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Sample records for demography model ed

  1. Technical note: A hydrological routing scheme for the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2+R) tested in the Tapajós River basin in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Fabio F.; Farinosi, Fabio; Arias, Mauricio E.; Lee, Eunjee; Briscoe, John; Moorcroft, Paul R.

    2017-09-01

    Land surface models are excellent tools for studying how climate change and land use affect surface hydrology. However, in order to assess the impacts of Earth processes on river flows, simulated changes in runoff need to be routed through the landscape. In this technical note, we describe the integration of the Ecosystem Demography (ED2) model with a hydrological routing scheme. The purpose of the study was to create a tool capable of incorporating to hydrological predictions the terrestrial ecosystem responses to climate, carbon dioxide, and land-use change, as simulated with terrestrial biosphere models. The resulting ED2+R model calculates the lateral routing of surface and subsurface runoff resulting from the terrestrial biosphere models' vertical water balance in order to determine spatiotemporal patterns of river flows within the simulated region. We evaluated the ED2+R model in the Tapajós, a 476 674 km2 river basin in the southeastern Amazon, Brazil. The results showed that the integration of ED2 with the lateral routing scheme results in an adequate representation (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency up to 0.76, Kling-Gupta efficiency up to 0.86, Pearson's R up to 0.88, and volume ratio up to 1.06) of daily to decadal river flow dynamics in the Tapajós. These results are a consistent step forward with respect to the no river representation common among terrestrial biosphere models, such as the initial version of ED2.

  2. Technical note: A hydrological routing scheme for the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2+R tested in the Tapajós River basin in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. Pereira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Land surface models are excellent tools for studying how climate change and land use affect surface hydrology. However, in order to assess the impacts of Earth processes on river flows, simulated changes in runoff need to be routed through the landscape. In this technical note, we describe the integration of the Ecosystem Demography (ED2 model with a hydrological routing scheme. The purpose of the study was to create a tool capable of incorporating to hydrological predictions the terrestrial ecosystem responses to climate, carbon dioxide, and land-use change, as simulated with terrestrial biosphere models. The resulting ED2+R model calculates the lateral routing of surface and subsurface runoff resulting from the terrestrial biosphere models' vertical water balance in order to determine spatiotemporal patterns of river flows within the simulated region. We evaluated the ED2+R model in the Tapajós, a 476 674 km2 river basin in the southeastern Amazon, Brazil. The results showed that the integration of ED2 with the lateral routing scheme results in an adequate representation (Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency up to 0.76, Kling–Gupta efficiency up to 0.86, Pearson's R up to 0.88, and volume ratio up to 1.06 of daily to decadal river flow dynamics in the Tapajós. These results are a consistent step forward with respect to the no river representation common among terrestrial biosphere models, such as the initial version of ED2.

  3. Black Hole Demography: From scaling relations to models

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed paper I review our current knowledge of the local Black Hole (BH) scaling relations, and their impact on the determination of the local BH mass function. I particularly emphasize the remaining systematic uncertainties impinging upon a secure determination of the BH mass function and how progress can be made. I then review and discuss the evidence for a different time evolution for separate BH-galaxy scaling relations, and how these independent empirical evidences can be reconciled with the overall evolution of the structural properties of the host galaxies. I conclude discussing BH demography in the context of semi-empirical continuity accretion models, as well as more complex evolutionary models, emphasizing the general constraints we can set on them.

  4. Complex Dynamics of Discrete SEIS Models with Simple Demography

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    Hui Cao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate bifurcations and dynamical behaviors of discrete SEIS models with exogenous reinfections and a variety of treatment strategies. Bifurcations identified from the models include period doubling, backward, forward-backward, and multiple backward bifurcations. Multiple attractors, such as bistability and tristability, are observed. We also estimate the ultimate boundary of the infected regardless of initial status. Our rigorously mathematical analysis together with numerical simulations show that epidemiological factors alone can generate complex dynamics, though demographic factors only support simple equilibrium dynamics. Our model analysis supports and urges to treat a fixed percentage of exposed individuals.

  5. Effect of infection age on an SIR epidemic model with demography on complex networks

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    Yang, Junyuan; Chen, Yuming

    2017-08-01

    For the long term population behavior, demography is a very important factor impacting the disease spread. Infection age also helps us better understand the process of the disease transmission. In this paper, we incorporate these two factors in an SIR epidemic model on complex networks. Through mathematical analysis, the basic reproduction number R0 is shown to be a sharp threshold to determine whether or not the disease spreads. Precisely, if R0 is less than 1 then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable while if R0 is larger than 1 then the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable. Some simulations are carried out to illustrate the theoretical results.

  6. A stand-alone demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models

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    Nieradzik, L. P.; Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Cook, G. D.; Briggs, P.; Roxburgh, S.; Liedloff, A.; Meyer, C.; Canadell, J.

    2013-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new approach for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any earth system model (Haverd et al., 2013). The approach is encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP). We demonstrate the behaviour and performance of POP coupled to the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange model (CABLE) for two contrasting applications: (i) to the Northern Australian Tropical Transect, featuring gradients in savanna vegetation cover, rainfall and fire disturbance and (ii) to a set of globally distributed forest locations coinciding with observations of forest biomass allometry. Along the Northern Australian Tropical Transect, CABLE-POP is able to simultaneously reproduce observation-based estimates of key functional and structural variables, namely gross primary production, tree foliage projective cover, basal area and maximum tree height. This application particularly demonstrates the ability of POP to quantify the contributions of drought and fire to tree mortality. Drought is manifested as an increase in mortality due to a decline in growth efficiency, while fires are treated as partial disturbance events, with tree mortality depending on tree size and fire intensity. In the application to global forests, POP is integrated with global forest data by calibrating it against paired observations of stem biomass and number density. The calibrated POP model is then coupled with CABLE and the coupled model is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 20 to 400 years. Results indicate that, in contrast to simulations from many global land surface models (Wolf et al., 2011), simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP, which can readily be coupled to the terrestrial carbon cycle

  7. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

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    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  8. Evolutionary demography of iteroparous plants: incorporating non-lethal costs of reproduction into integral projection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom E X; Williams, Jennifer L; Jongejans, Eelke; Brys, Rein; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2012-07-22

    Understanding the selective forces that shape reproductive strategies is a central goal of evolutionary ecology. Selection on the timing of reproduction is well studied in semelparous organisms because the cost of reproduction (death) can be easily incorporated into demographic models. Iteroparous organisms also exhibit delayed reproduction and experience reproductive costs, although these are not necessarily lethal. How non-lethal costs shape iteroparous life histories remains unresolved. We analysed long-term demographic data for the iteroparous orchid Orchis purpurea from two habitat types (light and shade). In both the habitats, flowering plants had lower growth rates and this cost was greater for smaller plants. We detected an additional growth cost of fruit production in the light habitat. We incorporated these non-lethal costs into integral projection models to identify the flowering size that maximizes fitness. In both habitats, observed flowering sizes were well predicted by the models. We also estimated optimal parameters for size-dependent flowering effort, but found a strong mismatch with the observed flower production. Our study highlights the role of context-dependent non-lethal reproductive costs as selective forces in the evolution of iteroparous life histories, and provides a novel and broadly applicable approach to studying the evolutionary demography of iteroparous organisms.

  9. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes, CLM4.5(ED)

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    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; Spessa, A.; Lawrence, D.; Bonan, G.

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties using the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leaf trait database. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked to each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments and the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.

  10. Demography in a new key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The widespread opinion that demography is lacking in theory is based in part on a particular view of the nature of scientific theory, generally known as logical empiricism [or positivism]. A newer school of philosophy of science, the model-based view, provides a different perspective on demography, one that enhances its status as a scientific discipline. From this perspective, much of formal demography can be seen as a collection of substantive models of population dynamics [how populations and cohorts behave], in short, theoretical knowledge. And many theories in behavioural demography - often discarded as too old or too simplistic - can be seen as perfectly good scientific theory, useful for many purposes, although often in need of more rigorous statement.

  11. An application of Data Assimilation to a dynamic global vegetation model: fusing CLM(ED) model results with streams of observed data

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    Massoud, Elias; Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Vrugt, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    We implement a data assimilation approach for a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM), named the CLM(ED) for its combined strengths of a Community Land Model (CLM) and an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept. This unique model combination allows for scaling the behavior of forest ecosystems by aggregating individual trees into representative "cohorts", and thus allows for the prediction of plant distribution (including stem distribution, mortality, and growth) directly from their given physiological traits. The model is constantly improving as it evolves, as less simple empirical models are used and more physically based ones are included to represent the physiological and biogeochemical processes taking place on the land-air surface. For example, very recently a mechanistic model simulating the photosynthetic capacity was implemented for a better representation of a leaf's nitrogen allocation. Some possible outputs of CLM(ED) include GPP, NPP, LAI, and interestingly, predictions of biome boundaries. In this study, we first conduct a global sensitivity analysis by estimating the range of model parameters from literature. Then, an application of Data Assimilation (DA) is introduced, where we attempt to fuse the model simulations with observed data, such as GPP. The updated system properties achieved through DA allow for better parameterization and more accurate overall predictions of vegetation dynamics. More importantly, this study addresses structural uncertainties within the model, and by combining model estimates with observed measurements, we aim to improve the overall representation of the underlying processes by explicitly pinpointing deficiencies in the model structure. We advocate the use of DA in Earth System Models for many reasons, including the direct benefit linked to the recent availability of ecological data sets, the efficient implementation within models thanks to improvements in computational power, and the proven ability of DA

  12. A stand-alone tree demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models: integration with global forest data

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    Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Nieradzik, L. P.; Briggs, P. R.

    2014-02-01

    Poorly constrained rates of biomass turnover are a key limitation of Earth system models (ESM). In light of this, we recently proposed a new approach encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP), for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. POP is suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any ESM. POP bridges the gap between first generation Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) with simple large-area parameterisations of woody biomass (typically used in current ESMs) and complex second generation DVMs, that explicitly simulate demographic processes and landscape heterogeneity of forests. The key simplification in the POP approach, compared with second-generation DVMs, is to compute physiological processes such as assimilation at grid-scale (with CABLE or a similar land surface model), but to partition the grid-scale biomass increment among age classes defined at sub grid-scale, each subject to its own dynamics. POP was successfully demonstrated along a savanna transect in northern Australia, replicating the effects of strong rainfall and fire disturbance gradients on observed stand productivity and structure. Here, we extend the application of POP to a range of forest types around the globe, employing paired observations of stem biomass and density from forest inventory data to calibrate model parameters governing stand demography and biomass evolution. The calibrated POP model is then coupled to the CABLE land surface model and the combined model (CABLE-POP) is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 3 to 200 yr. Results indicate that simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP represents a preferable alternative to large-area parameterisations of woody biomass turnover, typically used in current ESMs.

  13. A stand-alone tree demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models: integration with global forest data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Haverd

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Poorly constrained rates of biomass turnover are a key limitation of Earth system models (ESM. In light of this, we recently proposed a new approach encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP, for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. POP is suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any ESM. POP bridges the gap between first generation Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs with simple large-area parameterisations of woody biomass (typically used in current ESMs and complex second generation DVMs, that explicitly simulate demographic processes and landscape heterogeneity of forests. The key simplification in the POP approach, compared with second-generation DVMs, is to compute physiological processes such as assimilation at grid-scale (with CABLE or a similar land surface model, but to partition the grid-scale biomass increment among age classes defined at sub grid-scale, each subject to its own dynamics. POP was successfully demonstrated along a savanna transect in northern Australia, replicating the effects of strong rainfall and fire disturbance gradients on observed stand productivity and structure. Here, we extend the application of POP to a range of forest types around the globe, employing paired observations of stem biomass and density from forest inventory data to calibrate model parameters governing stand demography and biomass evolution. The calibrated POP model is then coupled to the CABLE land surface model and the combined model (CABLE-POP is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 3 to 200 yr. Results indicate that simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP represents a preferable alternative to large-area parameterisations of woody biomass turnover, typically used in current ESMs.

  14. Disciplining anthropological demography

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    Sara Randall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study furthers the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. Firstly we situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Secondly, in order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography. Finally, we flesh out some of the epistemological and theoretical debates about anthropological demography by sketching out the formative research process of our own work on low fertility in the UK.

  15. Crossroads of demography

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    Devedžić Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the 50th anniversary of the Stanovništvo (Population journal, launched by the Center for demographic research in Belgrade in 1963. The anniversary is an opportunity to reflect on developments and trends in demography as a discipline, thus the paper points out certain specifics of these developments. The specifics discussed mirror the author's choice, which was guided primarily by the criterion of interestingness, but also by the intention to make a survey. Hence points about the development of demography are backed by insights made by a number of other demographers. The major source of references were papers and speeches given on similar occasions - anniversaries of journals, anniversaries of associations of demographers, as well as special issues of journals dedicated to theory and methodology. Certain points are also made based on other sources of reference. The major part of the paper is related to transformations of demography, which has started as a predominantly formal discipline and has developed into a social and interdisciplinary field. Topical and methodological expansion of demography induces mixed reactions among demographers. Ones welcome its diversification, whereas others see such changes as signs of abandoning the essence of demography. This makes it harder and harder to define the area of demographic research. Changes in demography are mostly studied from the standpoint of polarized dimensions: quantitative-qualitative, macro-micro, and, in the context of diversification, formal demography vs. population studies. Another important segment of development trends in demography is that of improving its vocabulary, which is affected by other fields related to demography. Terminological changes are also related to the specification of certain branches and subfields of demography. For instance, anthropological and spatial demography have roots in earlier development phases of demography. Still, these terms

  16. Health demography comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R K; Pol, L G

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. health care industry has been hampered in the development of a mature marketing function in part due to characteristics unique to the industry. These characteristics include a lack of market data, poorly developed market research techniques, and a poor understanding of consumer behavior within the industry. Some of the deficiencies are being addressed through the development of an emerging field that is being referred to as "health demography." Health demography and those who have begun to refer to themselves as health demographers are drawing from the fields of demography, epidemiology, biostatistics, and the social sciences to formulate a new discipline uniquely related to the needs of today's health care marketers and planners. Those involved with health demography are developing databases and models for application to concrete problems in health care delivery. The development of this field is contributing to the advancement of the state of marketing in health care and serving to reduce many of the barriers that have retarded the development of a mature marketing function within the health care industry.

  17. Bayesian salamanders: analysing the demography of an underground population of the European plethodontid Speleomantes strinatii with state-space modelling

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    Salvidio Sebastiano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that Plethodontid salamanders are excellent candidates for indicating ecosystem health. However, detailed, long-term data sets of their populations are rare, limiting our understanding of the demographic processes underlying their population fluctuations. Here we present a demographic analysis based on a 1996 - 2008 data set on an underground population of Speleomantes strinatii (Aellen in NW Italy. We utilised a Bayesian state-space approach allowing us to parameterise a stage-structured Lefkovitch model. We used all the available population data from annual temporary removal experiments to provide us with the baseline data on the numbers of juveniles, subadults and adult males and females present at any given time. Results Sampling the posterior chains of the converged state-space model gives us the likelihood distributions of the state-specific demographic rates and the associated uncertainty of these estimates. Analysing the resulting parameterised Lefkovitch matrices shows that the population growth is very close to 1, and that at population equilibrium we expect half of the individuals present to be adults of reproductive age which is what we also observe in the data. Elasticity analysis shows that adult survival is the key determinant for population growth. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates how an understanding of population demography can be gained from structured population data even in a case where following marked individuals over their whole lifespan is not practical.

  18. A micro-simulation model of firms : Applications of concepts of the demography of the firm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, L

    Recently, there is an increasing demand in spatial planning for models based on the demographic concepts of birth and death of firms. This article describes the structure of a spatial demographic simulation model of firms, and its application within The Netherlands. The model structure is

  19. Inference for Size Demography from Point Pattern Data using Integral Projection Models.

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    Ghosh, Souparno; Gelfand, Alan E; Clark, James S

    2012-12-01

    Population dynamics with regard to evolution of traits has typically been studied using matrix projection models (MPMs). Recently, to work with continuous traits, integral projection models (IPMs) have been proposed. Imitating the path with MPMs, IPMs are handled first with a fitting stage, then with a projection stage. Fitting these models has so far been done only with individual-level transition data. These data are used to estimate the demographic functions (survival, growth, fecundity) that comprise the kernel of the IPM specification. Then, the estimated kernel is iterated from an initial trait distribution to project steady state population behavior under this kernel. When trait distributions are observed over time, such an approach does not align projected distributions with these observed temporal benchmarks. The contribution here, focusing on size distributions, is to address this issue. Our concern is that the above approach introduces an inherent mismatch in scales. The redistribution kernel in the IPM proposes a mechanistic description of population level redistribution. A kernel of the same functional form, fitted to data at the individual level, would provide a mechanistic model for individual-level processes. Resulting parameter estimates and the associated estimated kernel are at the wrong scale and do not allow population-level interpretation. Our approach views the observed size distribution at a given time as a point pattern over a bounded interval. We build a three-stage hierarchical model to infer about the dynamic intensities used to explain the observed point patterns. This model is driven by a latent deterministic IPM and we introduce uncertainty by having the operating IPM vary around this deterministic specification. Further uncertainty arises in the realization of the point pattern given the operating IPM. Fitted within a Bayesian framework, such modeling enables full inference about all features of the model. Such dynamic modeling

  20. A spatial interpretation of the density dependence model in industrial demography

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    van Wissen, L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the density dependence model, which was developed in organizational ecology, is compared to the economic-geographical notion of agglomeration economies. There is a basic resemblance: both involve some form of positive feedback between size of the population and growth. The paper explor

  1. A spatial interpretation of the density dependence model in industrial demography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the density dependence model, which was developed in organizational ecology, is compared to the economic-geographical notion of agglomeration economies. There is a basic resemblance: both involve some form of positive feedback between size of the population and growth. The paper explor

  2. A spatial interpretation of the density dependence model in industrial demography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the density dependence model, which was developed in organizational ecology, is compared to the economic-geographical notion of agglomeration economies. There is a basic resemblance: both involve some form of positive feedback between size of the population and growth. The paper

  3. I-STEM Ed Exemplar: Implementation of the PIRPOSAL Model

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    Wells, John G.

    2016-01-01

    The opening pages of the first PIRPOSAL (Problem Identification, Ideation, Research, Potential Solutions, Optimization, Solution Evaluation, Alterations, and Learned Outcomes) article make the case that the instructional models currently used in K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education fall short of conveying their…

  4. Demography, foreclosure, and crime:: Assessing spatial heterogeneity in contemporary models of neighborhood crime rates

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    Eric P. Baumer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present research evaluates the possibility of spatial heterogeneity in the effects on neighborhood crime rates of both traditional demographic indicators - immigrant concentration, racial composition, socioeconomic disadvantage, and residential instability - and a contemporary aspect of housing transition - foreclosure - that has garnered significant attention in recent scholarship. OBJECTIVE This research advances previous research by explicitly assessing the merits of the typical "global" or "one size fits all" approach that has been applied in most neighborhood studies of demographic context and neighborhood crime rates by juxtaposing it against an alternative strategy - geographically weighted regression (GWR - that highlights the potentially significant "local" variability in model parameters. We assess the local variation of these relationships for census tracts within the city of Chicago. METHODS This paper utilizes GWR to test for spatial heterogeneity in the effects of demographic context and other predictors on neighborhood crime rates. We map local parameter estimates and t-values generated from the GWR models to highlight some of the patterns of demographic context observed in our analysis. CONCLUSIONS GWR results indicate significant variation across Chicago census tracts in the estimates of logged percent black, immigrant concentration, and foreclosure for both robbery and burglary rates. The observed effects of socioeconomic disadvantage on robbery rates and residential stability on burglary rates also are found to vary across local neighborhood clusters in Chicago. Visual inspection of these effects illuminates the importance of supplementing current approaches by "thinking locally" when developing theoretical explanations and empirical models of how demographic context shapes crime rates.

  5. Demography of a reintroduced population: moving toward management models for an endangered species, the whooping crane

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    Servanty, Sabrina; Converse, Sarah J.; Bailey, Larissa L.

    2014-01-01

    The reintroduction of threatened and endangered species is now a common method for reestablishing populations. Typically, a fundamental objective of reintroduction is to establish a self-sustaining population. Estimation of demographic parameters in reintroduced populations is critical, as these estimates serve multiple purposes. First, they support evaluation of progress toward the fundamental objective via construction of population viability analyses (PVAs) to predict metrics such as probability of persistence. Second, PVAs can be expanded to support evaluation of management actions, via management modeling. Third, the estimates themselves can support evaluation of the demographic performance of the reintroduced population, e.g., via comparison with wild populations. For each of these purposes, thorough treatment of uncertainties in the estimates is critical. Recently developed statistical methods - namely, hierarchical Bayesian implementations of state-space models - allow for effective integration of different types of uncertainty in estimation. We undertook a demographic estimation effort for a reintroduced population of endangered whooping cranes with the purpose of ultimately developing a Bayesian PVA for determining progress toward establishing a self-sustaining population, and for evaluating potential management actions via a Bayesian PVA-based management model. We evaluated individual and temporal variation in demographic parameters based upon a multi-state mark-recapture model. We found that survival was relatively high across time and varied little by sex. There was some indication that survival varied by release method. Survival was similar to that observed in the wild population. Although overall reproduction in this reintroduced population is poor, birds formed social pairs when relatively young, and once a bird was in a social pair, it had a nearly 50% chance of nesting the following breeding season. Also, once a bird had nested, it had a high

  6. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-11-14

    Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions--native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level--and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of the Impact of Hospital Occupancy: When Do Dwindling Hospital Beds Cause ED Gridlock?

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    Lori Whelan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The time emergency department (ED patients spend from presentation to admittance is known as their length of stay (LOS. This study aimed to quantify the inpatient occupancy rate (InptOcc/ED LOS relationship and develop a methodology for identifying resource-allocation triggers using InptOcc-LOS association-curve inflection points. Methods. This study was conducted over 200 consecutive days at a 700-bed hospital with an annual ED census of approximately 50,000 using multivariate spline (piecewise regression to model the InptOcc/LOS relationship while adjusting for confounding covariates. Nonlinear modeling was used to assess for InptOcc/LOS associations and determine the inflection point where InptOcc profoundly impacted LOS. Results. At lower InptOcc, there was no association. Once InptOcc reached ≥88%, there was a strong InptOcc/LOS association; each 1% InptOcc increase predicted a 16-minute (95% CI, 12–20 minutes LOS prolongation, while the confounder-adjusted analysis showed each 1% InptOcc increase >89% precipitating a 13-minute (95% CI, 10–16 minutes LOS prolongation. Conclusions. The study hospital’s InptOcc was a significant predictor of prolonged ED LOS beyond the identified inflection point. Spline regression analysis identified a clear inflection point in the InptOcc-LOS curve that potentially identified a point at which to optimize inpatient bed availability to prevent increased costs of prolonged LOS.

  8. A stand-alone tree demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models: integration with inventory data from temperate and boreal forests

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    Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Nieradzik, L. P.; Briggs, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    Poorly constrained rates of biomass turnover are a key limitation of Earth system models (ESMs). In light of this, we recently proposed a new approach encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP), for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. POP is suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any ESM. POP bridges the gap between first-generation dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) with simple large-area parameterisations of woody biomass (typically used in current ESMs) and complex second-generation DVMs that explicitly simulate demographic processes and landscape heterogeneity of forests. The key simplification in the POP approach, compared with second-generation DVMs, is to compute physiological processes such as assimilation at grid-scale (with CABLE (Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange) or a similar land surface model), but to partition the grid-scale biomass increment among age classes defined at sub-grid-scale, each subject to its own dynamics. POP was successfully demonstrated along a savanna transect in northern Australia, replicating the effects of strong rainfall and fire disturbance gradients on observed stand productivity and structure. Here, we extend the application of POP to wide-ranging temporal and boreal forests, employing paired observations of stem biomass and density from forest inventory data to calibrate model parameters governing stand demography and biomass evolution. The calibrated POP model is then coupled to the CABLE land surface model, and the combined model (CABLE-POP) is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 3 to 200 year. Results indicate that simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP represents an ecologically plausible and efficient alternative to large-area parameterisations of woody

  9. The anthropological demography of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Hutter

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a collection of related research studies on the anthropological demography of Europe. Anthropological demography is a specialty within demography that uses anthropological theory and methods to provide a better understanding of demographic phenomena in current and past populations. Its genesis and ongoing growth lies at the intersection of demography and socio-cultural anthropology and with their efforts to understand population processes: mainly fertility, migration, and mortality. Both disciplines share a common research subject, namely human populations, and they focus on mutually complementary aspects. The authors of this paper focus on the differences between the disciplines of anthropology and demography, the emergence of anthropological demography and its theoretical, methodological, and empirical aspects. In addition, they critically summarize the contributions that were presented in the first workshop of the Working Group on Anthropological Demography of Europe of the European Association for Population Studies, held in Rostock in Fall 2005 and reflect on how these papers add to the further development of anthropological demography in Europe, i.e. elaborating the epistemology of anthropological demography; applying additional theoretical perspectives to better understand demographic behaviour in Europe ; illustrating the way in which culture plays a role in case studies on European demographic behaviour; and emphasizing the need for a holistic approach to data collection and the added value of triangulating quantitative and qualitative analyses.

  10. Anthropology and demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an outline of the relationship between anthropology and demography, sometimes depicted as "long, tortured, often ambivalent, and sometimes passionate." Although early anthropologists (primarily British social anthropologists routinely made use of demographic data, especially in their studies of kinship, the two disciplines gradually drifted away from each other. The re-approachment took place from 1960s, and the last fifteen years saw more intensive cooperation and more insights about possible mutual benefits that could be achieved through combining of methodologies and revision of some theoretical assumptions, primarily through anthropological demography. As summarized by Laura Bernardi and Inge Hutter, "Anthropological demography is a specialty within demography that uses anthropological theory and methods to provide a better understanding of demographic phenomena in current and past populations. Its genesis and ongoing growth lies at the intersection of demography and socio-cultural anthropology and with their efforts to understand population processes: mainly fertility, migration, and mortality. Both disciplines share a common research subject, namely human populations, and they focus on mutually complementary aspects" (2007: 541. In the first part of the paper, the author presents some general considerations, like the one that "demography is one of the best understood and predictable parts of human behavior, even if demographers still find themselves unable to predict accurately when parameters will change in interesting ways, such as the ′the baby boom′ or the shift to later childbeanng in the 1970s and 1980s North America" (Howell, 1986: 219. Nancy Howell also noted the importance of demographic anthropology, because, in her words "if we knew, reliably, the birth and death probability schedules of particular populations, we would know a great deal about their size, age composition, growth rate. And with just a

  11. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  12. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-18

    This poster is based on the paper of the same name, presented at the IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting, July18, 2016. Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions - native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level - and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  13. Interaction between ungulates and bruchid beetles and its effect on Acacia trees: modeling the costs and benefits of seed dispersal to plant demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Wiegand, Kerstin; Ward, David

    2011-09-01

    Integrative studies of plant-animal interactions that incorporate the multiple effects of interactions are important for discerning the importance of each factor within the population dynamics of a plant species. The low regeneration capacity of many Acacia species in arid savannas is a consequence of a combination of reduction in seed dispersal and high seed predation. Here we studied how ungulates (acting as both seed dispersers and herbivores) and bruchid beetles (post-dispersal seed predators) modulate the population dynamics of A. raddiana, a keystone species in the Middle East. We developed two simulation models of plant demography: the first included seed ingestion by ungulates and seed predation by bruchids, whereas the second model additionally incorporated herbivory by ungulates. We also included the interacting effects of seed removal and body mass, because larger ungulates destroy proportionally fewer seeds and enhance seed germination. Simulations showed that the negative effect of seed predation on acacia population size was compensated for by the positive effect of seed ingestion at 50 and 30% seed removal under scenarios with and without herbivory, respectively. Smaller ungulates (e.g., seeds than larger ungulates (e.g., >250 kg) to compensate for the negative effect of seed predation. Seedling proportion increased with seed removal in the model with herbivory. Managing and restoring acacia seed dispersers is key to conserving acacia populations, because low-to-medium seed removal could quickly restore their regeneration capacity.

  14. Enforcement of Mask Rule Compliance in Model-Based OPC'ed Layouts during Data Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Dirk H.; Vuletic, Radovan; Seidl, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    Currently available commercial model-based OPC tools do not always generate layouts which are mask rule compliant. Additional processing is required to remove mask rule violations, which are often too numerous for manual patching. Although physical verification tools can be used to remove simple mask rule violations, the results are often unsatisfactory for more complicated geometrical configurations. The subject of this paper is the development and application of a geometrical processing engine that automatically enforces mask rule compliance of the OPC'ed layout. It is designed as an add-on to a physical verification tool. The engine constructs patches, which remove mask rule violations such as notches or width violations. By employing a Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) optimization method, the edges of each patch are placed in a way that avoids secondary violations while modifying the OPC'ed layout as little as possible. A sequence of enforcement steps is applied to the layout to remove all types of mask rule violations. This approach of locally confined minimal layout modifications retains OPC corrections to a maximum amount. This method has been used successfully in production on a variety of DRAM designs for the non-array regions.

  15. The probability of epidemic fade-out is non-monotonic in transmission rate for the Markovian SIR model with demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, P G; Bean, N G; Ross, J V

    2016-03-21

    Epidemic fade-out refers to infection elimination in the trough between the first and second waves of an outbreak. The number of infectious individuals drops to a relatively low level between these waves of infection, and if elimination does not occur at this stage, then the disease is likely to become endemic. For this reason, it appears to be an ideal target for control efforts. Despite this obvious public health importance, the probability of epidemic fade-out is not well understood. Here we present new algorithms for approximating the probability of epidemic fade-out for the Markovian SIR model with demography. These algorithms are more accurate than previously published formulae, and one of them scales well to large population sizes. This method allows us to investigate the probability of epidemic fade-out as a function of the effective transmission rate, recovery rate, population turnover rate, and population size. We identify an interesting feature: the probability of epidemic fade-out is very often greatest when the basic reproduction number, R0, is approximately 2 (restricting consideration to cases where a major outbreak is possible, i.e., R0>1). The public health implication is that there may be instances where a non-lethal infection should be allowed to spread, or antiviral usage should be moderated, to maximise the chance of the infection being eliminated before it becomes endemic.

  16. [Demography and human ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, J M

    1993-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century the German biologist Ernest Haekel was the first scientist to use the term ecology, which was defined as the study of relationships of organisms or groups of organisms with the environment and indicated the interdependence of the living world, including plants, animals, and humans. This concept also indicates a continuous process of adaptation of organisms to their external environment. The basic concepts of scientific ecology, which developed at the end of the 19th century, can be attributed to Darwin: the relationships between living beings and the notion of the process of adaptation to their environment. The term human ecology appeared in the early 1920s. Human ecology embodies fundamental ideas: biotype, habitat, community, biocenosis, ecosystem, biomass, interchange and equilibrium, and circulation of energy. The accumulated knowledge about human ecology is broken down using the criteria of topography (ecology of humid forests, deserts, lakes, etc.); followed by the appearance of species; and the variants of classical division: auto ecology (influence of external factors on living beings) and sinecology (the study of groups of associated organisms, i.e., natural, animal, and vegetation communities). The species are considered on the basis of equality or sinecology (all of them have the same interests), while in human ecology a species is determined by its relation to a reference group--autoecology or anthropocentric ecology. In 1911, J. Thompson bridged the gap between biological knowledge and social sciences; in 1921, H. Barrows identified human ecology as a component of geography; in 1925, L. Bernard presented the classification of ecosystems; and in 1936, Ezra Park published his work, Human Ecology, followed in 1945 by the emergence of the Chicago school. Demography and human ecology are intimately connected because population is the result of natural and migratory movements, therefore the two sciences require a methodology

  17. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  18. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions--native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level--and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  19. The role of demography, intra-species variation, and species distribution models in species’ projections under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swab, Rebecca Marie; Regan, Helen M.; Matthies, Diethart

    2015-01-01

    Organisms are projected to shift their distribution ranges under climate change. The typical way to assess range shifts is by species distribution models (SDMs), which predict species’ responses to climate based solely on projected climatic suitability. However, life history traits can impact spe...

  20. Demography, growth, and inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierau, J.O.; Turnovsky, S.J.

    We extend the single-sector endogenous growth model to allow for a general demographic structure. The model shows that due to the "generational turnover term," the equilibrium growth rate is less than that of a representative agent model. We find the local dynamics about the balanced growth path

  1. Modeling and analysis of the EDS Maglev system with the Halbach magnet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonsuk

    The magnetic field analysis based on the wavelet transform is performed. The Halbach array magnetic field analysis has been studied using many methods such as magnetic scalar potential, magnetic vector potential, Fourier analysis and Finite Element Methods. But these analyses cannot identify a transient oscillation at the beginning stage of levitation. The wavelet transform is used for analyzing the transient oscillatory response of an EDS Maglev system. The proposed scheme explains the under-damped dynamics that results from the cradle's dynamic response to the irregular distribution of the magnetic field. It suggests this EDS Maglev system that responds to a vertical repulsive force could be subject to such instability at the beginning stage of a low levitation height. The proposed method is useful in analyzing instabilities at the beginning stage of levitation height. A controller for the EDS maglev system with the Halbach array magnet is designed for the beginning stage of levitation and after reaching the defined levitation height. To design a controller for the EDS system, two different stages are suggested. Before the object reaches a stable position and after it has reached a stable position. A stable position can be referred to as a nominal height. The former is the stage I and the latter is the stage II. At the stage I, to achieve a nominal height the robust controller is investigated. At the stage II, both translational and rotational motions are considered for the control design. To maintain system stability, damping control as well as LQR control are performed. The proposed method is helpful to understand system dynamics and achieve system stability.

  2. A novel method to establish a rat ED model using internal iliac artery ligation combined with hyperlipidemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate a novel method, namely using bilateral internal iliac artery ligation combined with a high-fat diet (BCH, for establishing a rat model of erectile dysfunction (ED that, compared to classical approaches, more closely mimics the chronic pathophysiology of human ED after acute ischemic insult. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty 4-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly placed into five groups (n = 8 per group: normal control (NC, bilateral internal iliac artery ligation (BIIAL, high-fat diet (HFD, BCH, and mock surgery (MS. All rats were induced for 12 weeks. Copulatory behavior, intracavernosal pressure (ICP, ICP/mean arterial pressure, hematoxylin-eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining, serum lipid levels, and endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemical staining of the cavernous smooth muscle and endothelium were assessed. Data were analyzed by SAS 8.0 for Windows. RESULTS: Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the HFD and BCH groups than the NC and MS groups. High density lipoprotein levels were significantly lower in the HFD and BCH groups than the NC and MS groups. The ICP values and mount and intromission numbers were significantly lower in the BIIAL, HFD, and BCH groups than in the NC and MS groups. ICP was significantly lower in the BCH group than in the BIIAL and HFD groups. Cavernous smooth muscle and endothelial damage increased in the HFD and BCH groups. Cavernous smooth muscle to collagen ratio, nNOS and eNOS staining decreased significantly in the BIIAL, HFD, and BCH groups compared to the NC and MS groups. CONCLUSIONS: The novel BCH model mimics the chronic pathophysiology of ED in humans and avoids the drawbacks of traditional ED models.

  3. Demography of the Vegetable Ivory Palm Phytelephas seemannii in Colombia, and the Impact of Seed Harvesting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodrigo Bernal

    1998-01-01

    1. The demography of the vegetable ivory palm Phytelephas seemannii was studied on the Pacific coast of Colombia and a female-based matrix model was used to determine the proportion of seed that can...

  4. The demography of famine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, P

    1987-01-01

    crisis. Hugo (1984) elaborated on the Bongaarts and Cain model, providing a typology of community and individual responses to famine, emphasizing particularly demographic responses. Hugo maintains that in recent famines in 3rd world nations evidence exists that permanent and temporary migration movements have been the most widespread and significant of contemporary adjustments to famine. The Karnataka study also provides support for the Bongaarts and Cain hypothesis that a famine-prone environment encourages high fertility. The data from China tend to support the Bongaarts and Cain model of demographic responses to famine.

  5. Modeling environmental influences on child growth in the MAL-ED cohort study: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Stephanie A; McCormick, Benjamin J J; Miller, Mark A; Caulfield, Laura E; Checkley, William

    2014-11-01

    Although genetics, maternal undernutrition and low birth weight status certainly play a role in child growth, dietary insufficiency and infectious diseases are key risk factors for linear growth faltering during early childhood. A primary goal of the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is to identify specific risk factors associated with growth faltering during the first 2 years of life; however, growth in early childhood is challenging to characterize because growth may be inherently nonlinear with age. In this manuscript, we describe some methods for analyzing longitudinal growth to evaluate both short- and long-term associations between risk factors and growth trajectories over the first 2 years of life across 8 resource-limited settings using harmonized protocols. We expect there will be enough variability within and between sites in the prevalence of risk factors and burden of linear growth faltering to allow us to distinguish some of the key pathways to linear growth faltering in the MAL-ED study.

  6. SmEdA vibro-acoustic modelling in the mid-frequency range including the effect of dissipative treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H. D.; Maxit, L.; Ege, K.; Gerges, Y.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2017-04-01

    Vibro-acoustic simulation in the mid-frequency range is of interest for automotive and truck constructors. The dissipative treatments used for noise and vibration control such as viscoelastic patches and acoustic absorbing materials must be taken into account in the problem. The Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis (SmEdA) model consists in extending Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to the mid-frequency range by establishing power balance equations between the modes of the different subsystems. The modal basis of uncoupled-subsystems that can be estimated by the finite element method in the mid-frequency range is used as input data. SmEdA was originally developed by considering constant modal damping factors for each subsystem. However, this means that it cannot describe the local distribution of dissipative materials. To overcome this issue, a methodology is proposed here to take into account the effect of these materials. This methodology is based on the finite element models of the subsystems that include well-known homogenized material models of dissipative treatments. The Galerkin method with subsystem normal modes is used to estimate the modal damping loss factors. Cross-modal coupling terms which appear in the formulation due to the dissipative materials are assumed to be negligible. An approximation of the energy sharing between the subsystems damped by dissipative materials is then described by SmEdA. The different steps of the method are validated experimentally by applying it to a laboratory test case composed of a plate-cavity system with different configurations of dissipative treatments. The comparison between the experimental and the simulation results shows good agreement in the mid-frequency range.

  7. U. Blossing, G. Imsen & L. Moos (eds., The Nordic Education Model: ´A School for All´ Encounters Noe-Liberal Policy (Dordrecht: Springer, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Þorlákur Axel Jónsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Book review of: Blossing, G. Imsen & L. Moos (eds, The Nordic Education Model: ´A School for All´ Encounters Noe-Liberal Policy (Dordrecht: Springer, Policy Implications of Research in Education 1, 2014

  8. Enhanced understanding of the relationship between erection and satisfaction in ED treatment: application of a longitudinal mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmakin, A G; Cappelleri, J C; Symonds, T; Stecher, V J

    2014-01-01

    To apportion the direct effect and the indirect effect (through erections) that sildenafil (vs placebo) has on individual satisfaction and couple satisfaction over time, longitudinal mediation modeling was applied to outcomes on the Sexual Experience Questionnaire. The model included data from weeks 4 and 10 (double-blind phase) and week 16 (open-label phase) of a controlled study. Data from 167 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) were available for analysis. Estimation of statistical significance was based on bootstrap simulations, which allowed inferences at and between time points. Percentages (and corresponding 95% confidence intervals) for direct and indirect effects of treatment were calculated using the model. For the individual satisfaction and couple satisfaction domains, direct treatment effects were negligible (not statistically significant) whereas indirect treatment effects via the erection domain represented >90% of the treatment effects (statistically significant). Week 4 vs week 10 percentages of direct and indirect effects were not statistically different, indicating that the mediation effects are longitudinally invariant. As there was no placebo arm in the open-label phase, mediation effects at week 16 were not estimable. In conclusion, erection has a crucial role as a mediator in restoring individual satisfaction and couple satisfaction in men with ED treated with sildenafil.

  9. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between

  10. Introducing the new business demography statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Introducing the new business demography statisticsA new National Statistics series waspublished on 28 November 2008 bythe Offi ce for National Statistics (ONS),providing data on business births,deaths and survival rates, called BusinessDemography: Enterprise Births andDeaths. The Department for Business,Enterprise & Regulatory Reform (BERR)also published its series Business start upsand closures: VAT registrations andde-registrations in 2007 on the sameday. The year 2008 is the final update t...

  11. Bayesian demography 250 years after Bayes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijak, Jakub; Bryant, John

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian statistics offers an alternative to classical (frequentist) statistics. It is distinguished by its use of probability distributions to describe uncertain quantities, which leads to elegant solutions to many difficult statistical problems. Although Bayesian demography, like Bayesian statistics more generally, is around 250 years old, only recently has it begun to flourish. The aim of this paper is to review the achievements of Bayesian demography, address some misconceptions, and make the case for wider use of Bayesian methods in population studies. We focus on three applications: demographic forecasts, limited data, and highly structured or complex models. The key advantages of Bayesian methods are the ability to integrate information from multiple sources and to describe uncertainty coherently. Bayesian methods also allow for including additional (prior) information next to the data sample. As such, Bayesian approaches are complementary to many traditional methods, which can be productively re-expressed in Bayesian terms.

  12. Statistical methods with applications to demography and life insurance

    CERN Document Server

    Khmaladze, Estáte V

    2013-01-01

    Suitable for statisticians, mathematicians, actuaries, and students interested in the problems of insurance and analysis of lifetimes, Statistical Methods with Applications to Demography and Life Insurance presents contemporary statistical techniques for analyzing life distributions and life insurance problems. It not only contains traditional material but also incorporates new problems and techniques not discussed in existing actuarial literature. The book mainly focuses on the analysis of an individual life and describes statistical methods based on empirical and related processes. Coverage ranges from analyzing the tails of distributions of lifetimes to modeling population dynamics with migrations. To help readers understand the technical points, the text covers topics such as the Stieltjes, Wiener, and Itô integrals. It also introduces other themes of interest in demography, including mixtures of distributions, analysis of longevity and extreme value theory, and the age structure of a population. In addi...

  13. Modeling the Integrated Expansion of the Canadian and U.S. Power Sectors with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibanez, Eduardo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, Donna [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eurek, Kelly [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-02

    This document describes the development effort for creating a robust representation of the combined capacity expansion of the U.S. and Canadian electric sectors within the NREL ReEDS model. Thereafter, it demonstrates the newly established capability through an illustrative sensitivity analysis. In conducting the sensitivity analysis, we describe the value of an integrated modeling approach.

  14. Application of ED-optimality to screening experiments for analgesic compounds in an experimental model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, A; Nyberg, J; de Lange, E C M; Danhof, M; Della Pasqua, O

    2012-12-01

    In spite of the evidence regarding high variability in the response to evoked pain, little attention has been paid to its impact on the screening of drugs for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study, we explore the feasibility of introducing optimality concepts to experimental protocols, enabling estimation of parameter and model uncertainty. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic data from different experiments in rats were pooled and modelled using nonlinear mixed effects modelling. Pain data on gabapentin and placebo-treated animals were generated in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of neuropathic pain. A logistic regression model was applied to optimise sampling times and dose levels to be used in an experimental protocol. Drug potency (EC(50)) and interindividual variability (IIV) were considered the parameters of interest. Different experimental designs were tested and validated by SSE (stochastic simulation and estimation) taking into account relevant exposure ranges. The pharmacokinetics of gabapentin was described by a two-compartment PK model with first order absorption (CL = 0.159 l h(-1), V(2) = 0.118 l, V(3) = 0.253 l, Ka = 0.26 h(-1), Q = 1.22 l h(-1)). Drug potency (EC(50)) for the anti-allodynic effects was estimated to be 1400 ng ml(-1). Protocol optimisation improved bias and precision of the EC50 by 6 and 11.9. %, respectively, whilst IIV estimates showed improvement of 31.89 and 14.91 %, respectively. Our results show that variability in behavioural models of evoked pain response leads to uncertainty in drug potency estimates, with potential impact on the ranking of compounds during screening. As illustrated for gabapentin, ED-optimality concepts enable analysis of discrete data taking into account experimental constraints.

  15. Spending and Growth: A Modi fi ed Debt to GDP Dynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Yanushevsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses a topical issue – how expansionary fiscal policy affects the debt to GDP ratio. It examines whether the projected future economic growth (stimulated by government spending is sustained with the resulting national debt. It is discussedif government investment in infrastructure is an effective approach to boost the economy in times of economic downturn. The authors develop the debt to GDP ratio dynamics model and perform a series of simulations (based on US data to forecast the evolution of the debt to GDP ratio over a 10-year horizon. It is shown that for the data characterizing the current state of the U.S. economy the government investment in infrastructure cannot decrease the debt to GDP ratio.

  16. Inform@ed space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Peter; Olsen, Kasper Nefer

    2001-01-01

    Inform@ed space Sensorial Perception And Computer Enchancement - bidrag til Nordisk Arkitekturforskningsforenings IT-konference, AAA april 2001.......Inform@ed space Sensorial Perception And Computer Enchancement - bidrag til Nordisk Arkitekturforskningsforenings IT-konference, AAA april 2001....

  17. Himalayan Households, Tamang Demography and Domestic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Prasad Sapkota

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thomes E. Fricke 1981, Himalayan Households, Tamang Demography and Domestic Process, Book Faith India, 1993 ( pp 227 Price 300 Rs DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v3i0.2789 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.3 2009 201-206

  18. Demography of European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Rob G.; Vermeulen, Minou; Hemerik, Lia; Klok, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Bijlsma R.G., Vermeulen M., Hemerik L. & Klok C. 2012. Demography of European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus. Ardea 100: 163-177. We set out to explore whether changes in fecundity and survival (or both) of European Honey Buzzards were associated with trends observed in The Netherlands. We used stan

  19. Cholesterol as a factor regulating the influence of natural (PAF and lysoPAF) vs synthetic (ED) ether lipids on model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have performed a comparative study on the effect of antineoplastic ether lipid-edelfosine (ED), its natural analogs - Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) and its precursor (lyso-PAF), both lacking anticancer properties, on cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine (Chol/PC) monolayers, serving as model membranes. Since all the above ether lipids are membrane active, it can be expected that their effect on membranes may differentiate their biological activity. Our investigations were aimed at studying potential relationship of the effect of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF on model membranes, differing in condensation. We have modified molecular packing of Chol/PC model systems either by increasing the level of sterol in the system or changing the structure of PC, while keeping the same sterol content. Additionally, we have performed a detailed comparison of the miscibility of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with various membrane lipids. The collected data evidenced that all the investigated ether lipids influence Chol/PC films in the same way; however, in a different magnitude. Moreover, the interactions of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with model membranes were the strongest at the highest level of sterol in the system. A thorough analysis of the obtained results has proved that the effect of the investigated ether lipids on membranes is not dependent on the condensation of the system, but it is strongly determined by the concentration of cholesterol. Since ED was found to interact with model membranes stronger than PAF and lyso-PAF, we have suggested that this fact may contribute to differences in cytotoxicity of these compounds.

  20. A comment on Thomas K. Burch's paper "Does demography need differential equations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of this commentary is as follows. First I discuss differential equations and show that they are more common in demography than is generally accepted, and that they can be used to develop theories of population dynamics. The integration of mathematical modeling with differential

  1. Extrapolating demography with climate, proximity and phylogeny: approach with caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Shaun R; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Csergő, Anna M; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2016-12-01

    Plant population responses are key to understanding the effects of threats such as climate change and invasions. However, we lack demographic data for most species, and the data we have are often geographically aggregated. We determined to what extent existing data can be extrapolated to predict population performance across larger sets of species and spatial areas. We used 550 matrix models, across 210 species, sourced from the COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database, to model how climate, geographic proximity and phylogeny predicted population performance. Models including only geographic proximity and phylogeny explained 5-40% of the variation in four key metrics of population performance. However, there was poor extrapolation between species and extrapolation was limited to geographic scales smaller than those at which landscape scale threats typically occur. Thus, demographic information should only be extrapolated with caution. Capturing demography at scales relevant to landscape level threats will require more geographically extensive sampling. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  2. Demography-adjusted tests of neutrality based on genome-wide SNP data

    KAUST Repository

    Rafajlović, Marina

    2014-08-01

    Tests of the neutral evolution hypothesis are usually built on the standard model which assumes that mutations are neutral and the population size remains constant over time. However, it is unclear how such tests are affected if the last assumption is dropped. Here, we extend the unifying framework for tests based on the site frequency spectrum, introduced by Achaz and Ferretti, to populations of varying size. Key ingredients are the first two moments of the site frequency spectrum. We show how these moments can be computed analytically if a population has experienced two instantaneous size changes in the past. We apply our method to data from ten human populations gathered in the 1000 genomes project, estimate their demographies and define demography-adjusted versions of Tajima\\'s D, Fay & Wu\\'s H, and Zeng\\'s E. Our results show that demography-adjusted test statistics facilitate the direct comparison between populations and that most of the differences among populations seen in the original unadjusted tests can be explained by their underlying demographies. Upon carrying out whole-genome screens for deviations from neutrality, we identify candidate regions of recent positive selection. We provide track files with values of the adjusted and unadjusted tests for upload to the UCSC genome browser. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Phylogeography, historical demography and distribution modelling of freshwater fishes inhabiting seasonally fluctuating Mediterranean river systems: a case study using the Iberian cyprinid Squalius valentinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Perea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean freshwater fish fauna has evolved under constraints imposed by the seasonal weather/hydrological patterns that define the Mediterranean climate. These conditions have influenced the genetic and demographic structure of aquatic communities since their origins in the Mid-Pliocene. Freshwater species in Mediterranean-type climates will likely constitute genetically well-differentiated populations as a consequence of fragmentation resulting from drought/flood cycles, to varying extents depending on basin size. We developed an integrative framework to study spatial patterns in genetic diversity, demographic trends, distribution modelling, and landscape genetics to evaluate the evolutionary response of Mediterranean-type freshwater fish to seasonal fluctuations in weather. To test this evolutionary response, the model species used was Squalius valentinus, an endemic cyprinid of the Spanish Levantine area, where seasonal weather fluctuations are extreme, although our findings may be extrapolated to other Mediterranean-type species. Our results underscore the significant role of the Mediterranean climate, along with Pleistocene glaciations, in diversification of S. valentinus. We found higher nuclear diversity in larger drainage basins, but higher mitochondrial diversity correlated to habitat suitability rather than basin size. We also found strong correlation between genetic structure and climatic factors associated with Mediterranean seasonality. Demographic and migration analyses suggested population expansion during glacial periods that also contributed to the current genetic structure of S. valentinus populations. The inferred species distribution models support the significant contribution of precipitation and isothermality for S. valentinus habitat suitability. We highlight the importance of stable habitat conditions, fostered by typical karstic springs found on the Mediterranean littoral coasts, for the preservation of

  4. Demography of Verreaux's sifaka in a stochastic rainfall environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Richard R; Caswell, Hal; Richard, Alison F; Ratsirarson, Joelisoa; Dewar, Robert E; Schwartz, Marion

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we use deterministic and stochastic models to analyze the demography of Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi) in a fluctuating rainfall environment. The model is based on 16 years of data from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, southwest Madagascar. The parameters in the stage-classified life cycle were estimated using mark-recapture methods. Statistical models were evaluated using information-theoretic techniques and multi-model inference. The highest ranking model is time-invariant, but the averaged model includes rainfall-dependence of survival and breeding. We used a time-series model of rainfall to construct a stochastic demographic model. The time-invariant model and the stochastic model give a population growth rate of about 0.98. Bootstrap confidence intervals on the growth rates, both deterministic and stochastic, include 1. Growth rates are most elastic to changes in adult survival. Many demographic statistics show a nonlinear response to annual rainfall but are depressed when annual rainfall is low, or the variance in annual rainfall is high. Perturbation analyses from both the time-invariant and stochastic models indicate that recruitment and survival of older females are key determinants of population growth rate.

  5. The implications of environmental variability on caribou demography: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Schaefer

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Random environmental influences, such as snow cover, are widely regarded as an integral feature of caribou population dynamics. We conducted computer simulations to explore the ramifications of such stochastic variability for caribou demography. We devised 4 models with increasing levels of complexity: Model 1, density-independence under different levels of stochasticity and r; Model 2, non-linear effect of snow cover on r; Model 3, non-linear effect of snow cover on r and stochasticity as a function of population size; and Model 4, non-linear effect of snow cover on r, stochasticity as a funciton of population size, and density-dependence according to the logistic equation. The results of Model 1 indicated that nearly all caribou populations subject only to environmental vagaries experienced either extincition or irruption. Model 2 revealed that non-linear effect of snow cover depressed the realised r as a function of population size. Finally, Model 4 suggested long-term population as previously reported in literature, but with reduced chance of overshooting K under moderate to high environmental variability.

  6. Culture and demography: from reluctant bedfellows to committed partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Christine A

    2014-02-01

    Demography and culture have had a long but ambivalent relationship. Cultural influences are widely recognized as important for demographic outcomes but are often "backgrounded" in demographic research. I argue that progress toward a more successful integration is feasible and suggest a network model of culture as a potential tool. The network model bridges both traditional (holistic and institutional) and contemporary (tool kit) models of culture used in the social sciences and offers a simple vocabulary for a diverse set of cultural concepts, such as attitudes, beliefs, and norms, as well as quantitative measures of how culture is organized. The proposed model conceptualizes culture as a nested network of meanings represented by schemas that range in complexity from simple concepts to multifaceted cultural models. I illustrate the potential value of a model using accounts of the cultural changes underpinning the transformation of marriage in the United States and point to developments in the social, cognitive, and computational sciences that could facilitate the application of the model in empirical demographic research.

  7. Temporally variable dispersal and demography can accelerate the spread of invading species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Stephen P; Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2012-12-01

    We analyze how temporal variability in local demography and dispersal combine to affect the rate of spread of an invading species. Our model combines state-structured local demography (specified by an integral or matrix projection model) with general dispersal distributions that may depend on the state of the individual or its parent. It allows very general patterns of stationary temporal variation in both local demography and in the frequency and distribution of dispersal distances. We show that expressions for the asymptotic spread rate and its sensitivity to parameters, which have been derived previously for less general models, continue to hold. Using these results we show that random temporal variability in dispersal can accelerate population spread. Demographic variability can further accelerate spread if it is positively correlated with dispersal variability, for example if high-fecundity years are also years in which juveniles tend to settle further away from their parents. A simple model for the growth and spread of patches of an invasive plant (perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium) illustrates these effects and shows that they can have substantial impacts on the predicted speed of an invasion wave. Temporal variability in dispersal has received very little attention in both the theoretical and empirical literature on invasive species spread. Our results suggest that this needs to change.

  8. Ed Deutschman Interview [video

    OpenAIRE

    Deutschman, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ed Deutschman was a Navy cadet at the Del Monte Pre-Flight School, located at the now (2013) Naval Postgraduate School. Mr Deutschman visited the Dudley Knox Library on May 2, 2011, and spoke about his service in World War II as a Corsair fighter pilot in the Pacific.

  9. Compatibility of IEC 61400-27-1 Ed 1 and WECC 2nd Generation Wind Turbine Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Ömer; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Morales, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The IEC TC88 WG27 and the Western Electric Coordinating Council (WECC) Renewable Energy Modeling Task Force, in North America, have been developing the IEC 61400-27-1 and WECC 2nd Generation Wind Turbine generic electrical models, where the first editions are published in 2014 and 2013......, respectively. Although the two working groups have been collaborating closely, there are small differences between the approaches of the two modelling standards, especially in terms of parameter sets and complexities for different functions. In this paper, compatibility of the IEC and WECC wind turbine models...... to model comparison of the IEC and WECC wind turbines’ simulation results for the wind turbine types 3 and 4, which are the most common technologies. Additionally, detailed behavior of the IEC type 3 model during voltage drop and recovery are compared against measurements....

  10. Density dependence in demography and dispersal generates fluctuating invasion speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren L; Li, Bingtuan; Miller, Tom E X; Neubert, Michael G; Shaw, Allison K

    2017-05-09

    Density dependence plays an important role in population regulation and is known to generate temporal fluctuations in population density. However, the ways in which density dependence affects spatial population processes, such as species invasions, are less understood. Although classical ecological theory suggests that invasions should advance at a constant speed, empirical work is illuminating the highly variable nature of biological invasions, which often exhibit nonconstant spreading speeds, even in simple, controlled settings. Here, we explore endogenous density dependence as a mechanism for inducing variability in biological invasions with a set of population models that incorporate density dependence in demographic and dispersal parameters. We show that density dependence in demography at low population densities-i.e., an Allee effect-combined with spatiotemporal variability in population density behind the invasion front can produce fluctuations in spreading speed. The density fluctuations behind the front can arise from either overcompensatory population growth or density-dependent dispersal, both of which are common in nature. Our results show that simple rules can generate complex spread dynamics and highlight a source of variability in biological invasions that may aid in ecological forecasting.

  11. Demography and ecology drive variation in cooperation across human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Shakti; Mace, Ruth

    2011-08-30

    Recent studies argue that cross-cultural variation in human cooperation supports cultural group selection models of the evolution of large-scale cooperation. However, these studies confound cultural and environmental differences between populations by predominantly sampling one population per society. Here, we test the hypothesis that behavioral variation between populations is driven by environmental differences in demography and ecology. We use a public goods game played with money and a naturalistic measure of behavior involving the distribution of salt, an essential and locally valued resource, to demonstrate significant variation in levels of cooperation across 16 discrete populations of the same small-scale society, the Pahari Korwa of central India. Variation between these populations of the same cultural group is comparable to that found between different cultural groups in previous studies. Demographic factors partly explain this variation; age and a measure of social network size are associated with contributions in the public goods game, while population size and the number of adult sisters residing in the population are associated with decisions regarding salt. That behavioral variation is at least partly contingent on environmental differences between populations questions the existence of stable norms of cooperation. Hence, our findings call for reinterpretation of cross-cultural data on cooperation. Although cultural group selection could theoretically explain the evolution of large-scale cooperation, our results make clear that existing cross-cultural data cannot be taken as empirical support for this hypothesis.

  12. Political demography: Powerful trends under-attended by demographic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The interconnections between politics and the dramatic demographic changes under way around the world have been neglected by the two research disciplines that could contribute most to their understanding: demography and political science. Instead, this area of 'political demography' has largely been ceded to political activists, pundits, and journalists, leading often to exaggerated or garbled interpretation. The terrain includes some of the most politically sensitive and contested issues: alleged demographically determined shifts in the international balance of power; low fertility, population decline, and demographic ageing; international migration; change in national identity; and compositional shifts in politically sensitive social categories and human rights. Meanwhile many governments and non-governmental actors have actively pursued varieties of 'strategic demography', deploying fertility, mortality, or migration as instruments of domestic or international policy. Political scientists and demographers could and should use their knowledge and analytic techniques to improve understanding and to moderate excessive claims and fears on these topics.

  13. Real time analysis under EDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  14. On the quantitativeness of EDS STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugg, N.R. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kothleitner, G. [Institute for Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Shibata, N.; Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Chemical mapping using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has recently shown to be a powerful technique in analyzing the elemental identity and location of atomic columns in materials at atomic resolution. However, most applications of EDS STEM have been used only to qualitatively map whether elements are present at specific sites. Obtaining calibrated EDS STEM maps so that they are on an absolute scale is a difficult task and even if one achieves this, extracting quantitative information about the specimen – such as the number or density of atoms under the probe – adds yet another layer of complexity to the analysis due to the multiple elastic and inelastic scattering of the electron probe. Quantitative information may be obtained by comparing calibrated EDS STEM with theoretical simulations, but in this case a model of the structure must be assumed a priori. Here we first theoretically explore how exactly elastic and thermal scattering of the probe confounds the quantitative information one is able to extract about the specimen from an EDS STEM map. We then show using simulation how tilting the specimen (or incident probe) can reduce the effects of scattering and how it can provide quantitative information about the specimen. We then discuss drawbacks of this method – such as the loss of atomic resolution along the tilt direction – but follow this with a possible remedy: precession averaged EDS STEM mapping. - Highlights: • Signal obtained in EDS STEM maps (of STO) compared to non-channelling signal. • Deviation from non-channelling signal occurs in on-axis experiments. • Tilting specimen: signal close to non-channelling case but atomic resolution is lost. • Tilt-precession series: non-channelling signal and atomic-resolution features obtained. • Associated issues are discussed.

  15. Hanford site environment. [Demography, meteorology, geology, hydrology, seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-06-24

    A synopsis is given of the detailed characterization of the existing environment at Hanford. The following aspects are covered: demography, land use, meteorology, geology, hydrology, and seismology. It is concluded that Hanford is one of the most extensively characterized nuclear sites. 16 figures. (DLC)

  16. Rebooting the EdD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergin, Jon F.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Jon Wergin reminds readers of the philosophical and historical foundations of the doctor of education (EdD) degree. He argues that the EdD should be based, in large part, on John Dewey's progressive ideals of democratization and Paulo Freire's concepts of emancipatory education. Drawing on theories of reflective practice,…

  17. EDS becoms CERN Openlab contributor

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "EDS announced that it has become an official contributor to CERN openlab. The purpose of the joint project beteween CERN and EDS is to carry out research and development in the field of monitoring, management and operation of grid services." (1 page)

  18. EDS becomes CERN Openlab contributor

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "EDS today announced that it has become an official contributor to CERN openlab. The purpose of the joint project between CERN and EDS is to carry out research and development in the field of monitoring, management and operaiton of grid services." (2/3 page)

  19. Climate, demography and lek stability in an Amazonian bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Thomas B; Sillett, T Scott

    2016-01-27

    Lekking is a rare, but iconic mating system where polygynous males aggregate and perform group displays to attract females. Existing theory postulates that demographic and environmental stability are required for lekking to be an evolutionarily viable reproductive strategy. However, we lack empirical tests for the hypotheses that lek stability is facilitated by age-specific variation in demographic rates, and by predictable, abundant resources. To address this knowledge gap, we use multistate models to examine how two demographic elements of lek stability-male survival and recruitment-vary with age, social status and phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in a Neotropical frugivorous bird, the wire-tailed manakin (Pipra filicauda). Our results show that demographic and environmental conditions were related to lek stability in the Ecuadorean Amazon. Apparent annual survival probability of territorial males was higher than that of non-territorial floaters, and recruitment probability increased as males progressed in an age-graded queue. Moreover, annual survival of territorial males and body condition of both floaters and territory holders were higher following years with El Niño conditions, associated with reduced rainfall and probably higher fruit production in the northern Neotropics, and lower after years with wet, La Niña conditions that predominated our study. Recruitment probabilities varied annually, independent of ENSO phase, and increased over our study period, but the annual mean number of territorial males per lek declined. Our results provide empirical support for hypothesized demographic and environmental drivers of lek dynamics. This study also suggests that climate-mediated changes in resource availability can affect demography and subsequent lek stability in a relatively buffered, lowland rainforest.

  20. Climate, demography and lek stability in an Amazonian bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Thomas B.; Sillett, T. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Lekking is a rare, but iconic mating system where polygynous males aggregate and perform group displays to attract females. Existing theory postulates that demographic and environmental stability are required for lekking to be an evolutionarily viable reproductive strategy. However, we lack empirical tests for the hypotheses that lek stability is facilitated by age-specific variation in demographic rates, and by predictable, abundant resources. To address this knowledge gap, we use multistate models to examine how two demographic elements of lek stability—male survival and recruitment—vary with age, social status and phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in a Neotropical frugivorous bird, the wire-tailed manakin (Pipra filicauda). Our results show that demographic and environmental conditions were related to lek stability in the Ecuadorean Amazon. Apparent annual survival probability of territorial males was higher than that of non-territorial floaters, and recruitment probability increased as males progressed in an age-graded queue. Moreover, annual survival of territorial males and body condition of both floaters and territory holders were higher following years with El Niño conditions, associated with reduced rainfall and probably higher fruit production in the northern Neotropics, and lower after years with wet, La Niña conditions that predominated our study. Recruitment probabilities varied annually, independent of ENSO phase, and increased over our study period, but the annual mean number of territorial males per lek declined. Our results provide empirical support for hypothesized demographic and environmental drivers of lek dynamics. This study also suggests that climate-mediated changes in resource availability can affect demography and subsequent lek stability in a relatively buffered, lowland rainforest. PMID:26791615

  1. Technical Analysis of IEC 61850 Ed 2.0%IEC 61850 Ed 2.0技术分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任雁铭; 操丰梅; 张军

    2013-01-01

    对IEC 61850 Ed 2.0的文件构成和技术路线进行了介绍.对比IEC 61850 Ed 1.0,从数据模型、工程配置语言和一致性测试3个方面,对IEC 61850 Ed 2.0的技术特点进行了技术分析.从设备制造商和检测中心2个方面,讨论了如何从IEC 61850 Ed 1.0迁徙到IEC 61850 Ed 2.0.%The profile and technical philosophy of IEC 61850 Ed 2.0 are described. By comparison with IEC 61850 Ed 1.0, an analysis is made of the technical features of IEC 61850 Ed 2.0 data model, substation configuration language and conformance test. A discussion is made of shifting from IEC 61850 Ed 1.0 to IEC 61850 Ed 2.0 with respect to the manufacturer and testing organization.

  2. Regions of homozygosity in the porcine genome: consequence of demography and the recombination landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Bosse

    Full Text Available Inbreeding has long been recognized as a primary cause of fitness reduction in both wild and domesticated populations. Consanguineous matings cause inheritance of haplotypes that are identical by descent (IBD and result in homozygous stretches along the genome of the offspring. Size and position of regions of homozygosity (ROHs are expected to correlate with genomic features such as GC content and recombination rate, but also direction of selection. Thus, ROHs should be non-randomly distributed across the genome. Therefore, demographic history may not fully predict the effects of inbreeding. The porcine genome has a relatively heterogeneous distribution of recombination rate, making Sus scrofa an excellent model to study the influence of both recombination landscape and demography on genomic variation. This study utilizes next-generation sequencing data for the analysis of genomic ROH patterns, using a comparative sliding window approach. We present an in-depth study of genomic variation based on three different parameters: nucleotide diversity outside ROHs, the number of ROHs in the genome, and the average ROH size. We identified an abundance of ROHs in all genomes of multiple pigs from commercial breeds and wild populations from Eurasia. Size and number of ROHs are in agreement with known demography of the populations, with population bottlenecks highly increasing ROH occurrence. Nucleotide diversity outside ROHs is high in populations derived from a large ancient population, regardless of current population size. In addition, we show an unequal genomic ROH distribution, with strong correlations of ROH size and abundance with recombination rate and GC content. Global gene content does not correlate with ROH frequency, but some ROH hotspots do contain positive selected genes in commercial lines and wild populations. This study highlights the importance of the influence of demography and recombination on homozygosity in the genome to understand

  3. Measuring the Fidelity of Re-ED Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadowcroft, Pamela; Cantrell, Mary Lynn; Cantrell, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of a comprehensive intervention like Re-ED (Reeducation of Emotional Disturbed Children) requires a clear definition of the essential components of the model. This article describes an ongoing process to create a program assessment tool for Re-ED. Program fidelity requires being able to specify precisely what is meant by certain…

  4. Different rates of DNA replication at early versus late S-phase sections: multiscale modeling of stochastic events related to DNA content/EdU (5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine) incorporation distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Zhao, Hong; Rybak, Paulina; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Kimmel, Marek

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical modeling allows relating molecular events to single-cell characteristics assessed by multiparameter cytometry. In the present study we labeled newly synthesized DNA in A549 human lung carcinoma cells with 15-120 min pulses of EdU. All DNA was stained with DAPI and cellular fluorescence was measured by laser scanning cytometry. The frequency of cells in the ascending (left) side of the "horseshoe"-shaped EdU/DAPI bivariate distributions reports the rate of DNA replication at the time of entrance to S phase while their frequency in the descending (right) side is a marker of DNA replication rate at the time of transition from S to G2 phase. To understand the connection between molecular-scale events and scatterplot asymmetry, we developed a multiscale stochastic model, which simulates DNA replication and cell cycle progression of individual cells and produces in silico EdU/DAPI scatterplots. For each S-phase cell the time points at which replication origins are fired are modeled by a non-homogeneous Poisson Process (NHPP). Shifted gamma distributions are assumed for durations of cell cycle phases (G1, S and G2 M), Depending on the rate of DNA synthesis being an increasing or decreasing function, simulated EdU/DAPI bivariate graphs show predominance of cells in left (early-S) or right (late-S) side of the horseshoe distribution. Assuming NHPP rate estimated from independent experiments, simulated EdU/DAPI graphs are nearly indistinguishable from those experimentally observed. This finding proves consistency between the S-phase DNA-replication rate based on molecular-scale analyses, and cell population kinetics ascertained from EdU/DAPI scatterplots and demonstrates that DNA replication rate at entrance to S is relatively slow compared with its rather abrupt termination during S to G2 transition. Our approach opens a possibility of similar modeling to study the effect of anticancer drugs on DNA replication/cell cycle progression and also to quantify other

  5. TechEdSat Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the Technical Education Satellite (TechEdSat) is to employ a small spacecraft to evaluate, demonstrate, and validate two new technologies for...

  6. Prospective study of violence against ED workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalenko, Terry; Gates, Donna; Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Succop, Paul; Mentzel, Tammy K

    2013-01-01

    Health care support occupations have an assault-injury rate nearly 10 times the general sector. Emergency departments (EDs) are at greatest risk of such events. The objective was to describe the incidence of violence in ED health care workers (HCWs) over 9 months. Specific aims were to (1) identify demographic, occupational, and perpetrator factors related to violent events (VEs) and (2) identify predictors of acute stress in victims and predictors of loss of productivity. A longitudinal, repeated-methods design was used to collect monthly survey data from ED HCWs at 6 hospitals. Surveys assessed number and type of VEs, and feelings of safety and confidence. Victims also completed specific VE surveys. Descriptive statistics and a repeated-measure linear regression model were used. Two hundred thirteen ED HCWs completed 1795 monthly surveys and 827 VEs were reported. Average VE rate per person per 9 months was 4.15. Six hundred one events were physical threats (PTs) (3.01 per person). Two hundred twenty six events were assaults (1.13 per person). Five hundred one VE surveys were completed, describing 341 PTs and 160 assaults. Men perpetrated 63% of PTs and 52% of assaults. Significant differences in VEs were reported between registered nurses (RNs) and medical doctors (MDs) (P = .0017) and patient care assistants (P stress than the MDs (P stress reduced productivity (P stress, and lost productivity. Acute stress has negative consequences on workers' ability to perform their duties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Empirical Succession Mapping and Data Assimilation to Constrain Demographic Processes in an Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R.; Andrews, T.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Shifts in ecological communities in response to environmental change have implications for biodiversity, ecosystem function, and feedbacks to global climate change. Community composition is fundamentally the product of demography, but demographic processes are simplified or missing altogether in many ecosystem, Earth system, and species distribution models. This limitation arises in part because demographic data are noisy and difficult to synthesize. As a consequence, demographic processes are challenging to formulate in models in the first place, and to verify and constrain with data thereafter. Here, we used a novel analysis of the USFS Forest Inventory Analysis to improve the representation of demography in an ecosystem model. First, we created an Empirical Succession Mapping (ESM) based on ~1 million individual tree observations from the eastern U.S. to identify broad demographic patterns related to forest succession and disturbance. We used results from this analysis to guide reformulation of the Ecosystem Demography model (ED), an existing forest simulator with explicit tree demography. Results from the ESM reveal a coherent, cyclic pattern of change in temperate forest tree size and density over the eastern U.S. The ESM captures key ecological processes including succession, self-thinning, and gap-filling, and quantifies the typical trajectory of these processes as a function of tree size and stand density. Recruitment is most rapid in early-successional stands with low density and mean diameter, but slows as stand density increases; mean diameter increases until thinning promotes recruitment of small-diameter trees. Strikingly, the upper bound of size-density space that emerges in the ESM conforms closely to the self-thinning power law often observed in ecology. The ED model obeys this same overall size-density boundary, but overestimates plot-level growth, mortality, and fecundity rates, leading to unrealistic emergent demographic patterns. In particular

  8. COMADRE: a global data base of animal demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Archer, C Ruth; Bein, Christoph; de Buhr, Hendrik; Farack, Claudia; Gottschalk, Fränce; Hartmann, Alexander; Henning, Anne; Hoppe, Gabriel; Römer, Gesa; Ruoff, Tara; Sommer, Veronika; Wille, Julia; Voigt, Jakob; Zeh, Stefan; Vieregg, Dirk; Buckley, Yvonne M; Che-Castaldo, Judy; Hodgson, David; Scheuerlein, Alexander; Caswell, Hal; Vaupel, James W

    2016-03-01

    The open-data scientific philosophy is being widely adopted and proving to promote considerable progress in ecology and evolution. Open-data global data bases now exist on animal migration, species distribution, conservation status, etc. However, a gap exists for data on population dynamics spanning the rich diversity of the animal kingdom world-wide. This information is fundamental to our understanding of the conditions that have shaped variation in animal life histories and their relationships with the environment, as well as the determinants of invasion and extinction. Matrix population models (MPMs) are among the most widely used demographic tools by animal ecologists. MPMs project population dynamics based on the reproduction, survival and development of individuals in a population over their life cycle. The outputs from MPMs have direct biological interpretations, facilitating comparisons among animal species as different as Caenorhabditis elegans, Loxodonta africana and Homo sapiens. Thousands of animal demographic records exist in the form of MPMs, but they are dispersed throughout the literature, rendering comparative analyses difficult. Here, we introduce the COMADRE Animal Matrix Database, an open-data online repository, which in its version 1.0.0 contains data on 345 species world-wide, from 402 studies with a total of 1625 population projection matrices. COMADRE also contains ancillary information (e.g. ecoregion, taxonomy, biogeography, etc.) that facilitates interpretation of the numerous demographic metrics that can be derived from its MPMs. We provide R code to some of these examples. We introduce the COMADRE Animal Matrix Database, a resource for animal demography. Its open-data nature, together with its ancillary information, will facilitate comparative analysis, as will the growing availability of databases focusing on other aspects of the rich animal diversity, and tools to query and combine them. Through future frequent updates of COMADRE, and

  9. Heat conduction. 3. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, Latif M. [City Coll. of City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This textbook presents the classical topics of conduction heat transfer and extends the coverage to include chapters on perturbation methods, heat transfer in living tissue, and microscale conduction. This makes the book unique among the many published textbook on conduction heat transfer. Other noteworthy features of the book are: The material is organized to provide students with the tools to model, analyze and solve a wide range of engineering applications involving conduction heat transfer. Mathematical techniques are presented in a clear and simplified fashion to be used as instruments in obtaining solutions. The simplicity of one-dimensional conduction is used to drill students in the role of boundary conditions and to explore a variety of physical conditions that are of practical interest. Examples are carefully selected to illustrate the application of principles and the construction of solutions. Students are trained to follow a systematic problem solving methodology with emphasis on thought process, logic, reasoning and verification. Solutions to all examples and end-of-chapter problems follow an orderly problems solving approach. (orig.)

  10. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  11. Symmetry breaking. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strocchi, F. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Classe di Scienze, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    This new edition of Prof. Strocchi's well received primer on rigorous aspects of symmetry breaking presents a more detailed and thorough discussion of the mechanism of symmetry breaking in classical field theory in relation with the Noether theorem. Moreover, the link between symmetry breaking without massless Goldstone bosons in Coulomb systems and in gauge theories is made more explicit in terms of the delocalized Coulomb dynamics. Furthermore, the chapter on the Higgs mechanism has been significantly expanded with a non-perturbative treatment of the Higgs phenomenon, at the basis of the standard model of particle physics, in the local and in the Coulomb gauges. Last but not least, a subject index has been added and a number of misprints have been corrected. From the reviews of the first edition: The notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking has proven extremely valuable, the problem is that most derivations are perturbative and heuristic. Yet mathematically precise versions do exist, but are not widely known. It is precisely the aim of his book to correct this unbalance. - It is remarkable to see how much material can actually be presented in a rigorous way (incidentally, many of the results presented are due to Strocchi himself), yet this is largely ignored, the original heuristic derivations being, as a rule, more popular. - At each step he strongly emphasizes the physical meaning and motivation of the various notions introduced, a book that fills a conspicuous gap in the literature, and does it rather well. It could also be a good basis for a graduate course in mathematical physics. It can be recommended to physicists as well and, of course, for physics/mathematics libraries. J.-P. Antoine, Physicalia 28/2, 2006 Strocchi's main emphasis is on the fact that the loss of symmetric behaviour requires both the non-symmetric ground states and the infinite extension of the system. It is written in a pleasant style at a level suitable for graduate students in

  12. Demography and the extinction of European Neanderthals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    Causes previously suggested for the sudden extinction of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) in Europe, starting around 35,000 years ago, comprise food shortage, climatic effects and violence from Modern Humans. The aim here is to formulate a demographic model with reconstructed fertility and de...... Human newcomers during the last part of the period. The conclusion is that other reasons for extinction than climate or starvation must be sought....

  13. Demography and the extinction of European Neanderthals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    Causes previously suggested for the sudden extinction of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) in Europe, starting around 35,000 years ago, comprise food shortage, climatic effects and violence from Modern Humans. The aim here is to formulate a demographic model with reconstructed fertility and de...... Human newcomers during the last part of the period. The conclusion is that other reasons for extinction than climate or starvation must be sought....

  14. Mitigating Higher Ed Cyber Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gary; Ashford, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the many and varied cyber attacks that have recently occurred in the higher ed community. We will discuss the perpetrators, the victims, the impact and how these institutions have evolved to meet this threat. Mitigation techniques and defense strategies will be covered as will a discussion of effective security…

  15. Teaching demography: strategies that work with students of all ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, K

    1992-01-01

    Teaching demography is appropriate for all ages depending on how lessons are designed and concrete information is provided. The advice for teaching elementary students is to begin in the 3rd or 4th grades by integrating demography into concepts about the world and the geography of different countries and regions. Population size distribution and structure are appropriate topics. In grades 4-6, tools for understanding size can be integrated into math classes, i.e., reading graphs, learning percentages, and working with place values in the billions. Science classes might focus on environmental problems due to population pressure. Resources from the Population Reference Bureau that are helpful are noted. Comparisons can be made between countries, regions, and states. An assignment might be to create a statistical portrait of a child in a selected country. Population growth might be demonstrated with each child representing a unit, such as 500 million persons; the class should stand in rows in a pyramidal shape expressing different time frames and population growth. Secondary school education may provide conceptualization of complex charts of population growth and global issues. Teenagers are able to manipulate data better even though the materials used are the same for elementary grades. The example is given of a 10th grade class using the tabled data and the MacAtlas software to construct a choropleth map of population concentration in Africa. The indicator was analyzed and compared with 6 countries outside Africa. At the college level it is expected that few have a grasp of population concepts. Students might be asked to analyze projections, discuss data collection processes, or speculate about future trends in any set of indicators. An assignment might be to break the classes into groups representing regions of the world, and select countries that fit the definition of developed or developing (least or moderately). More detailed mapping work is also possible

  16. Health care utilization before and after an outpatient ED visit in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Carolyn; Schmader, Kenneth; Sanders, Linda L; Heflin, Mitchell; Ragsdale, Luna; McConnell, Eleanor; Hocker, Michael; Hastings, S Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Older adults in the United States receive a significant amount of care in the emergency department (ED), yet the associations between ED and other types of health care utilization have not been adequately studied in this population. The goals of this study were to examine the relationships between health care use before and after an ED visit among older adults. This retrospective cohort study examined health care use among 308 patients 65 years or older discharged from a university-affiliated ED. Proportional-hazards models were used to assess the relationship between pre-ED health care use (primary care physician [PCP], specialist, ED, and hospital) and risk of return ED visits. Older ED patients in this study had visited other types of providers frequently in the previous year (median number of PCP and specialist visits, 4). Patients who used the ED on 2 or more occasions in the previous year were found to have visited their PCP more often than those without frequent ED use (median number of visits, 7.0 vs 4.0; P < .001). Despite more PCP use in this population, frequent ED use was associated with increased risk of a repeat ED visit (hazard ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-4.21), in models adjusted for demographics and health status. Older adults who use the ED are also receiving significant amounts of care from other sources; simply providing additional access to care may not improve outcomes for these vulnerable individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Diagnosing the dangerous demography of manta rays using life history theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulvy, Nicholas K; Pardo, Sebastián A; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Carlson, John K

    2014-01-01

    Background. The directed harvest and global trade in the gill plates of mantas, and devil rays, has led to increased fishing pressure and steep population declines in some locations. The slow life history, particularly of the manta rays, is cited as a key reason why such species have little capacity to withstand directed fisheries. Here, we place their life history and demography within the context of other sharks and rays. Methods. Despite the limited availability of data, we use life history theory and comparative analysis to estimate the intrinsic risk of extinction (as indexed by the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase r max) for a typical generic manta ray using a variant of the classic Euler-Lotka demographic model. This model requires only three traits to calculate the maximum intrinsic population growth rate r max: von Bertalanffy growth rate, annual pup production and age at maturity. To account for the uncertainty in life history parameters, we created plausible parameter ranges and propagate these uncertainties through the model to calculate a distribution of the plausible range of r max values. Results. The maximum population growth rate r max of manta ray is most sensitive to the length of the reproductive cycle, and the median r max of 0.116 year(-1) 95th percentile [0.089-0.139] is one of the lowest known of the 106 sharks and rays for which we have comparable demographic information. Discussion. In common with other unprotected, unmanaged, high-value large-bodied sharks and rays the combination of very low population growth rates of manta rays, combined with the high value of their gill rakers and the international nature of trade, is highly likely to lead to rapid depletion and potential local extinction unless a rapid conservation management response occurs worldwide. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to derive important insights into the demography extinction risk of data-poor species using well-established life history theory.

  18. Diagnosing the dangerous demography of manta rays using life history theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas K. Dulvy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The directed harvest and global trade in the gill plates of mantas, and devil rays, has led to increased fishing pressure and steep population declines in some locations. The slow life history, particularly of the manta rays, is cited as a key reason why such species have little capacity to withstand directed fisheries. Here, we place their life history and demography within the context of other sharks and rays. Methods. Despite the limited availability of data, we use life history theory and comparative analysis to estimate the intrinsic risk of extinction (as indexed by the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase rmax for a typical generic manta ray using a variant of the classic Euler–Lotka demographic model. This model requires only three traits to calculate the maximum intrinsic population growth rate rmax: von Bertalanffy growth rate, annual pup production and age at maturity. To account for the uncertainty in life history parameters, we created plausible parameter ranges and propagate these uncertainties through the model to calculate a distribution of the plausible range of rmax values. Results. The maximum population growth rate rmax of manta ray is most sensitive to the length of the reproductive cycle, and the median rmax of 0.116 year−1 95th percentile [0.089–0.139] is one of the lowest known of the 106 sharks and rays for which we have comparable demographic information. Discussion. In common with other unprotected, unmanaged, high-value large-bodied sharks and rays the combination of very low population growth rates of manta rays, combined with the high value of their gill rakers and the international nature of trade, is highly likely to lead to rapid depletion and potential local extinction unless a rapid conservation management response occurs worldwide. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to derive important insights into the demography extinction risk of data-poor species using well-established life

  19. Demography of the Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, C.M.; Mattson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a demographic analysis of the Yellowstone grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) to identify critical environmental factors controlling grizzly bear vital rates, and thereby to help evaluate the effectiveness of past management and to identify future conservation issues. We concluded that, within the limits of uncertainty implied by the available data and our methods of data analysis, the size of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population changed little from 1975 to 1995. We found that grizzly bear mortality rates are about double in years when the whitebark pine crop fails than in mast years, and that the population probably declines when the crop fails and increases in mast years. Our model suggests that natural variation in whitebark pine crop size over the last two decades explains more of the perceived fluctuations in Yellowstone grizzly population size than do other variables. Our analysis used demographic data from 202 radio-telemetered bears followed between 1975 and 1992 and accounted for whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) crop failures during 1993-1995. We used a maximum likelihood method to estimate demographic parameters and used the Akaike Information Criteria to judge the significance of various independent variables. We identified no independent variables correlated with grizzly bear fecundity. In order of importance, we found that grizzly bear mortality rates are correlated with season, whitebark pine crop size (mast vs. nonmast year), sex, management-trapping status (never management-trapped vs. management-trapped once or more), and age. The mortality rate of bears that were management-trapped at least once was almost double that of bears that were never management-trapped, implying a source/sink (i.e., never management-trapped/management-trapped) structure. The rate at which bears move between the source and sink, estimated as the management-trapping rate (h), is critical to estimating the finite rate of increase, I>I?. We quantified h by

  20. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  1. Leaf development and demography explain photosynthetic seasonality in Amazon evergreen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Albert, Loren P; Lopes, Aline P; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Hayek, Matthew; Wiedemann, Kenia T; Guan, Kaiyu; Stark, Scott C; Christoffersen, Bradley; Prohaska, Neill; Tavares, Julia V; Marostica, Suelen; Kobayashi, Hideki; Ferreira, Mauricio L; Campos, Kleber Silva; da Silva, Rodrigo; Brando, Paulo M; Dye, Dennis G; Huxman, Travis E; Huete, Alfredo R; Nelson, Bruce W; Saleska, Scott R

    2016-02-26

    In evergreen tropical forests, the extent, magnitude, and controls on photosynthetic seasonality are poorly resolved and inadequately represented in Earth system models. Combining camera observations with ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes at forests across rainfall gradients in Amazônia, we show that aggregate canopy phenology, not seasonality of climate drivers, is the primary cause of photosynthetic seasonality in these forests. Specifically, synchronization of new leaf growth with dry season litterfall shifts canopy composition toward younger, more light-use efficient leaves, explaining large seasonal increases (~27%) in ecosystem photosynthesis. Coordinated leaf development and demography thus reconcile seemingly disparate observations at different scales and indicate that accounting for leaf-level phenology is critical for accurately simulating ecosystem-scale responses to climate change.

  2. Leaf development and demography explain photosynthetic seasonality in Amazon evergreen forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Albert, Lauren; Lopes, Aline; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Hayek, Matthew; Wiedemann, Kenia T.; Guan, Kaiyu; Stark, Scott C.; Christoffersen, Bradley; Prohaska, Neill; Tavares, Julia V.; Marostica, Suelen; Kobayashi, Hideki; Ferreira, Maurocio L.; Campos, Kleber Silva; da Silva, Rodrigo; Brando, Paulo M.; Dye, Dennis G.; Huxman, Travis E.; Huete, Alfredo; Nelson, Bruce; Saleska, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In evergreen tropical forests, the extent, magnitude, and controls on photosynthetic seasonality are poorly resolved and inadequately represented in Earth system models. Combining camera observations with ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes at forests across rainfall gradients in Amazônia, we show that aggregate canopy phenology, not seasonality of climate drivers, is the primary cause of photosynthetic seasonality in these forests. Specifically, synchronization of new leaf growth with dry season litterfall shifts canopy composition toward younger, more light-use efficient leaves, explaining large seasonal increases (~27%) in ecosystem photosynthesis. Coordinated leaf development and demography thus reconcile seemingly disparate observations at different scales and indicate that accounting for leaf-level phenology is critical for accurately simulating ecosystem-scale responses to climate change.

  3. Factors affecting ED length-of-stay in surgical critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B; Sullivan, S; Levine, A; Dallara, J

    1995-09-01

    To determine what patient characteristics are associated with prolonged emergency department (ED) length-of-stay (LOS) for surgical critical care patients, the charts of 169 patients admitted from the ED directly to the operating room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU) during a 6-week period in 1993 were reviewed. The ED record was reviewed for documentation of factors that might be associated with prolonged ED LOS, such as use of computed tomographic (CT), radiology special procedures, and the number of plain radiographs and consultants. ED LOS was considered to be the time from triage until a decision was made to admit the patient. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, use of CT and special procedures were the strongest independent predictors of prolonged ED length-of-stay. The number of plain radiographs and consultants had only a minimal effect. Use of a protocol-driven trauma evaluation system was associated with a shorter ED LOS. In addition to external factors that affect ED overcrowding, ED patient management decisions may also be associated with prolonged ED length-of-stay. Such ED-based factors may be more important in surgical critical care patients, whose overall ED LOS is affected more by the length of the ED work-up rather than the time spent waiting for a ICU bed or operating suite.

  4. Ed Watson - 1940-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Ed Watson passed away suddenly on 1 August in Geneva, he was 66. He leaves his wife and two children. Ed Watson arrived at CERN in March 1973 to work on digital electronics and CAMAC systems under Bob Dobinson, after many years at Rolls Royce in Scotland. He joined the European Muon Collaboration in 1976, where he played a major role in the design, deployment and running of its data acquisition system (DAQ) with David Botterill, Bob Dobinson, and Vicky White. The CAMAC-ROMULUS system was by far the largest and most advanced of its time, and it became a defining standard for DAQ systems for years to come. Ed was deeply involved in the detailed planning of the control rooms and the experiment cabling, as well as sharing the responsibility for the CAMAC readout system. He had a real talent for trouble shooting and played a vital part in supporting the experiment throughout its lifetime. He offered great moral support to the younger members of the collaboration and helped them a great deal with their work. The...

  5. Ed Watson 1940-2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Ed Watson arrived at CERN in March 1973 to work on digital electronics and CAMAC systems under Bob Dobinson, after many years at Rolls Royce in Scotland. He joined the European Muon Collaboration in 1976, where he played a major role in the design, deployment and running of its data acquisition system (DAQ) with David Botterill, Bob Dobinson, and Vicky White. The CAMAC-ROMULUS system was by far the largest and most advanced of its time, and it became a defining standard for DAQ systems for years to come. Ed was deeply involved in the detailed planning of the control rooms and the experiment cabling, as well as sharing the responsibility for the CAMAC readout system. He had a real talent for trouble shooting and played a vital part in supporting the experiment throughout its lifetime. He offered great moral support to the younger members of the collaboration and helped them a great deal with their work. The EMC had a wonderful social life to which Ed was a major contributor - who can forget its barbecues?  In...

  6. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Sharp

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods: We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results: There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6% had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06-1.61], high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12-2.00], and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60-0.90] were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59-0.91] was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002. Conclusion: NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition.

  7. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Brian R.; Sharp, Kristen M.; Patterson, Brian; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED) visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6%) had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06–1.61]), high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12–2.00]), and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60–0.90]) were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59–0.91]) was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002). Conclusion NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition. PMID:27625723

  8. Owned dog ecology and demography in Villa de Tezontepec, Hidalgo, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Luz Maria; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Sargeant, Jan M; Coe, Jason B; Flockhart, D T Tyler; Reynoso Palomar, Alejandro; Canales Vargas, Erick J; Greer, Amy L

    2016-12-01

    against rabies in 2015. The knowledge of owned dog demography and ecology provided by this study can inform local government planning of dog population control interventions, and could serve as a baseline for the development of agent-based models to evaluate the effects of different dog population control strategies on dog demography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tree demography suggests multiple directions and drivers for species range shifts in mountains of Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Jay W; Dovciak, Martin

    2016-12-09

    Climate change is expected to lead to upslope shifts in tree species distributions, but the evidence is mixed partly due to land-use effects and individualistic species responses to climate. We examined how individual tree species demography varies along elevational climatic gradients across four states in the northeastern United States to determine whether species elevational distributions and their potential upslope (or downslope) shifts were controlled by climate, land-use legacies (past logging), or soils. We characterized tree demography, microclimate, land-use legacies, and soils at 83 sites stratified by elevation (~500 to ~1200 m above sea level) across 12 mountains containing the transition from northern hardwood to spruce-fir forests. We modeled elevational distributions of tree species saplings and adults using logistic regression to test whether sapling distributions suggest ongoing species range expansion upslope (or contraction downslope) relative to adults, and we used linear mixed models to determine the extent to which climate, land use, and soil variables explain these distributions. Tree demography varied with elevation by species, suggesting a potential upslope shift only for American beech, downslope shifts for red spruce (more so in cool regions) and sugar maple, and no change with elevation for balsam fir. While soils had relatively minor effects, climate was the dominant predictor for most species and more so for saplings than adults of red spruce, sugar maple, yellow birch, cordate birch, and striped maple. On the other hand, logging legacies were positively associated with American beech, sugar maple, and yellow birch, and negatively with red spruce and balsam fir - generally more so for adults than saplings. All species exhibited individualistic rather than synchronous demographic responses to climate and land use, and the return of red spruce to lower elevations where past logging originally benefited northern hardwood species indicates

  10. AdvancED Flex 4

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Shashank; Schulze, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    AdvancED Flex 4 makes advanced Flex 4 concepts and techniques easy. Ajax, RIA, Web 2.0, mashups, mobile applications, the most sophisticated web tools, and the coolest interactive web applications are all covered with practical, visually oriented recipes. * Completely updated for the new tools in Flex 4* Demonstrates how to use Flex 4 to create robust and scalable enterprise-grade Rich Internet Applications.* Teaches you to build high-performance web applications with interactivity that really engages your users.* What you'll learn Practiced beginners and intermediate users of Flex, especially

  11. Demography, vulnerabilities and right to health to Brazilian prison population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marden Marques; Bueno, Paula Michele Martins Gomes

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the latest research on the profile of the Brazilian prison population, its demography and current laws and regulations. It aims in the direction of ensuring the human right to health. Brazilian prison system is a complex universe in which state and federal criminal contexts keep more than 607,000 people in custody. This population is composed of 75% of young and black people, 67% poorly educated and 41% are pre-trial detainees, living in overcrowded prisons and architecturally vandalized, with population growth of around 575% in 24 years, making this environment a major focus of production of diseases. The prison becomes the object of differentiated intervention by public bodies linked to the executive and the judiciary - it is worth remarking that the data show the high level of inequalities and health vulnerabilities among the prison population, whose needs involve a set of cross-sector of transverse public policies actions towards penal execution.

  12. A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project's primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

  13. Flooding and Canopy Dynamics Shape the Demography of a Clonal Amazon Understorey Herb

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthias Schleuning; Vicky Huamán; Diethart Matthies

    2008-01-01

    .... We studied the influence of flooding and canopy gaps on the demography of the widespread clonal herb Heliconia metallica in 16 populations in the Peruvian Amazon over two wet and two dry seasons...

  14. The specific charged hadron multiplicity in ep and eD semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering in the PYTHIA and PACIAE models

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yu-Liang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhou, Dai-Mei; Cheng, Yun; Dong, Bao-Guo; Cai, Xu; Sa, Ben-Hao

    2015-01-01

    We employed the PYTHIA 6.4 model and the extended parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE 2.2 to comparatively investigate the DIS normalized specific charged hadron multiplicity in the 27.6 GeV electron semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off proton and deuteron. The PYTHIA and PACIAE results calculated with default model parameters not well and fairly well reproduce the corresponding HERMES data, respectively. In addition, we have discussed the effects of the differences between the PYTHIA and PACIAE models.

  15. Models for economical and environmental systematic cost benefit assessment of waste separate collection. Their application to the paper cycle; Modelli per la valutazione sistemica costi-benefici, economici ed ambientali, della raccolta differenziata dei rifiuti urbani. Applicazione alla filiera carta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltramo, R. [Turin Univ., Turin (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Merceologiche; Scapino, C. [Fise Assoambiente Unionmaceri, Rome (Italy)

    2001-04-01

    The research carried out by the Turin University on behalf of Fise Assoambiente, starting from an analysis of the specialised bibliography of the sector, has highlighted the complexity of the waste problem and the need of a more thorough study aiming at assessing economical and environmental impacts deriving from separate collection, with particular reference to the paper sector. To this end, thanks to the co-operation of companies operating in the collection, sorting and grading of paper and paper mills using maceration, it was possible to develop a model for micro-economical and environmental analysis of the paper cycle which supplied useful data for the detection - by means of the Stella programme, produced by High Performance Systems Inc. - of the effects resulting from a waste management policy oriented towards the attainment of the rigid separate collection targets. [Italian] La ricerca svolta dall'Universita' di Torino per conto di Fise Assoambiente, partendo da un'analisi di bibliografia specializzata del settore, ha evidenziato la complessita' del problema rifiuti e la necessita' di un approfondimento volto a valutare gli impatti economici ed ambientali derivanti dalla raccolta differenziata, con particolare riferimento al settore della carta. A tale scopo, grazie alla collaborazione di imprese operanti nel settore della raccolta, selezione e cernita della carta e di cartiere che utilizzano macero, e' stato predisposto un modello per l'analisi microeconomica ed ambientale della filiera carta, che ha fornito dati utili per rilevare a livello macroeconomico, mediante il programma Stella, prodotto dalla High Performance Systems Inc., gli effetti che scaturiscono da una politica di gestione dei rifiuti orientata al raggiungimento di obiettivi rigidi di raccolta differenziata.

  16. Drell-Yan production of multi Z'-bosons at the LHC within Non-Universal ED and 4D Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Accomando, Elena; De Curtis, Stefania; Fiaschi, Juri; Moretti, Stefano; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H

    2016-01-01

    The Drell-Yan di-lepton production at hadron colliders is by far the preferred channel to search for new heavy spin-1 particles. Traditionally, such searches have exploited the Narrow Width Approximation (NWA) for the signal, thereby neglecting the effect of the interference between the additional Z'-bosons and the Standard Model Z and {\\gamma}. Recently, it has been established that both finite width and interference effects can be dealt with in experimental searches while still retaining the model independent approach ensured by the NWA. This assessment has been made for the case of popular single Z'-boson models currently probed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this paper, we test the scope of the CERN machine in relation to the above issues for some benchmark multi Z'-boson models. In particular, we consider Non-Universal Extra Dimensional (NUED) scenarios and the 4-Dimensional Composite Higgs Model (4DCHM), both predicting a multi-Z' peaking structure. We conclude that in a variety of cases, s...

  17. Drell-Yan production of multi Z '-bosons at the LHC within Non-Universal ED and 4D Composite Higgs Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomando, Elena; Barducci, Daniele; De Curtis, Stefania; Fiaschi, Juri; Moretti, Stefano; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.

    2016-07-01

    The Drell-Yan di-lepton production at hadron colliders is by far the preferred channel to search for new heavy spin-1 particles. Traditionally, such searches have exploited the Narrow Width Approximation (NWA) for the signal, thereby neglecting the effect of the interference between the additional Z '-bosons and the Standard Model Z and γ. Recently, it has been established that both finite width and interference effects can be dealt with in experimental searches while still retaining the model independent approach ensured by the NWA. This assessment has been made for the case of popular single Z '-boson models currently probed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this paper, we test the scope of the CERN machine in relation to the above issues for some benchmark multi Z '-boson models. In particular, we consider Non-Universal Extra Dimensional (NUED) scenarios and the 4-Dimensional Composite Higgs Model (4DCHM), both predicting a multi- Z ' peaking structure. We conclude that in a variety of cases, specifically those in which the leptonic decays modes of one or more of the heavy neutral gauge bosons are suppressed and/or significant interference effects exist between these or with the background, especially present when their decay widths are significant, traditional search approaches based on the assumption of rather narrow and isolated objects might require suitable modifications to extract the underlying dynamics.

  18. Unraveling the effects of selection and demography on immune gene variation in free-ranging plains zebra (Equus quagga populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline L Kamath

    Full Text Available Demography, migration and natural selection are predominant processes affecting the distribution of genetic variation among natural populations. Many studies use neutral genetic markers to make inferences about population history. However, the investigation of functional coding loci, which directly reflect fitness, is critical to our understanding of species' ecology and evolution. Immune genes, such as those of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, play an important role in pathogen recognition and provide a potent model system for studying selection. We contrasted diversity patterns of neutral data with MHC loci, ELA-DRA and -DQA, in two southern African plains zebra (Equus quagga populations: Etosha National Park, Namibia, and Kruger National Park, South Africa. Results from neutrality tests, along with observations of elevated diversity and low differentiation across populations, supported previous genus-level evidence for balancing selection at these loci. Despite being low, MHC divergence across populations was significant and may be attributed to drift effects typical of geographically separated populations experiencing little to no gene flow, or alternatively to shifting allele frequency distributions driven by spatially variable and fluctuating pathogen communities. At the DRA, zebra exhibited geographic differentiation concordant with microsatellites and reduced levels of diversity in Etosha due to highly skewed allele frequencies that could not be explained by demography, suggestive of spatially heterogeneous selection and local adaptation. This study highlights the complexity in which selection affects immune gene diversity and warrants the need for further research on the ecological mechanisms shaping patterns of adaptive variation among natural populations.

  19. Project-based Collaborative learning in distance education in "The Aalborg PBL Model – Progress, Diversity and Challenges" (Eds.: Anette Kolmos, Flemming K. Fink and Lone Krogh)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, C.; Helbo, Jan

    This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII......, didactic adjustments have been made based on feedback, in particular from evaluation questionnaires. This process has been very constructive in approaching the goal: a successful model for project organized learning in distance education....

  20. Due etimologie venete ed istriane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zamboni

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Un isolato dialetto del Medio Agordino (La Valle, BL attesta per 'ginepro' (Juniperus eommunis L., d'altronde compattamente designato come dzené(iver, deneore il termine bozičo che richiama il busicio dato già per l'area bellunese dal Soravia (1877, 108. II Pellegrini (1964, 28 enota 51 ne riscontra il perfetto corrispondente del Veneto orientale buzíčo documentato al p. 356 (S. Stino di Livenza dali' AIS 599 e l'accosta senz'altro al padovano (in realtà piuttosto veneziano di terraferma brusiehio (eh = (č! segnalato dal Patriarchi (1821, ma I'ed. 1775 e che si giustificherebbe con l'intrusione di 'bruciare' dal noto usodi bruciare le bacche della pianta per suffumigi, cfr. il ted. regionale Feuerbaum (su cui Marzell 2/1972, 1091 e anche il tipo brusìn dell'alta Val di Sole (Pedrotti-Bertoldi 1931, 206s.. Si osservi che anche il grande repertorio poliglotta del Nemnich (3/1794, 267 dà esplicitamente brusichio per Venezia. Sul tipo e sull'etimo il Pellegrini ritorna più avanti (1982, 185 riassumendo la bibliografia precedente e aggiungendo documentazioni dall' ASLEF: bo/ič al p. 172 (Chions, PN e ancora nel friulano occidentale (in pratica sempre nella zona di confine col veneto sbrodicio, sbradicio a Budoia (AppiSanson 1970, 28;

  1. A Cold Model Experimental Study on the Flow Characterisitcs of Bed Baterial in A Fluidized ed Bottom Ash Cooler in a CFB Boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuXiaofeng; LiYourong

    2000-01-01

    A cold model experimental study on the flowing characteristics of bed meterial between a fluidized bed ash cooler and a furnace of CFB boiler were discussed in this paper.The research results showed that flowing status of the bed material in a bubbling bed,which was run with a circulating fluidized bed together in parallel operation,was influenced by the pressure difference between the CFB and the bubbling bed,the switch status of unlocking air ,and the structure of the exit of the bubbling bed.There was a circulating flow of bed material between CFB and bubbling bed.

  2. Regional statistical model for the estimation of storm depths of high return period; Modello regionale per la stima delle piogge di breve durata ed elevato tempo di ritorno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maione, U.; Romiti, R.; Tomirotti, M. [Milan Politecnico, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Idraulica, Ambientale e del Rilevamento

    2000-06-01

    In the present paper a regional model for the estimation of storm depths for the Po river basin is proposed. The method is based on the introduction of a probabilistic model depending only on the standard deviation of the random variable; this model has been calibrated upon the largest values of the historical series of the annual maxima of rainfall depths in given duration available for the gauging stations belonging to the region under study. Adopting the usual monomial formula for the intensity-duration-frequency curves, the parameters of these curves have been expressed in terms of the standard deviation of the maximum annual 1-hour and 24-hour rainfall depths. The regional estimation of the intensity-duration-frequency curves has been accomplished by mapping the contour lines of the standard deviation of the maximum annual 1-hour and 1-day rainfall depths after calibration of a relation between the latter and the standard deviation of the maximum annual 24-hour rainfall depth. The performances of the method have been compared with those coming from other models recently proposed in literature. [Italian] Nella presente memoria viene proposto un metodo di stima regionale delle piogge intense per il bacino del Po. Esso si basa sull'introduzione di un modello probabilistico dipendente dal solo scarto quadratico medio della variabile; tale modello e' stato tarato sui valori massimi delle serie storiche delle altezze massime annuali di precipitazione in assegnata durata relative alle stazioni pluviografiche ricadenti nell'area di indagine. Adottando la consueta espressione monomia delle linee segnalatrici di possibilita' pluviometrica, i parametri di tali curve sono stati espressi in funzione dello scarto quadratico medio dell'altezza di precipitazione massima annuale di durata 1 e 24 ore. La stima regionale delle linee segnalatrici di possibilita' pluviometrica e' stata ottenuta mediante la costruzione di mappe delle isolinee

  3. Project-based Collaborative learning in distance education in "The Aalborg PBL Model – Progress, Diversity and Challenges" (Eds.: Anette Kolmos, Flemming K. Fink and Lone Krogh)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Bajard, C.; Helbo, Jan

    This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII)......, didactic adjustments have been made based on feedback, in particular from evaluation questionnaires. This process has been very constructive in approaching the goal: a successful model for project organized learning in distance education.......This article describes the experiences drawn from an experiment in transferring positive experience with a project-organised on-campus engineering programme to a technology supported distance education programme. Three years of experience with the Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII......) programme indicates, however, that adjustments are required in transforming the on-campus model to distance education. The main problem is that while project work is an excellent regulator of the learning process for on-campus students, this does not seem to be the case for off-campus students. Consequently...

  4. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) movement and demography at Dilman Meadow: implications for future monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelgren, Nathan D.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Bowerman, Jay; Adams, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    and size classes and the transition between these classes. Body size in amphibians is strongly positively linked with the probability of breeding (Semlitsch et al. 1988, Smith 1987), fecundity (Howard 1980, Berven 1981, Berven and Gill 1983), and survival (Altwegg and Reyer 2003, Chelgren et al. 2006). Thus, growth of individuals is an important component of population change. Estimates of demographic rates for one gender are often used to infer population growth rates or population viability (Caswell 2001). However, in anurans such as Ranid frogs, gender is thought to affect survival rate (Wood et al. 1998, Lyapkov et al. 2004), probability of dispersal (Austin et al. 2003, Palo et al. 2004), age at sexual maturation (Lyapkov et al. 2004), and breeding probability (Muths et al. 2006). Moreover, males and females differ in energetic costs associated with breeding (Feder and Burggren 1992) and in growth rate (Lyapkov et al. 2004). Differences in demographic rates between genders will generally affect population growth rate for small populations (Engen et al. 2003, Si??ther et al. 2004, Husby et al. 2006), so it is important to distinguish these differences during monitoring. For example, it has been hypothesized that differences in the frequency at which male and female western toads (Bufo boreas) visit breeding sites have led to differential mortality from Chytridiomycosis, resulting in highly skewed sex ratios and diminished reproductive output (Muths et al. 2003). We examined sex- and size-specific demography at Dilman Meadow with particular focus on a priori hypotheses regarding survival, movement, and growth. It is generally no longer defensible to use captures or sightings of individuals to estimate demographic rates when numbers are uncorrected for differences in the probability of capture. Instead, capture, survival, and movement probabilities are modeled simultaneously to reduce bias in estimates of demographic rates (Williams et al. 2001). The missin

  5. [Effects of temperature on Keratella quadrata life table demography and morphometric characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ya-Li; Xi, Yi-Long; Ma, Jie; Xu, Dan-Dan

    2011-05-01

    By the method of individual culture, this paper studied the effects of temperature (10 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 20 degrees C, and 25 degrees C) on the life table demography (net reproductive rate, intrinsic rate of population increase, generation time, average lifespan, and proportion of mictic offspring) and the offspring morphometric characteristics (body length, body width, antero-median spine length, left and right antero-lateral spine lengths, left and right posterior-spine lengths, and posterior spine number) of two posterior-spined, single posterior-spined, and zero posterior-spined morphotypes of Keratella quadrata. All the test life table demographic parameters and offspring morphometric parameters differed with morphotype and temperature, and their responses to elevated temperature differed with morphotype. Temperature had significant effects on the intrinsic rate of population increase, generation time, average lifespan, and the offspring morphometric parameters (P morphotype had significant effects on the offspring body length, antero-median spine length, and left and right posterior-spine lengths (P 0.05); and the interaction of temperature and morphotype had significant effects on the generation time and all the offspring morphometric parameters (P morphotypes, the two posterior-spined morphotype had shorter offspring body length (122.1+/- 0.6 microm) than the zero and single posterior-spined morphotypes (126.3 +/- 0.7 microm and 125.1 +/- 0.7 microm, respectively). The offspring antero-median spine length (32.5 +/- 0.3 microm) of the two posterior-spined morphotype was longer than that of the zero and single posterior-spined morphotypes (31.1 +/- 0.3 microm and 30.8 +/- 0.3 microm, respectively). The offspring left and right posterior-spine lengths of the two posterior-spined morphotype (31.2 +/- 1.0 microm and 32.3 +/- 0.9 microm, respectively) were similar to those of the single posterior-spined morphotype (29.5 +/-0.8 microm and 31.5 +/- 0

  6. GeneEd -- A Genetics Educational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 GeneEd — A Genetics Educational Resource Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Science ... The Hereditary Material of Life / GeneEd — A Genetics Educational Resource / Using The Genetics Home Reference Website / Understanding the ...

  7. Spatial structure and nest demography reveal the influence of competition, parasitism and habitat quality on slavemaking ants and their hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer-Blass Birgit

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural communities are structured by intra-guild competition, predation or parasitism and the abiotic environment. We studied the relative importance of these factors in two host-social parasite ecosystems in three ant communities in Europe (Bavaria and North America (New York, West Virginia. We tested how these factors affect colony demography, life-history and the spatial pattern of colonies, using a large sample size of more than 1000 colonies. The strength of competition was measured by the distance to the nearest competitor. Distance to the closest social parasite colony was used as a measure of parasitism risk. Nest sites (i.e., sticks or acorns are limited in these forest ecosystems and we therefore included nest site quality as an abiotic factor in the analysis. In contrast to previous studies based on local densities, we focus here on the positioning and spatial patterns and we use models to compare our predictions to random expectations. Results Colony demography was universally affected by the size of the nest site with larger and more productive colonies residing in larger nest sites of higher quality. Distance to the nearest competitor negatively influenced host demography and brood production in the Bavarian community, pointing to an important role of competition, while social parasitism was less influential in this community. The New York community was characterized by the highest habitat variability, and productive colonies were clustered in sites of higher quality. Colonies were clumped on finer spatial scales, when we considered only the nearest neighbors, but more regularly distributed on coarser scales. The analysis of spatial positioning within plots often produced different results compared to those based on colony densities. For example, while host and slavemaker densities are often positively correlated, slavemakers do not nest closer to potential host colonies than expected by random. Conclusions The

  8. Experts correctly describe demography associated with historical decline of the endangered Indiana bat, but not recent period of stationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Sanders-Reed, Carol A.; Szymanski, Jennifer; Pruitt, Lori; Runge, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic characteristics of bats are often insufficiently described for modeling populations. In data poor situations, experts are often relied upon for characterizing ecological systems. In concert with the development of a matrix model describing Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) demography, we elicited estimates for parameterizing this model from 12 experts. We conducted this elicitation in two stages, requesting expert values for 12 demographic rates. These rates were adult and juvenile seasonal (winter, summer, fall) survival rates, pup survival in fall, and propensity and success at breeding. Experts were most in agreement about adult fall survival (3% Coefficient of Variation) and least in agreement about propensity of juveniles to breed (37% CV). The experts showed greater concordance for adult ( mean CV, adult = 6.2%) than for juvenile parameters ( mean CV, juvenile = 16.4%), and slightly more agreement for survival (mean CV, survival = 9.8%) compared to reproductive rates ( mean CV, reproduction = 15.1%). However, survival and reproduction were negatively and positively biased, respectively, relative to a stationary dynamic. Despite the species exhibiting near stationary dynamics for two decades prior to the onset of a potential extinction-causing agent, white-nose syndrome, expert estimates indicated a population decline of -11% per year (95% CI = -2%, -20%); quasi-extinction was predicted within a century ( mean = 61 years to QE, range = 32, 97) by 10 of the 12 experts. Were we to use these expert estimates in our modeling efforts, we would have errantly trained our models to a rapidly declining demography asymptomatic of recent demographic behavior. While experts are sometimes the only source of information, a clear understanding of the temporal and spatial context of the information being elicited is necessary to guard against wayward predictions.

  9. The role of demography and markets in determining deforestation rates near Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P Brooks

    Full Text Available The highland forests of Madagascar are home to some of the world's most unique and diverse flora and fauna and to some of its poorest people. This juxtaposition of poverty and biodiversity is continually reinforced by rapid population growth, which results in increasing pressure on the remaining forest habitat in the highland region, and the biodiversity therein. Here we derive a mathematical expression for the subsistence of households to assess the role of markets and household demography on deforestation near Ranomafana National Park. In villages closest to urban rice markets, households were likely to clear less land than our model predicted, presumably because they were purchasing food at market. This effect was offset by the large number of migrant households who cleared significantly more land between 1989-2003 than did residents throughout the region. Deforestation by migrant households typically occurred after a mean time lag of 9 years. Analyses suggest that while local conservation efforts in Madagascar have been successful at reducing the footprint of individual households, large-scale conservation must rely on policies that can reduce the establishment of new households in remaining forested areas.

  10. The co-evolution of social institutions, demography, and large-scale human cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Simon T; Lehmann, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Human cooperation is typically coordinated by institutions, which determine the outcome structure of the social interactions individuals engage in. Explaining the Neolithic transition from small- to large-scale societies involves understanding how these institutions co-evolve with demography. We study this using a demographically explicit model of institution formation in a patch-structured population. Each patch supports both social and asocial niches. Social individuals create an institution, at a cost to themselves, by negotiating how much of the costly public good provided by cooperators is invested into sanctioning defectors. The remainder of their public good is invested in technology that increases carrying capacity, such as irrigation systems. We show that social individuals can invade a population of asocials, and form institutions that support high levels of cooperation. We then demonstrate conditions where the co-evolution of cooperation, institutions, and demographic carrying capacity creates a transition from small- to large-scale social groups. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  11. Demography of a breeding population of whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz, Johanna

    I used a GIS raster layer of an area in the Churchill, Manitoba region to investigate the effect of breeding habitat on demography and density of Whimbrel from 2010 through 2013. Program MARK was used to quantify adult and daily nest survival. Apparent annual survival of 0.73 +/- 0.06 SE (95% CI = 0.60-0.83) did not significantly differ between sexes or habitats and was lower than expected based on longevity records and estimates for other large-bodied shorebirds. Nest success, corrected for exposure days, was highly variable, ranging from a low of 3% (95% CI = 0-12%) in 2011 to a high of 71% (95% CI = 54-83%) in 2013. The highest rate of nest survival occurred in the spring with the warmest mean temperature. I developed a generalized linear model (GLM) with a negative-binomial distribution from random plots that were surveyed for abundance to extrapolate a local breeding population size of 410 +/- 230 SE and density of 3.2 birds per square km +/- 1.8 SE. The result of my study suggests that other aspects of habitat not captured by the land cover categories may be more important to population dynamics.

  12. Sex-specific demography and generalization of the Trivers-Willard theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Susanne; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Grüning, André; Neuhaus, Peter; Traill, Lochran W.; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2015-10-01

    The Trivers-Willard theory proposes that the sex ratio of offspring should vary with maternal condition when it has sex-specific influences on offspring fitness. In particular, mothers in good condition in polygynous and dimorphic species are predicted to produce an excess of sons, whereas mothers in poor condition should do the opposite. Despite the elegance of the theory, support for it has been limited. Here we extend and generalize the Trivers-Willard theory to explain the disparity between predictions and observations of offspring sex ratio. In polygynous species, males typically have higher mortality rates, different age-specific reproductive schedules and more risk-prone life history tactics than females; however, these differences are not currently incorporated into the Trivers-Willard theory. Using two-sex models parameterized with data from free-living mammal populations with contrasting levels of sex differences in demography, we demonstrate how sex differences in life history traits over the entire lifespan can lead to a wide range of sex allocation tactics, and show that correlations between maternal condition and offspring sex ratio alone are insufficient to conclude that mothers adaptively adjust offspring sex ratio.

  13. Interplay between insecticide-treated bed-nets and mosquito demography: implications for malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngonghala, Calistus N; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal; Zhao, Ruijun; Prosper, Olivia

    2016-05-21

    Although malaria prevalence has witnessed a significant reduction within the past decade, malaria still constitutes a major health and economic problem, especially to low-income countries. Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) remain one of the primary measures for preventing the malignant disease. Unfortunately, the success of ITN campaigns is hampered by improper use and natural decay in ITN-efficacy over time. Many models aimed at studying malaria transmission and control fail to account for this decay, as well as mosquito demography and feeding preferences exhibited by mosquitoes towards humans. Omitting these factors can misrepresent disease risk, while understanding their effects on malaria dynamics can inform control policy. We present a model for malaria dynamics that incorporates these factors, and a systematic analysis, including stability and sensitivity analyses of the model under different conditions. The model with constant ITN-efficacy exhibits a backward bifurcation emphasizing the need for sustained control measures until the basic reproduction number, R0, drops below a critical value at which control is feasible. The infectious and partially immune human populations and R0 are highly sensitive to the probability that a mosquito feeds successfully on a human, ITN coverage and the maximum biting rate of mosquitoes, irrespective of whether ITN-efficacy is constant or declines over time. This implies that ITNs play an important role in disease control. When ITN-efficacy wanes over time, we identify disease risks and corresponding ITN coverage, as well as feeding preference levels for which the disease can be controlled or eradicated. Our study leads to important insights that could assist in the design and implementation of better malaria control strategies. We conclude that ITNs that can retain their effectiveness for longer periods will be more appropriate in the fight against malaria and that making more ITNs available to highly endemic regions is

  14. Thai family demography: a review and research prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K; Podhisita, C

    1992-01-01

    A review of family demography in Thailand is presented, and future research needs are identified. Suggestions for future research include a determination of an acceptable set of standard roles and obligations among family members in the "loose structure" paradigm and an analysis of marital stability. Other researchable topics include support to the elderly, family allocations to children, changes among rural adolescents, and family responses to AIDS. Embree and other researchers defined the Thai family as a "loosely structured" paradigm where behavior within the family was highly variable. Anthropologists Sulamith and Potter have described the matrilineal system, and others have referred to the influences of Buddhism on family roles. Foster identified traditional Thai marriage as based on individual choice of spouse, which was often based on romantic love and the desired approval of parents. Arranged marriages declined in importance. Rural Thais married within their villages but outside their matrilineage. Bridewealth payments were not rigidly enforced. Marriage forms included formal Buddhist marriage, legal registration, or both; elopement; and cohabitation. By 1991 marriage age had stabilized at 22 years for women and 24 years for men. Muslim women married at a younger age than Buddhist women. Marriage was delayed in urban areas, after migration, with increased education, and with labor force participation and nonagricultural employment. Studies by Limanonda found that first birth status and smaller sibling size were associated with earlier marriage. Marriage was nearly universal, but singlehood was accepted. 15% of first marriages during the later 1970s were found to have ended in divorce. Remarriage was common. Average household size was 4.0 in 1988. 15.7% of households with children 0-15 years old in 1990 were female headed. Higher education was found to be related to nuclear family formation. Kinship was a bilateral system based on sex, relative age, and

  15. "What do people do if they don't have insurance?": ED to ED Referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Prasad, Siddharth; Rhodes, Karin V

    2017-08-28

    Up to 20% of patients seen in public emergency departments (EDs) have already been seen for the same complaint at another ED, but little is known about the origin or impact of these duplicate ED visits. The goals of this investigation were to explore (1) whether patients making a repeat ED visit are self-referred or indirectly referred from the other ED; and (2) gather the perspective of affected patients on the health, social, and financial consequences of these duplicate ED visits. This mixed-methods study conducted over a 10-week period during 2016 in a large public hospital ED in Texas prospectively surveyed patients seen in another ED for the same chief complaint. Selected patients presenting with fractures were then enrolled for semi-structured qualitative interviews, which were audiotaped, transcribed, and independently coded by two team members until thematic saturation was reached. 143 patients were identified as being recently seen at another local ED for the same chief complaint prior to presenting to the public hospital; 94% were uninsured and 61% presented with fractures. 27% required admission at the public ED and 95% of those discharged required further outpatient follow-up. 51 patients completed a survey and qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 fracture patients. 53% of patients reported that staff at the first hospital told them to go the public hospital ED, and 23% reported referral from a follow-up physician associated with the first hospital. 73% reported receiving the same tests at both EDs. Interview themes identified multiple healthcare visits for the same injury, concern about complications, disrespectful treatment at the first ED, delayed care, problems accessing needed follow-up care without insurance, loss of work, and financial strain. The majority of patients presenting to a public hospital ED after treatment for the same complaint in another local ED were indirectly referred to the public ED without transferring paperwork or

  16. Thermodynamics. 5. enl. ed.; Thermodynamik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, C.; Kroemer, H.

    2001-07-01

    This textbook covers the following topics: States in a model system, entropy and temperature, Boltzmann distribution and free energy, thermal radiation and Planck distribution, chemical potential and Gibbs distribution, the ideal gas, Fermi and Bose gases, heat, free enthalpy and chemical reactions, phase transitions, binary mixtures, low-temperature technique, semiconductor statistics, kinetic gas theory (WL).

  17. Interactions between social structure, demography, and transmission determine disease persistence in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadie J Ryan

    Full Text Available Catastrophic declines in African great ape populations due to disease outbreaks have been reported in recent years, yet we rarely hear of similar disease impacts for the more solitary Asian great apes, or for smaller primates. We used an age-structured model of different primate social systems to illustrate that interactions between social structure and demography create 'dynamic constraints' on the pathogens that can establish and persist in primate host species with different social systems. We showed that this varies by disease transmission mode. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs require high rates of transmissibility to persist within a primate population. In particular, for a unimale social system, STIs require extremely high rates of transmissibility for persistence, and remain at extremely low prevalence in small primates, but this is less constrained in longer-lived, larger-bodied primates. In contrast, aerosol transmitted infections (ATIs spread and persist at high prevalence in medium and large primates with moderate transmissibility;, establishment and persistence in small-bodied primates require higher relative rates of transmissibility. Intragroup contact structure - the social network - creates different constraints for different transmission modes, and our model underscores the importance of intragroup contacts on infection prior to intergroup movement in a structured population. When alpha males dominate sexual encounters, the resulting disease transmission dynamics differ from when social interactions are dominated by mother-infant grooming events, for example. This has important repercussions for pathogen spread across populations. Our framework reveals essential social and demographic characteristics of primates that predispose them to different disease risks that will be important for disease management and conservation planning for protected primate populations.

  18. Interactions between social structure, demography, and transmission determine disease persistence in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sadie J; Jones, James H; Dobson, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic declines in African great ape populations due to disease outbreaks have been reported in recent years, yet we rarely hear of similar disease impacts for the more solitary Asian great apes, or for smaller primates. We used an age-structured model of different primate social systems to illustrate that interactions between social structure and demography create 'dynamic constraints' on the pathogens that can establish and persist in primate host species with different social systems. We showed that this varies by disease transmission mode. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) require high rates of transmissibility to persist within a primate population. In particular, for a unimale social system, STIs require extremely high rates of transmissibility for persistence, and remain at extremely low prevalence in small primates, but this is less constrained in longer-lived, larger-bodied primates. In contrast, aerosol transmitted infections (ATIs) spread and persist at high prevalence in medium and large primates with moderate transmissibility;, establishment and persistence in small-bodied primates require higher relative rates of transmissibility. Intragroup contact structure - the social network - creates different constraints for different transmission modes, and our model underscores the importance of intragroup contacts on infection prior to intergroup movement in a structured population. When alpha males dominate sexual encounters, the resulting disease transmission dynamics differ from when social interactions are dominated by mother-infant grooming events, for example. This has important repercussions for pathogen spread across populations. Our framework reveals essential social and demographic characteristics of primates that predispose them to different disease risks that will be important for disease management and conservation planning for protected primate populations.

  19. Demography and population status of polar bears in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Regher, Eric V; Servanty, Sabrina; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the demography and population status of the Western Hudson Bay (WH) polar bear subpopulation for the period 1984-2011, using live-recapture data from research studies and management actions, and dead-recovery data from polar bears harvested for subsistence purposes or removed during human-bear conflicts.

  20. Demography of Mexican spotted owls in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph L. Ganey; Gary C. White; James P. Ward; Sean C. Kyle; Darrell L. Apprill; Todd A. Rawlinson; Ryan S. Jonnes

    2014-01-01

    Information on population dynamics is key to gauging the status of threatened or endangered species. We monitored demography of a population of threatened Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico from 2003 to 2011. We estimated reproductive output for territorial pairs of owls; used mark-recapture methodology and Pradel...

  1. Contemporary population structure and post-glacial genetic demography in a migratory marine species, the blacknose shark, Carcharhinus acronotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, D S; Hollenbeck, C M; Belcher, C N; Driggers, W B; Frazier, B S; Gelsleichter, J; Grubbs, R D; Gold, J R

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of population structure and historical genetic demography of blacknose sharks in the western North Atlantic Ocean were assessed using variation in nuclear-encoded microsatellites and sequences of mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Significant heterogeneity and/or inferred barriers to gene flow, based on microsatellites and/or mtDNA, revealed the occurrence of five genetic populations localized to five geographic regions: the southeastern U.S Atlantic coast, the eastern Gulf of Mexico, the western Gulf of Mexico, Bay of Campeche in the southern Gulf of Mexico and the Bahamas. Pairwise estimates of genetic divergence between sharks in the Bahamas and those in all other localities were more than an order of magnitude higher than between pairwise comparisons involving the other localities. Demographic modelling indicated that sharks in all five regions diverged after the last glacial maximum and, except for the Bahamas, experienced post-glacial, population expansion. The patterns of genetic variation also suggest that the southern Gulf of Mexico may have served as a glacial refuge and source for the expansion. Results of the study demonstrate that barriers to gene flow and historical genetic demography contributed to contemporary patterns of population structure in a coastal migratory species living in an otherwise continuous marine habitat. The results also indicate that for many marine species, failure to properly characterize barriers in terms of levels of contemporary gene flow could in part be due to inferences based solely on equilibrium assumptions. This could lead to erroneous conclusions regarding levels of connectivity in species of conservation concern.

  2. Population issues in economic planning: uses of demography in business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R J

    1984-01-01

    Economists use demography in planning and forecasting business needs. As a bank, Westpac uses the information for its own internal business purposes and to assess general economic trends. Externally, the bank is expected by government and the public to have some authoritative views on the state of the economy. To form these views, it is necessary to understand a very wide array of statistical indicators, including demographic statistics. The main population issues of concern are: size, location, and changes in the population of Australia as a whole and by State; labor force (including projections); age profile of Australia and by State. The major source for this information is the Australian Bureau of Statistics. More detailed patterns often emerge, particularly for individual States, from papers prepared by others. This information is used by Westpac in 3 main planning areas and 2 broad assessment areas: planning -- location of bank branches, products/services offered, and marketing of products/services; and assessment -- economic outlook (labor force, housing needs, demand for funds) and specific industries. Recently, Westpac restructured its organization to cater to the changing needs of customers and the changing geographic patterns of population spread. The bank now has 4 major groups: retail financial services for personal and commercial markets; corporate and international; management services; and group planning (includes economic department). To offer products that fit the market, the bank needs to know the characteristics of the population by age, spending patterns, lifestyle preferences, and investment needs. Within Australia, a relatively new service offered by most financial institutions, which is directly related to population issues, is a counseling service for retirees. Westpac has a product called Club 55, which is a package of services designed for persons who have retired or are planning to retire. Another clearly perceived community need is for

  3. Plant immunity: the EDS1 regulatory node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiermer, Marcel; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E

    2005-08-01

    ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1) and its interacting partner, PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4), constitute a regulatory hub that is essential for basal resistance to invasive biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens. EDS1 and PAD4 are also recruited by Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-type nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins to signal isolate-specific pathogen recognition. Recent work points to a fundamental role of EDS1 and PAD4 in transducing redox signals in response to certain biotic and abiotic stresses. These intracellular proteins are important activators of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and also mediate antagonism between the jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) defense response pathways. EDS1 forms several molecularly and spatially distinct complexes with PAD4 and a newly discovered in vivo signaling partner, SENESCENCE ASSOCIATED GENE 101 (SAG101). Together, EDS1, PAD4 and SAG101 provide a major barrier to infection by both host-adapted and non-host pathogens.

  4. Demography of a population collapse: the Northern Idaho ground squirrel (Spermophilus brunneus brunneus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, P.W.; Runge, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the demography of a population of Northern Idaho ground squirrels (Spermophilus brunneus brunneus) in Adams Co., Idaho. The population was completely censused yearly from 1987 to 1999, during which time it declined from 272 to 10 animals. The finite population growth rate, based on a Leslie matrix model of average life-history parameters, was only 0.72 (i.e., significantly sensitive to proportional changes in juvenile female survival than to any other single life-history parameter. Comparisons with self-sustaining populations of closely related ground squirrel species revealed that juvenile survival and breeding rates of yearling females were anomalously low. We believe that the ultimate cause of the population's collapse was inadequacy of food resources, particularly seeds, due to drying of the habitat and changes in plant species composition, likely the result of fire suppression and grazing. No 'rescue' by immigration occurred, probably because S. b. brunneus seldom disperse long distances and fire suppression has allowed conifers to encroach on inhabited meadows, shrinking them and closing dispersal routes. The proximate cause of the population's collapse was mortality of older breeding females, which reduced the mean age of breeders. Younger females had lower average pregnancy rates and litter sizes. To place our results in context we developed a new, general classification of anthropogenic population declines, based on whether they are caused by changes in the means of the life-history parameters (blatant disturbances), their variances (inappropriate variations), or the correlations among them (evolutionary traps). Many S. b. brunneus populations have disappeared in recent years, apparently due to blatant disturbances, especially loss of habitat and changes in food-plant composition, resulting in inadequate prehibernation nutrition and starvation overwinter. In addition, our study population may have been caught in an evolutionary trap, because the

  5. Rapid intrahost evolution of human cytomegalovirus is shaped by demography and positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzette, Nicholas; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Fisher, Donna; Schleiss, Mark R; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    Populations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a large DNA virus, are highly polymorphic in patient samples, which may allow for rapid evolution within human hosts. To understand HCMV evolution, longitudinally sampled genomic populations from the urine and plasma of 5 infants with symptomatic congenital HCMV infection were analyzed. Temporal and compartmental variability of viral populations were quantified using high throughput sequencing and population genetics approaches. HCMV populations were generally stable over time, with ~88% of SNPs displaying similar frequencies. However, samples collected from plasma and urine of the same patient at the same time were highly differentiated with approximately 1700 consensus sequence SNPs (1.2% of the genome) identified between compartments. This inter-compartment differentiation was comparable to the differentiation observed in unrelated hosts. Models of demography (i.e., changes in population size and structure) and positive selection were evaluated to explain the observed patterns of variation. Evidence for strong bottlenecks (>90% reduction in viral population size) was consistent among all patients. From the timing of the bottlenecks, we conclude that fetal infection occurred between 13-18 weeks gestational age in patients analyzed, while colonization of the urine compartment followed roughly 2 months later. The timing of these bottlenecks is consistent with the clinical histories of congenital HCMV infections. We next inferred that positive selection plays a small but measurable role in viral evolution within a single compartment. However, positive selection appears to be a strong and pervasive driver of evolution associated with compartmentalization, affecting ≥ 34 of the 167 open reading frames (~20%) of the genome. This work offers the most detailed map of HCMV in vivo evolution to date and provides evidence that viral populations can be stable or rapidly differentiate, depending on host environment. The

  6. Rapid intrahost evolution of human cytomegalovirus is shaped by demography and positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Renzette

    Full Text Available Populations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, a large DNA virus, are highly polymorphic in patient samples, which may allow for rapid evolution within human hosts. To understand HCMV evolution, longitudinally sampled genomic populations from the urine and plasma of 5 infants with symptomatic congenital HCMV infection were analyzed. Temporal and compartmental variability of viral populations were quantified using high throughput sequencing and population genetics approaches. HCMV populations were generally stable over time, with ~88% of SNPs displaying similar frequencies. However, samples collected from plasma and urine of the same patient at the same time were highly differentiated with approximately 1700 consensus sequence SNPs (1.2% of the genome identified between compartments. This inter-compartment differentiation was comparable to the differentiation observed in unrelated hosts. Models of demography (i.e., changes in population size and structure and positive selection were evaluated to explain the observed patterns of variation. Evidence for strong bottlenecks (>90% reduction in viral population size was consistent among all patients. From the timing of the bottlenecks, we conclude that fetal infection occurred between 13-18 weeks gestational age in patients analyzed, while colonization of the urine compartment followed roughly 2 months later. The timing of these bottlenecks is consistent with the clinical histories of congenital HCMV infections. We next inferred that positive selection plays a small but measurable role in viral evolution within a single compartment. However, positive selection appears to be a strong and pervasive driver of evolution associated with compartmentalization, affecting ≥ 34 of the 167 open reading frames (~20% of the genome. This work offers the most detailed map of HCMV in vivo evolution to date and provides evidence that viral populations can be stable or rapidly differentiate, depending on host environment

  7. TED-Ed lessons & TED-Ed clubs: Educational activities to amplify students' voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villias, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    TED-Ed lessons and TED-Ed clubs are two powerful educational tools that can be used in today's school classrooms in order to create an educational environment that is engaging for the students and favors their active participation, created and fostered by TED-Ed. TED-Ed is TED's educational initiative, committed to create lessons worth sharing and amplify the voices and ideas of teachers and students around the world. TED-Ed animated lessons are fully organized lessons structured around an animated video that introduces new topics to learners in an exciting, thought-provoking way. These lessons have been created as a result of the cooperation between expert educators and animators and have been uploaded at the TED-Ed platform (http://ed.ted.com). On the other hand, TED-Ed Clubs are also an interesting way to offer students the chance, the voice and the opportunity to express their thoughts, engage actively on these matters and connect with each other, both at a local, as well as at an international level (http://ed.ted.com/clubs). By developing new TED-Ed lessons or by customizing appropriately existing animated TED-Ed lessons (translating, modifying the questions asked, introducing new discussion topics), I have created and implemented in my student-centered, didactic approach, a series of TED-ED animated lessons directly connected with the Greek national science syllabus that were used to spark students curiosity and initiate a further analytical discussion or introduce other relevant educational activities (http://gvillias.wixsite.com/education). Furthermore, at my school, we established Varvakeio TED-Ed Club, an environment that supports and empowers our students to research, develop and disseminate their own personal ideas that worth spreading. During the year, our members were inspired by watching TED talks presented by experts on their field on various different areas, including social, economical, environmental and technological-scientific issues. Our aim

  8. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  9. Species-specific patterns of fine root demography and hydraulic lift among trees of the fall-line sandhills

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Below ground processes, such as fine root demography and soil water redistribution, can alter carbon, nutrient and water cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Although...

  10. Demography and market impacts on dental practices’ development in Bulgaria during the period of transition 1990-2010

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lydia Katrova; Krassimir Tzokov

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to present the impact of demography and market dynamics on the organizational and technological development of dental practices in Bulgaria during the period of socio...

  11. Ed Deutschman Visit Images, May 2, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Deutschman, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ed Deutschman was a Navy cadet at the Del Monte Pre-Flight School, located at the now (2013) Naval Postgraduate School. Mr Deutschman visited the Dudley Knox Library on May 2, 2011, and spoke about his service in World War II as a Corsair fighter pilot in the Pacific.

  12. States leverage telepsychiatry solutions to ease ED crowding, accelerate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Many states are having success turning to telepsychiatry-based solutions to connect mental health patients with needed care while also decompressing crowded EDs. Just one year into a statewide telepsychiatry initiative in North Carolina (NC-STeP), administrators say the approach has saved as much as $7 million, and hospital demand for the service is higher than anticipated. In Texas, mental health emergency centers (MHEC) that use telepsychiatry to connect patients in rural areas with needed psychiatric care are freeing up EDs to focus on medical care. In just 11 months, 91 North Carolina hospitals have at least started the process to engage in NC-STeP. Much of the savings from NC-STeP come from involuntary commitment orders being overturned as a result of the telepsychiatry consults, reducing the need for expensive inpatient care. Implementing NC-STeP has involved multiple hurdles including credentialing difficulties and technical/firewall challenges. The Texas model provides 24/7 availability of psychiatrists via telemedicine through a network of MHECs. In-person staff at the MHECs perform basic screening tests and blood draws so that medical clearance can be achieved without the need for an ED visit in most cases. Funding for the MHECs comes from the state, hospitals in the region, and local governmental authorities that reap savings or benefits from the initiative.

  13. Effects of yearling, juvenile and adult survival on reef manta ray (Manta alfredi) demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallegange, Isabel M; van der Ouderaa, Isabelle B C; Tibiriçá, Yara

    2016-01-01

    The trade in manta ray gill plates has considerably increased over the last two decades. The resulting increases in ray mortality, in addition to mortality caused by by-catch, has caused many ray populations to decrease in size. The aim of this study was to ascertain how yearling and juvenile growth and survival, and adult survival and reproduction affect reef manta ray (Manta alfredi) population change, to increase our understanding of manta ray demography and thereby improve conservation research and measures for these fish. We developed a population projection model for reef manta rays, and used published life history data on yearling and juvenile growth and adult reproduction to parameterise the model. Because little is known about reef manta ray yearling and juvenile survival, we conducted our analyses using a range of plausible survival rate values for yearlings, juveniles and adults. The model accurately captured observed variation in population growth rate, lifetime reproductive success and cohort generation time in different reef manta ray populations. Our demographic analyses revealed a range of population consequences in response to variation in demographic rates. For example, an increase in yearling or adult survival rates always elicited greater responses in population growth rate, lifetime reproductive success and cohort generation time than the same increase in juvenile survival rate. The population growth rate increased linearly, but lifetime reproductive success and cohort generation time increased at an accelerating rate with increasing yearling or adult survival rates. Hence, even a small increase in survival rate could increase lifetime reproductive success by one pup, and cohort generation time by several years. Elasticity analyses revealed that, depending on survival rate values of all life stages, the population growth rate is either most sensitive to changes in the rate with which juveniles survive but stay juveniles (i.e., do not mature

  14. The Demography of Royal Navy Surgeons: Some Views on the Process of Prosopography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H Myers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is a brief social biography and demography of British naval doctors during the nineteenth century, asking why Scottish-educated surgeons were so prominent.  Understanding the demography and changing dynamics of naval surgeons’ labor illuminates the complex relationship among the military, discrimination, and nationalism that shaped this influential labor market. This study reviews how to collect demographic information from multiple types of sources: university archives, matriculation records, digitized medical journals, and student rolls.  It also uses chi-square tests to show the significance of the demographic information collected.  The results show us the entangled relationship between database conceptualization, data collection, and data analysis.  

  15. The impacts of climate, land use, and demography on fires during the 21st century simulated by CLM-CN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kloster

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Landscape fires during the 21st century are expected to change in response to multiple agents of global change. Important controlling factors include climate controls on the length and intensity of the fire season, fuel availability, and fire management, which are already anthropogenically perturbed today and are predicted to change further in the future. An improved understanding of future fires will contribute to an improved ability to project future anthropogenic climate change, as changes in fire behavior will in turn impact climate.

    In the present study we used a coupled-carbon-fire model to investigate how changes in climate, demography, and land use may alter fire emissions. We used climate projections following the SRES A1B scenario from two different climate models (ECHAM5/MPI-OM and CCSM and changes in population. Land use and harvest rates were prescribed according to the RCP 45 scenario. In response to the combined effect of all these drivers, our model estimated, depending on our choice of climate projection, an increase in future (2075–2099 fire carbon emissions by 17 and 62% compared to present day (1985–2009. The largest increase in fire emissions was predicted for Southern Hemisphere South America for both climate projection. For Northern Hemisphere Africa, a region that contributed significantly to the global total fire carbon emissions, the response varied between a decrease and an increase depending on the climate projection.

    We disentangled the contribution of the single forcing factors to the overall response by conducting an additional set of simulations in which each factor was individually held constant at pre-industrial levels. The two different projections of future climate change evaluated in this study led to increases in global fire carbon emissions by 22% (CCSM and 66% (ECHAM5/MPI-OM. The RCP 45 projection of harvest and land use led to a decrease in fire carbon emissions by −5%. Changes in

  16. A Bayesian uncertainty analysis of cetacean demography and bycatch mortality using age-at-death data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey E; Read, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    Wildlife ecologists and managers are challenged to make the most of sparse information for understanding demography of many species, especially those that are long lived and difficult to observe. For many odontocete (dolphin, porpoise, toothed whale) populations, only fertility and age-at-death data are feasibly obtainable. We describe a Bayesian approach for using fertilities and two types of age-at-death data (i.e., age structure of deaths from all mortality sources and age structure of anthropogenic mortalities only) to estimate rate of increase, mortality rates, and impacts of anthropogenic mortality on those rates for a population assumed to be in a stable age structure. We used strandings data from 1977 to 1993 (n = 96) and observer bycatch data from 1989 to 1993 (n = 233) for the Gulf of Maine, USA, and Bay of Fundy, Canada, harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) population as a case study. Our method combines mortality risk functions to estimate parameters describing age-specific natural and bycatch mortality rates. Separate functions are simultaneously fit to bycatch and strandings data, the latter of which are described as a mixture of natural and bycatch mortalities. Euler-Lotka equations and an estimate of longevity were used to constrain parameter estimates, and we included a parameter to account for unequal probabilities of natural vs. bycatch deaths occurring in a sample. We fit models under two scenarios intended to correct for possible data bias due to indirect bycatch of calves (i.e., death following bycatch mortality of mothers) being underrepresented in the bycatch sample. Results from the two scenarios were "model averaged" by sampling from both Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains with uniform probability. The median estimate for potential population growth (r(nat)) was 0.046 (90% credible interval [CRI] = 0.004-0.116). The median for actual growth (r) was -0.030 (90% CRI = -0.192 to +0.065). The probability of population decline due to added

  17. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  18. Case Study:EDS in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Asign that China is quickly moving up the global service outsourcing ranking came earlier this year when EDS (Electronic Data Services), one of the world's leading IT outsourcing companies,announced it would be moving its Asia headquarters to Shanghai from Australia. Recognizing the growing potential of China in this area, the company also announced it would shortly be launching at least two offshore software development centers in the country, with the first location due to be announced at the begining of November.

  19. Mapping the Indonesian territory, based on pollution, social demography and geographical data, using self organizing feature map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernawati, Kuswari; Insani, Nur; Bambang S. H., M.; Nur Hadi, W.; Sahid

    2017-08-01

    This research aims to mapping the 33 (thirty-three) provinces in Indonesia, based on the data on air, water and soil pollution, as well as social demography and geography data, into a clustered model. The method used in this study was unsupervised method that combines the basic concept of Kohonen or Self-Organizing Feature Maps (SOFM). The method is done by providing the design parameters for the model based on data related directly/ indirectly to pollution, which are the demographic and social data, pollution levels of air, water and soil, as well as the geographical situation of each province. The parameters used consists of 19 features/characteristics, including the human development index, the number of vehicles, the availability of the plant's water absorption and flood prevention, as well as geographic and demographic situation. The data used were secondary data from the Central Statistics Agency (BPS), Indonesia. The data are mapped into SOFM from a high-dimensional vector space into two-dimensional vector space according to the closeness of location in term of Euclidean distance. The resulting outputs are represented in clustered grouping. Thirty-three provinces are grouped into five clusters, where each cluster has different features/characteristics and level of pollution. The result can used to help the efforts on prevention and resolution of pollution problems on each cluster in an effective and efficient way.

  20. ``Models'' CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!: ``Toy Models Too-Often Yield Toy-Results''!!!: Statistics, Polls, Politics, Economics, Elections!!!: GRAPH/Network-Physics: ``Equal-Distribution for All'' TRUMP-ED BEC ``Winner-Take-All'' ``Doctor Livingston I Presume?''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibus-Norquist, R. N. C.-Grover; Bush-Romney, G. W.-Willard-Mitt; Dimon, J. P.; Adelson-Koch, Sheldon-Charles-David-Sheldon; Krugman-Axelrod, Paul-David; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; D. N. C./O. F. P./''47''%/50% Collaboration; R. N. C./G. O. P./''53''%/49% Collaboration; Nyt/Wp/Cnn/Msnbc/Pbs/Npr/Ft Collaboration; Ftn/Fnc/Fox/Wsj/Fbn Collaboration; Lb/Jpmc/Bs/Boa/Ml/Wamu/S&P/Fitch/Moodys/Nmis Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    ``Models''? CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!: ``Toy Models Too-Often Yield Toy-Results''!!!: Goldenfeld[``The Role of Models in Physics'', in Lects.on Phase-Transitions & R.-G.(92)-p.32-33!!!]: statistics(Silver{[NYTimes; Bensinger, ``Math-Geerks Clearly-Defeated Pundits'', LATimes, (11/9/12)])}, polls, politics, economics, elections!!!: GRAPH/network/net/...-PHYSICS Barabasi-Albert[RMP (02)] (r,t)-space VERSUS(???) [Where's the Inverse/ Dual/Integral-Transform???] (Benjamin)Franklin(1795)-Fourier(1795; 1897;1822)-Laplace(1850)-Mellin (1902) Brillouin(1922)-...(k,)-space, {Hubbard [The World According to Wavelets,Peters (96)-p.14!!!/p.246: refs.-F2!!!]},and then (2) Albert-Barabasi[]Bose-Einstein quantum-statistics(BEQS) Bose-Einstein CONDENSATION (BEC) versus Bianconi[pvt.-comm.; arXiv:cond-mat/0204506; ...] -Barabasi [???] Fermi-Dirac

  1. Using Google Flu Trends data in forecasting influenza-like-illness related ED visits in Omaha, Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Ozgur M; Bentley, Dan; Muelleman, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Emergency department (ED) visits increase during the influenza seasons. It is essential to identify statistically significant correlates in order to develop an accurate forecasting model for ED visits. Forecasting influenza-like-illness (ILI)-related ED visits can significantly help in developing robust resource management strategies at the EDs. We first performed correlation analyses to understand temporal correlations between several predictors of ILI-related ED visits. We used the data available for Douglas County, the biggest county in Nebraska, for Omaha, the biggest city in the state, and for a major hospital in Omaha. The data set included total and positive influenza test results from the hospital (ie, Antigen rapid (Ag) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) tests); an Internet-based influenza surveillance system data, that is, Google Flu Trends, for both Nebraska and Omaha; total ED visits in Douglas County attributable to ILI; and ILI surveillance network data for Douglas County and Nebraska as the predictors and data for the hospital's ILI-related ED visits as the dependent variable. We used Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average and Holt Winters methods with3 linear regression models to forecast ILI-related ED visits at the hospital and evaluated model performances by comparing the root means square errors (RMSEs). Because of strong positive correlations with ILI-related ED visits between 2008 and 2012, we validated the use of Google Flu Trends data as a predictor in an ED influenza surveillance tool. Of the 5 forecasting models we have tested, linear regression models performed significantly better when Google Flu Trends data were included as a predictor. Regression models including Google Flu Trends data as a predictor variable have lower RMSE, and the lowest is achieved when all other variables are also included in the model in our forecasting experiments for the first 5 weeks of 2013 (with RMSE = 57.61). Google Flu Trends data

  2. 34 CFR 85.942 - ED Deciding Official.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.942 ED Deciding Official. The ED Deciding Official is an ED officer who has delegated authority under the procedures of the Department of Education to decide whether to affirm a suspension or enter a debarment. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189), E.O. 12689 ( 3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p...

  3. edX e-learning course development

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    If you are an educator creating a course for edX or a corporate trainer using Open edX for large-scale learning and development initiatives, then edX E-Learning Course Development is the ideal book for you.

  4. La Costituzione Islandese: storia ed evoluzione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Quartino

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "La Costituzione Islandese: storia ed evoluzione" is a degree thesis defended on 15th July 2009 by Fabio Quartino under the supervision of Prof. Andrea Canepa of the University of Genoa, Italy. It offers an extensive overview of Icelandic history aimed at finding out the roots of the nation's constitutional order, which is currently in the process of being revised by the first ever elected constitutional assembly in the life of the country. Fabio Quartino's work wishes to be a source of useful information for Italian-speaking scholars who have an interest in Iceland's constitutional history and may not have access to comprehensive overviews in their native tongue.

  5. The demography of Atelopus decline: Harlequin frog survival and abundance in central Panama prior to and during a disease outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca McCaffery

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Harlequin frogs (Bufonidae: Atelopus are a species-rich genus of Neotropical toads that have experienced disproportionately severe population declines and extinctions caused by the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. The genus Atelopus is of high conservation concern, but relatively little is known about the population dynamics and life history of the majority of species. We examined the demography of one population of Atelopus zeteki and two populations of A. varius in central Panama using three to six years of mark-recapture data collected prior to and during an outbreak of Bd. We estimated male survival probabilities prior to the arrival of Bd and sex-specific population sizes for these three populations using state-space Bayesian population models. Prior to the arrival of Bd, monthly apparent survival probabilities were higher for A. varius males than for A. zeteki males, and recaptures among years were low in both species. Abundance of both species varied over time and declined rapidly after the arrival of Bd. Male densities were generally greater than female densities, though female densities were higher or equivalent to males after the arrival of Bd. Estimates of survival and abundance over time may be explained by differences in the use of stream habitat by the two sexes and three populations, both during and between breeding seasons. These estimates provide key baseline population information that can be used to inform reintroductions from captive assurance colonies and studies of extant Atelopus populations as part of conservation and management programs.

  6. Long-term effects of tetanus toxoid inoculation on the demography and life expectancy of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Matthew J; Hernández Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Ruiz-Lambrides, Angelina; Delgado, Diana L; Sabat, Alberto M

    2015-02-01

    Tetanus was a major cause of mortality in the free-ranging population of rhesus monkeys on Cayo Santiago prior to 1985 when the entire colony was given its first dose of tetanus toxoid. The immediate reduction in mortality that followed tetanus toxoid inoculation (TTI) has been documented, but the long-term demographic effects of eliminating tetanus infections have not. This study uses the Cayo Santiago demographic database to construct comparative life tables 12 years before, and 12 years after, TTI. Life tables and matrix projection models are used to test for differences in: (i) survival among all individuals as well as among social groups, (ii) long-term fitness of the population, (iii) age distribution, (iv) reproductive value, and (v) life expectancy. A retrospective life table response experiment (LTRE) was performed to determine which life cycle transition contributed most to observed changes in long-term fitness of the population post-TTI. Elimination of clinical tetanus infections through mass inoculation improved the health and well-being of the monkeys. It also profoundly affected the population by increasing survivorship and long-term fitness, decreasing the differences in survival rates among social groups, shifting the population's age distribution towards older individuals, and increasing reproductive value and life expectancy. These findings are significant because they demonstrate the long-term effects of eradicating a major cause of mortality at a single point in time on survival, reproduction, and overall demography of a naturalistic population of primates.

  7. Confronting model predictions of carbon fluxes with measurements of Amazon forests subjected to experimental drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas L; Galbraith, David R; Christoffersen, Bradley O; Harper, Anna; Imbuzeiro, Hewlley M A; Rowland, Lucy; Almeida, Samuel; Brando, Paulo M; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Costa, Marcos Heil; Levine, Naomi M; Malhi, Yadvinder; Saleska, Scott R; Sotta, Eleneide; Williams, Mathew; Meir, Patrick; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2013-10-01

    Considerable uncertainty surrounds the fate of Amazon rainforests in response to climate change. Here, carbon (C) flux predictions of five terrestrial biosphere models (Community Land Model version 3.5 (CLM3.5), Ecosystem Demography model version 2.1 (ED2), Integrated BIosphere Simulator version 2.6.4 (IBIS), Joint UK Land Environment Simulator version 2.1 (JULES) and Simple Biosphere model version 3 (SiB3)) and a hydrodynamic terrestrial ecosystem model (the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) model) were evaluated against measurements from two large-scale Amazon drought experiments. Model predictions agreed with the observed C fluxes in the control plots of both experiments, but poorly replicated the responses to the drought treatments. Most notably, with the exception of ED2, the models predicted negligible reductions in aboveground biomass in response to the drought treatments, which was in contrast to an observed c. 20% reduction at both sites. For ED2, the timing of the decline in aboveground biomass was accurate, but the magnitude was too high for one site and too low for the other. Three key findings indicate critical areas for future research and model development. First, the models predicted declines in autotrophic respiration under prolonged drought in contrast to measured increases at one of the sites. Secondly, models lacking a phenological response to drought introduced bias in the sensitivity of canopy productivity and respiration to drought. Thirdly, the phenomenological water-stress functions used by the terrestrial biosphere models to represent the effects of soil moisture on stomatal conductance yielded unrealistic diurnal and seasonal responses to drought.

  8. Elementary particles. From the atoms via the Standard Model until the Higgs boson. 2. ed.; Elementare Teilchen. Von den Atomen ueber das Standard-Modell bis zum Higgs-Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleck-Neuhaus, Joern [Bremen Univ. (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The current state of knowledge of nuclear and elementary-particle physics has a checkered history, often characterized by shocking new concept formations, which also opens up to the present day students of physics only with difficulty. This book uses those controversial yet educational development in order to enable learners to improve access to the new concepts. It helps to understand how the physical picture of the smallest particles is today, and why it is so and not otherwise originated: Beginning in the detection of the atoms up to the current standard model of elementary-particle physics and the Higgs boson. So readers gain an impression of that great field, which is originated in the constant interplay between established theoretical models, confirmatory or contradictory findings, sometimes controversial new concept formations, and improved experiments - a process, that surely continues in the future. Guideline of the presentation is a comprehensible also in detail as possible reasoning argumentation. Students of physics before their B.Sc. degree will thus be able to acquire knowledge of the subatomic physics relating to general knowledge in their field. Also for physics teachers at schools or colleges, this new representation should be interesting. The second edition has been updated to the newest state of knowledge, in particular first results of the LHC have been incorporated.

  9. Demography management and challenges of alternating shift work; Demographiemanagement und Herausforderungen der Wechselschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzkowiak, Matthias [Arbeitsmedizin Rheinisches Revier, RWE Power AG, Bergheim (Germany); Schmitz, Michael [Personalcontrolling/-strategie, RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany); Feldhaus, Christian [Arbeitsmedizin/Betriebliches Gesundheitsmanagement, RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    RWE Power has launched a comprehensive process to develop strategies for future demography management. A special focus is on the challenges which result from the age structure of the workforce in connection with alternating shift work. A comprehensive catalogue of measures was developed which is currently being implemented. Among other things, it includes programmes for the employees on issues like health and ergonomics or optimisation of existing shift systems. Several follow-up projects are also included. The measures presented in this paper are meant to help in responding proactively to future demographic trends and the resulting challenges. (orig.)

  10. Demography of Oenocarpus bataua and implications for sustainable harvest of its fruit in western Amazon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaza, Carolina; Matorrell, C; Cevallos, G

    2016-01-01

    Oenocarpus bataua is one of the most abundant and most used palm in the Amazon region. The main resource obtained from the species is the fruits that are harvested for human consumption. Across its distribution area adults are felled to obtain the racemes, which may affect the palm’s populations....... In this paper we studied the demography of two populations of Oenocarpus bataua to assess the harvest potential of its fruits and the density variation in different habitats in the western Amazon to estimate fruit yields in different forest types. Forest of non-inundated lands held the greatest densities...

  11. Influence of demography and environment on persistence in toad populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Brad A.; Schorr, Robert A.; Schneider, Scott C.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Effective conservation of rare species requires an understanding of how potential threats affect population dynamics. Unfortunately, information about population demographics prior to threats (i.e., baseline data) is lacking for many species. Perturbations, caused by climate change, disease, or other stressors can lead to population declines and heightened conservation concerns. Boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas boreas) have undergone rangewide declines due mostly to the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), with only a few sizable populations remaining in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA, that are disease-free. Despite the apparent region-wide occurrence of Bd, our focal populations in central Colorado were disease free over a 14-year capture-mark-recapture study until the recent discovery of Bd at one of the sites. We used recapture data and the Pradel reverse-time model to assess the influence of environmental and site-specific conditions on survival and recruitment. We then forecast changes in the toad populations with 2 growth models; one using an average lambda value to initiate the projection, and one using the most recent value to capture potential effects of the incursion of disease into the system. Adult survival was consistently high at the 3 sites, whereas recruitment was more variable and markedly low at 1 site. We found that active season moisture, active season length, and breeding shallows were important factors in estimating recruitment. Population growth models indicated a slight increase at 1 site but decreasing trends at the 2 other sites, possibly influenced by low recruitment. Insight into declining species management can be gained from information on survival and recruitment and how site-specific environmental factors influence these demographic parameters. Our data are particularly useful because they provide baseline data on demographics in populations before a disease outbreak and enhance our ability to detect changes

  12. Demography, not inheritance, drives phenotypic change in hunted bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traill, Lochran W; Schindler, Susanne; Coulson, Tim

    2014-09-09

    Selective harvest, such as trophy hunting, can shift the distribution of a quantitative character such as body size. If the targeted character is heritable, then there will be an evolutionary response to selection, and where the trait is not, then any response will be plastic or demographic. Identifying the relative contributions of these different mechanisms is a major challenge in wildlife conservation. New mathematical approaches can provide insight not previously available. Here we develop a size- and age-based two-sex integral projection model based on individual-based data from a long-term study of hunted bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Canada. We simulate the effect of trophy hunting on body size and find that the inheritance of body mass is weak and that any perceived decline in body mass of the bighorn population is largely attributable to demographic change and environmental factors. To our knowledge, this work provides the first use of two-sex integral projection models to investigate the potential eco-evolutionary consequences of selective harvest.

  13. Effects of yearling, juvenile and adult survival on reef manta ray (Manta alfredi demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Smallegange

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The trade in manta ray gill plates has considerably increased over the last two decades. The resulting increases in ray mortality, in addition to mortality caused by by-catch, has caused many ray populations to decrease in size. The aim of this study was to ascertain how yearling and juvenile growth and survival, and adult survival and reproduction affect reef manta ray (Manta alfredi population change, to increase our understanding of manta ray demography and thereby improve conservation research and measures for these fish. Methods We developed a population projection model for reef manta rays, and used published life history data on yearling and juvenile growth and adult reproduction to parameterise the model. Because little is known about reef manta ray yearling and juvenile survival, we conducted our analyses using a range of plausible survival rate values for yearlings, juveniles and adults. Results The model accurately captured observed variation in population growth rate, lifetime reproductive success and cohort generation time in different reef manta ray populations. Our demographic analyses revealed a range of population consequences in response to variation in demographic rates. For example, an increase in yearling or adult survival rates always elicited greater responses in population growth rate, lifetime reproductive success and cohort generation time than the same increase in juvenile survival rate. The population growth rate increased linearly, but lifetime reproductive success and cohort generation time increased at an accelerating rate with increasing yearling or adult survival rates. Hence, even a small increase in survival rate could increase lifetime reproductive success by one pup, and cohort generation time by several years. Elasticity analyses revealed that, depending on survival rate values of all life stages, the population growth rate is either most sensitive to changes in the rate with which juveniles

  14. The changing world demography of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anders; Christian Hirsch, Niels; Pramming, Stig Krøger

    2003-01-01

    In recent years it has been estimated that the current global prevalence of type 2 diabetes amounts to about 150 million patients. Projections suggest that by the year 2025 the number of prevalent patients in the world will reach approximately 300 million. It is assumed that the increase in the number of patients will be most pronounced in nations currently undergoing socio-economic development including increasing urbanization. The technique used to provide these estimates is based on results from available, contemporary survey results, combined with expected future trends in demographic indicators. We suggest that the currently available methods for the estimation of the future global burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus yield underestimates. Further modifications and validity tests of the modelling techniques are necessary in order to develop a reliable instrument to globally monitor the effects of the struggle against the diabetes problem.

  15. The changing world demography of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Hirsch, Niels Christian; Pramming, Stig Krøger

    2003-01-01

    In recent years it has been estimated that the current global prevalence of type 2 diabetes amounts to about 150 million patients. Projections suggest that by the year 2025 the number of prevalent patients in the world will reach approximately 300 million. It is assumed that the increase in the n......In recent years it has been estimated that the current global prevalence of type 2 diabetes amounts to about 150 million patients. Projections suggest that by the year 2025 the number of prevalent patients in the world will reach approximately 300 million. It is assumed that the increase...... indicators. We suggest that the currently available methods for the estimation of the future global burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus yield underestimates. Further modifications and validity tests of the modelling techniques are necessary in order to develop a reliable instrument to globally monitor...

  16. COMADRE - A global data base of animal demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R.; Archer, C. Ruth

    2016-01-01

    models (MPMs) are among the most widely used demographic tools by animal ecologists. MPMs project population dynamics based on the reproduction, survival and development of individuals in a population over their life cycle. The outputs from MPMs have direct biological interpretations, facilitating......The open-data scientific philosophy is being widely adopted and proving to promote considerable progress in ecology and evolution. Open-data global data bases now exist on animal migration, species distribution, conservation status, etc. However, a gap exists for data on population dynamics...... spanning the rich diversity of the animal kingdom world-wide. This information is fundamental to our understanding of the conditions that have shaped variation in animal life histories and their relationships with the environment, as well as the determinants of invasion and extinction. Matrix population...

  17. Domestic violence in an inner-city ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, A A; Nick, T G; Weiss, S J; Houry, D; Mills, T

    1997-08-01

    A confidential written survey was conducted at the emergency department (ED) of Charity Hospital in New Orleans to determine the prevalence of domestic violence (DV) for male and female ED patients and to determine the demographics of DV. Four violence parameters were calculated for patients who had a partner at the time of presentation: 1) present physical; 2) present nonphysical; 3) past physical; and 4) past nonphysical. Out of the 516 patients enrolled, 283 were women and 233 were men. On the basis of Index of Spouse Abuse scoring, 14% of men and 22% of women had experienced past nonphysical violence, and 28% of men and 33% of women had experienced past physical violence. Of the 157 men and 207 women with partners at the time of presentation, 11% men and 15% women reported present nonphysical violence, and 20% men and 19% of the women reported present physical violence. Logistic-regression models demonstrated that women experienced significantly more past and present nonphysical violence but not physical violence than men. Alcohol, drug use, and suicidal ideation were found to be significant predictors associated with DV. In conclusion, DV rates were high in the New Orleans population, with nearly equal rates of past and present physical violence for men and women.

  18. Citar e referenciar : APA 6ª ed.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos, Isabel Marques

    2016-01-01

    A elaboração correta dos trabalhos científicos pressupõe o respeito por um conjunto de princípios normativos de citação e referenciação bibliográfica que salvaguardam os autores das criações intelectuais do uso indevido das mesmas. Partindo de três conceitos: citação, referência bibliográfica e lista de referências apresentam-se as normas da APA 6ª ed. nos seus elementos essenciais. Estas normas, da área da informação e documentação, definem regras para a normalização das referências bibliogr...

  19. Pareto vs Simmel: residui ed emozioni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Fornari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A cento anni dalla pubblicazione del Trattato di sociologia generale (Pareto 1988 siamo a mantenere vivo ed attuale lo studio paretiano con una rilettura contemporanea del suo pensiero. Ricordato per la grande versatilità intellettuale dagli economisti, rimane lo scienziato rigoroso ed analitico i cui contributi sono ancora discussi a livello internazionale. Noi ne analizzeremo gli aspetti che l’hanno portato ad avvicinarsi all’approccio sociologico, con l’introduzione della nota distinzione dell’azione sociale: logica e non-logica. Una dicotomia utilizzata per dare conto dei cambiamenti sociali riguardanti le modalità d’azione degli uomini e delle donne. Com’è noto le azioni logiche sono quelle che riguardano comportamenti mossi da logicità e raziocinio, in cui vi è una diretta relazione causa-effetto, azioni oggetto di studio degli economisti, e di cui non si occupano i sociologi. Le azioni non-logiche riguardano tutte le tipologie di agire umano che rientrano nel novero delle scienze sociali, e che rappresentano la parte più ampia dell’agire sociale. Sono le azioni guidate dai sentimenti, dall’emotività, dalla superstizione, ecc., illustrate da Pareto nel Trattato di sociologia generale e in saggi successivi, dove riprende anche il concetto di eterogenesi dei fini, formulato per la prima volta da Giambattista Vico. Concetto secondo il quale la storia umana, pur conservando in potenza la realizzazione di certi fini, non è lineare e lungo il suo percorso evolutivo può accadere che l’uomo nel tentativo di raggiungere una finalità arrivi a conclusioni opposte. Pareto collega la definizione del filosofo napoletano alle tipologie di azione sociale e alla loro distinzione (logiche, non-logiche. L’eterogenesi dei fini per Pareto è dunque l’esito di un particolare tipo di azione non-logica dell’essere umano e della collettività.

  20. Comparative demography of an at-risk African elephant population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Wittemyer

    influenced by human impacts (laying the foundation for modeling approaches, supporting predictions of evolutionary theory regarding demographic responses to ecological processes.

  1. Demography and genetic structure of a recovering grizzly bear population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, K.C.; Stetz, J.B.; Boulanger, J.; Macleod, A.C.; Paetkau, David; White, Gary C.

    2009-01-01

    Grizzly bears (brown bears; Ursus arctos) are imperiled in the southern extent of their range worldwide. The threatened population in northwestern Montana, USA, has been managed for recovery since 1975; yet, no rigorous data were available to monitor program success. We used data from a large noninvasive genetic sampling effort conducted in 2004 and 33 years of physical captures to assess abundance, distribution, and genetic health of this population. We combined data from our 3 sampling methods (hair trap, bear rub, and physical capture) to construct individual bear encounter histories for use in Huggins-Pledger closed mark-recapture models. Our population estimate, N?? = 765 (95% CI = 715-831) was more than double the existing estimate derived from sightings of females with young. Based on our results, the estimated known, human-caused mortality rate in 2004 was 4.6% (95% CI = 4.2-4.9%), slightly above the 4% considered sustainable; however, the high proportion of female mortalities raises concern. We used location data from telemetry, confirmed sightings, and genetic sampling to estimate occupied habitat. We found that grizzly bears occupied 33,480 km2 in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) during 1994-2007, including 10,340 km beyond the Recovery Zone. We used factorial correspondence analysis to identify potential barriers to gene flow within this population. Our results suggested that genetic interchange recently increased in areas with low gene flow in the past; however, we also detected evidence of incipient fragmentation across the major transportation corridor in this ecosystem. Our results suggest that the NCDE population is faring better than previously thought, and they highlight the need for a more rigorous monitoring program.

  2. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services.

  3. The role of sensory fiber demography in trigeminal and postherpetic neuralgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, A F; DosSantos, M F

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we systematically investigated fiber demography, based on function and distribution, from the periphery to their destinations in the various central (sub) nuclei in the trigeminal brainstem nuclear sensory complex. Conventional and novel compelling information is provided, demonstrating that the ratio and somatotopy of types A and C sensory fibers at the site of a lesion can elucidate important puzzles in TNP disorders. For instance, we explain how of a major shift in the fibers' direction and ratio at the level of the trigeminal root entry zone (REZ) influences the pathophysiology of pre- and typical trigeminal neuralgia. As a result, there is a high A/C ratio of oral and peri-oral fibers in the supero-medial region of the REZ, which is mostly susceptible to vascular compression. However, this A/C ratio varies considerably at lower proportions in other areas along the peripheral trigeminal pathway, where an injury (viral, vessel compression, or trauma) can lead to a broader spectrum of fiber involvement and, consequently, pain outcome. In summary, we explain how fiber demography can influence pain quality, location, temporal features, progress, and treatment prognosis of TNP in those patients who develop it.

  4. Retrospective analysis of attitudes to ageing in the Economist: apocalyptic demography for opinion formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ruth; Williams, Caroline; O'Neill, Desmond

    2009-12-08

    To investigate the description of older people and ageing in a major weekly newspaper, influential in political and financial circles, to see whether it reflected ageing in a balanced manner, and to what extent it indulged in apocalyptic demography-the portrayal of population ageing as a financial burden rather than a scientific advance. Electronic search of the digital archive of the Economist of articles published between January 1997 and April 2008. Main outcomes measures Categorisation of articles as portraying population ageing as a burden or a benefit or with a balanced view. Of 6306 identified articles, 262 were relevant. Most featured pensions, demography, and politics. Of these 262, 64% portrayed population ageing as a burden and 12% as a benefit; 24% had a balanced view. Most articles therefore showed a predominantly ageist view of older people as a burden on society, often portraying them as frail non-contributors. Recurrent themes included pension and demographic "time bombs" and future unsustainable costs of health care for older people. This negative view of older people might be influential in shaping the attitudes of readers, who include opinion formers in political and economic circles. Gerontologists (including geriatricians) need to engage with influential media, as well as helping to promote a professional development of journalists that is informed and knowledgeable about the negative impact of ageism on the wellbeing of older people.

  5. Reproductive demography of a temperate protogynous and herbivorous fish, Odax pullus (Labridae, Odacini)

    KAUST Repository

    Laman Trip, Elizabeth

    2011-03-07

    A common view is that, in marine fishes, herbivory and sex change are subject to physiological constraints at high latitudes, which are likely to affect growth rates and reproductive outputs. The present study examines the reproductive demography of Odax pullus, an herbivorous and protogynous species of temperate New Zealand. We establish an otolith-based methodology for age estimation and investigate sex-specific growth, longevity and age-based reproductive events. Individuals achieved a maximum age of 11 years, reached 85% of adult body size (455mm FL) within the first 3.5 years of life, were sexually mature by the age of 1.11.5 years and changed sex at 2.83.5 years, indicating fast simultaneous somatic and reproductive growth. There was no significant difference in growth or body size between the sexes. Ovary weight of spawning females increased significantly with size and age, suggesting the presence of size- and age-fecundity skews underlying the absence of sex change in larger and older females. Testes of reproductively active males comprised less than 1% of bodyweight, suggesting pair-spawning and little sperm competition. The present study provides metrics to support comparisons of the demography of this temperate protogynous and herbivorous labrid across spatial or temporal strata. © CSIRO 2011.

  6. The Relationship Between the Use of a Worksite Medical Home and ED Visits or Hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Stroo BS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Worksite medical homes may be a good model for improving employee health. The aim of this study was to compare the likelihood of being seen in the emergency department (ED or being hospitalized by level of use (no use, occasional use, or primary care of a worksite medical home, overall and by type of user (employee, adult dependent, or pediatric dependent. This was a retrospective analysis of claims data, using covariate-adjusted logistic regression models for ED visits and inpatient hospitalizations. Secondary data for the years 2006 to 2008 from a company that offers an on-site health care center (HCC were used. Analyses were based on a data set that combines health plan claims and human resources demographic data. Overall, people who did not use the HCC were more likely to be seen in the ED (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval or CI [1.06, 1.37], P = .005 or to be hospitalized (adjusted OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.34, 1.86]; P < .0001 compared with those who used the HCC for primary care. Both ED visits and hospitalizations for employees and dependents in this study were lower among those who used the worksite medical home for primary care. Worksite medical homes can improve chronic disease management and thus reduce ED visits and hospitalizations. These findings contribute to growing evidence that worksite medical homes are potentially cost-effective.

  7. ED50 and ED95 of Intrathecal Bupivacaine Coadministered with Sufentanil for Cesarean Delivery Under Combined Spinal-epidural in Severely Preeclamptic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xiao; Wen-Ping Xu; Xiao-Min Zhang; Yin-Fa Zhang; Li-Zhong Wang; Xin-Zhong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background:Spinal anesthesia was considered as a reasonable anesthetic option in severe preeclampsia when cesarean delivery is indicated,and there is no indwelling epidural catheter or contraindication to spinal anesthesia.However,the ideal dose of intrathecal bupivacaine has not been quantified for cesarean delivery for severe preeclamptic patients.This study aimed to determine the ED50 and ED95 of intrathecal bupivacaine for severely preeclamptic patients undergoing elective cesarean delivery.Methods:Two hundred severely preeclamptic patients are undergoing elective cesarean delivery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia enrolled in this randomized,double-blinded,dose-ranging study.Patients received 4 mg,6 mg,8 mg,or 10 mg intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine with 2.5 μg sufentanil.Successful spinal anesthesia was defined as a T6 sensory level achieved within 10 minutes after intrathecal drug administration and/or no epidural supplement was required during the cesarean section.The ED50 and ED95 were calculated with a logistic regression model.Results:ED50 and ED95 ofintrathecal bupivacaine for successful spinal anesthesia were 5.67 mg (95% confidence interval [CI]:5.20-6.10 mg) and 8.82 mg (95% CI:8.14-9.87 mg) respectively.The incidence of hypotension in Group 8 mg and Group 10 mg was higher than that in Group 4 mg and Group 6 mg (P < 0.05).The sensory block was significantly different among groups 10 minutes after intrathecal injection (P < 0.05).The use of lidocaine in Group 4 mg was higher than that in other groups (P < 0.05).The use of phenylephrine in Group 8 mg and Group 10 mg was higher than that in the other two groups (P < 0.05).The lowest systolic blood pressure before the infant delivery of Group 8 mg and Group 10 mg was lower than the other two groups (P < 0.05).The satisfaction of muscle relaxation in Group 4 mg was lower than other groups (P < 0.05).There was no significant difference in patients' satisfaction and the newborns

  8. Violence prevention in the ED: linkage of the ED to a social service agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zun, Leslie S; Downey, La Vonne; Rosen, Jodi

    2003-10-01

    was a strong positive correlation of using services and case management (Pearson coefficient = 0.728, significance =.00). The referral of young victims of violence from the ED to psychosocial services could be successful using a case management model and an alliance between a healthcare system and a social service agency.

  9. Structured classification for ED presenting complaints – from free text field-based approach to ICPC-2 ED application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmström Tomi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there is a major need to record and analyse presenting complaints in emergency departments (EDs, no international standard exists. The aim of the present study was to produce structured complaint classification suitable for ED use and to implement it in practice. The structured classification evolved from a study of free text fields and ICPC-2 classification. Methods Presenting complaints in a free text field of ED admissions during a one-year period (n=40610 were analyzed and summarized to 70 presenting complaint groups. The results were compared to ICPC-2 based complaints collected in another ED. An expert panel reviewed the results and produced an ED application of ICPC-2 classification. This study implemented the new classification into an ED. Results The presenting complaints summarized from free text fields and those from ICPC-2 categories were remarkably similar. However, the ICPC-2 classification was too broad for ED; an adapted version was needed. The newly developed classification includes 89 presenting complaints and ED staff found it easy to use. Conclusions ICPC-2 classification can be adapted for ED use. The authors suggest a list of 89 presenting complaints for use in EDs adult patients.

  10. Take steps to curb violence, improve safety for ED personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    While violent eruptions are well documented in the ED, there is a not a lot of research into what strategies are most effective at both curbing violence and managing incidents when they do occur. Experts suggest that ED managers should consider staff training and visible security measures when developing procedures for dealing with violence. In one survey of ED physicians, more than three-quarters reported at least one incident of workplace violence in the previous 12 months. Researchers report that many EDs post security at the point of entry, but lack security coverage in patient care areas. Experts suggest that verbal de-escalation techniques can be helpful in lowering anxiety levels.They also urge ED managers to bring in assistance when the ED is crowded or waiting times are long.

  11. Flow cytometric analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation in vivo by EdU incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojing; Zhang, Chunpan; Jin, Hua; Sun, Guangyong; Tian, Yue; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Dong

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring T lymphocyte proliferation, especially in vivo, is essential for the evaluation of adaptive immune reactions. Flow cytometry-based proliferation assays have advantages in measuring cell division of different T lymphocyte subsets at the same time by multicolor labelling. In this study, we aimed to establish the use of 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation in vivo to monitor T lymphocyte proliferation by flow cytometry with an adoptive transfer model. We found that fixation followed by permeabilization preserved T cell surface antigens and had no obvious effects on the fluorescence intensity of APC, PE, PE-Cy7, FITC and PerCP-Cy5.5 when the concentration of the permeabilization reagents was optimized. However, the click reaction resulted in a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity of PE and PE-Cy7, and surface staining after the click reaction improved the fluorescence intensity. Thus, an extra step of blocking with PBS with 3% FBS between the click reaction and cell surface staining is needed. Furthermore, the percentage of EdU-positive cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, and the saturated dose of EdU was 20mg/kg. Intraperitoneal and intravenous injection had no differences in lymphocyte proliferation detection with EdU in vivo. In addition, T cell proliferation measured by EdU incorporation was comparable to BrdU but was lower than CFSE labelling. In conclusion, we optimized the protocols for EdU administration in vivo and staining in vitro, providing a feasible method for the measurement of T lymphocyte proliferation with EdU incorporation by flow cytometry in vivo.

  12. EDs trying not to let the bed bugs bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    As bed bugs have emerged as a growing problem for EDs, managers have developed strategies for prevention and decontamination. Here are some of the approaches they have shared with ED Management: Educate your staff on what they should look for on patients and in rooms that would indicate the presence of bed bugs. Be proactive. Have an exterminator examine your ED on a regular basis. A decontamination room on the outside of the building will prevent the spread of these bugs in your ED.

  13. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehlata V Gajbhiye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were "ED and experimental models," "ED and nervous stimulation," "ED and cavernous nerve stimulation," "ED and central stimulation," "ED and diabetes mellitus," "ED and ageing," "ED and hypercholesteremia," "ED and Peyronie′s disease," "radiation induced ED," "telemetric recording," "ED and mating test" and "ED and non-contact erection test."

  14. Evolutionary Demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levitis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    of biological and cultural evolution. Demographic variation within and among human populations is influenced by our biology, and therefore by natural selection and our evolutionary background. Demographic methods are necessary for studying populations of other species, and for quantifying evolutionary fitness...

  15. Supermassive Black-Hole Growth Over Cosmic Time: Active Galaxy Demography, Physics, and Ecology from Chandra Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N

    2010-01-01

    Extragalactic X-ray surveys over the past decade have dramatically improved understanding of the majority populations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over most of the history of the Universe. Here we briefly highlight some of the exciting discoveries about AGN demography, physics, and ecology with a focus on results from Chandra. We also discuss some key unresolved questions and future prospects.

  16. The NOURISHED randomised controlled trial comparing mentalisation-based treatment for eating disorders (MBT-ED) with specialist supportive clinical management (SSCM-ED) for patients with eating disorders and symptoms of borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul; Hellier, Jennifer; Barrett, Barbara; Barzdaitiene, Daiva; Bateman, Anthony; Bogaardt, Alexandra; Clare, Ajay; Somers, Nadia; O'Callaghan, Aine; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Kern, Nikola; Schmidt, Ulrike; Morando, Sara; Ouellet-Courtois, Catherine; Roberts, Alice; Skårderud, Finn; Fonagy, Peter

    2016-11-17

    In this multi-centre randomized controlled trial (RCT) we compared modified mentalisation-based treatment (MBT-ED) to specialist supportive clinical management (SSCM-ED) in patients with eating disorders (EDs) and borderline personality disorder symptoms (BPD). This group of patients presents complex challenges to clinical services, and a treatment which addresses their multiple problems has the potential to improve outcome. MBT has been shown to be effective in improving outcome in patients with BPD, but its use has not been reported in ED. Sixty-eight eligible participants were randomised to MBT-ED or SSCM-ED. The primary outcome measure was the global score on the Eating Disorder Examination. Secondary outcomes included measures of BPD symptoms (the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder), general psychiatric state, quality of life and service utilisation. Participants were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 18 months after randomisation. Analysis was performed using linear mixed models. Only 15 participants (22 %) completed the 18 month follow-up. Early drop-out occurred significantly more in the SSCM-ED group. Drop-out did not vary with treatment model later in therapy and was sometimes attributed to participants moving away. There was higher drop--out amongst smokers and those with higher neuroticism scores. 47.1 % of participants in the MBT-ED arm and 37.1 % in the SSCM-ED arm attended at least 50 % of therapy sessions offered. Amongst those remaining in the trial, at 12 and 18 months MBT-ED was associated with a greater reduction in Shape Concern and Weight Concern in the Eating Disorder Examination compared to SSCM-ED. At 6, 12 and 18 months there was a decline of ED and BPD symptoms in both groups combined. Ten participants were reported as having had adverse events during the trial, mostly self-harm, and there was one death, attributed as 'unexplained' by the coroner. The high drop-out rate made interpretation of the results

  17. Partitioning CO2 fluxes with isotopologue measurements and modeling to understand mechanisms of forest carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleska, Scott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Davidson, Eric [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Finzi, Adrien [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Wehr, Richdard [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Moorcroft, Paul [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    1. Objectives This project combines automated in situ observations of the isotopologues of CO2 with root observations, novel experimental manipulations of belowground processes, and isotope-enabled ecosystem modeling to investigate mechanisms of below- vs. aboveground carbon sequestration at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurements Site (EMS). The proposed objectives, which have now been largely accomplished, include: A. Partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) into photosynthesis and respiration using long-term continuous observations of the isotopic composition of NEE, and analysis of their dynamics ; B. Investigation of the influence of vegetation phenology on the timing and magnitude of carbon allocated belowground using measurements of root growth and indices of belowground autotrophic vs. heterotrophic respiration (via trenched plots and isotope measurements); C. Testing whether plant allocation of carbon belowground stimulates the microbial decomposition of soil organic matter, using in situ rhizosphere simulation experiments wherein realistic quantities of artificial isotopically-labeled exudates are released into the soil; and D. Synthesis and interpretation of the above data using the Ecosystem Demography Model 2 (ED2). 2. Highlights Accomplishments: • Our isotopic eddy flux record has completed its 5th full year and has been used to independently estimate ecosystem-scale respiration and photosynthesis. • Soil surface chamber isotopic flux measurements were carried out during three growing seasons, in conjunction with a trenching manipulation. Key findings to date (listed by objective): A. Partitioning of Net Ecosystem Exchange: 1. Ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light (the “Kok effect”) at the ecosystem scale. 2. Because it neglects the Kok effect, the standard NEE partitioning approach overestimates ecosystem photosynthesis (by ~25%) and

  18. Minor injury attendance times to the ED.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conlon, Ciaran

    2009-07-01

    The Health Service Executive (HSE) highlights the need for effective patient throughput and management, whilst providing appropriate staffing and therapeutic interventions. It acknowledges that patient need is integral to the development of a nurse led service and advocates planning staffing levels to reflect arrival times of patients. An observational study of all patients who presented to the emergency department in July 2005 and February 2006 was undertaken (n=7768). The study identified 1577 patients suitable for treatment by the Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) in these two months, which represents 20% of all patient attendances to the ED in this time period. A data collection tool was devised collectively by the ANPs to identify appropriate patients. The findings of the study revealed that 73% of patients suitable for the ANP service presented between the hours of 0800 and 2000, of which 54% attended between 0800 and 1600 h. Sunday emerged as the busiest day in July 2005 whereas Monday was found to be the busiest day in February 2006. Friday was found to be consistently busy for both months.

  19. Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain In the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and Leeann Zarzabal for statistical support. References [1] Todd KH, Ducharme J, Choiniere M, Crandall CS, Fosnocht DE, Homel P, et al. Pain in the...model of acute pain. Am J Emerg Med 2001;19: 531–2. [8] Lester L, Braude DA, Niles C, Crandall CS. Low-dose ketamine for analgesia in the ED: a...retrospective case series. Am J Emerg Med 2010;28:820–7. [9] Lester L, Braude DA, Niles C, Crandall CS. Low-dose ketamine for analgesia in the ED: a

  20. Effects of harvest of nontimber forest products and ecological differences between sites on the demography of African mahogany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaoue, Orou G; Ticktin, Tamara

    2010-04-01

    The demographic impacts of harvesting nontimber forest products (NTFP) have been increasingly studied because of reports of potentially unsustainable harvest. Nevertheless, our understanding of how plant demographic response to harvest is altered by variation in ecological conditions, which is critical for developing realistic sustainable-use plans, is limited. We built matrix population models to test whether and how variation in ecological conditions affects population responses to harvest. In particular, we examined the effect of bark and foliage harvest on the demography of populations of African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) in two contrasting ecological regions of Benin, West Africa. K. senegalensis bark and foliage harvest significantly reduced its stochastic population growth rates, but ecological differences between regions had a greater effect on population growth rates than did harvest. The effect of harvest on population growth rates (Deltalambda) was slightly stronger in the moist than in the drier region. Life-table response experiments revealed that the mechanism by which harvesting reduced lambda differed between ecological regions. Lowered stasis (persistence) of larger life stages lead to a reduction in lambda in the drier region, whereas lowered growth of all life stages lowered lambda in moist region. Potential strategies to increase population growth rates should include decreasing the proportion of individuals harvested, promoting harvester-owned plantations of African mahogany, and increasing survival and growth by promoting no-fire zones in gallery forests. Our results show how population responses to harvest of NTFP may be altered by ecological differences across sites and emphasize the importance of monitoring populations over the climatic range in which they occur to develop more realistic recommendations for conservation.

  1. A non-marine source of variability in Adélie Penguin demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, William R.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.; Ribic, Christine; Schofield, Oscar; Ducklow, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    A primary research objective of the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program has been to identify and understand the factors that regulate the demography of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae). In this context, our work has been focused on variability in the marine environment on which this species depends for virtually all aspects of its life history (Ainley, 2002). As we show here, however, there are patterns evident in the population dynamics of Adélie penguins that are better explained by variability in breeding habitat quality rather than by variability in the marine system. Interactions between the geomorphology of the terrestrial environment that, in turn, affect patterns of snow deposition, drive breeding habitat quality.

  2. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  3. Adaptation to sea level rise: does local adaptation influence the demography of coastal fish populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, K M; Klerks, P L; Leberg, P L

    2010-10-01

    This study compared the growth of two western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis populations that were previously demonstrated to have genetic adaptations that increased survival under lethal salinity exposures. The objective was to evaluate how genetic adaptations to lethal salinity stress affect population demography when exposed to sublethal salinity stress. Results indicate that chronic salinity exposure had a generally negative impact on population size, but fish originating from one of the two populations established with fish from a brackish site exhibited an increase in population size. Saltwater intrusion seems to result in reduced population size for most populations. Some populations inhabiting more saline sites, however, may develop localized adaptations, mitigating the consequences of increased salinity on population productivity.

  4. A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project`s primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

  5. Sexual development and reproductive demography of the green humphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum) in the Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, R. J.; Adams, S.; Choat, J. H.

    2008-03-01

    An investigation of the reproductive biology of the green humphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum) from three areas in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands revealed that B. muricatum exhibits several features that differ from the pattern of reproductive development observed in most parrotfishes. Unlike most parrotfishes, histological evidence suggests that the sexual pattern of B. muricatum is essentially gonochoristic with high incidences of anatomical but non-functional hermaphroditism. B. muricatum also differs from other parrotfishes in that all males pass through an immature female (or bisexual) phase as demonstrated by all adult testis retaining the ex-ovarian lumen and peripheral sperm sinuses in the gonad wall. However, a protogynous diandric reproductive strategy cannot be excluded given that sampling may have missed transitional individuals. Marked variation in the demography of male B. muricatum between the three locations examined is considered to reflect variation in historical fishing effort.

  6. Teaching Elementary School Social Studies Methods under edTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a self-study that analyzes my experience as a teacher educator navigating a turbulent educational landscape with the advent of edTPA. The data consist of my journal entries, the syllabi, handouts, work submitted by my students, and course evaluations. Data were analyzed by using an inductive process to describe how the edTPA…

  7. Effects of EdU labeling on mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, Hongxiu; Albersen, Maarten; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2013-01-01

    Thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) has recently been used for tracking mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we tested whether EdU was cytotoxic and whether it interfered with differentiation, cytokine secretion and migration of MSCs.

  8. Greater sexual reproduction contributes to differences in demography of invasive plants and their noninvasive relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jean H; Pardini, Eleanor A; Schutzenhofer, Michele R; Chung, Y Anny; Seidler, Katie J; Knight, Tiffany M

    2013-05-01

    An understanding of the demographic processes contributing to invasions would improve our mechanistic understanding of the invasion process and improve the efficiency of prevention and control efforts. However, field comparisons of the demography of invasive and noninvasive species have not previously been conducted. We compared the in situ demography of 17 introduced plant species in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to contrast the demographic patterns of invasive species with their less invasive relatives across a broad sample of angiosperms. Using herbarium records to estimate spread rates, we found higher maximum spread rates in the landscape for species classified a priori as invasive than for noninvasive introduced species, suggesting that expert classifications are an accurate reflection of invasion rate. Across 17 species, projected population growth was not significantly greater in invasive than in noninvasive introduced species. Among five taxonomic pairs of close relatives, however, four of the invasive species had higher projected population growth rates compared with their noninvasive relative. A Life Table Response Experiment suggested that the greater projected population growth rate of some invasive species relative to their noninvasive relatives was primarily a result of sexual reproduction. The greater sexual reproduction of invasive species is consistent with invaders having a life history strategy more reliant on fecundity than survival and is consistent with a large role of propagule pressure in invasion. Sexual reproduction is a key demographic correlate of invasiveness, suggesting that local processes influencing sexual reproduction, such as enemy escape, might be of general importance. However, the weak correlation of projected population growth with spread rates in the landscape suggests that regional processes, such as dispersal, may be equally important in determining invasion rate.

  9. Disciplining ethnicity: social sorting intersects with political demography in Israel's pre-state period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibler, Anat

    2014-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the professional and political activities of the demographer Roberto Bachi prior to Israel's establishment as a state in 1948. The article describes his involvement in two interconnected major areas: first, his advocacy of pro-natal policies, connected to a nation-building strategy by the Jewish population to achieve numerical dominance over Arab Palestinians in areas to be incorporated in the Jewish state, and second, the development of Jewish ethnic distinctions, particularly the 'Mizrahi type', to track differences in birthrates and changing cultural features within the Jewish population. The article also revises the historical record by showing the importance of this ethnic classification in the years prior to the large waves of Jewish immigration from Arab countries. Without the reworking of the popular category 'Mizrahi' into a scientifically systematized category by a demographer who would become the head of the state's Central Bureau of Statistics upon its founding in 1948, this binary social epistemology could not be as strong and legitimate as it actually was. Two factors account for Bachi's success. First was his ability to provide a new way of understanding the present in terms of the future. His numerical predictions on the Jewish and Arab demographic development made statistics and demography an indispensable technology for public policy and social planning. Second was his role as a boundary actor--a unique mediating position between political and scientific spheres. The Israeli case study exemplifies similar dynamics found in other countries during periods of structuring the modern state, namely, processes in which experts of infrastructural knowledge such as statistics and demography saw themselves as responsible for the national progress and its social modernity.

  10. Introducing tropical lianas in a vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Brugnera, Manfredo di Procia e.; Krshna Moorthy Paravathi, Sruthi; Pausenberger, Nancy; Roels, Jana; kearsley, elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are essential components of the earth system and play a critical role for land surface feedbacks to climate change. These forests are currently experiencing large-scale structural changes, including the increase of liana abundance and biomass. This liana proliferation might have large impacts on the carbon cycle of tropical forests. However no single global vegetation model currently accounts for lianas. The TREECLIMBERS project (ERC starting grant) aims to introduce for the first time lianas into a vegetation model. The project attempts to reach this challenging goal by performing a global meta-analysis on liana data and by collecting new data in South American forests. Those new and existing datasets form the basis of a new liana plant functional type (PFT) that will be included in the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2). This presentation will show an overview of the current progress of the TREECLIMBERS project. Liana inventory data collected in French Guiana along a forest disturbance gradient show the relation between liana abundance and disturbance. Xylem water isotope analysis indicates that trees and lianas can rely on different soil water resources. New modelling concepts for liana PFTs will be presented and in-situ leaf gas exchange and sap flow data are used to parameterize water and carbon fluxes for this new PFT. Finally ongoing terrestrial LiDAR observations of liana infested forest will be highlighted.

  11. TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murbach, Marcus; Martinez, Andres; Guarneros Luna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    TechEdSat-3p is the second generation in the TechEdSat-X series. The TechEdSat Series uses the CubeSat standards established by the California Polytechnic State University Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. With typical blocks being constructed from 1-unit (1U 10x10x10 cm) increments, the TechEdSat-3p has a 3U volume with a 30 cm length. The project uniquely pairs advanced university students with NASA researchers in a rapid design-to-flight experience lasting 1-2 semesters.The TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series provides a rapid platform for testing technologies for future NASA Earth and planetary missions, as well as providing students with an early exposure to flight hardware development and management.

  12. The full moon and ED patient volumes: unearthing a myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D A; Adams, S L

    1996-03-01

    To determine if there is any effect of the full moon on emergency department (ED) patient volume, ambulance runs, admissions, or admissions to a monitored unit, a retrospective analysis of the hospital electronic records of all patients seen in an ED during a 4-year period was conducted in an ED of a suburban community hospital. A full moon occurred 49 times during the study period. There were 150,999 patient visits to the ED during the study period, of which 34,649 patients arrived by ambulance. A total of 35,087 patients was admitted to the hospital and 11,278 patients were admitted to a monitored unit. No significant differences were found in total patient visits, ambulance runs, admissions to the hospital, or admissions to a monitored unit on days of the full moon. The occurrence of a full moon has no effect on ED patient volume, ambulance runs, admissions, or admissions to a monitored unit.

  13. One carbon cycle: Impacts of model integration, ecosystem process detail, model resolution, and initialization data, on projections of future climate mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, J.; Hurtt, G. C.; le page, Y.; Patel, P. L.; Chini, L. P.; Sahajpal, R.; Dubayah, R.; Thomson, A. M.; Edmonds, J.; Janetos, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Integrated assessment models (IAMs) simulate the interactions between human and natural systems at a global scale, representing a broad suite of phenomena across the global economy, energy system, land-use, and carbon cycling. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on maintaining or enhancing the terrestrial carbon sink as a substantial contribution to restrain the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, however most IAMs rely on simplified regional representations of terrestrial carbon dynamics. Our research aims to reduce uncertainties associated with forest modeling within integrated assessments, and to quantify the impacts of climate change on forest growth and productivity for integrated assessments of terrestrial carbon management. We developed the new Integrated Ecosystem Demography (iED) to increase terrestrial ecosystem process detail, resolution, and the utilization of remote sensing in integrated assessments. iED brings together state-of-the-art models of human society (GCAM), spatial land-use patterns (GLM) and terrestrial ecosystems (ED) in a fully coupled framework. The major innovative feature of iED is a consistent, process-based representation of ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle throughout the human, terrestrial, land-use, and atmospheric components. One of the most challenging aspects of ecosystem modeling is to provide accurate initialization of land surface conditions to reflect non-equilibrium conditions, i.e., the actual successional state of the forest. As all plants in ED have an explicit height, it is one of the few ecosystem models that can be initialized directly with vegetation height data. Previous work has demonstrated that ecosystem model resolution and initialization data quality have a large effect on flux predictions at continental scales. Here we use a factorial modeling experiment to quantify the impacts of model integration, process detail, model resolution, and initialization data on projections of

  14. Structural basis for signaling by exclusive EDS1 heteromeric complexes with SAG101 or PAD4 in plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stephan; Stuttmann, Johannes; Rietz, Steffen; Guerois, Raphael; Brunstein, Elena; Bautor, Jaqueline; Niefind, Karsten; Parker, Jane E

    2013-12-11

    Biotrophic plant pathogens encounter a postinfection basal resistance layer controlled by the lipase-like protein enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and its sequence-related interaction partners, senescence-associated gene 101 (SAG101) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4). Maintainance of separate EDS1 family member clades through angiosperm evolution suggests distinct functional attributes. We report the Arabidopsis EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer crystal structure with juxtaposed N-terminal α/β hydrolase and C-terminal α-helical EP domains aligned via a large conserved interface. Mutational analysis of the EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer and a derived EDS1-PAD4 structural model shows that EDS1 signals within mutually exclusive heterocomplexes. Although there is evolutionary conservation of α/β hydrolase topology in all three proteins, a noncatalytic resistance mechanism is indicated. Instead, the respective N-terminal domains appear to facilitate binding of the essential EP domains to create novel interaction surfaces on the heterodimer. Transitions between distinct functional EDS1 heterodimers might explain the central importance and versatility of this regulatory node in plant immunity.

  15. Deconstructing Stereotypes : Ed Bullins' the Taking of Miss Janie = Ed Bullins'in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Pala MULL

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available African-American playwright Ed Bullins is one of the most significant figures to emerge from the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. His 1975 play The Taking of Miss Janie is a dramatic portrait of the specific events and ideas that created the 1960s, and their impact on the individual consciousnesses of the characters. The play brings into the foreground many issues related to race and ethnicity in America. Even though the general tone of The Taking of Miss Janie is one of violence and gloom, this reading focuses on those moments where love and human affection outshine the sense of destruction predominant in the play.

  16. Partitioning CO2 fluxes with isotopologue measurements and modeling to understand mechanisms of forest carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleska, Scott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Davidson, Eric [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Finzi, Adrien [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wehr, Richard [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Moorcroft, Paul [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-01-28

    1. Objectives This project combines automated in situ observations of the isotopologues of CO2 with root observations, novel experimental manipulations of belowground processes, and isotope-enabled ecosystem modeling to investigate mechanisms of below- vs. aboveground carbon sequestration at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurements Site (EMS). The proposed objectives, which have now been largely accomplished, include: A. Partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) into photosynthesis and respiration using long-term continuous observations of the isotopic composition of NEE, and analysis of their dynamics ; B. Investigation of the influence of vegetation phenology on the timing and magnitude of carbon allocated belowground using measurements of root growth and indices of belowground autotrophic vs. heterotrophic respiration (via trenched plots and isotope measurements); C. Testing whether plant allocation of carbon belowground stimulates the microbial decomposition of soil organic matter, using in situ rhizosphere simulation experiments wherein realistic quantities of artificial isotopically-labeled exudates are released into the soil; and D. Synthesis and interpretation of the above data using the Ecosystem Demography Model 2 (ED2). 2. Highlights Accomplishments: • Our isotopic eddy flux record has completed its 5th full year and has been used to independently estimate ecosystem-scale respiration and photosynthesis. • Soil surface chamber isotopic flux measurements were carried out during three growing seasons, in conjunction with a trenching manipulation. Key findings to date (listed by objective): A. Partitioning of Net Ecosystem Exchange: 1. Ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light (the “Kok effect”) at the ecosystem scale. 2. Because it neglects the Kok effect, the standard NEE partitioning approach overestimates ecosystem

  17. Evidence of salicylic acid pathway with EDS1 and PAD4 proteins by molecular dynamics simulation for grape improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Gitanjali; Jaiswal, Sarika; Iquebal, M A; Kumar, Sunil; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Biotic stress is a major cause of heavy loss in grape productivity. In order to develop biotic stress-resistant grape varieties, the key defense genes along with its pathway have to be deciphered. In angiosperm plants, lipase-like protein phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) is well known to be essential for systemic resistance against biotic stress. PAD4 functions together with its interacting partner protein enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) to promote salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and SA-independent defense pathway. Existence and structure of key protein of systemic resistance EDS1 and PAD4 are not known in grapes. Before SA pathway studies are taken in grape, molecular evidence of EDS1: PAD4 complex is to be established. To establish this, EDS1 protein sequence was retrieved from NCBI and homologous PAD4 protein was generated using Arabidopsis thaliana as template and conserved domains were confirmed. In this study, computational methods were used to model EDS1 and PAD4 and simulated the interactions of EDS1 and PAD4. Since no structural details of the proteins were available, homology modeling was employed to construct three-dimensional structures. Further, molecular dynamic simulations were performed to study the dynamic behavior of the EDS1 and PAD4. The modeled proteins were validated and subjected to molecular docking analysis. Molecular evidence of stable complex of EDS1:PAD4 in grape supporting SA defense pathway in response to biotic stress is reported in this study. If SA defense pathway genes are explored, then markers of genes involved can play pivotal role in grape variety development especially against biotic stress leading to higher productivity.

  18. High-Resolution Modeling Disturbance-Induced Forest Carbon Dynamics with Lidar and Landsat Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M.; Huang, C.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Fisk, J.; Sahajpal, R.; Flanagan, S.; Swatantran, A.; Huang, W.; Tang, H.; ONeil-Dunne, J.; Johnson, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Forest stands are dynamic in a status from severely, partially disturbed, or undisturbed to different stages of recovery towards maturity and equilibrium. Forest ecosystem models generally use potential biomass (an assumption of equilibrium status) as initial biomass, which is unrealistic and could result in unreliable estimates of disturbance-induced carbon changes. To accurately estimate spatiotemporal changes of forest carbon stock and fluxes, it requires accurate information on initial biomass, the extent and severity of disturbance, and following land use. We demonstrate a prototype system to achieve this goal by integrating 1-m small footprint Lidar acquired in year 2004, 30-m Landsat disturbances from 1984 to 2011, and an individual-based structure height Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. Lidar provides critical information on forest canopy height, improving the accuracy of initial forest biomass estimates; impervious surfaces data and yearly disturbance data from Landsat provide information on wall-to-wall yearly natural and anthropogenic disturbances and their severity (on average 0.32% for the natural and 0.19% for the anthropogenic for below test area); ED model plays a central role by linking both Lidar canopy height and Landsat disturbances with ecosystem processes. We tested the system at 90-m spatial resolution in Charles County, Maryland, by running ED model for six experiments, the combinations of three initial biomass (potential, moderate and low initial biomass constrained by Lidar canopy height) with two disturbance scenarios (with and without anthropogenic disturbances). Our experiments show that estimated changes of carbon stock and flux are sensitive to initial biomass status and human-induced land cover change. Our prototype system can assess regional carbon dynamics at local scale under changing climate and disturbance regimes, and provide useful information for forest management and land use policies.

  19. Interactions between demography, genetics, and landscape connectivity increase extinction probability for a small population of large carnivores in a major metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John F; Mahoney, Peter J; Sikich, Jeff A; Serieys, Laurel E K; Pollinger, John P; Ernest, Holly B; Riley, Seth P D

    2016-08-31

    The extinction vortex is a theoretical model describing the process by which extinction risk is elevated in small, isolated populations owing to interactions between environmental, demographic, and genetic factors. However, empirical demonstrations of these interactions have been elusive. We modelled the dynamics of a small mountain lion population isolated by anthropogenic barriers in greater Los Angeles, California, to evaluate the influence of demographic, genetic, and landscape factors on extinction probability. The population exhibited strong survival and reproduction, and the model predicted stable median population growth and a 15% probability of extinction over 50 years in the absence of inbreeding depression. However, our model also predicted the population will lose 40-57% of its heterozygosity in 50 years. When we reduced demographic parameters proportional to reductions documented in another wild population of mountain lions that experienced inbreeding depression, extinction probability rose to 99.7%. Simulating greater landscape connectivity by increasing immigration to greater than or equal to one migrant per generation appears sufficient to largely maintain genetic diversity and reduce extinction probability. We provide empirical support for the central tenet of the extinction vortex as interactions between genetics and demography greatly increased extinction probability relative to the risk from demographic and environmental stochasticity alone. Our modelling approach realistically integrates demographic and genetic data to provide a comprehensive assessment of factors threatening small populations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Effects of rainfall, host demography, and musth on strongyle fecal egg counts in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, M I; O'Connell-Rodwell, C E; Turner, W C; Nambandi, K; Kinzley, C; Rodwell, T C; Faulkner, C T; Felt, S A; Bouley, D M

    2011-01-01

    Wild African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are commonly infected with intestinal strongyle parasites. Our objective was to determine baseline fecal strongyle egg counts for elephants in the northeast region of Etosha National Park, Namibia and determine if these numbers were affected by annual rainfall, elephant demography (age of individuals and composition of groups), and hormonal state of males. We found that matriarchal family group members have significantly higher fecal egg counts than male elephants (bulls). Among family group members, strongyle egg counts increased with age, whereas among bulls, strongyle egg counts decreased with age. Years of higher rainfall were correlated with decreased numbers of strongyle eggs among bulls. Finally, bulls were not affected by their physiologic (hormonal) status (musth vs. nonmusth). These results suggest that infection by strongyle parasites in Namibian African elephants is a dynamic process affected by intrinsic and extrinsic factors including host demography and rainfall.

  1. Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phrases: Modified atmosphere packaging, polypropylene, low density polyethylene ..... data from two packs pre treatment; mean separation by Duncan's Multiple Range Test at value 1%. ..... communities of lrltltiopia. ltlast Africa Medical. Journal ...

  2. A distance regular graph of type E1 Ed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this note, the distance regular graph of type E1 Ed is considered and some characterization of the type graph is given. The results generalize the characterization of tight distance regular graphs.

  3. Elementi ed esercizi di geometria analitica e proiettiva

    CERN Document Server

    Francia, Giovanni

    1950-01-01

    La retta : preliminario ; coordinate cartesiane nel piano, equazioni della retta, distanze ed angoli ; cambiamento delle coordinate, coordinate polari ; il cerchio ; le coniche come luoghi geometrici : l'ellisse, l'iperbole, parabola.

  4. Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed. Ramesh Chandra, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer Business. Philadelphia, 2012. Softbound, 224 pp. Price: $69.99. ISBN: 9781451109412. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. 我国社区居家养老模式的发展困境与机制创新%Development Plight and Innovation Mechanism in Community A~ed Care Model in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成曦

    2012-01-01

    Community aged care model is suitable for China's current circumstances,which can effectively alleviate impact of population aging on the various aspects munity aged care model in various regions, there are to innovate the community aged care model, change of China's economy, society, etc. , but from the practice of com- not a few problems and deficiencies. Therefore, it is necessary the status quo of the formerly government dependenee and lack of impetus to the development. With the power of market-oriented, it showld give full play to the natural advantages of the property services business, so that the community aged care has better operability and applicability.%社区居家养老模式适合我国现阶段的国情,能够有效缓解人口老龄化对我国经济、社会等各方面造成的冲击,但是从各地社区居家养老的实践来看,还存在着不少的问题与缺陷。因此,需要对社区居家养老模式进行大胆的创新,改变以往对政府依赖性强,发展动力不足的现状,借助市场化的力量,充分发挥物业服务企业在社区居家养老中的天然优势,以使社区居家养老具备更好的可操作性和适用性。

  6. Safe Handling of Snakes in an ED Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Melanie; Swanson, Kristofer; Sanders, April; Prater, Samuel; von Wenckstern, Toni; Mick, JoAnn

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to improve consistency in management of snakes and venomous snake bites in the emergency department (ED) can improve patient and staff safety and outcomes, as well as improve surveillance data accuracy. The emergency department at a large academic medical center identified an opportunity to implement a standardized process for snake disposal and identification to reduce staff risk exposure to snake venom from snakes patients brought with them to the ED.

  7. DISTRIBUZIONE, TASSONOMIA ED IMPATTO ECOLOGICO DI SPECIE ALIENE

    OpenAIRE

    Stinca, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Il problema delle specie aliene, soprattutto negli ultimi decenni, è diventato un elemento cruciale nella biologia della conservazione. La diffusione rapida ed incontrollata di organismi estranei al contesto territoriale di riferimento, infatti, spesso comporta impatti sulla biodiversità e sul funzionamento degli ecosistemi. In tali casi, pertanto, vi è anche l’incapacità da parte degli stessi sistemi biologici invasi a ristabilire autonomamente ed in tempi relativamente brevi le condizioni i...

  8. Owned dog demography in Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulczer, Andrew S; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Waltner-Toews, David; Dewey, Cate E

    2013-02-01

    A thorough knowledge of the dog demography should be an integral element in the planning, implementation and evaluation of dog population control measures. In May 2008, a door-to-door household census of human and owned canine populations was conducted in 12 contiguous neighbourhoods in the town of Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Guatemala. During the census, household and footpath data were recorded using a handheld Global Positioning System (GPS), and used to create digital census route maps, and perimeter and area estimates of the study region. Approximately 99% of all households (472/476) participated in the census, representing 2461 people in the overall estimated study region area of 80 hectares (ha). A total of 382 dogs were owned by 50.8% (240/472) of households, yielding means of 0.8 (382/472) owned dogs per household and 1.6 (382/240) dogs per dog-owning household. Of the total 382 owned dogs, 88.2% (337/382) were aged three months or older; of these, 68.5% (231/337) were reported as not normally being confined on the household property during the average day, and 9.7% (24/247) of the males and none of the females (0/81) were reported to be neutered. Of the households that owned female dogs, 89.7% (52/58) and 91.4% (53/58) reported that they would have females surgically or non-surgically neutered, respectively, if these services were available. Of the households that owned male dogs, 90.3% (176/195) and 92.3% (180/195) reported that they would have males surgically or non-surgically neutered, respectively, if these services were available. Approximately 72% (238/330) of owned dogs were vaccinated for rabies, and 80% (187/238) of these were males. The owned dog male:female ratio was 2.6:1 (275/107), the owned dog:human ratio was 1:6.4 (382/2461), and the absolute density was 478 (382/0.80) owned dogs/km(2). This knowledge of the owned dog demography was generated using simple means and has been of direct use in support of, and as baseline data for the planning

  9. Demography of northern flying squirrels informs ecosystem management of western interior forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmkuhl, John F; Kistler, Keith D; Begley, James S; Boulanger, John

    2006-04-01

    We studied northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) demography in the eastern Washington Cascade Range to test hypotheses about regional and local abundance patterns and to inform managers of the possible effects of fire and fuels management on flying squirrels. We quantified habitat characteristics and squirrel density, population trends, and demography in three typical forest cover types over a four-year period. We had 2034 captures of flying squirrels over 41 000 trap nights from 1997 through 2000 and marked 879 squirrels for mark-recapture population analysis. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest appeared to be poorer habitat for flying squirrels than young or mature mixed-conifer forest. About 35% fewer individuals were captured in open pine forest than in dry mixed-conifer Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and grand fir (Abies grandis) forests. Home ranges were 85% larger in pine forest (4.6 ha) than in mixed-conifer forests (2.5 ha). Similarly, population density (Huggins estimator) in ponderosa pine forest was half (1.1 squirrels/ha) that of mixed-conifer forest (2.2 squirrels/ha). Tree canopy cover was the single best correlate of squirrel density (r = 0.77), with an apparent threshold of 55% canopy cover separating stands with low- from high-density populations. Pradel estimates of annual recruitment were lower in open pine (0.28) than in young (0.35) and mature (0.37) forest. High recruitment was most strongly associated with high understory plant species richness and truffle biomass. Annual survival rates ranged from 45% to 59% and did not vary among cover types. Survival was most strongly associated with understory species richness and forage lichen biomass. Maximum snow depth had a strong negative effect on survival. Rate of per capita increase showed a density-dependent response. Thinning and prescribed burning in ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer forests to restore stable fire regimes and forest structure might reduce flying squirrel

  10. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  11. Response to the society of toxicology task force re-examination of the ED01 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodell, R L; Gaylor, D W; Greenman, D L; Littlefield, N A; Farmer, J H

    1983-01-01

    This communication has re-examined and justified certain of the NCTR's analyses and recommendations from the ED01 Study, which were either misunderstood or misinterpreted by the SOT Task Force. In addition, we have shown that some of the Task Force's own analyses and interpretations are subject to review on scientific grounds. The Task Force's rejection of the linear extrapolation method recommended by the NCTR was stated because of a suspected force-fitting of a linear model to data, an approach that is not part of the NCTR procedure. In suspecting a protective effect of 2-AAF against bladder tumors, the Task Force used an inappropriate model that overpredicted the background bladder tumor rate in control mice. Contrary to the Task Force's belief, a failure to account adequately for time to tumor response was more characteristic of analyses performed by the Task Force rather than those performed by the NCTR. The Task Force's questioning of the multistage model for risk assessment was based on its use of inappropriate, crude tumor data rather than upon NCTR's use of the multistage model with time-adjusted tumor data. The Hartley-Sielken model did not fit the ED01 tumor data as well as the Task Force had presumed. In a risk extrapolation comparison by the Task Force, a coarse time partition of the ED01 data that had been questioned by the Task Force actually produced more stable results than a finer partition proposed by the Task Force. Another problem in the Task Force report concerns the change of protocol. Instead of resulting in a loss of strength as anticipated by the Task Force, the change of protocol during the ED01 Study resulted in an increase in information as alluded to by the Task Force. If the Task Force's proposal for restricting the length of feeding studies had been followed in the ED01 Study, most of the dose related tumor information would not have been obtained. Also, the Task Force's belief that low doses of 2-AAF had some effect on the

  12. Continuum of quanta in the final theory. Model of spiral fields. Basic ideas for a compatible physics and a consistent nature science. 4. rev. ed.; Quantenkontinuum in der Finaltheorie. Spiralfeldmodell. Grundgedanken fuer eine Kompatible Physik und eine Konsistente Naturwissenschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartje, Udo Albert Juergen

    2009-07-01

    solution of the puzzle around the 'Dualism of Waves and Particles'. Structures of matter do not consist of any a priori, i.e. out the beginning existing tiniest primordial particles that secondarily swings; but they generate themselves from radiation which does not interrupt their light-fast movement in the interior of particles; and therefore it remains radiation-like. The circulation in itself creates locality; without that the radiation lost their dynamics; and without that this radiation must itself change into electrons: with their secondary turn in the orbital path. The Classic Physics and the Quantum Physics amalgamate into the 'Spiral Field Model' (Model of Spiral Fields). Classic Physics and the Quantum Physics merge in a Model of Spiral Fields into a paramount thought building with a new imagination for radiation and particles. Molecules, atoms and seedless particles have to be analyzed on the new basis. The rich fundus of proven knowledge will help. Problems of the natural sciences which do not find any immediate explanation should be taken in relation to the new thoughts; therewith will the special aspects visible. A single human is not able to it in view of the gigantic range of the accumulated knowledge. (orig.)

  13. Modelo de respuesta sitio-específica del maíz al nitrógeno y agua edáfica en un haplustol Site-specific corn nitrogen and soil water response model in haplustolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Gregoret

    2006-12-01

    potential were identified: rainfed high and low potential and high potential with irrigation. The data are from on-farm trials for the 2004-2005 crop season, in Manfredi (Córdoba with a uniform N rate along strips (0, 32, 64, 96, 129 and 161 kg N ha-¹ in the dry land and 0, 64, 137, 212, 279 and 351 kg N ha-¹ in the irrigated area and a randomized complete block design to estimate site-specific crop response functions. Spatial autocorrelation is taken into account in regression estimation of N response functions by landscape position, in the form a spatial autoregressive error structure. Results suggest that N response differs significantly by landscape position and by soil water availability. Yields ranged from 4.914 to 11,346 kg ha-¹ in the zone of low productivity, between 4,956 and 12,204 kg ha-¹ in the one of high productivity and between 7,830 and 14,387 kg ha-¹ in irrigated plots. The agronomical (DOA and economically (DOE optimal N rates also differed among management zones, being DOA= 285, 184 and 162 kg ha-1 for the zones from greater to smaller productivity, meanwhile DOE values were 171, 111 and 90 kg ha-1, respectively. Initial soil nitrogen and available water inclusion allowed us to build a single N response model for the rainfed management zones. Besides, irrigated experiment maize performance was well predicted by the same model type but excluding available water (non-limiting factor, as input. The model performed well using either available N at 60 or 200 cm soil depth, and available water al 200 cm depth. This model allowed us to recommend fertilization rates using variable rate application, maximizing net return to N, and minimizing environment contamination risks, by over dose input (i.e. N fertilization application. Our conclusions are preliminary because they come from a single year experiment, which did not include the whole range of expectated initial conditions. More scenarios are needed in order to validate the proposed model.

  14. Modeling multiple resource limitation in tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvigy, D.; Xu, X.; Zarakas, C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) are characterized by a long dry season when little rain falls. At the same time, many neotropical soils are highly weathered and relatively nutrient poor. Because TDFs are often subject to both water and nutrient constraints, the question of how they will respond to environmental perturbations is both complex and highly interesting. Models, our basic tools for projecting ecosystem responses to global change, can be used to address this question. However, few models have been specifically parameterized for TDFs. Here, we present a new version of the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model that includes a new parameterization of TDFs. In particular, we focus on the model's framework for representing limitation by multiple resources (carbon, water, nitrogen, and phosphorus). Plant functional types are represented in terms of a dichotomy between "acquisitive" and "conservative" resource acquisition strategies. Depending on their resource acquisition strategy and basic stoichiometry, plants can dynamically adjust their allocation to organs (leaves, stem, roots), symbionts (e.g. N2-fixing bacteria), and mycorrhizal fungi. Several case studies are used to investigate how resource acquisition strategies affect ecosystem responses to environmental perturbations. Results are described in terms of the basic setting (e.g., rich vs. poor soils; longer vs. shorter dry season), and well as the type and magnitude of environmental perturbation (e.g., changes in precipitation or temperature; changes in nitrogen deposition). Implications for ecosystem structure and functioning are discussed.

  15. Anthropological demography in Europe: Methodological lessons from a comparative ethnographic study in Athens and London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Georgiadis

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a descriptive account of the methods used to conduct a comparative ethnographic study of below-replacement fertility in Athens, Greece and London, UK. It argues that in order for anthropology and demography to forge a closer relationship each discipline first needs to gain a deeper appreciation of the other's methodological perspectives. The following discussion presents the key anthropological approaches employed to realize a research project on low fertility in Europe, and provides justification for their use. While the practices described in this paper might be familiar to anthropologists and qualitative demographers, they are less well-known in the wider demographic community. Those convinced of the benefits of the ethnographic approach to the study of fertility are also invited to consider the specific obstacles encountered in the course of this enquiry. This paper reaches the following methodological conclusions: 1 Findings from two ethnographic studies of low fertility can be compared and generalised if such concepts as 'comparison' and 'generalisation' are understood in the anthropological sense. 2 Those investigating fertility in Europe must remain critical of their position relative to their study participants, even if they are undertaking research 'at home'. 3 Exploring attitudes towards reproduction and experiences of family-formation in an urban setting presents unique challenges as does 4 asking women about their childbearing beliefs and practices. 5 Analysing press perspectives on low fertility must involve treating media representations as 'discourse' and 6 qualitative studies are invaluable to the low fertility debate because of their thematic contributions.

  16. The demography of the lizard Tropidurus torquatus (Squamata, Tropiduridae in a highly seasonal Neotropical savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga C. Wiederhecker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The demography of a population of Tropidurus torquatus was studied from March 1996 until December 1998, in the Cerrado biome of the Central Brazil, using the method of capture and recapture. Population size, number of incoming individuals in the population, and age structure varied seasonally, reflecting the reproductive cycle of the species. The instantaneous rate of population increase did not differ from zero throughout the study. In general, the permanence rate of juveniles and adults were low, indicating a large turnover of individuals in the population, with a maximum life expectancy of three years. The sex-ratio among adults was biased toward females. Since no bias was observed among juveniles and there was no difference in adults permanence between sexes, we suggestet that the biased adult sex-ratio resulted from a lower permanence of males during a short ontogenetic period, when secondary sexual characteristics develop. When compared to T. itambere, the studied population of T. torquatus attained a higher density and a greater female bias in the sex-ratio. In general, the studied population presented characteristics that, according to life history theory, should be associated with early age at maturity and polyginy: short life expectancy, high population turnover, and female biased sex-ratios.

  17. Mercury concentration trend as a possible result of changes in cod population demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruus, Anders; Hjermann, Dag Ø; Beylich, Bjørnar; Schøyen, Merete; Øxnevad, Sigurd; Green, Norman W

    2017-07-20

    Mercury (Hg) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is one of many parameters that are monitored through OSPAR's Joint Assessment and Monitoring Programme. Time series for cod in the Inner Oslofjord (Norway) go back to 1984. Until 2014, annual median Hg-concentrations in cod from the Inner Oslofjord showed both significant upward long-term (whole time series) and short-term (recent 10 years) trends (when 2015 was included, the short-term trend was not significant). However, the median length of the cod sampled also showed upward trends. This may have been caused by low cod recruitment in the area since the start of the 2000s, as indicated by beach seine surveys. To investigate how length would impact the trend analysis, the Hg-concentrations in the cod were normalised to 50 cm. No significant short-term trend in Hg-concentrations could be detected for length-normalised concentrations. The results indicated that most of the upward trend in Hg-concentrations could be attributed to the sampling of larger fish. The reasons for the apparent change in the cod population demography are not conclusive, however, sampling bias must also be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mismatch Between Birth Date and Vegetation Phenology Slows the Demography of Roe Deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Coulson, Tim; Hewison, A. J. Mark; Delorme, Daniel; Warnant, Claude; Bonenfant, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Marked impacts of climate change on biodiversity have frequently been demonstrated, including temperature-related shifts in phenology and life-history traits. One potential major impact of climate change is the modification of synchronization between the phenology of different trophic levels. High phenotypic plasticity in laying date has allowed many bird species to track the increasingly early springs resulting from recent environmental change, but although changes in the timing of reproduction have been well studied in birds, these questions have only recently been addressed in mammals. To track peak resource availability, large herbivores like roe deer, with a widespread distribution across Europe, should also modify their life-history schedule in response to changes in vegetation phenology over time. In this study, we analysed the influence of climate change on the timing of roe deer births and the consequences for population demography and individual fitness. Our study provides a rare quantification of the demographic costs associated with the failure of a species to modify its phenology in response to a changing world. Given these fitness costs, the lack of response of roe deer birth dates to match the increasingly earlier onset of spring is in stark contrast with the marked phenotypic responses to climate change reported in many other mammals. We suggest that the lack of phenotypic plasticity in birth timing in roe deer is linked to its inability to track environmental cues of variation in resource availability for the timing of parturition. PMID:24690936

  19. Mismatch between birth date and vegetation phenology slows the demography of roe deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Coulson, Tim; Hewison, A J Mark; Delorme, Daniel; Warnant, Claude; Bonenfant, Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Marked impacts of climate change on biodiversity have frequently been demonstrated, including temperature-related shifts in phenology and life-history traits. One potential major impact of climate change is the modification of synchronization between the phenology of different trophic levels. High phenotypic plasticity in laying date has allowed many bird species to track the increasingly early springs resulting from recent environmental change, but although changes in the timing of reproduction have been well studied in birds, these questions have only recently been addressed in mammals. To track peak resource availability, large herbivores like roe deer, with a widespread distribution across Europe, should also modify their life-history schedule in response to changes in vegetation phenology over time. In this study, we analysed the influence of climate change on the timing of roe deer births and the consequences for population demography and individual fitness. Our study provides a rare quantification of the demographic costs associated with the failure of a species to modify its phenology in response to a changing world. Given these fitness costs, the lack of response of roe deer birth dates to match the increasingly earlier onset of spring is in stark contrast with the marked phenotypic responses to climate change reported in many other mammals. We suggest that the lack of phenotypic plasticity in birth timing in roe deer is linked to its inability to track environmental cues of variation in resource availability for the timing of parturition.

  20. Eugenics from the New Deal to the Great Society: genetics, demography and population quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Edmund

    2008-12-01

    The relationship between biological and social scientists as regards the study of human traits and behavior has often been perceived in terms of mutual distrust, even antipathy. In the interwar period, population study seemed an area that might allow for closer relations between them-united as they were by a concern to improve the eugenic quality of populations. Yet these relations were in tension: by the early post-war era, social demographers were denigrating the contributions of biologists to the study of population problems as embodying the elitist ideology of eugenics. In response to this loss of credibility, the eugenics movement pursued a simultaneous program of withdrawal and expansion: its leaders helped focus concern with biological quality onto the developing field of medical genetics, while at the same moment, extended their scope to improving the social quality of populations through birth control policies, guided by demography. While this approach maintained boundaries between the social and the biological, in the 1960s, a revitalized American Eugenics Society helped reunite leading demographers and geneticists. This paper will assess the reasons for this period of influence for eugenics, and explore its implications for the social and biological study of human populations.

  1. Confronting the stigma of eugenics: genetics, demography and the problems of population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Edmund

    2009-12-01

    Building upon the work of Thomas Gieryn and Erving Goffman, this paper will explore how the concepts of stigma and boundary work can be usefully applied to history of population science. Having been closely aligned to eugenics in the early 20th century, from the 1930s both demographers and geneticists began to establish a boundary between their own disciplines and eugenic ideology. The eugenics movement responded to this process of stigmatization. Through strategies defined by Goffman as 'disclosure' and 'concealment', stigma was managed, and a limited space for eugenics was retained in science and policy. Yet by the 1960s, a revitalized eugenics movement was bringing leading social and biological scientists together through the study of the genetic demography of characteristics such as intelligence. The success of this programme of 'stigma transformation' resulted from its ability to allow geneticists and demographers to conceive of eugenic improvement in ways that seemed consistent with the ideals of individuality, diversity and liberty. In doing so, it provided them with an alternative, and a challenge, to more radical and controversial programmes to realize an optimal genotype and population. The processes of stigma attribution and management are, however, ongoing, and since the rise of the nature-nurture controversy in the 1970s, the use of eugenics as a 'stigma symbol' has prevailed.

  2. Urban park characteristics, genetic variation, and historical demography of white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus populations in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Munshi-South

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the characteristics of urban green spaces required to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether isolation in New York City (NYC parks results in genetic bottlenecks in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus, and test the hypotheses that park size and time since isolation are associated with genetic variability using nonlinear regression and information-theoretic model selection. White-footed mice have previously been documented to exhibit male-biased dispersal, which may create disparities in genetic variation between males and females in urban parks. We use genotypes of 18 neutral microsatellite data and four different statistical tests to assess this prediction. Given that sex-biased dispersal may create disparities between population genetic patterns inferred from bi- vs. uni-parentally inherited markers, we also sequenced a 324 bp segment of the mitochondrial D-loop for independent inferences of historical demography in urban P. leucopus. We report that isolation in urban parks does not necessarily result in genetic bottlenecks; only three out of 14 populations in NYC parks exhibited a signature of a recent bottleneck at 18 neutral microsatellite loci. Mouse populations in larger urban parks, or parks that have been isolated for shorter periods of time, also do not generally contain greater genetic variation than populations in smaller parks. These results suggest that even small networks of green spaces may be sufficient to maintain the evolutionary potential of native species with certain characteristics. We also found that isolation in urban parks results in weak to nonexistent sex-biased dispersal in a species known to exhibit male-biased dispersal in less fragmented environments. In

  3. Pediatric overtriage as a consequence of the tachycardia responses of children upon ED admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Che; Ng, Chip-Jin; Wu, Chang-Teng; Chen, Li-Chin; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Overtriage has been observed among pediatric patients in emergency departments (EDs) under 5-level acuity pediatric triage systems. This study aimed to investigate the causes of overtriage and to provide suggestions for future amendments to such systems. This study has a retrospective follow-up design in which 42000 pediatric patients who were admitted to the ED of the largest medical center in Taiwan between January and December of 2010 were recruited. The study variables included patient demographics, chief concerns, individual vital signs (ie, blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation), triage level, ED final disposition, ED expenses, and total medical expenses. A logistic regression model was applied to explore the causes of overtriage and the effectiveness of a modified acuity system. Approximately 13.6% of the pediatric ED visits were upgraded to acuity level 1 based on vital signs that included heart rate (97.3%). The strength of the trend association (odds ratio) between decreasing acuity urgency (from levels 1 to 5) and hospitalization increased from 0.73 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.75) with the Pediatric Triage and Acuity System (Ped-TTAS) to 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.59) with the modified Ped-TTAS, which downgraded acuity levels by excluding the weighting of vital signs. Further validation was accomplished by comparing the trend association between decreasing acuity urgency and total medical expenses (Ped-TTAS: β = -0.13; modified Ped-TTAS: β = -0.18). Heart rate is prone to be affected by emotional responses among pediatric patients in certain specific age groups. Appropriate revisions of the pediatric triage system are suggested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MANY MEN USED ED TREATMENT WITHOUT THEIR PARTNERS’ KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan HM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to identify and explore the understanding and perception of erectile dysfunction (ED using exploratory qualitative approaches. This study was conducted in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 17 urban men aged 40-75 years. A semi-structural interview guide was used to explore men’s understanding of ED, impacts on their well-being and experiences with treatments. The focus groups revealed that ED was perceived to be an important loss in men’s lives as sexual performance was closely related to manhood. The men associated ED with a loss of masculinity and self-esteem. Men’s understanding of ED treatments was restricted to phophodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE-5 inhibitors and traditional therapies. Although PDE-5 inhibitors were perceived to be effective, they were concerned about their safety and costs. Some of the men have learned to cope with ED rather than to seek help, particularly among older men, who attributed their decreased sexual capacities and erection difficulties to aging, and therefore conditioned themselves to accepting it. In contrast, younger men who have erectile difficulties are considered as ‘abnormal’, and are more likely to seek help and receive treatment for their sexual problem. Men’s knowledge of and experience with modern treatments of ED were mainly associated with PDE-5 inhibitors. Their perception towards PDE-5 inhibitors was largely influenced by personal experience, information from mass media and friends. The high cost and fear of side effects were two main deterrents in the use of PDE-5 inhibitors. Many men had conceded their use of PDE-5 inhibitors without their partners’ knowledge. They worried that their partners would view the matter with suspicion and mistrust.

  5. HARDNESS INDICES ESTIMATION OF SUPPORTING STRUCTURE ELEMENTS OF MOTOR BOGIES OF THE ELECTRIC TRAIN ED9M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Bondarev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of article is to develop the measures of hardness indices improvement of the supporting structures of motor cars of the electric trains ED9M. Methodology. In order to achieve the above stated aims the following measures had to be done: to develop a finite element model of the supporting structures of the motor bogie of the electric train ED9M, determine parameters of the developed model; perform the calculations to determine the stress-strain state during loads corresponding to different operating conditions with the search of geometric parameters reducing the highest stress levels. Findings. The obtained results of calculations (fields of stress distribution and strains in the elements of the motor bogie frame from the viewpoint of the strength and stiffness discovered the best geometric parameters of the bearings in the central suspension beams of the electric trains ED9M in the places of load transmission from the car body to the bogie frame. Originality. Based on the developed finite element models and the theoretical and experimental researches the scientifically grounded modernization measures of the construction elements of the central suspension beams for motor bogies of the electric trains ED9M were developed. Practical value. It was developed an engineering solution concerning the measures to improve the strength and stiffness characteristics of the central suspension beams for the motor cars of the electric trains ED9M. It was given to the Ukrzaliznytsya’s professionals to implement them during repairs.

  6. Predicting ecosystem dynamics at regional scales: an evaluation of a terrestrial biosphere model for the forests of northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvigy, David; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2012-01-19

    Terrestrial biosphere models are important tools for diagnosing both the current state of the terrestrial carbon cycle and forecasting terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change. While there are a number of ongoing assessments of the short-term predictive capabilities of terrestrial biosphere models using flux-tower measurements, to date there have been relatively few assessments of their ability to predict longer term, decadal-scale biomass dynamics. Here, we present the results of a regional-scale evaluation of the Ecosystem Demography version 2 (ED2)-structured terrestrial biosphere model, evaluating the model's predictions against forest inventory measurements for the northeast USA and Quebec from 1985 to 1995. Simulations were conducted using a default parametrization, which used parameter values from the literature, and a constrained model parametrization, which had been developed by constraining the model's predictions against 2 years of measurements from a single site, Harvard Forest (42.5° N, 72.1° W). The analysis shows that the constrained model parametrization offered marked improvements over the default model formulation, capturing large-scale variation in patterns of biomass dynamics despite marked differences in climate forcing, land-use history and species-composition across the region. These results imply that data-constrained parametrizations of structured biosphere models such as ED2 can be successfully used for regional-scale ecosystem prediction and forecasting. We also assess the model's ability to capture sub-grid scale heterogeneity in the dynamics of biomass growth and mortality of different sizes and types of trees, and then discuss the implications of these analyses for further reducing the remaining biases in the model's predictions.

  7. Improved spectrum simulation for validating SEM-EDS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statham, P.; Penman, C.; Duncumb, P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray microanalysis by SEM-EDS requires corrections for the many physical processes that affect emitted intensity for elements present in the material. These corrections will only be accurate provided a number of conditions are satisfied and it is essential that the correct elements are identified. As analysis is pushed to achieve results on smaller features and more challenging samples it becomes increasingly difficult to determine if all conditions are upheld and whether the analysis results are valid. If a theoretical simulated spectrum based on the measured analysis result is compared with the measured spectrum, any marked differences will indicate problems with the analysis and can prevent serious mistakes in interpretation. To achieve the necessary accuracy a previous theoretical model has been enhanced to incorporate new line intensity measurements, differential absorption and excitation of emission lines, including the effect of Coster-Kronig transitions and an improved treatment of bremsstrahlung for compounds. The efficiency characteristic has been measured for a large area SDD detector and data acquired from an extensive set of standard materials at both 5 kV and 20 kV. The parameterized model has been adjusted to fit measured characteristic intensities and both background shape and intensity at the same beam current. Examples are given to demonstrate how an overlay of an accurate theoretical simulation can expose some non-obvious mistakes and provide some expert guidance towards a valid analysis result. A new formula for calculating the effective mean atomic number for compounds has also been derived that is appropriate and should help improve accuracy in techniques that calculate the bremsstrahlung or use a bremsstrahlung measurement for calibration.

  8. Chick embryo proliferation studies using EdU labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michelle; Puskarczyk, Karolina; Chapman, Susan C

    2009-04-01

    Cell proliferation studies are an important experimental tool. The most commonly used thymidine analogues, tritiated thymidine and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) label cells during S-phase. Both methods have significant drawbacks: low sensitivity in the case of tritiated thymidine and a denaturation step during BrdU detection that destroys most cellular epitopes, requiring careful optimization. The antibody against BrdU is also large and tissue penetration can be difficult. EdU (5'-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) is closely chemically related to BrdU, with detection achieved by a copper catalyzed reaction requiring a small fluorescently conjugated azide. Cell cultures, flow cytometry and high throughput studies using EdU-labeled cells is exceptionally fast and does not require denaturation or antibodies. We have developed a tissue-labeling technique in chick embryos using EdU. Following EdU chemistry to detect proliferating cells, the tissue can undergo immunolabeling. We demonstrate fluorescent EdU chemistry followed by Tuj1 antibody staining resulting in multiplex fluorescent tissues.

  9. Mechanistic model for light-controlled leaf phenology in the Amazon rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Bras, R. L.; Medvigy, D.; Hutyra, L. R.; Pyle, E. H.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Satellite-based vegetation observations in the Amazon rainforest indicate a flush of leaves during the dry season when solar radiation is high. This light-controlled phenology is further confirmed with ground-based observations at the Tapajos National Forest (TNF; 2.86S, 54.96W, Para, Brazil) near km 67 of the Santarem-Cuiaba highway from 2001 to 2006. Observed leaf litterfall and canopy photosynthesis (Gross Primary Productivity: GPP) lags a few months past the seasonal variation of solar radiation. In well-watered rainforests, rich light leads to flush of new leaves, which have a high photosynthetic efficiency, consequently increasing GPP during the following months. In this study, we incorporate these mechanistic processes into the Ecosystem Demography model (ED) in order to capture the seasonality of leaf phenology and GPP, including the dry season flush of leaves. We use leaf litterfall rates, GPP and evapotranspiration measured at the TNF to constrain the model parameterizations. The initial model underestimates litterfall rates in both magnitude and seasonal fluctuation compared to the observed ones, and predicts seasonality of GPP opposite to the observed pattern, presenting peaks during the sunny dry season. The constrained model significantly improves the simulated litterfall rates and GPP against the observed ones. The model simulates litterfall rates quite accurately, and captures some of the seasonal dynamics of GPP. We also show that this modification in phenology, together with other changes in the model sensitivity to environmental conditions, improves the predicted seasonality of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE).

  10. Reduction of electron channeling in EDS using precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yifeng; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrated that EDS measurement can be significantly improved by precessing the electron beam, thereby reducing electron channeling effects. For a SrTiO3 specimen orientated along the [001] zone axis, the measured strontium to titanium atomic ratio was 0.74-0.80 using conventional EDS methods, and the ratio was improved to ~0.99 by precessing the electron beam for angles greater than 22.54 mRad. In ALCHEMI-like experiments in which the specimen was tilted to near two-beam condition, the strontium to titanium ratio was insensitive to the deviation from the Bragg condition using a precessed electron beam. Similar reduction of electron channeling effects was also observed in precession-assisted EDS measurements for an L21-ordered Fe2MnAl intermetallic alloy tilted to the [011] zone axis as well as near two-beam conditions.

  11. Improvement in student science proficiency through InSciEd out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Chris; Sonju, James D; Leicester, Jean E; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K-8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5(th) and 8(th) grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools.

  12. Flux pinning in superconductors. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Teruo [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Computer Science and Electronics

    2014-04-01

    Ideal for graduate students studying superconductivity and experts alike. Written by a researcher with more than 30 years experience in the field. All chapters are completely revised. The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of superconductor, specimen size and electric field strength. Recent developments of critical current properties in various high-Tc superconductors and MgB2 are introduced. Other topics are: singularity in the case of transport current in a parallel magnetic field such as deviation from the Josephson relation, reversible flux motion inside pinning potentials which causes deviation from the critical state model prediction, the concept of the minimization of energy dissipation in the flux pinning phenomena which gives the basis for the critical state model, etc. Significant reduction in the AC loss in AC wires with very fine filaments originates from the reversible flux motion which is dominant in the two-dimensional pinning. The concept of minimum energy dissipation explains also the behavior

  13. Pathological demography of native patients in a nephrology center in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈惠萍; 唐政; 曾彩虹; 胡伟新; 王庆文; 俞雨生; 姚小丹; 王建平; 朱茂艳; 周虹; 刘红; 刘志红; 黎磊石

    2003-01-01

    Objective To analysis the pathological demography in Chinese patients undergoing renal biopsy from our niphrology center. Methods Between January 1979 and October 2000 in Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, China, 10002 attempts of percutaneous renal were performed in patients with renal disease from 33 provinces of China. The pathological classifications were made according to the WHO criteria of 1982 for renal pathology or the modified WHO criteria of 1995 by a panel of pathologists and nephrologists during routine clinical-pathological rounds. The pathological demography between those specimens collected from 1979-1989 and those from 1990-1999 was compared.Results The mean age of the 10 002 subjects undergoing renal biopsy was 31.4±13.0 years (ranging from 1 to 78 years), with a male to female ratio of 1.3∶ 1; for the 592 renal transplant recipients, the mean age was 37.5±9.1 years (ranging from 16 to 66 years), with a male to female ratio of 2.36∶ 1. Primary glomerular diseases (PGD) accounted for 71% of the total patients undergoing renal biopsies, secondary glomerular nephritis (SGN) 23%, tubular-interstitial diseases 3.2%, unclassified renal diseases 1.3%, hereditary and congenital renal diseases 1.0%, end stage renal diseases 0.96%, and recently realized or rare renal diseases 0.15%. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was the most frequent pathological pattern (40%) of PGD, followed by mesangial proliferative lesion (MsPL) (30%), membranous nephropathy (MN) (10%), and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) (6%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the most pathology common seen (74%) in SGN. During the 22 years of the study period, there was a steady increase in patients with SGN discovered during pathological evaluation of renal disorders. A rise in prevalence was found in IgA nephropathy, MN (both P<0.001), crescentic glomerulonephritis (P<0.0001), anti-GBM disease, and hemolytic-uremic syndrome/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura related renal damages (both P<0

  14. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-08-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  15. Characterization of eds1, a mutation in Arabidopsis suppressing resistance to Peronospora parasitica specified by several different RPP genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J E; Holub, E B; Frost, L N; Falk, A; Gunn, N D; Daniels, M J

    1996-11-01

    The interaction between Arabidopsis and the biotrophic oomycete Peronospora parasitica (downy mildew) provides an attractive model pathosystem to identify molecular components of the host that are required for genotype-specific recognition of the parasite. These components are the so-called RPP genes (for resistance to P. parasitica). Mutational analysis of the ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws-0) revealed an RPP-nonspecific locus called EDS1 (for enhanced disease susceptibility) that is required for the function of RPP genes on chromosomes 3 (RPP1/RPP14 and RPP10) and 4 (RPP12). Genetic analyses demonstrated that the eds1 mutation is recessive and is not a defective allele of any known RPP gene, mapping to the bottom arm of chromosome 3 (approximately 13 centimorgans below RPP1/RPP14). Phenotypically, the Ws-eds1 mutant seedlings supported heavy sporulation by P. parasitica isolates that are each diagnostic for one of the RPP genes in wild-type Ws-0; none of the isolates is capable of sporulating on wild-type Ws-0. Ws-eds1 seedlings exhibited enhanced susceptibility to some P. parasitica isolates when compared with a compatible wild-type ecotype, Columbia, and the eds1 parental ecotype, Ws-0. This was observed as earlier initiation of sporulation and elevated production of conidiosporangia. Surprisingly, cotyledons of Ws-eds1 also supported low sporulation by five isolates of P. parasitica from Brassica oleracea. These isolates were unable to sporulate on > 100 ecotypes of Arabidopsis, including wild-type Ws-0. An isolate of Albugo candida (white blister) from B. oleracea also sporulated on Ws-eds1, but the mutant exhibited no alteration in phenotype when inoculated with several oomycete isolates from other host species. The bacterial resistance gene RPM1, conferring specific recognition of the avirulence gene avrB from Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea, was not compromised in Ws-eds1 plants. The mutant also retained full responsiveness to the chemical inducer of systemic

  16. Mitochondrial DNA regionalism and historical demography in the extant populations of Chirocephalus kerkyrensis (Branchiopoda: Anostraca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketmaier, Valerio; Marrone, Federico; Alfonso, Giuseppe; Paulus, Kirsten; Wiemann, Annika; Tiedemann, Ralph; Mura, Graziella

    2012-01-01

    Mediterranean temporary water bodies are important reservoirs of biodiversity and host a unique assemblage of diapausing aquatic invertebrates. These environments are currently vanishing because of increasing human pressure. Chirocephalus kerkyrensis is a fairy shrimp typical of temporary water bodies in Mediterranean plain forests and has undergone a substantial decline in number of populations in recent years due to habitat loss. We assessed patterns of genetic connectivity and phylogeographic history in the seven extant populations of the species from Albania, Corfu Is. (Greece), Southern and Central Italy. We analyzed sequence variation at two mitochondrial DNA genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I and 16s rRNA) in all the known populations of C. kerkyrensis. We used multiple phylogenetic, phylogeographic and coalescence-based approaches to assess connectivity and historical demography across the whole distribution range of the species. C. kerkyrensis is genetically subdivided into three main mitochondrial lineages; two of them are geographically localized (Corfu Is. and Central Italy) and one encompasses a wide geographic area (Albania and Southern Italy). Most of the detected genetic variation (≈81%) is apportioned among the aforementioned lineages. Multiple analyses of mismatch distributions consistently supported both past demographic and spatial expansions with the former predating the latter; demographic expansions were consistently placed during interglacial warm phases of the Pleistocene while spatial expansions were restricted to cold periods. Coalescence methods revealed a scenario of past isolation with low levels of gene flow in line with what is already known for other co-distributed fairy shrimps and suggest drift as the prevailing force in promoting local divergence. We recommend that these evolutionary trajectories should be taken in proper consideration in any effort aimed at protecting Mediterranean temporary water bodies.

  17. Microhabitat selection, demography, and correlates of home range size for the King Rail (Rallus elegans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Bradley A.; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Animal movements and habitat selection within the home range, or microhabitat selection, can provide insights into habitat requirements, such as foraging and area requirements. The King Rail (Rallus elegans) is a wetland bird of high conservation concern in the United States, but little is known about its movements, habitats, or demography. King Rails (n = 34) were captured during the 2010–2011 breeding seasons in the coastal marshes of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas. Radio telemetry and direct habitat surveys of King Rail locations were conducted to estimate home ranges and microhabitat selection. Within home ranges, King Rails selected for greater plant species richness and comparatively greater coverage of Phragmites australis, Typha spp., and Schoenoplectus robustus. King Rails were found closer to open water compared to random locations placed 50 m from King Rail locations. Home ranges (n = 22) varied from 0.8–32.8 ha and differed greatly among sites. Home range size did not vary by year or sex; however, increased open water, with a maximum of 29% observed in the study, was correlated with smaller home ranges. Breeding season cumulative survivorship was 89% ± 22% in 2010 and 61% ± 43% in 2011, which coincided with a drought. With an equal search effort, King Rail chicks and juveniles observed in May-June decreased from 110 in 2010 to only 16 in the drier year of 2011. The findings show King Rail used marsh with ≤ 29% open water and had smaller home ranges when open water was more abundant.

  18. A conceptual review of mate choice: stochastic demography, within-sex phenotypic plasticity, and individual flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-King, Malin; Gowaty, Patricia Adair

    2016-07-01

    behavior in both sexes, (2) controlled for within-individual variation in choice behavior as demography changes, and which (3) report effects on fitness from movement of individual's switch points.

  19. Socio-Demography Factors that Influence Youth Attitude Towards Contract Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. D’Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Malaysia is one of the developing countries that rely on agriculture to boost its economy sector. This can be proved through The Ninth Malaysia Plan where agriculture is planned to be the third income generator of the country. Contract farming is one of the potential agriculture activities that proffers propel maximization of production and enhancing economic and social conditions among the farming communities. This innovative and economic viable farming opportunity indeed depends on the commitment of youth since they are the pillar to the sustainability of agriculture. However, do youth in Malaysia have a positive attitude towards contract farming? Approach: This study is a quantitative study, using a pre tested and developed questionnaire. This study inspected the attitude of Malaysian youths toward contract farming and socio-demography factors that affect it. A sample random sampling were performed where a total of 400 undergraduates were selected to be the respondents of the study. The data were analyzed using PASW software. Results: Results gained depicted that youths have a positive attitude towards contract farming. Moreover, from the independent t-test and ANOVA test done, it can be concluded that information regarding contract farming, type of course taken and university where the students study play a major role in influencing their attitude towards contract farming. Conclusion/Recommendations: From the results gained it can be concluded that information, course taken and universities where they learn can influence youth acceptance towards contract farming. It can be noted that specific course on contract farming can be established within selected universities in order to expose contract farming to the youth. It was recommended that a specific study on the role of universities in creating a better attitude among youth should be conducted.

  20. ED becomes 'lean' and cuts LBTC, LOS times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Lean manufacturing techniques, first developed by Toyota, can be successfully adapted to help improve processes in your ED. St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has used Lean to reduce median length of stay, frequency of diversions, and the percentage of patients who left before treatment was complete (LBTC). Here's why "Lean" can help improve the performance of your ED: It enables you and your staff to see things from the patient's point of view. Lean tools enable you to view the status of your department in real-time and to compare that status with your performance goals. Exercises help identify areas where your processes break down and determine the most likely solutions.

  1. Reduction of Electron Channeling in EDS using Precession

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Yifeng; Marks, Laurence D.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that EDS measurement can be significantly improved by precessing the electron beam, thereby reducing electron channeling effects. For a SrTiO3 specimen orientated along [001] zone axis, the measured strontium to titanium atomic ratio was 0.74 – 0.80 using conventional EDS methods, and the ratio was improved to ~0.99 by precessing the electron beam for angles greater than 22.54 mRad. In ALCHEMI-like experiments in which the specimen was tilted to near two-beam condition, the str...

  2. New psych unit eases patient burden in ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Creating a special unit for psychiatric patients frees up beds in your ED, ensures better care for that patient population, and improves the atmosphere in the main department for the rest of your patients. Consider these suggestions: The creation of a psych unit can be extremely costly. Be prepared to demonstrate projected savings when pitching the idea to administration. Make sure an ED physician has overall responsibility for each patient at all times. Keep a regular group of nurses in rotation. This setup will help ensure smooth handoffs.

  3. Early Pleistocene lineages of Bagre bagre (Linnaeus, 1766 (Siluriformes: Ariidae, from the Atlantic coast of South America, with insights into the demography and biogeography of the species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wemerson C. da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Coastal and marine environments are characterized by a lack of evident physical barriers or geographic isolation, and it may be difficult to understand how divergence can arise and be sustained in marine environments. The identification of 'soft' barriers is a crucial step towards the understanding of gene flow in marine environments. The marine catfishes of the family Ariidae are a demersal group with restricted migratory behavior, no pelagic larval stages, and mechanisms of larval retention, representing a potentially useful model for the understanding of historical processes of allopatric speciation in the marine environment. In the present study, two lineages of the Coco sea catfish, Bagre bagre , were recognized from their complete segregation at both mitochondrial and morphological levels. One lineage is distributed between Venezuela and the northern coast of Brazil, including the semiarid northeast coast, while the second lineage is found on the eastern coast of Brazil, including the humid northeast coast. Based on distribution area, habitats preference, and genetic variability, inferences are made in relation to biogeography and demography of lineages in Atlantic coast of South America.

  4. Improving predictions of tropical forest response to climate change through integration of field studies and ecosystem modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaohui; Uriarte, María; González, Grizelle; Reed, Sasha C.; Thompson, J.; Zimmerman, Jess K.; Murphy, Lora

    2017-01-01

    Tropical forests play a critical role in carbon and water cycles at a global scale. Rapid climate change is anticipated in tropical regions over the coming decades and, under a warmer and drier climate, tropical forests are likely to be net sources of carbon rather than sinks. However, our understanding of tropical forest response and feedback to climate change is very limited. Efforts to model climate change impacts on carbon fluxes in tropical forests have not reached a consensus. Here we use the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2) to predict carbon fluxes of a Puerto Rican tropical forest under realistic climate change scenarios. We parameterized ED2 with species-specific tree physiological data using the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer workflow and projected the fate of this ecosystem under five future climate scenarios. The model successfully captured inter-annual variability in the dynamics of this tropical forest. Model predictions closely followed observed values across a wide range of metrics including above-ground biomass, tree diameter growth, tree size class distributions, and leaf area index. Under a future warming and drying climate scenario, the model predicted reductions in carbon storage and tree growth, together with large shifts in forest community composition and structure. Such rapid changes in climate led the forest to transition from a sink to a source of carbon. Growth respiration and root allocation parameters were responsible for the highest fraction of predictive uncertainty in modeled biomass, highlighting the need to target these processes in future data collection. Our study is the first effort to rely on Bayesian model calibration and synthesis to elucidate the key physiological parameters that drive uncertainty in tropical forests responses to climatic change. We propose a new path forward for model-data synthesis that can substantially reduce uncertainty in our ability to model tropical forest responses to future climate.

  5. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation and carotid intima-media thickness in young ED patients with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S-F; Yao, F-J; Sun, X-Z; Wu, R-P; Huang, Y-P; Zheng, F-F; Yang, Q-Y; Han, D-Y; Xie, M-Q; Ding, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, G-H; Deng, C-H

    2016-09-01

    The evidence of a close relationship between cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction (ED) is well documented. The aim of this study is to investigate whether there is an early asymptomatic impairment of the peripheral vasculature in young ED patients without obvious cardiovascular disease. We studied a total of 261 ED patients (19-40 years old) and 40 age-matched healthy controls. All participants received questionnaires of cardiovascular risk factors and erectile function assessment, were subjected to lab tests of fasting blood sample, and underwent the ultrasonographic examination of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT). Insulin resistance (IR) was measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Compared with normal human controls, FMD was significantly lower, whereas the average c-IMT was significantly greater in ED patients. An inverse correlation was found between FMD and mean c-IMT. The ED patients had significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index, but showed relatively lower total testosterone and prolactin levels than the controls. Both FMD and c-IMT showed a significant correlation with International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire (IIEF-5) score, age and HOMA-IR. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that age, HOMA-IR and IIEF-5 score were the risk factors associated with FMD and c-IMT. In conclusion, young ED patients in association with IR display diminished FMD and increased c-IMT. Furthermore, ED, HOMA-IR and age are independent predictors of the two subclinical atherosclerotic markers.

  6. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; Lawrence, D.; Bonan, G.

    2015-04-01

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in Eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties determined by the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leaf trait database. Further, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked with each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate for intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments, and for the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.

  7. Thermally Induced Silane Dehydrocoupling on Silicon Nanostructures (International ed.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    Arkles Gelest Inc. 11 East Steel Rd., Morrisville, PA 19067 (USA) Y. W. Jun, Prof. Dr. K. H. Ahn Department of Chemistry Pohang University of Science...Figure 1a) and elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis revealed strong carbon and oxygen signals (Table S2). By contrast, a

  8. Ed Henneke receives award for innovation in nondestructive testing research

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Ed Henneke, of Blacksburg, associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, received the Award for Innovation in Nondestructive Testing Research (NDT) at the American Society for Nondestructive Testing's 14th Annual Research Symposium in Albuquerque, N.M. This award was established to recognize highly distinguished individual breakthroughs in research in NDT.

  9. Murray Pittock, ed., The Edinburgh Companion to Scottish Romanticism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Malzahn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Murray Pittock, ed., The Edinburgh Companion to Scottish Romanticism. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011. Pp. 251. ISBN 978-0-7486-3845-1 (hardback. £ 65.00. ISBN 978-0-7486-3846-8 (paperback. £ 21.99.

  10. Review: Askew, Mark (ed.: Legitimacy Crisis in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napisa Waitoolkiat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the edited volume: Askew, Mark (ed. (2010, Legitimacy Crisis in Thailand, Chiang Mai, Thailand: Silkworm Books (= King Prajadhipok’s Institute Yearbook No. 5 (2008/09. ISBN 978-974-9511-97-8, 340 pages

  11. Inside the Sex Ed Studio: An Interview with Peggy Brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    "Inside the Sex Ed Studio" profiles leaders in the field of sexuality education. Peggy Brick, former director of Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey's Center for Family Life Education (CFLE) and author of numerous sexuality education resources used worldwide, is the subject of this interview. Ms. Brick was interviewed by…

  12. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  13. Engaging the public through writing an op-ed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labosier, Chris; Zhu, Laiyin; Quiring, Steven

    2012-10-01

    In May, prior to the start of the 2012 hurricane season, AGU asked us to write an op-ed for the Houston Chronicle on the importance of funding hurricane research. We were excited to be asked and pleased that AGU facilitated the process by providing us with some guidance on writing the op-ed. Given the impact that Hurricane Ike had in Texas just a few years ago, we felt it was important to remind the citizens of the greater Houston metropolitan area of the societal benefits of funding hurricane research. Thanks to the assistance of AGU staff, writing the article required only a few hours of time. Our op-ed was published in the print edition of the Houston Chronicle on 1 June 2012, the official start of the hurricane season (http://www.chron.com/default/article/Tight-budgets-posing-threat-to-Texas-hurricane-3600363.php). It was picked up by the media relations office in the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University and featured on the college's Web site in the dean's biweekly briefing and on its Facebook page. As a result, the op-ed reached a large and diverse audience.

  14. Candidate Success and edTPA: Looking at the Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lesley A.; Kelly, Mary K.; Baldwin, Joni L.; Arnold, Jackie M.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study looks at the correlations between Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) data and numerous program data points, including GPA, major GPA, and benchmark assignment scores, gathered in an Early Childhood Education (ECE) program. Previous studies have looked to correlate grade point average (GPA) with pre-service teacher…

  15. Lifeworld and Textualism: Reassembling the Researcher/ed and "Others"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2005-01-01

    This response to McKenzie's "post-post" concerns about environmental education research draws upon empirical, conceptual, anecdotal, metaphorical, imaged and poetic means to help the researcher "reassemble" the researcher/ed by attending to her/his relational body and embodiment of various, often hegemonic, socially constructed environmental…

  16. TRAUMA (RE-)IMAG(IN)ED: EXPERIENCES AND MEMORIES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imitch

    terms what trauma is, and interfaces it with how Soyinka has (re-)imag(in)ed it and submits ... innermost and visceral thoughts and being of his characters. .... Like The Man Died, Madmen and Specialists arose from Soyinka's painful and traumatic acquaintance ... out of the period, which I stayed in prison, which was just over.

  17. TrED: the Trichophyton rubrum Expression Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Tao

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte species and the most frequent cause of fungal skin infections in humans worldwide. It's a major concern because feet and nail infections caused by this organism is extremely difficult to cure. A large set of expression data including expressed sequence tags (ESTs and transcriptional profiles of this important fungal pathogen are now available. Careful analysis of these data can give valuable information about potential virulence factors, antigens and novel metabolic pathways. We intend to create an integrated database TrED to facilitate the study of dermatophytes, and enhance the development of effective diagnostic and treatment strategies. Description All publicly available ESTs and expression profiles of T. rubrum during conidial germination in time-course experiments and challenged with antifungal agents are deposited in the database. In addition, comparative genomics hybridization results of 22 dermatophytic fungi strains from three genera, Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton, are also included. ESTs are clustered and assembled to elongate the sequence length and abate redundancy. TrED provides functional analysis based on GenBank, Pfam, and KOG databases, along with KEGG pathway and GO vocabulary. It is integrated with a suite of custom web-based tools that facilitate querying and retrieving various EST properties, visualization and comparison of transcriptional profiles, and sequence-similarity searching by BLAST. Conclusion TrED is built upon a relational database, with a web interface offering analytic functions, to provide integrated access to various expression data of T. rubrum and comparative results of dermatophytes. It is devoted to be a comprehensive resource and platform to assist functional genomic studies in dermatophytes. TrED is available from URL: http://www.mgc.ac.cn/TrED/.

  18. The impact of an ED-only full-capacity protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watase, Taketo; Fu, Rongwei; Foster, Denise; Langley, Denise; Handel, Daniel A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an emergency department (ED)-only full-capacity protocol and diversion, controlling for patient volumes and other potential confounding factors. This was a preintervention and postintervention cohort study using data 12 months before and 12 months after the implementation of the protocol. During the implementation period, attending physicians and charge nurses were educated with clear and simple figures on the criteria for the initiation of the new protocol. A multiple logistic regression model was used to compare ambulance diversion between the 2 periods. The proportion of days when the ED went on diversion at least once during a 24-hour period was 60.4% during the preimplementation period and 20% in the postimplementation periods (P protocol was significantly associated with decreased odds of diversion rate in the postimplementation period (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.21-0.48). Our predivert/full-capacity protocol is a simple and generalizable strategy that can be implemented within the boundaries of the ED and is significantly associated with a decreased diversion rate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The demography of free-roaming dog populations and applications to disease and population control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morters, Michelle K; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Restif, Olivier; Conlan, Andrew J K; Cleaveland, Sarah; Hampson, Katie; Whay, Helen R; Damriyasa, I Made; Wood, James L N

    2014-08-01

    1. Understanding the demography of domestic dog populations is essential for effective disease control, particularly of canine-mediated rabies. Demographic data are also needed to plan effective population management. However, no study has comprehensively evaluated the contribution of demographic processes (i.e. births, deaths and movement) to variations in dog population size or density, or determined the factors that regulate these processes, including human factors. 2. We report the results of a 3-year cohort study of domestic dogs, which is the first to generate detailed data on the temporal variation of these demographic characteristics. The study was undertaken in two communities in each of Bali, Indonesia and Johannesburg, South Africa, in rabies-endemic areas and where the majority of dogs were free-roaming. None of the four communities had been engaged in any dog population management interventions by local authorities or animal welfare organizations. All identified dogs in the four communities were monitored individually throughout the study. 3. We observed either no population growth or a progressive decline in population size during the study period. There was no clear evidence that population size was regulated through environmental resource constraints. Rather, almost all of the identified dogs were owned and fed regularly by their owners, consistent with population size regulated by human demand. Finally, a substantial fraction of the dogs originated from outside the population, entirely through the translocation of dogs by people, rather than from local births. These findings demonstrate that previously reported growth of dog populations is not a general phenomenon and challenge the widely held view that free-roaming dogs are unowned and form closed populations. 4.Synthesis and applications. These observations have broad implications for disease and population control. The accessibility of dogs for vaccination and evaluation through owners and the

  20. Applied Demography in Action: A Case Study of “Population Identification”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanson, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThis case study deals with a problem quite different than the typical one facing most applied demographers. It involves the identification of a “population”using a set of criteria established by a regulatory agency. Specifically, criteria established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for purposes of Site Characterization of the High Level Nuclear Waste Repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Consistent with other recent studies, this one suggests that a wide range of skills may be needed in dealing with problems posed to applied demographers by clients and users in the 21st century. As such,budding applied demographers, especially those nearing completion of their graduate studies, should consider adopting a set of skills beyond traditional demography.FrenchCette étude de cas se centre sur un problème très différent des problèmestypiques qui confrontent les démographes en démographie appliquée. Ce cas-cia pour sujet comment identifier une « population » en suivant un ensemble decritères établis par un organisme de régulation. Plus spécifiquement, des critèresétablis par le US Nuclear Regulatory Commission pour établir la caractérisationde site pour le Dépôt de déchets nucléaires de haute activité proposé à YuccaMountain, au Nevada. En accord avec d’autres études récentes, la présentesuggère qu’une grande étendue de compétences pourrait se prouver utiles auxdémographes en démographie appliquée pour faire face aux problèmes présentéspar les clients et les utilisateurs du XXIème siècle. À ce titre, les démographesen démographie appliquée débutants, et spécialement ceux qui tirent à la fin deleurs cycles supérieurs, devraient considérer se munir de compétences dontl’étendue dépasse la démographie appliquée traditionnelle.

  1. Revisiting the phylogeography and demography of European badgers (Meles meles) based on broad sampling, multiple markers and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, A C; McDevitt, A D; Pope, L C; Kochan, J; Davison, J; Clements, C F; Elmeros, M; Molina-Vacas, G; Ruiz-Gonzalez, A; Balestrieri, A; Van Den Berge, K; Breyne, P; Do Linh San, E; Ågren, E O; Suchentrunk, F; Schley, L; Kowalczyk, R; Kostka, B I; Ćirović, D; Šprem, N; Colyn, M; Ghirardi, M; Racheva, V; Braun, C; Oliveira, R; Lanszki, J; Stubbe, A; Stubbe, M; Stier, N; Burke, T

    2014-01-01

    Although the phylogeography of European mammals has been extensively investigated since the 1990s, many studies were limited in terms of sampling distribution, the number of molecular markers used and the analytical techniques employed, frequently leading to incomplete postglacial recolonisation scenarios. The broad-scale genetic structure of the European badger (Meles meles) is of interest as it may result from historic restriction to glacial refugia and/or recent anthropogenic impact. However, previous studies were based mostly on samples from western Europe, making it difficult to draw robust conclusions about the location of refugia, patterns of postglacial expansion and recent demography. In the present study, continent-wide sampling and analyses with multiple markers provided evidence for two glacial refugia (Iberia and southeast Europe) that contributed to the genetic variation observed in badgers in Europe today. Approximate Bayesian computation provided support for a colonisation of Scandinavia from both Iberian and southeastern refugia. In the whole of Europe, we observed a decline in genetic diversity with increasing latitude, suggesting that the reduced diversity in the peripheral populations resulted from a postglacial expansion processes. Although MSVAR v.1.3 also provided evidence for recent genetic bottlenecks in some of these peripheral populations, the simulations performed to estimate the method's power to correctly infer the past demography of our empirical populations suggested that the timing and severity of bottlenecks could not be established with certainty. We urge caution against trying to relate demographic declines inferred using MSVAR with particular historic or climatological events. PMID:24781805

  2. ED and quality of life in CABG patients: an intervention study using PRECEDE-PROCEED educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournaghash-Tehrani, S; Etemadi, S

    2014-01-01

    Some reports have examined ED, an important indicator of quality of life (QoL), in cardiac patients. However, the results of these studies have been contradictory. Although some studies report of improvement of ED following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), others show either no improvement or worsening of the condition. Given such controversy, this study attempted to examine the status of ED following an educational intervention program called PRECEDE-PROCEED model in CABG patients (the PRECEDE acronym stands for predisposing, reinforcing, enabling constructs in educational/environmental diagnosis and evaluation and PROCEED stands for policy, regulatory and organizational constructs in educational and environmental development). This model is a planning model and offers a framework that enables us to recognize useful intervention strategies in achieving desired outcomes. Specifically, it works on two premises. First, it posits that the purpose of a health program is to improve the QoL for individuals. Second, it works on the principle that a diagnosis should begin with the preferred end result and work backward to assess what must be done to bring about that result. As such, the results of our study showed that the implementation of the intervention program following surgery not only significantly decreased ED but enhanced the QoL. Thus, utilization of educational intervention program after CABG operations is recommended.

  3. Nanoscale voxel spectroscopy by simultaneous EELS and EDS tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Georg; Orthacker, Angelina; Albu, Mihaela; Li, Jiehua; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2014-11-01

    Extending the capabilities of electron tomography with advanced imaging techniques and novel data processing methods, can augment the information content in three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from projections taken in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this work we present the application of simultaneous electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to scanning TEM tomography. Various tools, including refined tilt alignment procedures, multivariate statistical analysis and total-variation minimization enable the 3D reconstruction of analytical tomograms, providing 3D analytical metrics of materials science samples at the nanometer scale. This includes volumetric elemental maps, and reconstructions of EDS, low-loss and core-loss EELS spectra as four-dimensional spectrum volumes containing 3D local voxel spectra. From these spectra, compositional, 3D localized elemental analysis becomes possible opening the pathway to 3D nanoscale elemental quantification.

  4. Differential cDNA cloning by enzymatic degrading subtraction (EDS).

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We describe a new method, called enzymatic degrading subtraction (EDS), for the construction of subtractive libraries from PCR amplified cDNA. The novel features of this method are that i) the tester DNA is blocked by thionucleotide incorporation; ii) the rate of hybridization is accelerated by phenol-emulsion reassociation; and iii) the driver cDNA and hybrid molecules are enzymatically removed by digestion with exonucleases III and VII rather than by physical partitioning. We demonstrate th...

  5. Ethynyldeoxyuridine (EdU) suppresses in vitro population expansion and in vivo tumor progression of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Heather H; Rahman, Maryam; Levkoff, Lindsay H; Millette, Sebastien; Martin-Carreras, Teresa; Dunbar, Erin M; Reynolds, Brent A; Laywell, Eric D

    2011-12-01

    Thymidine analogs (TAs) are synthetic nucleosides that incorporate into newly synthesized DNA. Halogenated pyrimidines (HPs), such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), are a class of TAs that can be detected with antibodies and are commonly used for birthdating individual cells and for assessing the proliferative index of cell populations. It is well established that HPs can act as radiosensitizers when incorporated into DNA chains, but they are generally believed not to impair normal cell function in the absence of secondary stressors. However, we and others have shown that HP incorporation leads to a sustained suppression of cell cycle progression in mammalian cells, resulting in cellular senescence in somatic cells. In addition, we have shown that HP incorporation results in delayed tumor progression in a syngeneic rat model of glioma. Here we examine ethynyldeoxyuridine (EdU), a newly developed and alkylated TA, for its anti-cancer activity, both in vitro and in vivo. We show that EdU, like HPs, leads to a severe reduction in the proliferation rate of normal and transformed cells in vitro. Unlike HPs, however, EdU incorporation also causes DNA damage resulting in the death of a substantial subset of treated cells. When administered over an extended time as a monotherapy to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of human glioblastoma multiforme tumors, EdU significantly reduces tumor volume and increases survival without apparent significant toxicity. These results, combined with the fact that EdU readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, support the continued investigation of EdU as a potential therapy for malignant brain tumors.

  6. Variation in ploidy level and phenology can result in large and unexpected differences in demography and climatic sensitivity between closely related ferns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de G.A.; Zuidema, P.A.; Groot, H.; During, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Current environmental changes may affect the dynamics and viability of plant populations. This environmental sensitivity may differ between species of different ploidy level because polyploidization can influence life history traits. We compared the demography and climatic se

  7. INSIST-ED: Italian Society of Andrology registry on penile prosthesis surgery. First data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Pescatori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Italian Society of Andrology, i.e. “Società Italiana di Andrologia” (S.I.A., launched on December 2014 a prospective, multicenter, monitored and internal review board approved Registry for penile implants, the “INSIST-ED” (Italian Nationwide Systematic Inventarisation of Surgical Treatment for ED Registry. Purpose of this first report is to present a baseline data analysis of the characteristics of penile implant surgery in Italy. Material and methods: The INSIST-ED Registry is open to all surgeons implanting penile prostheses (all brands, all models in Italy, providing anonymous patient, device, surgical procedure, outcome, follow-up data, for both first and revision surgeries. A Registry project Board overviews all the steps of the project, and a Registry Monitor interacts with the Registry implanting surgeons. Results: As by April 8, 2016, 31 implanting surgeons actively joined the Registry, entering 367 surgical procedures in its database, that comprise: 310 first implants, 43 prosthesis substitutions, 14 device explants without substitution. Implanted devices account for: 288 three-component devices (81,3%, 20 two-component devices (5,4%, 45 non-hydraulic devices (12,3%. Leading primary ED etiologies in first implant surgeries resulted: former radical pelvic surgery in 111 cases (35,8%, Peyronie’s disease in 66 cases (21,3%, diabetes in 39 cases (12,6%. Two intraoperative complications have been recorded. Main reasons for 57 revision surgeries were: device failure (52,6%, erosion (19,3%, infection (12,3%, patient dissatisfaction (10,5%. Surgical settings for patients undergoing a first penile implant were: public hospitals in 251 cases (81%, private environments in 59 cases (19%. Conclusions: The INSIST-ED Registry represents the first European experience of penile prosthesis Registry. This baseline data analysis shows that: three-pieces inflatable prosthesis is the most implanted device, leading etiology of

  8. Impact of prospective verification of intravenous antibiotics in an ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allyson; Nakajima, Steven; Hall Zimmerman, Lisa; Patel, Manav

    2016-12-01

    Delay in appropriate antibiotic therapy is associated with an increase in mortality and prolonged length of stay. Automatic dispensing machines decrease the delivery time of intravenous (IV) antibiotics to patients in the emergency department (ED). However, when IV antibiotics are not reviewed by pharmacists before being administered, patients are at risk for receiving inappropriate antibiotic therapy. The objective of this study was to determine if a difference exists in the time to administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy before and after implementation of prospective verification of antibiotics in the ED. This retrospective, institutional review board-approved preimplementation vs postimplementation study evaluated patients 18years or older who were started on IV antibiotics in the ED. Patients were excluded if pregnant, if the patient is a prisoner, if no cultures were drawn, or if the patient was transferred from an outside facility. Appropriate antibiotic therapy was based on empiric source-specific evidence-based guidelines, appropriate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and microbiologic data. The primary end point was the time from ED arrival to administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Of the 1628 evaluated, 128 patients met the inclusion criteria (64 pre vs 64 post). Patients were aged 65.2±17.0years, with most of infections being pneumonia (44%) and urinary tract infections (18%) and most patients being noncritically ill. Time to appropriate antibiotic therapy was reduced in the postgroup vs pregroup (8.1±8.6 vs 15.2±22.8hours, respectively, P=.03). In addition, appropriate empiric antibiotics were initiated more frequently after the implementation (92% post vs 66% pre; P=.0001). There was no difference in mortality or length of stay between the 2 groups. Prompt administration of the appropriate antibiotics is imperative in patients with infections presenting to the ED. The impact of prospective verification of

  9. Direct interaction between the Arabidopsis disease resistance signaling proteins, EDS1 and PAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, B J; Moisan, L J; Newman, M A; Parker, J E

    2001-10-01

    The Arabidopsis EDS1 and PAD4 genes encode lipase-like proteins that function in resistance (R) gene-mediated and basal plant disease resistance. Phenotypic analysis of eds1 and pad4 null mutants shows that EDS1 and PAD4 are required for resistance conditioned by the same spectrum of R genes but fulfil distinct roles within the defence pathway. EDS1 is essential for elaboration of the plant hypersensitive response, whereas EDS1 and PAD4 are both required for accumulation of the plant defence-potentiating molecule, salicylic acid. EDS1 is necessary for pathogen-induced PAD4 mRNA accumulation, whereas mutations in PAD4 or depletion of salicylic acid only partially compromise EDS1 expression. Yeast two-hybrid analysis reveals that EDS1 can dimerize and interact with PAD4. However, EDS1 dimerization is mediated by different domains to those involved in EDS1-PAD4 association. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that EDS1 and PAD4 proteins interact in healthy and pathogen-challenged plant cells. We propose two functions for EDS1. The first is required early in plant defence, independently of PAD4. The second recruits PAD4 in the amplification of defences, possibly by direct EDS1-PAD4 association.

  10. A simple, sufficient, and consistent method to score the status of threats and demography of imperiled species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob W. Malcom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers of large, complex wildlife conservation programs need information on the conservation status of each of many species to help strategically allocate limited resources. Oversimplifying status data, however, runs the risk of missing information essential to strategic allocation. Conservation status consists of two components, the status of threats a species faces and the species’ demographic status. Neither component alone is sufficient to characterize conservation status. Here we present a simple key for scoring threat and demographic changes for species using detailed information provided in free-form textual descriptions of conservation status. This key is easy to use (simple, captures the two components of conservation status without the cost of more detailed measures (sufficient, and can be applied by different personnel to any taxon (consistent. To evaluate the key’s utility, we performed two analyses. First, we scored the threat and demographic status of 37 species recently recommended for reclassification under the Endangered Species Act (ESA and 15 control species, then compared our scores to two metrics used for decision-making and reports to Congress. Second, we scored the threat and demographic status of all non-plant ESA-listed species from Florida (54 spp., and evaluated scoring repeatability for a subset of those. While the metrics reported by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS are often consistent with our scores in the first analysis, the results highlight two problems with the oversimplified metrics. First, we show that both metrics can mask underlying demographic declines or threat increases; for example, ∼40% of species not recommended for reclassification had changes in threats or demography. Second, we show that neither metric is consistent with either threats or demography alone, but conflates the two. The second analysis illustrates how the scoring key can be applied to a substantial set of species to

  11. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  12. Is EdF carrying things too far?; EdF va-t-il trop loin?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemain, A.; Rouaud, P.O.

    2002-06-01

    Considered as too fast, too dispersed and financially too hazardous, the recent series of acquisitions of Electricite de France (EdF) oblige the French government to make short work of the statute of the French electrical utility. This situation increases the debt of the company and constrains its captive clients (domestic clients and small and medium size companies) to contribute to this unlimited expansionism by paying their electricity a higher price. (J.S.)

  13. Does the Op-Ed Page Have a Chance to Become a Public Forum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofalo, Andrew; Traverso, Kim

    1994-01-01

    Surveys op-ed page editors, finding that fewer than half of the responding papers have op-ed pages; that professional journalists, public figures, and propagandists dominate the pages; and that editors firmly control the agenda. (SR)

  14. Climatic Factors Drive Population Divergence and Demography: Insights Based on the Phylogeography of a Riparian Plant Species Endemic to the Hengduan Mountains and Adjacent Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Shao-Tian; Nie, Ze-Long; Zhang, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhuo; Deng, Tao; Sun, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary climatic factors have played a significant role in population divergence and demography. Here we investigated the phylogeography of Osteomeles schwerinae, a dominant riparian plant species of the hot/warm-dry river valleys of the Hengduan Mountains (HDM), Qinling Mountains (QLM) and Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau (YGP). Three chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions (trnD-trnT, psbD-trnT, petL-psbE), one single copy nuclear gene (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase; G3pdh), and climatic data during the Last Interglacial (LIG; c. 120-140 ka), Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; c. 21 ka), and Current (c. 1950-2000) periods were used in this study. Six cpDNA haplotypes and 15 nuclear DNA (nDNA) haplotypes were identified in the 40 populations of O. schwerinae. Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variance, median-joining networks, and Bayesian phylogenetic trees based on the cpDNA and nDNA datasets, all suggested population divergence between the QLM and HDM-YGP regions. Our climatic analysis identified significant heterogeneity of the climatic factors in the QLM and HDM-YGP regions during the aforementioned three periods. The divergence times based on cpDNA and nDNA haplotypes were estimated to be 466.4-159.4 ka and 315.8-160.3 ka, respectively, which coincide with the time of the weakening of the Asian monsoons in these regions. In addition, unimodal pairwise mismatch distribution curves, expansion times, and Ecological Niche Modeling suggested a history of population expansion (rather than contraction) during the last glaciation. Interestingly, the expansion times were found being well consistent with the intensification of the Asian monsoons during this period. We inferred that the divergence between the two main lineages is probably caused by disruption of more continuous distribution because of weakening of monsoons/less precipitation, whilst subsequent intensification of the Asian monsoons during the last glaciation facilitated the expansion of O. schwerinae populations.

  15. [Demography and nesting ecology of green iguana, Iguana iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae), in 2 exploited populations in Depresión Momposina, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Eliana M; Ortega, Angela M; Bock, Brian C; Páez, Vivian P

    2003-03-01

    We studied the demography and nesting ecology of two populations of Iguana iguana that face heavy exploitation and habitat modification in the Momposina Depression, Colombia. Lineal transect data was analyzed using the Fourier model to provide estimates of social group densities, which was found to differ both within and among populations (1.05-6.0 groups/ha). Mean group size and overall iguana density estimates varied between populations as well (1.5-13.7 iguanas/ha). The density estimates were far lower than those reported from more protected areas in Panama and Venezuela. Iguana densities were consistently higher in sites located along rivers (2.5 iguanas/group) than in sites along the margin of marshes, probably due to vegetational differences (1.5 iguanas/group). There was no correlation between density estimates and estimates of relative abundance (number of iguanas seen/hour/person) due to differing detectabilities of iguana groups among sites. The adult sex ratio (1:2.5 males:females) agreed well with other reports in the literature based upon observation of adult social groups, and probably results from the polygynous mating system in this species rather than a real demographic skew. Nesting in this population occurs from the end of January through March and hatching occurs between April and May. We monitored 34 nests, which suffered little vertebrate predation, perhaps due to the lack of a complete vertebrate fauna in this densely inhabited area, but nests suffered from inundation, cattle trampling, and infestation by phorid fly larvae. Clutch sizes in these populations were lower than all other published reports except for the iguana population on the highly xeric island of Curaçao, implying that adult females in our area are unusually small. We argue that this is more likely the result of the exploitation of these populations rather than an adaptive response to environmentally extreme conditions.

  16. The effects of pastoralism and protection on lion behaviour, demography and space use in the Mara Region of Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Niels L.; Oguto, Joseph O.; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    behaviour. We investigated this by comparing the behaviour, demography and space-use of three lion (Panthera leo) prides in the protected Masai Mara National Reserve and the adjoining Koyiaki pastoral ranch in southwestern Kenya during 2005-2006. The mean times lions were inactive was similar between...... the three prides except when the ranch lions were severely disturbed and became more nocturnal and inactive. The reserve lions ate their kills on open plains and returned to them often but the ranch lions did so only inside bushes and abandoned unfinished kills during a drought in 2005. The reserve lions...... to the reserve. We discuss the implications of these findings for lion conservation on pastoral lands....

  17. Major factors influencing linkage disequilibrium by analysis of different chromosome regions in distinct populations: demography, chromosome recombination frequency and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavattari, P; Deidda, E; Whalen, M; Lampis, R; Mulargia, A; Loddo, M; Eaves, I; Mastio, G; Todd, J A; Cucca, F

    2000-12-12

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping of disease genes is complicated by population- and chromosome-region-specific factors. We have analysed demographic factors by contrasting intermarker LD results obtained in a large cosmopolitan population (UK), a large genetic isolate (Sardinia) and a subisolate (village of Gavoi) for two regions of the X chromosome. A dramatic increase of LD was found in the subisolate. Demographic history of populations therefore influences LD. Chromosome-region-specific effects, namely the pattern and frequency of homologous recombination, were next delineated by the analysis of chromosome 6p21, including the HLA region. Patterns of global LD in this region were very similar in the UK and Sardinian populations despite their entirely distinct demographies, and correlate well with the pattern of recombinations. Nevertheless, haplotypes extend across recombination hot spots indicative of selection of certain haplotypes. Subisolate aside, chromosome-region-specific differences in LD patterns appear to be more important than the differences in intermarker LD between distinct populations.

  18. A functional EDS1 ortholog is differentially regulated in powdery mildew resistant and susceptible grapevines and complements an Arabidopsis eds1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Shu, Xiaomei; Ali, Mohammad Babar; Howard, Susanne; Li, Nan; Winterhagen, Patrick; Qiu, Wenping; Gassmann, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Vitis vinifera (grapevine) is the most economically important deciduous fruit crop, but cultivated grapevine varieties lack adequate innate immunity to a range of devastating diseases. To identify genetic resources for grapevine innate immunity and understand pathogen defense pathways in a woody perennial plant, we focus in this study on orthologs of the central Arabidopsis thaliana defense regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). The family of EDS1-like genes is expanded in grapevine, and members of this family were previously found to be constitutively upregulated in the resistant variety 'Norton' of the North American grapevine species Vitis aestivalis, while they were induced by Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of grapevine powdery mildew (PM), in the susceptible V. vinifera variety 'Cabernet Sauvignon'. Here, we determine the responsiveness of individual EDS1-like genes in grapevine to PM and salicylic acid, and find that EDS1-like paralogs are differentially regulated in 'Cabernet Sauvignon', while two are constitutively upregulated in 'Norton'. Sequencing of VvEDS1 and VaEDS1 cDNA and genomic clones revealed high conservation in the protein-encoding sequence and some divergence of the promoter sequence in the two grapevine varieties. Complementation of the Arabidopsis eds1-1 mutant showed that the EDS1-like gene with highest predicted amino acid sequence similarity to AtEDS1 from either grapevine varieties is a functional ortholog of AtEDS1. Together, our analyses show that differential susceptibility to PM is correlated with differences in EDS1 expression, not differences in EDS1 function, between resistant 'Norton' and susceptible 'Cabernet Sauvignon'.

  19. A Successful ED Fall Risk Program Using the KINDER 1 Fall RiskAssessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ann B; Valle-Ortiz, Marisol; Sansweet, Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Emergency nurses did not perform falls risk assessments routinely on our ED patients; the instrument used was aimed at inpatients. We identified a need to revise fall assessment practices specific to our emergency department. The purpose of the performance improvement project was to reduce ED falls and evaluate the use of an ED-specific fall risk tool, the KINDER 1 Fall Risk Assessment. The plan was to establish fall risk assessment practices at point of ED entry and to decrease total falls.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) from Gossypium barbadense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaofeng; Qi, Xiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays an important role in plant defense against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. The necrotrophic pathogen Verticillium dahliae infection of Gossypium barbadense could lead to Verticillium wilt which seriously reduces the cotton production. Here, we cloned and characterized a G. barbadense homolog of EDS1, designated as GbEDS1. The full-length cDNA of the GbEDS1 gene was obtained by the technique of rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of the GbEDS1 gene was 1,647 bp long and encoded a protein of 548 amino acids residues. Comparison of the cDNA and genomic DNA sequence of GbEDS1 indicated that this gene contained a single intron and two exons. Like other EDS1s, GbEDS1 contained a conserved N-terminal lipase domain and an EDS1-specific KNEDT motif. Subcellular localization assay revealed that GbEDS1-green fluorescence protein fusion protein was localized in both cytosol and nucleus. Interestingly, the transcript levels of GbEDS1 were dramatically increased in response to pathogen V. dahliae infection. To investigate the role of GbEDS1 in plant resistance against V. dahliae, a conserved fragment derived from GbEDS1 was used to knockdown the endogenous EDS1 in Nicotiana benthamiana by heterologous virus-induced gene silencing. Our data showed that silencing of NbEDS1 resulted in increased susceptibility to V. dahliae infection in N. benthamiana, suggesting a possible involvement of the novelly isolated GbEDS1 in the regulation of plant defense against V. dahliae.

  1. Disturbance Distance: Using a process based ecosystem model to estimate and map potential thresholds in disturbance rates that would give rise to fundamentally altered ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, K. A.; Hurtt, G. C.; Fisk, J.; Flanagan, S.; LePage, Y.; Sahajpal, R.

    2014-12-01

    Disturbance plays a critical role in shaping the structure and function of forested ecosystems as well as the ecosystem services they provide, including but not limited to: carbon storage, biodiversity habitat, water quality and flow, and land atmosphere exchanges of energy and water. As recent studies highlight novel disturbance regimes resulting from pollution, invasive pests and climate change, there is a need to include these alterations in predictions of future forest function and structure. The Ecosystem Demography (ED) model is a mechanistic model of forest ecosystem dynamics in which individual-based forest dynamics can be efficiently implemented over regional to global scales due to advanced scaling methods. We utilize ED to characterize the sensitivity of potential vegetation structure and function to changes in rates of density independent mortality. Disturbance rate within ED can either be altered directly or through the development of sub-models. Disturbance sub-models in ED currently include fire, land use and hurricanes. We use a tiered approach to understand the sensitivity of North American ecosystems to changes in background density independent mortality. Our first analyses were conducted at half-degree spatial resolution with a constant rate of disturbance in space and time, which was altered between runs. Annual climate was held constant at the site level and the land use and fire sub-models were turned off. Results showed an ~ 30% increase in non-forest area across the US when disturbance rates were changed from 0.6% a year to 1.2% a year and a more than 3.5 fold increase in non-forest area when disturbance rates doubled again from 1.2% to 2.4%. Continued runs altered natural background disturbance rates with the existing fire and hurricane sub models turned on as well as historic and future land use. By quantify differences between model outputs that characterize ecosystem structure and function related to the carbon cycle across the US, we

  2. Demography of zooplankton (Anuraeopsis fissa, Brachionus rubens and Moina macrocopa) fed Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus acutus cultured on different media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ventura, Jesús; Nandini, S; Sarma, S S S; Castellanos-Páez, Maria Elena

    2012-09-01

    Generally zooplankton growth is often limited by the quality of their algal diet. A cheaper common practice in aquaculture, is to culture algae with fertilizers; however, the demography of zooplankton when fed these algae has not yet been evaluated. We studied the population growth and life table demography of the rotifers Anuraeopsis fissa and Brachionus rubens, and the cladoceran Moina macrocopa. For this, the algae Scenedesmus acutus or Chlorella vulgaris were cultured on defined (Bold's basal) medium or the commercial liquid fertilizer (Bayfolan). Experiments were conducted at one algal concentration 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL of C. vulgaris or its equivalent dry weight of 0.5 x 10(6) cells/mL of S. acutus. The population dynamics were tested at 23 +/- 1 degrees C in 100 mL transparent jars, each with 50mL of the test medium, with an initial density of 0.5indiv/mL, for a total of 48 test jars (3 zooplankton 2 algal species x 2 culture media x 4 replicates). For the life table experiments with M. macrocopa, we introduced 10 neonates (liquid fertilizer as compared to the other diets. The growth rates of M. macrocopa ranged from 0.1 to 0.38/d, and were highest with diets of C. vulgaris cultured in Bold medium and S. acutus cultured in fertilizer. Thus, regardless of the culture medium used, the growth rates of the evaluated zooplankton species were higher with Chlorella than with Scenedesmus. The peak population density was highest (2 800ind/mL) for A. fissa fed Chlorella that was cultured on liquid fertilizers, while B. rubens and M. macrocopa had peak abundances of 480 and 12ind/mL, respectively under similar conditions.

  3. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  4. EDS V26 Containment Vessel Explosive Qualification Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haroldsen, Brent L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stofleth, Jerome H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the test was to qualify the vessel for its intended use by subjecting it to a 1.25 times overtest. The criteria for success are that the measured strains do not exceed the calculated strains from the vessel analysis, there is no significant additional plastic strain on subsequent tests at the rated design load (shakedown), and there is no significant damage to the vessel and attached hardware that affect form, fit, or function. Testing of the V25 Vessel in 2011 established a precedent for testing V26 [2]. As with V25, two tests were performed to satisfy this objective. The first test used 9 pounds of Composition C-4 (11.25 lbs. TNT-equivalent), which is 125 percent of the design basis load. The second test used 7.2 pounds of Composition C-4 (9 lbs. TNT-equivalent) which is 100 percent of the design basis load. The first test provided the required overtest while the second test served to demonstrate shakedown and the absence of additional plastic deformation. Unlike the V25 vessel, which was mounted in a shipping cradle during testing, the V26 vessel was mounted on the EDS P2U3 trailer prior to testing. Visual inspections of the EDS vessel, surroundings, and diagnostics were completed before and after each test event. This visual inspection included analyzing the seals, fittings, and interior surfaces of the EDS vessel and documenting any abnormalities or damages. Photographs were used to visually document vessel conditions and findings before and after each test event.

  5. Esther Schor, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne BERTON

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available “Today, whether she is found between staid cloth covers, in paperback, on the screen or in cyberspace, Mary Shelley is everywhere,” writes Esther Schor in her Introduction to this collection of essays (2. Interest in “the Author of Frankenstein” and of other works has grown steadily over the last twenty years, thanks notably to the publication of her Journals (The Journals of Mary Shelley, 1814-1844, ed. Paula R. Feldman and Diana Scott-Kilvert, 2 vols, Oxford: Clarendon, 1987, of her Lette...

  6. Book Review: Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.)

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Kessler

    2010-01-01

    Cohen, F. (2010). Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.). Livermore, CA: ASP Press. 452 pages, ISBN: 978-1-878109-45-3, US$79.Reviewed by Gary C. Kessler, Gary Kessler Associates & Edith Cowan University ()On the day that I sat down to start to write this review, the following e-mailcame across on one of my lists:Person A and Person B write back and forth and create an email thread. Person A then forwards the email to Person C, but changes some wording in the e...

  7. Chronic cardiac allograft rejection: critical role of ED-A(+) fibronectin and implications for targeted therapy strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Marcus; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Chronic cardiac allograft rejection is characterized by cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) causing severe long-term complications after heart transplantation and determining allograft function and patients' prognosis. Until now, there have been no sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. CAV and CIF are accompanied by changes in the extracellular matrix, including re-expression of the fetal fibronectin splice variant known as ED-A(+) fibronectin. This molecule has been shown to be crucial for the development of myofibroblasts (MyoFbs) as the main cell type in CIF and for the activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as the main cell type in CAV. Relevant re-expression and protein deposition of ED-A(+) fibronectin has been demonstrated in animal models of chronic rejection, with spatial association to CAV and CIF, and a quantitative correlation to the rejection grade. The paper by Booth et al published in this issue of The Journal of Pathology could prove for the first time the functional importance of ED-A(+) fibronectin for the development of CIF as a main component of chronic cardiac rejection. Thus, promising conclusions for the development of new diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for chronic cardiac rejection focusing on ED-A(+) fibronectin can be suggested.

  8. Constitutive disease resistance requires EDS1 in the Arabidopsis mutants cpr1 and cpr6 and is partially EDS1-dependent in cpr5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J D; Aarts, N; Feys, B J; Dong, X; Parker, J E

    2001-05-01

    The systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response in Arabidopsis is characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), expression of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, and enhanced resistance to virulent bacterial and oomycete pathogens. The cpr (constitutive expressor of PR genes) mutants express all three SAR phenotypes. In addition, cpr5 and cpr6 induce expression of PDF1.2, a defense-related gene associated with activation of the jasmonate/ethylene-mediated resistance pathways. cpr5 also forms spontaneous lesions. In contrast, the eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility) mutation abolishes race-specific resistance conferred by a major subclass of resistance (R) gene products in response to avirulent pathogens. eds1 plants also exhibit increased susceptibility to virulent pathogens. Epistasis experiments were designed to explore the relationship between the cpr- and EDS1-mediated resistance pathways. We found that a null eds1 mutation suppresses the disease resistance phenotypes of both cpr1 and cpr6. In contrast, eds1 only partially suppresses resistance in cpr5, leading us to conclude that cpr5 expresses both EDS1-dependent and EDS1-independent components of plant disease resistance. Although eds1 does not prevent lesion formation on cpr5 leaves, it alters their appearance and reduces their spread. This phenotypic difference is associated with increased pathogen colonization of cpr5 eds1 plants compared to cpr5. The data allow us to place EDS1 as a necessary downstream component of cpr1- and cpr6-mediated responses, but suggest a more complex relationship between EDS1 and cpr5 in plant defense.

  9. Constraining predictions of tundra permafrost and vegetation through model-data feedbacks and data-assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C. D.; Dietze, M.

    2011-12-01

    Arctic climate is warming at a rate disproportionate to the rest of the world, and recent interest has emerged in using terrestrial biosphere models to understand and predict the response of tundra ecosystems to such warming. Of particular interest are the potential feedbacks between permafrost melting, plant community dynamics, and biogeochemical cycles. Here, we report on efforts to calibrate and validate version 2 of the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2) for the Alaskan tundra and on the use of model analyses to motivate targeted field measurements. ED2 is a terrestrial biosphere model unique in its ability to scale physiological and plant community dynamics to regional levels. We began by assessing the ability of ED2's land surface model to capture permafrost thermodynamics and hydrology. Simulations at Barrow and Toolik Lake, Alaska bore several incongruities with observed data, with soil temperatures significantly higher and soil moisture lower than observed. Modifications were made to increase the soil column depth and to simulate the effect of wind compaction on snow density, and in turn, the insulation of winter soils. In addition to these changes, a new soil class was created to represent unique characteristics within the organic horizon of tundra soils. Together these changes significantly improved permafrost dynamics without substantially altering dynamics in the temperate region. To capture tundra vegetation dynamics, tundra species were classified into three plant functional types (graminoid, deciduous shrub, evergreen shrub). ED2 was then iteratively calibrated for the tundra using the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), a scientific workflow and ecoinformatics toolbox developed to aid model parameterization and analysis. Initial parameter estimates were derived from a formal Bayesian meta-analysis of compiled plant trait data. Sensitivity analyses and variance decomposition demonstrated that model uncertainties were driven by the minimum

  10. Modeling the impact of disturbances on the carbon cycle of a mixed-deciduous forest in the upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, R.; Bohrer, G.; Medvigy, D.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Vogel, C.; Curtis, P.

    2013-12-01

    Disturbances, either natural or anthropogenic, impact the carbon and water cycles. Therefore, understanding their immediate effect, as well as how fluxes evolve while forests recover from disturbances is essential to carbon and water cycle modeling. Our study area is located in northern Michigan and encompasses the mixed-deciduous forest surrounding the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). The two AmeriFlux affiliated towers operated by the UMBS, one with an undisturbed footprint and a second overlooking the Forest Accelerated Succession ExperimenT (FASET) site, a 39 ha area where all aspen (Populus spp.) and birch (Betula papyrifera) trees were girdled, provides the supporting data for our study. We used the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 (ED2) to run three scenarios: a control (undisturbed) case, a homogeneous disturbance (dist-1) where 30% of the leaf area was removed regardless of functional type, and a FASET like disturbance (dist-2) where all early successional trees, which occupy 30% of leaf area, were removed. We parameterized ED2 using observations of monthly and yearly net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent, and sensible heat fluxes from the undisturbed site (UMBS-AmeriFlux) from pre-disturbance years. We force the model using meteorological data recorded by the flux towers and evaluate the output of the three cases against NEE, latent, and sensible heat fluxes measured at the UMBS-AmeriFlux site (undisturbed case) and against the FASET tower (cases dist-1 and dist-2) after the disturbance occurred. Our results indicate that in such a case of an intermediate disturbance the results of the disturbance are defendant on the functional type that was affected. As a result of this study, we expect to improve the understanding of the role disturbances and the subsequent recovery on carbon and water fluxes of broadleaved deciduous forests.

  11. The collection of MicroED data for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dan; Nannenga, Brent L; de la Cruz, M Jason; Liu, Jinyang; Sawtelle, Steven; Calero, Guillermo; Reyes, Francis E; Hattne, Johan; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-05-01

    The formation of large, well-ordered crystals for crystallographic experiments remains a crucial bottleneck to the structural understanding of many important biological systems. To help alleviate this problem in crystallography, we have developed the MicroED method for the collection of electron diffraction data from 3D microcrystals and nanocrystals of radiation-sensitive biological material. In this approach, liquid solutions containing protein microcrystals are deposited on carbon-coated electron microscopy grids and are vitrified by plunging them into liquid ethane. MicroED data are collected for each selected crystal using cryo-electron microscopy, in which the crystal is diffracted using very few electrons as the stage is continuously rotated. This protocol gives advice on how to identify microcrystals by light microscopy or by negative-stain electron microscopy in samples obtained from standard protein crystallization experiments. The protocol also includes information about custom-designed equipment for controlling crystal rotation and software for recording experimental parameters in diffraction image metadata. Identifying microcrystals, preparing samples and setting up the microscope for diffraction data collection take approximately half an hour for each step. Screening microcrystals for quality diffraction takes roughly an hour, and the collection of a single data set is ∼10 min in duration. Complete data sets and resulting high-resolution structures can be obtained from a single crystal or by merging data from multiple crystals.

  12. Variability of Phenology and Fluxes of Water and Carbon with Observed and Simulated Soil Moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM Version 1.0.1.0.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Aleinov, Igor; Puma, M. J.; Kiang, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs). This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0 coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost hardening), soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation) and radiation (light length). Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leaf-out and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan- Monroe State Forest, US), C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US) and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US). For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland), the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  13. Variability of Phenology and Fluxes of Water and Carbon with Observed and Simulated Soil Moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM Version 1.0.1.0.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Aleinov, Igor; Puma, M. J.; Kiang, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs). This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0 coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost hardening), soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation) and radiation (light length). Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leaf-out and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan- Monroe State Forest, US), C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US) and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US). For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland), the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  14. Variability of phenology and fluxes of water and carbon with observed and simulated soil moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs. This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0, coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost-hardening, soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation, and radiation (light length. Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood, and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leafout and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan–Monroe State Forest, US, C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US, and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US. For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland, the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost-hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  15. Demography and behavior of polar bears summering on land in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Lily

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the southern Beaufort Sea population (SB) are spending increased time on the coastal North Slope of Alaska between July and October (Gleason and Rode 2010). The duration spent on land by polar bears, satellite collared on the sea-ice in the spring, during the summer and fall has also increased (USGS, unpublished data; Figure 1). This change in polar bear ecology has relevance for human-bear interactions, subsistence harvest, prevalence of defense kills, and disturbance associated with existing land-based development [e.g., National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska (NPRA), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)], Native Alaskan communities, recreation (ANWR) and tourism (e.g., bear viewing in Kaktovik, AK). These activities have the potential to impact, in new ways, the status of the entire SB population. Concomitantly, the change in polar bear ecology will impact these human activities, and a base-line characterization of this phenomenon can better inform mitigation (e.g., industry permitting under the Endangered Species Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act). In this study we aim to characterize the demography, habitat-use, and aspects of foraging ecology and health of polar bears spending fall on land. The SB population is characterized by a divergent-sea ice ecology, where polar bears typically spend most of the year on the sea-ice, even as the pack ice retreats northward, away from the coast, to its minimal extent in September (Amstrup et al. 2008; Durner et al. 2009). From 2000 – 2005, using coastal aerial surveys, Schliebe et al. (2008) observed between 3.7 and 8% of polar bears from SB (~ 60 – 120 of 1526, Regher et al. 2006) on land during the autumn. Sighting probability was not estimated in these surveys, and therefore the numbers represent minimum numbers of bears on land. Our analysis of USGS data suggest an annual average of 15% (± 3%, SE) of polar bears satellite-tagged on the spring-time sea ice (total n = 18 of 124

  16. Improving ED specimen TAT using Lean Six Sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Janet H; Karr, Tedd

    2015-01-01

    Lean and Six Sigma are continuous improvement methodologies that have garnered international fame for improving manufacturing and service processes. Increasingly these methodologies are demonstrating their power to also improve healthcare processes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a case study for the application of Lean and Six Sigma tools in the reduction of turnaround time (TAT) for Emergency Department (ED) specimens. This application of the scientific methodologies uncovered opportunities to improve the entire ED to lab system for the specimens. This case study provides details on the completion of a Lean Six Sigma project in a 1,000 bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Six Sigma's Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control methodology is very similar to good medical practice: first, relevant information is obtained and assembled; second, a careful and thorough diagnosis is completed; third, a treatment is proposed and implemented; and fourth, checks are made to determine if the treatment was effective. Lean's primary goal is to do more with less work and waste. The Lean methodology was used to identify and eliminate waste through rapid implementation of change. The initial focus of this project was the reduction of turn-around-times for ED specimens. However, the results led to better processes for both the internal and external customers of this and other processes. The project results included: a 50 percent decrease in vials used for testing, a 50 percent decrease in unused or extra specimens, a 90 percent decrease in ED specimens without orders, a 30 percent decrease in complete blood count analysis (CBCA) Median TAT, a 50 percent decrease in CBCA TAT Variation, a 10 percent decrease in Troponin TAT Variation, a 18.2 percent decrease in URPN TAT Variation, and a 2-5 minute decrease in ED registered nurses rainbow draw time. This case study demonstrated how the quantitative power of Six Sigma and the speed of Lean worked in harmony to improve

  17. Registered Nurses and Discharge Planning in a Taiwanese ED: A Neglected Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen; Goopy, Suzanne; Lin, Chun-Chih; Barnard, Alan; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Han, Chin-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Published research on discharge planning is written from the perspective of hospital wards and community services. Limited research focuses on discharge planning in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to identify ED nurses' perceptions of factors influencing the implementation of discharge planning. This qualitative study collected data from 25 ED nurses through in-depth interviews and a drawing task in which participants were asked to depict on paper the implementation of discharge planning in their practice. Factors influencing discharge planning were grouped into three categories: discharge planning as a neglected issue in the ED, heavy workload, and the negative attitudes of ED patients and their families. The study highlighted a need for effective discharge planning to be counted as an essential clinical competency for ED nurses and factored into their everyday workload. Nurses perceived that organizational culture, and parents' and relatives' attitudes were barriers to implementing discharge teaching in the ED.

  18. Partitioning CO2 fluxes with isotopologue measurements and modeling to understand mechanisms of forest carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Eric A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA (United States); Saleska, Scott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Savage, Kathleen [Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA (United States); Finzi, Adrien [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Moorcroft, Paul [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wehr, Richard [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-02-18

    1. Project Summary and Objectives This project combines automated in situ observations of the isotopologues of CO2 with root observations, novel experimental manipulations of belowground processes, and isotope-enabled ecosystem modeling to investigate mechanisms of below- vs. aboveground carbon sequestration at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurements Site (EMS). The proposed objectives, which have now been largely accomplished, include: A. Partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) into photosynthesis and respiration using long-term continuous observations of the isotopic composition of NEE, and analysis of their dynamics ; B. Investigation of the influence of vegetation phenology on the timing and magnitude of carbon allocated belowground using measurements of root growth and indices of belowground autotrophic vs. heterotrophic respiration (via trenched plots and isotope measurements); C. Testing whether plant allocation of carbon belowground stimulates the microbial decomposition of soil organic matter, using in situ rhizosphere simulation experiments wherein realistic quantities of artificial isotopically-labeled exudates are released into the soil; and D. Synthesis and interpretation of the above data using the Ecosystem Demography Model 2 (ED2).

  19. Partitioning CO2 fluxes with isotopologue measurements and modeling to understand mechanisms of forest carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleska, Scott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Davidson, Eric [Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA (United States); Finzi, Adrien [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Wehr, Richard [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Moorcroft, Paul [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

    2016-01-28

    This project combines automated in situ observations of the isotopologues of CO2 with root observations, novel experimental manipulations of below ground processes, and isotope-enabled ecosystem modeling to investigate mechanisms of below- vs. above ground carbon sequestration at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurements Site (EMS). The proposed objectives, which have now been largely accomplished, include: (A) Partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) into photosynthesis and respiration using long-term continuous observations of the isotopic composition of NEE, and analysis of their dynamics; (B) Investigation of the influence of vegetation phenology on the timing and magnitude of carbon allocated below ground using measurements of root growth and indices of below ground autotrophic vs. heterotrophic respiration (via trenched plots andisotope measurements); (C) Testing whether plant allocation of carbon below ground stimulates the microbial decomposition of soil organic matter, using in situ rhizosphere simulation experiments wherein realistic quantities of artificial isotopically-labeled exudates are released into the soil; and (D) Synthesis and interpretation of the above data using the Ecosystem Demography Model 2 (ED2).

  20. Constraining carbon budgets at a regional scale: fusing forest inventory data with a cohort-based biosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskari, T.; Dietze, M.; Desai, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Forest inventories play an essential role in carbon monitoring and REDD+, however they provide a sparse picture of the carbon cycle at a regional scale. Terrestrial Biosphere Models (TBMs) provide a complete picture of the carbon cycle, but efforts at combining inventory data with models have focused primarily on model calibration and purely model-based regional-scale carbon estimation, which ignore observed disturbances, management, and spatiotemporal variability in forest. Our approach is based on assimilating inventory observations in a size- and age-structured model, the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2). Assumptions of large homogenous areas in ecological models result in loss of details that hinder incorporation of observations. We address how to assimilate inventory data with model predictions in a practical way that is readily extensible to the simultaneous fusion of remote sensing and eddy covariance along with inventories. We updated ED2 predictions on forest growth with Forest Inventory and Analysis program (FIA) data. Data assimilation method was the Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter (EAKF) as implemented in Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) workflow. The study area is a 1° by 1° grid with the Willow Creek Ameriflux tower in Wisconsin at center. ED2 groups individual trees in cohorts so it captures the landscape-scale heterogeneity. Although this approach speeds up computations, it is not practical to estimate each FIA plot within a chosen area. We classified and averaged data for different plots according to their biomass based on number and size of trees within a plot, focusing on biomass changes over a measurement period. We separately calculated the average diameter at breast height (dbh) and stem density for plants over 5 cm for measured and modeled plots within a biomass class for different Plant Functional Types (PFTs). The results showed EAKF successfully adjusting the predicted changes in biomass according to observations. Variation in

  1. SEM-EDS analysis and discrimination of forensic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Salih; Cengiz Karaca, Ali; Cakir, Ismail; Bülent Uner, H; Sevindik, Aytekin

    2004-04-20

    Soils vary among different areas, and have some characteristics because of the natural effects and transfers made by human and other living beings in time. So that forensic examination of soil is not only concerned with the analysis of naturally occurring rocks, minerals, vegetation, and animal matter. It also includes the detection of such manufactured materials such as ions from synthetic fertilizers and from different environments (e.g., nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate) as environmental artifacts (e.g., lead or objects as glass, paint chips, asphalt, brick fragments, and cinders) whose presence may impart soil with characteristics that will make it unique to a particular location. Many screening and analytical methods have been applied for determining the characteristics which differentiate and discriminate the forensic soil samples but none of them easily standardized. Some of the methods that applied in forensic laboratories in forensic soil discrimination are the color comparison of the normal air-dried (dehumidified) and overheated soil samples, macroscopic observation, and low-power stereo-microscopic observation, determination of anionic composition by capillary electrophoresis (CE), and the elemental composition by scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) and other high sensitivity techniques. The objective of this study was to show the effect of the application of 9 tonnes/cm2 pressure on the elemental compositions obtained by SEM-EDS technique and comparing the discrimination power of the pressed-homogenized and not homogenized forensic soil samples. For this purpose soil samples from 17 different locations of Istanbul were collected. Aliquots of the well mixed samples were dried in an oven at 110-120 degrees C and sieved by using 0.5 mm sieve and then the undersieve fraction(JEO-JSM-5600 equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer OXFORD Link-ISIS-300. The samples from top of the sieves were examined with

  2. Prevalence and correlates of erectile dysfunction (ED) and treatment seeking for ED in Asian Men: the Asian Men's Attitudes to Life Events and Sexuality (MALES) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui-Meng; Low, Wah Yun; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Chen, Kuang-Kuo; Sugita, Minoru; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Marumo, Ken; Lee, Sung Won; Fisher, William; Sand, Michael

    2007-11-01

    There have been limited multiregional studies in Asia examining the parameters of men's general and sexual health and quality of life in the general population vs. those in clinical cohorts of patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). The aims of the Asian Men's Attitudes to Life Events and Sexuality (Asian MALES) study were to investigate the prevalence of ED, associated health conditions, and ED treatment-seeking patterns in the general male population in five regions of Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, and Taiwan). Standardized questionnaire previously used in a similar multiregional study and modified to ensure culturally appropriate content for Asia. Phase I of the study involved 10,934 adult men, aged 20-75 years, who were interviewed using the standardized questionnaire. Phase II of the study involved men with self-reported ED recruited from Phase I and via physician referral, invitations in general practitioner offices, and street interception (total Phase II sample, N = 1,209). The overall prevalence of self-reported ED in the Phase I study population was 6.4%. ED prevalence varied by region and significantly increased with age (P influencer of treatment seeking in all regions except Malaysia. The findings confirm those of existing research on ED in both Asian and non-Asian males: ED is a prevalent condition; the prevalence of ED increases with age and is strongly associated with comorbid conditions; and the majority of men have never sought treatment for their condition. This study highlights a substantial need for the evaluation and treatment of ED in Asian men.

  3. Predictors of body appearance cognitive distraction during sexual activity in a sample of men with ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, P M; Raposo, C F; Oliveira, L B

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to scrutinize the extent to which aspects of body dissatisfaction and relationship variables predict body appearance cognitive distraction during sexual activity (BACDSA) in a sample of men diagnosed with ED. A total of 65 heterosexual Portuguese participants with ED completed a survey that included questions on socio-demographic data as well as body-related and relationship measures. We used the Global Body Dissatisfaction (GBD) Subscale of the Body Attitudes Test; a version of the Contour Drawing Rating Scale; a single item on partner's opinion perceived about one's body appearance; the Global Measure of Relationship Satisfaction; and the Inclusion of Other in Self Scale. Open questions assessed focus on specific body parts during sexual activity and relationship length. Hierarchical multiple regression indicated that only GBD was a significant predictor of BACDSA, contrary to the relationship measures that showed no significant predictive effect (R(2) =0.47). Our results support the important role of individual factors on explanatory models of sexual dysfunctions, suggesting that interventions addressing individual factors that affect BACDSA may be of preference.

  4. Fisica e fumetti: Paperone ed il deposito sotterraneo

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2011-01-01

    I fumetti, come i film, spesso utilizzano idee scientifiche "fantasiose". Non ci riferiamo qui alla violazione implicita delle leggi della fisica, cosa permessa in un mondo di fantasia, quanto piuttosto all'uso di spiegazioni fisiche errate che vengono usate in buona fede perch\\'e a riflettono convinzioni molto diffuse, ma sbagliate, sull'interpretazione di fenomeni a partire dai principi fisici. D'altra parte questi errori possono servire a illustrare la corretta applicazione della fisica in una maniera molto pi\\`u accattivante rispetto alla modalit\\'a tradizionale di presentazione. Analizziamo qui l'avventura Paperone ed il deposito sotterraneo di Pezzin e Cavezzano. ----- Comics and cartoon movies sometimes exploit fictitious scientific ideas. It is often the case that these ideas, althought wrong, actually reflect the popular vision of some natural phenomenon. We do not refer here to the implicit violation of physical laws in fictions, a practice allowed by the underlining "poetic licence" of comics. Howe...

  5. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  6. The impact of gender demography on male and female role interpretations and contributions: A qualitative study of non-executive directors of Icelandic boards

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsdottir, Thoranna

    2010-01-01

    This thesis, submitted for the Cranfield DBA programme, examines and explores the impact of gender demography on male and female director’s role interpretations and contributions. The study was inspired by the scarcity of females on corporate boards and a desire to seek an understanding of how women and men contribute to boards. The study brings together the literature on females on boards, and on board roles and processes, revealing that both bodies of literature could benefit from more in-...

  7. ED services: the impact of caring behaviors on patient loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sandra S; Franz, David; Allen, Monette; Chang, En-Chung; Janowiak, Dana; Mayne, Patricia; White, Ruth

    2010-09-01

    This article describes an observational study of caring behaviors in the emergency departments of 4 Ascension Health hospitals and the impact of these behaviors on patient loyalty to the associated hospital. These hospitals were diverse in size and geography, representing 3 large urban community hospitals in metropolitan areas and 1 in a midsized city. Research assistants from Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN) conducted observations at the first study site and validated survey instruments. The Purdue research assistants trained contracted observers at the subsequent study sites. The research assistants conducted observational studies of caregivers in the emergency departments at 4 study sites using convenience sampling of patients. Caring behaviors were rated from 0 (did not occur) to 5 (high intensity). The observation included additional information, for example, caregiver roles, timing, and type of visit. Observed and unobserved patients completed exit surveys that recorded patient responses to the likelihood-to-recommend (loyalty) questions, patient perceptions of care, and demographic information. Common themes across all study sites emerged, including (1) the area that patients considered most important to an ED experience (prompt attention to their needs upon arrival to the emergency department); (2) the area that patients rated as least positive in their actual ED experience (prompt attention to their needs upon arrival to the emergency department); (3) caring behaviors that significantly affected patient loyalty (eg, making sure that the patient is aware of care-related details, working with a caring touch, and making the treatment procedure clearly understood by the patient); and (4) the impact of wait time to see a caregiver on patient loyalty. A number of correlations between caring behaviors and patient loyalty were statistically significant (P loyalty but that occurred least frequently. The study showed through factor analysis that some caring

  8. Electromagnetic field effect simulation over a realistic pixel ed phantom human's brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, R.; Calderon, J. A.; Rivera, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J., E-mail: rafaelturing@prodigy.net.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The exposition to different types of electromagnetic radiations can produce damages and injures on the people's tissues. The scientist, spend time and resources studying the effects of electromagnetic fields over the organs. Particularly in medical areas, the specialist in imaging methodologies and radiological treatment, are very worried about no injure there patient. Determination of matter radiation interaction, can be experimental or theoretical is not an easy task anyway. At first case, is not possible make measures inside the patient, then the experimental procedure consist in make measures in human's dummy, however, is not possible see deformations of electromagnetic fields due the organs presence. In the second case, is necessary solve, the Maxwell's equations with the electromagnetic field, crossing a lot of organs and tissues with different electric and magnetic properties each one. One alternative for theoretical solution, is make a computational simulation, however, this option, require an enormous quantity of memory and large computational times. Then, the most simulations are making in 2 dimensional or in 3 dimensional although using human models approximations, build ed with basic geometrical figures, like spheres, cylinders, ellipsoids, etc. Obviously this models just lets obtain a coarse solution of the actually situation. In this work, we propose a novel methodology to build a realistic pixel ed phantom of human's organs, and solve the Maxwell's equations over this models, evidently, the solutions are more approximated to the real behaviour. Additionally, there models results optimized when they are discretized and the finite element method is used to calculate the electromagnetic field and the induced currents. (Author)

  9. Functions of EDS1-like and PAD4 genes in grapevine defenses against powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Dai, Ru; Pike, Sharon M; Qiu, Wenping; Gassmann, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The molecular interactions between grapevine and the obligate biotrophic fungus Erysiphe necator are not understood in depth. One reason for this is the recalcitrance of grapevine to genetic modifications. Using defense-related Arabidopsis mutants that are susceptible to pathogens, we were able to analyze key components in grapevine defense responses. We have examined the functions of defense genes associated with the salicylic acid (SA) pathway, including ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), EDS1-LIKE 2 (EDL2), EDL5 and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) of two grapevine species, Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon, which is susceptible to E. necator, and V. aestivalis cv. Norton, which is resistant. Both VaEDS1 and VvEDS1 were previously found to functionally complement the Arabidopsis eds1-1 mutant. Here we show that the promoters of both VaEDS1 and VvEDS1 were induced by SA, indicating that the heightened defense of Norton is related to its high SA level. Other than Va/VvEDS1, only VaEDL2 complemented Arabidopsis eds1-1, whereas Va/VvPAD4 did not complement Arabidopsis pad4-1. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation results indicated that Vitis EDS1 and EDL2 proteins interact with Vitis PAD4 and AtPAD4, suggesting that Vitis EDS1/EDL2 forms a complex with PAD4 to confer resistance, as is known from Arabidopsis. However, Vitis EDL5 and PAD4 did not interact with Arabidopsis EDS1 or PAD4, correlating with their inability to function in Arabidopsis. Together, our study suggests a more complicated EDS1/PAD4 module in grapevine and provides insight into molecular mechanisms that determine disease resistance levels in Vitis species native to the North American continent.

  10. [Demography of Caulerpa paspaloides var. wudermanni (Bryopsidales: Caulerpaceae) in the coastal zone of Campeche, México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sergio Armando; Gallegos, Margarita E; Mandujano, María C

    2014-06-01

    Demography of Caulerpa paspaloides var. wudermanni (Bryopsidales: Caulerpaceae) in the coastal zone of Campeche, México. The subaquatic vegetation of Los Petenes, Campeche, Mexico, stands out due to its considerable floristic diversity, composed of a great variety of sea grasses and several species of the genus Caulerpa sp. This is a genus of ecological relevance, with the invasive species in the Mediterranean, with negative impact on several native sub-aquatic plants; nevertheless, little is known about the demography and population dynamics of Caulerpa species and their contribution to food webs. Thus the main objective of this study was to describe the demographics of Caulerpa paspaloides var. wudermanni, using the number of stolons, complete and incomplete fronds, the diameter of the stolons and the biomass. The information was used to determine the growth rate (lambda) of this species. The study was conducted in the Biosphere Reserve of Los Petenes, which is located in the Northwest of the state of Campeche. The submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the Petenes Biosphere consists of monospecific and mixed populations of seagrass species (Thalassia testudinum, Halodule wrightii and Syringodium filiforme). Although chlorophytes, brown algae and red algae, are fundamental elements in the specific composition of the SAV in Petenes, several species of Caulerpa are prominent because of their coverage and abundance. In May and June of 2010, significant differences in the quantity of stolons, their diameter, incomplete and complete fronds, and the size of the stolons and rhizomes, were observed. In 2010, the finite population growth rate (lambda) was 2.38 +/- 0.1571 for individuals and 1.20 +/- 0.1356 for the population, and in 2011 the values of lambda were 1.80 +/- 0.3608 and 1.35 +/- 0.1571, respectively. From these results it can be concluded that the population is growing; however, growth is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors. Despite there was no apparent

  11. Inflammation in HIV-infected patients: impact of HIV, lifestyle, body composition, and demography - a cross sectional cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Langkilde

    Full Text Available To examine mechanisms underlying the increased inflammatory state of HIV-infected patients, by investigating the association of HIV-related factors, demography, lifestyle, and body composition with the inflammatory marker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR.suPAR was measured in EDTA-plasma and associated with HIV-related factors (HIV-duration, combination antiretroviral treatment (cART, nadir CD4+ cell count, CD4+ cell count, and HIV RNA; demography; lifestyle; and body composition determined by Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA scan, in multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for biological relevant covariates, in a cross-sectional study of 1142 HIV-infected patients.Increased suPAR levels were significantly associated with age, female sex, daily smoking, metabolic syndrome and waist circumference. cART was associated with 17% lower suPAR levels. In cART-treated patients 10-fold higher HIV RNA was associated with 15% higher suPAR, whereas there was no association in untreated patients. Patients with CD4+ cell count <350 cells/µL had higher suPAR levels than patients with CD4+ cell count ≥350 cells/µL , though not significantly. We found no association with nadir CD4+ cell count or with duration of HIV-infection [corrected]. Finally, suPAR was not associated with adipose tissue distribution, but strongly associated with low leg muscle mass [corrected].In patients infected through intravenous drug use (IDU, CD4+ cell counts ≥350 cells/µL were associated with 27% lower suPAR (p = 0.03, andsuPAR was 4% lower pr. year during treatment (p = 0.05; however, there was no association with HIV RNA, duration of HIV-infection, nor cART [corrected].We found elevated suPAR levels in untreated patients compared to patients on cART. Moreover, we observed a significant positive association between suPAR and HIV RNA levels in cART-treated patients. Age, HIV-transmission through IDU, metabolic syndrome, smoking, and low leg

  12. RT-PCR Analysis of ED-A,ED-B, and IIICS Fibronectin Domains: A New Screening Marker For Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahmadi Javid

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibronectin seems to play a very important role in the progression and invasion of bladder cancer. EDA, EDB, and IIICS domains of fibronectin are not expressed in the adult persons but they’re expressed in different cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the mRNA of fibronectin in transitional carcinoma cells (TCC of bladder to study these domains. Methods: A total of 20 patients with known bladder cancer were studied. Two of them excluded since their excised tissues were not enough for both the pathological examination and RNA study. Another 20 (control group were normal volunteers who needed bladder operations. The excised tissue was immediately transferred to RNAlater (Ambion,TX. RNA was extracted via RNAWIZ (Ambion, TX. cDNA was made via RevertAid First Strand cDNA Synthesis Kit (Fermentas. PCR of the cDNAs was performed using primers for EDA, EDB, and IIICS (Eurogentec,Belgium. Results: For the first time, we present the expression of the oncofetal fibronectin mRNA in the transitional cell carcinoma of bladder. The high grade muscle invasive (G3T2 tumor, expressed ED-A, ED-B, and IIICS. Expression of ED-A, ED-B, and IIICS was confirmed in the two patients with G3T1 TCC. The four patients with G2Ta and G3Ta expressed both ED-A and ED-B. The four patients with G1T1 tumor expressed ED-A only, similar to the nine patients with G1Ta tumor. None of the normal volunteers expressed the oncofetal extra domains. The sensitivity of ED-A positive fibronectin RNA for detecting TCC of any kind is 100%, and of ED-B was only 35%. The specificity of ED-B positive fibronectin RNA for the high grade TCC is 100%. Conclusion: ED-A, ED-B, and IIICS could be used as useful markers for the diagnosis and following up of bladder carcinoma. Keywords: Transitional Cell Carcinoma, bladder cancer, fibronectin, RT-PCR, oncofetal.

  13. Patient-Centered Care Transition for Patients Admitted through the ED: Improving Patient and Employee Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Algauer BSN, RN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With increasing wait times in emergency departments (ED across America, there is a need to streamline the inpatient admission process in order to decrease wait times and more important, to increase patient and employee satisfaction. One inpatient unit at New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center initiated a program to help expedite the inpatient admission process from the ED. The goal of the ED Bridge program is to ease the patient's transition from the ED to an inpatient unit by visiting the patient in the ED and introducing and setting expectations for the inpatient environment (i.e. telemetry alarms, roommates, hourly comfort rounds. Along with improving the patient experience, this program intends to improve the collaboration between ED nurses and inpatient nurses. With the continued support of our nurse management, hospital administrators and most important, our staff, this concept is aimed to increase patient satisfaction scores and subsequently employee satisfaction.

  14. The NStED Periodogram Service and Interface for Public CoRoT Data

    CERN Document Server

    von Braun, K; Beekley, A; Berriman, G B; Bryden, G; Chan, B; Ciardi, D R; Good, J; Harbut, M; Kane, S R; Laity, A; Lau, C; Lynn, M; McElroy, D; Plavchan, P; Regelson, M; Rey, R; Ramirez, S V; Stauffer, J; Zhang, A

    2011-01-01

    As part of the NASA-CNES agreement, the NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) serves as the official US portal for the public CoRoT data products. NStED is a general purpose archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals. Consequently, the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) developed, and NStED adapted, a periodogram service for CoRoT data to determine periods of variability phenomena and create phased photometric light curves. Through the NStED periodogram interface, the user may choose three different period detection algorithms to use on any photometric time series product, or even upload and analyze their own data. Additionally, the NStED periodogram is remotely accessed by the CoRoT archive as part of its interface. NStED is available at {\\bf http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu}.

  15. Effect of Layered Double Hydroxides on Ultraviolet Aging Resistance of SBS Modifi ed Bitumen Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Song; YU Jianying; XUE Lihui; SUN Yubin; XIE Dong

    2015-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs)/styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) copolymer modified bitumen was prepared by melt blending. The effect of LDHs on the ultraviolet (UV) aging behavior of SBS modifi ed bitumen was investigated. The changes of chemical structures of modifi ed bitumen before and after UV aging were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results show that LDHs obviously reduce the variation of softening point and low temperaturefl exibility of SBS modifi ed bitumen under different UV radiation intensities, which indicates that the UV aging resistance performance of SBS modifi ed bitumen is improved effectively by LDHs. Compared with SBS modifi ed bitumen, the changes of carbonyl, sulfoxide and butadienyl of LDHs/SBS modified bitumen decrease significantly after UV aging according to FTIR analysis, demonstrating that the oxidation and degradation reactions of SBS modifi ed bitumen were restrained effectively by adding LDHs.

  16. Are family physicians the answer to ED doctor shortage, or 'blasphemy'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Some organizations maintain that family physicians have the skills and training necessary to practice in the ED and help combat the current physician shortage, while others maintain their training is inadequate. Here are some issues to take into consideration with such candidates: Have they obtained thorough experience the necessary skills to practice in the ED? Have they received a significant amount of clinical training in an ED? Has their training progress been monitored by a teaching attending?

  17. Effect of Pleistocene climatic oscillations on the phylogeography and demography of red knobby newt (Tylototriton shanjing from southwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yu

    Full Text Available Factors that determine the genetic structure of species in southwestern China remain largely unknown. In this study, phylogeography and demography of Tylototriton shanjing was investigated from a mitochondrial perspective to address the role of the Quaternary ice ages in shaping phylogeographic history and genetic diversity of Yunnan. A total of 146 individuals from 19 populations across the entire range of the species were collected. We detected four maternal phylogenetic lineages corresponding to four population groups, and found that major glaciation events during the Pleistocene have triggered the intra-specific divergence. Coalescent simulations indicated that the populations retreated to different refugia located in southern Yunnan, northwestern Yunnan, the border region of western Yunnan with Myanmar, and middle-western Yunnan, respectively, during previous glacial periods in the Pleistocene, and these four refugia were not retained during the Last Glacial Maximum. Population expansions occurred during the last inter-glaciation, during which ice core and pollen data indicated that the temperature and precipitation gradually increased, and declines of population sizes started after the beginning of the Last Glacial Maximum when the climate became cooler and dryer. The paleo-drainage system had no contribution to the current genetic structure and the rivers were not dispersal barriers for this salamander.

  18. Impacts of Frequent Burning on Live Tree Carbon Biomass and Demography in Post-Harvest Regrowth Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Collins

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of forest ecosystems to increase carbon storage is a global concern. Fire frequency has the potential to shift considerably in the future. These shifts may alter demographic processes and growth of tree species, and consequently carbon storage in forests. Examination of the sensitivity of forest carbon to the potential upper and lower extremes of fire frequency will provide crucial insight into the magnitude of possible change in carbon stocks associated with shifts in fire frequency. This study examines how tree biomass and demography of a eucalypt forest regenerating after harvest is affected by two experimentally manipulated extremes in fire frequency (i.e., ~3 year fire intervals vs. unburnt sustained over a 23 year period. The rate of post-harvest biomass recovery of overstorey tree species, which constituted ~90% of total living tree biomass, was lower within frequently burnt plots than unburnt plots, resulting in approximately 20% lower biomass in frequently burnt plots by the end of the study. Significant differences in carbon biomass between the two extremes in frequency were only evident after >15–20 years of sustained treatment. Reduced growth rates and survivorship of smaller trees on the frequently burnt plots compared to unburnt plots appeared to be driving these patterns. The biomass of understorey trees, which constituted ~10% of total living tree biomass, was not affected by frequent burning. These findings suggest that future shifts toward more frequent fire will potentially result in considerable reductions in carbon sequestration across temperate forest ecosystems in Australia.

  19. Population status, demography and habitat preferences of the threatened lipstick palm Cyrtostachys renda Blume in Kerumutan Reserve, Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyatmoko, Didik; Burgman, Mark A.; Guhardja, Edi; Mogea, Johanis P.; Walujo, Eko B.; Setiadi, Dede

    2005-09-01

    Population status and demography of a population of the threatened lipstick palm Cyrtostachys renda in a peat swamp ecosystem of Kerumutan Reserve, Sumatra (one of the largest remaining populations) was documented at 16 different sites, covering a wide range of forest and habitat types, vegetation associations, and population sizes. Population sizes were dominated by suckers comprising 89% of the total population. Individuals with stem heights between 0 and 4 m (47.5%), stem diameters between 4 and 10 cm (82.0%), and leaf scar numbers between 0 and 60 (69.2%) dominated. Ages of individuals were estimated and used to fit a curvilinear relationship between age and stem height. Wild plants reach reproductive maturity within 25-30 years, or when they have stem heights in excess of 2.0 m, or when they have 15-25 leaf scars. They can survive more than 80 years. Cultivated plants appear to reproduce earlier and produce more seeds than wild plants. Individual growth was plant size-dependent with the adult stage being the most productive. Higher mortality was experienced by suckers, especially in continuously waterlogged conditions and locations with dense canopies. Sucker growth was faster than seedling growth, an adaptation that may allow the species to cope with periodically waterlogged conditions. Population abundances varied with habitat types; well-drained areas were the most suitable habitat. To conserve the most important remaining populations of the lipstick palm, it is crucial to protect well-drained sites in Kerumutan Reserve.

  20. Research on Petroleum Reservoir Diagenesis and Damage Using EDS Quantitative Analysis Method With Standard Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包书景; 陈文学; 等

    2000-01-01

    In recent years,the X-ray spectrometer has been devekloped not only just in enhancing resolution,but also towards dynamic analysis.Computer modeling processing,sampled quantitative analysis and supra-light element analysis.With the gradual sophistication of the quantitative analysis system software,the rationality and accuracy of the established sample deferential document have become the most important guarantee to the reliability of sample quantitative analysis.This work is an important technical subject in China Petroleum Reservoir Research.Through two years of research and experimental work,the EDS quantitative analysis method for petroleum geolgey and resevoir research has been established.and referential documents for five mineral(silicate,etc).specimen standards have been compiled.Closely combining the shape characters and compositional characters of the minerals together and applying them into reservoir diagenetic research and prevention of oil formations from damage,we have obtained obvious geological effects.

  1. Sensitivity of burned area in Europe to climate change, atmospheric CO2 levels, and demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Minchao; Knorr, Wolfgang; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    -European scale, and we investigate uncertainties in the relative importance of the determining factors. We simulated future burned area with LPJ-GUESS-SIMFIRE, a patch-dynamic global vegetation model with a semiempirical fire model, and LPJmL-SPITFIRE, a dynamic global vegetation model with a process-based fire...... model. Applying a range of future projections that combine different scenarios for climate changes, enhanced CO2 concentrations, and population growth, we investigated the individual and combined effects of these drivers on the total area and regions affected by fire in the 21st century. The two models......Global environmental changes and human activity influence wildland fires worldwide, but the relative importance of the individual factors varies regionally and their interplay can be difficult to disentangle. Here we evaluate projected future changes in burned area at the European and sub...

  2. Spazio, movimento, prospettiva ed empatia: un prototipo di videogame didattico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pio Alfredo Di Tore

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Questo lavoro presenta la cornice teorica che sta alla base della progettazione di un videogame didattico pensato per valutare le abilità di perspective taking (capacità di adottare la prospettiva altrui e di mental rotation (rotazione mentale dei giocatori. Lo studio mira a rilevare come tali abilità siano coinvolte nella relazione empatica e a verificarne le implicazioni in campo educativo. Il lavoro adotta la definizione di empatia riconducibile ad Alain Berthoz ed alla teoria spaziale dell’empatia qui presentata con i relativi sistemi di riferimento spaziale. È inoltre fornita una rapida revisione della letteratura sulla rappresentazione dello spazio nel bambino e sulla rappresentazione dello spazio nel gioco (su base visiva. Infine, il lavoro descrive il prototipo di gioco – realizzato presso l’Università di Salerno – in cui il giocatore si trova alle prese con tre differenti compiti di cui due progettati per misurare le abilità di perspective taking mentre il terzo è calibrato sulle abilità di mental rotation.

  3. Etica ed evoluzionismo: la proposta di Marc Hauser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pilloni

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Le recenti scoperte nell’ambito della psicologia evoluzionistica potrebbero offrire una risposta al dibattito sull’origine evoluzionistica della facoltà morale dell’Homo sapiens. In passato, il tentativo di spiegare il comportamento morale a partire dalla teoria dell’evoluzione è stato intrapreso dal padre fondatore dell’evoluzionismo Charles Darwin, successivamente da T.H. Huxley e da H. Spencer e infine dal sociobiologo E. Wilson a metà degli anni ‘70 del Novecento. Oggi questa impresa è stata ereditata dallo psicologo evoluzionista Marc Hauser, le cui indagini prendono avvio da un’analogia tra facoltà morale e facoltà linguistica. Questa analogia gli consente di affermare che la pluralità di codici morali adottati dagli uomini nelle differenti culture dipende da un numero limitato di principi morali, nello stesso modo in cui la varietà di lingue con cui gli uomini si esprimono, dipende da un numero limitato di principi linguistici universali. Dunque, sembrerebbe che l’evoluzione biologica abbia plasmato dei principi morali universali e uniformi che si presentano costanti in tutti gli uomini a prescindere dalla loro appartenenza culturale. Come vadano intesi i principi morali universali e quale rapporto intercorre tra di essi e i vari codici morali sarà l’argomento di questo saggio, il quale tenterà di analizzare la proposta di Marc Hauser all’interno della cornice dei rapporti tra etica ed evoluzionismo.

  4. Interdisciplinary mistrust, communication breakdowns cited in survey of ED handoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Both emergency and inpatient physicians agree that miscommunication during interunit handoffs can compromise patient care and that sequential handoffs are particularly problematic, according to a new study conducted at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) in Omaha, NE. The study highlights physician survey data showing that there is mistrust between inpatient and emergency physicians, and that which provider is responsible for patient care can be unclear when a verbal handoff is made. To make improvements, UNMC has been piloting a tool aimed at standardizing verbal and written handoff communications. Nearly a third of all the participating physicians surveyed reported having handoff-related adverse events, and most put the blame on ineffective communication. Ninety-four percent of emergency physicians surveyed indicated that they had to defend their clinical decisions at least some of the time. The admitting physicians largely validated this concern, with more than 25% noting that they usually disagree with decisions made in the ED. Using the situation, background, assessment, recommendation (SBAR) form of communication as a starting point, an intervention tool aims to streamline handoff communications, both verbally and in the electronic medical record.

  5. Book Review: Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Kessler

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cohen, F. (2010. Digital Forensic Evidence Examination (2nd ed.. Livermore, CA: ASP Press. 452 pages, ISBN: 978-1-878109-45-3, US$79.Reviewed by Gary C. Kessler, Gary Kessler Associates & Edith Cowan University (gck@garykessler.netOn the day that I sat down to start to write this review, the following e-mailcame across on one of my lists:Person A and Person B write back and forth and create an email thread. Person A then forwards the email to Person C, but changes some wording in the email exchange between A & B. What is the easiest way (and is it even possible to find out when that earlier email message was altered before sent to Person C?Before you try to answer these questions, read Fred Cohen's Digital Forensic Evidence Examination. His book won't actually tell you how to answer these questions but it will help you understand the difficulty in even trying to answer them with any level of certainty.(see PDF for full review

  6. Hearing of Mr. Francois Roussely, President of EdF; Audition de M. Francois Roussely, President d'EdF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussely, F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    This document is the proceedings of the hearing of F. Roussely, President of Electricite de France (EdF), at the commission of economic affairs of the French house of commons, about the advisability of the construction of the EPR (European pressurized reactor) demonstration plant and about its possible financing by EdF. In a first part, F. Roussely recalls the European context of deregulation of energy markets and its impact of the French electric power industry (opening of the French market, industrial and social actions of EdF, need of a new generation of nuclear reactor, preservation of EdF's energy mix, warranty of public utility, un-bundling between energy trade and distribution, EdF's turnover and profitability, EdF's foreign daughter companies). In a second part, F. Roussely answers a series of questions asked by the different members of the commission concerning the different points presented in the first part. (J.S.)

  7. Research on Female Postgraduate's Demography Variable Factors of Subjective Well Being%女硕士研究生主观幸福感的人口学变量影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范琳洁; 张术霞; 王冰

    2011-01-01

    为研究女硕士研究生主观幸福感的人口学变量影响因素,采用人口学变量问卷、总体幸福感量表和幸福感指数量表,运用SPSS数据分析方法,对武汉七所高校的348名女硕士研究生进行实证研究。结果表明,女硕士研究生的整体幸福感水平较高,个体差异较大。人口学变量中只有生源地、所在年级和家庭经济状况在主观幸福感的总体幸福感、幸福感指数、总体情感指数、生活满意度四个维度均存在显著性差异,而性别、学历、独生子女状况、年龄、所学专业和婚恋状况只在主观幸福感的部分维度存在显著性差异,并根据研究结果建立女硕士研究生主观幸福感的人口学变量影响因素模型图。%In order to investigate the relationship between the relationship between Demography variable and Subjective Well Being,348 female postgraduates in Wuhan were tested their Subjective Well Being,and were evaluated by Demography Variable Scale,General Well Being Schedule and Index of Well Being.The results show that the female graduate students have a high level of Subjective Well Being,but great individual differences.Differences in hometowns,grades,family economic status,rather than in genders,academic qualifications,being the single child or not,ages,majors,marriage status,lead to all differences in general well-being dimension,index of well-being dimension,index of general affect dimension and life satisfaction dimension of Subjective Well Being,and according to the results we established female graduate of subjective well being of demographic variables factor model diagram.

  8. The utility of transvaginal ultrasound in the ED evaluation of complications of first trimester pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Nova L; Shofer, Frances; Fields, J Matthew; Anderson, Kenton; Mangili, Alessandro; Matsuura, Asako C; Dean, Anthony J

    2015-06-01

    For patients with early intrauterine pregnancy (IUP), the sonographic signs of the gestation may be below the resolution of transabdominal ultrasound (TAU); however, it may be identified by transvaginal ultrasound (TVU). We sought to determine how often TVU performed in the emergency department (ED) reveals a viable IUP after a nondiagnostic ED TAU and the impact of ED TVU on patient length of stay (LOS). This was a retrospective cohort study of women presenting to our ED with complications of early pregnancy from January 1, 2007 to February 28, 2009 in a single urban adult ED. Abstractors recorded clinical and imaging data in a database. Patient imaging modality and results were recorded and compared with respect to ultrasound (US) findings and LOS. Of 2429 subjects identified, 795 required TVU as part of their care. Emergency department TVU was performed in 528 patients, and 267 went to radiology (RAD). Emergency department TVU identified a viable IUP in 261 patients (49.6%). Patients having initial ED US had shorter LOS than patients with initial RAD US (median 4.0 vs 6.0 hours; P < .001). Emergency department LOS was shorter for women who had ED TVU performed compared with those sent for RAD TVU regardless of the findings of the US (median 4.9 vs 6.7 hours; P < .001). There was no increased LOS for patients who needed further RAD US after an indeterminate ED TVU (7.0 vs 7.1 hours; P = .43). There was no difference in LOS for those who had a viable IUP confirmed on ED TAU vs ED (median 3.1 vs 3.2 hours, respectively; P < .32). When an ED TVU was performed, a viable IUP was detected 49.6% of the time. Emergency department LOS was significantly shorter for women who received ED TVU after indeterminate ED TAU compared with those sent to RAD for TVU, with more marked time savings among those with live IUP diagnosed on ED TVU. For patients who do not receive a definitive diagnosis of IUP on ED TVU, this approach does not result in increased LOS. Copyright © 2015

  9. SPATIALLY AUTOCORRELATED DEMOGRAPHY AND INTERPOND MIGRATION IN THE CALIFORNIA TIGER SALAMANDER (AMBYSTOME CALIFORNIENSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the metapopulation structure of the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) using a combination of indirect and direct methods to evaluate two key requirements of modern metapopulation models: 1) that patches support somewhat independent populations ...

  10. Vytvoření 3D modelu prostředí pomocí senzoru Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Kumpán, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Bakalářská práce pojednává o užití senzoru Microsoft Kinect pro vytváření trojrozměrného modelu prostředí. V práci je popsána metoda pro snímání prostředí a její implementace ve verzích pro běžný procesor a grafickou kartu. Výstupem práce je aplikace umožňující snímání prostředí a vytvoření modelu ve formě bodového mračna a polygonové sítě. This bachelor thesis deals with the use of Microsoft Kinect sensor to create a three-dimensional model of the environment. The thesis describes a metho...

  11. [Construction and functional analysis of a bispecific antibody that targets TNF-α and ED-B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Jun; Yang, Yan-Qun; Hu, Xue-Ping; Xie, Mian; Liu, Meng-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    In order to enhance the specificity of TNF-α monoclonal antibody to inflamed site, a bispecific antibody BsDb that targets TNF-α and the extra-domain B (ED-B) of fibronectin (FN) was constructed by covalently linking the anti-TNF-α single chain Fv antibody (TNF-scFv) and the anti-ED-B scFv L19 via a flexible peptide linker deriving from human serum albumin (HSA). ED-B is an antigen specifically expressed at the inflamed site. BsDb is expressed in E. coli, identified by immunoblot, and purified with affinity chromatography. This was followed by further examination of its bioactivities and pharmacokinetics. We demonstrated that BsDb retained the immunoreactivity of its original antibodies as it could simultaneously bind to TNF-α and ED-B and neutralize the biological action of TNF-α. In the collagen-induced arthritis mice model, BsDb selectively accumulate in the inflamed joint with a maximal uptake of (12.2 ± 1.50)% ID/g in a single inflamed paw and retain in the inflamed paw for at least 72 h. In contrast, BsDb showed a short serum half-life of (0.50 ± 0.05) h and a rapid clearance from normal tissues. The findings reported herein indicate that BsDb has good specificity to the inflamed site and low toxicity to normal tissues. BsDb is therefore likely to have greater clinical applications in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. This laid a stable basis for its preclinical study.

  12. PathEdEx – Uncovering high-explanatory visual diagnostics heuristics using digital pathology and multiscale gaze data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visual heuristics of pathology diagnosis is a largely unexplored area where reported studies only provided a qualitative insight into the subject. Uncovering and quantifying pathology visual and nonvisual diagnostic patterns have great potential to improve clinical outcomes and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. Methods: Here, we present PathEdEx, an informatics computational framework that incorporates whole-slide digital pathology imaging with multiscale gaze-tracking technology to create web-based interactive pathology educational atlases and to datamine visual and nonvisual diagnostic heuristics. Results: We demonstrate the capabilities of PathEdEx for mining visual and nonvisual diagnostic heuristics using the first PathEdEx volume of a hematopathology atlas. We conducted a quantitative study on the time dynamics of zooming and panning operations utilized by experts and novices to come to the correct diagnosis. We then performed association rule mining to determine sets of diagnostic factors that consistently result in a correct diagnosis, and studied differences in diagnostic strategies across different levels of pathology expertise using Markov chain (MC modeling and MC Monte Carlo simulations. To perform these studies, we translated raw gaze points to high-explanatory semantic labels that represent pathology diagnostic clues. Therefore, the outcome of these studies is readily transformed into narrative descriptors for direct use in pathology education and practice. Conclusion: PathEdEx framework can be used to capture best practices of pathology visual and nonvisual diagnostic heuristics that can be passed over to the next generation of pathologists and have potential to streamline implementation of precision diagnostics in precision medicine settings.

  13. Book Review: John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (2007) (eds) Everyday Politics of the World Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Michael Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Book Review: John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (2007) (eds) Everyday Politics of the World Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 254pp. Udgivelsesdato: 2009......Book Review: John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (2007) (eds) Everyday Politics of the World Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 254pp. Udgivelsesdato: 2009...

  14. Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracious, F. L. Antony; Shyla, F. L. Jasmine Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of prospective B.Ed teachers was probed to find the relationship between Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers. Data for the study were collected using self made Multiple Intelligence Inventory and Digital Learning Awareness Scale.…

  15. A Review of "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Joan Mogul

    2010-01-01

    While virtually all sex ed curricula are designed to be used with children, teens and young adults, "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only" ([C] 2009, Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey) offers lessons to help participants fully embrace the possibility of sexual pleasure and intimacy from mid-life through…

  16. MobilED – a mobile tools and services platform for formal and informal learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ford, M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The MobilED initiative is aimed at designing teaching and learning environments that are meaningfully enhanced with mobile technologies and services. The MobilED deliverables are to develop a set of scenarios and guidelines of how mobile...

  17. "What about Bilingualism?" A Critical Reflection on the edTPA with Teachers of Emergent Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleyn, Tatyana; López, Dina; Makar, Carmina

    2015-01-01

    Amidst the debates surrounding teacher quality and preparation programs, the edTPA (education Teaching Performance Assessment) has emerged to assess future teachers through a portfolio-based certification process. This study offers the perspective of three faculty members who participated in an experimental configuration of edTPA implementation…

  18. An EDS1 orthologue is required for N-mediated resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Jack R; Cook, Graeme; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Baulcombe, David C

    2002-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, EDS1 is essential for disease resistance conferred by a structural subset of resistance (R) proteins containing a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich-repeats and amino-terminal similarity to animal Toll and Interleukin-1 (so-called TIR-NBS-LRR proteins). EDS1 is not required by NBS-LRR proteins that possess an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif (CC-NBS-LRR proteins). Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of a Nicotiana benthaminana EDS1 orthologue, we investigated the role of EDS1 in resistance specified by structurally distinct R genes in transgenic N. benthamiana. Resistance against tobacco mosaic virus mediated by tobacco N, a TIR-NBS-LRR protein, was EDS1-dependent. Two other R proteins, Pto (a protein kinase), and Rx (a CC-NBS-LRR protein) recognizing, respectively, a bacterial and viral pathogen did not require EDS1. These data, together with the finding that expression of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis EDS1 mRNAs are similarly regulated, lead us to conclude that recruitment of EDS1 by TIR-NBS-LRR proteins is evolutionarily conserved between dicotyledenous plant species in resistance against bacterial, oomycete and viral pathogens. We further demonstrate that VIGS is a useful approach to dissect resistance signaling pathways in a genetically intractable plant species.

  19. Minimizing ED Waiting Times and Improving Patient Flow and Experience of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaad Sayah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a pre- and postintervention analysis to assess the impact of a process improvement project at the Cambridge Hospital ED. Through a comprehensive and collaborative process, we reengineered the emergency patient experience from arrival to departure. The ED operational changes have had a significant positive impact on all measured metrics. Ambulance diversion decreased from a mean of 148 hours per quarter before changes in July 2006 to 0 hours since April 2007. ED total length of stay decreased from a mean of 204 minutes before the changes to 132 minutes. Press Ganey patient satisfaction scores rose from the 12th percentile to the 59th percentile. ED patient volume grew by 11%, from a mean of 7,221 patients per quarter to 8,044 patients per quarter. Compliance with ED specific quality core measures improved from a mean of 71% to 97%. The mean rate of ED patients that left without being seen (LWBS dropped from 4.1% to 0.9%. Improving ED operational efficiency allowed us to accommodate increasing volume while improving the quality of care and satisfaction of the ED patients with minimal additional resources, space, or staffing.

  20. The demography of climate-driven and density-regulated population dynamics in a perennial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan; Bengstsson, Karin; Ehrlén, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the internal and external drivers of population dynamics is a key objective in ecology, currently accentuated by the need to forecast the effects of climate change on species distributions and abundances. The interplay between environmental and density effects is one particularly...... important aspect of such forecasts. We examined the simultaneous impact of climate and intraspecific density on vital rates of the dwarf shrub Fumana procumbens over 20 yr, using generalized additive mixed models. We then analyzed effects on population dynamics using integral projection models....... The population projection models accurately captured observed fluctuations in population size. Our analyses suggested the population was intrinsically regulated but with annual fluctuations in response to variation in weather. Simulations showed that implicitly assuming variation in demographic rates...

  1. Variation in opioid prescribing patterns between ED providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulowitz, Peter B; Cary, Chris; Boyle, Katherine L; Novack, Victor; Jagminas, Liudvikas

    2016-12-01

    Abuse of opioid prescription drugs has become an epidemic across the developed world. Despite the fact that emergency physicians overall account for a small proportion of total opioids prescribed, the number of prescriptions has risen dramatically in the past decade and, to some degree, contributes to the available supply of opioids in the community, some of which are diverted for non-medical use. Since successfully reducing opioid prescribing on the individual level first requires knowledge of current prescribing patterns, we sought to determine to what extent variation exists in opioid prescribing patterns at our institution. This was a single-institution observational study at a community hospital with an annual ED volume of 47,000 visits. We determined the number of prescriptions written by each provider, both total number and accounting for the number of patients seen. Our primary outcome measure was the level of variation at the physician level for number of prescriptions written per patient. We also identified the mean number of pills written per prescription. We analyzed data from November 13, 2014 through July 31, 2015 for 21 full-time providers. There were a total of 2211 prescriptions for opioids written over this time period for a total of 17,382 patients seen. On a per-patient basis, the rate of opioid prescriptions written per patient during this period was 127 per 1000 visits (95 % CI 122-132). There was a variation on the individual provider level, with rates ranging from 33 per to 332 per 1000 visits. There was also substantial variation by provider in the number of pills written per prescription with coefficient of variation (standard deviation divided by mean) averaged over different opioids ranging from 16 to 40 %. There was significant variation in opioid prescribing patterns at the individual physician level, even when accounting for the number of patients seen.

  2. Francesco Fiorentino (ed., Figure e forme della memoria culturale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Gennaro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lavorare la memoria, obliare, ricordare, riscrivere il passato con gli strumenti del presente, è questo il soggetto e l’oggetto dei saggi riuniti in questo volume da Francesco Fiorentino, che li introduce attraverso l’operazione artistica di Robert Rauschenberg, il quale, dopo aver chiesto un disegno a de Kooning, maestro dell’Espressionismo astratto, lo espone cancellato. Questa «sottile meditazione iconologica sul tempo edipico dell’arte moderna» (7-8 annuncia uno dei leitmotiv del volume, verità ovvia ma necessaria: se la novità ha valore estetico, come è vero dal Settecento, allora il passato diventa fondamentale come sistema interno dell’arte. È su questo necessario filtro di selezione che agiscono le memorie citate nei saggi seguenti: intersezioni di tracce e cancellazioni, di cui si indagano autenticità, costruzione, ricostruzione, senza che i confini siano tra l’altro mai definiti – ed è questo, forse, che crea l’arte, per suo mezzo e scopo, tramite l’inaffidabilità della memoria: arte che è, come il quadro di Rauschenberg, «rappresentazione della permanenza e, insieme, dell’inattingibilità di ciò che è cancellato» (11. È insomma la «dimensione performativa dell’agire culturale» che viene messa in evidenza in questo volume, memoria che è culturale, appunto, umana e storica, e che, come il Wunderblock di Freud, si cancella ma mai completamente, e mai innocuamente. L’irriconoscibilità finale del ricordo rappresenta quindi il risultato della dimenticanza, e il suo prodotto più creativo. È proprio l’infedeltà della memoria a renderla oggetto sostanziale dell’arte, così come di questo lavoro, oggetto autoriflessivo della memoria collettiva.

  3. Demography of zooplankton (Anuraeopsis fissa, Brachionus rubens and Moina macrocopa fed Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus acutus cultured on different media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Morales-Ventura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Generally zooplankton growth is often limited by the quality of their algal diet. A cheaper common practice in aquaculture, is to culture algae with fertilizers; however, the demography of zooplankton when fed these algae has not yet been evaluated. We studied the population growth and life table demography of the rotifers Anuraeopsis fissa and Brachionus rubens, and the cladoceran Moina macrocopa. For this, the algae Scenedesmus acutus or Chlorella vulgaris were cultured on defined (Bold’s basal medium or the commercial liquid fertilizer (Bayfolan. Experiments were conducted at one algal concentration 1.0x10(6cells/mL of C. vulgaris or its equivalent dry weight of 0.5x10(6cells/mL of S. acutus. The population dynamics were tested at 23±1ºC in 100mL transparent jars, each with 50mL of the test medium, with an initial density of 0.5indiv/mL, for a total of 48 test jars (3 zooplankton 2 algal species x 2 culture media x 4 replicates. For the life table experiments with M. macrocopa, we introduced 10 neonates (Generalmente el crecimiento del zooplancton está a menudo limitado por la calidad de su dieta de algas. La demografía del zooplancton durante la alimentación con algas no ha sido estudiada, a pesar de que el cultivo de algas con fertilizantes es una práctica económica común en acuacultura. Se analizó la demografía de Anuraeopsis fissa y Brachionus rubens (rotíferos y Moina macrocopa (cladóceros, alimentados con las algas verdes Scenedesmus acutus o Chlorella vulgaris cultivadas en medio Bold o fertilizante líquido comercial (Bayfolan, de Bayer. En los rotíferos no se observaron diferencias significativas en el promedio de vida, sin embargo, este parámetro en M. macrocopa con S. acutus cultivada en Medio Bold, fue significativamente menor que en otras dietas. Las tasas de reproducción bruta y neta de A. fissa fueron significativamente mayores con C. vulgaris cultivada en medio Bold, que con el fertilizante; estas tasas en B

  4. 联合应用顺阿曲库铵与维库溴铵后ED50和ED95的改变%The change of ED50 and ED95 for combination of cisatracurium and ve-curonium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛培青; 叶照君; 陶伟平; 梁伟民

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察顺式阿曲库铵联合维库溴铵用药后ED50和ED95的变化。方法将75例择期手术患者(ASAⅠ~Ⅱ级)随机分为3组:顺式阿曲库铵组、维库溴铵组和顺式阿曲库铵+维库溴铵组,每组各25例。麻醉诱导后,以单次给药法观察起效时间和T1达到最大抑制的时间,描绘3组患者的量-效曲线,求得各自的ED50和ED95值,并运用等效图法和代数法对两药相互作用进行分析。结果单用顺式阿曲库铵组、维库溴铵组ED50值分别为32.35、28.78μg/kg,ED95值分别为52.67、51.20μg/kg。联合用药时ED50值为16.81、12.17μg/kg,ED95值为23.49、22.16μg/kg,与单独用药相比,差异均有统计学意义。联合用药时ED50和ED95的合用代数值分别为0.942、0.879。结论联合使用顺式阿曲库铵和维库溴铵具有协同作用,且量-效曲线产生左移。%Objective To observe the change of ED50 and ED95 for the treatment with cisatracurium and vecuronium. Methods 75 cases of patients undergoing elective surgery (ASA Ⅰ to II level) were ramdomly divided into three groups:cisatracurium group,vecuronium group and cisatracurium+vecuronium group,each group of 25 cases.The onset time and T1 maximum inhibition time were determined by the single-injection doseresponse technique after anesthesia induction.Their respective ED50 of ED95 values were caculated by the depicted dose-response curve among the three groups of patients.The two medicine interaction analysis was caculated by the equivalent diagram method and algebraic method. Results ED50 was 32.35,28.78 μg/kg and ED95 was 52.67,51.20 μg/kg when patients were given single dose of atracurium or vecuronium.ED50 was 16.81,12.17 μg/kg and ED95 was 23.49,22.16 μg/kg when it combined the both two groups.Compared with other group,the differences in cisatracurium+vecuronium group were statistically significant.The combinational value of ED50 and ED95 was 0.942 and 0.879,respectively

  5. Accuracy of ED Bedside Ultrasound for Identification of Gallstones: Retrospective Analysis of 575 Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scruggs, William

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective: To determine the ability of emergency department (ED physicians to diagnose cholelithiasis with bedside ultrasound. Methods: ED gallbladder ultrasounds recorded over 37 months were compared to radiology ultrasound interpretation. Results: Of 1,690 ED gallbladder ultrasound scans performed during this period, radiology ultrasound was performed in 575/1690 (34% cases. ED physician bedside interpretation was 88% sensitive [95% CI, 84-91] and 87% specific [95% CI, 82-91], while positive predictive value (PPV was 91% [88- 94%] and negative predictive value (NPV was 83% [78-87%], using radiology interpretation as the criterion reference. Conclusion: ED physician ultrasound of the gallbladder for cholelithiasis is both sensitive and specific.

  6. The influence of sonority on the production of words ending in -ed by Brazilian EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Delatorre

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of sonority on the production of vowel epenthesis in verbs ending in -ed by Brazilian learners of English. Participants were twenty-six upper-intermediate Brazilian EFL learners who read and audio-recorded ten paragraphs containing 91 verbs ending in ed. The results demonstrated that sonority influenced mispronunciations since the least sonorous obstruents preceding -ed induced more vowel epenthesis than the more sonorous sonorants, which in turn induced more epenthesis than vowels in the same position. The results also demonstrated that within the class of obstruents, affricates preceding -ed induced more epenthesis than stops, which induced more epenthesis than fricatives, and that, within the class of sonorants, nasals induced more epenthesis than liquids. These results suggest that markedness in terms of sonority affects the production of vowel epenthesis in words ending in -ed.

  7. The influence of sonority on the production of words ending in -ed by Brazilian EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Delatorre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2008n55p83 This study investigated the influence of sonority on the production of vowel epenthesis in verbs ending in -ed by Brazilian learners of English. Participants were twenty-six upper-intermediate Brazilian EFL learners who read and audio-recorded ten paragraphs containing 91 verbs ending in ed. The results demonstrated that sonority influenced mispronunciations since the least sonorous obstruents preceding -ed induced more vowel epenthesis than the more sonorous sonorants, which in turn induced more epenthesis than vowels in the same position. The results also demonstrated that within the class of obstruents, affricates preceding -ed induced more epenthesis than stops, which induced more epenthesis than fricatives, and that, within the class of sonorants, nasals induced more epenthesis than liquids. These results suggest that markedness in terms of sonority affects the production of vowel epenthesis in words ending in -ed.

  8. Population divergence times and historical demography in red knots and dunlins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buehler, DM; Baker, AJ

    2005-01-01

    We employed Bayesian coalescent modeling of samples of mitochondrial control region sequences in two species of shorebird, Red Knots (Calidris canutus) and Durdins (Calidris alpina) to estimate evolutionary effective population size, population divergence times, and time to most recent common ancest

  9. Inferring Amazon leaf demography from satellite observations of leaf area index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Caldararu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and year-to-year variations in leaf cover imprint significant spatial and temporal variability on biogeochemical cycles, and affect land-surface properties related to climate. We develop a demographic model of leaf phenology based on the hypothesis that trees seek an optimal Leaf Area Index (LAI as a function of available light and soil water, and fitted it to spaceborne observations of LAI over the Amazon Basin, 2001–2005. We find the model reproduces the spatial and temporal LAI distribution whilst also predicting geographic variation in leaf age from the basin center (2.1 ± 0.2 yr, through to the lowest values over the deciduous Eastern Amazon (6 ± 2 months. The model explains the observed increase in LAI during the dry season as a net addition of leaves in response to increased solar radiation. We anticipate our work to be a starting point from which to develop better descriptions of leaf phenology to incorporate into more sophisticated earth system models.

  10. Comment on "How science survived: medieval manuscripts' 'demography' and classic texts' extinction".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Georges

    2005-12-09

    Exciting though it may seem, the mathematical model developed by Cisne (Reports, 25 February 2005, p. 1305) to analyze the transmission of texts and manuscripts from Antiquity and the Middle Ages does not hold up to scrutiny. It seriously underestimates the losses, thus leading to conclusions that are unwarranted.

  11. Inferring Amazon leaf demography from satellite observations of leaf area index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Caldararu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and year-to-year variations in leaf cover imprint significant spatial and temporal variability on biogeochemical cycles, and affect land-surface properties related to climate. We develop a demographic model of leaf phenology based on the hypothesis that trees seek an optimal leaf area index (LAI as a function of available light and soil water, and fit it to spaceborne observations of LAI over the Amazon basin, 2001–2005. We find the model reproduces the spatial and temporal LAI distribution whilst also predicting geographic variation in leaf age from the basin centre (2.1 ± 0.2 years, through to the lowest values over the deciduous eastern and southern Amazon (6 ± 2 months. The model explains the observed increase in LAI during the dry season as a net addition of leaves in response to increased solar radiation. We anticipate our work to be a starting point from which to develop better descriptions of leaf phenology to incorporate into more sophisticated earth system models.

  12. The impact of roads on the demography of grizzly bears in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal factors that have reduced grizzly bear populations has been the creation of human access into grizzly bear habitat by roads built for resource extraction. Past studies have documented mortality and distributional changes of bears relative to roads but none have attempted to estimate the direct demographic impact of roads in terms of both survival rates, reproductive rates, and the interaction of reproductive state of female bears with survival rate. We applied a combination of survival and reproductive models to estimate demographic parameters for threatened grizzly bear populations in Alberta. Instead of attempting to estimate mean trend we explored factors which caused biological and spatial variation in population trend. We found that sex and age class survival was related to road density with subadult bears being most vulnerable to road-based mortality. A multi-state reproduction model found that females accompanied by cubs of the year and/or yearling cubs had lower survival rates compared to females with two year olds or no cubs. A demographic model found strong spatial gradients in population trend based upon road density. Threshold road densities needed to ensure population stability were estimated to further refine targets for population recovery of grizzly bears in Alberta. Models that considered lowered survival of females with dependant offspring resulted in lower road density thresholds to ensure stable bear populations. Our results demonstrate likely spatial variation in population trend and provide an example how demographic analysis can be used to refine and direct conservation measures for threatened species.

  13. Population demography and spatial ecology of a reintroduced lion population in the Greater Makalali Conservancy, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Druce

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Many recently established small game reserves in southern Africa have introduced lion, and have had to actively manage their populations as the lion are in relatively small(<1000 km², enclosed areas. This study was undertaken on the Greater Makalali Conservancy (140 km², Limpopo Province, South Africa to describe population demography and lion movement patterns in order to enhance management decisions. A pride of five lion were introduced to Makalali in December 1994 and since then 35 cubs have been born (11.6 % population growth per year over 7.5 years, 31 of which have been translocated to other reserves. To increase genetic diversity, the two male coalition was removed in May 1999 and another two males introduced during July 1999. During the study, the reserve area was increased by approximately 23 %. Although the Makalali lion utilised a smaller home range during winter (75.3 km² than summer (106.8 km², this difference was not significant. The core ranges also shifted between seasons, with 46 % of the summer core being utilised during winter. When the new males were introduced, they centred their core range near their release boma. The females also shifted their core range to this region after their young male cubs were moved into the boma. After the Makalali area was increased, the lion increased their home range area, while their core range became reduced and more dispersed. There was no significant difference in the distances the lion moved in a 24 hour period between the two seasons, or before and after the two management actions. The Makalali lion also spent more time than expected in low open woodland and grassland habitats and less than expected in low thickets. We conclude that lion populations can successfully exist within small reserves (<100km² and that actions to manage the population can be successful if certain criteria are considered.

  14. In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader's explosive population growth rate and restored natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisz, Susan; Spigler, Rachel B; Horvitz, Carol C

    2014-03-25

    A major goal in ecology is to understand mechanisms that increase invasion success of exotic species. A recent hypothesis implicates altered species interactions resulting from ungulate herbivore overabundance as a key cause of exotic plant domination. To test this hypothesis, we maintained an experimental demography deer exclusion study for 6 y in a forest where the native ungulate Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) is overabundant and Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is aggressively invading. Because population growth is multiplicative across time, we introduce metrics that correctly integrate experimental effects across treatment years, the cumulative population growth rate, λc, and its geometric mean, λper-year, the time-averaged annual population growth rate. We determined λc and λper-year of the invader and of a common native, Trillium erectum. Our results conclusively demonstrate that deer are required for the success of Alliaria; its projected population trajectory shifted from explosive growth in the presence of deer (λper-year = 1.33) to decline toward extinction where deer are excluded (λper-year = 0.88). In contrast, Trillium's λper-year was suppressed in the presence of deer relative to deer exclusion (λper-year = 1.04 vs. 1.20, respectively). Retrospective sensitivity analyses revealed that the largest negative effect of deer exclusion on Alliaria came from rosette transitions, whereas the largest positive effect on Trillium came from reproductive transitions. Deer exclusion lowered Alliaria density while increasing Trillium density. Our results provide definitive experimental support that interactions with overabundant ungulates enhance demographic success of invaders and depress natives' success, with broad implications for biodiversity and ecosystem function worldwide.

  15. Demography, types, outcome and relationship of surgically treated intracranial suppuration complicating chronic suppurative otitis media and bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Emmanuel Idowu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgically treated intracranial suppurations (ICS are uncommon, life-threatening neurosurgical emergencies. They can result from complication of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM and bacterial rhinosinusitis (BRS. The objective of this study was to know the frequency of BRS and CSOM and relate it to its rare complication of surgically treated ICS while also describing the demography, type and outcome of ICS that resulted from BRS and CSOM. Materials and Methods: All patients that presented to the Otorhinolaryngological department and Neurosurgical unit of the same institution with clinical and radiological features of CSOM, BRS, and ICS were prospectively studied over a 5-year period. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 3 months. Results: Two thousand, two hundred and seventy-nine patients presented during the 5-year study period. Of all these patients, 1511 had CSOM (66.3% and 768 (33.7% presented with features of BRS. Eleven (0.73% had ICS complicating their CSOM while 8 (1.04% cases of surgically treated ICS followed BRS. Bacterial rhinosinusitis was not more likely to lead to ICS (P = 0.4348. The Odds ratio (OR of a child ≤ 18 years of age with CSOM developing ICS was 5.24 (95% Confidence interval 1.13-24.34; P = 0.0345, while it was 7.60 (95% Confidence interval 1.52-37.97; P = 0.0134 for children with BRS. Conclusions: The most common type of ICS complicating CSOM and BRS was brain abscess and subdural empyema, respectively. Children are more prone to develop surgical ICS following CSOM and BRS. The proportion of males that had ICS was higher in both CSOM and BRS patients. Optimal outcome is achieved in patients that presented with GCS of 13 and above.

  16. The Effects of Habitat Type and Volcanic Eruptions on the Breeding Demography of Icelandic Whimbrels Numenius phaeopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrínardóttir, Borgný; Alves, José A; Sigurjónsdóttir, Hrefna; Hersteinsson, Páll; Gunnarsson, Tómas G

    2015-01-01

    Distinct preference of species for habitats is most often driven by long term differences in demographic rates between habitats. Estimating variation in those rates is key for developing successful conservation strategies. Stochastic events can interact with underlying variation in habitat quality in regulating demography but the opportunities to explore such interactions are rare. Whimbrels in Iceland show a strong preference for sparsely vegetated riverplains. Such habitats in Iceland face various threats, e.g., climate change, river regulation and spread of alien plant species. In this study we compared demographic parameters of breeding Whimbrels between riverplains and other habitats before, during and after volcanic eruption events to estimate the importance of the habitats for the species and the effect of ash deposit on breeding success. We found that an estimated minimum of 23% of the Icelandic population of Whimbrels and c. 10% of the world population of the species breed in riverplain habitats in Iceland. Whimbrels bred consistently at much higher densities in riverplain habitats than in other habitats and riverplains also had higher densities of pairs with fledglings although the proportion of successful breeders was similar between habitats. Predation by livestock may have had a considerable negative effect on breeding success on our study sites. Breeding was negatively affected by the volcanic activity, probably through the effects of ash on the invertebrate food supply, with breeding success being gradually worse closer to the eruption. Breeding success was equally affected by volcanism across habitats which differed in underlying habitat quality. This study gives an example of how populations can be regulated by factors which operate at different spatial scales, such as local variation in habitat quality and stochastic events which impact larger areas.

  17. Effects of an invasive grass on the demography of the Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis: Implications for cacti conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sandoval, Julissa; Meléndez-Ackerman, Elvia

    2012-05-01

    The impact of exotic species around the world is among the primary threats to the conservation and management of rare and endangered species. In this work we asked whether or not the presence of the African grass Megathyrsus maximus on Mona Island was associated with negative impacts on the demography of the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis. To address this question we performed field observations where we compared demographic data collected at un-manipulated areas invaded by Megathyrsus with un-manipulated areas non-invaded by this exotic grass. Additionally, demographic data were also collected in areas in which we removed the exotic grass biomass using two alternative treatments: complete and partial grass removal. Results demonstrated that the presence of Megathyrsus has negative effects on demographic parameters of Harrisia at various stages throughout its life cycle. In general, the survival, growth, and reproduction of Harrisia plants were depressed under the presence of Megathyrsus. Growth and survival of seedlings and juveniles of Harrisia were more impacted by the presence of Megathyrsus than adult performance and seedling recruitment only occurred in areas with grass absence. Our combined results suggest that modifications of the micro-environment by the presence of Megathyrsus may add an additional level of vulnerability to the persistence of Harrisia, and as such this factor must be considered when designing conservation strategies for this endangered species. This study highlights the need for a greater emphasis on understanding the interactions between invasive grass species and native cacti, and the importance of such information in designing conservation strategies for cacti species elsewhere.

  18. Teaching and Assessing ED Handoffs: A Qualitative Study Exploring Resident, Attending, and Nurse Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Flanigan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that residency programs ensure resident competency in performing safe, effective handoffs. Understanding resident, attending, and nurse perceptions of the key elements of a safe and effective emergency department (ED handoff is a crucial step to developing feasible, acceptable educational interventions to teach and assess this fundamental competency. The aim of our study was to identify the essential themes of ED-based handoffs and to explore the key cultural and interprofessional themes that may be barriers to developing and implementing successful ED-based educational handoff interventions. Methods: Using a grounded theory approach and constructivist/interpretivist research paradigm, we analyzed data from three primary and one confirmatory focus groups (FGs at an urban, academic ED. FG protocols were developed using open-ended questions that sought to understand what participants felt were the crucial elements of ED handoffs. ED residents, attendings, a physician assistant, and nurses participated in the FGs. FGs were observed, hand-transcribed, audiorecorded and subsequently transcribed. We analyzed data using an iterative process of theme and subtheme identification. Saturation was reached during the third FG, and the fourth confirmatory group reinforced the identified themes. Two team members analyzed the transcripts separately and identified the same major themes. Results: ED providers identified that crucial elements of ED handoff include the following: 1 Culture (provider buy-in, openness to change, shared expectations of sign-out goals; 2 Time (brevity, interruptions, waiting; 3 Environment (physical location, ED factors; 4 Process (standardization, information order, tools. Conclusion: Key participants in the ED handoff process perceive that the crucial elements of intershift handoffs involve the themes of culture, time, environment, and process. Attention

  19. EdU induces DNA damage response and cell death in mESC in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, Fanni; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Jackson, Dean A

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a novel DNA replication precursor analogue called 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) has been widely used to monitor DNA synthesis as an alternative to bromodeoxyuridine. Use of EdU benefits from simplicity and reproducibility and the simple chemical detection systems allows excellent preservation of nuclear structure. However, the alkyne moiety is highly reactive, raising the possibility that incorporation might compromise genome stability. To assess the extent of possible DNA damage, we have analysed the effect of EdU incorporation into DNA during short- and long-term cell culture using a variety of cell lines. We show that EdU incorporation has no measurable impact on the rate of elongation of replication forks during synthesis. However, using different cell lines we find that during long-term cell culture variable responses to EdU incorporation are seen, which range from delayed cell cycle progression to complete cell cycle arrest. The most profound phenotypes were seen in mouse embryonic stem cells, which following incorporation of EdU accumulated in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle before undergoing apoptosis. In long-term cell culture, EdU incorporation also triggered a DNA damage response in all cell types analysed. Our study shows that while EdU is extremely useful to tag sites of on-going replication, for long-term studies (i.e. beyond the cell cycle in which labelling is performed), a careful analysis of cell cycle perturbations must be performed in order to ensure that any conclusions made after EdU treatment are not a direct consequence of EdU-dependent activation of cell stress responses.

  20. The demography of climate-driven and density-regulated population dynamics in a perennial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan; Bengstsson, Karin; Ehrlén, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the internal and external drivers of population dynamics is a key objective in ecology, currently accentuated by the need to forecast the effects of climate change on species distributions and abundances. The interplay between environmental and density effects is one particularly...... to be driven solely by the environment can overestimate extinction risks if there is density dependence. We conclude that density regulation can dampen effects of climate change on Fumana population size, and discuss the need to quantify density dependence in predictions of population responses...... important aspect of such forecasts. We examined the simultaneous impact of climate and intraspecific density on vital rates of the dwarf shrub Fumana procumbens over 20 yr, using generalized additive mixed models. We then analyzed effects on population dynamics using integral projection models...

  1. The impact of roads on the demography of grizzly bears in Alberta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Boulanger

    Full Text Available One of the principal factors that have reduced grizzly bear populations has been the creation of human access into grizzly bear habitat by roads built for resource extraction. Past studies have documented mortality and distributional changes of bears relative to roads but none have attempted to estimate the direct demographic impact of roads in terms of both survival rates, reproductive rates, and the interaction of reproductive state of female bears with survival rate. We applied a combination of survival and reproductive models to estimate demographic parameters for threatened grizzly bear populations in Alberta. Instead of attempting to estimate mean trend we explored factors which caused biological and spatial variation in population trend. We found that sex and age class survival was related to road density with subadult bears being most vulnerable to road-based mortality. A multi-state reproduction model found that females accompanied by cubs of the year and/or yearling cubs had lower survival rates compared to females with two year olds or no cubs. A demographic model found strong spatial gradients in population trend based upon road density. Threshold road densities needed to ensure population stability were estimated to further refine targets for population recovery of grizzly bears in Alberta. Models that considered lowered survival of females with dependant offspring resulted in lower road density thresholds to ensure stable bear populations. Our results demonstrate likely spatial variation in population trend and provide an example how demographic analysis can be used to refine and direct conservation measures for threatened species.

  2. Herd immunity acquired indirectly from interactions between the ecology of infectious diseases, demography and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, Matthew H; Rohani, Pejman

    2010-03-01

    Patterns of morbidity and mortality around the globe are determined by interactions between infectious diseases and systematic human socioeconomic processes. The most obvious of these patterns is that the greatest burdens of infectious diseases are found among the poor, who lack the basic resources for disease prevention and treatment. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that many infectious diseases are themselves causes of poverty owing to their effects on labour productivity. A particularly subtle phenomenon that receives little attention in the epidemiology literature and is especially important for poor communities is the role of the birth rate as an important direct cause of high disease burdens. Because of their high rates of transmission and life-long immunity, the persistence of many child diseases such as measles relies on high rates of reproduction as their source of susceptible individuals. Thus, there are significant direct health benefits of lower fertility rates, which are further enhanced by interactions with economic processes. Indeed, fertility, poverty and disease all interact with each other in important and predictable ways that can be built into traditional disease ecology models. We present such a model here that provides insights into the long-term effect of policy interventions. For example, because of indirect income effects, herd immunity may be acquired with lower vaccine coverage than previously thought. Reductions in the disease burden can also occur through lower fertility. Our model thus provides a disease ecology framework that is useful for the analysis of demographic transitions.

  3. Inferring responses to climate dynamics from historical demography in neotropical forest lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Ivan; Xue, Alexander T; Brown, Jason L; Alvarado-Serrano, Diego F; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Hickerson, Michael J; Carnaval, Ana C

    2016-07-19

    We apply a comparative framework to test for concerted demographic changes in response to climate shifts in the neotropical lowland forests, learning from the past to inform projections of the future. Using reduced genomic (SNP) data from three lizard species codistributed in Amazonia and the Atlantic Forest (Anolis punctatus, Anolis ortonii, and Polychrus marmoratus), we first reconstruct former population history and test for assemblage-level responses to cycles of moisture transport recently implicated in changes of forest distribution during the Late Quaternary. We find support for population shifts within the time frame of inferred precipitation fluctuations (the last 250,000 y) but detect idiosyncratic responses across species and uniformity of within-species responses across forest regions. These results are incongruent with expectations of concerted population expansion in response to increased rainfall and fail to detect out-of-phase demographic syndromes (expansions vs. contractions) across forest regions. Using reduced genomic data to infer species-specific demographical parameters, we then model the plausible spatial distribution of genetic diversity in the Atlantic Forest into future climates (2080) under a medium carbon emission trajectory. The models forecast very distinct trajectories for the lizard species, reflecting unique estimated population densities and dispersal abilities. Ecological and demographic constraints seemingly lead to distinct and asynchronous responses to climatic regimes in the tropics, even among similarly distributed taxa. Incorporating such constraints is key to improve modeling of the distribution of biodiversity in the past and future.

  4. Bayesian analysis of multi-state data with individual covariates for estimating genetic effects on demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Sarah J.; Royle, J. Andrew; Urbanek, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Inbreeding depression is frequently a concern of managers interested in restoring endangered species. Decisions to reduce the potential for inbreeding depression by balancing genotypic contributions to reintroduced populations may exact a cost on long-term demographic performance of the population if those decisions result in reduced numbers of animals released and/or restriction of particularly successful genotypes (i.e., heritable traits of particular family lines). As part of an effort to restore a migratory flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) to eastern North America using the offspring of captive breeders, we obtained a unique dataset which includes post-release mark-recapture data, as well as the pedigree of each released individual. We developed a Bayesian formulation of a multi-state model to analyze radio-telemetry, band-resight, and dead recovery data on reintroduced individuals, in order to track survival and breeding state transitions. We used studbook-based individual covariates to examine the comparative evidence for and degree of effects of inbreeding, genotype, and genotype quality on post-release survival of reintroduced individuals. We demonstrate implementation of the Bayesian multi-state model, which allows for the integration of imperfect detection, multiple data types, random effects, and individual- and time-dependent covariates. Our results provide only weak evidence for an effect of the quality of an individual's genotype in captivity on post-release survival as well as for an effect of inbreeding on post-release survival. We plan to integrate our results into a decision-analytic modeling framework that can explicitly examine tradeoffs between the effects of inbreeding and the effects of genotype and demographic stochasticity on population establishment.

  5. The COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database: an open online repository for plant demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Römer, Gesa

    2014-01-01

    Summary Schedules of survival, growth and reproduction are key life-history traits. Data on how these traits vary among species and populations are fundamental to our understanding of the ecological conditions that have shaped plant evolution. Because these demographic schedules determine...... population growth or decline, such data help us understand how different biomes shape plant ecology, how plant populations and communities respond to global change and how to develop successful management tools for endangered or invasive species. Matrix population models summarize the life cycle components...

  6. SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education) Increases Long-Term Food Security among Indiana Households with Children in a Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rebecca L; Maulding, Melissa K; Abbott, Angela R; Craig, Bruce A; Eicher-Miller, Heather A

    2016-11-01

    Food insecurity is negatively associated with US children's dietary intake and health. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) aims to alleviate food insecurity by offering nutrition, budgeting, and healthy lifestyle education to low-income individuals and families. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term impact of the Indiana SNAP-Ed on food security among households with children. A randomized, controlled, parallel study design with SNAP-Ed as an intervention was carried out during a 4- to 10-wk intervention period. Intervention group participants received the first 4 Indiana SNAP-Ed curriculum lessons. Study participants (n = 575) were adults aged ≥18 y from low-income Indiana households with ≥1 child living in the household. Both treatment groups completed an assessment before and after the intervention period and 1 y after recruitment. The 18-item US Household Food Security Survey Module was used to classify the primary outcomes of food security for the household and adults and children in the household. A linear mixed model was used to compare intervention with control group effects over time on food security. Mean ± SEM changes in household food security score and food security score among household adults from baseline to 1-y follow-up were 1.2 ± 0.4 and 0.9 ± 0.3 units lower, respectively, in the intervention group than in the control group (P security score from baseline to 1-y follow-up among household children was not significantly different in the intervention group compared with the control group. SNAP-Ed improved food security over a longitudinal time frame among low-income Indiana households with children in this study. SNAP-Ed may be a successful intervention to improve food security. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Isotherm and kinetic studies of Burazol Blue ED dye biosorption by dried anaerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Necmettin; Kiran, Ismail; Ilhan, Semra; Iscen, Cansu Filik

    2009-06-15

    Biosorption potential of dried anaerobic sludge (DAS) for Burazol Blue ED (BB) was studied with respect to pH, equilibrium time, initial dye concentrations and temperature to determine equilibrium and kinetic models. The most suitable pH, equilibrium time and initial dye concentration were determined as 0.5+/-0.03, 75 min and 150 mg/L, respectively, at a biomass dosage of 0.4 g/L and 25 degrees C+/-1.0. The equilibrium data was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model. Maximum uptake capacity (q(m)) of DAS for the dyestuff (BB) were 118.3, 125.8 and 127.5mg/g biomass at temperatures of 25, 40 and 50 degrees C, respectively, indicating that the biosorption process is spontaneous and favored at higher temperatures. The overall biosorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Gibbs free energy changes were calculated as -356.8, -519.7 and -520.6J/mol at 25, 40 and 50 degrees C, respectively.

  8. Factors affecting communication in emergency departments: doctors and nurses' perceptions of communication in a trilingual ED in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Jack K H; Matthiessen, Christian M I M; Murray, Kristen A; Slade, Diana

    2015-12-01

    EDs, (2) accepting the tenets and practices of patient-centred care, (3) establishing clear and consistent knowledge transfer procedures and (4) lowering the patient-to-clinician ratio in order to create the conditions that foster successful communication. The research provides a model for future research on the relationship between communication and the quality and safety of the patient safety.

  9. Validation of spatially allocated small area estimates for 1880 Census demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Ruther

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE This paper details the validation of a methodology which spatially allocates Census microdata to census tracts, based on known, aggregate tract population distributions. To protect confidentiality, public-use microdata contain no spatial identifiers other than the code indicating the Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA in which the individual or household is located. Confirmatory information including the location of microdata households can only be obtained in a Census Research Data Center (CRDC. Due to restrictions in place at CRDCs, a systematic procedure for validating the spatial allocation methodology needs to be implemented prior to accessing CRDC data. METHODS This study demonstrates and evaluates such an approach, using historical census data for which a 100Š count of the full population is available at a fine spatial resolution. The approach described allows for testing of the behavior of a maximum entropy imputation and spatial allocation model under different specifications. The imputation and allocation is performed using a microdata sample of records drawn from the full 1880 Census enumeration and synthetic summary files created from the same source. The results of the allocation are then validated against the actual values from the 100Š count of 1880. RESULTS The results indicate that the validation procedure provides useful statistics, allowing an in-depth evaluation of the household allocation and identifying optimal configurations for model parameterization. This provides important insights as to how to design a validation procedure at a CRDC for spatial allocations using contemporary census data.

  10. Ancestry and demography and descendants of Iron Age nomads of the Eurasian Steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterländer, Martina; Palstra, Friso; Lazaridis, Iosif; Pilipenko, Aleksandr; Hofmanová, Zuzana; Groß, Melanie; Sell, Christian; Blöcher, Jens; Kirsanow, Karola; Rohland, Nadin; Rieger, Benjamin; Kaiser, Elke; Schier, Wolfram; Pozdniakov, Dimitri; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Georges, Myriam; Wilde, Sandra; Powell, Adam; Heyer, Evelyne; Currat, Mathias; Reich, David; Samashev, Zainolla; Parzinger, Hermann; Molodin, Vyacheslav I.; Burger, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    During the 1st millennium before the Common Era (BCE), nomadic tribes associated with the Iron Age Scythian culture spread over the Eurasian Steppe, covering a territory of more than 3,500 km in breadth. To understand the demographic processes behind the spread of the Scythian culture, we analysed genomic data from eight individuals and a mitochondrial dataset of 96 individuals originating in eastern and western parts of the Eurasian Steppe. Genomic inference reveals that Scythians in the east and the west of the steppe zone can best be described as a mixture of Yamnaya-related ancestry and an East Asian component. Demographic modelling suggests independent origins for eastern and western groups with ongoing gene-flow between them, plausibly explaining the striking uniformity of their material culture. We also find evidence that significant gene-flow from east to west Eurasia must have occurred early during the Iron Age. PMID:28256537

  11. Impacts of road deicing salt on the demography of vernal pool-breeding amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karraker, Nancy E; Gibbs, James P; Vonesh, James R

    2008-04-01

    Deicing agents, primarily road salt, are applied to roads in 26 states in the United States and in a number of European countries, yet the scale of impacts of road salt on aquatic organisms remains largely under-studied. The issue is germane to amphibian conservation because both adult and larval amphibians are known to be particularly sensitive to changes in their osmolar environments. In this study, we combined survey, experimental, and demographic modeling approaches to evaluate the possible effects of road salt on two common vernal-pond-breeding amphibian species, the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and the wood frog (Rana sylvatica). We found that in the Adirondack Mountain Region of New York (USA), road salt traveled up to 172 m from the highway into wetlands. Surveys showed that egg mass densities of spotted salamanders (A. maculatum) and wood frogs (R. sylvatica) were two times higher in forest pools than roadside pools, but this pattern was better explained by road proximity than by increased salinity. Experiments demonstrated that embryonic and larval survival were reduced at moderate (500 muS) and high conductivities (3000 muS) in A. maculatum and at high conductivities in R. sylvatica. Demographic models suggest that such egg and larval stage effects of salt may have important impacts on populations near roads, particularly in the case of A. maculatum, for which salt exposure may lead to local extinction. For both species, the effect of road salt was dependent upon the strength of larval density dependence and declined rapidly with distance from the roadside, with the greatest negative effects being limited to within 50 m. Based on this evidence, we argue that efforts to protect local populations of A. maculatum and R. sylvatica in roadside wetlands should, in part, be aimed at reducing application of road salt near wetlands with high conductivity levels.

  12. Demography of Female Greater Prairie-Chickens in Unfragmented Grasslands in Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline K. Augustine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido have been declining because of loss and fragmentation of tallgrass prairie habitats, and management plans require contemporary demographic data. Our objectives were to determine whether maternal nutrition or predation were determinants of nesting success and female survival. We captured and radio-marked 43 females at four leks in natural, unfragmented prairie during a 4-year study. Reproductive potential was high because females laid large clutches (10.9 ± 0.3 eggs, n = 24, renested following clutch loss (22.2%, n = 27 females, and had high egg viability (88.6 ± 5.0% of eggs hatched; n = 7 nests, but reproductive traits were not correlated with female morphometrics (mass, or tarsus and keel lengths. Daily survival rate of nests was low (0.928, n = 34 nests resulting in a predicted nest success rate of 7.4% for a 35-day exposure period. We used known fate models to estimate weekly survival from telemetry data for 40 females. Weekly survival was 0.970 and the extrapolated survival rate for the 6-month breeding season was 45.7%. Using time-since-marking Cormack-Jolly-Seber models for live encounter data to control for transience, annual apparent survival was 0.277 ± 0.081 SE for 55 marked females after initial capture, and 0.424 ± 0.139 during subsequent intervals. Survival of females was 1.6 to 2.0 times higher during the nonbreeding season than the breeding season, presumably because females are susceptible to predation during incubation and brood-rearing. Predation of nests and females may be the main demographic factors limiting population viability because predation, and not maternal nutrition, accounted for unexpectedly low nesting success and breeding season survival of Greater Prairie-Chickens in natural habitats. Future research should investigate rangeland practices that increase residual nesting cover or reduce predator impacts.

  13. Demography of the threatened coral Acropora cervicornis: implications for its management and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Molina, Alex E.; Ruiz-Diaz, Claudia P.; Pérez, María E.; Rodríguez-Barreras, Ruber; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2015-12-01

    Populations of Acropora cervicornis have collapsed throughout the Caribbean. This situation has prompted the initiation of many restoration efforts; yet, there are insufficient demographic data and analyses to effectively guide these initiatives. In this study we assessed the spatiotemporal variability of A. cervicornis vital rates. We also developed a population matrix model to (1) evaluate the risk of population extinction, (2) estimate population growth rates (λ) considering different rates of colony fragmentation and fragment survival, (3) determine the demographic transition(s) that contribute the most to spatiotemporal differences in λs, and (4) analyze the effectiveness of outplanting coral fragments of different sizes. The model was parameterized by following the fate of 300 colonies from 2011 to 2013 at two localities in Puerto Rico. Demographic transitions varied spatiotemporally, with a significant interaction between location and time period on colony fate. Spatiotemporal variations in λ were also observed. During the first year, populations exhibited λs below equilibrium (0.918 and 0.948), followed by a dramatic decline at both sites (0.535 and 0.709) during the second year. The lower λs were caused by a decrease in the probability of stasis of large-sized colonies coupled with lack of sexual recruits and a meager contribution of asexual recruitment. Spatial variations in λs were largely due to differences in the probability of medium-sized colonies advancing to the largest size class. The viability analysis forecasts that the populations will reach quasi-extinction levels of 25 % of the initial population size in ≤16 yrs. Numerical simulations indicate that outplanting fragments ≥250 cm in total linear length (TLL) would result in a higher asymptotic population size than outplanting smaller fragments. We argue, however, that transplanting colonies ≤100 cm TLL will be a better management strategy because they can be produced faster and in

  14. Rapid Primary Care Follow-up from the ED to Reduce Avoidable Hospital Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Amanda S; Steel, Peter; Tanouye, Robert; Novikov, Aleksey; Clark, Sunday; Sinha, Sanjai; Tung, Judy

    2017-08-01

    Hospital admissions from the emergency department (ED) now account for approximately 50% of all admissions. Some patients admitted from the ED may not require inpatient care if outpatient care could be optimized. However, access to primary care especially immediately after ED discharge is challenging. Studies have not addressed the extent to which hospital admissions from the ED may be averted with access to rapid (next business day) primary care follow-up. We evaluated the impact of an ED-to-rapid-primary-care protocol on avoidance of hospitalizations in a large, urban medical center. We conducted a retrospective review of patients referred from the ED to primary care (Weill Cornell Internal Medicine Associates - WCIMA) through a rapid-access-to-primary-care program developed at New York-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center. Referrals were classified as either an avoided admission or not, and classifications were performed by both emergency physician (EP) and internal medicine physician reviewers. We also collected outcome data on rapid visit completion, ED revisits, hospitalizations and primary care engagement. EPs classified 26 (16%) of referrals for rapid primary care follow-up as avoided admissions. Of the 162 patients referred for rapid follow-up, 118 (73%) arrived for their rapid appointment. There were no differences in rates of ED revisits or subsequent hospitalizations between those who attended the rapid follow-up and those who did not attend. Patients who attended the rapid appointment were significantly more likely to attend at least one subsequent appointment at WCIMA during the six months after the index ED visit [N=55 (47%) vs. N=8 (18%), P=0.001]. A rapid-ED-to-primary-care-access program may allow EPs to avoid admitting patients to the hospital without risking ED revisits or subsequent hospitalizations. This protocol has the potential to save costs over time. A program such as this can also provide a safe and reliable ED discharge option

  15. Genetic demography at the leading edge of the distribution of a rabies virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Russell, Amy L; Osorio, Ignacio A; Jiménez Ramírez, Alejandro; Fischer, Justin W; Neuwald, Jennifer L; Tibbels, Annie E; Lecuona, Luis; McCracken, Gary F

    2017-07-01

    The common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus, ranges from South America into northern Mexico in North America. This sanguivorous species of bat feeds primarily on medium to large-sized mammals and is known to rely on livestock as primary prey. Each year, there are hotspot areas of D. rotundus-specific rabies virus outbreaks that lead to the deaths of livestock and economic losses. Based on incidental captures in our study area, which is an area of high cattle mortality from D. rotundus transmitted rabies, it appears that D. rotundus are being caught regularly in areas and elevations where they previously were thought to be uncommon. Our goal was to investigate demographic processes and genetic diversity at the north eastern edge of the range of D. rotundus in Mexico. We generated control region sequences (441 bp) and 12-locus microsatellite genotypes for 602 individuals of D. rotundus. These data were analyzed using network analyses, Bayesian clustering approaches, and standard population genetic statistical analyses. Our results demonstrate panmixia across our sampling area with low genetic diversity, low population differentiation, loss of intermediate frequency alleles at microsatellite loci, and very low mtDNA haplotype diversity with all haplotypes being very closely related. Our study also revealed strong signals of population expansion. These results follow predictions from the leading-edge model of expanding populations and supports conclusions from another study that climate change may allow this species to find suitable habitat within the U.S. border.

  16. Translocation and early post-release demography of endangered Laysan teal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, M.H.; Seavy, N.E.; Vekasy, M.S.; Klavitter, J.L.; Laniawe, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the high extinction risk inherent to small island populations, we translocated wild Laysan teal Anas laysanensis to a portion of its presumed prehistoric range. Most avian translocations lack the strategic post-release monitoring needed to assess early population establishment or failure. Therefore, we monitored the survival and reproduction of all founders, and their first-generation offspring using radio telemetry for 2 years after the first release. Forty-two Laysan teal were sourced directly from the only extant population on Laysan Island and transported 2 days by ship to Midway Atoll. All birds survived the translocation with nutritional and veterinary support, and spent between 4 and 14 days in captivity. Post-release survival of 42 founders was 0.857 (95% CI 0.86-0.99) during 2004-2006 or annualized 0.92 (95% CI 0.83-0.98). Seventeen of 18 founding hens attempted nesting in the first two breeding seasons. Fledgling success was 0.57 (95% CI 0.55-0.60) in 2005 and 0.63 (95% CI 0.62-0.64) in 2006. The effective founding female population (Ne) was 13. We applied these initial demographic rates to model population growth. The nascent population size increased to >100 after only 2 years post-release (?? = 1.73). If this growth rate continues, the size of the Midway population could surpass the source population before 2010. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 The Zoological Society of London.

  17. Nautilus at risk--estimating population size and demography of Nautilus pompilius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Andrew; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Marshall, Justin

    2011-02-10

    The low fecundity, late maturity, long gestation and long life span of Nautilus suggest that this species is vulnerable to over-exploitation. Demand from the ornamental shell trade has contributed to their rapid decline in localized populations. More data from wild populations are needed to design management plans which ensure Nautilus persistence. We used a variety of techniques including capture-mark-recapture, baited remote underwater video systems, ultrasonic telemetry and remotely operated vehicles to estimate population size, growth rates, distribution and demographic characteristics of an unexploited Nautilus pompilius population at Osprey Reef (Coral Sea, Australia). We estimated a small and dispersed population of between 844 and 4467 individuals (14.6-77.4 km(-2)) dominated by males (83:17 male:female) and comprised of few juveniles (<10%).These results provide the first Nautilid population and density estimates which are essential elements for long-term management of populations via sustainable catch models. Results from baited remote underwater video systems provide confidence for their more widespread use to assess efficiently the size and density of exploited and unexploited Nautilus populations worldwide.

  18. Nautilus at risk--estimating population size and demography of Nautilus pompilius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dunstan

    Full Text Available The low fecundity, late maturity, long gestation and long life span of Nautilus suggest that this species is vulnerable to over-exploitation. Demand from the ornamental shell trade has contributed to their rapid decline in localized populations. More data from wild populations are needed to design management plans which ensure Nautilus persistence. We used a variety of techniques including capture-mark-recapture, baited remote underwater video systems, ultrasonic telemetry and remotely operated vehicles to estimate population size, growth rates, distribution and demographic characteristics of an unexploited Nautilus pompilius population at Osprey Reef (Coral Sea, Australia. We estimated a small and dispersed population of between 844 and 4467 individuals (14.6-77.4 km(-2 dominated by males (83:17 male:female and comprised of few juveniles (<10%.These results provide the first Nautilid population and density estimates which are essential elements for long-term management of populations via sustainable catch models. Results from baited remote underwater video systems provide confidence for their more widespread use to assess efficiently the size and density of exploited and unexploited Nautilus populations worldwide.

  19. A web platform for landuse, climate, demography, hydrology and beach erosion in the Black Sea catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Anthony; Guigoz, Yaniss; Ray, Nicolas; Mancosu, Emanuele; Abbaspour, Karim C.; Rouholahnejad Freund, Elham; Allenbach, Karin; de Bono, Andrea; Fasel, Marc; Gago-Silva, Ana; Bär, Roger; Lacroix, Pierre; Giuliani, Gregory

    2017-07-01

    The Black Sea catchment (BSC) is facing important demographic, climatic and landuse changes that may increase pollution, vulnerability and scarcity of water resources, as well as beach erosion through sea level rise. Limited access to reliable time-series monitoring data from environmental, statistical, and socio-economical sources is a major barrier to policy development and decision-making. To address these issues, a web-based platform was developed to enable discovery and access to key environmental information for the region. This platform covers: landuse, climate, and demographic scenarios; hydrology and related water vulnerability and scarcity; as well as beach erosion. Each data set has been obtained with state-of-the-art modelling tools from available monitoring data using appropriate validation methods. These analyses were conducted using global and regional data sets. The data sets are intended for national to regional assessments, for instance for prioritizing environmental protection projects and investments. Together they form a unique set of information, which lay out future plausible change scenarios for the BSC, both for scientific and policy purposes.

  20. Impacts of changing rainfall regime on the demography of tropical birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Jeffrey D.; Benson, Thomas J.; Stager, Maria; Sly, Nicholas D.; Tarwater, Corey E.

    2016-12-01

    Biodiversity in tropical regions is particularly high and may be highly sensitive to climate change. Unfortunately, a lack of long-term data hampers understanding of how tropical species, especially animals, may react to projected environmental changes. The amount and timing of rainfall is key to the function of tropical ecosystems and, although specific model predictions differ, there is general agreement that rainfall regimes will change over large areas of the tropics. Here, we estimate associations between dry season length (DSL) and the population biology of 20 bird species sampled in central Panama over a 33-year period. Longer dry seasons decreased the population growth rates and viability of nearly one-third of the species sampled. Simulations with modest increases in DSL suggest that consistently longer dry seasons will change the structure of tropical bird communities. Such change may occur even without direct loss of habitat--a finding with fundamental implications for conservation planning. Systematic changes in rainfall regime may threaten some populations and communities of tropical animals even in large tracts of protected habitat. These findings suggest the need for collaboration between climate scientists and conservation biologists to identify areas where rainfall regimes will be able to plausibly maintain wildlife populations.

  1. The demography of words: The global decline in non-numeric fertility preferences, 1993-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Margaret; Bachan, Lauren

    2017-07-01

    This paper examines the decline in non-numeric responses to questions about fertility preferences among women in the developing world. These types of response-such as 'don't know' or 'it's up to God'-have often been interpreted through the lens of fertility transition theory as an indication that reproduction has not yet entered women's 'calculus of conscious choice'. However, this has yet to be investigated cross-nationally and over time. Using 19 years of data from 32 countries, we find that non-numeric fertility preferences decline most substantially in the early stages of a country's fertility transition. Using country-specific and multilevel models, we explore the individual- and contextual-level characteristics associated with women's likelihood of providing a non-numeric response to questions about their fertility preferences. Non-numeric fertility preferences are influenced by a host of social factors, with educational attainment and knowledge of contraception being the most robust and consistent predictors.

  2. A web platform for landuse, climate, demography, hydrology and beach erosion in the Black Sea catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Anthony; Guigoz, Yaniss; Ray, Nicolas; Mancosu, Emanuele; Abbaspour, Karim C; Rouholahnejad Freund, Elham; Allenbach, Karin; De Bono, Andrea; Fasel, Marc; Gago-Silva, Ana; Bär, Roger; Lacroix, Pierre; Giuliani, Gregory

    2017-07-04

    The Black Sea catchment (BSC) is facing important demographic, climatic and landuse changes that may increase pollution, vulnerability and scarcity of water resources, as well as beach erosion through sea level rise. Limited access to reliable time-series monitoring data from environmental, statistical, and socio-economical sources is a major barrier to policy development and decision-making. To address these issues, a web-based platform was developed to enable discovery and access to key environmental information for the region. This platform covers: landuse, climate, and demographic scenarios; hydrology and related water vulnerability and scarcity; as well as beach erosion. Each data set has been obtained with state-of-the-art modelling tools from available monitoring data using appropriate validation methods. These analyses were conducted using global and regional data sets. The data sets are intended for national to regional assessments, for instance for prioritizing environmental protection projects and investments. Together they form a unique set of information, which lay out future plausible change scenarios for the BSC, both for scientific and policy purposes.

  3. Analyses of pig genomes provide insight into porcine demography and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenen, Martien A. M.; Archibald, Alan L.; Uenishi, Hirohide; Tuggle, Christopher K.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Rothschild, Max F.; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Park, Chankyu; Milan, Denis; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Li, Shengting; Larkin, Denis M.; Kim, Heebal; Frantz, Laurent A. F.; Caccamo, Mario; Ahn, Hyeonju; Aken, Bronwen L.; Anselmo, Anna; Anthon, Christian; Auvil, Loretta; Badaoui, Bouabid; Beattie, Craig W.; Bendixen, Christian; Berman, Daniel; Blecha, Frank; Blomberg, Jonas; Bolund, Lars; Bosse, Mirte; Botti, Sara; Bujie, Zhan; Bystrom, Megan; Capitanu, Boris; Silva, Denise Carvalho; Chardon, Patrick; Chen, Celine; Cheng, Ryan; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Chow, William; Clark, Richard C.; Clee, Christopher; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Dawson, Harry D.; Dehais, Patrice; De Sapio, Fioravante; Dibbits, Bert; Drou, Nizar; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Eversole, Kellye; Fadista, João; Fairley, Susan; Faraut, Thomas; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Fowler, Katie E.; Fredholm, Merete; Fritz, Eric; Gilbert, James G. R.; Giuffra, Elisabetta; Gorodkin, Jan; Griffin, Darren K.; Harrow, Jennifer L.; Hayward, Alexander; Howe, Kerstin; Hu, Zhi-Liang; Humphray, Sean J.; Hunt, Toby; Hornshøj, Henrik; Jeon, Jin-Tae; Jern, Patric; Jones, Matthew; Jurka, Jerzy; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Kim, Jaebum; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Tae-Hun; Larson, Greger; Lee, Kyooyeol; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Leggett, Richard; Lewin, Harris A.; Li, Yingrui; Liu, Wansheng; Loveland, Jane E.; Lu, Yao; Lunney, Joan K.; Ma, Jian; Madsen, Ole; Mann, Katherine; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Morozumi, Takeya; Murtaugh, Michael P.; Narayan, Jitendra; Nguyen, Dinh Truong; Ni, Peixiang; Oh, Song-Jung; Onteru, Suneel; Panitz, Frank; Park, Eung-Woo; Park, Hong-Seog; Pascal, Geraldine; Paudel, Yogesh; Perez-Enciso, Miguel; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Reecy, James M.; Zas, Sandra Rodriguez; Rohrer, Gary A.; Rund, Lauretta; Sang, Yongming; Schachtschneider, Kyle; Schraiber, Joshua G.; Schwartz, John; Scobie, Linda; Scott, Carol; Searle, Stephen; Servin, Bertrand; Southey, Bruce R.; Sperber, Goran; Stadler, Peter; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Tafer, Hakim; Thomsen, Bo; Wali, Rashmi; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; White, Simon; Xu, Xun; Yerle, Martine; Zhang, Guojie; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Shuhong; Rogers, Jane; Churcher, Carol; Schook, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    For 10,000 years pigs and humans have shared a close and complex relationship. From domestication to modern breeding practices, humans have shaped the genomes of domestic pigs. Here we present the assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic Duroc pig (Sus scrofa) and a comparison with the genomes of wild and domestic pigs from Europe and Asia. Wild pigs emerged in South East Asia and subsequently spread across Eurasia. Our results reveal a deep phylogenetic split between European and Asian wild boars ~1 million years ago, and a selective sweep analysis indicates selection on genes involved in RNA processing and regulation. Genes associated with immune response and olfaction exhibit fast evolution. Pigs have the largest repertoire of functional olfactory receptor genes, reflecting the importance of smell in this scavenging animal. The pig genome sequence provides an important resource for further improvements of this important livestock species, and our identification of many putative disease-causing variants extends the potential of the pig as a biomedical model. PMID:23151582

  4. Effects of the crisis in the resin sector on the demography of rural municipalities in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno Perez, S.; Garcia Robredo, F.; Ayuga Tellez, E.; Fullana Belda, C.

    2013-05-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this work is to test the positive effect of a substantially developed resin sector on rural demographic evolution. This work shows how in the period between 1970 and 2010 the demographic decline in the interior regions of Spain was more pronounced in areas characterized by the importance of resin-producing forest stands compared to other nearby rural municipalities where this natural resource is not present. Area of study: The study area consists of a set of rural municipalities in Central Spain, both resin and non-resin producing, in the provinces of Segovia, Avila, Valladolid, Burgos, Soria, Cuenca and Guadalajara. Material and methods: The relationship between resin production and population in resin and non-resin producing municipalities was modeled by means of linear regression analysis. Main results: Generally speaking, between 1950 and 1970 the production of resin halted demographic decline in the regions where this activity was substantially developed. However, when the resin sector entered into crisis in the 1970s, and the economic repercussions of this activity gradually ceased to be felt, the demographic decline in the regions which had been involved in resin production was much more acute than in other non-resin-producing rural areas. Research highlights: This work shows the relationship between resin extraction activity and population evolution in rural municipalities. Sustainable resin exploitation can contribute to the maintenance and development of rural communities, and should be used as a tool for generating employment in rural areas. (Author) 37 refs.

  5. DEMOGRAPHY OF ALPINE SHORT-LIVED PLANTS, LONGEVITY AND ONTOGENY STAGE DURATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Kazantseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim - to evaluate lifespan (full cycle and ontogeny stage durations of nine alpine short-lived North- West Caucasus plants.Methods. For calculation we used a new method which was developed and suggested earlier by us. This method is based on a discrete ontogeny description and on the probability theory and random processes. The data on the monitoring of the marked individuals were collected during six years.Results. We found out that the lifespan of Anthyllis vulneraria is 2.6±0.3 years (hereinafter “±” is Standard error, Draba hispida – 4.5±0.3, Murbeckiella huetii – 4.6±1.1, Carum meifolium – 7.8±1.4, Eritrichium caucasicum – 9.1±1.4, Trifolium badium – 10.3±2.6, Sedum tenellum – 11±2.05, Androsace albana – 12.1±2.5, Minuartia recurva – 22.9±4.5. Also we demonstrated the matrix population models for studied plants, which show the probability of transition of individuals from one ontogeny stage to another in time interval (in our experiment – 1 year.Conclusion. Mortality of seedlings and juvenile plants, except Murbeckiella huetii, is around and more than 50%. Two years is the minimal amount of time that is necessary for full cycle of short-lived alpine plants, as it was shown for Anthyllis vulneraria, Murbeckiella huetii и Trifolium badium. A 3-12 years lifespan was calculated for other studied species. Persistence of Eritrichium caucasicum and Androsace albana populations provided by resistance of adult vegetative plants.

  6. Living on the edge: demography of the slender-billed gull in the Western Mediterranean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sanz-Aguilar

    Full Text Available Small and peripheral populations are typically vulnerable to local extinction processes but important for the metapopulation dynamics of species. The Slender-billed gull (Chroicocephalus genei is a long-lived species breeding in unstable ephemeral coastal habitats. Their Western Mediterranean populations are relatively small and represent the edge of their global geographical distribution. At a local scale, using long-term data (14 years on annual breeding success and capture-resights of marked individuals, we estimated and compared the vital rates and evaluated the connectivity of two Spanish populations (Ebro Delta and Doñana varying in their local environmental conditions. At a metapopulation scale, we analyzed 22 years of data on breeding numbers to predict their future prospects by means of population demographic models. Local survival and breeding success of gulls from the Ebro Delta was lower than those from Doñana, which is likely the result of higher permanent emigration and/or winter mortality in the former. Gulls from the Ebro Delta wintered mostly in Mediterranean areas whereas those from Doñana did so in Atlantic coasts, where food availability is higher. Whereas adult local survival was constant, juvenile local survival showed temporal parallel variations between colonies, probably related to natal dispersal to other breeding colonies. Our results suggested that dispersal was higher at the Ebro Delta and gulls emigrating from their natal colonies settled preferentially in close patches. We found large fluctuations in breeding numbers among local populations probably related to the fact that the Slender-billed gull is a species adapted to unstable and unpredictable habitats with high abilities to disperse between suitable patches depending on environmental stochastic conditions during breeding.

  7. Demography, range use, and behavior in black lemurs (Eulemur macaco macaco) at Ampasikely, northwest Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayart, Françoise; Simmen, Bruno

    2005-11-01

    We studied a black lemur population over a 2-year period (1992-1993) and 8 years later (2000) in a 50-ha secondary forest in northwest Madagascar. All of the animals were marked to investigate population dynamics and seasonal variation in ranging and behavior, and new data on black lemurs were obtained. Our data on demographic characteristics were expanded to include other forest sites and contrasted with those collected in other Eulemur macaco macaco field studies, in relation to human activity and the presence of introduced and cultivated plant species. Density is affected by deforestation and hunting. Group size and home range depend on the composition of the forest and probably food patches. Sex ratio at birth varies according to the number of females per group, a result that fits the local resource competition model. Groups are multimale-multifemale, and adult females form the core of the groups. Reproductive parameters indicate sharply defined seasonal breeding, a high female reproductive rate, and birth synchrony. Changes in group composition reveal male and female juvenile dispersal, male transfer between groups at the time of mating, and adult female transfer and group fission when groups exceed a critical size. At mating and birth, intergroup agonistic encounters occurred at home-range boundaries, and larger groups were dominant over smaller groups. Patterns of intragroup interactions suggest that males compete for access to groups of females during the mating season, and that females may compete for food resources during the birth season. Our study also reports female social dominance and lack of sexual weight dimorphism in this species.

  8. Effects of an introduced pathogen and fire exclusion on the demography of sugar pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Keifer, MaryBeth; Keeley, Jon E.

    2004-01-01

    An introduced pathogen, white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), has caused declines in five-needled pines throughout North America. Simultaneously, fire exclusion has resulted in dense stands in many forest types, which may create additional stress for these generally shade-intolerant pines. Fire exclusion also allows fuels to accumulate, and it is unclear how affected populations will respond to the reintroduction of fire. Although white pine blister rust and fire exclusion are widely recognized threats, long-term demographic data that document the effects of these stressors are rare. We present population trends from 2168 individuals over 5–15 years for an affected species, sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana), at several burned and unburned sites in the Sierra Nevada of California. Size-based matrix models indicate that most unburned populations have negative growth rates (λ range: 0.82–1.04). The growth rate of most populations was, however, indistinguishable from replacement levels (λ = 1.0), implying that, if populations are indeed declining, the progression of any such decline is slow, and longer observations are needed to clearly determine population trends. We found significant differences among population growth rates, primarily due to variation in recruitment rates. Deaths associated with blister rust and stress (i.e., resource competition) were common, suggesting significant roles for both blister rust and fire exclusion in determining population trajectories. Data from 15 prescribed fires showed that the immediate effect of burning was the death of many small trees, with the frequency of mortality returning to pre-fire levels within five years. In spite of a poor prognosis for sugar pine, our results suggest that we have time to apply and refine management strategies to protect this species.

  9. Minimum area requirements for an at-risk butterfly based on movement and demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Leone M; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-02-01

    Determining the minimum area required to sustain populations has a long history in theoretical and conservation biology. Correlative approaches are often used to estimate minimum area requirements (MARs) based on relationships between area and the population size required for persistence or between species' traits and distribution patterns across landscapes. Mechanistic approaches to estimating MAR facilitate prediction across space and time but are few. We used a mechanistic MAR model to determine the critical minimum patch size (CMP) for the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas phaeton), a locally abundant species in decline along its southern range, and sister to several federally listed species. Our CMP is based on principles of diffusion, where individuals in smaller patches encounter edges and leave with higher probability than those in larger patches, potentially before reproducing. We estimated a CMP for the Baltimore checkerspot of 0.7-1.5 ha, in accordance with trait-based MAR estimates. The diffusion rate on which we based this CMP was broadly similar when estimated at the landscape scale (comparing flight path vs. capture-mark-recapture data), and the estimated population growth rate was consistent with observed site trends. Our mechanistic approach to estimating MAR is appropriate for species whose movement follows a correlated random walk and may be useful where landscape-scale distributions are difficult to assess, but demographic and movement data are obtainable from a single site or the literature. Just as simple estimates of lambda are often used to assess population viability, the principles of diffusion and CMP could provide a starting place for estimating MAR for conservation.

  10. The effect of migration on ages at vital events: a critique of family reconstitution in historical demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasakoff, A B; Adams, J W

    1995-09-01

    study focuses on questioning the analytical units in historical demography and suggests closer study of migrants and the disaggregation of ages at vital events in the study of such complex processes as modernization.

  11. Demography of domestic dogs in rural and urban areas of the Coquimbo region of Chile and implications for disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Jamett, G; Cleaveland, S; Cunningham, A A; Bronsvoort, B M Dec

    2010-05-01

    A cross-sectional household questionnaire survey was conducted along two transects (80 and 45km long) from Coquimbo and Ovalle cities to the Fray Jorge National Park (FJNP) in the Coquimbo region of Chile in 2005-2007 to investigate the demography of dogs in the context of a study of canine infectious diseases. Data were collected on the number of dogs per household, fecundity, mortality, and sex and age distribution. The results from 1021 households indicated that dog ownership was common, with a higher proportion of households owning dogs in rural areas (89%), than in towns (63%) or cities (49%). Dog density ranged from 1380+/-183 to 1509+/-972 dogs km(-2) in cities, from 119+/-18 to 1544+/-172 dogs km(-2) in towns, and from 1.0+/-0.4 to 15.9+/-0.4 dogs km(-2) in rural sites. The dog population was estimated to be growing at 20% in cities, 19% in towns and 9% in rural areas. The human:dog ratio ranged from 5.2 to 6.2 in cities, from 2.3 to 5.3 in towns, and from 1.1 to 2.1 in rural areas. A high percentage of owned dogs was always allowed to roam freely in the different areas (27%, 50% and 67% in cities, towns and rural areas, respectively). Observations of free-roaming dogs of unknown owner were reported from a greater proportion of respondents in cities (74%), followed by towns (51%) and finally by rural areas (21%). Overall only 3% of dogs had been castrated. In addition, only 29% of dogs were reported to have been vaccinated against canine distemper virus (CDV) and 30% against canine parvovirus (CPV). The higher population size and density, higher growth rate and a higher turnover of domestic dogs in urban than in rural areas and the poorly supervised and inadequately vaccinated dog populations in urban areas suggest that urban areas are more likely to provide suitable conditions for dogs to acts as reservoirs of pathogenic infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Size and demography pattern of the domestic dog population in Bhutan: Implications for dog population management and disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinzin, Karma; Tenzin, Tenzin; Robertson, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the demography of domestic dogs is essential to plan the dog population management and rabies control program. In this study, we estimated the owned and stray dog population and the proportion of owned dogs that are free-roaming in Bhutan. For this, a cross-sectional household surveys were conducted in six districts (both urban and rural areas) and two border towns in southern Bhutan. The population estimation was done by extrapolation of the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person, whilst mark-resight survey was conducted to estimate the proportion of owned dogs that were free-roaming. A total of 1,301 (rural:585; urban:716) respondents (one per household) were interviewed of which 173 households (24.4%) in urban areas owned 237 dogs whilst 238 households (40.8%) in rural areas owned 353 dogs. The mean number of dogs per dog owning household was estimated to be 1.44 (urban:1.37 dogs; rural:1.48 dogs) and dogs per household was estimated to be 0.45 (urban:0.33; rural:0.60). The dog: human ratio was 1:16.30 (0.06 dogs per person) in urban areas and 1:8.43 (0.12 dogs per person) in rural areas. The total owned dog population based on the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person were estimated to be 65,312 and 71,245 in the country, respectively. The male: female ratio of the owned dog was 1.31:1 in urban areas and 2.05:1 in rural areas. Majority of the dogs were local non-descript breeds in both urban (60.8%) and rural (78%) areas, and the most common source was acquisition from friends or family (44.7%). The stray dog population in Bhutan was estimated to be 48,379 (urban:22,772; rural:25,607). Of the total estimated owned dog population in the two border towns, the proportion that were found free-roaming was estimated to be 31%. The different dog population estimation methods were compared and discussed in this paper. This study generated baseline data on the demographic patterns of the owned and stray dogs in Bhutan which

  13. Reproductive efficiency and herd demography of Nguni cattle in village-owned and group-owned enterprises under low-input communal production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Obert; Muchenje, Voster; Dzama, Kennedy

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the herd demography and reproductive efficiency of the Nguni cattle in village-owned and group-owned enterprises under low-input communal production systems. Data on husbandry practices, reason of cattle entry/exist, herd structure, bulling rates, breeding females, age at first calving and calving interval were obtained from 22 village-owned and 19 group-owned enterprises in a cross-sectional survey of an ecologically controlled low-input cattle production system. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests of association were computed on enterprise ownership patterns, husbandry practices and herd demography. An AN(C)OVA was used to determine significant factors affecting herd structure, mortality, age at first calving and calving interval in the enterprises. Village-owned enterprises had higher (p 0.05). Significant differences were observed on the calving interval (p bulling rate was higher in village-owned enterprises, while the proportion of breeding females was higher in group-owned enterprises. Farmers with a college education had Nguni animals with the shortest calving interval. It was concluded that group-owned enterprises had significantly better calving intervals, mortality rates and overall herd structure than village-owned enterprises.

  14. Prestack migration velocity analysis based on simplifi ed two-parameter moveout equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Hai-Feng; Li Xiang-Yang; Qian Zhong-Ping; Song Jian-Jun; Zhao Gui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stacking velocityVC2, vertical velocity ratioγ0, effective velocity ratioγef, and anisotropic parameterχef are correlated in the PS-converted-wave (PS-wave) anisotropic prestack Kirchhoff time migration (PKTM) velocity model and are thus difficult to independently determine. We extended the simplified two-parameter (stacking velocity VC2 and anisotropic parameterkef) moveout equation from stacking velocity analysis to PKTM velocity model updating and formed a new four-parameter (stacking velocityVC2, vertical velocity ratioγ0, effective velocity ratioγef, and anisotropic parameterkef) PS-wave anisotropic PKTM velocity model updating and processfl ow based on the simplifi ed two-parameter moveout equation. In the proposed method, first, the PS-wave two-parameter stacking velocity is analyzed to obtain the anisotropic PKTM initial velocity and anisotropic parameters; then, the velocity and anisotropic parameters are corrected by analyzing the residual moveout on common imaging point gathers after prestack time migration. The vertical velocity ratioγ0 of the prestack time migration velocity model is obtained with an appropriate method utilizing the P- and PS-wave stacked sections after level calibration. The initial effective velocity ratioγef is calculated using the Thomsen (1999) equation in combination with the P-wave velocity analysis; ultimately, the final velocity model of the effective velocity ratioγef is obtained by percentage scanning migration. This method simplifi es the PS-wave parameter estimation in high-quality imaging, reduces the uncertainty of multiparameter estimations, and obtains good imaging results in practice.

  15. Review: Abdul Raufu Mustapha (ed., Sects & Social Disorder: Muslim Identities & Conflict in Northern Nigeria (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Bergstresser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the edited volume:Abdul Raufu Mustapha (ed., Sects & Social Disorder: Muslim Identities & Conflict in Northern Nigeria, Martlesham: James Currey, 2014, ISBN 9781847011077, 256 pages

  16. Review: Funston, John (ed. (2009, Divided Over Thaksin: Thailand’s Coup and Problematic Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Chambers

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Review of the edited volume: Funston, John (ed. (2009, Divided Over Thaksin: Thailand’s Coup and Problematic Transition, Chiangmai: Silkworm Books, Singapore: ISEAS. ISBN 978-981-230-961-7, 203 pages.

  17. Hispaania võib oma väed Iraagist ära tuua / Erkki Bahovski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bahovski, Erkki, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    Hispaania parlamendivalimised võitnud sotsialistliku partei liider, arvatav uus peaminister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero lubas Hispaania väed Iraagist ära tuua. Diagrammid: Hispaania valimistulemused

  18. Modified Adomian decomposition method for fracture of laminated uni-directional composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Raghu Prasad; P V Ramana

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the well-known Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM) is modified to solve the fracture laminated multi-directional problems. The results are compared with the existing analytical/exact or experimental method. The already known existing ADM is modified to improve the accuracy and convergence. Thus, the modified method is named as Modified Adomian Decomposition Method (MADM). The results from MADM are found to converge very quickly, simple to apply for fracture(singularity) problems and are more accurate compared to experimental and analytical methods. MADM is quite efficient and is practically well-suited for use in these problems. Several examples are given to check the reliability of the present method. In the present paper, the principle of the decomposition method is described, and its advantages form the analyses of fracture of laminated uni-directional composites.

  19. Hispaania võib oma väed Iraagist ära tuua / Erkki Bahovski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bahovski, Erkki, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    Hispaania parlamendivalimised võitnud sotsialistliku partei liider, arvatav uus peaminister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero lubas Hispaania väed Iraagist ära tuua. Diagrammid: Hispaania valimistulemused

  20. Jean Libis, Fabio Ferreira, Catherine Gublin, Sarah Mezaguer (eds.), Les Lectures de Gaston Bachelard. Index bibliographique

    OpenAIRE

    Aurosa Alison

    2012-01-01

    Jean Libis, Fabio Ferreira, Catherine Gublin, Sarah Mezaguer (eds.), Les Lectures de Gaston Bachelard. Index bibliographique (Paris, Presse Universitaire de Franche-Comté, 2011 ISBN: 978-2-84867-392) di     Aurosa Alison

  1. Voyager, a journey into the unknown - an interview with Ed Stone (Caltech), Voyager project scientist

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions; Piotr Traczyk

    2012-01-01

    Voyager, a journey into the unknown - an interview with Ed Stone (Caltech), Voyager project scientist, interviewed on the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Cosmic Rays conference, Spaceparts, at CERN in November 2012.

  2. Ekspert : "Väed Afganistanist välja!" / Aadu Hiietamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hiietamm, Aadu, 1954-

    2007-01-01

    Saksa kriisiekspert Peter Scholl-Latour on seisukohal, et välisväed peavad Afganistanist lahkuma, sest seni pole keegi suutnud seal sõda võita. P. Scholl-Latouri artiklist poliitikaajakirjas Cicero

  3. Jean Libis, Fabio Ferreira, Catherine Gublin, Sarah Mezaguer (eds., Les Lectures de Gaston Bachelard. Index bibliographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurosa Alison

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Jean Libis, Fabio Ferreira, Catherine Gublin, Sarah Mezaguer (eds., Les Lectures de Gaston Bachelard. Index bibliographique (Paris, Presse Universitaire de Franche-Comté, 2011 ISBN: 978-2-84867-392 di  Aurosa Alison

  4. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V García

    Full Text Available An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1. In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  5. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana V; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E

    2010-07-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  6. Abstracts and program proceedings of the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercher, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    This document contains information about the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter. The topics discussed include: extinction risk assessment modelling, ecological risk analysis of uranium mining, impacts of pesticides, demography, habitats, atmospheric deposition, and climate change.

  7. 2003 annual results of EdF group; Resultats annuels 2003 du groupe EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    The Electricite de France (EdF) group Board of Directors, meeting on March 11, 2004, under the Chairmanship of Francois Roussely, reviewed the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended 12/31/2003. This document presents the consolidated results of EdF group for 2003: consolidated financial statements, highlights of the year, focus on 2003 events, commercial results, EDF in Europe and worldwide, EDF France highlights, key figures. (J.S.)

  8. Timeliness of interfacility transfer for ED patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael J; Kripalani, Sunil; Storrow, Alan B; Liu, Dandan; Speroff, Theodore; Matheny, Michael; Thomassee, Eric J; Vogus, Timothy J; Munoz, Daniel; Scott, Carol; Fredi, Joseph L; Dittus, Robert S

    2015-03-01

    Most US hospitals lack primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capabilities to treat patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) necessitating transfer to PCI-capable centers. Transferred patients rarely meet the 120-minute benchmark for timely reperfusion, and referring emergency departments (EDs) are a major source of preventable delays. We sought to use more granular data at transferring EDs to describe the variability in length of stay at referring EDs. We retrospectively analyzed a secondary data set used for quality improvement for patients with STEMI transferred to a single PCI center between 2008 and 2012. We conducted a descriptive analysis of the total time spent at each referring ED (door-in-door-out [DIDO] interval), periods that comprised DIDO (door to electrocardiogram [EKG], EKG-to-PCI activation, and PCI activation to exit), and the relationship of each period with overall time to reperfusion (medical contact-to-balloon [MCTB] interval). We identified 41 EDs that transferred 620 patients between 2008 and 2012. Median MCTB was 135 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 114,172). Median overall ED DIDO was 74 minutes (IQR 56,103) and was composed of door to EKG, 5 minutes (IQR 2,11); EKG-to-PCI activation, 18 minutes (IQR 7,37); and PCI activation to exit, 44 minutes (IQR 34,56). Door-in door-out accounted for the largest proportion (60%) of overall MCTB and had the largest variability (coefficient of variability, 1.37) of these intervals. In this cohort of transferring EDs, we found high variability and substantial delays after EKG performance for patients with STEMI. Factors influencing ED decision making and transportation coordination after PCI activation are a potential target for intervention to improve the timeliness of reperfusion in patients with STEMI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of SEM/EDS method in mineralogical analysis of ordinary chondritic meteorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breda Mirtič

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersiveX-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS for determination of mineral phases according to their stoichiometry and assessment of mineral composition of ordinary chondritic meteorite. For the purposes of this study, H3 type ordinary chondritic meteorite Abbott was selected. SEM/EDS allows identification and characterisation of mineralphases, whose size is below the resolution of an optical microscope. Mineral phases in chondrules and interstitial matrix were located in backscattered electron (BSE mode and were assessed from atomic proportions of constituent elements, obtained by the EDS analysis. SEM/EDS analyses of mineral phases showed that Abbott meteorite is characterised by Fe-rich (Fe, Ni-alloy kamacite, Fe-sulphide troilite or pyrrhotite, chromite, Mg-rich olivine, orthopyroxene bronzite or hypersthene, clinopyroxene Al-diopside, acid plagioclase oligoclase, accessory mineral chlorapatite and secondary minerals Fe-hydroxides (goethite or lepidocrocite. Results of semi-quantitative analyses confirmed that most of analysed mineralphases conform well to stoichiometric minerals with minor deviations of oxygen from stoichiometric proportions. Comparison between mineral phases in chondrules and interstitial matrix was also performed, however it showed no significant differences in elemental composition.Differences in chemical composition between minerals in interstitial matrix and chondrules are sometimes too small to be discernedby the SEM/EDS, therefore knowledge of SEM/EDS capabilities is important for correct interpretation of chondrite formation.

  10. Solving the worldwide emergency department crowding problem - what can we learn from an Israeli ED?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Bernstein, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    ED crowding is a prevalent and important issue facing hospitals in Israel and around the world, including North and South America, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa. ED crowding is associated with poorer quality of care and poorer health outcomes, along with extended waits for care. Crowding is caused by a periodic mismatch between the supply of ED and hospital resources and the demand for patient care. In a recent article in the Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, Bashkin et al. present an Ishikawa diagram describing several factors related to longer length of stay (LOS), and higher levels of ED crowding, including management, process, environmental, human factors, and resource issues. Several solutions exist to reduce ED crowding, which involve addressing several of the issues identified by Bashkin et al. This includes reducing the demand for and variation in care, and better matching the supply of resources to demands in care in real time. However, what is needed to reduce crowding is an institutional imperative from senior leadership, implemented by engaged ED and hospital leadership with multi-disciplinary cross-unit collaboration, sufficient resources to implement effective interventions, access to data, and a sustained commitment over time. This may move the culture of a hospital to facilitate improved flow within and across units and ultimately improve quality and safety over the long-term.

  11. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  12. Usefulness of ED036 kit for measuring serum PIVKA-II levels in small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuromatsu, R; Tanaka, M; Shimauchi, Y; Shimada, M; Tanikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokoo, T

    1997-08-01

    As a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), serum protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has high specificity, yet its sensitivity is relatively low, marking it less suitable to serve as an adjunct in the diagnosis of small HCC. Recently, the ED036 kit (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan), whose detection limit is approximately ten times superior to that of a conventional kit (Eitest MONOP II, Eisai) has been developed. In this study, serum PIVKA-II levels in serum samples from 83 patients with benign chronic liver diseases (CLD) and 129 patients with HCC were measured with those two kits. With the ED036 kit, the cut-off value was set at 40 mAU/ml. For PIVKA-II measured with the ED036 kit, sensitivity was 45.0%, specificity 92.8%, and accuracy 63.7%, when we discriminated patients with HCC from those with CLD without HCC. While maintaining a high specificity, of 92.8%, the ED036 kit showed a significantly higher sensitivity than the conventional kit (45.0% versus 27.9%; P PIVKA-II with the ED036 kit was significantly greater than the rate with the conventional kit (21.4% versus 9.5%; P < 0.005). Thus, the ED036 kit was thought to be more useful than the conventional kit as a tumor marker for small HCC.

  13. Arabidopsis EDS1 connects pathogen effector recognition to cell compartment-specific immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Katharina; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Tasset, Céline; Pouzet, Cécile; Deslandes, Laurent; Parker, Jane E

    2011-12-01

    Pathogen effectors are intercepted by plant intracellular nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors. However, processes linking receptor activation to downstream defenses remain obscure. Nucleo-cytoplasmic basal resistance regulator EDS1 (ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1) is indispensible for immunity mediated by TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor)-NB-LRR receptors. We show that Arabidopsis EDS1 molecularly connects TIR-NB-LRR disease resistance protein RPS4 recognition of bacterial effector AvrRps4 to defense pathways. RPS4-EDS1 and AvrRps4-EDS1 complexes are detected inside nuclei of living tobacco cells after transient coexpression and in Arabidopsis soluble leaf extracts after resistance activation. Forced AvrRps4 localization to the host cytoplasm or nucleus reveals cell compartment-specific RPS4-EDS1 defense branches. Although nuclear processes restrict bacterial growth, programmed cell death and transcriptional resistance reinforcement require nucleo-cytoplasmic coordination. Thus, EDS1 behaves as an effector target and activated TIR-NB-LRR signal transducer for defenses across cell compartments.

  14. Extensive FE-SEM/EDS, HR-TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS studies of micron- to nano-particles in anthracite fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Joana [Centro de Geologia, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); DaBoit, Kátia [Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development, IPADHC, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Flores, Deolinda [Centro de Geologia, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Geociências, Ambiente e Ordenamento do Território, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Kronbauer, Marcio A. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Silva, Luis F.O., E-mail: felipeqma@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Catarinense Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development, IPADHC, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil)

    2013-05-01

    The generation of anthropogenic carbonaceous matter and mixed crystalline/amorphous mineral ultrafine/nano-particles in the 1 to 100 nm size range by worldwide coal power plants represents serious environmental problems due to their potential hazards. Coal fly ash (CFA) that resulted from anthracite combustion in a Portuguese thermal power plant was studied in this work. The physico-chemical characterization of ultrafine/nano-particles present in the CFA samples and their interaction with environment are the aim of this study. The methodologies applied for this work were field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (HR-TEM/EDS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Some hazardous volatile elements, C, N, S and Hg contents were also determined in the studied samples. Generally, the CFA samples comprise carbonaceous, glassy and metallic solid spheres with some containing mixed amorphous/crystalline phases. The EDS analysis coupled with the FE-SEM and HR-TEM observations of the fly ash particles with 100 to 0.1 nm demonstrates that these materials contain a small but significant proportion of encapsulated HVEs. In addition, the presence of abundant multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amorphous carbon particles, both containing hazardous volatile elements (HVEs), was also evidenced by the FE-SEM/EDS and HR-TEM/EDS analysis. A wide range of organic and inorganic compounds was determined by chemical maps obtained in ToF-SIMS analysis. - Highlights: ► We examine changes in the level of ultrafine and nanoparticles of coal mining. ► Increasing geochemical information will increase human health information in this area. ► Electron bean and Tof-SIMS increase area information.

  15. A Comparative Study of Different Amorphous and Paracrystalline Silica by NMR and SEM/EDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yuan; WANG Baomin; ZHANG Tingting

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to research the structure models of amorphous materials. Five amorphous and paracrystalline samples (natural or artiifcial) were investigated via29Si/27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS). The results of NMR showed the resonances of different specimens:-93.2 ppm,-101.8 ppm,-111.8 ppm for natural pozzolana opal shale (POS). These peaks were assigned to the Q2(2OH), Q3(OH)/Q4(1Al) and Q4 respectively. The results of27Al MAS NMR indicated that Al substituted for Si site in tetrahedral existing in the POS, while the Al/Si atomic ratio in opal was low (around 0.04). For the alkali-silicate-hydrate gel, there were at least three resolved signals assigned to Q0 and Q1, respectively. For the fused silica glass powder, there were the primary signals centered about at the range from-107 to-137 ppm, which were assigned to Q4 units. In addition, the peaks at around-98 and-108 ppm were corresponding to Q3(1OH) and Q4 units existing in aerogel silica structure.

  16. Cosmological constant in the Bianchi type-I-modified Brans–Dicke cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Azad; J N Islam

    2003-01-01

    In 1961, Brans and Dicke [1] provided an interesting alternative to general relativity based on Mach’s principle. To understand the reasons leading to their field equations, we first consider homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models in the Brans–Dicke theory. Accordingly we start with the Robertson–Walker line element and the energy tensor of a perfect fluid. The scalar field is now a function of the cosmic time only. Then we consider spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-I-cosmological solutions of modified Brans–Dicke theory containing barotropic fluid. These have been obtained by imposing a condition on the cosmological parameter (). Again we try to focus the meaning of this cosmological term and to relate it to the time coordinate which gives us a collapse singularity or the initial singularity. On the other hand, our solution is a generalization of the solution found by Singh and Singh [2]. As far as we are aware, such solution has not been given earlier.

  17. Combining dendrochronology and matrix modelling in demographic studies: An evaluation for Juniperus procera in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couralet, C.; Sass, U.G.W.; Sterck, F.J.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tree demography was analysed by applying dendrochronological techniques and matrix modelling on a static data set of Juniperus procera populations of Ethiopian dry highland forests. Six permanent sample plots were established for an inventory of diameters and 11 stem discs were collected for

  18. Structure of a simulation model for energy-related regional assessment. [Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraley, D.W.; Swift, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of a dynamic simulation model designed to analyze the effects of potential future energy policies and actions as a multistate, regional level is described. The simulation structure includes the interacting effects of energy development, energy- and macro-economics, and demography on land use, water resources, air quality, ecosystems, and society.

  19. Verifica empirica ed analisi critica del modello mistura bivariata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aride Mazzali

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Bivariate mixture models, introduced by Tauchen-Pitts, try to esplain the relationship between return volatility and trading volume in financial markets, by stochastic changes in a single latent variable, representing the number of information arrivals. In this article, dynamic bivariate mixture models that allow for autocorrelation in the latent variable are represented by nonlinear state space systems, nonlinearity being due to the measurement equation. The parametres are estimated by simulated maximum likelihood and the latent variable by simulated non linear filter, both being based on the same rejection sampling algorithm. The results, based on italian daily stock market data, reveal that dynamic bivariate mixture models neither can explain the autocorrelation, nor can account for the persistence in return variance.

  20. Cell type specific applicability of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) for dynamic proliferation assessment in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Clarke, Scott T; Hill, Dani; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Bradford, Jolene A; Brockhoff, Gero

    2009-06-01

    Using the nucleoside analogue EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) for thymidine substitution instead of BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) in cell proliferation assays has recently been proposed. However, the effect of EdU on cell viability, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle progression and consequently its usability for dynamic cell proliferation analysis in vitro has not been explored. We compared the effect of EdU and BrdU incorporation into SK-BR-3 and BT474 breast cancer cells and the impact on cell cycle kinetics, cell viability, and DNA damage. We found that EdU can be used not only for pulse but also for continuous cell labeling and henceforth in high resolution EdU/Hoechst quenching assays. BrdU and EdU proliferation assays based on click chemistry revealed comparable results. However, cell viability of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells was highly affected by long term exposure to EdU. Both SK-BR-3 as well as BT474 cells show cell cycle arrests upon long term EdU treatment whereas only SK-BR-3 cells were driven into necrotic cell death by long term exposure to EdU. In contrast BT474 cells appeared essentially unharmed by EdU treatment in terms of viability. Consequently using EdU enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of proliferating cells and facilitates even continuous cell cycle assessment. Nevertheless, potential cellular susceptibility needs to be individually evaluated.

  1. The cost-effectiveness analysis of video capsule endoscopy compared to other strategies to manage acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrew C; Ward, Michael J; Gralnek, Ian M; Pines, Jesse M

    2014-08-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a common presentation in hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). A novel diagnostic approach is to use video capsule endoscopy to directly visualize the upper GI tract and identify bleeding. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the relative costs and benefits of video capsule endoscopy compared to other strategies in low- to moderate-risk ED patients with acute upper GI hemorrhage. We constructed a model using standard decision analysis software to examine the cost-effectiveness of 4 available strategies for a base-case patient who presents to the ED with either mild- or moderate-risk scenarios (by Glasgow-Blatchford Score) for requiring invasive hemostatic intervention (ie, endoscopic, surgical, etc) The 4 available diagnostic strategies were (1) direct imaging with video capsule endoscopy performed in the ED; (2) risk stratification using the Glasgow-Blatchford score; (3) nasogastric tube placement; and, finally, (4) an admit-all strategy. In the low-risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy was the preferred strategy (cost $5691, 14.69 quality-adjusted life years [QALYs]) and was more cost-effective than the remaining strategies including nasogastric tube strategy (cost $8159, 14.69 QALYs), risk stratification strategy (cost $10,695, 14.69 QALYs), and admit-all strategy (cost $22,766, 14.68 QALYs). In the moderate-risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy continued to be the preferred strategy (cost $9190, 14.56 QALYs) compared to nasogastric tube (cost $9487, 14.58 QALYs, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio $15,891) and more cost effective than admit-all strategy (cost, $22,584, 14.54 QALYs.) Video capsule endoscopy may be cost-effective for low- and moderate-risk patients presenting to the ED with acute upper GI hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computational prediction and experimental characterization of a "size switch type repacking" during the evolution of dengue envelope protein domain III (ED3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Montasir; Islam, Monirul M; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Toh, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Dengue viruses (DEN) are classified into four serotypes (DEN1-DEN4) exhibiting high sequence and structural similarities, and infections by multiple serotypes can lead to the deadly dengue hemorrhagic fever. Here, we aim at characterizing the thermodynamic stability of DEN envelope protein domain III (ED3) during its evolution, and we report a structural analysis of DEN4wt ED3 combined with a systematic mutational analysis of residues 310 and 387. Molecular modeling based on our DEN3 and DEN4 ED3 structures indicated that the side-chains of residues 310/387, which are Val(310)/Ile(387) and Met(310)/Leu(387) in DEN3wt and DEN4wt, respectively, could be structurally compensated, and that a "size switch type repacking" might have occurred at these sites during the evolution of DEN into its four serotypes. This was experimentally confirmed by a 10°C and 5°C decrease in the thermal stability of, respectively, DEN3 ED3 variants with Met(310)/Ile(387) and Val(310)/Leu(387), whereas the variant with Met(310)/Leu(387), which contains a double mutation, had the same stability as the wild type DEN3. Namely, the Met310Val mutation should have preceded the Leu387Ile mutation in order to maintain the tight internal packing of ED3 and thus its thermodynamic stability. This view was confirmed by a phylogenetic reconstruction indicating that a common DEN ancestor would have Met(310)/Leu(387), and the intermediate node protein, Val(310)/Leu(387), which then mutated to the Val(310)/Ile(387) pair found in the present DEN3. The hypothesis was further confirmed by the observation that all of the present DEN viruses exhibit only stabilizing amino acid pairs at the 310/387 sites.

  3. Demography and Intercontinental Spread of the USA300 Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Philippe; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Villain, Adrien; Barbier, Maxime; Tristan, Anne; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Bes, Michele; Laurent, Frederic; Guillemot, Didier; Wirth, Thierry; Vandenesch, François

    2016-02-16

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized worldwide during the 1990s; in less than a decade, several genetically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes have emerged on every continent. Most notably, in the United States, the sequence type 18-IV (ST8-IV) clone known as USA300 has become highly prevalent, outcompeting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other MRSA strains in both community and hospital settings. CA-MRSA bacteria are much less prevalent in Europe, where the European ST80-IV European CA-MRSA clone, USA300 CA-MRSA strains, and other lineages, such as ST22-IV, coexist. The question that arises is whether the USA300 CA-MRSA present in Europe (i) was imported once or on very few occasions, followed by a broad geographic spread, anticipating an increased prevalence in the future, or (ii) derived from multiple importations with limited spreading success. In the present study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a collection of French USA300 CA-MRSA strains responsible for sporadic cases and micro-outbreaks over the past decade and United States ST8 MSSA and MRSA isolates. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the population structure of the French isolates is the product of multiple introductions dating back to the onset of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in North America. Coalescent-based demography of the USA300 lineage shows that a strong expansion occurred during the 1990s concomitant with the acquisition of the arginine catabolic mobile element and antibiotic resistance, followed by a sharp decline initiated around 2008, reminiscent of the rise-and-fall pattern previously observed in the ST80 lineage. A future expansion of the USA300 lineage in Europe is therefore very unlikely. To trace the origin, evolution, and dissemination pattern of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in France, we sequenced a collection of strains of this lineage from cases reported in France in

  4. [Demography and society. An analysis of the goals of the State Development Plan (Sinaloa) 1987-1992].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo Hernandez, J R

    1991-01-01

    The State Development Plan for Sinaloa, Mexico, for 1987-1992 contains 7 important goals in its section on Demography and Society that have met with considerable success. Data from the 1990 general population census and projections by the state population council are the basis for an evaluation of progress. To contribute to lowering the fertility rate, the State Population Council for Sinaloa (CONEPOSIN), in coordination with the educational and health sectors, has developed family planning activities for all levels of care throughout the state. The emphasis is on population education, and a program to evaluate IEC programs has been underway since 1987. The crude birth rate declined from 51.9/1000 in 1970 to 39.8 in 1980 and 28.6 in 1990. In the area of regulating population growth and bringing it into balance with economic and social development, the 1st step was consideration of a population policy in the 1987-1992 state development plan. During the past 4 years, the gross state product increased by 2.9% annually, while population increased at 1.8% annually. Economic projections indicate improvement with the culmination of some major infrastructural projects. But demographic growth reduces the speed of economic and social improvement. The goal of reducing population concentration in the municipio of Culiacan will be furthered by a continuing decline in the natural increase rate and a gradual improvement in social development. The population of the municipio for the year 2000 is projected at slightly over 718,000 and the growth rate at about 1.8%. Even if the growth goal is achieved there will still be strong demand for employment because of the young age structure. The 4th plan goal is generating development strategies that will contribute to rationalizing population distribution in the state. The proportion of the population living in localities of over 15,000 increased from 33% in 1970 to 42% in 1980 and around 50% in 1990. 90% of the urban population and 45

  5. The Copper Age Settlement of Valencina de la Concepción (Seville, Spain: Demography, Metallurgy and Spatial Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Caramé, Manuel Eleazar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from a review of the archaeological record available for the prehistoric site of Valencina de la Concepción (Seville, Spain, one of the most important settlements of SW Iberia in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC. Two main variables, namely demography and metallurgical production, are examined in the light of both conventional and spatial statistical methods (with particular emphasis on significance testing with the aim of assessing the wider issue of social complexity. Among the various conclusions emerging from this empirical study, two stand out. Firstly, neither the correlation between the total extension of the settlement and the complexity of its internal organisation, nor the spatial delimitation between domestic/productive and funerary practices is as straightforward as previously claimed. Secondly, no simple, clear-cut statistical patterns are found in the spatial distribution of human remains or metal objects. These conclusions provide the basis for a critique of currently held interpretations of Valencina de la Concepción as the political centre of an early state extending across the lower Guadalquivir valley.

    En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en una revisión del registro arqueológico disponible del sitio prehistórico de Valencina de la Concepción (Sevilla, España, uno de los asentamientos más importantes del Suroeste de la Península Ibérica durante los milenios III y II ANE. A la luz de métodos estadísticos convencionales y espaciales (con particular énfasis en las pruebas de significación se examinan dos variables principales, la demografía y la metalurgia, con el objeto de valorar la más amplia cuestión de la complejidad social. De las principales conclusiones obtenidas en este estudio destacan dos. En primer lugar, ni la correlación entre la extensión total del asentamiento y la complejidad de su organización interna, ni la

  6. New directions for the Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miedzybrodzka, K. (Revenue Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    Essential features of the Canadian federal government's Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) Program are described, with an update of recent initiatives taken to enhance the delivery of the program. In this instance, the emphasis is on the implications of these changes for the mining and energy industries. The objective of the SR and ED program is to encourage research and experimental development in Canada by the private sector through broad-based support, with incentives that are as much as possible of immediate benefit, recognizing that science and technology are the cornerstones of progress and hence the foundations of Canada's prosperity. The essence of the program is investment tax credits in the form of fixed percentages of qualified SR and ED current and capital expenditures. Initiatives introduced in 1997 include clarification of definitions to enhance the certainty of what qualifies as SR and ED; enhancing the consistency in SR and ED reviews and audits; enhancing timeliness in processing SR and ED tax credits; and reducing the costs and administrative burden for claimants, most particularly for small and first-time claimants. Proposed initiatives to improve delivery include reorganization of the Program into a stand-alone unit with a focus on the science and incentive aspects; more consistent interpretation of relevant legislation across all industry sectors; further clarification of practices and procedures and resolution of problems associated with program administration; the appointment of a Steering Committee to oversee the administration of these initiatives and the appointment of industry sector committees (including the mining, oil and natural gas industries) to develop issue sheets, standards and interpretation guidelines for their respective sectors. The investment credits to companies doing SR and ED amount to $1.3 billion annually, which represents 27 per cent of federal government expenditures on research and

  7. New directions for the Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miedzybrodzka, K. [Revenue Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    Essential features of the Canadian federal government`s Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) Program are described, with an update of recent initiatives taken to enhance the delivery of the program. In this instance, the emphasis is on the implications of these changes for the mining and energy industries. The objective of the SR and ED program is to encourage research and experimental development in Canada by the private sector through broad-based support, with incentives that are as much as possible of immediate benefit, recognizing that science and technology are the cornerstones of progress and hence the foundations of Canada`s prosperity. The essence of the program is investment tax credits in the form of fixed percentages of qualified SR and ED current and capital expenditures. Initiatives introduced in 1997 include clarification of definitions to enhance the certainty of what qualifies as SR and ED; enhancing the consistency in SR and ED reviews and audits; enhancing timeliness in processing SR and ED tax credits; and reducing the costs and administrative burden for claimants, most particularly for small and first-time claimants. Proposed initiatives to improve delivery include reorganization of the Program into a stand-alone unit with a focus on the science and incentive aspects; more consistent interpretation of relevant legislation across all industry sectors; further clarification of practices and procedures and resolution of problems associated with program administration; the appointment of a Steering Committee to oversee the administration of these initiatives and the appointment of industry sector committees (including the mining, oil and natural gas industries) to develop issue sheets, standards and interpretation guidelines for their respective sectors. The investment credits to companies doing SR and ED amount to $1.3 billion annually, which represents 27 per cent of federal government expenditures on research and

  8. Improved Early Detection of Sepsis in the ED With a Novel Monocyte Distribution Width Biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouser, Elliott D; Parrillo, Joseph E; Seymour, Christopher; Angus, Derek C; Bicking, Keri; Tejidor, Liliana; Magari, Robert; Careaga, Diana; Williams, JoAnna; Closser, Douglas R; Samoszuk, Michael; Herren, Luke; Robart, Emily; Chaves, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    Sepsis most often presents to the ED, and delayed detection is harmful. WBC count is often used to detect sepsis, but changes in WBC count size also correspond to sepsis. We sought to determine if volume increases of circulating immune cells add value to the WBC count for early sepsis detection in the ED. A blinded, prospective cohort study was conducted in two different ED populations within a large academic hospital. Neutrophil and monocyte volume parameters were measured in conjunction with routine CBC testing on a UniCel DxH 800 analyzer at the time of ED admission and were evaluated for the detection of sepsis. There were 1,320 subjects in the ED consecutively enrolled and categorized as control subjects (n = 879) and those with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (n = 203), infection (n = 140), or sepsis (n = 98). Compared with other parameters, monocyte distribution width (MDW) best discriminated sepsis from all other conditions (area under the curve [AUC], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.73-0.84; sensitivity, 0.77; specificity, 0.73; MDW threshold, 20.50), sepsis from SIRS (AUC, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.67-0.84), and severe sepsis from noninfected patients in the ED (AUC, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99; negative predictive value, 99%). The added value of MDW to WBC count was statistically significant (AUC, 0.89 for MDW + WBC vs 0.81 for WBC alone; P detection of sepsis compared with WBC count alone at the time of admission in the ED. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT02232750; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. mED2-一个小鼠胚胎发育的新基因%mED2-A Novel Gene Involved in Mouse Embryonic Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    端家忠; 张靖溥; 朱少侠

    2006-01-01

    克隆参与胚胎发育的新基因并研究其表达规律和功能是揭示胚胎发育的基因调控机理的重要途径.囊胚形成和原肠形成是哺乳动物胚胎发育过程中的两个关键阶段.囊胚阶段发生了胚胎的第一次分化,是细胞多能性和分化的一个转折点.此时涉及的基因活动,既有维持胚胎干细胞全能性或多能性的基因活动,又有按照预定发育模式参与胚胎定向分化的基因活动.原肠期是胚胎发育过程中的第二个关键转折点,涉及到3个胚层的形成和细胞命运决定等多种变化.在这个时期胚胎获得了胎儿原基的所有信息,新组织的产生和细胞迁移的再生组织与形态发生、细胞增殖、细胞分化、模式形成等存在着非常复杂而相互协调的关联.大多数细胞正由原来的多潜能逐渐向寡潜能发展,控制组织器官形态建成的基因正逐渐开启.这两个时期的基因表达图式、特征和种类会有很大的差异和变化,因此研究这两个时期的新基因的表达规律和功能,将是了解胚胎发育的基因调控机理的重要途径.文章以这两个时期胚胎为原始材料,利用减法杂交方法克隆到一新的小鼠胚胎基因mED2,对其进行了表达规律和生物学功能的初步分析.RT-PCR-Southem和原位杂交实验表明,mED2基因转录水平具有发育阶段的依赖性;随着发育过程的进行,其表达主要在胚神经系统和中胚层衍生的组织表达.mED2基因活性的knockdown对于合子的卵裂和植入前早期胚胎发育均有抑制作用.亚细胞定位实验表明,mED2基因编码的蛋白基本定位于细胞核膜及其临近的内膜细胞器(粗糙内质网和高尔基体).根据生物信息学分析,mED2蛋白可能为一跨膜蛋白且与含有硫氧还蛋白结构域的蛋白有部分匹配.由此推测mED2基因参与了小鼠植入前早期胚胎发育,其基因产物可能通过蛋白之间的相互作用,即对蛋白进

  10. WeedML: a Tool for Collaborative Weed Demographic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Niels

    2010-01-01

    WeedML is a proposed standard to formulate models of weed demography, or maybe even complex models in general, that are both transparent and straightforward to re-use as building blocks for new models. The paper describes the design and thoughts behind WeedML which relies on XML and object-oriented systems development. Proof-of-concept software is provided as open-source C++ code and executables that can be downloaded freely.

  11. Assessment of metal species in river Ganga sediment at Varanasi, India using sequential extraction procedure and SEM-EDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Mayank; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, B D

    2015-09-01

    Aim of the present study was to assess impact of urban drains over river water and sediments by physico-chemical and metal analysis. Metal speciation (Sequential Extraction Procedure) and elemental composition analysis (SEM-EDS) was used to quantify metal pollution load in river sediments. Metal speciation analysis showed dominance of available and labile fractions of all heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) except Mn and Fe which were dominant in residual forms. Cluster analysis (CA), Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were applied as source receptor modeling for pollutants. Results classified river stretch into three zones i.e. moderately, severely and extremely polluted, on the basis of pollutant concentration released from anthropogenic sources. SEM-EDS study revealed the elemental composition percentage in river sediments. Pollution Load Index (PLI) varied from 1.8 (S1)-3.9 (S15). The Geo accumulation index (GAI) was found highest for Cd (6.88-8.97) and Pb (2.41-3.24).

  12. Faults and foibles of quantitative scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a powerful and flexible elemental analysis method that can identify and quantify elements with atomic numbers > 4 (Be) present as major constituents (where the concentration C > 0.1 mass fraction, or 10 weight percent), minor (0.01history of more than 40 years, and the sophistication of modern analytical software, the method is vulnerable to serious shortcomings that can lead to incorrect elemental identifications and quantification errors that significantly exceed reasonable expectations. This paper will describe shortcomings in peak identification procedures, limitations on the accuracy of quantitative analysis due to specimen topography or failures in physical models for matrix corrections, and quantitative artifacts encountered in xray elemental mapping. Effective solutions to these problems are based on understanding the causes and then establishing appropriate measurement science protocols. NIST DTSA II and Lispix are open source analytical software available free at www.nist.gov that can aid the analyst in overcoming significant limitations to SEM/EDS.

  13. Users guide to simulation with 9DGEM on the EIA/EDS computer. Volume IV. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorosh, P.A.; Hudson, E.A.; Parrish, J.E.

    1981-03-01

    DGEM has been assembled on the EIA/EDS system with ease of use a primary consideration. A JCL command procedure for running DGEM simulations is provided to the user. User input requirements are limited to a reasonably simple set of instructions which are handled completely by the command procedure provided. In addition, instructions for compiling and linking the Fortran codes are provided should the user desire to alter DGEM. Each of these procedures, user input requirements, and examples are given. The first section describes the simulation requirements for DGEM. The second section includes an example of the input runstream, the execute instructions, and a sample output. The third section specifies the use of the new technology sectors of the model. The fourth and fifth sections cover the use of the energy investment option and some applications of the investment linkages. The sixth section explains the way in which the program is altered and a new executable module is created. Finally, the last section describes certain deviations from the original DGEM documentation which have facilitated the use of DGEM on the EIA EDS system.

  14. Suicide Prevention in an Emergency Department Population: The ED-SAFE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ivan W; Camargo, Carlos A; Arias, Sarah A; Sullivan, Ashley F; Allen, Michael H; Goldstein, Amy B; Manton, Anne P; Espinola, Janice A; Jones, Richard; Hasegawa, Kohei; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2017-06-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of deaths in the United States. Although the emergency department (ED) is an opportune setting for initiating suicide prevention efforts, ED-initiated suicide prevention interventions remain underdeveloped. To determine whether an ED-initiated intervention reduces subsequent suicidal behavior. This multicenter study of 8 EDs in the United States enrolled adults with a recent suicide attempt or ideation and was composed of 3 sequential phases: (1) a treatment as usual (TAU) phase from August 2010 to December 2011, (2) a universal screening (screening) phase from September 2011 to December 2012, and (3) a universal screening plus intervention (intervention) phase from July 2012 to November 2013. Screening consisted of universal suicide risk screening. The intervention phase consisted of universal screening plus an intervention, which included secondary suicide risk screening by the ED physician, discharge resources, and post-ED telephone calls focused on reducing suicide risk. The primary outcome was suicide attempts (nonfatal and fatal) over the 52-week follow-up period. The proportion and total number of attempts were analyzed. A total of 1376 participants were recruited, including 769 females (55.9%) with a median (interquartile range) age of 37 (26-47) years. A total of 288 participants (20.9%) made at least 1 suicide attempt, and there were 548 total suicide attempts among participants. There were no significant differences in risk reduction between the TAU and screening phases (23% vs 22%, respectively). However, compared with the TAU phase, patients in the intervention phase showed a 5% absolute reduction in suicide attempt risk (23% vs 18%), with a relative risk reduction of 20%. Participants in the intervention phase had 30% fewer total suicide attempts than participants in the TAU phase. Negative binomial regression analysis indicated that the participants in the intervention phase had significantly fewer total suicide attempts

  15. Preparation and Application of Polyclonal Antibody with a Peptide EDS1%EDS1多肽抗体的制备和应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卓; 宋宝安; 刘开兴; 于丹丹; 刘家驹; 王贞超; 李向阳; 毕亮; 胡德禹; 杨松

    2011-01-01

    EDS1 is an important protein with regulation function at SA signal transduction pathway at plant host. In order to acquire polyclonal antibody of high titer and specificity against enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), according to the primary structure of information about EDS1 in NCBI GenBank, 3 polypeptides with sequence-specific was obtained by using bioinformatics software contained Blastn,Blastx and Expasy. One polypeptide was synthetized by fmoc solid phase synthesis methods, and determined theirs purity and molecular weight by using HPLC and GC-MS, purity value reaching at 89.37% and molecular weight being at 1978.33. The polypeptide was coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to form a complex of Pep-KLH by us EDC. Anti-sera were acquired by immunizing rabbit with Pep-KLH emulsified by Complete Freund' s adjuvant (CFA) and Incomplete Freund' s adjuvant (IFA), and polyclonal antibody was purified by affinity chromatography. The titer and specificity of anti-sera and polyclonal antibody were determined by Indirect-ELISA and Western blotting. The results shown that anti-sera and polyclonal antibody reacted with Pep-KLH and detected a specific band of 70 kD, and the size was agreed with the predicted molecular mass. The EDS1 polyclonal antibody revealed high sensitivity and specificity.%EDS1蛋白是植物寄主SA信号转导通路中具有重要调控功能的蛋白,为获得效价高和选择性强的EDS1抗体,根据NCBI GenBank中报道的EDS1蛋白一级结构信息,采用Blastn、Blastx和ExPASy等生物信息学软件进行序列同源性分析,获得三段序列特异性较高的多肽,并从中优选一段序列特异性多肽,采用9-氟甲氧羰基固相合成法获得序列特异性最好的多肽,采用HPLC和GC-MS测定合成多肽的浓度和分子量,试验表明目的多肽纯度达89.37%,目的多肽分子量为1978.33.采用碳化二亚胺法将多肽与KLH进行偶联获得免疫原-Pep-KLH,并将其免疫新西兰大白兔以获

  16. Discordance between patient report and chart review of risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in ED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, Jeffrey M; Graham, Lauren; King, Andrew; Hoppes, Tyler

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the level of agreement between patient self-report and chart review for presence of antimicrobial resistance (AR) risk factors in emergency department (ED) patients. This is a cross-sectional analysis of adult ED patients from July 2010 to January 2011. All ED patients 18 years or older were eligible. Exclusion criteria included pregnant women, prisoners, altered mental status, non-English speakers, traumas, and patients unable to provide consent. Data were obtained by ED patient interview and review of the preceding 3 months of the medical record. We report the difference between patient self-report and chart review of identifying 1 or more AR risk factors using McNemar's χ(2). The test statistic was also calculated for individual risk factors and significance adjusted for multiple comparisons (P care utilization, current indwelling devices, and medical history. Among 289 patients, 1 or more risk factors were reported by 68% (95% CI, 63%-74%) of patients and found in 59% (95% CI, 53%-65%) of charts, a difference of 9.7% (95% CI, 5.3%-14%) (P care and results of ED research studies relying on chart reviews. Patient self-report identifies a greater number of AR risk factors than chart review. © 2013.

  17. Hardiness Mediates Stress and Impact Level in ED Nurses Who Experienced a Violent Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Eun Nam; Kong, Kyung Ran; Jang, Moon Jung

    2017-06-01

    This secondary analysis examined the mediating effect of hardiness between stress and impact level in ED nurses who experienced a violent event. This correlational study was conducted from June to August 2014. We used the visual analog scale to measure stress level, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised to measure impact level after the violent event, and the Dispositional Resilience Scale to measure hardiness. We then analyzed mediating effects with the Sobel test. Data were collected in 31 emergency medical centers located in B city in Korea. Data from 321 ED nurses who experienced a violent event were analyzed. Most nurses (91.9%) were women, with a mean age of 28.73 years. The main outcome measure was the mediating effect of hardiness between stress and impact level after ED nurses experienced violence. We found that both violence-related stress (B = 0.22, P event. Based on results of a Sobel test, hardiness partially mediated the relationship between violence-related stress and impact level from a violent event (Z = 2.03, P = .044). Hardiness had an effect on reducing the impact level of ED nurses who had experienced a violent event and had a mediating role in mitigating their stress. Therefore, we recommend the development of an intervention program that emphasizes the improvement of hardiness in ED nurses. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury.

  19. Follow the money: There's no business like the ed. business...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Murray; Levine, Adeline G

    2014-07-01

    The debate about charter schools and public schools has been conducted on an ideological level. However, the ideological argument obscures the ongoing transfer of public funds to private use, the creation of business and investment opportunities, and the effects of the private enterprise model on education. In the current two-part article, the authors discuss charter schools and finances. Part 1 concerns charter schools and management organizations. Part 2 focuses on charter schools as business investments. Throughout, the authors link the information to effects on education.

  20. Uber Yourself Before you get Kodak’ed

    OpenAIRE

    Shingles, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Linear to Exponential Thinking: Future-proofing your business in an era of disruptive innovation- New perspective shifts as to the coming era of “exponentials”, and the implications to linear-thinking enterprises. Marcus has been working with Dr. Peter Diamandis, Salim Ismail, the SU faculty, and Fortune 200 CEOs and Board of Directors on the implications to “linear” business models and corporate cultures as they are disrupted by the “exponential” pace of change brought about by technology...

  1. Predicting yields of short-rotation hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) for the United States through model-data synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; LeBauer, David; Dietze, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) is an important biomass crop being evaluated for cellulosic ethanol production. Predictions of poplar growth, rotation period, and soil carbon sequestration under various growing conditions, soils, and climates are critical for farmers and managers planning to establish short-rotation forestry (SRF) plantations. In this study, we used an ecoinformatics workflow, the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), to integrate literature data and field measurements into the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model to estimate yield potential of poplar plantations. Within PEcAn 164 records of seven different traits from the literature were assimilated using a Bayesian meta-analysis. Next, variance decomposition identified seven variables for further constraint that contributed > 80% to the uncertainty in modeled yields: growth respiration, dark respiration, quantum efficiency, mortality coefficient, water conductance, fine-root allocation, and root turnover rate. Assimilation of observed yields further constrained uncertainty in model parameters (especially dark respiration and root turnover rate) and biomass estimates. Additional measurements of growth respiration, mortality, water conductance, and quantum efficiency would provide the most efficient path toward further constraint of modeled yields. Modeled validation demonstrated that ED2 successfully captured the interannual and spatial variability of poplar yield observed at nine independent sites. Site-level analyses were conducted to estimate the effect of land use change to SRF poplar on soil C sequestration compared to alternate land uses. These suggest that poplar plantations became a C sink within 18 years of conversion from corn production or existing forest. Finally, poplar yields were estimated for the contiguous United States at a half degree resolution in order to determine potential productivity, estimate the optimal rotation period, and compare poplar to perennial grass yields. This

  2. 网络场域:人口学研究的空间转向%Network Field:Demography Turn to Spatial Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓志强; 王颖

    2013-01-01

    Space is the core concept of demographic research,which is based on the analysis from the perspective. Demograph-ic research has been upon the topics. With the rise of the network society,the human survival and the development space has changed. Demography should have a new theoretical framework and a new awareness of the problem. As the development of the network society,demographic research should strengthen reflexivity and consciousness on space research. With theoretical and methodological support Network Demography is able to develop because of independent research object.%空间是人口学研究的核心概念,是人口学理论的一个基本分析视角,是人口学方法的一个重要分析工具。随着网络社会的崛起,人类生存与发展的空间发生了变化,人口学发展产生了新的理论框架和新的问题意识。转向网络场域是人口学对空间研究的反思,是人口学随着网络社会崛起对空间研究的理论自觉。基于拥有独立研究对象、有理论基础的支撑和研究方法的支持,网络人口学得以可能。

  3. Phylogeography and historical demography of the anadromous fish Leucopsarion petersii in relation to geological history and oceanography around the Japanese Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokita, Tomoyuki; Nohara, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Phylogeographical patterns of marine and diadromous organisms are often influenced by dynamic ocean histories. For example, the marine realm around the Japanese Archipelago is an interesting area for phylogeographical research because of the wide variation in the environments driven by repeated shifts in sea level in the Quaternary. We analysed mitochondrial cyt b gene and nuclear myh6 gene sequences for individuals collected from throughout the range of the anadromous fish Leucopsarion petersii to assess the lineage divergence, phylogeographical pattern and historical demography in relation to geological history and oceanographic features around the archipelago. Leucopsarion petersii has two major lineages (the Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean lineages), which diverged during the late-early to middle Pleistocene. Geographical distributions of the two lineages were closely related to the pathways of the two warm currents, the Tsushima Current and the Kuroshio Current, that flow past the archipelago. Evidence of introgressive hybridization between these lineages was found at two secondary contact zones. Demographic tests suggested that the Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean lineages carried the genetic signal of different historical demographic processes, and these signals are probably associated with differences in habitat stability during recent glacial periods. The Japan Sea lineage has a larger body-size and more vertebrae, probably in relation to severe habitat conditions through Pleistocene climatic oscillations. Thus, the two lineages have long independent evolutionary histories, and the phylogeographical structure and demography of this species have been influenced both by historical events and the present-day oceanography around the Japanese Archipelago. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Detection of DNA Synthesis in Proliferating Cells with EdU%EdU在检测细胞增殖中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雷

    2010-01-01

    5-乙炔基-2'脱氧尿嘧啶核苷(EdU)作为一种胸腺嘧啶核苷类似物,在细胞增殖时可以取代脱氧胸腺嘧啶核苷插入正在复制的DNA分子之中,EdU技术的检测原理是基于乙炔基与一种小分子荧光叠氮化合物探针反应形成稳定的三唑环,该反应是一种被称作"click"化学作用的Cu催化的环加成作用,基于这一反应可以高效快速地检测细胞增殖,并可以有效地检测处于S期细胞的比例.现就EdU在应用于检测细胞增殖的原理、优越性以及具体应用实例等方面进行综述.

  5. Cinema ed enogastronomia nel portale turistico della Regione Toscana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luigi Corinto

    2016-05-01

    The paper analyzes the case study of the Tuscan Region which in 2007 has charged the Sistema Toscana Foundation to strategically control all the territorial marketing activities, even including those of the regional film commission and the promotional tourist web site. The aim is to analyze the specific promotional model for enogastronomy and film tourism, as in the peculiar combination of the Tuscan case. The findings are that enongatronomy and tourism have been promoted in combination but only referring to 'minor' tuscan destinations, different from the crowded regional capital or other cultural sites. This choice has been determined by the strategic market positioning of the entire regional tourism supply, effectively integrating local vocations in the web communications. The task of the Foundation in promoting the whole territory and even the minor destinations must be considered as substantially successful, mainly because it has increased the visibility of the Tuscan region by conveniently using all the old and new media tools.

  6. Ion Beam Synthesis of Ge Nanowires. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, T.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of Ge nanowires in V-grooves has been studied experimentally as well as theoretically. As substrate oxide covered Si V-grooves were used formed by anisotropic etching of (001)Si wafers and subsequent oxidation of their surface. Implantation of 1 x 10{sup 17} Ge{sup +}cm{sup -2} at 70 keV was carried out into the oxide layer covering the V-grooves. Ion irradiation induces shape changes of the V-grooves, which are captured in a novel continuum model of surface evolution. It describes theoretically the effects of sputtering, redeposition of sputtered atoms, and swelling. Thereby, the time evolution of the target surface is determined by a nonlinear integro-differential equation, which was solved numerically for the V-groove geometry. A very good agreement is achieved for the predicted surface shape and the shape observed in XTEM images. Surprisingly, the model predicts material (Si, O, Ge) transport into the V-groove bottom which also suggests an Ge accumulation there proven by STEM-EDX investigations. In this Ge rich bottom region, subsequent annealing in N{sub 2} atmosphere results in the formation of a nanowire by coalescence of Ge precipitates shown by XTEM images. The process of phase separation during the nanowire growth was studied by means of kinetic 3D lattice Monte-Carlo simulations. These simulations also indicate the disintegration of continuous wires into droplets mediated by thermal fluctuations. Energy considerations have identified a fragmentation threshold and a lower boundary for the droplet radii which were confirmed by the Monte Carlo simulation. The here given results indicate the possibility of achieving nanowires being several nanometers wide by further growth optimizations as well as chains of equally spaced clusters with nearly uniform diameter. (orig.)

  7. Benign breast diseases. Radiology, pathology, risk assessment. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinyama, Catherine N. [Princess Elizabeth Hospital, Le Vauquiedor, St. Martin' s Guernsey, Channel Islands (United Kingdom); Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Radiological and pathological correlation of the full range of benign breast lesions, with emphasis on screen-detected lesions. Detailed discussion of risk assessment. Revised and updated edition, with a new chapter on gynaecomastia. Ideal aid to the management of patients with benign or indeterminate breast lesions in a multidisciplinary setting. The second edition of this book has been extensively revised and updated. There have been numerous scientific advances in the radiology, pathology and risk assessment of benign breast lesions since the publication of the first edition. The first edition concentrated on screen-detected lesions, which has since been rectified; new symptomatic and screen-detected lesions are discussed in the second edition and include: mastitis and breast abscesses, idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, phyllodes tumours, gynaecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The chapters on columnar cell lesions and mucocele-like lesions have been extensively updated. Where applicable, genetic analysis of the benign lesions, which is becoming part of personalised medicine in the field of breast cancer, has been included. The book also presents detailed analyses of the main models, such as the Gail Model, used to assess the subsequent risk of breast cancer in individuals. The current trend in the management of all cancers is preventative. Screening mammography detects early curable cancers as well as indeterminate lesions, the latter of which are invariably pathologically benign. The author has collated important benign lesions and, based on peer-reviewed publications, has documented the relative risk of subsequent cancer to allow the patient and the clinician to implement preventative measures where possible. This book will therefore serve as an essential component of multidisciplinary management of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected benign breast lesions.

  8. "Etica ed Estetica sono tutt’uno" Riflessioni su TLP 6.421

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tomasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Per il primo Wittgenstein etica ed estetica erano tutt’uno. Scopo del saggio è fornire un’interpretazione di questa concezione. Esaminando il modo in cui è proposta nel Tractatus e considerando alcune annotazioni dei Quaderni 1914-1916 si evidenzia che l’unità di etica ed estetica è in un modo di vedere il mondo per cui esso non appare come fonte di limitazione. L’etica è un’estensione al mondo - alla vita - della capacità di conferire significato che nell’arte si realizza nei riguardi di oggetti particolari. Affermando l’unità di etica ed estetica Wittgenstein attira l’attenzione sul fatto che la radice dell’etica è in un certo modo di vedere le cose, in un atteggiamento verso la vita. Si tratta della prospettiva di un valore non connesso a come il mondo è e che è evocato dalla meraviglia per l’esistenza del mondo.

  9. Introducing the Collaborative E-Learning Design Method (CoED)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Buus, Lillian; Nyvang, Tom;

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, a specific learning design method is introduced and explained, namely the Collaborative E-learning Design method (CoED), which has been developed through various projects in “e-Learning Lab – Centre for User Driven Innovation, Learning and Design” (Nyvang & Georgsen, 2007). We...... briefly situate this method within the wider area of Learning Design, where after we present the theoretical background of the CoED method. We illustrate the method through discussing its concrete implementation in recent projects and discuss its capacities and challenges in relation to other methods...... within the area of learning design. Finally, we discuss some challenges related to the CoED-method and the field of learning design in general....

  10. Morphology and Composition of Nanocrystalline Stabilized Zirconia using Sem-Eds System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Adesunloye JONAH

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide of known mole percentages has been incorporated into zirconia matrix via co-precipitation method. The co-precipitated powders containing mixed oxides of bismuth and zirconium are dried and calcined in air at 200°C and 800°C respectively to obtain nanosized-stabilized zirconia. The microstructures and the composition of the nanosized-stabilized zirconia are investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS at a low accelerating voltage of 5kV. The results revealed that the powders are homogenously sintered with particle size having typical dimensions in the range of ~1.0-255µm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS analysis of the solid solutions confirm a predominance in the concentration of bismuth and zirconium while sodium, chlorine, and oxygen are present in minor concentration. The quantitative analytic results from EDS were used to determine Zr/Bi ratio.

  11. Patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED boosts satisfaction, improves safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    To improve safety and patient flow, administrators at Hallmark Health System, based in Melrose, MA, implemented a new patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED at the health system's two hospitals. Under the new approach, inpatient nurses come down to the ED to take reports on new patients in a process that includes the ED care team as well as family members. The inpatient nurses then accompany the patients up to their designated floors. Since the new patient-transfer process was implemented in June 2012, patient satisfaction has increased by at least one point on patient satisfaction surveys. Administrators anticipate that medical errors or omissions related to the handoff process will show a drop of at least 50%, when data is tabulated.

  12. Recruitment and retention benefits of EMT--paramedic utilization during ED nursing shortages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Ryan

    2007-02-01

    ED nursing shortages have been widely documented in the literature; however, there has been little exploration of the benefits of using Emergency Medical Technicians-Paramedics (EMT-Ps) in the recruitment and retention of experienced ED registered nurses (RNs). This article will discuss the functionality of EMT-Ps in the nontraditional emergency care setting and the impact of their utilization against a background of nursing shortages. The proposed benefit from use of EMT-Ps in the emergency department will most certainly be lost without the input from the bedside RN. ED RNs play an integral part in the decision making and evaluation of all nontraditional roles that effect their departmental staffing, and their involvement in the process is critical to its success.

  13. Using process indicators to optimize service completion of an ED drug and alcohol brief intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Joanna; Johnson, J Aaron; Seale, J Paul; Kuperminc, Gabriel P

    2015-01-01

    The strongest evidence for effectiveness of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) programs is in primary care settings. Emergency department (ED) studies have shown mixed results. Implementation of SBIRT into ED settings is complicated by the type of patients seen and the fast-paced, high-throughput nature of the ED environment that makes it difficult to reach patients flagged for SBIRT services. This study uses data from an ED-based SBIRT program to examine the relationship between screen-positive rate, ED patient flow, and SBIRT service delivery. Data for the study (N = 67137) were derived from weekly reports extracted directly from one hospital's electronic health record. Measures included time and day of patient entry, drug/alcohol screen result (positive or negative), and whether the patient was reached by SBIRT specialists. Factorial analysis of variance compared variations in screen-positive rates by day and time and the percentage of patients reached by SBIRT specialists during these periods. Overall, 56% of screen-positive patients received SBIRT services. Only 5% of patients offered SBIRT services refused. Day and time of entry had a significant interaction effect on the reached rate (F12,14166 =3.48, P < .001). Although patient volume was lowest between 11 pm and 7 am, screen-positive rates were highest during this period, particularly on weekends; and patients were least likely to be reached during these periods. When implementing an ED-based SBIRT program, thoughtful consideration should be given to patient flow and staffing to maximize program impact and increase the likelihood of sustainability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stroke Risk After Non-Stroke ED Dizziness Presentations: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Kevin A.; Zahuranec, Darin B.; Brown, Devin L.; Meurer, William J.; Burke, James F.; Smith, Melinda A.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Fendrick, A. Mark; McLaughlin, Thomas; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute stroke is a serious concern in Emergency Department (ED) dizziness presentations. Prior studies, however, suggest that stroke is actually an unlikely cause of these presentations. Lacking are data on short- and long-term follow-up from population-based studies to establish stroke risk after presumed non-stroke ED dizziness presentations. Methods From 5/8/2011 to 5/7/2012, patients ≥ 45 years of age presenting to EDs in Nueces County, Texas, with dizziness, vertigo, or imbalance were identified, excluding those with stroke as the initial diagnosis. Stroke events after the ED presentation up to 10/2/2012 were determined using the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) study, which uses rigorous surveillance and neurologist validation. Cumulative stroke risk was calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results 1,245 patients were followed for a median of 347 days (IQR 230- 436 days). Median age was 61.9 years (IQR, 53.8-74.0 years). After the ED visit, fifteen patients (1.2%) had a stroke. Stroke risk was 0.48% (95% CI, 0.22%-1.07%) at 2 days; 0.48% (95% CI, 0.22%-1.07%) at 7 days; 0.56% (95% CI, 0.27%-1.18%) at 30 days; 0.56% (95% CI, 0.27%-1.18%) at 90 days; and 1.42% (95% CI, 0.85%-2.36%) at 12 months. Interpretation Using rigorous case ascertainment and outcome assessment in a population-based design, we found that the risk of stroke after presumed non-stroke ED dizziness presentations is very low, supporting a non-stroke etiology to the overwhelming majority of original events. High-risk subgroups likely exist, however, because most of the 90-day stroke risk occurred within 2-days. Vascular risk stratification was insufficient to identify these cases. PMID:24788511

  15. SEM/EDS analysis for problem solving in the food industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Wayne D.

    2015-10-01

    For forensic investigation in the food industry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) is a powerful, often non-destructive, instrumental analysis tool to provide information about: • Identification of inorganic (and some organic) materials found as foreign contaminants in food products returned by consumers or detected during quality control inspections in the production facilities • Identification of wear particles found in production lines • Distribution of materials within a matrix • Corrosion and failure analysis of production equipment The identification of materials by SEM/EDS is accomplished through a combination of morphology by SEM imaging and the elemental composition of the material by EDS. Typically, the EDS analysis provides a qualitative spectrum showing the elements present in the sample. Further analysis can be done to quantify the detected elements in order to further refine the material identification. Metal alloys can often be differentiated even within the same family such as 300 Series stainless steels. Glass types can be identified by the elemental composition where the detected elements are quantified as the oxides of each element. In this way, for example, common window glass is distinguishable from insulation glass used in many ovens. Wear particles or fragments from breakage can find their way into food products. SEM/EDS analysis of the materials is an important resource to utilize when trying to determine the original source. Suspected source materials can then be sampled for comparative analysis. EDS X-ray mapping is another tool that is available to provide information about the distribution of materials within a matrix. For example, the distribution of inorganic ingredients in a dried food helps to provide information about the grind and blend of the materials.

  16. MedEdPORTAL: a report on oral health resources for health professions educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickmagalur, Nithya S; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Sandmeyer, Sue; Valachovic, Richard W; Candler, Christopher S; Saleh, Michael; Cahill, Emily; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-09-01

    MedEdPORTAL is a unique web-based peer-reviewed publication venue for clinical health educators sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The open exchange of educational resources promotes professional collaboration across health professions. In 2008, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) collaborated with AAMC to allow dental educators to use the platform to publish dental curriculum resources. Oral health is integral to general health; hence, collaboration among health care professionals brings enormous value to patient-centered care. The aim of this study was to conduct a current survey of metrics and submission statistics of MedEdPORTAL resources. The data were collected using the MedEdPORTAL search engine and ADEA and AAMC staff. The data collected were categorized and reported in tables and charts. Results showed that at the time of this study there were over 2,000 medical and dental resources available to anyone worldwide. Oral health resources constituted approximately 30 percent of the total resources, which included cross-indexing with information relevant to both medical and dental audiences. There were several types of dental resources available; the most common were the ones focusing on critical thinking. The usage of MedEdPORTAL has been growing, with participation from over 190 countries and 10,000 educational institutions around the world. The findings of this report suggest that MedEdPORTAL is succeeding in its aim to foster global collaborative education, professional education, and educational scholarship. As such, MedEdPORTAL is providing a new forum for collaboration and opens venues for promising future work in professional education.

  17. Washington state initiative trims Medicaid budget, ED utilization without denying access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    In its first year of operation, Washington state's "ER is for Emergencies" initiative has helped to save the state's Medicaid budget $33.6 million. The initiative, which is based on the implementation of seven best practices, has succeeded in part by improving care coordination and by linking EDs across the state so information can be shared electronically. Leaders of the effort concede that while state pressure was essential in pushing providers to address excess use of the ED for nonemergency needs, they stress that the approach worked because all sides were willing to sit down and hammer out a solution. Further, they note that the infrastructure is now in place to address other problems in a similar fashion. An analysis of claims data shows that in the first year of the initiative, ED visits by Medicaid recipients declined by 9.9%, and the rate of visits by frequent ED utilizers declined by 10.7%. The analysis also shows that ED visits resulting in a scheduled drug prescription fell by 24%, and the rate of visits for a low-acuity diagnosis declined by 14.2%. While many EDs had to adjust their staffing and other resources to accommodate reduced volumes, others experienced few changes or even saw an uptick in volume, possibly from implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Leaders of the effort say the biggest challenge involved with implementing the initiative was securing administrative buy-in for investments that would likely result in improved efficiency and care, but also reduced revenue--at least initially.

  18. To understand relativity; 4. ed.; Comprendre la relativite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon, M.E.

    1995-12-31

    This book comprises three parts: the first one is about the restricted relativity theory with ten chapters which are from Galilee to Newton, tools of classical physics, relativity principle, a dreadful child: light, Michelson experience, the restricted relativity and Einstein postulates (1905), Lorentz transformation, relativistic kinematics, Minkowski time-space, and the relativistic dynamics; the second part concerns the general relativity and the gravitation, from chapter 11 to chapter 19, which are towards the general relativity, absolute acceleration has no sense, the equivalence principle, the principle of generalised relativity, the gravitation and the problems that it formulates, non euclidean theory of the gravitation field, the theory of 1915, Gauss coordinates, classical tests of general relativity; in the last and third part are studied the cosmologies with three chapters, the chapter 20 is dedicated to cosmological principle precursors, the chapter 21 is about the modern cosmological models and the last one finishes on that question: universe is it or not finished. (N.C.). 26 refs., 48 figs., 9 appends.

  19. Physics of organic semiconductors. 2. compl. new rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruetting, Wolfgang [Augsburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Adachi, Chihaya (eds.) [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Center for Future Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    The field of organic electronics has seen a steady growth over the last 15 years. At the same time, our scientific understanding of how to achieve optimum device performance has grown, and this book gives an overview of our present-day knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Based on the very successful first edition, the editors have invited top scientists from the US, Japan, and Europe to include the developments from recent years, covering such fundamental issues as: - growth and characterization of thin films of organic semiconductors, - charge transport and photophysical properties of the materials as well as their electronic structure at interfaces, and - analysis and modeling of devices like organic light-emitting diodes or organic lasers. The result is an overview of the field for both readers with basic knowledge and for an application-oriented audience. It thus bridges the gap between textbook knowledge largely based on crystalline molecular solids and those books focusing more on device applications.

  20. Carbonate reservoir characterization. An integrated approach. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, F. Jerry [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    What would the oil barons of Texas really like to know? Well, in the pages of this book they might find some answers. This hugely experienced author working in Texas, America's main oil-rich state, has produced a work that goes after one of the holy grails of oil prospecting. One main target in petroleum recovery is the description of the three-dimensional distribution of petrophysical properties on the interwell scale in carbonate reservoirs. Doing so would improve performance predictions by means of fluid-flow computer simulations. Lucia's book focuses on the improvement of geological, petrophysical, and geostatistical methods, describes the basic petrophysical properties, important geology parameters, and rock fabrics from cores, and discusses their spatial distribution. A closing chapter deals with reservoir models as an input into flow simulators. Not only does this book provide a hugely practical approach that uses geostatistical as well as petrophysical methods, it can also be used as course material to integrate geology, geophysics and engineering. (orig.)

  1. ED handles 30 burn patients after plant fire and explosion in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Dealing with a mass casualty event involving a high number of burn victims requires strategic use of ED resources. The ED at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah, GA, was praised by the receiving burn center for the care it gave victims of a recent plant disaster. Here are some of their key strategies: After making your primary concern the patient's airway, turn to fluid resuscitation and pain management. Be certain burn victims are placed in warm rooms and are covered with blankets. Have a pre-plan with a regional burn center, then establish contact with that center in multiple-burn patient incidents.

  2. Replica location mechanism in data grid based on ED-Chord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A peer-to-peer hierarchical replica location mechanism(PRLM)was designed for data grids to provide better load balancing capability and scalability.Global replica indexes of the PRLM are organized based on even distributed Chord(ED-Chord)structure.The locality can optimize queries on local replica indexes of virtual organizations.ED-Chord protocol collects the node identifiers information using a distributed method and assigns optimal identifiers for new nodes to make them more uniformly distributed in the entire identifier space.Theoretical analysis and simulations show that PRLM provides good performance,scalability and load balancing capability for replica location in data grids.

  3. Planning a brand new ED? Study up on acoustics, air quality, and patient wish-lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals planning to construct new EDs have a golden opportunity to integrate designs and materials that can please both patients and providers. Experts say attention to acoustics, privacy, and air quality can lower stress levels and boost satisfaction. Further, designs that prioritize efficient work flows get high marks from providers. Experts advise hospital leaders to get considerable input from patients before designing a new ED facility. Privacy, quiet, and a connection to nature are top priorities for patients. Use design to enhance patient flow.

  4. SEM, EDS, PL and absorbance study of CdTe thin films grown by CSS method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Torres, M.E.; Silva-Gonzalez, R.; Gracia-Jimenez, J.M. [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP, Apdo. Postal J-48, San Manuel, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Casarrubias-Segura, G. [CIE- UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-09-22

    Oxygen-doped CdTe films were grown on conducting glass substrates by the close spaced sublimation (CSS) method and characterized using SEM, EDS, photoluminescence (PL) and absorbance. A significant change in the polycrystalline morphology is observed when the oxygen proportion is increased in the deposition atmosphere. The EDS analysis showed that all samples are nonstoichiometric with excess Te. The PL spectra show emission bands associated with Te vacancies (V{sub Te}), whose intensities decrease as the oxygen proportion in the CSS chamber is increased. The oxygen impurities occupy Te vacancies and modify the surfaces states, improving the nonradiative process. (author)

  5. Sobredentaduras con implantes en pacientes geriátricos edéntulos totales

    OpenAIRE

    E. Velasco Ortega; R. Medel Soteras; A. García Méndez; I. Ortiz García; A. España López; E. Núñez Márquez

    2015-01-01

    En la actualidad, la implantología oral constituye una modalidad terapéutica en el tratamiento prostodóncico de los pacientes mayores edéntulos totales. La utilización de implantes oseointegrados para rehabilitar la mandíbula o el maxilar edéntulos ha aumentado en el tratamiento de los pacientes geriátricos. La odontología clínica ha demostrado la aplicación con éxito de las técnicas implantológicas orales en los pacientes ancianos. Las sobredentaduras son una excelente modalidad terapéutica ...

  6. Centocinquant’anni di diritto canonico ed ecclesiastico nelle Università italiane. Prefazione

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico G. Vitali

    2014-01-01

    Il contributo, non sottoposto a valutazione, riprende e rielabora il testo della relazione di sintesi al Convegno di Padova sul tema "Gl'insegnamenti del diritto canonico ed ecclesiastico a centocinquant'anni dall'Unità" (27-29 ottobre 2011), ed è destinato alla pubblicazione negli Atti, quale Prefazione. SOMMARIO: 1. I perché di una ricognizione storica – 2. Alcune indicazioni – 3. Alcune date importanti – 4. Dal Concordato del 1929 alla Costituzione repubblicana – 5. I nuovi indirizzi co...

  7. EdU, a new thymidine analogue for labelling proliferating cells in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehrehasa, Fatemah; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Dwyer, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Greger; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2009-02-15

    Labelling and identifying proliferating cells is central to understanding neurogenesis and neural lineages in vivo and in vitro. We present here a novel thymidine analogue, ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) for labelling dividing cells, detected with a fluorescent azide which forms a covalent bond via the "click" chemistry reaction (the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of an organic azide to a terminal acetylene). Unlike the commonly used BrdU, EdU detection requires no heat or acid treatment. It is quick and easy and compatible with multiple probes for fluorescence immunochemistry, facilitating the characterisation of proliferating cells at high resolution.