann, Dietmar; Jalabert, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collective plasmonic modes in a chain of metallic nanoparticles that are coupled by near-field interactions. The size- and momentum-dependent nonradiative Landau damping and radiative decay rates are calculated analytically within an open quantum system approach. These decay rates determine the excitation propagation along the chain. In particular, the behavior of the radiative decay rate as a function of the plasmon wavelength leads to a transition from an exponential decay of the collective excitation for short distances to an algebraic decay for large distances. Importantly, we show that the exponential decay is of a purely nonradiative origin. Our transparent model enables us to provide analytical expressions for the polarization-dependent plasmon excitation profile along the chain and for the associated propagation length. Our theoretical analysis constitutes an important step in the quest for the optimal conditions for plasmonic propagation in nanoparticle chains.

  15. Effect of correlation length between metallic nanoparticles in nonlinear properties of composition of oxide glass and metallic nanoparticles using SPFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Naseri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a kind of composite materials made up of noble metal nanoparticles (such as gold, silver, copper and a dielectric material (such as silica with unique properties. In this paper, using Strong Permittivity Fluctuation Theory (SPFT method, the coefficient of effective permittivity and the effective susceptibility coefficient are calculated for combining glass with metal nanoparticles, assuming that the nanoparticles are spherical. Coefficient of effective permittivity and the effective susceptibility index are estimated for the sample of homogeneous composite materials. And the results of this study are compared with experimental results and other models. It is observed that the data obtained for the zero-order estimate do not match the experimental results. By appropriate correlation length for the second- and third-order, specially for the second-order estimate of SPFT method, conformity between results can be established. Therefore, it can be concluded that SPFT method is betler than other models for calculating and improving the properties of the non-linear model.

  16. Present status and future outlook of selective metallization for electronics industry by laser irradiation to metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Recently an alternative to conventional methods based on vacuum processes such as evaporation or sputtering is desired to reduce the energy consumption and the environmental impact. Printed electronics has been developed as a one of the candidates, which is based on wet processes using soluble functional materials such as organic semiconductors, inorganic nanomaterials, organic-inorganic hybrids, and so on. Although inkjet printing has been studied widely as a core technology of printed electronics, the limitation of resolution is around 20 micrometer. The combination of the inkjet printing with other selective metallization process is necessary because the resolution of several micrometers is required in some optical and electrical devices. The laser processing has emerged as an attractive technique in microelectronics because of the fascinating features such as high resolution, high degree of flexibility to control the resolution and size of the micro-patterns, high speed, and a little environmental pollution. In this paper, the present status and future outlook of selective metallization for interconnection and the formation of transparent conductive film based on the laser processing using metal nanoparticles were reported. The laser beam irradiation to metal nanoparticles causes the fast and efficient sintering by plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticle, where the absorbed energy is confined in a nanoparticle and the nanoparticle acts as a nano-heater. The laser irradiation to metal nanoparticles was applied to the laser direct writing of metal wiring and micropatterns using silver and copper nanoparticles.

  17. Behavior of metallic nanoparticles in Al matrix under high electronic energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizza, G. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique/CEA-DRECAM/CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)]. E-mail: giancarlo.rizza@polytechnique.edu; Dunlop, A. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique/CEA-DRECAM/CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Dezellus, A. [LEPES/CNRS, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-03-15

    Metallic nanoparticles (Pb and Bi) embedded in a crystalline Al matrix were irradiated with 30 MeV C{sub 60} cluster ions at 300 K. Experimental evidence of partial amorphization of bismuth nanoparticles is observed. On the other hand, Pb inclusions remain crystalline. The condition under which embedded nanoparticles can be amorphized is discussed.

  18. Behavior of metallic nanoparticles in Al matrix under high electronic energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, G.; Dunlop, A.; Dezellus, A.

    2007-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (Pb and Bi) embedded in a crystalline Al matrix were irradiated with 30 MeV C60 cluster ions at 300 K. Experimental evidence of partial amorphization of bismuth nanoparticles is observed. On the other hand, Pb inclusions remain crystalline. The condition under which embedded nanoparticles can be amorphized is discussed.

  19. Optical trapping of metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters near photonic crystal microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Camilo A; Huang, Ningfeng; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-09-01

    We predict the formation of optically trapped, metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters above photonic crystal microcavities. We determine the conditions on particle size and position for a gold particle to be trapped above the microcavity. We then show that strong field redistribution and enhancement near the trapped gold nanoparticle results in secondary trapping sites for a pair of dielectric nanoparticles.

  20. Diameter-dependent thermodynamic and elastic properties of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jeewan; Kholiya, Kuldeep

    2015-04-01

    A simple theoretical model has been proposed to study the diameter-dependent properties of metallic nanoparticles, i.e. Ag, Au, Al, Ni, Pb, Cu and Fe. The diameter-dependent thermodynamic properties includes melting temperature, Debye temperature, evaporation temperature, melting enthapy and melting entropy. The model is also extended to study the diameter-dependent elastic properties including bulk modulus, Young's modulus and thermal expansion coefficient. On comparison with available experimental findings and other theoretical approaches, the results obtained with the present formulation depict a close agreement and demonstrate the validity of the method proposed in the present paper.

  1. Nanoparticles of noble metals in the supergene zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmodik, S. M.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Roslyakov, N. A.; Mironov, A. G.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Belyanin, D. K.; Nemirovskaya, N. A.; Spiridonov, A. M.; Nesterenko, G. V.; Airiyants, E. V.; Moroz, T. N.; Bul'bak, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Formation of noble metal nanoparticles is related to various geological processes in the supergene zone. Dispersed mineral phases appear during weathering of rocks with active participation of microorganisms, formation of soil, in aqueous medium and atmosphere. Invisible gold and other noble metals are incorporated into oxides, hydroxides, and sulfides, as well as in dispersed organic and inorganic carbonic matter. Sulfide minerals that occur in bedrocks and ores unaltered by exogenic processes and in cementation zone are among the main concentrators of noble metal nanoparticles. The ability of gold particles to disaggregate is well-known and creates problems in technological and analytical practice. When Au and PGE nanoparticles and clusters occur, these problems are augmented because of their unusual reactions and physicochemical properties. The studied gold, magnetite, titanomagnetite and pyrite microspherules from cementation zone and clay minerals of laterites in Republic of Guinea widen the knowledge of their abundance and inferred formation conditions, in particular, in the contemporary supergene zone. Morphology and composition of micrometer-sized Au mineral spherules were studied with SEM and laser microprobe. The newly formed segregations of secondary gold on the surface of its residual grains were also an object of investigation. The character of such overgrowths is the most indicative for nanoparticles. The newly formed Au particles provide evidence for redistribution of ultradispersed gold during weathering. There are serious prerequisites to state that microorganisms substantially control unusual nano-sized microspherical morphology of gold particles in the supergene zone. This is supported by experiments indicating active absorption of gold by microorganisms and direct evidence for participation of Ralstonia metallidurans bacteria in the formation of peculiar corroded bacteriomorphic surface of gold grains. In addition, the areas enriched in carbon

  2. Electrocatalysis of chemically synthesized noble metal nanoparticles on carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) NPs are promising catalysts for dioxygen reduction and oxidation of molecules such as formic acid and ethanol in fuel cells. Carbon nanomaterials are ideal supporting materials for electrochemical catalysts due to their good...... microscopy (AFM) which have proved to be highly efficient techniques to map the in situ structures of selfassembled molecular monolayers at molecular or sub-molecular resolution. Electrocatalysis of the Pd NPs immobilized on atomically flat, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) will be investigated...

  3. Reverse Microemulsion-mediated Synthesis of Monometallic and Bimetallic Early Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-11-27

    A reverse microemulsion is used to encapsulate monometallic or bimetallic early transition metal oxide nanoparticles in microporous silica shells. The silica-encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles are then carburized in a methane/hydrogen atmosphere at temperatures over 800 °C to form silica-encapsulated early transition metal carbide nanoparticles. During the carburization process, the silica shells prevent the sintering of adjacent carbide nanoparticles while also preventing the deposition of excess surface carbon. Alternatively, the silica-encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles can be nitridized in an ammonia atmosphere at temperatures over 800 °C to form silica-encapsulated early transition metal nitride nanoparticles. By adjusting the reverse microemulsion parameters, the thickness of the silica shells, and the carburization/nitridation conditions, the transition metal carbide or nitride nanoparticles can be tuned to various sizes, compositions, and crystal phases. After carburization or nitridation, the silica shells are then removed using either a room-temperature aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution or a 0.1 to 0.5 M NaOH solution at 40-60 °C. While the silica shells are dissolving, a high surface area support, such as carbon black, can be added to these solutions to obtain supported early transition metal carbide or nitride nanoparticles. If no high surface area support is added, then the nanoparticles can be stored as a nanodispersion or centrifuged to obtain a nanopowder.

  4. Intense generation of respirable metal nanoparticles from a low-power soldering unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Virginia [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanoscience Institute of Aragon (INA), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Irusta, Silvia [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanoscience Institute of Aragon (INA), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Balas, Francisco [Networking Biomedical Research Center of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Carboquímica – Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICB-CSIC), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Santamaria, Jesus, E-mail: Jesus.Santamaria@unizar.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanoscience Institute of Aragon (INA), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Intense generation of nanoparticles in the breathing range from a flux-soldering unit is detected. • Coagulation in the aerosol phase leads to 200-nm respirable nanoparticles up to 30 min after operation. • Nanoparticle concentration in the working environment depends on the presence of ambient air. • Metal-containing nanoparticles are collected in TEM grids and filters in the hundreds of nanometer range. -- Abstract: Evidence of intense nanoparticle generation from a low power (45 W) flux soldering unit is presented. This is a familiar device often used in daily life, including home repairs and school electronic laboratories. We demonstrate that metal-containing nanoparticles may reach high concentrations (ca. 10{sup 6} particles/cm{sup 3}) within the breathing range of the operator, with initial size distributions centered at 35–60 nm The morphological and chemical analysis of nanoparticle agglomerates collected on TEM grids and filters confirms their multiparticle structure and the presence of metals.

  5. Issues Affecting the Synthetic Scalability of Ternary Metal Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Morrow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ternary Mn-Zn ferrite (MnxZn1-xFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs have been prepared by the thermal decomposition of an oleate complex, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS mediated hydrazine decomposition of the chloride salts, and triethylene glycol (TREG mediated thermal decomposition of the metal acetylacetonates. Only the first method was found to facilitate the synthesis of uniform, isolable NPs with the correct Mn : Zn ratio (0.7 : 0.3 as characterized by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES. Scaling allowed for retention of the composition and size; however, attempts to prepare Zn-rich ferrites did not result in NP formation. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA indicated that the incomplete decomposition of the metal-oleate complexes prior to NP nucleation for Zn-rich compositions is the cause.

  6. Theoretical studies of preparation of core-shell nanoparticles by electrochemical metal deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oviedo, O.A.; Mariscal, M.M. [INFIQC, Departamento de Matematica y Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Leiva, E.P.M., E-mail: eleiva@fcq.unc.edu.a [INFIQC, Departamento de Matematica y Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-11-30

    In the present work we discuss the statistical mechanical framework for predicting the decoration of metallic nanoparticles using electrochemical methods, in thermodynamic equilibrium. It is found that depending on the interactions between the two metals, controlled decoration may be achieved for core-shell nanoparticles in undersaturation and oversaturation conditions. The concept of underpotential deposition is discussed for the case of nanoparticles, with the finding that this phenomenon may be size dependent.

  7. Topological collective plasmons in bipartite chains of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Charles A.; Weick, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We study a bipartite linear chain constituted by spherical metallic nanoparticles, where each nanoparticle supports a localized surface plasmon. The near-field dipolar interaction between the localized surface plasmons gives rise to collective plasmons, which are extended over the whole nanoparticle array. We derive analytically the spectrum and the eigenstates of the collective plasmonic excitations. At the edge of the Brillouin zone, the spectrum is of a pseudorelativistic nature similar to that present in the electronic band structure of polyacetylene. We find the effective Dirac Hamiltonian for the collective plasmons and show that the corresponding spinor eigenstates represent one-dimensional Dirac-like massive bosonic excitations. Therefore, the plasmonic lattice exhibits similar effects to those found for electrons in one-dimensional Dirac materials, such as the ability for transmission with highly suppressed backscattering due to Klein tunneling. We also show that the system is governed by a nontrivial Zak phase, which predicts the manifestation of edge states in the chain. When two dimerized chains with different topological phases are connected, we find the appearance of the bosonic version of a Jackiw-Rebbi midgap state. We further investigate the radiative and nonradiative lifetimes of the collective plasmonic excitations and comment on the challenges for experimental realization of the topological effects found theoretically.

  8. Precipitation of metal oxide nanoparticles using a miniemulsion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marion Winkelmann; Heike Petra Schuchmann

    2011-01-01

    A method to precipitate nanoparticles using a miniemulsion technique is described,in which miniemulsion droplets between 100 and 1000 nm in size serve as nanoreactors enabling both the control of particle formation and particle growth.The application ofminiemulsion droplets to synthesise nanoparticles comprises three advantages:first,the size of the precipitated particles is limited by the reactant concentration within the emulsion droplet; second,particle agglomeration is prevented as nanoparticle collision outside the nanoreactor is avoided; and third,easy technical scale up can be realized by increasing emulsion volume and thus the number of nanoreactors,while local conditions within the reactors are not changed.The miniemulsion technique is an easy scalable process which allows defined synthesis of particles by precipitation reactions.The miniemulsion technique involves first the preparation of a stable water-inoil miniemulsion by high pressure homogenisation.Whereas a water soluble reactant is provided within the aqueous droplets,another oil- as well as water-soluble reactant can be introduced to the emulsion after homogenisation.The precipitation reaction is induced by the diffusion of the second reactant into the emulsion droplet.Together with this contribution,a method is described and discussed which uses a high pressure homogenisation process to produce stable water-in-oil miniemulsions serving as a reaction medium to precipitate metal oxides.

  9. Piperidinium tethered nanoparticle-hybrid electrolyte for lithium metal batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Korf, Kevin S.

    2014-06-23

    We report on the synthesis of novel piperidinium-based ionic liquid tethered nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes and investigate their physical and electrochemical properties. Hybrid electrolytes based on the ionic liquid 1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone) imide covalently tethered to silica nanoparticles (SiO2-PP-TFSI) were blended with propylene carbonate-1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone) imide (LiTFSI). We employed NMR analysis to confirm the successful creation of the hybrid material. Dielectric and rheological measurements show that these electrolytes exhibit exceptional room-temperature DC ionic conductivity (10-2 to 10 -3 S cm-1) as well as high shear mechanical moduli (105 to 106 Pa). Lithium transference numbers were found to increase with particle loading and to reach values as high as 0.22 at high particle loadings where the particle jam to form a soft glassy elastic medium. Analysis of lithium electrodeposits obtained in the hybrid electrolytes using SEM and EDX spectra show that the SiO2-PP-TFSI nanoparticles are able to smooth lithium deposition and inhibit lithium dendrite proliferation in Li metal batteries. LTOSiO2-PP-TFSI/PC in 1 M LiTFSILi half-cells based on the SiO2-PP-TFSI hybrid electrolytes exhibit attractive voltage profiles and trouble-free extended cycling behavior over more than 1000 cycles of charge and discharge. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  10. Selective Catalysis in Nanoparticle Metal-Organic Framework Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Casey Justin

    The design of highly selective catalysts are becoming increasingly important, especially as chemical and pharmaceutical industries seek to improve atom economy and minimize energy intensive separations that are often required to separate side products from the desired product. Enzymes are among the most selective of all catalysts, generally operating through molecular recognition whereby an active site analogous to a lock and the substrate is analogous to a key. The assembly of a porous, crystalline material around a catalytically active metal particle could serve as an artificial enzyme. In this vein, we first synthesized the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated nanoparticles of interest and then encapsulated them within zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 or ZIF-8. 2.8 nm Pt-PVP nanoparticles, which were encapsulated within ZIF-8 to form Pt ZIF-8 composite. Pt ZIF-8 was inactive for the hydrogenation of cyclic olefins such as cis-cyclooctene and cis-cyclohexene while the composite proved to be a highly selective catalyst for the hydrogenation of terminal olefins, hydrogenating trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene in 95% selectivity after 24 hours under 1 bar H2. We extended our encapsulation method to sub-2 nm Au nanoparticles to form Au ZIF-8. Au ZIF-8 served as a highly chemoselective catalyst for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde an alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde, to crotyl alcohol an alpha,beta-unsaturated alcohol, in 90-95% selectivity. In order to investigate nanoparticle size effects on selectivity, 6-10 nm Au nanoparticles were encapsulated within ZIF-8 to form Au6 ZIF-8. Control catalysts with nanoparticles supported on the surface of ZIF-8 were synthesized as well, Au/ZIF-8 and Au6/ZIF-8. Au6 ZIF-8 hydrogenated crotonaldehyde in 85% selectivity towards the unsaturated alcohol. Catalysts with nanoparticles supported on the exterior of ZIF-8 were far less selective towards the unsaturated alcohol. Post-catalysis transmission electron microscopy analysis of Au ZIF

  11. Effects of particle size and surrounding media on optical radiation efficiencies of spherical plasmonic metal nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinayak A Dhumale; Preeti V Shah; Rishi B Sharma; Katsuaki Tanabe

    2012-04-01

    The optical radiation efficiency (), the ratio of scattering cross-section to extinction cross-section, of spherical metal nanoparticles (M= Al, Ag, Au and Cu) surrounded by glass and water was calculated using classical electrostatics. The effect of varying particle diameter (∼100 nm) on was also studied for free space wavelengths in the range of 400–1200 nm. The variations in the value of with the diameter () of the metal nanoparticles were calculated on the basis of quasi-static approximation. The increases with the size of metal nanoparticles. Corresponding to a metal nanoparticle, was found to exhibit a sharp dip (dip) at a characteristic wavelength ()M in a particular medium ( = air, glass and water). ()M was independent of particle size. The (medium)M was found to be slightly blue shifted for all metal nanoparticles surrounded by glass or water with respect to those in the air.

  12. Doping of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Functional Guest Molecules and Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Felicitas; Fischer, Roland A.

    Nanoparticle synthesis within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is performed by the adsorption of suitable precursor molecules for the metal component and subsequent decomposition to the composite materials nanoparticles@MOF. This chapter will review different approaches of loading MOFs with more complex organic molecules and metal-organic precursor molecules. The related reactions inside MOFs are discussed with a focus on stabilizing reactive intermediates in the corresponding cavities. The syntheses of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles inside MOFs are reviewed, and different synthetic routes compared. Emphasis is placed on the micro structural characterization of the materials nanoparticles@MOF with a particular focus on the location of embedded nanoparticles using TEM methods. Some first examples of applications of the doped MOFs in heterogeneous catalysis and hydrogen storage are described.

  13. Ancient Metal Mirror Alloy Revisited: Quasicrystalline Nanoparticles Observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, J. A.; Mantri, A. S.; Yamjala, S.; Saha, Sabyasachi; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Rao, P. Rama

    2015-12-01

    This article presents, for the first time, evidence of nanocrystalline structure, through direct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, in a Cu-32 wt.% Sn alloy that has been made by an age-old, uniquely crafted casting process. This alloy has been used as a metal mirror for centuries. The TEM images also reveal five-sided projections of nano-particles. The convergent beam nano-diffraction patterns obtained from the nano-particles point to the nano-phase being quasicrystalline, a feature that has never before been reported for a copper alloy, although there have been reports of the presence of icosahedral `clusters' within large unit cell intermetallic phases. This observation has been substantiated by x-ray diffraction, wherein the observed peaks could be indexed to an icosahedral quasi-crystalline phase. The mirror alloy casting has been valued for its high hardness and high reflectance properties, both of which result from its unique internal microstructure that include nano-grains as well as quasi-crystallinity. We further postulate that this microstructure is a consequence of the raw materials used and the manufacturing process, including the choice of mold material. While the alloy consists primarily of copper and tin, impurity elements such as zinc, iron, sulfur, aluminum and nickel are also present, in individual amounts not exceeding one wt.%. It is believed that these trace impurities could have influenced the microstructure and, consequently, the properties of the metal mirror alloy.

  14. Synthesis of Green Metallic Nanoparticles (NPs and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varahalarao Vadlapudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology (NT is a field that is mushrooming, making an impact in all spheres of human life. Presently available literature revealed that the NP synthesis using medicinal plants, microorganisms and algae and others as source has been unexplored and underexploited. NT is very important in developing sustainable technologies for the future, for humanity and the environment. The development of green processes for the synthesis of NP is evolving into an important branch of nanotechnology. Natural sources of nanoparticles include fires and volcanic eruptions. The nanotechnology have short to long term uses like environmental pollution cleanup, efficient and safe drug delivery mechanisms with less side effects, developments in information technology, self-cleaning window glass , ‘smart’ fabrics which adjust to suit the temperature. Plant mediated synthesis of metal nanoparticles is gaining more importance owing to its simplicity, rapid rate of synthesis of NP of attractive and diverse morphologies and elimination of elaborate maintenance of cell cultures and ecofriendliness. It has many advantages such as, ease with which the process can be measured up, economic viability and etc. Presently, the researchers are looking into the development of cost-effective procedures for producing reproducible, stable and biocompatible metal NPs.

  15. Multiple percolation tunneling staircase in metal-semiconductor nanoparticle composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Rupam; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Nadgorny, Boris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Multiple percolation transitions are observed in a binary system of RuO{sub 2}-CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} metal-semiconductor nanoparticle composites near percolation thresholds. Apart from a classical percolation transition, associated with the appearance of a continuous conductance path through RuO{sub 2} metal oxide nanoparticles, at least two additional tunneling percolation transitions are detected in this composite system. Such behavior is consistent with the recently emerged picture of a quantum conductivity staircase, which predicts several percolation tunneling thresholds in a system with a hierarchy of local tunneling conductance, due to various degrees of proximity of adjacent conducting particles distributed in an insulating matrix. Here, we investigate a different type of percolation tunneling staircase, associated with a more complex conductive and insulating particle microstructure of two types of non-spherical constituents. As tunneling is strongly temperature dependent, we use variable temperature measurements to emphasize the hierarchical nature of consecutive tunneling transitions. The critical exponents corresponding to specific tunneling percolation thresholds are found to be nonuniversal and temperature dependent.

  16. Evaluation of assemblies based on carbon materials modified with dendrimers containing platinum nanoparticles for PEM-fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledesma-Garcia, J.; Barbosa, R.; Chapman, T.W.; Arriaga, L.G.; Godinez, Luis A. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S.C. Parque Tecnologico Queretaro-Sanfandila, 76703 Pedro Escobedo, Qro. (Mexico)

    2009-02-15

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-encapsulated Pt nanoparticles (G4OHPt) are synthesized by chemical reduction and characterized by transmission electronic microscopy. An H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} fuel cell has been constructed with porous carbon electrodes modified with the dendrimer nanocomposites. Electrochemical and physical impregnation methods of electrocatalyst immobilization are compared. The modified surfaces are used as electrodes and gas-diffusion layers in the construction of three different membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs). The MEAs have been tested in a single polymer-electrolyte membrane-fuel cell at 30 C and 20 psig. The fuel cell is, then characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry, and its performance evaluated in terms of polarization curves and power profiles. The highest fuel cell performance is reached in the MEA constructed by physical impregnation method. The results are compared with a 32 cm{sup 2} prototype cell using commercial electrocatalyst operated at 80 C, obtaining encouraging results. (author)

  17. Textural Evidence of Episodic Introduction of Metallic Nanoparticles into Bonanza Epithermal Ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Saunders

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tertiary low sulfidation (LS epithermal deposits in the western USA often show evidence of the former presence of nanoparticle-sized precious-metal and silica phases in the highest grade (bonanza ores. Here, nanoparticles are defined to have a size less than ~10−7 m. The ore-mineral textures that formed from aggregation of nanoparticles (or colloids observed to date in these ores include electrum and naumannite (Ag2Se. Here it is proposed that chalcopyrite also forms nanoparticles in these ores, but sulfide nanoparticles apparently have significantly different physical (surface properties than the precious-metal phases, and thus exhibit different mineral textures (e.g., no textural evidence of previous chalcopyrite nanoparticles. Textures described here show that nanoparticles of precious-metal phases and silica were episodically and often repeatedly deposited to form the banded bonanza veins typical of many western USA epithermal deposits. Chalcopyrite is the most abundant metal-sulfide mineral in these bonanza ores, and it was also deposited episodically as well, and it appears to replace earlier formed naumannite dendrites. However, this apparent “replacement” texture may just be the result of naumannite dendrite limbs trapping chalcopyrite nanoparticles that later recrystallized to the apparent replacement texture. The episodic and repetitive nature of the metal-depositing events may record periodic “degassing” of magma chambers at depth, where metals are repeatedly delivered to the shallow epithermal environment by “vapor-phase” metal (loid transport.

  18. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  19. Investigation of laser heating effect of metallic nanoparticles on cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, G. S.; Liu, X. M.; Chen, H. J.; Yu, J. S.; Chen, X. D.; Yao, Y.; Qi, L. M.; Chen, Z. J.

    2016-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles can be applied for hyperthermia therapy of cancer treatment to enhance the efficacy because of their high absorption rate. The absorption of laser energy by metallic nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the concentration, shape, material of nanoparticles and the wavelength of the laser. However, there is no systematic investigation on the heating effect involving different material, concentration and laser wavelength. In this paper, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and sliver nanowires (AgNWs) with different concentrations are heated by 450nm and 532nm wavelength laser to investigate the heating effect. The result shows that the temperature distribution of heated metallic nanoparticles is non-uniform.

  20. Encapsulation of Mono- or Bimetal Nanoparticles Inside Metal-Organic Frameworks via In situ Incorporation of Metal Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyu; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Hongli; Li, Yingwei

    2015-06-10

    A facile, in situ metal precursor incorporation strategy is established for good control over the location and composition of metal nanoparticles within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). This one-step metal precursor incorporation route is successfully applied to the fabrication of ultrafine Pd, Ni, and PdNi alloys to be selectively encapsulated inside the pores of MOFs, achieving superior catalytic activity and stability in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene.

  1. Metal-Based Nanoparticles and the Immune System: Activation, Inflammation, and Potential Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Chang, Louis W; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials, including metal-based nanoparticles, are used for various biological and medical applications. However, metals affect immune functions in many animal species including humans. Different physical and chemical properties induce different cellular responses, such as cellular uptake and intracellular biodistribution, leading to the different immune responses. The goals of this review are to summarize and discuss the innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by metal-based nanoparticles in a variety of immune system models.

  2. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F. Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  3. Regulating the spatial distribution of metal nanoparticles within metal-organic frameworks to enhance catalytic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiu; Liu, Wenxian; Wang, Bingqing; Zhang, Weina; Zeng, Xiaoqiao; Zhang, Cong; Qin, Yongji; Sun, Xiaoming; Wu, Tianpin; Liu, Junfeng; Huo, Fengwei; Lu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Composites incorporating metal nanoparticles (MNPs) within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have broad applications in many fields. However, the controlled spatial distribution of the MNPs within MOFs remains a challenge for addressing key issues in catalysis, for example, the efficiency of catalysts due to the limitation of molecular diffusion within MOF channels. Here we report a facile strategy that enables MNPs to be encapsulated into MOFs with controllable spatial localization by using metal oxide both as support to load MNPs and as a sacrificial template to grow MOFs. This strategy is versatile to a variety of MNPs and MOF crystals. By localizing the encapsulated MNPs closer to the surface of MOFs, the resultant MNPs@MOF composites not only exhibit effective selectivity derived from MOF cavities, but also enhanced catalytic activity due to the spatial regulation of MNPs as close as possible to the MOF surface. PMID:28195131

  4. Regulating the spatial distribution of metal nanoparticles within metal-organic frameworks to enhance catalytic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiu; Liu, Wenxian; Wang, Bingqing; Zhang, Weina; Zeng, Xiaoqiao; Zhang, Cong; Qin, Yongji; Sun, Xiaoming; Wu, Tianpin; Liu, Junfeng; Huo, Fengwei; Lu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Composites incorporating metal nanoparticles (MNPs) within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have broad applications in many fields. However, the controlled spatial distribution of the MNPs within MOFs remains a challenge for addressing key issues in catalysis, for example, the efficiency of catalysts due to the limitation of molecular diffusion within MOF channels. Here we report a facile strategy that enables MNPs to be encapsulated into MOFs with controllable spatial localization by using metal oxide both as support to load MNPs and as a sacrificial template to grow MOFs. This strategy is versatile to a variety of MNPs and MOF crystals. By localizing the encapsulated MNPs closer to the surface of MOFs, the resultant MNPs@MOF composites not only exhibit effective selectivity derived from MOF cavities, but also enhanced catalytic activity due to the spatial regulation of MNPs as close as possible to the MOF surface.

  5. Biofilms Versus Activated Sludge: Considerations in Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Removal from Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Connie; Zhang, Wen

    2016-08-16

    The increasing application of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles [Me(O)NPs] in consumer products has led to a growth in concentration of these nanoparticles in wastewater as emerging contaminants. This may pose a threat to ecological communities (e.g., biological nutrient removal units) within treatment plants and those subject to wastewater effluents. Here, the toxicity, fate, and process implications of Me(O)NPs within wastewater treatment, specifically during activated sludge processing and biofilm systems are reviewed and compared. Research showed activated sludge achieves high removal rate of Me(O)NPs by the formation of aggregates through adsorption. However, recent literature reveals evidence that inhibition is likely for nutrient removal capabilities such as nitrification. Biofilm systems were much less studied, but show potential to resist Me(O)NP inhibition and achieve removal through possible retention by sorption. Implicating factors during bacteria-Me(O)NP interactions such as aggregation, surface functionalization, and the presence of organics are summarized. At current modeled levels, neither activated sludge nor biofilm systems can achieve complete removal of Me(O)NPs, thus allowing for long-term environmental exposure of diverse biological communities to Me(O)NPs in streams receiving wastewater effluents. Future research directions are identified throughout in order to minimize the impact of these nanoparticles released.

  6. Quantum dissipation and decoherence of collective excitations in metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weick, G.

    2006-09-22

    The treatment of the surface plasmon as a quantum particle provides a model system for the study of decoherence and quantum dissipation in confined nanoscopic systems, where the role of the electronic correlations is preponderant. Throughout this work we treat the metallic nanoparticle in the jellium approximation where the ionic structure is replaced by a continuous and homogeneous positive charge. The external laser field puts the center of mass into a coherent superposition of its ground and first excited state and thus creates a surface plasmon. The coupling between the center of mass and the relative coordinates causes decoherence and dissipation of this collective excitation. We have developed a theoretical formalism well adapted to the study of this dissipation, which is the reduced-density-matrix formalism. There are mainly two parameters which govern the surface plasmon dynamics: the decay rate of the plasmon, and the resonance frequency. For sizes smaller than 1 nm, presents oscillations as a function of the size. By means of a semiclassical formalism using Gutzwiller's trace formula for the density of states, we have shown that those oscillations are due to the correlations of the density of states of the particles and holes in the nanoparticle. If one considers a noble-metal nanoparticle in an inert matrix, we have shown that a naive application of the Kubo formula for the surface plasmon linewidth fails to reproduce the TDLDA numerical results, which are however consistent with experimental results. We have modified the Kubo theory in order to solve this discrepancy. We have shown, by extending our semiclassical theory to the nonlinear case, that the double plasmon is indeed well defined. We have calculated the lifetime of the double plasmon associated to this second-order effect. In addition to the width, we have also addressed the value of the resonance frequency. The classical electromagnetic Mie theory gives for the resonance frequency of the

  7. In vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Xiaoke; Cook, Sean; Wang Peng [Department of Biology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Hwang Hueymin [Department of Biology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States)], E-mail: hwang@jsums.edu

    2009-04-01

    The recent advances in nanotechnology and the corresponding popular usage of nanomaterials have resulted in uncertainties regarding their environmental impacts. In this study, we used a systematic approach to study and compare the in vitro cytotoxicity of selected engineered metal oxide nanoparticles to the test organisms - E. coli. Among the seven test nano-sized metal oxides, ZnO, CuO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3,} La{sub 2}O{sub 3,} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} SnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2,} ZnO showed the lowest LD{sub 50} of 21.1 mg/L and TiO{sub 2} had the highest LD{sub 50} of 1104.8 mg/L. Data of {sup 14}C-glucose mineralization test paralleled the results of bacteria viability test. After regression calculation, the cytotoxicity was found to be correlated with cation charges (R{sup 2} = 0.9785). The higher the cation charge is, the lower the cytotoxicity of the nano-sized metal oxide becomes. To the best of our knowledge, this finding is the first report in nanotoxicology.

  8. Colloidal Metal Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation and their Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianming; Claverie, Jerome; Chaker, Mohamed; Ma, Dongling

    2017-05-05

    This review article highlights the recent advances of the synthesis and application of metal nanoparticles (NPs) fabricated via pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) phase and also introduces relevant NP formation mechanisms. Although wet-chemical approaches have been well established to synthesize colloidal metal NPs with various components and structures, some inherent drawbacks, such as reaction residuals and/or contaminations, largely limit some of their applications. The PLAL method has recently been developed as an alternative approach and received increasing attention for colloidal NP preparation, without involving complicated chemical reactions. In certain cases, by using PLAL, ligand-free and surface-clean NPs can be obtained and well dispersed in liquid, leading to the formation of a "surface-clean" NP dispersion. This unique feature renders PLAL-synthesised metal NPs attractive candidates for many interesting applications in catalysis, biology, sensing, and clean energy generation and storage. We conclude this review by proposing several interesting research directions and future challenges, from PLAL fabrication to applications. We hope this review can serve as a good reference and help with the further development of PLAL-NPs and their diverse applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metallic iron nanoparticles: Flame synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunfeng Li; Yanjie Hu; Guangjian Huang; Chunzhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Metallic iron (Fe) nanoparticles (NPs) with a typical core-shell structure have been prepared by a simple and continuous flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) method,which are stabilized by the corresponding Fe3O4 shell with a thickness of 4-6 nm.The size of metallic Fe cores is about 30-80 nm.The core-shell structured iron NPs show an air stability as long as one month as a result of the protection of oxide shell.Through the control of the residence time of materials in flame and flame atmosphere,metallic Fe and iron oxides are obtained,showing a better external magnetic field responsibility.It is concluded that the evolution of morphology and composition of flame-made magnetic NPs could be attributed to the competition mechanism between reduction and oxidation reactions of in situ flame combustion,which offers more choices and better effective design strategy for the synthesis of advanced functional materials via FSP techniques.

  10. Asymmetries in transition metal XPS spectra: metal nanoparticle structure, and interaction with the graphene-structured substrate surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, E

    2010-03-16

    Transition-metal XPS spectra have traditionally been considered to possess a natural asymmetry, extending to the high-binding-energy side. This is based on the fact that these spectra have generally been found experimentally to have such an asymmetry, as well as on the confirmation of asymmetry offered by the Doniach-Sunjić equation, an equation based on the proposal that the conduction electron scattering amplitude for interband absorption or emission in metals, at the Fermi level, is a singularity. Our discovery that metal nanoparticles, prepared under vacuum and characterized without exposure to air, have symmetric peaks, which become asymmetric with time, informed us that these peak asymmetries have other sources. On the basis of our belief that all metal spectra are composed of symmetric peaks, where the asymmetries are attributed to overlapping minor peaks that are consistent with known physical and chemical phenomena associated with that metal, we have shown that, for the metals that we have studied, these asymmetries contain much information, otherwise unavailable, on the structures, contaminants, oxidation, and interfacial interactions of nanoparticle surfaces. The existence of this information has been demonstrated for several metals, and its value is shown by its use in explaining the strong interfacial bonding of the nanoparticles with substrates having graphene structures. A possible future research direction is offered in the field of metal-metal interactions in nanoparticle alloys.

  11. Design and Utility of Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Thioether End-Functionalized Polymeric Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumaila Razzaque

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The past few decades have witnessed significant advances in the development of functionalized metal/metal oxide nanoparticles including those of inorganic noble metals and magnetic materials stabilized by various polymeric ligands. Recent applications of such functionalized nanoparticles, including those in bio-imaging, sensing, catalysis, drug delivery, and other biomedical applications have triggered the need for their facile and reproducible preparation with a better control over their size, shape, and surface chemistry. In this perspective, the multidentate polymer ligands containing functional groups like thiol, thioether, and ester are important surface ligands for designing and synthesizing stable nanoparticles (NPs of metals or their oxides with reproducibility and high yield. These ligands have offered an unprecedented control over the particle size of both nanoparticles and nanoclusters with enhanced colloidal stability, having tunable solubility in aqueous and organic media, and tunable optical, magnetic, and fluorescent properties. This review summarizes the synthetic methodologies and stability of nanoparticles and fluorescent nanoclusters of metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and other transition metal oxides prepared by using thioether based ligands and highlights their applications in bio-imaging, sensing, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and catalysis. The future applications of fluorescent metal NPs like thermal gradient optical imaging, single molecule optoelectronics, sensors, and optical components of the detector are also envisaged.

  12. Magnetic metal nanoparticles coated polyacrylonitrile textiles as microwave absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akman, O. [Physics Department, Gebze Institute of Technology (GYTE), 41400 Gebze-Kocaeli (Turkey); Department of Physics, Sakarya University, 54100, Sakarya (Turkey); Kavas, H. [Department of Physics Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, Istanbul Medeniyet University, 34720 Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, A., E-mail: hbaykal@fatih.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, 34500, B. Cekmece-Istanbul (Turkey); Toprak, M.S. [Functional Materials Division, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-16440 Stockholm (Sweden); Yildirim Beyazit University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulus-Ankara (Turkey); Coruh, Ali [Department of Physics, Sakarya University, 54100, Sakarya (Turkey); Aktas, B., E-mail: aktas@gyte.edu.tr [Physics Department, Gebze Institute of Technology (GYTE), 41400 Gebze-Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) textiles with 2 mm thickness are coated with magnetic nanoparticles in coating baths with Ni, Co and their alloys via an electroless metal deposition method. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic nature of composites are investigated by X-ray Powder diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and dc magnetization measurement techniques. The frequency dependent microwave absorption measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (X and P bands). Diamagnetic and ferromagnetic properties are also investigated. Finally, the microwave absorption of composites is found strongly dependent on the coating time. One absorption peak is observed between 14.3 and 15.8 GHz with an efficient absorption bandwidth of 3.3-4.1 GHz (under -20 dB reflection loss limit). The Reflection loss (RL) can be achieved between -30 and -50 dB. It was found that the RL is decreasing and absorption bandwidth is decreasing with increasing coating time. While absorption peak moves to lower frequencies in Ni coated PAN textile, it goes higher frequencies in Co coated ones. The Ni-Co alloy coated composites have fluctuating curve of absorption frequency with respect to coating time. These results encourage further development of magnetic nanoparticle coated textile absorbers for broadband applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni, Co and Ni-Co alloyed coatings on PAN were successfully prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles leads to interfacial polarization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite prepared in Ni bath at 0.5 min leads to a wider absorption bandwidth and minimum coefficient of reflection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer About of -42 dB, more than 99.99% of the microwave absorption.

  13. Magnetic moment of a single metal nanoparticle determined from the Faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczytko, Jacek; Vaupotič, Nataša; Madrak, Karolina; Sznajder, Paweł; Górecka, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Optical properties of a composite material made of ferromagnetic metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric host are studied. We constructed an effective dielectric tensor of the composite material taking into account the orientational distribution of nanoparticle magnetic moments in external magnetic field. A nonlinear dependence of the optical rotation on magnetic field resulting from the reorientation of nanoparticles is demonstrated. The theoretical findings were applied to the magneto-optical experimental data of cobalt ferromagnetic nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric liquid host. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on Co-based ferromagnetic nanoparticles was measured as a function of the external magnetic field, varying the size of nanoparticles and the wavelength of light. The proposed approach enables quantitative determination of the magnetic moment and the plasma frequency of a single nanoparticle, and from this the size of the nonmagnetic shell of magnetic nanoparticles.

  14. Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle-decorated Carbon Nanotubes under Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata; Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the production of Metal Nanoparticle-decorated carbon Nanotubes. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were efficiently decorated with metal nanoparticles (e.g. Ag, Pt, etc.) using the corresponding metal acetate in a simple mixing process without the need of chemical reagents or further processing. The conversion of acetate compounds to the corresponding metal reached over 90%, forming nanoparticles with average diameters less than 10 nm under certain conditions. The process was readily scalable allowing for the convenient preparation of multi-gram quantities of metal nanoparticle-decorated MWCNTs in a matter of a few minutes. These materials are under evaluation for a variety of electrical and catalytic applications. The preparation and characterization of these materials will be presented. The microscopic views of the processed MWCNTs are shown

  15. Inhomogeneous depletion of oxygen ions in metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykhodets, Vladimir B.; Jarvis, Emily A. A.; Kurennykh, Tatiana E.; Beketov, Igor V.; Obukhov, Sviatoslav I.; Samatov, Oleg M.; Medvedev, Anatoly I.; Davletshin, Andrey E.; Whyte, Travis H.

    2016-02-01

    Zirconia and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have multiple uses, including catalysis, fuel cells, dental applications, and thermal coatings. We employ nuclear reaction analysis to determine elemental composition of YSZ nanoparticles synthesized by laser evaporation including 18O studies to distinguish between oxide and adsorbed oxygen content as a function of surface area. We see dramatic deviation from stoichiometry that can be traced to loss of oxygen from the oxide near the surface of these nanopowders. Density functional calculations are coupled with these experimental studies to explore the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric surfaces achieved through depletion of oxygen. Our results show oxygen-depleted surfaces present under oxygen potentials where stoichiometric, oxygen-terminated surfaces would be favored thermodynamically for crystalline systems. Oxygen depletion at nanopowder surfaces can create effective two-dimensional surface metallic states while maintaining stoichiometry in the underlying nanoparticle core. This insight into nanopowder surfaces applies to dissimilar oxides of aluminum and zirconium indicating synthesis conditions may be more influential than the inherent oxide properties and displaying need for distinct models for nanopowders of these important engineering materials where surface chemistry dominates performance.

  16. Synthesis and optical properties of anisotropic metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Encai; Schatz, George C; Hupp, Joseph T

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we overview our recent studies of anisotropic noble metal (e.g. gold and silver) nanoparticles, in which a combination of theory and experiment has been used to elucidate the extinction spectra of the particles, as well as information related to their surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. We used wet-chemical methods to generate several structurally well-defined nanostructures other than solid spheres, including silver nanodisks and triangular nanoprisms, and gold nanoshells and multipods. When solid spheres are transformed into one of these shapes, the surface plasmon resonances in these particles are strongly affected, typically red-shifting and even splitting into distinctive dipole and quadrupole plasmon modes. In parallel, we have developed computational electrodynamics methods based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to determine the origins of these intriguing optical features. This has resulted in considerable insight concerning the variation of plasmon wavelength with nanoparticle size, shape and dielectric environment, as well as the use of these particles for optical sensing applications.

  17. TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers with metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Tokuoka, Nozomu; Honda, Shinji; Shinkai, Yuji; Shimizu, Yasutomo; Fujimoto, Shinji [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: tsuchiya@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-01

    The present work reports the deposition behavior of Pd or Ag particles on TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers with an average diameter of 100 nm and length of 500 nm. The deposition of Pd or Ag particles is carried out by photo-induced reduction of metal ions. TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers are exposed to UV irradiation in an electrolyte containing Pd ions. Pd deposition behavior strongly depends on the crystal structure of TiO{sub 2} nantoube layers. As-anodized nanotube layers are in the amorphous state and can be converted to anatase without any changes in structural integrity. On as-formed amorphous nanotube layer, no Pd particles are deposited whereas in the case of anatase nanotube layer many Pd particles are formed by UV irradiation in PdCl2 electrolyte. However, the size of Pd particles is larger than the diameter of nanotubes and increases with irradiation time. In order to circumvent this problem, TiO{sub 2} nanotube layer is immersed in an electrolyte, then rinsed with deionized water, followed by exposure to UV irradiation. This results in the deposition of Ag nanoparticles with the size of 10 nm on and inside nanotubes. Photocurrent measurements reveal that the presence of Ag nanoparticles on TiO{sub 2} nanotube layer enhances the absorption efficiency of dye, leading to higher photocurrent.

  18. Dirac plasmons in bipartite lattices of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebb Sturges, Thomas; Woollacott, Claire; Weick, Guillaume; Mariani, Eros

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically ‘graphene-like’ plasmonic metamaterials constituted by two-dimensional arrays of metallic nanoparticles, including perfect honeycomb structures with and without inversion symmetry, as well as generic bipartite lattices. The dipolar interactions between localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in different nanoparticles gives rise to collective plasmons (CPs) that extend over the whole lattice. We study the band structure of CPs and unveil its tunability with the orientation of the dipole moments associated with the LSPs. Depending on the dipole orientation, we identify a phase diagram of gapless or gapped phases in the CP dispersion. We show that the gapless phases in the phase diagram are characterized by CPs behaving as massless chiral Dirac particles, in analogy with electrons in graphene. When the inversion symmetry of the honeycomb structure is broken, CPs are described as gapped chiral Dirac modes with an energy-dependent Berry phase. We further relax the geometric symmetry of the honeycomb structure by analysing generic bipartite hexagonal lattices. In this case we study the evolution of the phase diagram and unveil the emergence of a sequence of topological phase transitions when one hexagonal sublattice is progressively shifted with respect to the other.

  19. Magnetic metal nanoparticles coated polyacrylonitrile textiles as microwave absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, O.; Kavas, H.; Baykal, A.; Toprak, M. S.; Çoruh, Ali; Aktaş, B.

    2013-02-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) textiles with 2 mm thickness are coated with magnetic nanoparticles in coating baths with Ni, Co and their alloys via an electroless metal deposition method. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic nature of composites are investigated by X-ray Powder diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and dc magnetization measurement techniques. The frequency dependent microwave absorption measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (X and P bands). Diamagnetic and ferromagnetic properties are also investigated. Finally, the microwave absorption of composites is found strongly dependent on the coating time. One absorption peak is observed between 14.3 and 15.8 GHz with an efficient absorption bandwidth of 3.3-4.1 GHz (under -20 dB reflection loss limit). The Reflection loss (RL) can be achieved between -30 and -50 dB. It was found that the RL is decreasing and absorption bandwidth is decreasing with increasing coating time. While absorption peak moves to lower frequencies in Ni coated PAN textile, it goes higher frequencies in Co coated ones. The Ni-Co alloy coated composites have fluctuating curve of absorption frequency with respect to coating time. These results encourage further development of magnetic nanoparticle coated textile absorbers for broadband applications.

  20. Parahydrogen Induced Polarization Reactions on Supported Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Clifford; Zhou, Ronghui; Cheng, Wei; Neal, Luke; Hagelin-Weaver, Helena

    2014-03-01

    ALTADENA type parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) signals were acquired using various oxide (e.g. Al2O3, TiO2) supported Pt and Ir nanoparticle catalysts in the hydrogenation of small alkenes. The hydrogenation reactions were performed using a home-built mini-reactor installed on top of a 9.4 Tesla superconducting NMR magnet. Precise control of the gas mixture (i.e. alkene, para-H2 and carrier gas) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Hyperpolarized adducts were delivered down the magnet bore from the reactor to the NMR probe for NMR detection. For certain substrates, long-lived hyperpolarized states were generated and detected. The PHIP signal enhancement and pairwise H2 addition selectivity was measured as a function of the reactant partial pressures and reaction temperature. Activation energies and reaction kinetics were obtained for both pairwise and random addition. The reaction conditions and metal nanoparticle characteristics favoring pairwise selectivity were thus identified. This project is supported by the ACS-PRF #52258-ND5.

  1. Noncovalent functionalization of few-layer black phosphorus with metal nanoparticles and its application in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Caporali, Maria; Telesio, Francesca; Heun, Stefan; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Spinella, Corrado; Caporali, Stefano; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal nanoparticles of Ni, Pd, Ru and Au, each of them stabilized by a suitable capping agent, were dispersed on the surface of few-layer black phosphorus (2D BP) achieving new nanocomposite 2D materials. Ni nanoparticles supported on 2D BP worked successfully in the hydrogenation of phenylacetylene, showing good catalytic activity preserved after recycling tests. These results highlight that 2D BP is able to stabilize metal nanoparticles through weak noncovalent interactions and disclose a wide application of 2D BP as a hosting platform for catalytically active metal species.

  2. The challenges of testing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in algal bioassays: titanium dioxide and gold nanoparticles as case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic toxicology of engineered nanoparticles is challenged by methodological difficulties stemming partly from highly dynamic and poorly understood behavior of nanoparticles in biological test systems. In this paper scientific and technical challenges of testing not readily soluble nanoparticle...

  3. Bio-related noble metal nanoparticle structure property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Donovan Nicholas

    Structure property relationships of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be drastically different than bulk properties of the same metals. This research study used state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy and scanned probe microscopy to determine material properties on the nanoscale of bio-related Au and Pd NPs. Recently, it has been demonstrated the self-assembly of Au NPs on functionalized silica surfaces creates a conductive surface. Determination of the aggregate morphology responsible for electron conduction was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, changes in the electrical properties of the substrates after low temperature (encapsulate Au NPs. Results indicated the sol-gel deposited SiO2 had a band gap energy of ˜8.9eV, bulk plasmon-peak energy of ˜25.5eV and chemical composition of stoichiometric SiO2. Lastly, an attempt to elicit structure property relationships of novel RNA mediated Pd hexagon NPs was performed. Selected area electron diffraction (SAD), low voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (LV-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were chosen for characterization of atomic ordering, chemical composition and optoelectronic properties of the novel nanostructures. Data from control experiments found the hexagons could be made without RNA and confirmed the presence of nanocrystalline Pd metal NPs in unpurified Pd2(DBA)3 reagent powder. Furthermore, the study determined the hexagon platelets to have a chemical composition of ˜90at% carbon and ˜10at% Pd and a lattice parameter corresponding to molecular crystals of Pd2(DBA)3 precursor, not Pd metal.* *This dissertation is a compound document (contains both a paper copy and a CD as part of the dissertation). The CD requires the following system requirements: Windows MediaPlayer or RealPlayer.

  4. Green Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles via Natural Extracts: The Biogenic Nanoparticle Corona and Its Effects on Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    COLAVITA, PAULA

    2015-01-01

    The optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have attracted significant attention for applications in a wide variety of fields, thus prompting interest in developing sustainable synthetic strategies that leverage the redox properties of natural compounds or extracts. Here, we investigate the surface chemistry of nanoparticles synthesized using coffee as a biogenic reductant. Building on our previously developed synthetic protocols for the preparation of silver and palladium nan...

  5. Enhancement of nonlinear optical properties of compounds of silica glass and metallic nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GHARAATI A; KAMALDAR A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a method for enhancing the nonlinear optical properties in silica glass by using metallic nanoparticles. First, the T-matrix method is developed to calculate the effective dielectric constant for the compound of silica glass and metallic nanoparticles, both of which possess nonlinear dielectric constants. In the second step, the Maxwell–Garnetttheory is exploited to replace the spherical nanoparticles with cylindrical and ellipsoidal ones, facilitating the calculation of the third-order nonlinear effective susceptibility for a degenerate four-wave mixing case. The results are followed by numerical computations for silver, copper and gold nanoparticles. It is shown, graphically, that the maximum and minimum of the real part of thereflection coefficient for nanoparticles of silver occurs in smaller wavelengths compared to that of copper and gold. Further, it is found that spherical nanoparticles exhibit greater figure-of-merit compared to those with cylindrical or ellipsoidal geometries.

  6. Direct Imaging of Single Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles in Capillary with Laser Light-Sheet Scattering Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Feng, Jingjing; Pan, Qi; Xiong, Bin; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2017-03-07

    Understanding the heterogeneous distribution of the physical and chemical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles is fundamentally important to their basic and applied research. Traditionally, they are obtained either indirectly via bulk spectroscopic measurements plus electron microscopic characterizations or through single molecule/particle imaging of nanoparticles immobilized on planar substrates. In this study, by using light-sheet scattering microscopy with a supercontinuum white laser, highly sensitive imaging of individual metal nanoparticles (MNPs) flowing inside a capillary, driven by either pressure or electric field, was achieved for the first time. We demonstrate that single plasmonic nanoparticles with different size or chemical modification could be differentiated through their electrophoretic mobility in a few minutes. This technique could potentially be applied to high throughput characterization and evaluation of single metal nanoparticles as well as their dynamic interactions with various local environments.

  7. Magnesium nanoparticles with transition metal decoration for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Luca; Callini, Elsa; Brighi, Matteo; Boscherini, Federico; Montone, Amelia; Jensen, Torben R.; Maurizio, Chiara; Vittori Antisari, Marco; Bonetti, Ennio

    2011-11-01

    We report on the hydrogen storage behaviour of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) (size range 100 nm-1 μm) with metal-oxide core-shell morphology synthesized by inert gas condensation and decorated by transition metal (TM) (Pd or Ti) clusters via in situ vacuum deposition. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared and hydrogenated NPs is studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction including in situ experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in order to investigate the relationships with the hydrogen storage kinetics measured by the volumetric Sieverts method. With both Pd and Ti, the decoration deeply improves the hydrogen sorption properties: previously inert NPs exhibit complete hydrogenation with fast transformation kinetics, good stability and reversible gravimetric capacity that can attain 6 wt%. In the case of Pd-decoration, the occurrence of Mg-Pd alloying is observed at high temperatures and in dependence of the hydrogen pressure conditions. These structural transformations modify both the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydride formation, while Ti-decoration has an effect only on the kinetics. The experimental results are discussed in relation with key issues such as the amount of decoration, the heat of mixing between TM and Mg and the binding energy between TM and hydrogen.

  8. Metal Nanoparticle/Block Copolymer Composite Assembly and Disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zihui; Sai, Hiroaki; Warren, Scott C; Kamperman, Marleen; Arora, Hitesh; Gruner, Sol M; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were self-assembled with poly(isoprene-block-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PI-b-PDMAEMA) block copolymers to generate organic-inorganic hybrid materials. High loadings of NPs in hybrids were achieved through usage of N,N-di-(2-(allyloxy)ethyl)-N-3-mercaptopropyl-N-3-methylammonium chloride as the ligand, which provided high solubility of NPs in various solvents as well as high affinity to PDMAEMA. From NP synthesis, existence of sub-1 nm Pt NPs was confirmed by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. Estimations of the Pt NP ligand head group density based on HAADF-STEM images and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data yielded results comparable to what has been found for alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on flat Pt {111} surfaces. Changing the volume fraction of Pt NPs in block copolymer-NP composites yielded hybrids with spherical micellar, wormlike micellar, lamellar and inverse hexagonal morphologies. Disassembly of hybrids with spherical, wormlike micellar, and lamellar morphologies generated isolated metal-NP based nano-spheres, cylinders and sheets, respectively. Results suggest the existence of powerful design criteria for the formation of metal-based nanostructures from designer blocked macromolecules.

  9. Condensation Dynamics on Mimicked Metal Matrix Hydrophobic Nanoparticle-Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Viraj; Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Use of hydrophobic surfaces promotes condensation in the dropwise mode, which is significantly more efficient than the common filmwise mode. However, limited longevity of hydrophobic surface modifiers has prevented their wide spread use in industry. Recently, metal matrix composites (MMCs) having microscale hydrophobic heterogeneities dispersed in hydrophilic metal matrix have been proposed as durable and self-healing alternative to hydrophobic surface coatings interacting with deposited water droplets. While dispersion of hydrophobic microparticles in MMC is likely to lead to surface flooding during condensation, the effect of dispersion of hydrophobic nanoparticles (HNPs) with size comparable to water nuclei critical radii and spacing is not obvious. To this end, we fabricated highly ordered arrays of Teflon nanospheres on silicon substrates that mimic the top surface of the MMCs with dispersed HNPs. We used light and electron microscopy to observe breath figures resulting from condensation on these surfaces at varied degrees of subcooling. Here, we discuss the relation between the droplet size distribution, Teflon nanosphere diameter and spacing, and condensation mode. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  10. Optical properties and circular dichroism of chiral metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiyuan; Govorov, Alexander; OU Team

    2013-03-01

    In nature, biological systems are built up by homochiral building blocks, such as a sugar and protein. Circular dichroism (CD) is an effective tool of resolving molecular conformations. It utilizes circularly polarized light to detect differential absorption of chiral materials. In medicine, it will help us to develop new drugs and therapies, if we understand the connection between the physical or chemical properties of drug molecules and their conformations. With the rapid development of nanotechnologies, chiral nanomaterials attract lots of attention nowadays. CD signals of chiral molecules can be enhanced or shifted to the visible band in the presence of plasmonic nanocrystals. Here we present a plasmonic CD mechanism from a single chiral metal nanocrystal. The mechanism is essentially different from the dipolar plasmon-plasmon interaction in a chiral NP assembly, which mimics the CD mechanism of chiral molecules. Chiral metal nanocrystals are expected to have promising applications in biosensing. Recently a few experimental papers reported successful realizations of chiral nanocrystals in a macroscopic ensemble in solution. Particularly the paper described silver nanoparticles grown on chiral template molecules and demonstrating characteristic CD signals at a plasmonic wavelength. The plasmonic CD signals in Ref. can come from a dipolar plasmon-molecule interaction or from a chiral shape of nanocrystals. This work was supported by the NSF (project: CBET- 0933782) and by the Volkswagen Foundation.

  11. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures.

  12. Improving Efficiency of Multicrystalline Silicon and CIGS Solar Cells by Incorporating Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Jer Jeng; Zih-Yang Chen; Yu-Ling Xiao; Liann-Be Chang; Jianping Ao; Yun Sun; Ewa Popko; Witold Jacak; Lee Chow

    2015-01-01

    This work studies the use of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells. Au and Ag nanoparticles are deposited by spin-coating method, which is a simple and low cost process. The random distribution of nanoparticles by spin coating broadens the resonance wavelength of the transmittance. This broadening favors solar cell applications. Metal shadowing competes with light scattering in a manner that varies w...

  13. Defect-tolerant single-electron charging at room temperature in metal nanoparticle decorated biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berven, C.A.; Clarke, L.; Wybourne, M.N. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mooster, J.L.; Hutchison, J.E. [Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-01-16

    Gold nanoparticles assembled on a biopolymer template between metal electrodes on an insulating substrate are shown to exhibit unambiguous single electron charging effects that are found to depend on the nanoparticle properties and the geometrical contraints imposed by the biopolymer. The results support the idea of using nanoparticles in conjunction with biomolecular organization to produce nanoscale systems with defect-tolerant current-voltage behavior. (orig.)

  14. A Bioanalytical Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Students: Biosensors Based on Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niagi, John; Warner, John; Andreesco, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the development of new biosensors based on metal nanoparticles because of its high surface area and large binding ability. The adopted procedure is extremely simple and versatile and can be used in various applications of electrochemistry.

  15. In vitro screening of metal oxide nanoparticles for effects on neural function using cortical networks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data describe the effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on total spikes and active electrodes after exposure to various concentrations for 1, 24 and 48 hrs, or after...

  16. Study of Coating Geometries and Photoluminescence Properties of Metal Nanoparticles/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Barone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the results of a study of growth and characterization of metal nanoparticles (Ag, Au, and Co/carbon surfaces. The nanoparticles grew by laser ablation technique and their dimensions were controlled by light scattering study and AFM microscopy before their insertion on graphite surface. Nanoparticles appear randomly disposed on carbon surfaces aggregating to form big particles only in the case of silver. The different behavior of metal nanoparticles on carbon surface was explained in terms of different metal wetting of surface, in agreement with previous theoretical results of He et al. Chemical information, obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the doping process is a simple physisorption while the interfacial interaction between particles and carbon layers causes local defects in graphite structure and the appearance of a strong photoluminescence signal for all composites. Moreover, the visible optical absorption decreases about 10% indicating the progressive metallization of carbon surface.

  17. Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles: biodegradable polymers and enzymes in stabilization and surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current breakthroughs in green nanotechnology are capable to transform many of the existing processes and products that enhance environmental quality, reduce pollution, and conserve natural and non-renewable resources. Noteworthy, successful use of metal nanoparticles and 10 nano...

  18. Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles: biodegradable polymers and enzymes in stabilization and surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current breakthroughs in green nanotechnology are capable to transform many of the existing processes and products that enhance environmental quality, reduce pollution, and conserve natural and non-renewable resources. Noteworthy, successful use of metal nanoparticles and 10 nano...

  19. Metal nanoparticles (other than gold or silver) prepared using plant extracts for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasca, Roxana-Diana; Santa, Szabolcs; Racz, Levente Zsolt; Racz, Csaba Pal

    2016-12-01

    There are many modalities to prepare metal nanoparticles, but the reducing of the metal ions with plant extracts is one of the most promising because it is considerate less toxic for the environment, suitable for the use of those nanoparticles in vivo and not very expensive. Various metal ions have been already studied such as: cobalt, copper, iron, platinum, palladium, zinc, indium, manganese and mercury and the number of plant extracts used is continuously increasing. The prepared systems were characterized afterwards with a great number of methods of investigation: both spectroscopic (especially UV-Vis spectroscopy) and microscopic (in principal, electron microscopy-TEM) methods. The applications of the metal nanoparticles obtained are diverse and not completely known, but the medical applications of such nanoparticles occupy a central place, due to their nontoxic components, but some diverse industrial applications do not have to be forgotten.

  20. Electroless deposition of metal nanoparticle clusters: Effect of pattern distance

    KAUST Repository

    Gentile, Francesco

    2014-04-03

    Electroless plating is a deposition technique in which metal ions are reduced as atoms on specific patterned sites of a silicon surface to form metal nanoparticles (NPs) aggregates with the desired characteristics. Those NPs, in turn, can be used as constituents of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates, which are devices where the electromagnetic field and effects thereof are giantly amplified. Here, the electroless formation of nanostructures was studied as a function of the geometry of the substrate. High resolution, electron beam lithography techniques were used to obtain nonperiodic arrays of circular patterns, in which the spacing of patterns was varied over a significant range. In depositing silver atoms in those circuits, the authors found that the characteristics of the aggregates vary with the pattern distance. When the patterns are in close proximity, the interference of different groups of adjacent aggregates cannot be disregarded and the overall growth is reduced. Differently from this, when the patterns are sufficiently distant, the formation of metal clusters of NPs is independent on the spacing of the patterns. For the particular subset of parameters used here, this critical correlation distance is about three times the pattern diameter. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation model, which is a simulation method that can decipher the formation of nanoaggregates at an atomic level. In the discussion, the authors showed how this concept can be used to fabricate ordered arrays of silver nanospheres, where the size of those spheres may be regulated on varying the pattern distance, for applications in biosensing and single molecule detection.

  1. Towards stable catalysts by control over the collective features of supported metal nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto, G.; Zecevic, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386715; Friedrich, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837350; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372

    2013-01-01

    Supported metal nanoparticles play a pivotal role in areas such as nanoelectronics, energy storage/conversion1 and as catalysts for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals2–4. However, the tendency of nanoparticles to grow into larger crystallites is an impediment for stable performance5,6

  2. Enhancing spectral shifts of plasmon-coupled noble metal nanoparticles for sensing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeken, K.L.; Subramaniam, V.; Gill, R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles possess very large scattering cross-sections, which make them useful as tags in biosensing assays with the potential to detect even single binding events. In this study, we investigated the effects of nanoparticle size on the shift in the light scattering spectrum following

  3. Metal nanoparticle deposited inorganic nanostructure hybrids, uses thereof and processes for their preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, Reshef; Tsverin, Yulia; Burghaus, Uwe; Komarneni, Mallikharjuna Rao

    2016-01-26

    This invention relates to a hybrid component comprising at least one nanoparticle of inorganic layered compound (in the form of fullerene-like structure or nanotube), and at least one metal nanoparticle, uses thereof as a catalyst, (e.g. photocatalysis) and processes for its preparation.

  4. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on post-transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James L.

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide to liquid products is an important component in the utilization of CO2 and in the high-density storage of intermittent renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds. Materials based on indium and tin, which yield predominantly formic acid, have been investigated in order to gain a greater understanding of the electrochemically active species and the mechanism of CO2 reduction on these heavy post-transition metals, since prior studies on the bulk metals did not provide thermodynamically sensible reaction pathways. Nanoparticles of the oxides and hydroxides of tin and indium have been prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and various electrochemical methods in order to obtain structural information and analyze the role of various surface species on the CO2 reduction pathway. On both indium and tin, metastable surface-bound hydroxides bound CO2 and formed metal carbonates, which can then be reduced electrochemically. The relevant oxidation state of tin was suggested to be SnII rather than SnIV, necessitating a pre reduction to generate the CO2-binding species. Metallic indium nanoparticles partially oxidized in air and became highly efficient CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. Unit Faradaic efficiencies for formate, much higher than on bulk indium, were achieved with only 300 mV of overpotential on these particles, which possessed an oxyhydroxide shell surrounding a conductive metallic core. Alloys and mixed-metal oxide and hydroxide particles of tin and indium have also been studied for their carbon dioxide electrocatalytic capabilities, especially in comparison to the pure metal species. Additionally, a solar-driven indium-based CO2 electrolyzer was developed to investigate the overall efficiency for intermittent energy storage. The three flow cells were powered by a commercial photovoltaic array and had a maximum conversion efficiency of incident

  5. Biomimetic Synthesis of Gelatin Polypeptide-Assisted Noble-Metal Nanoparticles and Their Interaction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ying

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herein, the generation of gold, silver, and silver–gold (Ag–Au bimetallic nanoparticles was carried out in collagen (gelatin solution. It first showed that the major ingredient in gelatin polypeptide, glutamic acid, acted as reducing agent to biomimetically synthesize noble metal nanoparticles at 80°C. The size of nanoparticles can be controlled not only by the mass ratio of gelatin to gold ion but also by pH of gelatin solution. Interaction between noble-metal nanoparticles and polypeptide has been investigated by TEM, UV–visible, fluorescence spectroscopy, and HNMR. This study testified that the degradation of gelatin protein could not alter the morphology of nanoparticles, but it made nanoparticles aggregated clusters array (opposing three-dimensional α-helix folding structure into isolated nanoparticles stabilized by gelatin residues. This is a promising merit of gelatin to apply in the synthesis of nanoparticles. Therefore, gelatin protein is an excellent template for biomimetic synthesis of noble metal/bimetallic nanoparticle growth to form nanometer-sized device.

  6. Optimizing coverage of metal oxide nanoparticle prepared by pulsed laser deposition on nonenzymatic glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Ito, Takeshi; Hirabayashi, Yasuo; Ozawa, Takeshi; Okuda, Tetsuya; Motoizumi, Yu; Hirai, Kiyohito; Naganuma, Yasuhiro; Soga, Masayasu; Yoshimoto, Mamoru; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-04-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were applied to nonenzymatic glucose detection. NiO nanoparticles with size of 3 nm were deposited on glassy carbon (GC) and silicon substrates at room temperature in an oxygen atmosphere. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) image showed nanoparticles with the size of 3 nm uniformly scattered on the Si(001) substrate. Unlike co-sputtering nanoparticle and carbon simultaneously, the PLD method can easily control the surface coverage of nanoparticles on the surface of substrate by deposition time. Cyclic voltammetry was performed on the samples deposited on the GC substrates for electrochemical detection of glucose. The differences between peak currents with and without glucose was used to optimize the coverage of nanoparticles on carbon electrode. The results indicated that optimal coverage of nanoparticles on carbon electrode.

  7. Biotests and Biosensors for Ecotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja Kasemets

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologies have become a significant priority worldwide. Several manufactured nanoparticles - particles with one dimension less than 100 nm - are increasingly used in consumer products. At nanosize range, the properties of materials differ substantially from bulk materials of the same composition, mostly due to the increased specific surface area and reactivity, which may lead to increased bioavailability and toxicity. Thus, for the assessment of sustainability of nanotechnologies, hazards of manufactured nanoparticles have to be studied. Despite all the above mentioned, the data on the potential environmental effects of nanoparticles are rare. This mini-review is summarizing the emerging information on different aspects of ecotoxicological hazard of metal oxide nanoparticles, focusing on TiO2, ZnO and CuO. Various biotests that have been successfully used for evaluation of ecotoxic properties of pollutants to invertebrates, algae and bacteria and now increasingly applied for evaluation of hazard of nanoparticles at different levels of the aquatic food-web are discussed. Knowing the benefits and potential drawbacks of these systems, a suite of tests for evaluation of environmental hazard of nanoparticles is proposed. Special attention is paid to the influence of particle solubility and to recombinant metal-sensing bacteria as powerful tools for quantification of metal bioavailability. Using recombinant metal-specific bacterial biosensors and multitrophic ecotoxicity assays in tandem will create new scientific knowledge on the respective role of ionic species and of particles in toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

  8. Optical Effects in the Active Layer of Organic Solar Cells with Embedded Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Supachai Sompech; Sukhontip Thaomola; Thananchai Dasri

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of organic solar cells with noble metal nanoparticles such as Ag and Au embedded in the active layer were investigated. The Discrete Dipole Approximation theory was used to analyze the light scattering and absorption efficiencies. The results show that the size, refractive index of medium and amount of the metal nanoparticles are key factors that directly influence the plasmonic enhancements in the devices. These parameters were adjusted for the light scattering and abs...

  9. Pure and multi metal oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, antibacterial and cytotoxic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Suman, Sneha; Haque, Francia

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Th antibacterial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles has received marked global attention as they can be specifically synthesized to exhibit significant toxicity to bacteria. The importance of their application as antibacterial agents is evident keeping in mind the limited range and effectiveness of antibiotics, on one hand, and the plethora of metal oxides, on the other, along with the propensity of nanoparticles to induce resistance being much lower than that of an...

  10. χ measurements in Schiff’s base derivatives: Effect of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, P.; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2012-02-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of Schiff's base derivatives and the effect of metal nanoparticles (Ag & Au) on their nonlinear optical response were studied. Colloidal metal nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation. Z-scan technique with a 7ns Nd:YAG laser pulses at 532 nm were employed for the measurements. The compounds exhibit good optical limiting properties at the wavelength used. The materials used in the present work indicate that these materials are promising candidates for photonics applications.

  11. An expeditious synthesis of early transition metal carbide nanoparticles on graphitic carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressnig, Debora; Moldovan, Simona; Ersen, Ovidiu; Beaunier, Patricia; Portehault, David; Sanchez, Clément; Carenco, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    An expeditious synthesis of metal carbide nanoparticles onto various carbon supports is demonstrated. The procedure is versatile and readily yields TiC, VC, Mo2C and W2C nanoparticles on different types of carbons. The reaction is initiated at room temperature and proceeds within seconds. This novel synthetic route paves the way for a large variety of metal carbide-carbon nanocomposites that may be implemented in emerging nanotechnology fields.

  12. Faradaic efficiency of O2 evolution on metal nanoparticle sensitized hematite photoanodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iandolo, Beniamino; Wickman, Björn; Seger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Functionalization of transition metal oxides using metallic nanoparticles is an interesting route towards efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production via water splitting. Although an enhanced photocurrent in photoanodes upon functionalization with metallic nanostructures has been observed...... errors, for both sensitized and reference samples. Also, this work demonstrates that the sensitized samples were stable for at least 16 hours photocurrent testing. The concepts shown in this work are generally applicable to any situation in which a semiconductor has its water splitting performance...... enhanced by metallic nanostructures....

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of platinum-group-metal nanoparticles by using HEPES as a reductant and stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Man-Ho; Ho, Chi-Ming; Chen, Rong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Platinum-group-metal (Ru, Os, Rh, Ir, Pd and Pt) nanoparticles are synthesized in an aqueous buffer solution of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) (200 mM, pH 7.4) under hydrothermal conditions (180 degrees C). Monodispersed (monodispersity: 11-15%) metal nanoparticles were obtained with an average particle size of less than 5 nm (Ru: 1.8+/-0.2, Os: 1.6+/-0.2, Rh: 4.5+/-0.5, Ir: 2.0+/-0.3, Pd: 3.8+/-0.4, Pt: 1.9+/-0.2 nm). The size, monodispersity, and stability of the as-obtained metal nanoparticles were affected by the HEPES concentration, pH of the HEPES buffer solution, and reaction temperature. HEPES with two tertiary amines (piperazine groups) and terminal hydroxyl groups can act as a reductant and stabilizer. The HEPES molecules can bind to the surface of metal nanoparticles to prevent metal nanoparticles from aggregation. These platinum-group-metal nanoparticles could be deposited onto the surface of graphite, which catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes.

  14. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2011-12-27

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  15. Mesomorphic glass nanocomposites made of metal alkanoates and nanoparticles as emerging nonlinear-optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbovskiy, Y.; Klimusheva, G.; Mirnaya, T.

    2016-09-01

    Mesomorphic metal alkanoates is very promising yet overlooked class of nonlinear-optical materials. Metal alkanoates can exhibit a broad variety of condensed states of matter including solid crystals, plastic crystals, lyotropic and thermotropic ionic liquid crystals, liquids, mesomorphic glasses, and Langmuir-Blodgett films. Glass-forming properties of metal alkanoates combined with their use as nano-reactors and anisotropic host open up simple and efficient way to design various photonic nanomaterials. Despite very interesting physics, the experimental data on optical and nonlinearoptical properties of such materials are scarce. The goal of the present paper is to fill the gap by discussing recent advances in the field of photonic materials made of metal alkanoates, organic dyes, and nanoparticles. Optical and nonlinear-optical properties of the following materials are reviewed: (i) mesomorphic glass doped with organic dyes; (ii) smectic glass composed of cobalt alkanoates; (iii) semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in a glassy host; (iv) metal nanoparticles - glass (the cobalt octanoate) nanocomposites.

  16. Hollow nanoparticles of metal oxides and sulfides: fast preparation via laser ablation in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, K Y; Yang, J; Kulinich, S A; Sun, J; Du, X W

    2010-11-16

    In this work, diverse hollow nanoparticles of metal oxides and sulfides were prepared by simply laser ablating metal targets in properly chosen liquids. The Kirkendall voiding and the selective heating with an infrared laser were shown to work as two independent mechanisms for the formation of such hollow nanoparticles in only one- or two-step synthesis approaches. One of the prepared materials, ZnS hollow nanoparticles, showed high performance in gas sensing. The simple, fast, inexpensive technique that is proposed demonstrates very promising perspectives.

  17. In-situ synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles in alginate solution and their application in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhang, Xiaogang; Miao, Zhenjiang; Han, Buxing; An, Guimin; Liu, Zhimin

    2009-04-01

    Integration of eco-friendly method into metallic nanotechnology is one of the key issues in the field of nanoscience research. In this work, we reported a facile method to synthesize noble metal (Pt, Au, and Pd) nanoparticles in sodium alginate (SA) aqueous solution at 100 degrees C. The SA provides circumstance for reducing the metal precursors to their corresponding elemental states, and also acts as stabilizing agent for these metal nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the as-produced metal-SA composites showed that the metallic form was the dominant species in the SA matrix under the experimental conditions. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the metallic nanoparticles prepared in this way appeared to be homogeneous and their sizes were well within quantum size domain (<10 nm). The size and size distribution of the metal nanoparticles can be adjusted by altering the concentration of the metal precursors. The Pt-SA suspension could be cross-linked with divalent ions to form beads with porous structure at room temperature. The reaction behavior of cyclohexene hydrogenation suggested that the resultant Pt-alginate composites exhibited high catalytic activity.

  18. An analytical description for the elastic compression of metallic polyhedral nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticles are usually polyhedrons instead of perfect spheres, which presents a challenge to characterize their elastic response. In the present paper, the elastic compression of truncated octahedral nanoparticles is investigated through finite element calculations and atomic simulations. An analytical expression of load is obtained for octahedral particles, which is linearly proportional to indent depth, instead of the 3/2 power law relation predicted by Hertzian model for elastic sphere. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the obtained relation can predict the elastic response of polyhedral nanoparticles. This study is helpful to measure the elastic properties of polyhedral nanoparticles, and characterize their elastic response.

  19. One-Step Green Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles Using Sodium Alginate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Valdez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticles have been focus of research because of their characteristic properties, specifically the LSPR which can have wide applications in biomedical sciences and engineering. Currently, traditional physical and chemical methods can synthesize these nanoparticles but their disadvantages such as costs, time, effectiveness, and toxicity of precursors provide a wide range of problems for the synthesis of these nanoparticles. Recently, some natural polymers and organic compounds have been used for the synthesis of nanoparticles by green methods. In this study, we synthesize copper, silver, and gold nanoparticles using sodium alginate as reducing and stabilizing agent under microwave irradiation. The LSPR for each system was observed by UV-vis spectroscopy. Particle size distribution and zeta potential demonstrate the size and stability for these nanoparticles. FESEM and TEM microscopies have shown the size and morphology of these systems correlated with UV-vis, particle size distribution, and zeta potential analyses. The study demonstrates a rapid, facile, cheaper, and one-step green method of synthesis for these metallic nanoparticles being an alternative to the conventional methods used for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

  20. Facile synthesis of Curcuma longa tuber powder engineered metal nanoparticles for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Rahman, Pattanathu K. S. M.; Varunkumar, Krishnamoorthy; Anusha, Chidambaram; Kalaiarasi, Arunachalam; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials based fluorescent agents are rapidly becoming significant and promising transformative tools for improving medical diagnostics for extensive in vivo imaging modalities. Compared with conventional fluorescent agents, nano-fluorescence has capabilities to improve the in vivo detection and enriched targeting efficiencies. In our laboratory we synthesized fluorescent metal nanoparticles of silver, copper and iron using Curcuma longa tuber powder by simple reduction. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized metal nanoparticles were attained using UV-visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with EDAX spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Curcuma longa tuber powder has one of the bioactive compound Curcumin might act as a capping agent during the synthesis of nanoparticles. The synthesized metal nanoparticles fluorescence property was confirmed by spectrofluorometry. When compared with copper and iron nanoparticles the silver nanoparticles showed high fluorescence intensity under spectrofluorometry. Moreover, in vitro cell images of the silver nanoparticles in A549 cell lines also correlated with the results of spectrofluorometry. These silver nanoparticles show inspiring cell-imaging applications. They enter into cells without any further modifications, and the fluorescence property can be utilized for fluorescence-based cell imaging applications.

  1. Enhanced two-photon emission in coupled metal nanoparticles induced by conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhenping; Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between noble metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles and conjugated polymers as well as their one- and two-photon emission have been investigated. Ag and Au nanoparticles exhibited extraordinary quenching effects on the fluorescence of cationic poly(fluorinephenylene). The quenching efficiency by 37-nm Ag nanoparticles is ∼19 times more efficient than that by 13-nm Au nanoparticles, and 9-10 orders of magnitude more efficient than typical small molecule dye-quencher pairs. On the other hand, the cationic conjugated polymers induce the aggregate formation and plasmonic coupling of the metal nanoparticles, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy images and appearance of a new longitudinal plasmon band in the near-infrared region. The two-photon emissions of Ag and Au nanoparticles were found to be significantly enhanced upon addition of conjugated polymers, by a factor of 51-times and 9-times compared to the isolated nanoparticles for Ag and Au, respectively. These studies could be further extended to the applications of two-photon imaging and sensing of the analytes that can induce formation of metal nanoparticle aggregates, which have many advantages over the conventional one-photon counterparts.

  2. Copper Status of Exposed Microorganisms Influences Susceptibility to Metallic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Vincent C.; Spitzmiller, Melissa R.; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Kropat, Janette; Damoiseaux, Robert D.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Mahendra, Shaily

    2017-01-01

    Although interactions of metallic nanoparticles (NP) with various microorganisms have been previously explored, few studies have examined how metal sensitivity impacts NP toxicity. Herein, we investigated the effects of copper nanoparticles’ (Cu-NPs) exposure to the model alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in the presence and absence of the essential micronutrient copper. The toxic ranges for Cu-NPs and the ionic control, CuCl2, were determined using a high-throughput ATP-based fluorescence assay. Cu-NPs caused similar mortality in copper-replete and copper-deplete cells (IC50: 14–16 mg/L), but were less toxic than the ionic control, CuCl2 (IC50: 7 mg/L). Using this concentration range, we assessed Cu-NP impacts to cell morphology, copper accumulation, chlorophyll content, and expression of stress genes under both copper supply states. Osmotic swelling, membrane damage, and chloroplast and organelle disintegration were observed by transmission electron microscopy at both conditions. Despite these similarities, copper-deplete cells showed greater accumulation of loosely bound and tightly bound copper after exposure to Cu-NPs. Furthermore, copper-replete cells experienced greater loss of chlorophyll content, 19 % for Cu-NPs, compared to only an 11% net decrease in copper-deplete cells. The tightly bound copper was bioavailable as assessed by reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR analysis of CYC6, a biomarker for Cu-deficiency. The increased resistance of copper-deplete cells to Cu-NPs suggests that these cells potentially metabolize excess Cu-NPs or better manage sudden influxes of ions. Our findings recommend that toxicity assessments must account for the nutritional status of impacted organisms and use toxicity models based on estimations of the bioavailable fractions. PMID:26387648

  3. Hydrothermal vents as a source of pyrite and trace metal- containing mineral nanoparticles to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartman, A.; Yucel, M.; Luther, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    The pathways by which metals from hydrothermal vents may be transported through the ocean are still largely unknown. We demonstrate that pyrite nanoparticles as small as 4nm aggregate into nanoframboids of 50-350nm and are emitted from high temperature black smokers from vents at Lau Basin and the East Pacific Rise. These nanoparticles, which contain other metals including copper, are characterized via chemical methods as well as by using a combination of physical chemical techniques (TEM, SEM-EDS and EELS). Data indicate that the metal sulfide nanoparticles from Lau Basin, a back arc basin and EPR 9N, a fast spreading mid ocean ridge, have similar morphology. We report that laboratory hydrothermal syntheses can reproduce the size and morphology of the natural pyrite nanoparticles. Laboratory oxidation experiments show that these synthesized pyrite nanoparticles are stable in oxic seawater for months, and thus provide a potential transport mechanism for iron far from vent sources. These nanoparticles as well as others including iron silicates, which have also been identified, likely influence the transport of iron and other elements from the hydrothermal environment to the ocean. Hydrothermal vents serve as nanoparticle 'factories' that fertilize the ocean with metals that are important in a variety of biogeochemical processes.

  4. Carbon Materials Embedded with Metal Nanoparticles as Anode in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    2002-01-01

    Carbon materials containing metal nanoparticles that can form an alloy with lithium were tested for their capacity and cycle life to store and release lithium electrochemically. Metal nanoparticles may provide the additional lithium storage capacity as well as additional channels to conduct lithium in carbon. The cycle life of this carbon-metal composite can be long because the solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) on the carbon surface may protect both lithium and the metal particles in the carbon interior. In addition, the voids in the carbon interior may accommodate the nanoparticle's volume change, and such volume change may not cause much internal stress due to small sizes of the nanoparticles. This concept of improving carbon's performance to store and release lithium was demonstrated using experimental cells of C(Pd)/0.5M Lil-50/50 (vol.%) EC and DMC/Li, where C(Pd) was graphitized carbon fibers containing palladium nanoparticles, EC was ethylene carbonate, and DMC was dimethyl carbonate. However, such improvement was not observed if the Pd nanoparticles are replaced by aluminum, possibly because the aluminum nanoparticles were oxidized in air during storage, resulting in an inert oxide of aluminum. Further studies are needed to use this concept for practical applications.

  5. Controlling plasmon coupling in biomolecule-linked metal nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba, David S.

    with DNA control of interparticle separation. Plasmon coupling is investigated also in binary metal systems. A new method for forming stable oligonucleotide-silver conjugates is presented, and controlled plasmon coupling is observed in reconfigurable core-satellite assemblies composed of 20 nm silver satellites linked to a 50 nm gold core by DNA tethers. Reconfiguration of the DNA linkers from a compact to an extended state results in decreased plasmon coupling and a blue-shift of the gold core plasmon resonance, similar to the response observed in analogous structures formed with gold satellites. Simulations of structures composed of gold and silver cores and satellites are performed to determine how the optical properties of binary metal assemblies may differ from those composed of a single metal. It appears that gold plasmons are systematically red shifted by silver particles, whereas plasmons supported by silver particles appear differentially sensitive to gold particles according to whether the silver particle is in a core position or a satellite shell. Next, the plasmonic properties of immobilized binary nanoparticle assemblies that incorporate a single strongly scattering component that acts as a template for assembly of weakly scattering plasmonic particles are investigated. Assemblies are composed of a streptavidin-coated gold "core" nanoparticle and BSA-biotin-coated gold or silver "satellite" particles. Through correlation of measured and simulated spectra, the dependence of assembly optical properties upon satellite coverage and satellite orientation about the core is addressed. It appears that plasmon coupling in gold core-gold satellite structures depends upon satellite orientation about the core and can manifest as either peak shifting or peak splitting, while the gold plasmon response to silver satellite assembly appears to be independent of satellite orientation. Finally, binary coupling is studied in one-dimensional particle pairs and three

  6. Systematic study of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticle photoresists

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2015-03-19

    Ligand stabilized metal oxide nanoparticle resists are promising candidates for EUV lithography due to their high sensitivity for high-resolution patterning and high etching resistance. As ligand exchange is responsible for the patterning mechanism, we systematically studied the influence of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticles on their sensitivity and dissolution behavior. ZrO2 nanoparticles were protected with various aromatic ligands with electron withdrawing and electron donating groups. These nanoparticles have lower sensitivity compared to those with aliphatic ligands suggesting the structures of these ligands is more important than their pka on resist sensitivity. The influence of ligand structure was further studied by comparing the nanoparticles’ solubility for a single type ligand to mixtures of ligands. The mixture of nanoparticles showed improved pattern quality. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  7. Charge transfer between sensing and targeted metal nanoparticles in indirect nanoplasmonic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Langhammer, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    In indirect nanoplasmonic sensors, the plasmonic metal nanoparticles are adjacent to the material of interest, and the material-related changes of their optical properties are used to probe that material. If the latter itself represents another metal in the form of nanoparticles, its deposition is accompanied by charge transfer to or from the plasmonic nanoparticles in order to equalize the Fermi levels. We estimate the value of the transferred charge and show on the two examples, nanoparticle sintering and hydride formation, that the charge transfer has negligible influence on the probed processes, because the effect of charge transfer is less important than that of nanoparticle surface energy. This further corroborates the non-invasive nature of nanoplasmonic sensors.

  8. Assembly of metal nanoparticle-carbon nanotube composite materials at the liquid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Kim, Minjung; Hahn, Joeoong; Suh, Jung Sang; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Kwan; Han, Sang Woo

    2006-02-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-mediated self-assembly of metal (Au and Ag) nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid interface in the form of a stable nanocomposite film is reported. The metallic luster results from the electronic coupling of nanoparticles, suggesting the formation of closely packed nanoparticle thin films. The interfacial film could be transferred to mica substrates and carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. The transferred films were very stable for a prolonged time. The samples were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM and TEM results show that the films formed at the liquid/liquid interface are indeed composite materials consisting of CNTs and nanoparticles. XPS measurements further indicate the presence of the interaction between nanoparticles and CNTs.

  9. Supercritical Fluid Synthesis and Characterization of Catalytic Metal Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xiangrong; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Chong M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Yong; Wai, Chien M.

    2004-02-27

    A rapid, convenient and environmentally benign method has been developed for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle/multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. Nanoparticles of palladium, rhodium and ruthenium are deposited onto functionalized MWCNTs through a simple hydrogen reduction of metal-?-diketone precursors in supercritical carbon dioxide, and are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. These highly dispersed nanoparticles, with a narrow range of size distribution and good adhesion on MWCNT surfaces, are expected to exhibit promising catalytic properties for a variety of chemical reactions. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that Pd nanoparticles supported on MWCNTs are effective catalysts for hydrogenation of olefins in carbon dioxide. The Pd nanoparticle?MWCNT composite also shows a high electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction for potential fuel cell application.

  10. The origin of enhanced optical absorption in solar cells with metal nanoparticles embedded in the active layer

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung-Yong

    2010-04-29

    We analyze the enhancement in optical absorption of an absorbing medium when spherical metal nanoparticles are embedded in it. Our analysis uses generalized Mie theory to calculate the absorbed optical power as a function of the distance from the metal nanoparticle. This analysis is used to evaluate the potential of enhancing optical absorption in thin-film solar cells by embedding spherical metal nanoparticles. We consider the trade-off between maximizing overall optical absorption and ensuring that a large fraction of the incident optical power is dissipated in the absorbing host medium rather than in the metal nanoparticle. We show that enhanced optical absorption results from strong scattering by the metal nanoparticle which locally enhances the optical electric fields. We also discuss the effect of a thin dielectric encapsulation of the metal nanoparticles. ©2010 Optical Society of America.

  11. Size effects in the elastic deformation behavior of metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Patrick; Peukert, Wolfgang, E-mail: W.Peukert@lfg.uni-erlangen.de [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Particle Technology (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    In this work, the results of a series of molecular statics simulations to investigate the size dependence of the elastic properties of metallic nanoparticles are presented. The per-atom stiffness tensor was calculated from the derivative of the used embedded atom method potentials and, from it, lower order elastic parameters, such as the Young's modulus or the Poisson ratio. The Young's modulus decayed up to 30 % relative to the bulk values for 2.5 nm small particles, whereas the Poisson ratio showed an increase with decreasing particle size for most materials. Particles with a diameter of 30 nm approached the continuum values to around 1 %, marking the transition to continuum theory. The size-dependent Young's modulus and several other material properties can be described by a simple algebraic function of the number of atoms per particle. By plotting the radial distribution of the local Young's modulus within particles of different size, it is shown that only the outermost 2-3 atomic layers are responsible for the size-dependent change of elastic properties. Within these layers, the average atomic stiffness was found to decay linearly and independent of the particle size.

  12. Electrochemical Characterization of Ultrathin Cross-Linked Metal Nanoparticle Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chu; Percival, Stephen J; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-06

    Here we report the preparation, characterization, and electrochemical study of conductive, ultrathin films of cross-linked metal nanoparticles (NPs). Nanoporous films ranging from 40 to 200 nm in thickness composed of gold and platinum NPs of ∼5 nm were fabricated via a powerful layer-by-layer spin coating process. This process allows preparation of uniform NP films as large as 2 × 2 cm(2) with precise control over thickness, structure, and electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties. Gold, platinum, and bimetallic NP films were fabricated and characterized using cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, and conductance measurements. Their electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated. Our results show that the electrochemical activity of such NP films is initially hindered by the presence of dense thiolate cross-linking ligands. Both electrochemical cycling and oxygen plasma cleaning are effective means in restoring their electrochemical activity. Gold NP films have higher electric conductivity than platinum possibly due to more uniform film structure and closer particle-particle distance. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic performance of platinum NP films can be greatly enhanced by the incorporation of gold NPs. This work focuses on electrochemical characterization of cross-linked NP films and demonstrates several unique properties. These include quick and easy preparation, ultrathin and uniform film thickness, tunable structure and composition, and transferability to many other substrates.

  13. Metal-passivated PbS nanoparticles: fabrication and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaplyguine, M; Mikkelä, M-H; Mårsell, E; Polley, C; Mikkelsen, A; Zhang, W; Yartsev, A; Hetherington, C J D; Wallenberg, L R; Björneholm, O

    2017-03-08

    Organic-shell-free PbS nanoparticles have been produced in the size range relevant for quantum-dot solar cells (QDSCs) by a vapor aggregation method involving magnetron reactive sputtering. This method creates a beam of free 5-10 nm particles in a vacuum. The dimensions of the particles were estimated after their deposition on a substrate by imaging them using ex situ SEM and HRTEM electron microscopy. The particle structure and chemical composition could be deduced "on the fly", prior to deposition, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable synchrotron radiation. Our XPS results suggest that under certain conditions it is possible to fabricate particles with a semiconductor core and 1 to 2 monolayer shells of metallic lead. For this case the absolute energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) in PbS has been determined to be (5.0 ± 0.5) eV below the vacuum level. For such particles deposited on a substrate HRTEM has confirmed the XPS-based conclusions on the crystalline PbS structure of the semiconductor core. Absorption spectroscopy on the deposited film has given a value of ∼1 eV for the lowest exciton. Together with the valence XPS results this has allowed us to reconstruct the energy level scheme of the particles. The results obtained are discussed in the context of the properties of PbS QDSCs.

  14. J-aggregates on metal nanoparticles characterized through ultrafast spectroscopy and near-field optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wurtz, Gregory A; Im, Jin Seo; Hranisavljevic, Jasmina

    2004-01-01

    Illumination of metal nanoparticles at the plasmon resonance produces enhanced evanescent fields on the nanoparticles' surfaces. The unusual strength of the field makes it a target for exploring photoinduced phenomena at the nanoscale, if efficient functionalization or coating of the nanoparticle surface with appropriate chromophores is possible. One direction is to use cyanine dyes that form monolayers of J-aggregates on the surface of noble metal nanoparticle colloids. The unique, collective electronic properties of J-aggregates produce excitons with enormous extinction coefficients that are of interest for their efficient energy transfer, electron transfer, and nonlinear optical properties. In that vein, we report our results on time-resolved spectroscopy and near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) of J-aggregate exciton dynamics on Ag and Au nanoparticle colloids. Ultrafast transient absorption studies show that J-aggregate exciton lifetimes on Ag nanoparticles are much longer than on Au nanoparticles, with a 300 ps lifetime that is two orders of magnitude longer than the electronic processes in the nanoparticles themselves. Complementary NSOM studies of the colloids show that fluorescence from the J-aggregates on the Ag nanoparticles is induced by the scanning probe. These results may be significant for improving the nanophotonic performance of hybrid materials for nanoscale applications.

  15. Bioactivity of noble metal nanoparticles decorated with biopolymers and their application in drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-30

    The unique properties of nanomaterials can be applied to solve different problems including new ways of drug delivery. Noble metal nanoparticles are most promising because they have been used for medicinal purposes since ancient time. It is evident from the past studies that the metallic nanoparticles are much more effective against various microorganisms when compared to their conventional counterparts. However, decoration of such nanoparticles with biomaterials add more advantages to their antimicrobial activity. Decoration of metal nanoparticles with biopolymers is a quite new area of research. Studies performed hitherto shown that nanoparticles of noble metals like silver, gold and platinum demonstrated better antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities when conjugated with biopolymers. The development of such technology has potential to develop materials that are more effective in the field of health science. Considering the importance and uniqueness of this concept, the present review aims to discuss the use of biopolymer-decorated metal nanoparticles for combating various diseases caused by microbial pathogens. Moreover, the nanotoxicity aspect has also been discussed.

  16. Fabrication of porous silicon by metal-assisted etching using highly ordered gold nanoparticle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Sebastian P.; Ullrich, Simon; Kudera, Stefan; Pacholski, Claudia

    2012-08-01

    A simple method for the fabrication of porous silicon (Si) by metal-assisted etching was developed using gold nanoparticles as catalytic sites. The etching masks were prepared by spin-coating of colloidal gold nanoparticles onto Si. An appropriate functionalization of the gold nanoparticle surface prior to the deposition step enabled the formation of quasi-hexagonally ordered arrays by self-assembly which were translated into an array of pores by subsequent etching in HF solution containing H2O2. The quality of the pattern transfer depended on the chosen preparation conditions for the gold nanoparticle etching mask. The influence of the Si surface properties was investigated by using either hydrophilic or hydrophobic Si substrates resulting from piranha solution or HF treatment, respectively. The polymer-coated gold nanoparticles had to be thermally treated in order to provide a direct contact at the metal/Si interface which is required for the following metal-assisted etching. Plasma treatment as well as flame annealing was successfully applied. The best results were obtained for Si substrates which were flame annealed in order to remove the polymer matrix - independent of the substrate surface properties prior to spin-coating (hydrophilic or hydrophobic). The presented method opens up new resources for the fabrication of porous silicon by metal-assisted etching. Here, a vast variety of metal nanoparticles accessible by well-established wet-chemical synthesis can be employed for the fabrication of the etching masks.

  17. Optical Limiting Properties of Ag-Cu Metal Alloy Nanoparticles Analysis by using MATLAB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Hua; LI Hui-Qing; LU Jian-Duo; WANG Ru-Wu

    2011-01-01

    Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles were formed by sequential ion implantation (Ag and Cu) in silica using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source.Third-order nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were measured at 1064nm excitations using the Z-scan technique.Curve fitting analysis,based on the MATLAB features for Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticle optical limiting experiments,is used.The results show that Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles display a refractive optical limiting effect at 1064 nm.Recently,increasing attention has been focused on the third-order nonlinear susceptibility and the photorefractive effect of noble-metal clusters embedded in dielectric matrices.[1-3] Third-order nonlinearities of metal/dielectric composite materials are influenced not only by the type and size of the embedded metal clusters,but also by the dielectric constant,thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the dielectric matrices.[4-6] Amongst the nanoparticles studied earlier,high nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction coefficients were found in copper and copper containing nanomaterials.[7,8] For silver,the nonlinear refractive index γ changes from positive to negative upon the growth of clusters.[9] Potential applications of optical limiters in the protection of sensors from intense laser pulses have motivated great efforts to design new nonlinear optical systems.[10]%Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles were formed by sequential ion implantation (Ag and Cu) in silica using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were measured at 1064 nm excitations using the Z-scan technique. Curve fitting analysis, based on the MATLAB features for Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticle optical limiting experiments, is used. The results show that Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles display a refractive optical limiting effect at 1064 nm.

  18. Linking experiment and theory for three-dimensional networked binary metal nanoparticle-triblock terpolymer superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zihui; Hur, Kahyun; Sai, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Gruner, Sol M.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Controlling superstructure of binary nanoparticle mixtures in three dimensions from self-assembly opens enormous opportunities for the design of materials with unique properties. Here we report on how the intimate coupling of synthesis, in-depth electron tomographic characterization and theory enables exquisite control of superstructure in highly ordered porous three-dimensional continuous networks from single and binary mixtures of metal nanoparticles with a triblock terpolymer. Poly(isoprene-block-styrene-block-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) is synthesized and used as structure-directing agent for ligand-stabilized platinum and gold nanoparticles. Quantitative analysis provides insights into short- and long-range nanoparticle-nanoparticle correlations, and local and global contributions to structural chirality in the networks. Results provide synthesis criteria for next-generation mesoporous network superstructures from binary nanoparticle mixtures for potential applications in areas including catalysis.

  19. Determination of Metal Nanoparticles Size Distribution in Gold Hydrosols of Plasmonic Absorption Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Bolesta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Substantiated method determining the distribution of metal particle size on the optical absorption data for composites consisting of dielectric medium and metallic inclusions and tested this method on hydrosols of gold nanoparticles compared to the data obtained by microscopic examination.

  20. A genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus that can produce gold nanoparticles from a metal salt precursor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Love

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV, and demonstrate that unlike wild type (WT TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10-40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials.

  1. CATALYTIC PROPERTIES OF POLYMER-STABILIZED COLLOIDAL METAL NANOPARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-xia Tu; Bao-lin He; Han-fan Liu; Xue-lan Luo; Xun Liang

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic properties of polymer-stabilized colloidal metal nanoparticles synthesized by microwave irradiation were studied in the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated aldehydes, o-chloronitrobenzene and the hydrogenation of alkenes. The results show that nanosized metal particles synthesized by microwave irradiation have similar catalytic performance in selective hydrogenation of unsaturated aldehydes, better selectivity to o-chloroaniline in hydrogenation of o-chloronitrobenzene and higher catalytic activities in hydrogenation of alkenes, compared with metal clusters prepared by conventional heating. The same apparent activation energy (Ea = 29 kJ mol-1) for hydrogenation of 1-heptene catalyzed with platinum nanoparticles prepared by both heating modes implied that the reaction followed the same mechanism.

  2. Influence of ligands in metal nanoparticle electrophoresis for the fabrication of biofunctional coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streich, Carmen; Koenen, Sven [Technical Chemistry I, University of Duisburg-Essen and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Universitaetsstr. 7, 45141 Essen (Germany); Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Barcikowski, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.barcikowski@uni-due.de [Technical Chemistry I, University of Duisburg-Essen and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Universitaetsstr. 7, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Particle mobility measurements quantify how ligand size and charge influence particle electrophoresis. • Although negatively-charged ligands enhance particle mobility, ultimate deposition is suppressed. • Laser-generated metal nanoparticles can serve as model materials in electrophoretic deposition because they are ligand-free, hard colloidal spheres. • Only bare nanoparticles feature a high electrophoretic mobility and a constant deposition rate with no barrier formation. • Bioactive implant coatings may result from depositing nanoparticles functionalized with cell-penetrating peptides. - Abstract: Electrophoretic deposition of colloidal nanoparticles shows great promise for the fabrication of nanostructured surfaces, especially relevant for the surface modification of three dimensional medical implants. Here, the role of small and bulky, chemisorbent and physisorbent ligands on metal (gold, platinum) nanoparticle deposition dynamics are systematically investigated. To be able to compare ligand-coated to ligand-free nanoparticles, pulsed laser ablation in liquid is employed as nanoparticle fabrication method. Nanoparticles’ electrophoretic properties are assessed via zeta potential measurements and nanoparticle tracking analysis, while online-UV–vis spectroscopy provides information about the deposition dynamics. Electron micrographs and contact angle measurements are employed to characterize the deposit. We show that ligand-free nanoparticles feature a high electrophoretic mobility and linear deposition kinetics, representing an excellent model material for controlled electrophoretic deposition. In contrast, the electrophoretic mobility of surface-modified nanoparticles is altered due to the surrounding ligand layer, resulting in less efficient deposition. Notably, electrophoretic mobility is not solely governed by the ligand's charge and does not correlate to the zeta potential values directly. Finally

  3. Heat and mass transfer enhancement of nanofluids flow in the presence of metallic/metallic-oxides spherical nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar; Ali, Kashif; Iqbal, M. Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shazad

    2017-01-01

    The numerical study of heat and mass transfer for an incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nanofluid flow containing spherical shaped nanoparticles through a channel with moving porous walls is presented. Further, another endeavour is to study the effect of two types of fluids, namely the metallic nanofluid (Au + water) and metallic-oxides nanofluid (TiO2 + water) are studied. The phenomena of spherical metallic and metallic-oxides nanoparticles have been also mathematically modelled by using the Hamilton-Crosser model. The influence of the governing parameters on the flow, heat and mass transfer aspects of the problem is discussed. The outcome of the investigation may be beneficial to the application of biotechnology and industrial purposes. Numerical solutions for the velocity, heat and mass transfer rate at the boundary are obtained and analysed.

  4. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced.

  5. Graphene layer encapsulated metal nanoparticles as a new type of non-precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Zhong, Lijie; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2016-01-01

    Cheap and efficient non-precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction have been a focus of research in the field of low-temperature fuel cells. This review is devoted to a brief summary of the recent work on a new type of catalysts, i.e., the graphene layer encapsulated metal nanoparticles....... The discussion is focused on the synthesis, structure, mechanism, performance, and further research....

  6. Laser heating of metallic nanoparticles for photothermal ablation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Shan, Guangshuai; Yu, Junsheng; Yang, Wei; Ren, Zhaodi; Wang, Xiaohui; Xie, Xi; Chen, Hui-jiuan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-02-01

    In order to search for a suitable frequency and material with higher photothermal efficacy for hyperthermia application in cancer treatment, a comparative study on laser heating of Au/Ag nanoparticles and Ag nanowires has been conducted. It is found that gold nanoparticles are more photothermal efficient in comparison with silver nanoparticles and silver nanowires at 450nm and 532 nm. Gold nanoparticles are more heated by 532 nm laser than 450 nm laser. In contrast, silver nanoparticles show slightly less temperature rise at 532 nm than 450 nm laser. For silver nanowires, no significant photothermal effect has been observed. Size-dependent effect study indicates that the absorption efficiency of single gold nanoparticles of larger diameter is higher than that of smaller diameter, in the diameter range of 0-50nm. A mathematical model for describing the heating profile in the heating sample has been built. The mathematical model can be utilized to predict the optimal treatment size of tumor.

  7. An electrodynamics-Langevin dynamics (ED-LD) approach to simulate metal nanoparticle interactions and motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, N; Rice, S A; Gray, S K; Scherer, N F

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the formation of electrodynamically interacting assemblies of metal nanoparticles requires accurate computational methods for determining the forces and propagating trajectories. However, since computation of electromagnetic forces occurs on attosecond to femtosecond timescales, simulating the motion of colloidal nanoparticles on milliseconds to seconds timescales is a challenging multi-scale computational problem. Here, we present a computational technique for performing accurate simulations of laser-illuminated metal nanoparticles. In the simulation, we self-consistently combine the finite-difference time-domain method for electrodynamics (ED) with Langevin dynamics (LD) for the particle motions. We demonstrate the ED-LD method by calculating the 3D trajectories of a single 100-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticle and optical trapping and optical binding of two and three 150-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticles in simulated optical tweezers. We show that surface charge on the colloidal metal nanoparticles plays an important role in their optically driven self-organization. In fact, these simulations provide a more complete understanding of the assembly of different structures of two and three Ag nanoparticles that have been observed experimentally, demonstrating that the ED-LD method will be a very useful tool for understanding the self-organization of optical matter.

  8. Potential application of metal nanoparticles for dosimetric systems: Concepts and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, Eder José, E-mail: ederguidelli@pg.ffclrp.usp.br; Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: ederguidelli@pg.ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-07

    Metallic nanoparticles increase the delivered dose and consequently enhance tissue radio sensitization during radiation therapy of cancer. The Dose Enhancement Factor (DEF) corresponds to the ratio between the dose deposited on a tissue containing nanoparticles, and the dose deposited on a tissue without nanoparticles. In this sense, we have used electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) to investigate how silver and gold nanoparticles affect the dose deposition in alanine dosimeters, which act as a surrogate of soft tissue. Besides optimizing radiation absorption by the dosimeter, the optical properties of these metal nanoparticles could also improve light emission from materials employed as radiation detectors. Therefore, we have also examined how the plasmonic properties of noble metal nanoparticles could enhance radiation detection using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry. This work will show results on how the use of gold and silver nanoparticles are beneficial for the ESR and OSL dosimetric techniques, and will describe the difficulties we have been facing, the challenges to overcome, and the perspectives.

  9. Peculiarities of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained in acoustoplasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Nikiforov, V. N.; Shevchenko, S. N.; Yakunin, V. G.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Bychenko, A. B.; Sredin, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles of tungsten, copper, iron, and zinc oxides were synthesized in acoustoplasma discharge. Their size distribution was studied by electron microscopy and laser correlation spectroscopy. Ultrasound was found to narrow significantly the size distribution width of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Water suspensions of zinc oxide nanoparticles showed photoluminescence in red and near infrared spectral ranges, which makes them a promising material for luminescent diagnostics of biological systems.

  10. Laser-ablation-induced synthesis of SiO2-capped noble metal nanoparticles in a single step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Ernesto; Abderrafi, Kamal; Abargues, Rafael; Valdés, José L; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2010-05-18

    Here we describe a simple, powerful technique based on the laser ablation of a target immersed in a water solution of a metal salt. With this method, nanoparticles of different metals and alloys can be processed very quickly. Both the target and the salt solution can be chosen to produce metal nanoparticles of different sizes, surface-oxidized nanoparticles (silica-silver, for example), or even more complex structures to be defined by the researcher on one or more steps because the technique combines the advantages of both physical and chemical methods. We have applied this technique to the fabrication of inert silica-metal (silver, gold, and silver-gold) nanoparticles with a strong surface plasmon resonance all together in a single step. The advantage of the simultaneous production of silica during laser ablation is the stabilization of the metal nanoparticle colloid but also the possibility to reduce the toxicity of these nanoparticles.

  11. Engineered metal nanoparticles in the sub-nanomolar levels kill cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodyanoy V

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitaly Vodyanoy,1 Yasmine Daniels,2 Oleg Pustovyy,1 William A MacCrehan,2 Shin Muramoto,2 Gheorghe Stan21Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn, AL, 2Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MA, USA Background: Small metal nanoparticles obtained from animal blood were observed to be toxic to cultured cancer cells, whereas noncancerous cells were much less affected. In this work, engineered zinc and copper metal nanoparticles were produced from bulk metal rods by an underwater high-voltage discharge method. The metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal nanoparticles, with estimated diameters of 1 nm–2 nm, were determined to be more than 85% nonoxidized. A cell viability assay and high-resolution light microscopy showed that exposure of RG2, cultured rat brain glioma cancer cells, to the zinc and copper nanoparticles resulted in cell morphological changes, including decreased cell adherence, shrinking/rounding, nuclear condensation, and budding from cell bodies. The metal-induced cell injuries were similar to the effects of staurosporine, an active apoptotic reagent. The viability experiments conducted for zinc and copper yielded values of dissociation constants of 0.22±0.08 nmol/L (standard error [SE] and 0.12±0.02 nmol/L (SE, respectively. The noncancerous astrocytes were not affected at the same conditions. Because metal nanoparticles were lethal to the cancer cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, they are potentially important as nanomedicine.Purpose: Lethal concentrations of synthetic metal nanoparticles reported in the literature are a few orders of magnitude higher than the natural, blood-isolated metal nanoparticles; therefore, in this work, engineered metal nanoparticles were examined to mimic the properties of endogenous metal

  12. The mechanism of metal nanoparticle formation in plants: limits on accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haverkamp, R. G., E-mail: r.haverkamp@massey.ac.nz; Marshall, A. T. [Massey University, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology (New Zealand)

    2009-08-15

    Metal nanoparticles have many potential technological applications. Biological routes to the synthesis of these particles have been proposed including production by vascular plants, known as phytoextraction. While many studies have looked at metal uptake by plants, particularly with regard to phytoremediation and hyperaccumulation, few have distinguished between metal deposition and metal salt accumulation. This work describes the uptake of AgNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}Ag(S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 2}, and Ag(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}NO{sub 3} solutions by hydroponically grown Brassica juncea and the quantitative measurement of the conversion of these salts to silver metal nanoparticles. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine the metal speciation within the plants, combined with atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for total Ag, the quantity of reduction of Ag{sup I} to Ag{sup 0} is reported. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed Ag particles of 2-35 nm. The factors controlling the amount of silver accumulated are revealed. It is found that there is a limit on the amount of metal nanoparticles that may be deposited, of about 0.35 wt.% Ag on a dry plant basis, and that higher levels of silver are obtained only by the concentration of metal salts within the plant, not by deposition of metal. The limit on metal nanoparticle accumulation, across a range of metals, is proposed to be controlled by the total reducing capacity of the plant for the reduction potential of the metal species and limited to reactions occurring at an electrochemical potential greater than 0 V (verses the standard hydrogen electrode).

  13. The mechanism of metal nanoparticle formation in plants: limits on accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, R. G.; Marshall, A. T.

    2009-08-01

    Metal nanoparticles have many potential technological applications. Biological routes to the synthesis of these particles have been proposed including production by vascular plants, known as phytoextraction. While many studies have looked at metal uptake by plants, particularly with regard to phytoremediation and hyperaccumulation, few have distinguished between metal deposition and metal salt accumulation. This work describes the uptake of AgNO3, Na3Ag(S2O3)2, and Ag(NH3)2NO3 solutions by hydroponically grown Brassica juncea and the quantitative measurement of the conversion of these salts to silver metal nanoparticles. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine the metal speciation within the plants, combined with atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for total Ag, the quantity of reduction of AgI to Ag0 is reported. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed Ag particles of 2-35 nm. The factors controlling the amount of silver accumulated are revealed. It is found that there is a limit on the amount of metal nanoparticles that may be deposited, of about 0.35 wt.% Ag on a dry plant basis, and that higher levels of silver are obtained only by the concentration of metal salts within the plant, not by deposition of metal. The limit on metal nanoparticle accumulation, across a range of metals, is proposed to be controlled by the total reducing capacity of the plant for the reduction potential of the metal species and limited to reactions occurring at an electrochemical potential greater than 0 V (verses the standard hydrogen electrode).

  14. Dialkyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes - a new class of single source precursors for deposition of metal selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sajid N.; Akhtar, Masood; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Qadeer Malik, Abdul; Azad Malik, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    We report here a new synthetic approach for convenient and high yield synthesis of dialkyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes. A number of diphenyldiselenophosphinato-metal as well as diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes have been synthesized and used as precursors for deposition of semiconductor thin films and nanoparticles. Cubic Cu2-xSe and tetragonal CuInSe2 thin films have been deposited by AACVD at 400, 450 and 500 °C whereas cubic PbSe and tetragonal CZTSe thin films have been deposited through doctor blade method followed by annealing. SEM investigations revealed significant differences in morphology of the films deposited at different temperatures. Preparation of Cu2-xSe and In2Se3 nanoparticles using diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal precursors has been carried out by colloidal method in HDA/TOP system. Cu2-xSe nanoparticles (grown at 250 °C) and In2Se3 nanoparticles (grown at 270 °C) have a mean diameter of 5.0 ± 1.2 nm and 13 ± 2.5 nm, respectively.

  15. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C. Wehmas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO, titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L. This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (∼22.7 fold when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 h toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity.

  16. Carbon Materials Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Composite and Battery Anode Composed of the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of forming a composite material for use as an anode for a lithium-ion battery is disclosed. The steps include selecting a carbon material as a constituent part of the composite, chemically treating the selected carbon material to receive nanoparticles, incorporating nanoparticles into the chemically treated carbon material and removing surface nanoparticles from an outside surface of the carbon material with incorporated nanoparticles. A material making up the nanoparticles alloys with lithium.

  17. Robust Synthesis of Ciprofloxacin-Capped Metallic Nanoparticles and Their Urease Inhibitory Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nisar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin (cip has been used to cap metallic (silver and gold nanoparticles by a robust one pot synthetic method under optimized conditions, using NaBH4 as a mild reducing agent. Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs showed constancy against variations in pH, table salt (NaCl solution, and heat. Capping with metal ions (Ag/Au-cip has significant implications for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of fluoroquinolone molecules. The metallic nanoparticles were characterized by several techniques such as ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV, atomic force microscopy (AFM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX methods. The nanoparticles synthesized using silver and gold were subjected to energy dispersive X-ray tests in order to show their metallic composition. The NH moiety of the piperazine group capped the Ag/Au surfaces, as revealed by spectroscopic studies. The synthesized nanoparticles were also assessed for urease inhibition potential. Fascinatingly, both Ag-cip and Au-cip NPs exhibited significant urease enzyme inhibitory potential, with IC50 = 1.181 ± 0.02 µg/mL and 52.55 ± 2.3 µg/mL, compared to ciprofloxacin (IC50 = 82.95 ± 1.62 µg/mL. MNPs also exhibited significant antibacterial activity against selected bacterial strains.

  18. Robust Synthesis of Ciprofloxacin-Capped Metallic Nanoparticles and Their Urease Inhibitory Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Qayum, Mughal; Khan, Ajmal; Farooq, Umar; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Ali, Rashid

    2016-03-25

    The fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin (cip) has been used to cap metallic (silver and gold) nanoparticles by a robust one pot synthetic method under optimized conditions, using NaBH₄ as a mild reducing agent. Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) showed constancy against variations in pH, table salt (NaCl) solution, and heat. Capping with metal ions (Ag/Au-cip) has significant implications for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of fluoroquinolone molecules. The metallic nanoparticles were characterized by several techniques such as ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) methods. The nanoparticles synthesized using silver and gold were subjected to energy dispersive X-ray tests in order to show their metallic composition. The NH moiety of the piperazine group capped the Ag/Au surfaces, as revealed by spectroscopic studies. The synthesized nanoparticles were also assessed for urease inhibition potential. Fascinatingly, both Ag-cip and Au-cip NPs exhibited significant urease enzyme inhibitory potential, with IC50 = 1.181 ± 0.02 µg/mL and 52.55 ± 2.3 µg/mL, compared to ciprofloxacin (IC50 = 82.95 ± 1.62 µg/mL). MNPs also exhibited significant antibacterial activity against selected bacterial strains.

  19. Hybridization of Metal Nanoparticles with Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Protein as Amphiphilic Stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hui; Zhang, Weina; Zhou, Weiqiang; Zou, Binghua; Zheng, Bing; Zhao, Shilin; Huo, Fengwei

    2017-07-26

    Here, a facile strategy is reported to efficiently hybridize metal nanoparticles (MNPs) with typical metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of ZIF-8 (zeolitic imidazolate framework-8), which employs bovine serum albumin (BSA, a serum albumin protein derived from cows) as the amphiphilic stabilizer to increase the affinity of MNP toward MOFs. For instance, the as-synthesized PdNPs/ZIF-8 composites with diameter from 100 to 200 nm always maintain well-defined crystalline structure, and the PdNPs with small size of ∼2 nm are well-dispersed in the crystal of MOFs without serious aggregations due to the BSA stabilizer. In Suzuki cross-coupling reactions of aryl halide, the PdNPs/ZIF-8 as catalysts have exhibited high activity and satisfied reusability owing to the use of BSA stabilizer as well as the fixing of MOFs matrixes. In addition, the strategy also can be extended to synthesize other kinds of MNPs/MOFs hybrid composites with tunable particle size, which brings more opportunity for functional MOFs hybrid materials.

  20. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Testino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR, has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1−xNixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO42 nanoparticles (NPs can be obtained with a production rate of about 1–10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  1. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Andrea; Pilger, Frank; Lucchini, Mattia Alberto; Quinsaat, Jose Enrico Q; Stähli, Christoph; Bowen, Paul

    2015-06-08

    Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR), has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1-x)NixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape) and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO4)2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be obtained with a production rate of about 1-10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  2. Phase diagrams of microemulsions containing reducing agents and metal salts as bases for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Reza; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2009-03-01

    We studied the phase diagrams of microemulsions with a view to using these systems for the synthesis of metallic Pt, Pb, and Bi nanoparticles as well as of intermetallic Pt/Pb and Pt/Bi nanoparticles. The microemulsions consisted of H(2)O/salt-n-decane-SDS-1-butanol. The salt was either one metal precursor (H(2)PtCl(6) x 6 H(2)O, Pb(NO(3))(2), or Bi(NO(3))(3) x 5 H(2)O), a mixture of two metal precursors (H(2)PtCl(6) x 6 H(2)O + Pb(NO(3))(2) or H(2)PtCl(6) x 6 H(2)O + Bi(NO(3))(3) x 5 H(2)O), or the reducing agent (NaBH(4)). In addition, other salts needed to be added in order to solubilize the metal precursors, to stabilize the reducing agent, and to adjust the ionic strength. Combining the microemulsion (mu e1) that contains the metal precursor(s) with the microemulsion (mu e2) that contains the reducing agent leads to metallic nanoparticles. To study systematically how the shape and size of the synthesized metallic nanoparticles depend on the size and shape of the respective microemulsion droplets, first of all one has to find those conditions under which mu e1 and mu e2 have the same structure. For that purpose we determined the water emulsification failure boundary (wefb) of each microemulsion as it is at the wefb where the water droplets are known to be spherical. We found that the ionic strength (I) of the aqueous phase as well as the hard acid and hard base properties of the ions are the key tuning parameters for the location of the wefb.

  3. Interactions of noble metal nanoparticles with their environment; Wechselwirkungen von Edelmetallnanopartikeln mit ihrer Umgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reismann, Maximilian

    2009-12-08

    Upon irradiating noble metal nanoparticles with light, unique optical phenomena can occur, such as resonantly enhanced light-scattering and light-absorption, or a tremendous enhancement of the exciting optical field close to the surface of the nanoparticles. These phenomena rely on the excitations of collective oscillations of the conduction electrons within a nanoparticle. The optical properties of a nanoparticle are determined by the resonance frequency of these so-called plasmon oscillations. This resonance frequency and the light-scattering spectrum of a nanoparticle depend (among other effects) on the dielectric environment of the particle. Due to this effect, noble metal nanoparticles can be applied for local optical sensing of chemical substances. The large light-absorption properties of a nanoparticle also enable the usage of light-irradiation to deposit heat in the nanoparticle in a selective and highly localized manner. Therefore, a local temperature increase can be induced in the nanoparticle and its immediate environment. This temperature increase could be used to trigger chemical or biological reactions, or it could be used for a selective hyperthermia of biological material. These and further possible applications rely on the detection or the systematic excitation of interactions between the noble metal nanoparticle and its environment. These interactions are the central subject of this thesis. Particular attention is paid to photothermal interactions. An interesting question is to what extend a nanoparticle-supported, photothermally-induced temperature rise can be applied to trigger a biomolecular reaction in a spatially confined volume. By carefully adjusting the photothermal treatment, one aims at affecting the molecules without damaging their chemical functionality. The photothermal interaction is addressed in two projects: First, networks built up by gold nanoparticles are investigated. In these networks, double-stranded DNA-molecules are used to

  4. Improving proton therapy by metal-containing nanoparticles : nanoscale insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Eustache, Pierre; Porcel, Erika; Salado, Daniela; Stefancikova, Lenka; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, Francois; Mowat, Pierre; Biegun, Aleksandra; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Remita, Hynd; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles to enhance the effect of radiation-based cancer treatments is a growing field of study and recently, even nanoparticle-induced improvement of proton therapy performance has been investigated. Aiming at a clinical implementation of this approach, it is essential to

  5. Direct synthesis of metal nanoparticles with tunable porosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Punzhin, Sergey; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile one-step synthesis route of porous bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles involving two parallel processes: alloying during nanocrystal growth and dealloying via galvanic replacement reaction. Further, we show that porosity in these nanoparticles can be tuned via their alloy compo

  6. Direct synthesis of metal nanoparticles with tunable porosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Punzhin, Sergey; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile one-step synthesis route of porous bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles involving two parallel processes: alloying during nanocrystal growth and dealloying via galvanic replacement reaction. Further, we show that porosity in these nanoparticles can be tuned via their alloy

  7. Improving proton therapy by metal-containing nanoparticles : nanoscale insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Eustache, Pierre; Porcel, Erika; Salado, Daniela; Stefancikova, Lenka; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, Francois; Mowat, Pierre; Biegun, Aleksandra; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Remita, Hynd; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles to enhance the effect of radiation-based cancer treatments is a growing field of study and recently, even nanoparticle-induced improvement of proton therapy performance has been investigated. Aiming at a clinical implementation of this approach, it is essential to characteri

  8. Improving proton therapy by metal-containing nanoparticles : nanoscale insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Eustache, Pierre; Porcel, Erika; Salado, Daniela; Stefancikova, Lenka; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, Francois; Mowat, Pierre; Biegun, Aleksandra; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Remita, Hynd; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles to enhance the effect of radiation-based cancer treatments is a growing field of study and recently, even nanoparticle-induced improvement of proton therapy performance has been investigated. Aiming at a clinical implementation of this approach, it is essential to characteri

  9. Potential for metal contamination by direct sonication of nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a growing need to examine the potential toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to establish regulations protective of environmental health and safety. During a series of experiments to evaluate the toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on terrestrial pla...

  10. Design of metallic nanoparticles gratings for filtering properties in the visible spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Brûlé, Y; Fehrembach, A -L; Gralak, B; Popov, E; Tayeb, G; Grangier, M; Barat, D; Bertin, H; Gogol, P; Dagens, B

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles are exploited to create efficient optical filtering functions. A Finite Element Method is used to model metallic nanoparticles gratings. The accuracy of this method is shown by comparing numerical results with measurements on a two-dimensional grating of gold nanocylinders with elliptic cross section. Then a parametric analysis is performed in order to design efficient filters with polarization dependent properties together with high transparency over the visible range. The behavior of nanoparticle gratings is also modelled using the Maxwell-Garnett homogenization theory and analyzed by comparison with the diffraction by a single nanoparticle. The proposed structures are intended to be included in optical systems which could find innovative applications.

  11. Design of metallic nanoparticle gratings for filtering properties in the visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlé, Y; Demésy, G; Fehrembach, A-L; Gralak, B; Popov, E; Tayeb, G; Grangier, M; Barat, D; Bertin, H; Gogol, P; Dagens, B

    2015-12-10

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles are exploited to create efficient optical filtering functions. A finite element method is used to model metallic nanoparticle gratings. The accuracy of this method is shown by comparing numerical results with measurements on a two-dimensional grating of gold nanocylinders with an elliptic cross section. A parametric analysis is then performed in order to design efficient filters with polarization dependent properties together with high transparency over the visible range. The behavior of nanoparticle gratings is also modeled using the Maxwell-Garnett homogenization theory and analyzed by comparison with the diffraction of a single nanoparticle. The proposed structures are intended to be included in optical systems that could find innovative applications.

  12. Facile synthesis of metal-chelating magnetic nanoparticles by exploiting organophosphorus coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Su, Wei Wen

    2011-01-01

    A new method is described for facile synthesis of metal-chelating magnetic nanoparticles by simply mixing iron oxide nanoparticles with a bifunctional organophosphorus compound, N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PM-IDA), in aqueous solution. On charging with nickel ions, the PM-IDA functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles exhibited high His-tag protein binding capacity (0.21 and 0.58 mg/mg for His-tagged green fluorescent protein and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, respectively) and were successfully used to purify these proteins from bacterial cell extracts to high purity in a single step. Although other synthetic schemes for metal-chelating magnetic nanoparticles have been reported, the method described here is markedly simpler and involves only low-cost reagents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gold Nanoparticles for Plasmonic Biosensing: The Role of Metal Crystallinity and Nanoscale Roughness

    CERN Document Server

    Tinguely, Jean-Claude; Leiner, Claude; Grand, Johan; Hohenau, Andreas; Felidj, Nordin; Aubard, Jean; Krenn, Joachim R

    2011-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles show specific optical properties due to the excitation of localized surface plasmons that make them attractive candidates for highly sensitive bionanosensors. The underlying physical principle is either an analyte-induced modification of the dielectric properties of the medium surrounding the nanoparticle or an increase of the excitation and emission rates of an optically active analyte by the resonantly enhanced plasmon field. Either way, besides the nanoparticle geometry the dielectric properties of the metal and nanoscale surface roughness play an important role for the sensing performance. As the underlying principles are however not yet well understood, we aim here at an improved understanding by analyzing the optical characteristics of lithographically fabricated nanoparticles with different crystallinity and roughness parameters. We vary these parameters by thermal annealing and apply a thin gold film as a model system to retrieve modifications in the dielectric function. We i...

  14. Mesoscopic metal nanoparticles doubly functionalized with natural and engineered lipidic dispersants for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tatsuya; Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Ishidate, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2014-07-22

    Surface engineering of mesoscopic metal nanoparticles to increase biocompatibility and cell interaction is important for improvement of their therapeutic properties. Here, we describe a strategy to stabilize mesoscopic metal nanoparticles and to enhance their cell interaction by stepwise addition of (Z)-9-octadecenoate (oleate) and a cell-penetrating peptide-fused high-density lipoprotein (cpHDL). Oleate replaces a cytotoxic dispersant on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs), which enables subsequent cpHDL binding without causing aggregation. Notably, these two lipidic dispersants are probably intercalated on the surface. This procedure was also used to stabilize 20 nm spherical gold nanoparticles and 40 nm aggregates of 10 nm magnetite nanoparticles. cpHDL-bound AuNRs were internalized greater than 80 times more efficiently than poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated AuNRs and were able to elicit cancer cell photoablation.

  15. A discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical method to describe the interaction of metal nanoparticles and molecular absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Seth Michael; Jensen, Lasse

    2011-10-07

    A frequency-dependent quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method for the calculation of response properties of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles is presented. This discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method represents the nanoparticle atomistically, thus accounting for the local environment of the nanoparticle surface on the optical properties of the adsorbed molecule. Using the DIM/QM method, we investigate the coupling between the absorption of a silver nanoparticle and of a substituted naphthoquinone. This system is chosen since it shows strong coupling due to a molecular absorption peak that overlaps with the plasmon excitation in the metal nanoparticle. We show that there is a strong dependence not only on the distance of the molecule from the metal nanoparticle but also on its orientation relative to the nanoparticle. We find that when the transition dipole moment of an excitation is oriented towards the nanoparticle there is a significant increase in the molecular absorption as a result of coupling to the metal nanoparticle. In contrast, we find that the molecular absorption is decreased when the transition dipole moment is oriented parallel to the metal nanoparticle. The coupling between the molecule and the metal nanoparticle is found to be surprisingly long range and important on a length scale comparable to the size of the metal nanoparticle. A simple analytical model that describes the molecule and the metal nanoparticle as two interacting point objects is found to be in excellent agreement with the full DIM/QM calculations over the entire range studied. The results presented here are important for understanding plasmon-exciton hybridization, plasmon enhanced photochemistry, and single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  16. Optical steering of thermally generated microbubbles in a liquid for targeted metallic nanoparticle delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnappa, Arjun; Abeywickrema, Ujitha; Banerjee, Partha

    2016-09-01

    A novel mathematical model is developed to investigate the behavior of thermally generated microbubbles in the presence of optical radiation to understand the mechanism of their steering. Forces acting on a bubble are studied in detail using a general force model. It has been proposed that these microbubbles with agglomerated metallic nanoparticles can be used for targeted drug delivery. The model can be extended to include the steering of bubbles with agglomerated silver or gold nanoparticles on their surface.

  17. Metal ions to control the morphology of semiconductor nanoparticles: copper selenide nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhua; Zamani, Reza; Ibáñez, Maria; Cadavid, Doris; Shavel, Alexey; Morante, Joan Ramon; Arbiol, Jordi; Cabot, Andreu

    2013-03-27

    Morphology is a key parameter in the design of novel nanocrystals and nanomaterials with controlled functional properties. Here, we demonstrate the potential of foreign metal ions to tune the morphology of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles. We illustrate the underlying mechanism by preparing copper selenide nanocubes in the presence of Al ions. We further characterize the plasmonic properties of the obtained nanocrystals and demonstrate their potential as a platform to produce cubic nanoparticles with different composition by cation exchange.

  18. Ionic Liquid-Nanoparticle Hybrid Electrolytes and their Application in Secondary Lithium-Metal Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yingying

    2012-07-12

    Ionic liquid-tethered nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes comprised of silica nanoparticles densely grafted with imidazolium-based ionic liquid chains are shown to retard lithium dendrite growth in rechargeable batteries with metallic lithium anodes. The electrolytes are demonstrated in full cell studies using both high-energy Li/MoS2 and high-power Li/TiO2 secondary batteries. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Optical second harmonic generation of single metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butet, Jérémy; Duboisset, Julien; Bachelier, Guillaume; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Benichou, Emmanuel; Jonin, Christian; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2010-05-12

    We report the optical second harmonic generation from individual 150 nm diameter gold nanoparticles dispersed in gelatin. The quadratic hyperpolarizability of the particles is determined and the input polarization dependence of the second harmonic intensity obtained. These results are found in excellent agreement with ensemble measurements and finite element simulations. These results open up new perspectives for the investigation of the nonlinear optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles.

  20. Is it possible to measure diameters of metal nanoparticles using BSE imaging in FESEM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesarova, Jana; Langhans, Jan; Slouf, Miroslav; Pavlova, Ewa; Vancova, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) equipped with an Autrata improved yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) detector of back-scattered electrons (BSE) for a determination of metal nanoparticles sizes were examined in this study. The diameters of Au and Pd nanoparticles with different sizes were resolved based on digitally recorded FESEM micrographs and were compared with diameters obtained with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In the case of Au nanoparticles, the data obtained from the FESEM exhibited smaller values in comparison with data from the TEM. The Pd nanoparticles diameters measured in the FESEM were comparable with those determined by means of the TEM, however. The influence of various parameters like the sizes of nanoparticles, their composition, use of accelerating voltage and other working conditions in the FESEM on the measurement results are discussed.

  1. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles and their superstructures; Darstellung von Edelmetallnanopartikeln und deren Ueberstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigall, Nadja-Carola

    2009-08-18

    A modified synthesis procedure for citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution is transferred under application of equal concentrations to the systems silver, platinum, and palladium. The nanoparticles are analyzed by means of absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Ordered superstructures of the noble-metal nanoparticles can be synthesized by infiltration of templates of block-copolymer films with aqueous nanoparticle solution. In dependence on the pre-treatment of the polymer films either two-dimensional periodical arrangements with a periodicity of less than 30 nm or fingerprint-like arrangements with a groove distance in the same order of magnitude. By removal of the polymer one- respectively two-dimensional arrangements of platinum nanowires respectively nanoparticles on a silicon waver arise.

  2. Nanosystems: the use of nanoalloys, metallic, bimetallic, and magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Karrina; Tofail, Syed A M

    2015-11-14

    There is a growing interest in the use of nanosystems such as nanoalloys, bimetallic nanoparticles, metallic nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications. These applications can be as diverse as hyperthermic treatments; targeted drug delivery; bio-imaging; cell labelling and gene delivery. The use of nanoalloys in these applications has received only limited attention due to the fact that there were many unanswered questions and concerns regarding nanoparticles and nanoalloys such as their stability over time, tendency to agglomerate, chemical activity, ease of oxidation, biocompatibility and cytotoxicity. In this chapter we survey current applications and advances in magnetic nanoparticles used in these biomedical applications so as to understand the materials properties that can pave the way for the use of nanoalloys as a potential alternative or improve solutions that are offered by current materials.

  3. Effect of metal support interaction on surface segregation in Pd Pt nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarkar, A.; Menon, Mahesh; Khanra, Badal C.

    2001-10-01

    In this work, we present the results of our Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies for the segregation behavior of supported, clean and gas-covered Pd-Pt nanoparticles as a function of the metal-support interaction. For preferential Pd-support interaction, the base of the nanoparticle is found to get enriched with Pd atoms; while for preferential interaction of Pt atoms with the support the base gets enriched in Pt. The composition of the rest of the particle changes slightly with the metal-support interaction. The presence of oxygen and hydrogen atoms does not influence the role of the metal-support interaction on the surface composition of Pd-Pt nanoparticles. The simulation results are found to be in total agreement with the known experimental results.

  4. P-Stereogenic Phosphines for the Stabilisation of Metal Nanoparticles. A Surface State Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Raluy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Palladium and ruthenium nanoparticles have been prepared following the organometallic precursor decomposition methodology, under dihydrogen pressure and in the presence of borane protected P-stereogenic phosphines. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance monitoring of the corresponding syntheses has permitted to determine the optimal metal/ligand ratio for leading to small and well-dispersed nanoparticles. Exchange ligand reactions of the as-prepared materials have proven the strong interaction of the phosphines with the metal surface; only oxidative treatment using hydrogen peroxide could release the phosphine-based stabiliser from the metal surface. Pd and Ru nanoparticles have been evaluated in hydrogenation reactions, confirming the robustness of the stabilisers, which selectively permitted the hydrogenation of exocyclic C=C bonds, preventing the coordination of the aromatic rings and as a result, their hydrogenation.

  5. Mechanistic aspects in the biogenic synthesis of extracellular metal nanoparticles by peptides, bacteria, fungi, and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Marcato, Priscyla D; Durán, Marcela; Yadav, Alka; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

    2011-06-01

    Metal nanoparticles have been studied and applied in many areas including the biomedical, agricultural, electronic fields, etc. Several products of colloidal silver are already on the market. Research on new, eco-friendly and cheaper methods has been initiated. Biological production of metal nanoparticles has been studied by many researchers due to the convenience of the method that produces small particles stabilized by protein. However, the mechanism involved in this production has not yet been elucidated although hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed in the literature. Thus, this review discusses the various mechanisms provided for the biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles by peptides, bacteria, fungi, and plants. One thing that is clear is that the mechanistic aspects in some of the biological systems need more detailed studies.

  6. Nonlinear optical absorption and stimulated Mie scattering in metallic nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang S.; Law, Wing-Cheung; Baev, Alexander; Liu, Sha; Swihart, Mark T.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2013-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of four metallic (Au-, Au/Ag-, Ag-, and Pt-) nanoparticle suspensions in toluene have been studied in both femtosecond and nanosecond regimes. Nonlinear transmission measurements in the femtosecond laser regime revealed two-photon absorption (2PA) induced nonlinear attenuation, while in the nanosecond laser regime a stronger nonlinear attenuation is due to both 2PA and 2PA-induced excited-state absorption. In the nanosecond regime, at input pump laser intensities above a certain threshold value, a new type of stimulated (Mie) scattering has been observed. Being essentially different from all other well known molecular (Raman, Brillouin) stimulated scattering effects, the newly observed stimulated Mie scattering from the metallic nanoparticles exhibits the features of no frequency shift and low pump threshold requirement. A physical model of induced Bragg grating initiated by the backward Mie scattering from metallic nanoparticles is proposed to explain the gain mechanism of the observed stimulated scattering effect.

  7. Comparative study on the uptake and bioimpact of metal nanoparticles released into environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, Maria; Pricop, Daniela; Grigoras, Marian; Lupu, Nicoleta; Sacarescu, Liviu; Creanga, Dorina; Iacomi, Felicia

    2015-12-01

    Metallic particles of very small size are ubiquitously released in the air, water and soil from various natural and artificial sources - the last ones with enhanced extent since nanotechnology development accelerated exponentially. In this study we focused on the impact of metal nanoparticles in vegetal species of agroindustrial interest namely the maize (Zea mais L.). Laboratory simulation of environmental pollution was carried out by using engineered nanoparticles of two types: iron oxides with magnetic properties and gold nanoparticles supplied in the form of dilutes stable suspensions in the culture medium of maize seedlings. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs) preparation was performed by applying chemical route from iron ferric and ferrous precursor salts in alkali reaction medium at relatively high temperature (over 80 °C). Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) synthesis was accomplished from auric hydrochloride acid in alkali reaction medium in similar temperature conditions. In both types of metallic nanoparticles citrate ions were used as coating shell with role of suspension stabilization. Plantlet response was assessed at the level of assimilatory pigment contents in green tissue of seedlings in early ontogenetic stages.

  8. Catalytically Active Bimetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Porous Carbon Capsules Derived From Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Bradley, Siobhan J; Chan, Andrew; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Nann, Thomas; Kruger, Paul E; Telfer, Shane G

    2016-09-14

    We report a new methodology for producing monometallic or bimetallic nanoparticles confined within hollow nitrogen-doped porous carbon capsules. The capsules are derived from metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals that are coated with a shell of a secondary material comprising either a metal-tannic acid coordination polymer or a resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer. Platinum nanoparticles are optionally sandwiched between the MOF core and the shell. Pyrolysis of the MOF-shell composites produces hollow capsules of porous nitrogen-doped carbon that bear either monometallic (Pt, Co, and Ni) or alloyed (PtCo and PtNi) metal nanoparticles. The Co and Ni components of the bimetallic nanoparticles are derived from the shell surrounding the MOF crystals. The hollow capsules prevent sintering and detachment of the nanoparticles, and their porous walls allow for efficient mass transport. Alloyed PtCo nanoparticles embedded in the capsule walls are highly active, selective, and recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines.

  9. Memory effects in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors incorporating dispensed highly monodisperse 1 nm silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Osama M.; Antoniadis, Dimitri A.; Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir H.

    2007-04-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors containing various densities of ex situ produced, colloidal, highly monodisperse, spherical, 1nm silicon nanoparticles were fabricated and evaluated for potential use as charge storage elements in future nonvolatile memory devices. The capacitance-voltage characteristics are well behaved and agree with similarly fabricated zero-nanoparticle control samples and with an ideal simulation. Unlike larger particle systems, the demonstrated memory effect exhibits effectively pure hole storage. The nature of charging, hole type versus electron type may be understood in terms of the characteristics of ultrasmall silicon nanoparticles: large energy gap, large charging energy, and consequently a small electron affinity.

  10. Potential to raise the efficiency of neutron and neutron-photon therapy using metal nonradioactive nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    The use of metal nonradioactive nanoparticles (specifically, gold ones) in neutron and neutron-photon cancer therapy is proposed. The minimum therapeutically effective average density of gold within a tumor subjected to neutron irradiation is estimated as a value on the order of 10-5-10-4 g/cm3. Potential benefits of the use of data obtained when using Peteosthor (a drug containing 224Ra and colloidal platinum) and Thorotrast (a radiopaque contrast agent containing thorium oxide nanoparticles) and its analogues in the analysis of safety and efficiency of application of nonradioactive nanoparticles in radiation therapy and diagnostics are discussed.

  11. Gold nanoparticles with cyclic phenylazomethines: one-pot synthesis and metal ion sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomura, Ryo; Chung, Keum Jee; Iwai, Hideo; Higuchi, Masayoshi

    2011-07-01

    New gold nanoparticles covered with cyclic phenylazomethine (CPA) were obtained by a one-pot synthesis. It is confirmed by XPS that imines of CPA in the nanoparticles (Au-CPA) are partially reduced to amines. The amine part of CPA in Au-CPA is attached to the surfaces of gold nanoparticles, and the imine part works as a redox-active site. A glassy carbon electrode modified with Au-CPA was revealed to work as an electrochemical probe for metal ion sensing.

  12. Multi-Objective Optimization of Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells with Metallic and Dielectric Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aiello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin-film solar cells enable a strong reduction of the amount of silicon needed to produce photovoltaic panels but their efficiency lowers. Placing metallic or dielectric nanoparticles over the silicon substrate increases the light trapping into the panel thanks to the plasmonic scattering from nanoparticles at the surface of the cell. The goal of this paper is to optimize the geometry of a thin-film solar cell with silver and silica nanoparticles in order to improve its efficiency, taking into account the amount of silver. An efficient evolutionary algorithm is applied to perform the optimization with a reduced computing time.

  13. Screening of metal-resistant coal mine bacteria for biofabrication of elemental silver nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUBHASMITA PANDA; KANTI KUSUM YADAV; PARTH SARTHI NAYAK; MANORANJAN ARAKHA; SUMAN JHA

    2016-04-01

    Green synthesis approaches for nanoparticle synthesis are considered as nontoxic, eco-friendly and cost-effective approaches than other physical and chemical approaches. Here, we report green synthesis of silver nanoparticle using the bacteria from the habitat of relatively metal-rich coal mine dust. The bacteria showed resistance to significant concentration of anti-microbial Ag(I) ion. The nanoparticle was synthesized at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Ag(I) using only two isolates. The synthesis of silver nanoparticle was confirmed from the surface plasmon resonance property of the nanoparticle, whereas morphological features were studied using field emission scanning electron microscope. The hydrodynamic size analysis showed the presence ofmicroparticles along with the nanoparticles. Additionally, IR study provided information about the bacterial proteins involved in either reduction of Ag(I) into silver nanoparticle or capping of reduced silver nanocrystal or both.Thus, majority of the bacteria found in the coal mines have the resistance against the antimicrobial metal ion, and the potential to reduce the ion into nano- or micro-particles. Hence, the bacteria can be used as a single cell factoryfor production of silver nanomaterial.

  14. Transition-metal-doped ZnO nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity under UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Rosari; Djaja, Nadia Febiana

    2014-09-15

    ZnO nanoparticles doped with transition metals (Mn and Co) were prepared by a co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-rays, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities of the transition-metal-doped ZnO nanoparticles were evaluated in the degradation of methyl orange under UV irradiation. ZnO nanoparticles doped with 12 at.% of Mn and Co ions exhibited the maximum photodegradation efficiency. The experiment also demonstrated that the photodegradation efficiency of Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles was higher than that of Co-doped ZnO nanoparticles. These results indicate that charge trapping states due to the doping were the decisive factor rather than the average particle size and energy gap. Moreover the effect of pH values on the degradation efficiency was discussed in the photocatalytic experiments using 12 at.% Mn- and Co-doped ZnO nanoparticles.

  15. Current [corrected] trends in phytosynthesis of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Yadav, Alka; Gade, Aniket

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology is emerging as a field of applied science and technology. Synthesis of nanoparticles is done by various physical and chemical methods but the biological system is gaining attention as an eco-friendly technique. The biosynthetic method employing plant parts is proving as a simple and cost-effective method for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The present mini review focuses on the different systems utilized for the synthesis of nanoparticles with special emphasis on the use of plants for the synthesis process, its applications and future directions.

  16. Metal nanoparticle-directed NiCo2O4 nanostructure growth on carbon nanofibers with high capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Zhu, Jiahua

    2014-08-04

    Metal nanoparticles (Ni, Co) decorated on an electrospun carbon nanofiber surface directed the growth of NiCo2O4 into nanorod and nanosheet morphologies. These metal nanoparticles served as a transition layer to strengthen the interface and promote charge transfer between carbon and NiCo2O4 to achieve a high capacitance of 781 F g(-1).

  17. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Hui; Liu, Xu-Jun; Guan, Lei-Lei; Li, Yan-Li; Sun, Jian; Ying, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Jia-Da; Xu, Ning

    2014-06-01

    Evenly separated crystalline CuIn0.8Ga0.2Se2 (CIGS) nanoparticles are deposited on ITO-glass substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Such CIGS layers are introduced between conjugated polymer layers and ITO-glass substrates for enhancing light absorbance of polymer solar cells. The P3HT:PCBM absorbance between 300 and 650 nm is enhanced obviously due to the introduction of CIGS nanoparticles. The current density-voltage curves of a P3HT:PCBM/CIGS solar cell demonstrate that the short-circuit current density is improved from 0.77 to 1.20 mA/cm2. The photoluminescence spectra show that the excitons in the polymer are obviously quenched, suggesting that the charge transfer between the P3HT:PCBM and CIGS occurred. The results reveal that the CIGS nanoparticles may exhibit the localized surface plasmon resonance effect just as metallic nanostructures.

  18. Feasibility of sizing metallic nanoparticles in concentrated suspensions from effective optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Luna, G.; Márquez-Islas, R.; Vázquez-Estrada, O.; Contreras-Tello, H.; García-Valenzuela, A.

    2015-08-01

    We explore using measurements of the effective refractive index of a metallic nanofluid to estimate the size of the particles in it. We assume the nanofluid consists of spherical metallic nanoparticles suspended in a transparent base liquid and discuss a way of measuring the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index for concentrated nanofluids to about 1% in particles' volume concentration. Specifically, we consider the case of copper nanoparticles suspended in water. We propose an unambiguous effective optical parameter as a candidate to evidence the particle size, potentially in real time. Limitations due to dependent scattering effects in concentrated nanofluids are briefly stated.

  19. Relaxation of a Quantum Emitter Resonantly Coupled to a Metal Nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Nerkararyan, Khachatur V

    2013-01-01

    Presence of a metal nanoparticle near a quantum dipole emitter, when a localized surface plasmon mode is excited via the resonant coupling with an excited quantum dipole, changes dramatically the relaxation dynamics: it is no longer described by an exponential decay but exhibits step-like behavior. The main physical consequence of this relaxation process is that the emission, being largely determined by the metal nanoparticle, comes out with a substantial delay. A large number of system parameters in our analytical description opens new possibilities for controlling quantum emitter dynamics.

  20. Nonpeturbative cavity-QED between a single quantum dot and a metal nanoparticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum optical properties of an excited single photon emitter (quantum dot) near the surface of a finite-size metal nanoparticle using a photon Green function technique that rigorously quantizes the electromagnetic fields. We obtain Purcell factors of up to 5 × 104 due to higher......|max/ωd = 1.28 × 10-2. Considering a small quantum-dot, positioned 2-nm from the metal nanoparticle surface, we demonstrate that the strong coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature and despite the non-propagating nature of the higher order...

  1. Lamellar metal-organic complex and its rod-like nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Metal-organic complex (H3NCH2CH2NH2)3[MoO2(OC6H4O)2] with a lamellar morphology has been syn- thesized. Its crystal structure was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The morphology of the crystal was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The metal-organic nanoparticles have been prepared by using an ultrasonic method. The morphology of the as-prepared nanoparticles was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The possible formation mechanism has also been proposed.

  2. Four-wave parametric amplification in semiconductor quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle hybrid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Bo; He, Meng-Dong; Chen, Li-Qun

    2014-10-06

    We study theoretically four-wave parametric amplification arising from the nonlinear optical response of hybrid molecules composed of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanoparticles. It is shown that highly efficient four-wave parametric amplification can be achieved by adjusting the frequency and intensity of the pump field and the distance between the quantum dot and the metallic nanoparticle. Specifically, the induced probe-wave gain is tunable in a large range from 1 to 1.43 × 10⁵. This gain reaches its maximum at the position of three-photon resonance. Our findings hold great promise for developing four-wave parametric oscillators.

  3. Metallic nanoparticles enhanced the spontaneous emission of semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in nanoimprinted photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboud, V; Lévêque, G; Striccoli, M; Placido, T; Panniello, A; Curri, M L; Alducin, J A; Kehoe, T; Kehagias, N; Mecerreyes, D; Newcomb, S B; Iacopino, D; Redmond, G; Sotomayor Torres, C M

    2013-01-07

    We report on a method to enhance the light-emission efficiency of printable thin films of a polymer doped with luminescent (CdSe)ZnS nanocrystals via metallic nanoparticles and nanoimprinted photonic crystals. We experimentally show a strong fluorescence enhancement of nanocrystals by coupling exciton-plasmon with the localized surface plasmon of metallic nanoparticles. The emitted light is efficiently diffracted by photonic crystals structures directly imprinted in the nanocomposite polymer. By combining the field susceptibility technique with optical Bloch equations, we examine the interaction of the quantum and plasmonic entities at small distances.

  4. Study on metal nanoparticles induced third-order optical nonlinearity in phenylhydrazone derivatives with DFWM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, P.; Rao, D. Mallikharjuna; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of newly synthesized phenylhydrazone derivatives and the influence of noble metal nanoparticles (Ag & Au) on their nonlinear optical responses were investigated by employing Degenerate Four wave Mixing (DFWM) technique with a 7 nanosecond, 10Hz Nd: YAG laser pulses at 532nm. Metal nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation and the particle formation was confirmed using UV-Visible spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The nonlinear optical susceptibility were measured and found to be of the order 10-13esu. The results are encouraging and conclude that the materials are promising candidate for future optical device applications.

  5. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle-embedded polymers for nonlinear optical applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Philip Anthony; Shatabdi Porel; D Narayana Rao; T P Radhakrishnan

    2005-11-01

    Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical applications are explored. A family of zinc complexes which form perfectly polar assemblies in their crystalline state are found to organize as uniaxially oriented crystallites in vapor deposited thin films on glass substrate. Optical second harmonic generation from these films is investigated. A simple protocol is developed for the in-situ fabrication of highly monodisperse silver nanoparticles in a polymer film matrix. The methodology can be used to produce free-standing films. Optical limiting capability of the nanoparticle-embedded polymer film is demonstrated.

  6. In Vitro Vascular Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are designed to possess unique physicochemical properties, but may also produce atypical and unforeseen exposure scenarios with adverse health effects. The ability ofNPs to translocate into systemic circulation following either inhalation or ingesti...

  7. In Vitro Vascular Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are designed to possess unique physicochemical properties, but may also produce atypical and unforeseen exposure scenarios with adverse health effects. The ability ofNPs to translocate into systemic circulation following either inhalation or ingesti...

  8. Matrix-dependent Strain Distributions of Au and Ag Nanoparticles in a Metal-oxide-semiconductor-based Nonvolatile Memory Device

    OpenAIRE

    Honghua Huang; Ying Zhang; Wenyan Wei; Ting Yu; Xingfang Luo; Cailei Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The matrix-dependent strain distributions of Au and Ag nanoparticles in a metal-oxide-semiconductor based nonvolatile memory device are investigated by finite element calculations. The simulation results clearly indicate that both Au and Ag nanoparticles incur compressive strain by high-k Al2O3 and conventional SiO2 dielectrics. The strain distribution of nanoparticles is closely related to the surrounding matrix. Nanoparticles embedded in different matrices experience different compressive s...

  9. Rh Nanoparticle Anchoring on Metal Phosphates: Fundamental Aspects and Practical Impacts on Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Masato

    2016-10-01

    Metal phosphates stabilize Rh nanoparticles on their surface via Rh-O-P bonds, in contrast to the Rh-O-M bonds formed on metal oxides (MOx ). The local structure, electronic structure, and redox properties of Rh nanoparticles anchored on metal phosphates, and their practical impacts on catalysis, are reviewed based on recent publications from the author's research group. Because of the covalency of the Rh-O-P bond, Rh oxide is readily reduced to metallic Rh having a higher catalytic activity, whereas Rh oxide on metal oxide supports is more difficult to reduce with an increase of the anchoring strength. Furthermore, Rh metal shows a higher tolerance to reoxidation when supported on metal phosphates because the Rh-O-P bond is preserved under reducing atmospheres. The electron deficiency of Rh metal is another feature that affects its catalytic properties, and the extent of the electron deficiency can be tuned by replacing the metal in the metal phosphate with one of higher basicity. Further impacts on practical performance (thermal stability, poisoning stability, and lean NOx purification) in automobile catalyst applications are also described.

  10. Tunable shapes in supported metal nanoparticles: From nanoflowers to nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque, Rafael, E-mail: q62alsor@uco.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidad de Cordoba, Edificio Marie Curie (C-3), Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, E-14004 Cordoba (Spain); Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD York (United Kingdom); Balu, Alina Mariana; Campelo, Juan Manuel [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidad de Cordoba, Edificio Marie Curie (C-3), Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, E-14004 Cordoba (Spain); Gonzalez-Arellano, Camino [Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD York (United Kingdom); Gracia, Maria Jose; Luna, Diego; Marinas, Jose Maria; Romero, Antonio Angel [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidad de Cordoba, Edificio Marie Curie (C-3), Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, E-14004 Cordoba (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The facile preparation of a range of supported nanoparticles on porous materials was successfully accomplished through the use of a range of environmentally friendly protocols including a modified impregnation/reduction methodology, ultrasounds and microwave irradiation. Materials were characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and XPS. Different morphologies including conventional nanospheres, nanoflower aggregates, nanorod-like structures and nanocubes were achieved under different conditions. The reported supported nanoparticles are envisaged to have interesting applications in various areas including catalysis, optics and sensors.

  11. Improving Efficiency of Multicrystalline Silicon and CIGS Solar Cells by Incorporating Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jer Jeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the use of gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS solar cells. Au and Ag nanoparticles are deposited by spin-coating method, which is a simple and low cost process. The random distribution of nanoparticles by spin coating broadens the resonance wavelength of the transmittance. This broadening favors solar cell applications. Metal shadowing competes with light scattering in a manner that varies with nanoparticle concentration. Experimental results reveal that the mc-Si solar cells that incorporate Au nanoparticles outperform those with Ag nanoparticles. The incorporation of suitable concentration of Au and Ag nanoparticles into mc-Si solar cells increases their efficiency enhancement by 5.6% and 4.8%, respectively. Incorporating Au and Ag nanoparticles into CIGS solar cells improve their efficiency enhancement by 1.2% and 1.4%, respectively. The enhancement of the photocurrent in mc-Si solar cells is lower than that in CIGS solar cells, owing to their different light scattering behaviors and material absorption coefficients.

  12. Facile green synthesis of variable metallic gold nanoparticle using Padina gymnospora, a brown marine macroalga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Kalaivani, R.; Manikandan, S.; Sangeetha, N.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The process of development of reliable and eco-friendly metallic nanoparticles is an important step in the field of nanotechnology. To achieve this, use of natural sources like biological systems becomes essential. In the present work, extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Padina gymnospora has been attempted and achieved rapid formation of gold nanoparticles in a short duration. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of brown alga confirmed that hydroxyl groups present in the algal polysaccharides were involved in the gold bioreduction. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (53-67 nm) and average height of the particle roughness (60.0 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the gold nanoparticles exhibited Bragg reflections corresponding to gold nanoparticles. This environment-friendly method of biological gold nanoparticle synthesis can be applied potentially in various products that directly come in contact with the human body, such as cosmetics, and foods and consumer goods, besides medical applications.

  13. Biocompatible Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles: Nanotechnology Improvement of Conventional Prosthetic Acrylic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S. Acosta-Torres

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most products for dental restoration are produced from acrylic resins based on heat-cured Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate (PMMA. The addition of metal nanoparticles to organic materials is known to increase the surface hydrophobicity and to reduce adherence to biomolecules. This paper describes the use of nanostructured materials, TiO2 and Fe2O3, for simultaneously coloring and/or improving the antimicrobial properties of PMMA resins. Nanoparticles of metal oxides were included during suspension polymerization to produce hybrid metal oxides-alginate-containing PMMA. Metal oxide nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, and X-ray diffraction. Physicochemical characterization of synthesized resins was assessed by a combination of spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, viscometry, porosity, and mechanical tests. Adherence of Candida albicans cells and cellular compatibility assays were performed to explore biocompatibility and microbial adhesion of standard and novel materials. Our results show that introduction of biocompatible metal nanoparticles is a suitable means for the improvement of conventional acrylic dental resins.

  14. Optical and structural properties of noble-metal nanoparticles; Optische und strukturelle Eigenschaften von Edelmetallnanopartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmen, C.

    2006-06-23

    Noble-metal nanoparticles exhibit rich optical behavior, such as resonant light scattering and absorption and non-linear signal enhancement. This makes them attractive for a multitude of physical, chemical, and biophysical applications. For instance, recent biomedical experiments demonstrate the suitability of noble-metal nanoparticles for selective photothermal apoptosis by heat transport by laser irradiation. The applications of nanoparticles largely exploit that plasmons, i. e. collective oscillations of the conduction electrons, can be optically excited in these nanoparticles. In optical spectroscopy, these are seen as pronounced resonances. In the first part of this work, model calculations are employed to elucidate how radiation damping in noble-metal nanoparticles, i. e. the transformation of plasmons into photons, depends on particle size, particle shape, and on electromagnetic coupling between individual particles. Exact electrodynamic calculations are carried out for individual spheroidal particles and for pairs of spherical particles. These calculations for spheroidal particles demonstrate for the first time that radiative plasmon decay is determined by both the particle volume and the particle shape. Model calculations for pairs of large spherical particles reveal that the electromagnetic fields radiated by the particles mediate electromagnetic coupling at interparticle distances in the micrometer range. This coupling can lead to immense modulations of the plasmonic linewidth. The question whether this coupling is sufficiently strong to mediate extended, propagating, plasmon modes in nanoparticle arrays is addressed next. Detailed analysis reveals that this is not the case; instead, for the particle spacings regarded here, a non-resonant, purely diffractive coupling is observed, which is identified by steplike signatures in reflection spectra of the particle arrays. In the second part of this work, structural and optical properties of noble-metal

  15. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of PDDS-coated metal oxide nanoparticles against Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob Inbaneson, Samuel; Ravikumar, Sundaram

    2013-06-01

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease, leading to annual death of about one million people and the Plasmodium falciparum develops resistant to well-established antimalarial drugs. The newest antiplasmodial drug from metal oxide nanoparticles helps in addressing this problem. Commercial nanoparticles such as Fe3O4, MgO, ZrO2, Al2O3 and CeO2 coated with PDDS and all the coated and non-coated nanoparticles were screened for antiplasmodial activity against P. falciparum. The Al2O3 nanoparticles (71.42 ± 0.49 μg ml-1) showed minimum level of IC50 value and followed by MgO (72.33 ± 0.37 μg ml-1) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (77.23 ± 0.42 μg ml-1). The PDDS-Fe3O4 showed minimum level of IC50 value (48.66 ± 0.45 μg ml-1), followed by PDDS-MgO (60.28 ± 0.42 μg ml-1) and PDDS-CeO2 (67.06 ± 0.61 μg ml-1). The PDDS-coated metal oxide nanoparticles showed superior antiplasmodial activity than the non-PDDS-coated metal oxide nanoparticles. Statistical analysis reveals that, significant in vitro antiplasmodial activity ( P < 0.05) was observed between the concentrations and time of exposure. The chemical injury to erythrocytes showed no morphological changes in erythrocytes by the nanoparticles after 48 h of incubation. It is concluded from the present study that, the PDDS-Fe3O4 showed good antiplasmodial activity and it might be used for the development of antiplasmodial drugs.

  16. Metallic nanoparticles and their medicinal potential. Part II: aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots and cochleates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Leena; Scarabelli, Tiziano

    2013-09-01

    Metallic miniaturization techniques have taken metals to nanoscale size where they can display fascinating properties and their potential applications in medicine. In recent years, metal nanoparticles such as aluminium, silicon, iron, cadmium, selenium, indium and calcium, which find their presence in aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots (Q-dots) and cochleates, have caught attention of medical industries. The increasing impact of metallic nanoparticles in life sciences has significantly advanced the production techniques for these nanoparticles. In this Review, the various methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles are outlined, followed by their physicochemical properties, some recent applications in wound healing, diagnostic imaging, biosensing, assay labeling, antimicrobial activity, cancer therapy and drug delivery are listed, and finally their toxicological impacts are revised. The first half of this article describes the medicinal uses of two noble nanoparticles - gold and silver. This Review provides further information on the ability of aluminum, silicon, iron, selenium, indium, calcium and zinc to be used as nanoparticles in biomedical sciences. Aluminosilicates find their utility in wound healing and antibacterial growth. Iron-oxide nanoparticles enhance the properties of MRI contrast agents and are also used as biomagnets. Cadmium, selenium, tellurium and indium form the core nanostructures of tiny Q-dots used in cellular assay labeling, high-resolution cell imaging and biosensing. Cochleates have the bivalent nano ions calcium, magnesium or zinc imbedded in their structures and are considered to be highly effective agents for drug and gene delivery. The aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, Q-dots and cochleates are discussed in the light of their properties, synthesis and utility.

  17. Metallization of DNA hydrogel: application of soft matter host for preparation and nesting of catalytic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Anatoly; Che, Yuxin; Taniguchi, Shota; Lopatina, Larisa I.; G. Sergeyev, Vladimir; Murata, Shizuaki

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Cu and Ni of 2-3 nm average-size and narrow-size distributions were synthesized in DNA cross-linked hydrogels by reducing corresponding metal precursors by sodium borohydride. DNA hydrogel plays a role of a universal reactor in which the reduction of metal precursor results in the formation of 2-3 nm ultrafine metal NPs regardless of metal used. Hydrogels metallized with various metals showed catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, and the catalytic activity of metallized hydrogels changed as follows: Pd > Ag ≈ Au ≈ Cu > Ni > Pt. DNA hydrogel-based "soft catalysts" elaborated in this study are promising for green organic synthesis in aqueous media as well as for biomedical in vivo applications.

  18. Noble metal-based bimetallic nanoparticles: the effect of the structure on the optical, catalytic and photocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana; Marchelek, Martyna; Diak, Magdalena; Grabowska, Ewelina

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles composed of two different metal elements show novel electronic, optical, catalytic or photocatalytic properties from monometallic nanoparticles. Bimetallic nanoparticles could show not only the combination of the properties related to the presence of two individual metals, but also new properties due to a synergy between two metals. The structure of bimetallic nanoparticles can be oriented in random alloy, alloy with an intermetallic compound, cluster-in-cluster or core-shell structures and is strictly dependent on the relative strengths of metal-metal bond, surface energies of bulk elements, relative atomic sizes, preparation method and conditions, etc. In this review, selected properties, such as structure, optical, catalytic and photocatalytic of noble metals-based bimetallic nanoparticles, are discussed together with preparation routes. The effects of preparation method conditions as well as metal properties on the final structure of bimetallic nanoparticles (from alloy to core-shell structure) are followed. The role of bimetallic nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis are discussed. Furthermore, structure and optical characteristics of bimetallic nanoparticles are described in relation to the some features of monometallic NPs. Such a complex approach allows to systematize knowledge and to identify the future direction of research.

  19. Submicron writing by laser irradiation on metal nano-particle dispersed films toward flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Aminuzzaman, Mohammod; Miyashita, Tokuji

    2009-02-01

    The requirement for microwiring technology by a wet process has significantly increased recently toward the achievement of printable and flexible electronics. We have developed the metal microwiring with a resolution higher than 1 μm by the laser direct writing technique using Ag and Cu nano-particle-dispersed films as precursors. The technique was applied to the microwiring on a flexible and transparent polymer film. The metallization is caused in a micro-region by focused laser beam, which reduces the thermal damage of the flexible polymer substrate during the metallization process. The laser direct writing technique is based on the efficient and fast conversion of photon energy to thermal energy by direct excitation of the plasmon absorption of a metal nano-particle, which provides Cu microwiring with a low resistivity owing to the inhibition of the surface oxidation of the Cu nano-particle.

  20. Anchoring and promotion effects of metal oxides on silica supported catalytic gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingjie; Ersen, Ovidiu; Chu, Wei; Dintzer, Thierry; Petit, Pierre; Petit, Corinne

    2016-11-15

    The understanding of the interactions between the different components of supported metal doped gold catalysts is of crucial importance for selecting and designing efficient gold catalysts for reactions such as CO oxidation. To progress in this direction, a unique supported nano gold catalyst Au/SS was prepared, and three doped samples (Au/SS@M) were elaborated. The samples before and after test were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the doping metal species prefer to be located on the surface of gold nanoparticles and that a small amount of additional reductive metal leads to more efficient reaction. During the catalytic test, the nano-structure of the metal species transforms depending on its chemical nature. This study allows one to identify and address the contribution of each metal on the CO reaction in regard to oxidative species of gold, silica and dopants. Metal doping leads to different exposure of interface sites between Au and metal oxide, which is one of the key factors for the change of the catalytic activity. The metal oxides help the activation of oxygen by two actions: mobility inside the metal bulk and transfer of water species onto of gold nanoparticles.

  1. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  2. Enhanced optical properties of germanate and tellurite glasses containing metal or semiconductor nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Cid Bartolomeu de Araujo; Diego Silvério da Silva; Thiago Alexandre Alves de Assumpção; Luciana Reyes Pires Kassab; Davinson Mariano da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Germanium- and tellurium-based glasses have been largely studied due to their recognized potential for photonics. In this paper, we review our recent studies that include the investigation of the Stokes and anti-Stokes photoluminescence (PL) in different glass systems containing metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs). In the case of the samples with metallic NPs, the enhanced PL was attributed to the increased local field on the rare-earth ions located in the proximity of the NPs and/...

  3. Metallic Nanoparticle Block Copoloymer Vesicles with Enhanced Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Leonardo Martinez-Hurtado

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and characterization of template silver nanoshell structures and the encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using biocompatible poly(oxyethylene-poly(butylene diblock co-polymer vesicles is described in this work. These vesicles have a narrow diameter size distribution around 200 nm. Silver nanoparticles (Ø = 1–10 nm functionalized with decanethiol were successfully entrapped in the hydrophobic membrane and non-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Ø = 3.0–5.5 nm were encapsulated in the vesicle core. Transmission Electron Microscopy confirms the localisation of the particles; silver functionalized nanoparticles appear to thicken the vesicle membrane as shown with TEM image analysis. The enhancement of the optical properties is confirmed using transmission spectrophotometry; the 430 nm plasmon resonance peak of the silver nanoparticles was replaced by a broader extinction spectrum to beyond 700 nm (O.D. = 0.8. For a number density of 4.8 x 1012 mL-1 the scattering cross section was calculated to be 0.92 x 10-4 μm2 with a scattering coefficient of 0.44 mm-1. The measurements indicate scattering cross section of 3.8 x 10-5 μm2, attenuation coefficient of 0.18 mm-1 and extinction efficiency equal to 1.2 x 10-3. Stable and biocompatible block co-polymer vesicles can potentially be used as plasmon-resonant optical contrast agents for biomedical applications.

  4. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: A REVIVAL IN PRECIOUS METAL ADMINISTRATION TO PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, AS; Jokerst, J; Zaveleta, C; Massoud, TF; Gambhir, SS

    2011-01-01

    Gold has been used as a therapeutic agent to treat a wide variety of rheumatic diseases including psoriatic arthritis, juvenile arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus. Although the use of gold has been largely superseded by newer drugs, gold nanoparticles are being used effectively in laboratory based clinical diagnostic methods whilst concurrently showing great promise in vivo either as a diagnostic imaging agent or a therapeutic agent. For these reasons, gold nanoparticles are therefore well placed to enter mainstream clinical practice in the near future. Hence, the present review summarizes the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution, metabolism and toxicity of bulk gold in humans based on decades of clinical observation and experiments in which gold was used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The beneficial attributes of gold nanoparticles, such as their ease of synthesis, functionalization and shape control are also highlighted demonstrating why gold nanoparticles are an attractive target for further development and optimization. The importance of controlling the size and shape of gold nanoparticles to minimize any potential toxic side effects is also discussed. PMID:21846107

  5. Synthesis and shapes of gold nanoparticles by using transition metal monosubstituted heteropolyanions as photocatalysts and stabilizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caihong NIU; Ying WU; Zhenping WANG; Zheng LI; Rong LI

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared via a simple photoreduction technique in the presence of transition metal monosubstituted Keggin heteropolyanions (PW11M, M= Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe3+), in which PWllM acted as reducing agent, photocatalyst and stabilizer. The results indicated that the formation rate and morphology of the nanoparticles strongly depended on the kind of transition metal substituted in heteropolyacid and the preparation conditions, such as irradiation time and propan-2-ol amount. The photoreduction rates of PWllZn and PWllFe were faster than those of PWllNi and PW 11 Cu. The shapes of the nanoparticles synthesized in the presence of PWllFe and PWllZn were nearlyuniform spheres, whereas the morphologies of the nanoparticles synthesized in the presence of PW11Ni and PW11Cu were found to contain a mixture of flat triangular/ hexagonal structures as well as spheres. Increases in the irradiation time and the propan-2-ol amount could make the morphology of nanoparticles uniform and shorten the formation time of the nanoparticles.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of metal based nanoparticles against microbes associated with diseases in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, P; Nayak, S K; Sasmal, A; Behera, T; Barik, S K; Swain, S K; Mishra, S S; Sen, A K; Das, J K; Jayasankar, P

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of diseases and mortalities in aquaculture and development of antibiotics resistance in aquatic microbes, has renewed a great interest towards alternative methods of prevention and control of diseases. Nanoparticles have enormous potential in controlling human and animal pathogens and have scope of application in aquaculture. The present investigation was carried out to find out suitable nanoparticles having antimicrobial effect against aquatic microbes. Different commercial as well as laboratory synthesized metal and metal oxide nanoparticles were screened for their antimicrobial activities against a wide range of bacterial and fungal agents including certain freshwater cyanobacteria. Among different nanoparticles, synthesized copper oxide (CuO), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and silver doped titanium dioxide (Ag-TiO2) showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity. On the contrary, nanoparticles like Zn and ZnO showed antifungal activity against fungi like Penicillium and Mucor species. Since CuO, ZnO and Ag nanoparticles showed higher antimicrobial activity, they may be explored for aquaculture use.

  7. Towards cost effective metal precursor sources for future photovoltaic material synthesis: CTS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, A. C.; Gurav, K. V.; Jo, Eunjin; He, Mingrui; Lokhande, C. D.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2016-04-01

    Copper tin sulfide (CTS) is an emerging candidate for solar application due to its favorable band gap and higher optical absorption coefficient. Kuramite-Tetragonal Cu3SnS4 (CTS) monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared by hot injection technique involving cost effective sulfate metal precursor source. A protocol for controlled crystal structure has been demonstrated by variation of cationic Cu:Sn ratio. The crystal structure, size, phase purity, atomic composition, oxidation state and optical properties of the nanoparticles are confirmed from X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible spectroscopy, respectively. Hexagonal shaped particles within the size distribution of 7-9 nm with an optimal band gap of 1.28 eV are obtained. XPS study shows the Cu1+, Sn4+ and S2- oxidation states. The effects of influential factors such as metal precursor ratio, metal precursor source, reaction time, heating rate and solvents have been demonstrated systematically on the synthesis of CTS nanoparticles. The plausible mechanism of the formation of CTS nanoparticles has been proposed. The obtained results provide new insight for applying CTS nanoparticles in photovoltaic applications.

  8. Towards stable catalysts by controlling collective properties of supported metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo; Zečević, Jovana; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jong, Krijn P.; de Jongh, Petra E.

    2013-01-01

    Supported metal nanoparticles play a pivotal role in areas such as nanoelectronics, energy storage/conversion and as catalysts for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. However, the tendency of nanoparticles to grow into larger crystallites is an impediment for stable performance. Exemplarily, loss of active surface area by metal particle growth is a major cause of deactivation for supported catalysts. In specific cases particle growth might be mitigated by tuning the properties of individual nanoparticles, such as size, composition and interaction with the support. Here we present an alternative strategy based on control over collective properties, revealing the pronounced impact of the three-dimensional nanospatial distribution of metal particles on catalyst stability. We employ silica-supported copper nanoparticles as catalysts for methanol synthesis as a showcase. Achieving near-maximum interparticle spacings, as accessed quantitatively by electron tomography, slows down deactivation up to an order of magnitude compared with a catalyst with a non-uniform nanoparticle distribution, or a reference Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. Our approach paves the way towards the rational design of practically relevant catalysts and other nanomaterials with enhanced stability and functionality, for applications such as sensors, gas storage, batteries and solar fuel production.

  9. Metal nanoparticle/ionic liquid/cellulose: new catalytically active membrane materials for hydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelesky, Marcos A; Scheeren, Carla W; Foppa, Lucas; Pavan, Flavio A; Dias, Silvio L P; Dupont, Jairton

    2009-07-13

    Transition metal-containing membrane films of 10, 20, and 40 μm thickness were obtained by the combination of irregularly shaped nanoparticles with monomodal size distributions of 4.8 ± 1.1 nm (Rh(0)) and 3.0 ± 0.4 nm (Pt(0)) dispersed in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (BMI·(NTf)(2)) with a syrup of cellulose acetate (CA) in acetone. The Rh(0) and Pt(0) metal concentration increased proportionally with increases in film thickness up to 20 μm, and then the material became metal saturated. The presence of small and stable Rh(0) or Pt(0) nanoparticles induced an augmentation in the CA/IL film surface areas. The augmentation of the IL content resulted in an increase of elasticity and decrease in tenacity and toughness, whereas the stress at break was not influenced. The introduction of IL probably causes an increase in the separation between the cellulose macromolecules that results in a higher flexibility, lower viscosity, and better formability of the cellulose material. The nanoparticle/IL/CA combinations exhibit an excellent synergistic effect that enhances the activity and durability of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. The nanoparticle/IL/cellulose acetate film membranes display higher catalytic activity (up to 7353 h(-1) for the 20 μm film of CA/IL/Pt(0)) and stability than the nanoparticles dispersed only in the IL.

  10. Reduced hydrogen sulfide from crude oil using metal nanoparticles produced by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Safarkhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is one of the most dangerous contaminants in crude oil and natural gas that must be removed before transport and refining. It has multiple effects on the environment and the industry is bad that these effects include acid rain, cancer, corrosion of pipelines, poison catalytic converters in car exhaust. In this study, to eliminate H2S crude oil Nano emulsion used ionic liquid. Ionic liquids also with metal nanoparticles (MNPs have been modified. Improve and reform the electrochemical deposition of metal salts is done. Ionic liquid 1 - Hydro One Atyl2- methyl imidazolium de cyanimide [HEMIM] [DCA] is inherently hydrophilic as Scavenger H2S was added to the crude oil. Two types of metal salts of Fe (acac 3 and Cu (SO4 electrochemical deposition method for producing metal nanoparticles in the ionic liquid [HEMIM] [DCA] was used. Suitable concentrations of ionic liquids for the complete removal of hydrogen sulfide from crude oil were determined by two methods: static and dynamic methods. Dynamic method to determine the required dose used to remove H2S. Static method using response surface and through statistical experimental design for modeling and assessment CCD H2S was removed parameters. Three factors, namely Scavengerdose, contact time and the reaction temperature were studied. The interaction between these factors on the concentration of H2S in the crude oil was studied. 3 important statistical models for ionic liquids and ionic liquid containing two types of metal nanoparticles were developed. This model has an index of noncompliance was not important. The ionic liquid modified with nanoparticles , activity and H2S removal capacity is significantly increased , to the extent that the effect of one or two major factors were considered too small or unimportant . Copper metal nanoparticles showed better performance for the removal of H2S to iron

  11. Pulse laser-induced generation of cluster codes from metal nanoparticles for immunoassay applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yin Chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have developed an assay for the detection of proteins by functionalized nanomaterials coupled with laser-induced desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS by monitoring the generation of metal cluster ions. We achieved selective detection of three proteins [thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB] by modifying nanoparticles (NPs of three different metals (Au, Ag, and Pt with the corresponding aptamer or antibody in one assay. The Au, Ag, and Pt acted as metal bio-codes for the analysis of thrombin, VEGF-A165, and PDGF-BB, respectively, and a microporous cellulose acetate membrane (CAM served as a medium for an in situ separation of target protein-bound and -unbound NPs. The functionalized metal nanoparticles bound to their specific proteins were subjected to LDI-MS on the CAM. The functional nanoparticles/CAM system can function as a signal transducer and amplifier by transforming the protein concentration into an intense metal cluster ion signal during LDI-MS analysis. This system can selectively detect proteins at picomolar concentrations. Most importantly, the system has great potential for the detection of multiple proteins without any pre-concentration, separation, or purification process because LDI-MS coupled with CAM effectively removes all signals except for those from the metal cluster ions.

  12. Pulse laser-induced generation of cluster codes from metal nanoparticles for immunoassay applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yin; Chu, Han-Wei; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Cang, Jinshun; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we have developed an assay for the detection of proteins by functionalized nanomaterials coupled with laser-induced desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) by monitoring the generation of metal cluster ions. We achieved selective detection of three proteins [thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165), and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)] by modifying nanoparticles (NPs) of three different metals (Au, Ag, and Pt) with the corresponding aptamer or antibody in one assay. The Au, Ag, and Pt acted as metal bio-codes for the analysis of thrombin, VEGF-A165, and PDGF-BB, respectively, and a microporous cellulose acetate membrane (CAM) served as a medium for an in situ separation of target protein-bound and -unbound NPs. The functionalized metal nanoparticles bound to their specific proteins were subjected to LDI-MS on the CAM. The functional nanoparticles/CAM system can function as a signal transducer and amplifier by transforming the protein concentration into an intense metal cluster ion signal during LDI-MS analysis. This system can selectively detect proteins at picomolar concentrations. Most importantly, the system has great potential for the detection of multiple proteins without any pre-concentration, separation, or purification process because LDI-MS coupled with CAM effectively removes all signals except for those from the metal cluster ions.

  13. Metal oxide and mercuric sulfide nanoparticles synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin

    Commercially available and laboratory-synthesized metal based nanoparticles (NPs), iron oxide (Fe2O3), copper oxide (CuO), titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and mercuric sulfide (HgS) were studied by comprehensive characterizations methods. The general synthesis process was modified sol-gel method. The size and morphology of NPs could be influenced by temperature, sonication, calcination, precursor concentration, pH and types of reaction media. All types of the laboratory-synthesized or commercially available NPs were characterized by physical and chemical processes. One characteristic of NP that can lead to ambiguous toxicity test results was the effect of agglomeration of primary nano-sized particles. Laser light scattering was used to measure the aggregated and particle size distribution. Aggregation effects were apparent and often extensive in some synthesis approaches. Electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) gave the images of those laboratory-synthesized particles and aggregation. The average single particle was about 5-20 nm of ZnO; 20-40 nm of CuO; 10-20 nm of TiO2; 20-35 nm of Fe2O3; 10-15 nm of HgS, while the aggregate size was in the range of a hundred nanometers or more. These five types of NPs were obtained with spherical and oblong formation and the agglomeration of ZnO, CuO, HgS and TiO2 was random, but Fe2O3 has web-like aggregation. Other measurements performed on the particles and aggregates include bandgap energies, surface composition, surface area, hydrodynamic radius, and particle surface charge. In aqueous environment, NPs are subject to processes such as solubilization and aggregation. These processes can be controlling factors in the fate of nanomaterials in environmental settings, including bioavailability to organisms. This study has focused primarily on measurement of the solubility in aqueous media of varying composition (pH, ionic strength, and organic carbon), sedimentation and stability. The aggregate size distribution was

  14. Enhancement of perovskite-based solar cells employing core-shell metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Saliba, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Sun, Yao; Shi, Xian; Wiesner, Ulrich; Snaith, Henry J

    2013-09-11

    Recently, inorganic and hybrid light absorbers such as quantum dots and organometal halide perovskites have been studied and applied in fabricating thin-film photovoltaic devices because of their low-cost and potential for high efficiency. Further boosting the performance of solution processed thin-film solar cells without detrimentally increasing the complexity of the device architecture is critically important for commercialization. Here, we demonstrate photocurrent and efficiency enhancement in meso-superstructured organometal halide perovskite solar cells incorporating core-shell Au@SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) delivering a device efficiency of up to 11.4%. We attribute the origin of enhanced photocurrent to a previously unobserved and unexpected mechanism of reduced exciton binding energy with the incorporation of the metal nanoparticles, rather than enhanced light absorption. Our findings represent a new aspect and lever for the application of metal nanoparticles in photovoltaics and could lead to facile tuning of exciton binding energies in perovskite semiconductors.

  15. Disorder-induced metal-insulator transition in cooled silver and copper nanoparticles: A statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano Sandonas, Leonardo; Landauro, Carlos V.

    2017-08-01

    The existence of a disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT) has been proved in cooled silver and copper nanoparticles by using level spacing statistics. Nanoparticles are obtained by employing molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that structural disorder is not strong enough to affect their electronic character, and it remains in the metallic regime. Whereas, electronic properties cross to the insulating regime after increasing the chemical disorder strength, W / t . Then, based on scaling theory, we have found that the critical chemical disorder WC / t in which MIT happens for silver and copper nanoparticles are 24.0 ± 1.1 and 22.3 ± 0.9 , respectively. Its universality has also been studied.

  16. A new rapid chemical route to prepare reduced graphene oxide using copper metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Gao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Wei; Gao, Chunjuan; Qiu, Haixia

    2013-05-31

    Copper metal nanoparticles were used as a reducing agent to reduce graphene oxide (GO). The reaction was complete in about 10 min and did not involve the use of any toxic reagents or acids that are typically used in the reduction of GO by Zn and Fe powders. The high reduction activity of the Cu nanoparticles, compared to Cu powder, may be the result of the formation of Cu₂O nanoparticles. The effect of the mass ratio of the metal to GO for this reduction was also investigated. The reduction of the GO was verified by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After reduction, Cu₂O supported on reduced GO was formed and showed superior catalytic ability for the degradation of a model dye pollutant, methylene blue.

  17. Spatio-temporal Modeling of Lasing Action in Core–Shell Metallic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale laser sources based on single metallic nanoparticles (spasers) have attracted significant interest for their fundamental implications and technological potential. Here we theoretically investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of lasing action in core–shell metallic nanoparticles that include optically pumped four-level gain media. By using detailed semiclassical simulations based on a time-domain generalization of the finite-element method, we study the evolution of the lasing dynamics when going from a spherical case to an elongated nanorod configuration. Our calculations show that there exists an optimal nanoparticle elongation that exhibits significantly improved lasing threshold and slope efficiency over those obtained for its spherical counterpart. These results are accounted for in terms of a coupled-mode theory analysis of the variation with elongation of the light confinement properties of localized surface plasmons. This work could be of importance for further development of nanoscale light sources based on localized surface plasmon resonances.

  18. Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoparticles Observed in a CS Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    of the support were deposited onto an amorphous carbon film on a 3mm copper TEM grid and sputter coated with a thin film of gold. The Au film readily formed nanoparticles ranging from a few nm up to 20nm in size. The samples were exposed to oxidizing and reducing environments at various temperatures......In catalyst design, high performance and stability are key issues. Many catalysts consist of metals or metal alloys deposited onto a support material as nanoparticles in order to optimize the exposed surface area. When exposed to the environment in a catalytic reactor, the particles tend to sinter...... of the microscope is needed. As industrial catalysts are usually complex high surface area materials, they are often not suited for fundamental studies. For this purpose, model systems consisting of gold nanoparticles on sheets of low surface area boron nitride and graphite supports were produced. Sheets...

  19. Synthesis of metallic nanoparticles through X-ray radiolysis using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Okada, Ikuo; Fukuoka, Takao; Sakurai, Ikuya; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    The potential to fabricate metallic nanoparticles directly on silicon substrates from liquid solutions is ideal for three-dimensional lithography systems, drug delivery materials, and sensing applications. Here, we report the successful synthesis of Au, Cu, and Fe nanoparticles from the corresponding liquid solutions [gold(I) trisodium disulphite, copper(II) sulfate, and potassium ferricyanide] by synchrotron (SR) X-ray irradiation. The deposition of gold nanoparticles in the gold(I) trisodium disulphite solution was performed by monochromatic X-ray exposure from synchrotron radiation. The use of ethanol as an additive enabled the nucleation and growth of Cu particles, while no Cu particles were produced in the copper sulfate solution without ethanol with polychromatic SR X-ray irradiation. Fe particles were generated by direct polychromatic SR X-ray irradiation. These results demonstrate the behavior of three-dimensional printers, enabling us to build composite material structures with metallic and plastic materials.

  20. Fabrication of novel cryomill for synthesis of high purity metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nirmal; Biswas, Krishanu

    2015-08-01

    The successful preparation of free standing metal nanoparticles with high purity in bulk quantity is the pre-requisite for any potential application. This is possible by using ball milling at cryogenic temperature. However, the most of ball mills available in the market do not allow preparing high purity metal nanoparticles by this route. In addition, it is not possible to carry out in situ measurements of process parameters as well as diagnostic of the process. In the present investigation, we present a detailed study on the fabrication of a cryomill, which is capable of avoiding contaminations in the product. It also provides in situ measurements and diagnostic of the low temperature milling process. Online monitoring of the milling temperature and observation of ball motion are the important aspects in the newly designed mill. The nanoparticles prepared using this fabricated mill have been found to be free standing and also free from contaminations.

  1. Two approaches for enhancing the hydrogenation properties of palladium: Metal nanoparticle and thin film over layers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manika Khanuja; B R Mehta; S M Shivaprasad

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, two approaches have been used for enhancing the hydrogenation properties of Pd. In the first approach, metal thin film (Cu, Ag) has been deposited over Pd and hydrogenation properties of bimetal layer Cu (thin film)/Pd(thin film) and Ag(thin film)/Pd(thin film) have been studied. In the second approach, Ag metal nanoparticles have been deposited over Pd and hydrogenation properties of Ag (nanoparticle)/Pd (thin film) have been studied and compared with Ag(thin film)/Pd(thin film) bimetal layer system. The observed hydrogen sensing response is stable and reversible over a number of hydrogen loading and deloading cycles in both bimetallic systems. Alloying between Ag and Pd is suppressed in case of Ag(nanoparticle)/Pd(thin film) bimetallic layer on annealing as compared to Ag (thin film)/Pd(thin film).

  2. Plasmon excitation and damping in noble metal nanoparticle-MoS2 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcherio, Gregory T.; Benamara, Mourad; Roper, D. Keith

    2016-09-01

    Improved fundamental understanding of resonant optical and electric interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and 2D materials, such as semiconductive molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), could benefit characterization of optoelectronic light harvesting schemes. Energy and damping of plasmon resonances of noble metal nanoparticle-decorated MoS2 were examined via parallel synthesis of (a) approximate discrete dipole (DDA) simulations and (b) near-field electron energy loss (EELS) and far-field optical transmission spectroscopies. Energy of localized surface plasmon resonance altered by MoS2 interactions was studied for gold nanospheres and silver nanoprisms. Augmented plasmon damping by injection of plasmon-excited electrons into the MoS2 was measured in EELS and represented by DDA. These techniques support rapid improvements in nanoparticle-2D material prototypes for photocatalysis and photodetection, for example.

  3. Interactions of noble metal nanoparticles with their environment; Wechselwirkungen von Edelmetallnanopartikeln mit ihrer Umgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reismann, Maximilian

    2009-12-08

    Upon irradiating noble metal nanoparticles with light, unique optical phenomena can occur, such as resonantly enhanced light-scattering and light-absorption, or a tremendous enhancement of the exciting optical field close to the surface of the nanoparticles. These phenomena rely on the excitations of collective oscillations of the conduction electrons within a nanoparticle. The optical properties of a nanoparticle are determined by the resonance frequency of these so-called plasmon oscillations. This resonance frequency and the light-scattering spectrum of a nanoparticle depend (among other effects) on the dielectric environment of the particle. Due to this effect, noble metal nanoparticles can be applied for local optical sensing of chemical substances. The large light-absorption properties of a nanoparticle also enable the usage of light-irradiation to deposit heat in the nanoparticle in a selective and highly localized manner. Therefore, a local temperature increase can be induced in the nanoparticle and its immediate environment. This temperature increase could be used to trigger chemical or biological reactions, or it could be used for a selective hyperthermia of biological material. These and further possible applications rely on the detection or the systematic excitation of interactions between the noble metal nanoparticle and its environment. These interactions are the central subject of this thesis. Particular attention is paid to photothermal interactions. An interesting question is to what extend a nanoparticle-supported, photothermally-induced temperature rise can be applied to trigger a biomolecular reaction in a spatially confined volume. By carefully adjusting the photothermal treatment, one aims at affecting the molecules without damaging their chemical functionality. The photothermal interaction is addressed in two projects: First, networks built up by gold nanoparticles are investigated. In these networks, double-stranded DNA-molecules are used to

  4. Conventional and microwave hydrothermal synthesis of monodispersed metal oxide nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monodispersed nanoparticles of metal oxide including ferrites MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and γ-Fe2O3, Ta2O5 etc. have been synthesized using a water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure uses readily availab...

  5. Absorption enhancement in metal nanoparticles for photoemission current for solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gritti, Claudia; Novitsky, Andrey; Malureanu, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the photoconversion efficiency, we consider the possibility of increasing the photocurrent in solar cells exploiting the electron photoemission from small metal nanoparticles into a semiconductor. The effect is caused by the absorption of photons and generation of local surfac...

  6. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosionis, Spyridon G; Terzis, Andreas F; Sadeghi, Seyed M; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-30

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  7. New organometallic salts as precursors for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Nunez, G., E-mail: galonso@cnyn.unam.mx; Garza, L. Morales de la; Rogel-Hernandez, E.; Reynoso, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia (Mexico); Licea-Claverie, A.; Felix-Navarro, R. M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Centro de Graduados e Investigacion (Mexico); Berhault, G. [UMR 5256 CNRS-Universite de Lyon, Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l' Environnement de Lyon (France); Paraguay-Delgado, F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S. C. (Mexico)

    2011-09-15

    New organometallic salts were synthesized in aqueous solution and were used as precursors for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by metallic nanoparticles. The precursors were obtained by reaction between HAuCl{sub 4}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 6}, or (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}RhCl{sub 6} with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The as-obtained (CTA){sub n}Me{sub x}Cl{sub y} salts (with Me = Au, Pt, Pd, Rh) were characterized by Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. These precursors were then used to synthesize metallic nanoparticles of Au, Pt, Pd, and Rh over multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and thermogravimetric analysis under air reveals that the CNT-supported catalysts exhibit high loading and good dispersion of the metallic nanoparticles with small average particle sizes. The present preparation procedure therefore allows obtaining high densities of small metallic nanoparticles at the surface of MWCNT.

  8. Evolution of the Surface Science of Catalysis from Single Crystals to Metal Nanoparticles under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-03-06

    Vacuum studies of metal single crystal surfaces using electron and molecular beam scattering revealed that the surface atoms relocate when the surface is clean (reconstruction) and when it is covered by adsorbates (adsorbate induced restructuring). It was also discovered that atomic steps and other low coordination surface sites are active for breaking chemical bonds (H-H, O=O, C-H, C=O and C-C) with high reaction probability. Investigations at high reactant pressures using sum frequency generation (SFG)--vibrational spectroscopy and high pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HPSTM) revealed bond breaking at low reaction probability sites on the adsorbate-covered metal surface, and the need for adsorbate mobility for continued turnover. Since most catalysts (heterogeneous, enzyme and homogeneous) are nanoparticles, colloid synthesis methods were developed to produce monodispersed metal nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range and controlled shapes to use them as new model catalyst systems in two-dimensional thin film form or deposited in mesoporous three-dimensional oxides. Studies of reaction selectivity in multipath reactions (hydrogenation of benzene, cyclohexene and crotonaldehyde) showed that reaction selectivity depends on both nanoparticle size and shape. The oxide-metal nanoparticle interface was found to be an important catalytic site because of the hot electron flow induced by exothermic reactions like carbon monoxide oxidation.

  9. Metallic nanoparticles deposited on carbon microspheres: novel materials for combinatorial electrochemistry and electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ronan; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Compton, Richard G

    2009-04-01

    This review deals with the preparation of metallic nanoparticles on glassy carbon microspheres and the use of these new hybrid materials for combinatorial electrochemistry and electroanalysis. First, the preparation of gold, silver and palladium nanoparticles on glassy carbon microspheres by a simple electroless procedure is described. Then, different types of electrodes modified with glassy carbon microspheres are described. These are: (i) glassy carbon electrodes modified by a composite film of glassy carbon microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, (ii) basal plane pyrolylic graphite electrodes modified by the abrasive attachment of glassy carbon microspheres and (iii) carbon-epoxy composite electrodes loaded with glassy carbon microspheres. The three types of electrode architectures described consist of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix and each of the electrode macrodisc surfaces actually correspond to a random metallic nanoelectrode array. Carbon-epoxy composite electrodes have good characteristics for their use as practical sensors. Furthermore, the use of several kinds of metallic nanoparticles allows the construction of a multi-analyte electrode and the screening of electroactive materials by following a combinatorial approach.

  10. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohayon-Courtès Céline

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial and HK-2 (epithelial proximal cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-κb was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential.

  11. QM/MD simulation of SWNT nucleation on transition-metal carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J; Yamane, Honami; Ohta, Yasuhito; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-11-10

    The mechanism and kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation from Fe- and Ni-carbide nanoparticle precursors have been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. The dependence of the nucleation mechanism and its kinetics on environmental factors, including temperature and metal-carbide carbon concentration, has also been elucidated. It was observed that SWNT nucleation occurred via three distinct stages, viz. the precipitation of the carbon from the metal-carbide, the formation of a "surface/subsurface" carbide intermediate species, and finally the formation of a nascent sp(2)-hybidrized carbon structure supported by the metal catalyst. The SWNT cap nucleation mechanism itself was unaffected by carbon concentration and/or temperature. However, the kinetics of SWNT nucleation exhibited distinct dependences on these same factors. In particular, SWNT nucleation from Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticles proceeded more favorably compared to nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) nanoparticles. Although SWNT nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) and Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticle precursors occurred via an identical route, the ultimate outcomes of these processes also differed substantially. Explicitly, the Ni(x)-supported sp(2)-hybridized carbon structures tended to encapsulate the catalyst particle itself, whereas the Fe(x)-supported structures tended to form isolated SWNT cap structures on the catalyst surface. These differences in SWNT nucleation kinetics were attributed directly to the relative strengths of the metal-carbon interaction, which also dictates the precipitation of carbon from the nanoparticle bulk and the longevity of the resultant surface/subsurface carbide species. The stability of the surface/subsurface carbide was also influenced by the phase of the nanoparticle itself. The observations agree well with experimentally available data for SWNT growth on iron and nickel catalyst particles.

  12. Distance and orientation dependence of excitation energy transfer: from molecular systems to metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sangeeta; Srinivas, Goundla; Bagchi, Biman

    2009-02-19

    The elegant theory developed by Forster to describe the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor has played a key role in understanding the structure and dynamics of polymers, biopolymers (proteins, nucleic acids), and self-assemblies (photosystems, micellar systems). Forster theory assumes the transition charge densities of donor and acceptor molecules are point dipoles and hence predicts a 1/R(6) dependence of energy transfer rate on center-to-center separation distance, R. In addition, a preaveraging over the orientations of the two dipoles is usually performed. The present review examines the validity of these assumptions in following different donor-acceptor (D-A) systems: (i) dye molecules attached to a flexible polymer chain in solution, (ii) extended conjugated dye molecules in quenched conformation, (iii) dye and a spherical metal nanoparticle of different sizes, (iv) two spherical metal nanoparticles, and (v) two prolate shaped metal nanoparticles at different relative orientations. In the case of dye molecules attached to a flexible polymer chain, we discuss the recent theoretical and computer simulation studies of energy transfer dynamics. It includes an analysis of Wilemski-Fixman (WF) theory of a bimolecular reaction in solution, applied to the excitation energy transfer between two ends of the polymer. We briefly describe the limitation of the WF theory and its generalizations that lead to a better agreement between the theory and the simulation results. The orientational dynamics of dye molecules is found to significantly influence the rate of excitation energy transfer, and may play a "hidden role" in influencing the observed distance dependence. For extended conjugated D-A systems and those involving nonspherical metal nanoparticles, even at intermediate separations, a significant deviation from 1/R(6)-type distance dependence of the energy transfer rate is found. Surprisingly, however, this distance

  13. Metal deposition by electroless plating on polydopamine functionalized micro- and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondin, Giovanni; Wisser, Florian M; Leifert, Annika; Mohamed-Noriega, Nasser; Grothe, Julia; Dörfler, Susanne; Kaskel, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metal coated micro- and nanoparticles by functionalization with a thin polydopamine layer followed by electroless plating is reported. The particles are initially coated with polydopamine via self-polymerization. The resulting polydopamine coated particles have a surface rich in catechols and amino groups, resulting in a high affinity toward metal ions. Thus, they provide an effective platform for selective electroless metal deposition without further activation and sensitization steps. The combination of a polydopamine-based functionalization with electroless plating ensures a simple, scalable, and cost-effective metal coating strategy. Silver-plated tungsten carbide microparticles, copper-plated tungsten carbide microparticles, and copper-plated alumina nanoparticles were successfully fabricated, showing also the high versatility of the method, since the polymerization of dopamine leads to the formation of an adherent polydopamine layer on the surface of particles of any material and size. The metal coated particles produced with this process are particularly well suited for the production of metal matrix composites, since the metal coating increases the wettability of the particles by the metal, promoting their integration within the matrix. Such composite materials are used in a variety of applications including electrical contacts, components for the automotive industries, magnets, and electromagnetic interference shielding.

  14. Metal nanoparticles and IR laser applications in medicine for biotissue ablation and welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biotissue by using metal and hybrid metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. A nanosecond YAG:Nd laser of wavelength 1064 nm has been used for synthesis of metal NPs. The Ag, Au, Cu, Ti and Ni, as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal colloidal NPs were formed in a liquid medium. The diagnostic technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to determine the biotissue ablation area after IR laser irradiation. The effectiveness of biotissue ablation was 4-5 times larger in the case of a tissue sample colored with metal NPs than for an uncolored sample. IR laser welding has been demonstrated for deep-located biotissue layers colored by metal NPs.

  15. The influence of metal nanoparticles on electrical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janas, Dawid, E-mail: dawid.janas@gmail.com; Koziol, Krzysztof K.K., E-mail: kk292@cam.ac.uk

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Metal nanoparticles were deposited onto carbon nanotube films. • Metal-CNT nanocomposites showed very interesting electrical, thermal and surface properties. • Tailoring of the size of metal nanoclusters shows big potential for catalysis. - Abstract: First, sputtering deposition of Au, Ag, Pt and Pd resulted in changes to the electrical resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) films due to electron localization followed by creation of percolation pathways. Metal-CNT composites created this way showed different reaction of electrical resistance to temperature as well as thermal stability. Furthermore, their surface properties show much higher affinity towards aqueous media than as-made CNT films. Finally, we have developed an easy way of tailoring the size of metal clusters on the surface of CNT films depending on the employed deposition and heating conditions. Electrothermal sintering yielded metal clusters of controlled size that showed big potential for the application in catalyst-assisted chemical transformations.

  16. DNA Modified with Metal Nanoparticles: Preparation and Characterization of Ordered Metal-DNA Nanostructures in a Solution and on a Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kasyanenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA interaction with silver and aluminum nanoparticles in a solution has been investigated with the AFM, SEM, dynamic light scattering, viscometry, and spectral methods. The comparison of DNA interaction with nanoparticles synthesized by the reduction of Ag+ ions and with nanoparticles obtained by the electric discharge plasma method was done. DNA metallization in a solution and on n-silicon surface with metal nanoparticles or by the reduction of silver ions after their binding to DNA was executed and studied. It was shown that DNA strands with regular location of silver or aluminum nanoparticles can be prepared. The conditions for the formation of silver nanoparticles and silver nanoclusters on DNA were analyzed.

  17. Recent advances in porous nanoparticles for drug delivery in antitumoral applications: inorganic nanoparticles and nanoscale metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology has provided new tools for addressing unmet clinical situations, especially in the oncology field. The development of smart nanocarriers able to deliver chemotherapeutic agents specifically to the diseased cells and to release them in a controlled way has offered a paramount advantage over conventional therapy. Areas covered: Among the different types of nanoparticle that can be employed for this purpose, inorganic porous materials have received significant attention in the last decade due to their unique properties such as high loading capacity, chemical and physical robustness, low toxicity and easy and cheap production in the laboratory. This review discuss the recent advances performed in the application of porous inorganic and metal-organic materials for antitumoral therapy, paying special attention to the application of mesoporous silica, porous silicon and metal-organic nanoparticles. Expert opinion: The use of porous inorganic nanoparticles as drug carriers for cancer therapy has the potential to improve the life expectancy of the patients affected by this disease. However, much work is needed to overcome their drawbacks, which are aggravated by their hard nature, exploiting the advantages offered by highly the ordered pore network of these materials.

  18. Metal nanoparticle - block copolymer composite assembly and disassembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.H.; Sai, H.; Warren, S.C.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Arora, H.; Gruner, S.M.; Wiesner, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were self-assembled with poly(isoprene-block-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PI-b-PDMAEMA) block copolymers to generate organic-inorganic hybrid materials. High loadings of NPs in hybrids were achieved through usage of N,N-di-(2-(allyloxy)ethyl)-N-

  19. OPTICALLY HOMOGENEOUS PHOSPHATE GLASSES DOPED WITH METAL NANOPARTICLES

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhgil'dyan, Georgiy; Savinkov, Vitaliy; Konev, Denis; Paleari, A.; Sigaev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The technique of batch preparation, melting, glass working and nanoscale modification of the structure of phosphate glass doped with gold nanoparticles was developed. Glass samples containing different amounts of phosphorus oxide were synthesized. Heat treatments of the samples were held in a gradient furnace. Physical, spectral-luminescent and nonlinear optical properties of the samples were studied.

  20. Metal nanoparticle - block copolymer composite assembly and disassembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.H.; Sai, H.; Warren, S.C.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Arora, H.; Gruner, S.M.; Wiesner, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were self-assembled with poly(isoprene-block-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PI-b-PDMAEMA) block copolymers to generate organic-inorganic hybrid materials. High loadings of NPs in hybrids were achieved through usage of

  1. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles of metals and metalloids by basidiomycetes. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by using purified fungal phenol oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetchinkina, Elena P; Loshchinina, Ekaterina A; Vodolazov, Ilya R; Kursky, Viktor F; Dykman, Lev A; Nikitina, Valentina E

    2017-02-01

    The work shows the ability of cultured Basidiomycetes of different taxonomic groups-Lentinus edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Grifola frondosa-to recover gold, silver, selenium, and silicon, to elemental state with nanoparticles formation. It examines the effect of these metal and metalloid compounds on the parameters of growth and accumulation of biomass; the optimal cultivation conditions and concentrations of the studied ion-containing compounds for recovery of nanoparticles have been identified. Using the techniques of transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray phase analysis, the degrees of oxidation of the bioreduced elements, the ζ-potential of colloidal solutions uniformity, size, shape, and location of the nanoparticles in the culture fluid, as well as on the surface and the inside of filamentous hyphae have been determined. The study has found the part played by homogeneous chromatographically pure fungal phenol-oxidizing enzymes (laccases, tyrosinases, and Mn-peroxidases) in the recovery mechanism with formation of electrostatically stabilized colloidal solutions. A hypothetical mechanism of gold(III) reduction from HAuCl4 to gold(0) by phenol oxidases with gold nanoparticles formation of different shapes and sizes has been introduced.

  2. IR-Laser Welding and Ablation of Biotissue Stained with Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biological tissue by the using of spherical metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation which spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. YAG:Nd laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 8 ns pulse duration, and operating in transverse electromagnetic modes TEM$_{00}$ was used for the synthesis of metal NPs. The Au,Ti Ni and Cu as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal NPs were formed in the liquid medium...

  3. Microwave irradiation assisted, one pot synthesis of simple and complex metal oxide nanoparticles: a general approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate a standard approach for the growth of binary/ternary metal oxide nanostructures within 5 min at a low temperature (Nanoparticles of some functionally advanced binary/ternary metal oxides (MnO2, Fe2O3, NiO, CdO, Ga2O3, Gd2O3, ZnFe2O4, ZnMn2O4) are synthesized and the structure/microstructure is analyzed to ensure the phase and crystallinity. This synthesis procedure can be extended to the large scale production of many other simple and complex metal oxides.

  4. A general strategy for synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles attached on carbon nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a general strategy for synthesis of a large variety of metal oxide nanoparticles on different carbon nanomaterials (CNMs, including single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a few-layer graphene. The approach was based on the π-π interaction between CNMs and modified aromatic organic ligands, which acted as bridges connecting metal ions and CNMs. Our methods can be applicable for a large variety of metal ions, thus offering a great potential application.

  5. Photoreactive surfactants: a facile and clean route to oxide and metal nanoparticles in reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo J; Brown, Paul; Correia, Gemima B; Rogers, Sarah E; Heenan, Richard; Grillo, Isabelle; Galembeck, André; Eastoe, Julian

    2011-08-01

    A new class of photoreactive surfactants (PRSs) is presented here, consisting of amphiphiles that can also act as reagents in photochemical reactions. An example PRS is cobalt 2-ethylhexanoate (Co(EH)(2)), which forms reverse micelles (RMs) in a hydrocarbon solvent, as well as mixed reversed micelles with the standard surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data show that mixed AOT/PRS RMs have a spherical structure and size similar to that of pure AOT micelles. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) band in the PRSs promotes electron transfer from PRS to associated metal counterions, leading to the generation of metal and metal-oxide nanoparticles inside the RMs. This work presents proof of concept for employing PRSs as precursors to obtain nearly monodisperse inorganic nanoparticles: here both Co(3)O(4) and Bi nanoparticles have been synthesized at high metal concentration (10(-2) M) by simply irradiating the RMs. These results point toward a new approach of photoreactive self-assembly, which represents a clean and straightforward route to the generation of nanomaterials.

  6. Formation and manipulation of regular metallic nanoparticle arrays on bacterial surface layers: an advanced TEM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertig, M.; Wahl, R.; Lehmann, M.; Simon, P.; Pompe, W.

    The template-directed formation of regular nanoparticle arrays on two-dimensional crystalline protein layers after their treatment with metal salt complexes was studied by transmission electron microscopy. For these investigations, bacterial surface layers (S layers), recrystallized in vitro into sheets and tube-shaped protein crystals with typical dimensions in the micrometer range, were used as the template. As identified by electron holography and scanning force microscopy, the S-layer tubes form alternating double layers when deposited onto a solid substrate surface. Two distinct pathways for the metal particle formation at the templates have been found: the site-specific growth of metal clusters by chemical reduction of the metal salt complexes, and the electron-beam induced growth of nanoparticles in the transmission electron microscope. Both mechanisms lead to regular arrays with particle densities > 6×1011cm-2. Nanoparticle formation by electron exposure takes exclusively place in the flat-lying double-layered protein tubes, where a sufficient amount of metal complexes can be accumulated during sample preparation.

  7. Comparison of characteristics of selected metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles produced by picosecond laser ablation at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles was only recently reported. The effect of laser wavelength in picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles is not yet fully understood. This investigation reports the new findings comparing the characteristics of Au, Ag, Ag-TiO2, TiO2, ZnO and iron oxide nanoparticles generated by picosecond laser ablation in deionised water at 532 and 1064 nm laser wavelengths. The laser ablation was carried out at a fixed pulse width of 10 ps, a repetition rate of 400 kHz and a scan speed of 250 mm/s. The nanoparticles were characterised by UV-Vis optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The work shows that there is no noticeable difference in the size of the metal oxide nanoparticles produced at 532 and 1064 nm, especially for the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles; however, a considerable size difference can be seen for metallic (e.g. Au) and metallic compound (e.g. Ag-TiO2) nanoparticles at the two wavelengths. It demonstrates that noble metals are more profoundly affected by laser wavelengths. The reasons behind these results are discussed. In addition, the work shows that there are different crystalline structures of the TiO2 nanoparticles at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths.

  8. Surface functionalization by gold nanoparticles and its prospects for application in conductometric metal oxide gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotcenkov, G.; Brinzari, V.; Cho, B. K.

    2017-03-01

    Approaches to surface functionalizing by gold nanoparticles of metal oxides aimed for gas sensors applications are discussed in this paper. It is demonstrated that surface modification by gold nanoparticles is accompanied by improvement of sensor performance. However, analysis of obtained results has shown that the achievement of strong improvement of gas sensor parameters is not a trivial task. For its reduction, it is necessary to ensure several specific conditions related to the size and density of gold clusters on the surface of metal oxide crystallites, the state of gold in the cluster, and to the properties of the metal oxide support used. It is also demonstrated that additional studies are required before conductometric gas sensors modified by gold nanoclusters will appear in gas-sensor market.

  9. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10-5 Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  10. An experimental assessment of toxic potential of nanoparticle preparation of heavy metals in streptozotocin induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sonia; Srinivasan, B P; Akarte, Atul Sureshrao

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals have attracted enormous scientific and technological interest. Biologically produced nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals are elaborately described in traditional texts and being widely prescribed. The underlying interactions of nano preparations within the physiological fluids are key feature to understand their biological impact. In this perspective, we performed an experimental assessment of the toxicity potential of a marketed metallic preparation named Vasant Kusumakar Ras (VKR), wherein different heavy metals in composite form are reduced to nanoparticle size to produce the desired effect in diabetes and its complications. VKR (50mg/kg) was administered to Albino Wistar rats rendered diabetic using streptozotocin (90mg/kg) in 2 days old neonates. Anti-hyperglycemic effect was observed with VKR along with increased levels of plasma insulin. Renal variables including total proteins and albumin along with glomerular filtration rate were found to improve biochemically. The results were supplemented by effects on different inflammatory and growth factors like TNF-α, nitric oxide, TGF-β and VEGF. However, the results observed in kidney histopathology were not in accordance with the biochemical parameters. Inflammation observed in kidney was confirmed by immunostaining metallothionein, which was due to the accumulation of heavy metals. Furthermore, mercury accumulation in kidney further confirmed by autometallography, which activated mononuclear phagocyte system, which generated an immune response. This was further supported by increase in the extent of apoptosis in kidney tissues. In conclusion, nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals can be toxic to kidney if it is not regulated with respect to its surface chemistry and dosage.

  11. Biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production: A novel approach in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy, E-mail: saravana732@gmail.com [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China); MubarakAli, Davoodbasha [Microbial Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, College of Life Science and Bioengineering, Incheon National University, Songdo 406772, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Kathiresan, Kandasamy [Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, Nooruddin [Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Naiyf S. [Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiechen59@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Trichoderma sp., showed an abilities to synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs with an excellent stability. • AuNPs significantly enhanced the bioelectricity production by MFC of anaerobic fermentation as catalyst. • Maximum bioelectricity production was optimized and obtained the voltage of 432.80 mA using RSM. - Abstract: The present work aimed to use the biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cell (MFC) approach under anaerobic condition. Silver and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using Trichoderma sp. Particle size and cystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction revealed the crystalline structure with average size of 36.17 nm. Electron microscopic studies showed spherical shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and cubical shaped AuNPs with size ranges from 50 to 150 nm. The concentration of biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for enhanced bioelectricity generations and estimated by response surface methodology (RSM) and found at the greatest of 342.80 mA under optimized conditions are time interval, temperature, nanoparticles used as 63 h, 28 ± 2.0 °C, 22.54 mg l{sup −1} (AgNPs) and 25.62 mg l{sup −1} (AuNPs) in a batch reactor. AuNPs acted as an excellent catalyst to enhance the bioelectricity production. This novel technique could be used for eco-friendly, economically feasible and facile electricity production.

  12. Universal relation for size dependent thermodynamic properties of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shiyun; Qi, Weihong; Cheng, Yajuan; Huang, Baiyun; Wang, Mingpu; Li, Yejun

    2011-06-14

    The previous model on surface free energy has been extended to calculate size dependent thermodynamic properties (i.e., melting temperature, melting enthalpy, melting entropy, evaporation temperature, Curie temperature, Debye temperature and specific heat capacity) of nanoparticles. According to the quantitative calculation of size effects on the calculated thermodynamic properties, it is found that most thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles vary linearly with 1/D as a first approximation. In other words, the size dependent thermodynamic properties P(n) have the form of P(n) = P(b)(1 -K/D), in which P(b) is the corresponding bulk value and K is the material constant. This may be regarded as a scaling law for most of the size dependent thermodynamic properties for different materials. The present predictions are consistent literature values.

  13. Adsorption and detection of sport doping drugs on metallic plasmonic nanoparticles of different morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Lorenzo, Irene; Alda, Irene; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Garcia-Ramos, José Vicente

    2012-06-19

    A comparative study of different plasmonic nanoparticles with different morphologies (nanospheres and triangular nanoprisms) and metals (Ag and Au) was done in this work and applied to the ultrasensitive detection of aminoglutethimide (AGI) drug by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and plasmon resonance. AGI is an aromatase inhibitor used as an antitumoral drug with remarkable pharmacological interest and also in illegal sport doping. The application of very sensitive spectroscopic techniques based on the localization of an electromagnetic field on plasmonic nanoparticles confirms the previous study of the adsorption of drugs onto a metal surface due to the near field character of these techniques. The adsorption of AGI on the above substrates was investigated at different pH values and surface coverages, and the results were analyzed on the basis of AGI/metal affinity, considering the interaction mechanism, the existence of two binding sites in AGI, and the influence of the interface on the adsorption in terms of surface charge due to the presence of other ions linked to the surface. Finally, a comparative quantitative detection of AGI was performed on both spherical and triangular nanoprism nanoparticles, and a limit of detection lower than those reported so far was deduced on the latter nanoparticles.

  14. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Sabella, Stefania

    2014-04-09

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment-where particles are abundantly internalized-is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a "lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect" since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments. The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  15. From iron coordination compounds to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Iacob

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various types, shapes and sizes of iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, preparation method and reaction conditions. The mixed valence trinuclear iron acetate, [Fe2IIIFeIIO(CH3COO6(H2O3]·2H2O (FeAc1, μ3-oxo trinuclear iron(III acetate, [Fe3O(CH3COO6(H2O3]NO3∙4H2O (FeAc2, iron furoate, [Fe3O(C4H3OCOO6(CH3OH3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeF, iron chromium furoate, FeCr2O(C4H3OCOO6(CH3OH3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeCrF, and an iron complex with an original macromolecular ligand (FePAZ were used as precursors for the corresponding oxide nanoparticles. Five series of nanoparticle samples were prepared employing either a classical thermal pathway (i.e., thermal decomposition in solution, solvothermal method, dry thermal decomposition/calcination or using a nonconventional energy source (i.e., microwave or ultrasonic treatment to convert precursors into iron oxides. The resulting materials were structurally characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The parameters were varied within each route to fine tune the size and shape of the formed nanoparticles.

  16. HREM analysis of graphite-encapsulated metallic nanoparticles for possible medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Robert, E-mail: bobsinc@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4034 (United States); Li, He [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4034 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4401 (United States); Madsen, Steven [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4034 (United States); Dai, Hongjie [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4401 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    High resolution electron microscopy has been applied to study the structure of metallic nanoparticles. These have sparked considerable interest as contrast agents in the field of biological imaging, including in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Here, we describe a method of synthesizing sub-10 nm superparamagnetic metal and alloy nanoparticles by reduction of metallic salts. Annealing at 900° C in a methane/hydrogen environment forms a thin graphitic-carbon shell which is expected to improve stability, biocompatibility, and functionalization. Subsequent high resolution electron microscopy verifies graphitization and allows for crystallographic analysis. Most particles consist of single crystals in the phase predicted for the bulk material at the annealing temperature. Electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and lattice constant measurements show large variation in composition for alloy nanoparticles from a single synthesis. The magnetization relaxation time (T{sub 2}) measurements demonstrate that Fe and AuFe nanoparticles compete with commercially available iron oxide MRI contrast agents. X-ray attenuation measurements of an AuFe alloy nanoparticle solution gave a relative radiodensity of 280 Hounsfield Units, demonstrating promise as a dual-purpose contrast agent in CT and MRI. Long term stability in an atmospheric environment was also tested, with no signs of corrosion or oxidation after several years of storage. - Highlights: • Fe, Co, Fe–Co and Au–Fe nanoparticles were made by annealing their salts in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}. • High resolution TEM has determined crystal structures and graphite layer thickness. • Particles can be superior to iron oxide particles currently in use for MRI contrast. • Particles can provide similar CT numbers to clinically used barium contrast agents. • The graphite encapsulated particles show no oxidation or corrosion in atmosphere.

  17. Orientational and quantum plasmonic effects in the optics of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Raman Anand

    The classical theory of plasmonics envisions spherical nanoparticles obeying classical electrodynamics. Modern colloidal synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles, in tandem with emerging methods of nanoparticle assembly, transcends the assumptions of this theory. First, strongly nonspherical particles give rise to optical spectra with complicated orientation dependence. An interpolation method is introduced to connect electrodynamic simulation results, generally carried out at fixed orientations, with experimental optical spectra, such as those of randomly oriented ensembles. Second, the ability to manipulate and arrange multiple spherical particles in solution with optical binding demands efficient calculation of the optical forces giving rise to their preferred geometries. A coupled-dipole model is developed to allow for rapid optical force calculations that predict many of the phenomena seen in the laboratory. Third, the prospect of attaching semiconductor quantum dots to metal nanoparticles in the electromagnetic near-field raises new questions about how the quantum behavior of localized surface plasmons affects the nonlinear optical response of the coupled system. Investigating such questions yields several new predictions about the optical response of plasmon-exciton systems. Under ultrafast pulsed illumination, a reversal of a Fano resonance is predicted, turning a dip into a spike in the pulsed optical spectrum. When two quantum dots are coupled to the same metal nanoparticle, it is found that their individual couplings to a quantized plasmon can give rise to coherence between the quantum dots, in particular a state enriched in an antisymmetric dark excitation that can be prepared with pulsed laser illumination. These theoretical tools and predictions, in addition to providing basic insight into plasmonic systems, will serve to guide further developments in colloidal synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and optical applications.

  18. Perturbation of an arctic soil microbial community by metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Niraj [Department of Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Shah, Vishal [Department of Biology, Dowling College, Oakdale, NY 11769 (United States); Walker, Virginia K., E-mail: walkervk@queensu.ca [Department of Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Biology, School of Environmental Studies and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Silver, copper and silica nanoparticles had an impact on arctic soil {yields} A microbial community toxicity indicator was developed {yields} Community surveys using pyrosequencing confirmed a shift in bacterial biodiversity {yields} Troublingly, silver nanoparticles were highly toxic to a plant beneficial bacterium - Abstract: Technological advances allowing routine nanoparticle (NP) manufacture have enabled their use in electronic equipment, foods, clothing and medical devices. Although some NPs have antibacterial activity, little is known about their environmental impact and there is no information on the influence of NPs on soil in the possibly vulnerable ecosystems of polar regions. The potential toxicity of 0.066% silver, copper or silica NPs on a high latitude (>78{sup o}N) soil was determined using community level physiological profiles (CLPP), fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) assays and DNA analysis, including sequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of these different investigations were amalgamated in order to develop a community toxicity indicator, which revealed that of the three NPs examined, silver NPs could be classified as highly toxic to these arctic consortia. Subsequent culture-based studies confirmed that one of the community-identified plant-associating bacteria, Bradyrhizobium canariense, appeared to have a marked sensitivity to silver NPs. Thus, NP contamination of arctic soils particularly by silver NPs is a concern and procedures for mitigation and remediation of such pollution should be a priority for investigation.

  19. The reactivity study of peptide A3-capped gold and silver nanoparticles with heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hongyu [New Energy Research Institute, School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhenghua, E-mail: zhht@scut.edu.cn [New Energy Research Institute, School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment and Pollution Control, School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Likai; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui [New Energy Research Institute, School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Yongqing [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment and Pollution Control, School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Shaowei, E-mail: shaowei@ucsc.edu [New Energy Research Institute, School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Apparent color change upon the addition of Hg{sup 2+} or As{sup 3+} ions into A3-AuNPs solution. • Distinct color change of A3-AgNPs solution only in the presence of Hg{sup 2+} ions. • The Hg{sup 2+} concentration limit of A3-AgNPs about 40 times lower than A3-AuNPs. • Based on the DLS, TEM and XPS results, two reaction mechanisms have been proposed. - Abstract: Peptide A3-capped gold and silver nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of metal salt precursors. The nanoparticles exhibited apparent but distinctly different color changes upon the addition of selected heavy metal ions. For gold nanoparticles, the solution color was found to change from red to blue in the presence of Hg{sup 2+} or As{sup 3+} ions, accompanied with broadening and a red-shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak. In contrast, silver nanoparticles showed an apparent color change from yellow to colorless only in the presence of Hg{sup 2+}, along with a blue-shift and diminishment of the surface plasmon resonance peak. The Hg{sup 2+} reaction concentration limit of silver nanoparticle was about 40 times lower than that of gold nanoparticle. Based on the dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results, the reaction mechanism has been proposed. Such a sensitive variation of the nanoparticle optical properties to selective ions might be exploited for ion detection for potential applications.

  20. Passive mass transport for direct and quantitative SERS detection using purified silica encapsulated metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Binaya Kumar

    This thesis focuses on understanding implications of nanomaterial quality control and mass transport through internally etched silica coated nanoparticles for direct and quantitative molecular detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Prior to use, bare nanoparticles (partially or uncoated with silica) are removal using column chromatography to improve the quality of these nanomaterials and their SERS reproducibility. Separation of silica coated nanoparticles with two different diameters is achieved using Surfactant-free size exclusion chromatography with modest fractionation. Next, selective molecular transport is modeled and monitored using SERS and evaluated as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and polarity. Molecular detection is achieved when the analytes first partition through the silica membrane then interact with the metal surface at short distances (i.e., less than 2 nm). The SERS intensities of unique molecular vibrational modes for a given molecule increases as the number of molecules that bind to the metal surface increases and are enhanced via both chemical and electromagnetic enhancement mechanisms as long as the vibrational mode has a component of polarizability tensor along the surface normal. SERS signals increase linearly with molecular concentration until the three-dimensional SERS-active volume is saturated with molecules. Implications of molecular orientation as well as surface selection rules on SERS intensities of molecular vibrational modes are studied to improve quantitative and reproducible SERS detection using internally etched Ag Au SiO2 nanoparticles. Using the unique vibrational modes, SERS intensities for p-aminothiophenol as a function of metal core compositions and plasmonics are studied. By understanding molecular transport mechanisms through internally etched silica matrices coated on metal nanoparticles, important experimental and materials design parameters are learned, which can be subsequently applied

  1. In situ introduction of dispersed metallic Ag nanoparticles into the channels of mesoporous carbon CMK-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An in situ reduction method has been developed to fabricate metallic Ag nanoparticles inside the channels of mesoporous carbon CMK-3. This approach combines function of the CMK-3 surface by oxidation using HNO3 with the subsequent absorption of Ag+.The resultant nanocomposite materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the conventional impregnation method, our approach shows that Ag nanoparticles of 2-4 nm can be uniformly incorporated into CMK-3.

  2. A simple approach to obtain hybrid Au-loaded polymeric nanoparticles with a tunable metal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Michel, Edurne; Larrea, Ane; Lahuerta, Celia; Sebastian, Víctor; Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Arruebo, Manuel; Blanco-Prieto, María J.; Santamaría, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    A new strategy to nanoengineer multi-functional polymer-metal hybrid nanostructures is reported. By using this protocol the hurdles of most of the current developments concerning covalent and non-covalent attachment of polymers to preformed inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) are overcome. The strategy is based on the in situ reduction of metal precursors using the polymeric nanoparticle as a nanoreactor. Gold nanoparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid), PLGA, are located in the core and shell, respectively. This novel technique enables the production of PLGA NPs smaller than 200 nm that bear either a single encapsulated Au NP or several smaller NPs with tunable sizes and a 100% loading efficiency. In situ reduction of Au ions inside the polymeric NPs was achieved on demand by using heat to activate the reductive effect of citrate ions. In addition, we show that the loading of the resulting Au NPs inside the PLGA NPs is highly dependent on the surfactant used. Electron microscopy, laser irradiation, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy characterization techniques confirm the location of Au nanoparticles. These promising results indicate that these hybrid nanomaterials could be used in theranostic applications or as contrast agents in dark-field imaging and computed tomography.A new strategy to nanoengineer multi-functional polymer-metal hybrid nanostructures is reported. By using this protocol the hurdles of most of the current developments concerning covalent and non-covalent attachment of polymers to preformed inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) are overcome. The strategy is based on the in situ reduction of metal precursors using the polymeric nanoparticle as a nanoreactor. Gold nanoparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid), PLGA, are located in the core and shell, respectively. This novel technique enables the production of PLGA NPs smaller than 200 nm that bear either a single encapsulated Au NP or several smaller NPs with tunable sizes and a 100% loading

  3. Nanoscale optical properties of metal nanoparticles probed by Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong; Nguyen, Ngoc; Gachet, David; Maillard, Vincent; Toury, Timothée; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-05-20

    We report spatial and vectorial imaging of local fields' confinement properties in metal nanoparticles with branched shapes, using Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy. Taking advantage of the coherent nature of this nonlinear process, the technique provides a direct evidence of the coupling between the excitation polarization and both localization and polarization specificities of local fields at the sub-diffraction scale. These combined features, which are governed by the nanoparticles' symmetry, are not accessible using other contrasts such as linear optical techniques or two-photon luminescence.

  4. Spectral gaps and mode localization in Fibonacci chains of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Luca; Feng, Ning-Ning

    2007-10-29

    In this paper we study the spectral, localization and dispersion properties of dipolar modes in quasi-periodically modulated nanoparticle chains based on the Fibonacci sequence. By developing a transfer matrix approach for the calculation of resonant frequencies, oscillation eigenvectors and integrated density of states (IDS) of spatially-modulated dipole chains, we demonstrate the presence of large spectral gaps and calculate the pseudo-dispersion diagram of Fibonacci plasmonic chains. The presence of plasmonic band-gaps and localized states in metal nanoparticle chains based on quasi-periodic order can have a large impact in the design and fabrication of novel nanophotonics devices.

  5. IR-Laser Welding and Ablation of Biotissue Stained with Metal Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lalayan, A A

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biological tissue by the using of spherical metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation which spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. YAG:Nd laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 8 ns pulse duration, and operating in transverse electromagnetic modes TEM$_{00}$ was used for the synthesis of metal NPs. The Au,Ti Ni and Cu as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal NPs were formed in the liquid medium. Effectiveness of laser ablation in the case of the biotissue sample that stained with the metal NPs was approximately on 4-5 times larger than for the native sample. Also the scheme of a laser point welding for the deep-located biotissue layer selectively stained by the metal NPs has been demonstrated.

  6. Shape-Controlled Metal Nanoparticles and Their Assemblies with Optical Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kawamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanoparticles (NPs possess excellent optical, optoelectronic, and optochemical properties based on their surface plasmon resonance. However, for practical use, the morphology and assembly of metal NPs need to be controlled. Here, we review facile control methods including seed-mediated growth accompanied with a comproportionation reaction of seeds to control their morphology and assembly. Several synthetic conditions have been modified to precisely control the morphology of metal NPs. Functionalized mesoporous oxides have also been used as hard templates to align metal nanorods and control their dimensions. The high performance of such metal nanorods in surface-enhanced Raman scattering, polarization of light, and photocatalysis has been measured, and the reasons for their high performance are discussed.

  7. Direct photocatalysis for organic synthesis by using plasmonic-metal nanoparticles irradiated with visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qi; Jaatinen, Esa; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in direct-use plasmonic-metal nanoparticles (NPs) as photocatalysts to drive organic synthesis reactions under visible-light irradiation have attracted great interest. Plasmonic-metal NPs are characterized by their strong interaction with visible light through excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Herein, we review recent developments in direct photocatalysis using plasmonic-metal NPs and their applications. We focus on the role played by the LSPR of the metal NPs in catalyzing organic transformations and, more broadly, the role that light irradiation plays in catalyzing the reactions. Through this, the reaction mechanisms that these light-excited energetic electrons promote will be highlighted. This review will be of particular interest to researchers who are designing and fabricating new plasmonic-metal NP photocatalysts by identifying important reaction mechanisms that occur through light irradiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Controlled synthesis of metallic iron nanoparticles and their magnetic hyperthermia performance in polyaniline composite nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ta-I.; Chang, Su-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Electrospun magnetic iron/polyaniline nanofibers with applicable heating performance in an AC magnetic field were developed. A new and low-cost method was introduced to synthesize metallic iron (Fe0) nanoparticles with uniform size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous environment at room temperature with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone and sodium citrate to tailor their particle sizes ranging from 10 to 20 nm. The experimental results showed that regulating the free iron ions present in the solution is critical for obtaining Fe0 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were subsequently incorporated with conductive polyaniline (PANI) to fabricate Fe0/PANI/polycaprolactone nanofibers using an electrospinning technique. The resultant composite nanofibers have controlled fiber diameters and also show electrochemical redox properties originating from the PANI polymer. The heating performance test concluded that both eddy current loss from PANI and Neel relaxation loss of magnetic Fe0 nanoparticles can contribute to the power dissipation of the prepared composite nanofibers. The optimal heating performance can be obtained by adjusting the composition of Fe0 nanoparticles and PANI in nanofibers.

  9. Solvent and stabilizer free growth of Ag and Pd nanoparticles using metallic salts/cyclotriphosphazenes mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz Valenzuela, C. [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Chile, La Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Casilla 653, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Valenzuela, M.L., E-mail: mlvalenzuela@unab.cl [Universidad Andres Bello, Departamento de Ciencias Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Av. Republica 275, Santiago (Chile); Caceres, S.; Diaz, R. [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Chile, La Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Casilla 653, Santiago de Chile (Chile); O' Dwyer, C. [Applied Nanoscience Group, Department of Chemistry, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Micro and Nanoelectronics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

    2013-12-16

    Cyclotriphosphazene is used as a sacrificial solid-state template to synthesize a range of Ag and Pd nanoparticles with diverse geometries by thermal treatment using MLn/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} mixtures. The Pd and Ag nanoparticles are synthesized by solid-state pyrolysis of AgPPh{sub 3}[CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}]/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} and PdCl{sub 2}/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} mixtures with molar relationships of 1:1, 1:5 and 1:10 respectively, in air and at 800 °C. The morphology of the as-prepared nanoparticles is found to depend on the molar ratio of the precursor mixture, the preparation method and of the nature of the metal. Ag and Pd, microcrystals were thermally grown on Si from the respective 1:1 precursors while that metal foams were grown from 1:5 ratios precursors on SiO{sub 2} wafers. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigations reveal in most cases small crystals of Pd. HRSTEM measurements indicate that the formation of the Pd and Ag nanoparticles occurs through a phase demixing and dewetting mechanism. This approach has potential to be a useful and facile method to prepare metallic nanoparticles without requiring solutions or surfactants for application in electronic, catalytic and sensor materials and devices. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis MLn/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} mixtures under air, give Pd and Ag nanoparticles. • AgPPh{sub 3}[CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] and PdCl{sub 2} in molar ratios 1:1 and 1:5 were used. • Metal foams were obtained from 1:5 ratios when deposited on SiO{sub 2.} • Using crucible supporting in 1:1 metal/trimer <2 nm Pd nanoparticles were obtained. • The probable mechanism involves a dewetting, nucleation and ripening crystallization.

  10. Synthesis and characterisation of metal nanoparticles and their effects on seed germination and seedling growth in commercially important Eruca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaka, Mehreen; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Rahman, Latif-Ur; Shah, Afzal; Zia, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis, characterisation and application of metal nanoparticles have become an important and attractive branch of nanotechnology. In current study, metallic nanoparticles of silver, copper, and gold were synthesised using environment friendly method (polyols process), and applied on medicinally important plant: Eruca sativa. Effects of application of these nanoparticles were evaluated on seed germination frequency and biochemical parameters of plant tissues. Seeds of E. sativa were germinated on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium incorporated with various combinations of nanoparticles suspension (30 µg/ml). Phytotoxicity study showed that nanoparticles could induce stress in plants by manipulating the endogenous mechanisms. In response to these stresses, plants release various defensive compounds; known as antioxidant secondary metabolites. These plants derived secondary metabolites having a great potential in treating the common human ailments. In the authors study, small-sized nanoparticles showed higher toxicity levels and enhanced secondary metabolites production, total protein content, total flavonoids content and total phenolics content.

  11. Anti-bacterial chitosan/zinc phthalocyanine fibers supported metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles for the removal of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fayaz; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Kamal, Tahseen; Anwar, Yasir; Alamry, Khalid A; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2017-10-01

    In this report, we prepared chitosan (CS) membrane, CS/zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc-CS) composite fibers and pellets as support for the synthesis of zero valent metal nanoparticles. The composite fibers and pellets of ZnPc-CS were prepared by simply dispersing 5wt% of ZnPc in CS solution. ZnPc-CS composite were applied as economical host material for the development of metallic and bimetallic zero valent nanoparticles. The composites of ZnPc-CS were put in 0.1M metals salt solutions (mono- and bi-metallic) for the adsorption of metal ions. The metal ions adsorbed ZnPc-CS fibers were treated with 0.1M sodium borohydride (NaBH4) aqueous solution for conversion of metal ions into nanoparticles. Thus, through water based in-situ preparation process, metals nanoparticles loaded on ZnPc-CS composite fibers and pellets were achieved. The presence of respective metals nanoparticles on the composite fibers was confirmed using FE-SEM, XRD and FTIR. Moreover, we determined that these composites exhibit excellent catalytic efficiency and recyclability in the reduction reactions of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), methyl orange (MO) and cango red (CR). In addition, these composites displayed high antibacterial activity as tested against pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of dissolved organic matter on the environmental fate of metals, nanoparticles, and colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, George R.; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2011-01-01

    We have known for decades that dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays a critical role in the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals and the mobility of colloidal particles in aquatic environments. In recent years, concerns about the ecological and human health effects of metal-based engineered nanoparticles released into natural waters have increased efforts to better define the nature of DOM interactions with metals and surfaces. Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties and enhanced reactivities that are not apparent in larger materials of the same composition1,2 or dissolved ions of metals that comprise the nanoparticles. These nanoparticle-specific properties generally result from the relatively large proportion of the atoms located at the surface, which leads to very high specific surface areas and a high proportion of crystal lattice imperfections relative to exposed surface area. Nanoscale colloids are ubiquitous in nature,2 and many engineered nanomaterials have analogs in the natural world. The properties of these materials, whether natural or manmade, are poorly understood, and new challenges have been presented in assessing their environmental fate. These challenges are particularly relevant in aquatic environments where interactions with DOM are key, albeit often overlooked, moderators of reactivity at the molecular and nanocolloidal scales.

  13. Preparation of Magnesium, Cobalt and Nickel Ferrite Nanoparticles from Metal Oxides using Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söldner, Anika; Zach, Julia; Iwanow, Melanie; Gärtner, Tobias; Schlosser, Marc; Pfitzner, Arno; König, Burkhard

    2016-09-05

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (DESs) dissolve simple metal oxides and are used as a reaction medium to synthesize spinel-type ferrite nanoparticles MFe2 O4 (M=Mg, Zn, Co, Ni). The best results for phase-pure spinel ferrites are obtained with the DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) and maleic acid. By employing DESs, the reactions proceed at much lower temperatures than usual for the respective solid-phase reactions of the metal oxides and at the same temperatures as synthesis with comparable calcination processes using metal salts. The method therefore reduces the overall required energy for the nanoparticle synthesis. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the thermolysis process of the eutectic melts in air occurs in one major step. The phase-pure spinel-type ferrite particles are thoroughly characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse-reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The properties of the obtained nanoparticles are shown to be comparable to those obtained by other methods, illustrating the potential of natural DESs for processing metal oxides.

  14. Catalytic Activity of Mono- and Bi-Metallic Nanoparticles Synthesized via Microemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Y.G. König

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-oil (w/o microemulsions were used as a template for the synthesis of mono- and bi-metallic nanoparticles. For that purpose, w/o-microemulsions containing H2PtCl6, H2PtCl6 + Pb(NO32 and H2PtCl6 + Bi(NO3, respectively, were mixed with a w/o-microemulsion containing the reducing agent, NaBH4. The results revealed that it is possible to synthesize Pt, PtPb and PtBi nanoparticles of ~3–8 nm in diameter at temperatures of about 30°C. The catalytic properties of the bimetallic PtBi and PtPb nanoparticles were studied and compared with monometallic platinum nanoparticles. Firstly, the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid to carbon monoxide was investigated, and it was found that the resistance of the PtBi and PtPb nanoparticles against the catalyst-poisoning carbon monoxide was significantly higher compared to the Pt nanoparticles. Secondly, investigating the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol,we found that the bimetallic NPs are most active at 23 °C, while the order of the activity changes at higher temperatures, i.e., that the Pt nanoparticles are the most active ones at 36 and 49 °C. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the support, which was either a polymer or Al2O3. Thirdly, for the hydrogenation of allylbenzene to propylbenzene, the monometallic Pt NPs turned out to be the most active catalysts, followed by the PtPb and PtBi NPs. Comparing the two bimetallic nanoparticles, one sees that the PtPb NPs are significantly more active than the respective PtBi NPs.

  15. Assessment of Carbon- and Metal-Based Nanoparticle DNA Damage with Microfluidic Electrophoretic Separation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda M; Powell, Thomas; Robertson, Tiffany; Hussain, Saber M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we examined the feasibility of extracting DNA from whole cell lysates exposed to nanoparticles using two different methodologies for evaluation of fragmentation with microfluidic electrophoretic separation. Human lung macrophages were exposed to five different carbon- and metal-based nanoparticles at two different time points (2 h, 24 h) and two different doses (5 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml). The primary difference in the banding patterns after 2 h of nanoparticle exposure is more DNA fragmentation at the higher NP concentration when examining cells exposed to nanoparticles of the same composition. However, higher doses of carbon and silver nanoparticles at both short and long dosing periods can contribute to erroneous or incomplete data with this technique. Also comparing DNA isolation methodologies, we recommend the centrifugation extraction technique, which provides more consistent banding patterns in the control samples compared to the spooling technique. Here we demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes, 15 nm silver nanoparticles and the positive control cadmium oxide cause similar DNA fragmentation at the short time point of 2 h with the centrifugation extraction technique. Therefore, the results of these studies contribute to elucidating the relationship between nanoparticle physicochemical properties and DNA fragmentation results while providing the pros and cons of altering the DNA isolation methodology. Overall, this technique provides a high throughput way to analyze subcellular alterations in DNA profiles of cells exposed to nanomaterials to aid in understanding the consequences of exposure and mechanistic effects. Future studies in microfluidic electrophoretic separation technologies should be investigated to determine the utility of protein or other assays applicable to cellular systems exposed to nanoparticles.

  16. Metallic nickel nanoparticles and their effect on the embryonic development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanold, Julia Maxi; Wang, Jiabin; Brümmer, Franz; Šiller, Lidija

    2016-05-01

    The presence of nanoparticles in many industrial applications and daily products is making it nowadays crucial to assess their impact when exposed to the environment. Metallic nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) are of high industrial interest due to their ability to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 to carbonic acid at ambient conditions. We characterized metallic Ni NPs by XRD, HRTEM and EDS and determined the solubility of free nickel ions from 3 mg/L metallic Ni NPs in seawater by ICP-MS over 96 h, which was below 3%. Further, embryonic development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was investigated for 48 h in the presence of metallic Ni NPs (0.03 mg/L to 3 mg/L), but no lethal effects were observed. However, 3 mg/L metallic Ni NPs caused a size reduction similar to 1.2 mg/L NiCl2*6 H2O. The obtained results contribute to current studies on metallic Ni NPs and point to their consequences for the marine ecosystem.

  17. Preparation of Chitosan/Polystyrene Sulfonate Multilayered Composite Metal Nanoparticles and Its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fangxin; Chen, Chunxiao; Liu, Shantang

    2016-06-01

    Metal-Chitosan (CTS) composite was first synthesized through the metal composition of chitosan (CTS) and metal ions. The formed composite was alternately deposited on the base with sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) through a layer-by-layer self-assembling technique, followed by an in situ reduction by sodium borohydride to produce a polyelectrolyte nanocomposite thin film containing metal nanoparticles. Assembly, surface morphology and electrochemical properties of the composite membrane were analyzed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The UV-Vis results indicated that the absorbance of the multilayer film at the characteristic absorption peak increased as the membrane bilayers increased, in a good linear relationship, which demonstrated that the multilayer film was uniformly assembled on the base. AFM images showed that the surface of the multilayer thin-film composite had some degree of roughness and metal nanoparticles of 10-20 nm in size were generated on the membrane. The CV results indicated that the metal nanocomposite film had excellent electrocatalytic activity to glucose and had a potential for applications in electrochemical sensors.

  18. Asymmetric organic/metal(oxide) hybrid nanoparticles: synthesis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Liu, Yijing; Hood, Taylor C; Zhang, Peng; Gong, Jinlong; Nie, Zhihong

    2013-06-21

    Asymmetric particles (APs) with broken centrosymmetry are of great interest, due to the asymmetric surface properties and diverse functionalities. In particular, organic/metal(oxide) APs naturally combine the significantly different and complementary properties of organic and inorganic species, leading to their unique applications in various fields. In this review article, we highlighted recent advances in the synthesis and applications of organic/metal(oxide) APs. This type of APs is grounded on chemical or physical interactions between metal(oxide) NPs and organic small molecular or polymeric ligands. The synthetic methodologies were summarized in three categories, including the selective surface modifications, phase separation of mixed ligands on the surface of metal(oxide) NPs, and direct synthesis of APs. We further discussed the unique applications of organic/metal(oxide) APs in self-assembly, sensors, catalysis, and biomedicine, as a result of the distinctions between asymmetrically distributed organic and inorganic components. Finally, challenges and future directions are discussed in an outlook section.

  19. Beet juice utilization: Expeditious green synthesis of nobel metal nanoparticles (Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd) using microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd were prepared in aqueous solutions via a rapid microwave-assisted green method using beet juice, an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce, served as both a reducing and a capping reagent. The Ag nanoparticles with capping prepared by b...

  20. Beet juice utilization: Expeditious green synthesis of nobel metal nanoparticles (Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd) using microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd were prepared in aqueous solutions via a rapid microwave-assisted green method using beet juice, an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce, served as both a reducing and a capping reagent. The Ag nanoparticles with capping prepared by b...

  1. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: A case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena; Pasteris, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    when performing Life Cycle Impact Assessment, where characterization models and consequently characterization factors (CFs) for ENPs are missing. This paper aims to provide the freshwater ecotoxicity CF for titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2). The USEtox™ model has been selected...

  2. Molecular Surface Chemistry by Metal Single Crystals and Nanoparticles from Vacuum to High Pressure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-04-05

    Model systems for studying molecular surface chemistry have evolved from single crystal surfaces at low pressure to colloidal nanoparticles at high pressure. Low pressure surface structure studies of platinum single crystals using molecular beam surface scattering and low energy electron diffraction techniques probe the unique activity of defects, steps and kinks at the surface for dissociation reactions (H-H, C-H, C-C, O{double_bond}O bonds). High-pressure investigations of platinum single crystals using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have revealed the presence and the nature of reaction intermediates. High pressure scanning tunneling microscopy of platinum single crystal surfaces showed adsorbate mobility during a catalytic reaction. Nanoparticle systems are used to determine the role of metal-oxide interfaces, site blocking and the role of surface structures in reactive surface chemistry. The size, shape and composition of nanoparticles play important roles in determining reaction activity and selectivity.

  3. Carbon Nanofibers Functionalized with Active Screen Plasma-Deposited Metal Nanoparticles for Electrical Energy Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corujeira Gallo, Santiago; Li, Xiaoying; Fütterer, Klaus; Charitidis, Constantinos A; Dong, Hanshan

    2017-07-12

    Supercapacitors are energy storage devices with higher energy densities than conventional capacitors but lower than batteries or fuel cells. There is a strong interest in increasing the volumetric and gravimetric capacitance of these devices to meet the growing demands of the electrical and electronic sectors. The capacitance depends largely on the electrode material, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have attracted much attention because of their relatively low cost, large surface area, and good electrical conductivity as well as chemical and thermal stability. The deposition of metal nanoparticles on CNFs is a promising way to increase their surface properties and, ultimately, the capacitance of the devices. In this study, nickel and silver nanoparticles were deposited on CNFs using the active screen plasma technology. The CNFs were characterized, and their electrochemical performance was assessed in a three-electrode cell. The results show significant improvements over the untreated CNFs, particularly after functionalization with silver nanoparticles.

  4. On the Size Dependences of the Metallic Nanoparticle Evaporation and Sublimation Heats: Thermodynamics and Atomistic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembel, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Size dependences of the nanocrystal sublimation and the evaporation heats of the corresponding nanodrops are investigated using the isothermal molecular dynamics and the tight-binding potential (on examples of Ni and Au nanoparticles). Results of computer simulation demonstrating linear dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats on the particle reciprocal radius are compared with results of thermodynamic calculations as well as with experimental data for bulk phases of the same metals. It has been found that the size dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats are directly related with the behavior of the size dependence of the melting heat that in its turn correlates with structural transformations in nanoparticles induced by the change of their size. The conclusion is drawn that there is some characteristic nanoparticle size (of the order of 1 nm) at which its crystal and liquid states become indistinguishable.

  5. Optical properties of dyes with/without metal nanoparticles doped in a highly ordered nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-ping; LI Yu-dong; QI Ji-wei; XU Jing-jun; SUN Qian

    2011-01-01

    Highly ordered nanocomposite arrays of Rh6G-Au-AAO are formed by filling anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and gold nanoparticles. The optical properties of Rh6G-Au-AAO are studied by visible absorptive and fluorescent spectroscopy. Compared with the fluorescence spectra of Rh6G-Au in the solution environment, the fluorescence peak intensities of Rh6G-Au-AAO are significantly enhanced, the maximum enhancement rate is 5.5, and a constant blue shift of~ 12 nm of peak positions is presented. The effects come from the spatial confinement of AAO and the inhibition of the fluorescence quenching effect induced by gold nanoparticles. The results show that the nanocomposite structures of fluorescence molecules-metal nanoparticles-AAO have a considerable potential in engineering molecular assemblies and creating functional materials of superior properties for future nanophotonics.

  6. A study of shape optimization on the metallic nanoparticles for thin-film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Xiaodong; Li, Qing; Xie, Yi Min

    2013-10-29

    The shape of metallic nanoparticles used to enhance the performance of thin-film solar cells is described by Gielis' superformula and optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. As a result, we have found a lens-like nanoparticle capable of improving the short circuit current density to 19.93 mA/cm2. Compared with a two-scale nanospherical configuration recently reported to synthesize the merits of large and small spheres into a single structure, the optimized nanoparticle enables the solar cell to achieve a further 7.75% improvement in the current density and is much more fabrication friendly due to its simple shape and tolerance to geometrical distortions.

  7. Antimicrobial precious-metal nanoparticles and their use in novel materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Katharina; Müller, Stefanie; Schacht, Veronika J; Bunge, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Nanotechnology offers powerful new approaches to controlling unwanted microorganisms and other potential biohazards. Engineered nanoparticles with antifungal, antimicrobial, and antiviral properties are now being developed for a variety of applications, including manufacture and maintenance of sterile surfaces, prevention and control of biological contamination, food and water safety, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. The great potential of antimicrobial precious-metal nanoparticles is reflected by the high number of recent publications and patent applications, which is summarized, at least in part, in this paper. This review should provide an overview and offer guidance to the scientific community interested in nano(bio)technology, nanomedicine, and nanotoxicology, and may also be of interest to a broader scientific audience. Furthermore, this review covers specific topics in research and development addressing the effects of nanoparticles on microorganisms as well as novel nanotechnology-based approaches for controlling potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  8. Probing elasticity at the nanoscale: Terahertz acoustic vibration of small metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvé, Vincent; Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Pellarin, Michel; Broyer, Michel; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2010-05-12

    The acoustic response of surface-controlled metal (Pt) nanoparticles is investigated in the small size range, between 1.3 and 3 nm (i.e., 75-950 atoms), using time-resolved spectroscopy. Acoustic vibration of the nanoparticles is demonstrated, with frequencies ranging from 1.1 to 2.6 THz, opening the way to the development of THz acoustic resonators. The frequencies, measured with a noncontact optical method, are in excellent agreement with the prediction of a macroscopic approach based on the continuous elastic model, together with the bulk material elastic constants. This demonstrates the validity of this model at the nanoscale and the weak impact of size reduction on the elastic properties of a material, even for nanoparticles formed by less than 100 atoms.

  9. Green Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles via Biological Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monaliben; Fawcett, Derek; Sharma, Shashi; Tripathy, Suraj Kumar; Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the creation, manipulation and use of materials at the nanometre size scale (1 to 100 nm). At this size scale there are significant differences in many material properties that are normally not seen in the same materials at larger scales. Although nanoscale materials can be produced using a variety of traditional physical and chemical processes, it is now possible to biologically synthesize materials via environment-friendly green chemistry based techniques. In recent years, the convergence between nanotechnology and biology has created the new field of nanobiotechnology that incorporates the use of biological entities such as actinomycetes algae, bacteria, fungi, viruses, yeasts, and plants in a number of biochemical and biophysical processes. The biological synthesis via nanobiotechnology processes have a significant potential to boost nanoparticles production without the use of harsh, toxic, and expensive chemicals commonly used in conventional physical and chemical processes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of recent trends in synthesizing nanoparticles via biological entities and their potential applications. PMID:28793638

  10. Nanoparticle Treated Stainless Steel Filters for Metal Vapor Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. The effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  11. Green Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles via Biological Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaliben Shah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is the creation, manipulation and use of materials at the nanometre size scale (1 to 100 nm. At this size scale there are significant differences in many material properties that are normally not seen in the same materials at larger scales. Although nanoscale materials can be produced using a variety of traditional physical and chemical processes, it is now possible to biologically synthesize materials via environment-friendly green chemistry based techniques. In recent years, the convergence between nanotechnology and biology has created the new field of nanobiotechnology that incorporates the use of biological entities such as actinomycetes algae, bacteria, fungi, viruses, yeasts, and plants in a number of biochemical and biophysical processes. The biological synthesis via nanobiotechnology processes have a significant potential to boost nanoparticles production without the use of harsh, toxic, and expensive chemicals commonly used in conventional physical and chemical processes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of recent trends in synthesizing nanoparticles via biological entities and their potential applications.

  12. Nanoparticle Treated Stainless Steel Filters for Metal Vapor Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. The effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  13. Development of heterogeneous olympic medal metal nanoparticle catalysts for environmentally benign molecular transformations based on the surface properties of hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Kiyotomi; Mitsudome, Takato; Mizugaki, Tomoo; Jitsukawa, Koichiro

    2010-12-08

    In this review, we describe the development by our research group of highly functionalized heterogeneous Olympic medal metal (gold, silver, and copper) nanoparticle catalysts using hydrotalcite as a support, aimed towards Green and Sustainable Chemistry. Olympic medal metal nanoparticles can cooperate with the basic sites on the hydrotalcite surface, providing unique and high performance catalysis in environmentally-benign organic transformations such as aerobic oxidation of alcohols, lactonization of diols and selective deoxygenation of epoxides and nitro aromatic compounds.

  14. Development of Heterogeneous Olympic Medal Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Environmentally Benign Molecular Transformations Based on the Surface Properties of Hydrotalcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Jitsukawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe the development by our research group of highly functionalized heterogeneous Olympic medal metal (gold, silver, and copper nanoparticle catalysts using hydrotalcite as a support, aimed towards Green and Sustainable Chemistry. Olympic medal metal nanoparticles can cooperate with the basic sites on the hydrotalcite surface, providing unique and high performance catalysis in environmentally-benign organic transformations such as aerobic oxidation of alcohols, lactonization of diols and selective deoxygenation of epoxides and nitro aromatic compounds.

  15. Development of Heterogeneous Olympic Medal Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Environmentally Benign Molecular Transformations Based on the Surface Properties of Hydrotalcite

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe the development by our research group of highly functionalized heterogeneous Olympic medal metal (gold, silver, and copper) nanoparticle catalysts using hydrotalcite as a support, aimed towards Green and Sustainable Chemistry. Olympic medal metal nanoparticles can cooperate with the basic sites on the hydrotalcite surface, providing unique and high performance catalysis in environmentally-benign organic transformations such as aerobic oxidation of alcohols, lactoni...

  16. Multispectral optical enhanced transmission of a continuous metal film coated with a plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-qiang; Hu, Ying; Liu, Zheng-qi; Cai, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Xiang-nan; Chen, Yuan-hao; Huang, Kuan

    2014-04-01

    We propose and show multispectral optical enhanced transmission in the visible and near-infrared region in a continuous metal film coated with a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal non-close-packed plasmonic array. The plasmonic array consists of metal/dielectric multilayer core-shell nanoparticles. The excitation of near-field plasmon resonance coupling between adjacent core-shell nanoparticles, plasmon resonance coupling between adjacent metal layers in the nanoparticle, and surface plasmon (SP) waves on the metal film are mainly responsible for the multispectral optical enhanced transmission behavior. The multispectral optical enhanced transmission response could be highly modified in the wavelength range, transparent bandwidth and transmission intensity by varying the geometry parameters including the gap distance between adjacent plasmonic nanoparticles, the size of metal core and the thickness of dielectric layer between the metal layers. In addition, the number of optical enhanced transmission bands increases with the number of metal layers in the plasmonic nanoparticle. The proposed structure shows many merits such as the deep sub-wavelength size, multispectral optical enhanced transmission bands as well as fully retained electric and mechanical properties of the natural metal. These merits may provide promising applications for highly integrated optoelectronic devices including plasmonic filters, nanoscale multiplexers, and nonlinear optics.

  17. Formation of alkali-metal nanoparticles in alkali-silicate glasses under electron irradiation and thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, E. S.; Sidorov, A. I.; Ignat'ev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Podsvirov, O. A.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation show that the irradiation of alkali-containing glasses using electrons at an energy of 35 keV and the subsequent thermal processing at a temperature above the vitrification point lead to the formation of spherical metal (lithium, sodium, and potassium) nanoparticles with oxide sheaths that exhibit plasmon resonances in the visible spectral range. Glasses containing two alkali metals exhibit mutual effect of metals on the formation of nanoparticles with two compositions due to the difference of ion radii and mobilities of metal ions.

  18. Investigation of metal nanoparticles encapsulated in polyelectrolyte multilayers for catalytic and antibacterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Srividhya

    Metal nanoparticles are an interesting class of materials because they often exhibit properties different from those of the corresponding bulk metals. For example, bulk Au is not catalytically active, but recent studies show that Au nanoparticles can serve as catalysts for oxidation and hydrogenation reactions. Without a suitable support, however, metal particles aggregate, reducing surface area and eventually affecting the particle properties. To overcome this problem, this research employs the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique, which was introduced by Decher in 1991, as a convenient method to prevent the aggregation of nanoparticles and immobilize them on solid supports. While the multilayers help in stabilizing the nanoparticles, they also aid in retaining important properties of Pd (catalytic) and silver (antibacterial) nanoparticles. Catalytic Pd nanoparticles in multilayer polyelectrolyte films can be easily prepared by alternating depositions of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and a polyethylenimine (PEI)-Pd(II) complex on alumina, and subsequent reduction of the Pd(II) by NaBH4. The polyelectrolytes limit aggregation of the particles and impart catalytic selectivity in the hydrogenation of alpha-substituted unsaturated alcohols by restricting access to catalytic sites. Hydrogenation of allyl alcohol by encapsulated Pd(0) nanoparticles can occur as much as 24-fold faster than hydrogenation of 3-methyl-l-penten-3-ol. In a related system, alternating adsorption of PdCl42- and polyethylenimine (PEI), followed by reduction of Pd(II), yields catalysts with a higher activity than found in [PAA/PEI-Pd(0)]nPAA films due to greater accessibility of the Pd nanocatalysts. In the [PAA/PEI-Pd(0)] nPAA system, turnover frequency decreases with the number of layers deposited, suggesting that the outer layer of the film is primarily responsible for catalysis. In contrast, turnover frequency increases with the number of deposited layers for reduced [PdCl42-/PEI] n films. We

  19. Mechanistic Aspects in the Formation, Growth and Surface Functionalization of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederberger, Markus; Deshmukh, Rupali

    2017-04-04

    The synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles in organic solvents, so-called nonaqueous (or nonhydrolytic) processes represent powerful alternatives to aqueous approaches and have become an independent research field. 10 years ago, when we published our first review on organic reaction pathways in nonaqueous sol-gel approaches,[1] the number of examples was relatively limited. Nowadays, it is almost impossible to provide an exhaustive overview. Here we review the development of the last few years, without neglecting pioneering examples, which help to follow the historical development. The importance of a profound understanding of mechanistic aspects of nanoparticle crystallization and formation mechanisms can't be overestimated, when it comes to the design of rational synthesis concepts under minimization of trial-and-error experiments. The main reason for the progress in mechanistic understanding lies in the availability of characterization tools that make it possible to monitor chemical reactions from the dissolution of the precursor to the nucleation and growth of the nanoparticles, by ex-situ methods involving sampling after different reaction times, but more and more also by in-situ studies. After a short introduction to experimental aspects of nonaqueous sol-gel routes to metal oxide nanoparticles, we provide an overview of the main and basic organic reaction pathways in these approaches. Afterwards, we summarize the main characterization methods to study formation mechanisms, and then we discuss in great depth the chemical formation mechanisms of many different types of metal oxide nanoparticles. The review concludes with a paragraph on selected crystallization mechanisms reported for nonaqueous systems and a few illustrative examples of nonaqueous sol-gel concepts applied to surface chemistry.

  20. Sensitivity of metal nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance to the dielectric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Molly M; Lazarides, Anne A

    2005-11-24

    Electrodynamic simulations of gold nanoparticle spectra were used to investigate the sensitivity of localized surface plasmon band position to the refractive index, n, of the medium for nanoparticles of various shapes and nanoshells of various structures. Among single-component nanoparticles less than 130 nm in size, sensitivities of dipole resonance positions to bulk refractive index are found to depend only upon the wavelength of the resonance and the dielectric properties of the metal and the medium. Among particle plasmons that peak in the frequency range where the real part of the metal dielectric function varies linearly with wavelength and the imaginary part is small and slowly varying, the sensitivity of the peak wavelength, lambda, to refractive index, n, is found to be a linearly increasing function of lambda, regardless of the structural features of the particle that determine lambda. Quasistatic theory is used to derive an analytical expression for the refractive index sensitivity of small particle plasmon peaks. Through this analysis, the dependence of sensitivity on band position is found to be determined by the wavelength dependence of the real part, epsilon', of the particle dielectric function, and the sensitivity results are found to extend to all particles with resonance conditions of the form, epsilon' = -2chin(2), where chi is a function of geometric parameters and other constants. The sensitivity results observed using accurate computational methods for dipolar plasmon bands of gold nanodisks, nanorods, and hollow nanoshells extend, therefore, to particles of other shapes (such as hexagonal and chopped tetrahedral), composed of other metals, and to higher-order modes. The bulk refractive index sensitivity yielded by the theory serves as an upper bound to sensitivities of nanoparticles on dielectric substrates and sensitivities of nanoparticles to local refractive index changes, such as those associated with biomolecule sensing.