WorldWideScience

Sample records for democratic member committee

  1. Association of Finnish Members of Parliament and Researchers: Social Democratic Parliamentary group MP K. Olin, Former Finnish MP M. Tiuri, Finnish Centre Party MP P. Vilkuna, Senior Assistant Professor I. Ruostetsaari and Finnish Parliament Committee of Future Researcher U. Gabrielsson at ATLAS experiment with P. Jenn, M. Nordberg and M. Kotamaki on 15 September 2006.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Association of Finnish Members of Parliament and Researchers: Social Democratic Parliamentary group MP K. Olin, Former Finnish MP M. Tiuri, Finnish Centre Party MP P. Vilkuna, Senior Assistant Professor I. Ruostetsaari and Finnish Parliament Committee of Future Researcher U. Gabrielsson at ATLAS experiment with P. Jenn, M. Nordberg and M. Kotamaki on 15 September 2006.

  2. PKS’ DEMOCRATIC EXPERIENCES IN RECRUITING MEMBERS AND LEADERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Nurdin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the views of democracy and the implementation of democratic rules in real politics by the Islamic political party that has a democracy platform in Indonesia, Partai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS. I examine PKS views on the relationship between Islam and democracy and its manner of recruiting members and leaders to show that this Islamic political party is not a threat to democracy at all. PKS believes that democracy goes to the roots of Islam and the Indonesian context in which they exist; and that it is a good political tool for an Islamic party like PKS to achieve its political goals. Taking the process of recruitment of members and leaders of PKS as examples, the paper also shows that the commitment of PKS to strengthening democracy in Indonesia could be seen in their process of recruiting leaders. PKS has practiced democratic rules in their internal party activities, particularly in the way they used to recruit their members who would be nominated as parliamentary members and how they choose their own leaders. However, it is necessary to note that in terms of member recruitment and expanding the cadres of the party, the PKS seems to have a special strategy; that is, encouraging their cadres to have big families. [Artikel mengulas pandangan Partai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS mengenai demokrasi dan implementasi nilai-nilai demokrasi dalam kehidupan politik. Dalam artikel ini, relasi Islam dan demokrasi serta metode PKS dalam merekrut anggota dan pemimpin partai akan dibahas. PKS sama sekali bukanlah ancaman bagi demokrasi. PKS percaya bahwa prinsip demokrasidapat ditemukan dalam Islam dan konteks Indonesia. Bagi PKS, demokrasi membuka ruang kesempatan bagi partai politik Islam untuk mencapai tujuan politiknya. Selain itu, artikel ini juga mengulas proses rekrutmen anggota dan pemimpin partai. Rekrutmen petinggi PKS memperlihatkan komitmen PKS terhadap penguatan demokrasi di Indonesia. PKS sudah mempraktekkan prinsip demokrasi dalam

  3. Members of the Committee | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Members of the Committee. Rohini M Godbole; Rajinder J Hans-Gill; D. Balasubramanian. Charge of the Committee. The members of the committee were assigned to formulate the terms of reference and to define appropriate action points to be followed for its work. The committee had come up with many initiatives and ...

  4. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovecki, A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten; Oreskovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. DESIGN: Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. SETTING: Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees,

  5. Do committees ru(i)n the bio-political culture? On the democratic legitimacy of bioethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friele, Minou Bernadette

    2003-08-01

    Bioethical and bio-political questions are increasingly tackled by committees, councils, and other advisory boards that work on different and often interrelated levels. Research ethics committees work on an institutional or clinical level; local advisory boards deal with biomedical topics on the level of particular political regions; national and international political advisory boards try to answer questions about morally problematic political decisions in medical research and practice. In accordance with the increasing number and importance of committees, the quality of their work and their functional status are being subjected to more and more scrutiny. Besides overall criticism regarding the quality of their work, particular committees giving political advice are often suspected of being incompatible with democratic values, such as respect for affected parties, representation of diverse values and transparency in the decision-making processes. Based on the example of the German National Ethics Council, whose inauguration caused a still ongoing debate on the aims and scopes of committees in general, this paper discusses: (1) the requirements of modern democratic societies in dealing with complex scientific-technical problems; (2) the composition and organisation of committees working as political advisory boards; and (3) the appointment procedures and roles of laymen and experts, and here in particular of ethicists, who may legitimately be taken on by a committee. I will argue that bioethics committees do not necessarily endanger democratic values, but can considerably improve their realisation in democratic decision-making procedures--if, and only if, they do not act as substitutes for parliamentarian processes, but help prepare parliamentarian processes to be organised as rationally as possible.

  6. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovecki, A; ten Have, H; Oresković, S

    2006-03-01

    To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees, Zagreb, 2003. Knowledge and attitudes of participants before and after the workshop; everyday functioning of hospital ethics committees. The majority of the respondents came from committees with at least five members. The majority of ethics committees were appointed by the governing bodies of their hospitals. Most committees were founded after the implementation of the law on health protection in 1997. Membership structure (three physicians and two members from other fields) and functions were established on the basis of that law. Analysis of research protocols was the main part of their work. Other important functions-education, case analysis, guidelines formation-were neglected. Members' level of knowledge was not sufficient for the complicated tasks they were supposed to perform. However, it was significantly higher after the workshop. Most respondents felt their knowledge should be improved by additional education. Their views on certain issues and bioethical dilemmas displayed a high level of paternalism and over protectiveness, which did not change after the workshop. The committees developed according to bureaucratic requirements. Furthermore, there are concerns about members' knowledge levels. More efforts need to be made to use education to improve the quality of the work. Additional research is necessary to explore ethics committees' work in Croatia especially in the hospital setting.

  7. 76 FR 38348 - Notice of Appointment of Committee Members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... Service Notice of Appointment of Committee Members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st.... ACTION: Notice of Appointment of Committee Members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st... the appointment of members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture...

  8. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, ...

  9. [Food hygiene training of members of corporate public catering committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Gerardo Cairo, Antonio; Ricciardi, Gualtiero

    2007-01-01

    A food hygiene training course was offered to 25 members of the public catering committees of seven corporate restaurants. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the course and identify critical topics, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and after completing the training course. Results are presented in this article and underscore the importance of training members of public catering committees in addition to food handlers.

  10. 21 CFR 14.95 - Compensation of advisory committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employees, but are reimbursed by the Food and Drug Administration for travel expenses. (b) Notwithstanding... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation of advisory committee members. 14.95 Section 14.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL...

  11. Members of House Committee on Science and Astronautics Visited MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather first-hand information of the nation's space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Marned Space Flight. Headed by Representative Olin E. Teague of Texas, other members were James G. Fulton, Pennsylvania; Ken Heckler, West Virginia; R. Walter Riehlman, New York; Richard L. Roudebush,, Indiana; John W. Davis, Georgia; James C. Corman, California; Joseph Waggoner, Louisiana; J. Edgar Chenoweth, Colorado; and William G. Bray, Indiana.

  12. 78 FR 49276 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... 25 members, who are Special Government Employees, and 5 ex-officio, non-voting members. Members and... committees; and therefore, extends particular encouragement to nominations for appropriately qualified female...

  13. 5 CFR 591.243 - How many members are on each COLA Advisory Committee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How many members are on each COLA Advisory Committee? 591.243 Section 591.243 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Areas Program Administration § 591.243 How many members are on each COLA Advisory Committee? A COLA...

  14. 75 FR 62509 - Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private-Sector Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private- Sector Members SUMMARY: Seven Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) advise the Department of Commerce on the technical parameters for export controls applicable to dual-use commodities and...

  15. 77 FR 2271 - Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private-Sector Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private- Sector Members SUMMARY: Seven Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) advise the Department of Commerce on the technical parameters for export controls applicable to dual-use commodities and...

  16. 78 FR 5774 - Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private-Sector Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private- Sector Members SUMMARY: Seven Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) advise the Department of Commerce on the technical parameters for export controls applicable to dual-use commodities and...

  17. Ethical Competence Training for Members on Clinical Ethics Committees (CEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knox, Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    To address the moral questions in patient care and medical practice, Danish hospitals are starting to solicit clinical ethics committees (CEC). As in other places around the world, CECs in Denmark is an interdisciplinary group that includes physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, lawyers...... lingering moral quandaries. Thus, the creation of CECs in Denmark has raised the question of qualifications for those who serve on a committee. When the Danish Society of Clinical Ethics was formed in 2012, it was therefore at the forefront of its agenda to establish a training program that would offer...... valuable contributions to the ethical aspect of medical decision making and to serve as an important resource for health care providers, patients and their families. This article describes the history, development and preliminary results of the current training program as well as reflects on future ideas...

  18. Perceptions of admission committee members: some aspects on individual admission to dental education at Karolinska Institutet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röding, Karin

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the study was to generate an overall impression of the admission committee's (AC) perspective on individualised admission procedures, derived from some perceived experience of the individual committee members using semi-structured interviews. Qualitative research was used and data were collected by use of interviews. The results show that the committee members are highly committed to the task and try to identify desirable, non-cognitive attributes in the applicants, such as motivation, empathy, drive, and tenacity: 'emotional intelligence'. The committee members were of the opinion that it was possible to identify these attributes in an applicant. The AC further believes that the admissions procedure influences academic achievements because students regard themselves as specially selected and therefore aspire to higher achievements.

  19. 7 CFR 917.122 - Qualification requirements and nominiation procedure for public members of Commodity Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits... members of Commodity Committees. (a) Public members shall not have a financial interest in or be associated with production, processing, financing, or marketing (except as consumers) of the commodities...

  20. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: A survey among ethics committee members

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hewage, Suwin; Lekamwattage, Manura; Athukorale, Manjula; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Murray, Joanna; Prince, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research. However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. Methods We obtained ethical ap...

  1. Evaluating the Training, Responsibilities, and Practices of P&T Committee Members and Nonmember Contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ryan; Kelly, Brett J; Moody, Mary

    2017-08-01

    Pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees are responsible for managing drug formularies in numerous health care settings. Although pharmacy practice and health care organizations provide general recommendations of responsibilities and skills for members and nonmember contributors of P&T committees, the study investigators hypothesized that there is diversity in the training, responsibilities, and practices of these members and contributors. To describe the training, responsibilities, and practices of members and nonmember contributors of P&T committees in a variety of health care settings, using an online survey. In December 2015, an online survey was delivered to clinicians who were considered likely to be involved in P&T committee service from hospitals ranked by U.S. News & World Report and a convenience sample of clinicians practicing in managed care settings. The survey instrument was designed to assess various domains and perceptions of P&T committee processes. Sixty-nine respondents representing various health care delivery settings in the United States were eligible for and completed the survey. The majority of the respondents were pharmacists (94.2%), and 72.5% of the respondents were P&T committee members. The remainder of the respondents were nonmember P&T committee contributors. Approximately 60% of the respondents had served in P&T committee roles for ≥ 10 years. Specialized postgraduate training incorporating literature evaluation and formulary management was possessed by 21.7% and 17.4% of the respondents, respectively; however, most of the respondents received on-the-job training. Approximately half of the respondents were responsible for preparation of P&T committee documents, and 58% reported that nonmember contributors typically write and prepare these documents. Skill in literature evaluation was the most important criterion in selecting authors of P&T committee documents, while 10.1% of the respondents indicated that their committees did not

  2. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. 200.9 Section 200.9 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL... railroad subject to the Interstate Commerce Act which own or control more than 50 percent of the total...

  3. 77 FR 55180 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Federal Economic Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... (SGEs) and are subject to ethics rules applicable to SGEs. b. Members serve three-year terms. Members... equal opportunity in the workplace and seeks diverse Committee membership. Dated: August 30, 2012...

  4. 75 FR 21000 - Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ...] (formerly Docket No. 02D-0049) Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Public Availability of Advisory Committee Members... and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, Public Law No. 110-85), and section 701 (21 U.S.C. 371...

  5. 77 FR 70182 - Reopening of Nomination Period for Members of the Advisory Committee on Climate Change and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... Nomination Period for Members of the Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science AGENCY... published a notice announcing the establishment of the Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural.... ADDRESSES: Send nominations to: Robin O'Malley, Policy and Partnership Coordinator, National Climate Change...

  6. 76 FR 23644 - Solicitation of Nominations for Members of the Transit Rail Advisory Committee for Safety (TRACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... communication of information from knowledgeable and independent perspectives regarding transit rail safety... evaluated mainly on academic experience but also the following factors: Leadership and organizational skills... committee member's name and organizational affiliation, a cover letter describing the nominee's...

  7. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: a survey among ethics committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hewage, Suwin; Lekamwattage, Manura; Athukorale, Manjula; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Murray, Joanna; Prince, Martin

    2008-05-20

    Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research.However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. We obtained ethical approval from UK and Sri Lanka. A series of consensus generation meetings on the protocol were conducted. A task oriented interview guide was developed. The interview was based on open-ended questionnaire. Then the participants were given a WHO checklist on informed consent and requested to rate the items on a three point scale ranging from extremely important to not important. Twenty-nine members from ethics committees participated. Majority of participants (23), believed a copy of the information leaflet and consent form, should accompany research proposal. Opinions about the items that should be included in the information leaflets varied. Participants identified 18 criteria as requirements in the information leaflet and 19 for the consent form. The majority, 20 (69%), believed that all research need ethical approval but identified limited human resource, time and inadequate capacity as constraints. Fifteen (52%) believed that written consent is not required for all research. Verbal consent emerged as an alternative to written consent. The majority of participants rated all components of the WHO checklist as important. The number of themes generated for the consent form (N = 18) is as many as for the information leaflet (N = 19) and had several overlaps. This suggests that the consent form should be itemized to reflect the contents covered in the information leaflet. The participants' opinion on components of the information leaflets and consent forms proved to be similar with WHO checklist on informed

  8. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: A survey among ethics committee members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwardhana Chesmal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research. However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. Methods We obtained ethical approval from UK and Sri Lanka. A series of consensus generation meetings on the protocol were conducted. A task oriented interview guide was developed. The interview was based on open-ended questionnaire. Then the participants were given a WHO checklist on informed consent and requested to rate the items on a three point scale ranging from extremely important to not important. Results Twenty-nine members from ethics committees participated. Majority of participants (23, believed a copy of the information leaflet and consent form, should accompany research proposal. Opinions about the items that should be included in the information leaflets varied. Participants identified 18 criteria as requirements in the information leaflet and 19 for the consent form. The majority, 20 (69%, believed that all research need ethical approval but identified limited human resource, time and inadequate capacity as constraints. Fifteen (52% believed that written consent is not required for all research. Verbal consent emerged as an alternative to written consent. The majority of participants rated all components of the WHO checklist as important. Conclusion The number of themes generated for the consent form (N = 18 is as many as for the information leaflet (N = 19 and had several overlaps. This suggests that the consent form should be itemized to reflect the contents covered in the information leaflet. The participants' opinion on components of the information leaflets and

  9. Implementing an interprofessional patient safety learning initiative: insights from participants, project leads and steering committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Abramovich, Ilona Alex; Hayes, Chris; Smith, Orla; Tregunno, Deborah; Chan, Wai-Hin; Reeves, Scott

    2013-11-01

    Effective teamwork and interprofessional collaboration are vital for healthcare quality and safety; however, challenges persist in creating interprofessional teamwork and resilient professional teams. A study was undertaken to delineate perceptions of individuals involved with the implementation of an interprofessional patient safety competency-based intervention and intervention participants. The study employed a qualitative study design that triangulated data from interviews with six steering committee members and five members of the project team who developed and monitored the intervention and six focus groups with clinical team members who participated in the intervention and implemented local patient safety projects within a large teaching hospital in Canada. Our study findings reveal that healthcare professionals and support staff acquired patient safety competencies in an interprofessional context that can result in improved patient and work flow processes. However, key challenges exist including managing projects amidst competing priorities, lacking physician engagement and sustaining projects. Our findings point to leaders to provide opportunities for healthcare teams to engage in interprofessional teamwork and patient safety projects to improve quality of patient care. Further research efforts should examine the sustainability of interprofessional safety projects and how leaders can more fully engage the participation of all professions, specifically physicians.

  10. Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

  11. 76 FR 11195 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Census Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... technical expertise from the following disciplines: demography, economics, geography, psychology, statistics... Advisory Committee are essential for sustained Advisory Committee membership as well as submission of... must have scientific and technical expertise in such areas as demography, economics, geography...

  12. 21 CFR 14.80 - Qualifications for members of standing policy and technical advisory committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with interested organizations. Nonvoting members— (i) Shall be selected by the interested organizations... cause. Good cause includes excessive absenteeism from committee meetings, a demonstrated bias that...

  13. The first twenty years of the ASME Committee on nuclear air and gas treatment - a retrospective by a founding member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, J. [Jacox Associates, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Since the 1996 Winter Meeting of CONAGT was the twentieth anniversary of CONAGT a review of the Committee and its members seems in order. This Paper will cover the background and formation of CONAGT as well as the history to date. This history will include not only the basic accomplishments but some of the less successfully met goals and a look at some of the personalities involved in the Committee work. General future plans will be included. The intent of the Paper is less a formal history than a personal recollection of the Committee and those who worked so hard to create the best possible Codes and Standards for the industry to use. 10 refs.

  14. 75 FR 29311 - Solicitation of Nominations for Members of the USDA Grain Inspection Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... the nominations of men and women of all racial and ethnic groups. The Advisory Committee meets twice... or regular places of business in performance of Advisory Committee service (see 5 U.S.C. 5703). A..., individuals with demonstrated ability and experience to represent the interests of racial and ethnic...

  15. Revisiting Financial (Accounting) Literacy: A Comparison of Audit Committee Members and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomino, Don E.; Wall, Joseph; Akers, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    While financial literacy is important for an audit committee in discharging its duties there is no authoritative guidance or definition and limited empirical research as to what constitutes financial literacy of audit committees and business students. Coates et al. conducted a study that examined the financial literacy of corporate board members…

  16. Leading Democratically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  17. 76 FR 80949 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on Public Advisory Panels or Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    .... Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel. Jamie Waterhouse, Center for Devices Circulatory System Devices... Advisory Committee--Neurosurgeons (cerebrovascular and pediatric), neurologists (stroke, pediatric, pain... ophthalmic clinical trials. Orthopaedic and 2 September 1, 2012. Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical...

  18. 76 FR 45578 - Request for Nominations for Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Medical Imaging Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... committees and, therefore, extends particular encouragement to nominations for appropriately qualified female... each nominee, current business and/or home address, telephone number, and e-mail address if available...

  19. 75 FR 57807 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... consists of up to 25 members, who are Special Government Employees, and 5 ex-officio, non-voting members... for appropriately qualified female, minority, or disabled candidates. Dated: September 15, 2010...

  20. 77 FR 61004 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on Public Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ..., engineering, biological and physical sciences, biotechnology, computer technology, statistics, epidemiology... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001... specific Committee questions, contact the following persons listed in Table 1 of this document: Table 1...

  1. 78 FR 64505 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... medicine, medical ethics, science, or technology involving the manufacture, evaluation, or use of tobacco... Advisory Committee, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products. FDA seeks to include the views of women... membership, the primary contact is: Caryn Cohen, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products, Food and...

  2. 75 FR 25844 - Federal Advisory Committee; National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; National Security... June 23, 2010, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the National Security.... Kevin Gormley, Program Officer, National Security Education Program, 1101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1210...

  3. Members of research ethics committees accepted a modification of the randomized consent design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, Ron; Kessels, Alfons G.; ter Riet, Gerben; Kleijnen, Jos; Leffers, Pieter; Knottnerus, J. André; Sturmans, Ferd

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objective: The use of randomized consent designs has been subject of methodologic and ethical controversy. In most Western countries, research ethics committees make the decision as to whether a randomized consent design can be applied. The purpose of the study is to assess to what

  4. Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    -RESIGA Politehnica University of Timisoara Romania Kazuhiro TANAKA Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Yoshinobu TSUJIMOTO Osaka University Japan Local Organizing Committee Chairman Yulin WU Tsinghua University Beijing Executive Chairman Zhengwei WANG Tsinghua University Beijing Members Shuliang CAO Tsinghua University Beijing Cichang CHEN South West University of Petroleum Chengdu Hongxun CHEN Shanghai University Shanghai Jiang DAI China Sanxia General Co Yichang Huashu DOU National University of Singapore Singapore Fengqin HAN Huanan University of Sci & Tech Guangzhou Kun LI Hefei Inst of General Machinery Hefei Rennian LI Lanzhou University of Sci & Tech Lanzhou Wanhong LI National Natural Science Foundation of China Beijing Chao LIU Yangzhou University Yangzhou Li LU China Inst of Water Resources and Hydropower Research Beijing Xingqi LUO Xi'an University of Tech Xi'an Zhenyue MA Dalian University of Sci & Tech Dalian Jiegang MU Zhejiang University of Tech Hangzhou Daqing QIN Harbin Electric Machinery Group Harbin Fujun WANG China Agriculture University Beijing Guoyu WANG Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) Beijing Leqin WANG Zhejiang University Hangzhou Yuzhen WU NERCSPV Beijing Hongyuan XU Tsinghua University Beijing Jiandong YANG Wuhan University Wuhan Minguan YANG Jiangsu University Zhenjiang Shouqi YUAN Jiangsu University Zhenjiang Lefu ZHANG Harbin Electric Machinery Group Harbin Lixiang ZHANG Yunnan University of Sci & Tech Kunming Shengchang ZHANG Zhejiang University of Tech Hangzhou Kun ZHAO China Water & Electric Consulting Corp Beijing Yuan ZHENG Hehai University Nanjing Jianzhong ZHOU Huazhong University of Sci & Tech Wuhan Lingjiu ZHOU China Agriculture University Beijing Hongwu ZHU China Petroleum University Beijing Zuchao ZHU Zhejiang Sci-Tech University Hangzhou Secretaries Shuhong LIU (Academic), liushuhong@tsinghua.edu.cn Xianwu LUO (Registration), luoxw@tsinghua.edu.cn Baoshan ZHU (Finance), bszhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

  5. 78 FR 29757 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on Public Advisory Panels or Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... views of women and men, members of all racial and ethnic groups, and individuals with and without... contracts to permit evaluation of possible sources of conflicts of interest. This notice is issued under the...

  6. 77 FR 10755 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Risk Communication...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... in ensuring that women, minority groups, and individuals with disabilities are adequately represented... who use FDA-regulated products. The latter may include patients and patients' family members, health... business address and/or home address, telephone number, and email address if available. Nominations must...

  7. Open letter to all Member State Delegates to CERN Finance Committee and CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Geneva, 17 September 2014 Dear Delegate, We are surprised to read that the “Terms of reference of a Council Working Group on the CERN Pension Fund” is on the agenda of the Council Session of 18 September 2014. Once more the transformation of the current defined benefit scheme into a defined contribution scheme, as well as the question of how to “re-define” the pension conditions for members and beneficiaries will be investigated. Already in the framework of the Working Group 2 (WG2) studies, two legal experts demonstrated that the political and administrative bodies of an international organization which are responsible as employer for managing the staff, must respect the general principles inherent in the law of the international civil service in all their actions, especially when proposing changes in employment conditions. In particular Council must respect the principle of acquired rights of active or retired members of personnel. To reach full funding on a 30-...

  8. The Challenge of Timely, Responsive and Rigorous Ethics Review of Disaster Research: Views of Research Ethics Committee Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Hunt

    Full Text Available Research conducted following natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods or hurricanes is crucial for improving relief interventions. Such research, however, poses ethical, methodological and logistical challenges for researchers. Oversight of disaster research also poses challenges for research ethics committees (RECs, in part due to the rapid turnaround needed to initiate research after a disaster. Currently, there is limited knowledge available about how RECs respond to and appraise disaster research. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the experiences of REC members who had reviewed disaster research conducted in low- or middle-income countries.We used interpretive description methodology and conducted in-depth interviews with 15 respondents. Respondents were chairs, members, advisors, or coordinators from 13 RECs, including RECs affiliated with universities, governments, international organizations, a for-profit REC, and an ad hoc committee established during a disaster. Interviews were analyzed inductively using constant comparative techniques.Through this process, three elements were identified as characterizing effective and high-quality review: timeliness, responsiveness and rigorousness. To ensure timeliness, many RECs rely on adaptations of review procedures for urgent protocols. Respondents emphasized that responsive review requires awareness of and sensitivity to the particularities of disaster settings and disaster research. Rigorous review was linked with providing careful assessment of ethical considerations related to the research, as well as ensuring independence of the review process.Both the frequency of disasters and the conduct of disaster research are on the rise. Ensuring effective and high quality review of disaster research is crucial, yet challenges, including time pressures for urgent protocols, exist for achieving this goal. Adapting standard REC procedures may be necessary. However, steps should be

  9. Familiar ethical issues amplified: how members of research ethics committees describe ethical distinctions between disaster and non-disaster research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Catherine M; Anderson, James; Boulanger, Renaud F; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Schwartz, Lisa; Hunt, Matthew

    2017-06-28

    The conduct of research in settings affected by disasters such as hurricanes, floods and earthquakes is challenging, particularly when infrastructures and resources were already limited pre-disaster. However, since post-disaster research is essential to the improvement of the humanitarian response, it is important that adequate research ethics oversight be available. We aim to answer the following questions: 1) what do research ethics committee (REC) members who have reviewed research protocols to be conducted following disasters in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) perceive as the key ethical concerns associated with disaster research?, and 2) in what ways do REC members understand these concerns to be distinct from those arising in research conducted in non-crisis situations? This qualitative study was developed using interpretative description methodology; 15 interviews were conducted with REC members. Four key ethical issues were identified as presenting distinctive considerations for disaster research to be implemented in LMICs, and were described by participants as familiar research ethics issues that were amplified in these contexts. First, REC members viewed disaster research as having strong social value due to its potential for improving disaster response, but also as requiring a higher level of justification compared to other research settings. Second, they identified vulnerability as an overarching concern for disaster research ethics, and a feature that required careful and critical appraisal when assessing protocols. They noted that research participants' vulnerabilities frequently change in the aftermath of a disaster and often in unpredictable ways. Third, they identified concerns related to promoting and maintaining safety, confidentiality and data security in insecure or austere environments. Lastly, though REC members endorsed the need and usefulness of community engagement, they noted that there are significant challenges in a disaster

  10. Democratic Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Michael W., Ed.; Beane, James A., Ed.

    This book illustrates how educators in four U.S. communities committed themselves to preparing students for the democratic way of life. In four narratives, educators directly involved in four different school-reform efforts describe how they initiated demographic practices in their educational settings. The four schools serve as reminders that…

  11. Democratically Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Goodin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The 'democracy unbound' project aspires to extend democracy in two dimensions: range and scope. The former would give a wider range of people the vote. The latter would give people a wider scope of things to vote on. In practice, no doubt there is room to do much more of both. But whereas it would be democratically justifiable in an ideal world for democracy to be completely unbounded as regards range, even in an ideal world democracy ought be subject to some limits internal to the logic of democracy itself as regards its scope. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1837428

  12. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany: Experience of applicants with the review of requests for opinion of the Ethics Committees - results of a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ, Hagen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of requests for a positive opinion of the ethics committees (application procedure as a requirement to start a clinical trial in Germany has been completely redesigned with the transposition of EU Directive 2001/20/EC in the 12th Amendment of the German Medicines Act in August 2004. The experience of applicants (sponsors, legal representatives of sponsors in the EU and persons or organizations authorized by the sponsors to make the application, respectively in terms of interactions with the ethics committees in Germany has been positive overall, especially with respect to ethics committee adherence to the statutory timelines applicable for review of requests. However, inconsistencies between ethics committees exist in terms of the form and content of the requirements for application documents and their evaluation.With the objective of further improving both the quality of applications and the evaluation of those applications by ethics committees, a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA was conducted from January to April 2008. Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective ethics committee in charge of the coordinating principal investigator (coordinating ethics committee, the type and frequency of formal and content-related objections to applications according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP Regulation were systematically documented, and qualitative and quantitative analyses performed. 21 out of 44 members of the VFA participated in the survey. 288 applications for Phase I–IV studies submitted between January and December 2007 to 40 ethics committees were evaluated.This survey shows that about one in six applications is incomplete and has formal and/or content objections, respectively, especially those that pertain to documents demonstrating the qualification of the investigator and/or suitability of the facilities. These objections are attributable to

  13. Adult education for democratic citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report presents, in brief, the findings from the study of research literature on Adult Education for Democratic Citizenship, which was carried out in the nine EU member states represented by the project: Austria, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Spain and United Kingdom...

  14. 11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) visiting the ATLAS experiment control room with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and ATLAS Muon Project Leader G. Mikenberg. Family photograph with CERN Japanese scientists in front of the ATLAS surface building.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) visiting the ATLAS experiment control room with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and ATLAS Muon Project Leader G. Mikenberg. Family photograph with CERN Japanese scientists in front of the ATLAS surface building.

  15. Implementing Democratic Equality in Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolleyer, Nicole; von Nostitz, Felix-Christopher; Little, Conor

    2015-01-01

    This article theorises and empirically assesses some important intra-organisational implications of maximising democratic equality in political parties both between followers and members and between members and elites. They include weak member commitment, passivity of the rank-and-file membership...

  16. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and practice of institutional ethics committee members from eastern India regarding ethics committee functioning and pharmacovigilance activities conducted during clinical trials: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrojyoti Bhowmick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of study: The vital responsibility of Institutional Ethics Committee (IEC members is to ensure the safety of the subjects participating in clinical trials. Hence, it is essential for IEC members to be aware of the common pharmacovigilance strategies followed during clinical trials. However, the information about the knowledge, attitude, and practice of IEC members regarding the pharmacovigilance activities followed during clinical trials is scarce worldwide, especially in India. Hence, this cross-sectional study was designed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of IEC members of 10 hospitals of Kolkata, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using a self-administered, validated questionnaire was conducted among 10 hospitals (five government and five corporate hospitals in Kolkata conducting active clinical research and having functional Ethics Committees (ECs in the month of September-November, 2012. An IEC approval was taken for this study. Two reminders were given to all EC members through telephone/e-mail for completion and returning of the forms. The filled in forms were returned to their respective Member Secretaries, from whom authors′ collected the forms. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 software and MS-Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square test and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of the 100 distributed questionnaires, 40 were returned of which 10 were not filled properly. Overall awareness regarding different pharmacovigilance terminologies and activities among EC members from nonmedical background (71.43% was found to be more than that of the medical members (68.75%, though the figure was not statistically significant. Majority of the members (75% felt that EC should decide compensation in case of a serious adverse event. Conclusion: The present study signifies that there is a low level of awareness in IEC members of Kolkata regarding

  17. From "a Fair Game" to "a Form of Covert Research": Research Ethics Committee Members' Differing Notions of Consent and Potential Risk to Participants Within Social Media Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbin, R A; Samuel, G; Derrick, G E

    2018-04-01

    Social media (SM) research presents new challenges for research ethics committees (RECs) who must balance familiar ethical principles with new notions of public availability. This article qualitatively examines how U.K. REC members view this balance in terms of risk and consent. While it found significant variance overall, there were discernible experience-based trends. REC members with less experience of reviewing SM held inflexible notions of consent and risk that could be categorized as either relying on traditional notions of requiring direct consent, or viewing publicly available data as "fair game." More experienced REC members took a more nuanced approach to data use and consent. We conclude that the more nuanced approach should be best practice during ethical review of SM research.

  18. 09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

  19. 29th November 2011 - Czech Parliament Members of the Social Committee of the Lower Chamber visiting CERN permanent exhibition Microcosm and ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Czech Physicist and ILO I. Lehraus.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    29th November 2011 - Czech Parliament Members of the Social Committee of the Lower Chamber visiting CERN permanent exhibition Microcosm and ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Czech Physicist and ILO I. Lehraus.

  20. 78 FR 21908 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic, and Other Populations AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Commerce..., students and youth, aging populations, American Indian and Alaska Native tribal considerations, new... technology and video/web conferencing to reduce meeting and travel costs, and to more fully engage local and...

  1. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, L R; Stewart, S M; Schoenfeld-Tacher, R; Hellyer, P W

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate's coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee's immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution). Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than traditional 4-year

  2. Democratic Leadership by Managing Meetings for Effective Group Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mary; Forest, Robert

    Instrumental to successful democratic leadership is the use of committees to solve management problems. In democratic leadership, a leader encourages participation and uses a guidance approach to direct a group toward consensus. This document offers leaders guidelines in effective democratic management of meetings. The authors first discuss the…

  3. BRICS Countries and Democratic Contagion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article explores whether the interstate dynamics of the BRICS can activate those processes of convergence of politicalregimes and practices known as “democratic contagion.” As this contagion was experienced during the “third wave” ofdemocratization, mainly because of homogeneity among states and structural conditions for democratic attraction, theBRICS are not likely to repeat these dynamics. On the contrary, the only real constitutional homogeneity among the BRICScountries is the standard of non-interference in the internal affairs of each member. Non-interference also means abstainingfrom any initiative to condition the transformation of political regimes in consideration of the same interstate cooperation. Thedynamics of the BRICS shows that different political regimes can promote institutionalized forms of interstate cooperationwithout any mutual contamination at the constitutional level. The theories of “transition” and “democratic contagion” areinsufficient to understand these dynamics in the context of the BRICS; for this reason, the theory of democratic transitioncannot provide an adequate analysis of BRICS. With its members “split in unity,” as an institution the BRICS suggests anevolution toward a model of “not eurocentric dependence” that can overcome the “peripheral realism” of the role of eachstate in its own foreign policy.

  4. 78 FR 19191 - Request for Nominations of Members to Serve on the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... pleasure of the Secretary of Commerce. 2. Members are nominated by the Department of Commerce, in...., Senior Advisor Performing the Duties of the Director, Bureau of the Census. [FR Doc. 2013-07344 Filed 3...

  5. E-survey with researchers, members of ethics committees and sponsors of clinical research in Brazil: an emerging methodology for scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainesi, Sonia Mansoldo; Goldbaum, Moisés

    2012-12-01

    The growth of Internet users enables epidemiological studies to be conducted electronically, representing a promising methodology for data collection. Members of Ethics Committees, Clinical Researchers and Sponsors were interviewed using questionnaires sent over the Internet. Along with the questionnaire, participants received a message explaining the survey and also the informed consent. Returning the questionnaire meant the consent of the participant was given. No incentive was offered; two reminders were sent. The response rate was 21% (124/599), 20% (58/290) and 45% (24/53) respectively for Ethics Committees, Researchers and Sponsors. The percentage of return before the two reminders was about 62%. Reasons for non-response: participant not found, refusal to participate, lack of experience in clinical research or in the therapeutic field. Characteristics of participants: 45% of Ethics Committee participants, 64% of Researchers and 63% of Sponsors were male; mean age (range), respectively: 47 (28-74), 53 (24-72) and 40 (29-65) years. Among Researchers and Sponsors, all respondents had at least a university degree and, in the Ethics Committees group, only two (1.7%) did not have one. Most of the questionnaires in all groups came from the Southeast Region of Brazil, probably reflecting the highest number of clinical trials and research professionals in this region. Despite the potential limitations of a survey done through the Internet, this study led to a response rate similar to what has been observed with other models, efficiency in obtaining responses (speed and quality), convenience for respondents and low cost.

  6. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Kogan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate’s coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee’s immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution. Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than

  7. Wage Setting in Democratic Labour Unions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the wage setting of a democratic labour union. The union members differ with respect to their employment probabilities. The union wage only changes if the parameters of the median member change. An exogenous shock to revenue may increase the wage, even if labour demand...... is iso-elastic and unemployment benefits may have only a small effect on wages if the median member differs from the average. These findings are in accordance with empirical results....

  8. A Developmental Model for Educational Planning: Democratic Rationalities and Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Michael; Johnson, Jerry; Reynolds, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The Developmental Democratic Planning (DDP) model frames educational planning as a process that extends beyond the immediate focus of a particular planning effort to acknowledge and cultivate the potential of all members of the organization to fulfill their roles as active participants in the democratic life of the organization. The DDP model…

  9. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

  10. Democratic Leadership in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Philip A.

    2005-01-01

    In this book Philip Woods turns his attention to issues of democracy and leadership. He has provided an eloquent, intellectually compelling and sophisticated account of a new leadership label--democratic leadership. He argues that the purpose of "democratic" leadership is to create and help sustain an environment that enables everyone…

  11. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.68) is the Lao People's Democratic Republic which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 November 2011. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 152 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statue with the depositary Government [fr

  12. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 42nd revision of INFCIRC/2 lists the 113 Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency as of 1 January 1993. It includes Slovenia as a new Member State as of 21 September 1992, Cambodia replaces the former name ''Democratic Kampuchea'' and Czechoslovakia was deleted as it ceased to be a member of the Agency as of 1 January 1993 (INFCIRC/417)

  13. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.68) is the Lao People's Democratic Republic which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 November 2011. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 152 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statue with the depositary Government [es

  14. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.68) is the Lao People's Democratic Republic which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 November 2011. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 152 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statue with the depositary Government

  15. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumfield, Einat; Moore, Michael M.; Drake, Mary K.; Goodman, Thomas R.; Lewis, Kristopher N.; Meyer, Laura T.; Ngo, Thang D.; Sammet, Christina; Stanescu, Arta Luana; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Swenson, David W.; Slovis, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects. (orig.)

  16. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumfield, Einat; Moore, Michael M; Drake, Mary K; Goodman, Thomas R; Lewis, Kristopher N; Meyer, Laura T; Ngo, Thang D; Sammet, Christina; Stanescu, Arta Luana; Swenson, David W; Slovis, Thomas L; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2017-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects.

  17. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumfield, Einat [Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, South Bronx, NY (United States); Moore, Michael M. [The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Penn State Hershey Children' s Hospital, Hershey, PA (United States); Drake, Mary K. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Goodman, Thomas R. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States); Lewis, Kristopher N. [Augusta University, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA (United States); Meyer, Laura T. [Wake Radiology, Raleigh, NC (United States); Ngo, Thang D. [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Sammet, Christina [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Stanescu, Arta Luana; Iyer, Ramesh S. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Swenson, David W. [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Providence, RI (United States); Slovis, Thomas L. [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects. (orig.)

  18. Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the Non-Compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (INFCIRC/403) and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The document contains the following items: Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of Safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded; resolution adopted by the Board on 1 April 1993 (Annex 1); Agreement of 30 January 1992 between the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (Annex 2); resolution adopted by the Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 (Annex 3); Communications from the Director General of the IAEA to the Minister for Atomic Energy of DPRK or from the Minister for Atomic Energy of the DPRK of the Director General of the IAEA (Annexes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12); statement of the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Pyongyang, 12 March 1993 (Annex 7); resolution adopted by the Board on 18 March 1993 (Annex 10)

  19. Democratic design experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehn, Pelle; Brandt, Eva; Halse, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Designers and design researchers are increasingly exploring societal challenges through engagements with issues that call forward new publics and new modes of democratic citizenship. Whatever this is called design activism, social design, adversarial design, participatory design or something else...

  20. Evaluation of Pharmacy and Therapeutic (P&T) Committee member knowledge, attitudes and ability regarding the use of comparative effectiveness research (CER) in health care decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D H; Warholak, T L; Hines, L E; Hurwitz, J; Brown, M; Taylor, A M; Brixner, D; Malone, D C

    2014-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is a constellation of research methods designed to improve health care decision making. Educational programs that improve health care decision makers' CER knowledge and awareness may ultimately lead to more cost-effective use of health care resources. This study was conducted to evaluate changes in CER knowledge, attitudes, and ability among Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) Committee members and support staff after attending a tailored educational program. Physicians and pharmacists from two professional societies and the Indian Health Service who participated in the P&T process were invited via email to participate in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire, designed specifically for this study, prior to and following the 4-hour live, educational program on CER to determine the impact on their related knowledge, attitudes, and ability to use CER in decision-making. Rasch analysis was used to assess validity and reliability of subsections of the questionnaire and regression analysis was used to assess programmatic impact on CER knowledge, attitude, and ability. One hundred and forty of the 199 participants completed both the pre- and post-CER session questionnaires (response rate = 70.4%). Most participants (>75%) correctly answered eight of the ten knowledge items after attending the educational session. More than 60% of the respondents had a positive attitude toward CER both before and after the program. Compared to baseline (pretest), participants reported significant improvements in their perceived ability to use CER after attending the session in these areas: using CER reviews, knowledge of CER methods, identifying problems with randomized controlled trials, identifying threats to validity, understanding of evidence synthesis approaches, and evaluating the quality of CER (all P values CER educational program was effective in increasing participants' CER knowledge and self-perceived ability to evaluate

  1. Degrees of democraticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergström

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available People have tended to load their different conceptions of democracy with their own political ideals; in this paper it is argued that normative and definitional questions should rather be separated, so that political philosophers and political scientists may adopt the same concept of democracy, even if they disagree normatively or politically. Moreover, it is argued that we should replace an absolute notion of democracy by a relativized notion, which allows for different degrees of democraticity. This facilitates the separation of normative and conceptual issues and it is convenient in contexts in which “democratic deficits” are discussed – as e.g. when democracy is to be implemented on a supranational level. Moreover, it has the consequence that democratic deficits are not necessarily bad. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1837342

  2. Democratic Citizenship: European referents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María PUIG GUTIÉRREZ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Let’s sense beforehand in this article a tour concerning the educational European policies that favors the development of a democratic citizenship. The aim that we chase is to understand the way in which nowadays it is being interpreted and stimulated the Citizenship education from European Union. for it we offer a conceptual delimiting of «Citizenship education» and later, we show an analysis of the principal documents and materials elaborated principally by the Council of Europe that mark the way followed by European Union as for education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC.

  3. The Third Wave of Democratization in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat (House of the Representatives) augmented by delegates from the regional territories and the groups in accordance with...unlimited THE THIRD WAVE OF DEMOCRATIZATION IN INDONESIA Azizan bin Md Delin Lieutenant Colonel, Malaysian Army LL B. (Hons), UiTM, Malaysia , 1996...Article 2(1) of the 1945 Constitution reads: "The Majelis Permusyawaratan Rakyat (People’s Consultative Assembly) shall consist of members of the

  4. Leadership in a Democratic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of a democratic school leader and understand how his conception of leadership is congruent or incongruent with notions of democracy and democratic leadership. This small, participant-observer case study follows a democratic school leader and his staff for a year and examines those challenges…

  5. Democratic contract law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the normative relationship between contract law and democracy. In particular, it argues that in order to be legitimate contract law needs to have a democratic basis. Private law is not different in this respect from public law. Thus, the first claim made in this article will

  6. Learning Democratic Global Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavelsrud, Magnus

    1996-01-01

    Outlines a model process of developing knowledge from within different groups and cultures to allow more equitable participation of all world societies in the definition of global governance. Reviews concepts relevant to education's contributions toward learning and creating democratic global governance. Discusses the educational utility of…

  7. Democratization in Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmanuel, Nikolas G.

    2013-01-01

    a political conditionality approach. Few countries have felt the weight of conditionality as much as Malawi did in the 1990s. Here, donors were able to use aid sanctions to successfully encourage democratization, while strengthening the demands of domestic opposition forces. This paper argues that three...

  8. 76 FR 29722 - Elko Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... (Pub. L. 110-343) (the Act) and operates in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The...- Determination Act; (2) Review roles of RAC committee members and Committee Chairman; (3) Overview of project...

  9. 11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Also present: ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, ATLAS Collaboration and University of Tokyo T. Kawamoto Adviser for Non-Member State Relations J. Ellis Deputy Director-General, Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen ATLAS Collaboration and KEK T.Kondo Second Secretary, Permanent Mission of Japan in Geneva K. Saito

  10. Securitization against Democratization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juego, Bonn

    2008-01-01

    paved the way either to the strengthening or resurgence of the hegemony, both in policy and discourse, of:   [a] “global war on terrorism” over historically sensitive conflict resolution mechanisms; [b] “authoritarian liberalism” over democratization; and [c] neo-liberalism over developmental statism.......   Each of these phenomena is inherently unstable and conflict-ridden. Hence, the securitization of social life in the region is not resulting in the reproduction of security-development agenda patterned after the US, but in the reproduction of social antagonisms that spring from the very contradictions...

  11. Homegrown Democracy, Homegrown Democrats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman K. Denzin

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Written on the eve of the 2004 American presidential election, this political narrative offers a critical reading of two models of democracy: Instant-Mix imperial democracy (bring to a boil, add oil, then bomb, criticized by Arundhati Roy, and Garrison Keillor’s Homegrown Democrat. Keillor’s pastoral view of democracy is anchored in LakeWobegon, his imaginary utopian community. His homegrown democracy is narrow, provincial, and White. The author concludes that he must look elsewhere for his alternative view of democracy.

  12. 27 Mayıs Darbesi Sonrası Celal Bayar ve Eski Demokrat Partililerin Türk Siyasi Hayatına Etkileri Ss, 2585-2598 The Effects of Celal Bayar and Former-Democratic Party Members on Turkish Political Life After the Coup of 27th May

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim YALANSIZ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Coup of 27th May 1960 was made against the Democratic Partygovernment. Other actors of the multi-party political life in Turkey,such as Republican Peoples Party and Republican Peasants’ NationParty were keeping its position, Democratic Party was officially bannedby the new regime. After the coup, 500 members of the party, includingex-prime ministers, ministers, parliamentarians and officials werearrested. A new court named Supreme Court of Justice wasestablished. After a year of prosecution process, Supreme Court ofJustice sentenced these members ranging from life imprisonment todeath penalty. The ex-president and the ministers who were sentencedto life imprisonment and death penalty were all pardoned after theheavy pressures of the Democratic Party electorates. The need for astabilization and the political anticipations of the new parties alsoplayed an important role on this decision. Some of them was freedbefore because of their health problems. After gaining their freedom,these politicians struggled for their political rights and fought to gettheir reestablishments. Although these politicians were all freed fromtheir penalties, they were also banned from any politicial activities, suchas membership to parties and participation in elections. They also werebanned from doing their previous jobs. At the end they got their rightsafter the reconciliation of the government and the opposition. With thenegative effects of 12th March 1971 and 12th September 1980 events,this process turned into a very harsh one. Former Democratic Partymembers at that time initiated to form their ex-party again. By doingthis they also wanted to establish the center-right policy again inTurkey. They were unsuccessful at this initiative because of the newand powerful parties of that time, most of which were founded by theex-Democrats, and their supporters from the young generations. In thisarticle, the struggle of the ex-Democrats will be evaluated. 27 Mayıs darbesi

  13. Nuclear Information Democratization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savić, Dobrica

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear information (Nl) interests people for many reasons, with energy supply, safety, and security being at the top of the list. Democratizing nuclear information has its roots in the growth of a knowledge-based economy, the knowledge worker as a user of nuclear information, developments in information and communication technologies (ICT), and the impact of internet growth. Results of democratization are apparent in the process of information creation, in how nuclear information is distributed and accessed, and in the conditions for using the information found. The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) both reflects and contributes to these trends. Nuclear information falls under the overall umbrella of scientific and technical information (STI). It is highly specialized, but it follows general principles and trends of STI. The world of STI has its own culture and its own long-established rules of use and existence. These have brought us many inventions and improvements, introduced important technological changes, and made our lives and work much easier and more pleasurable. However, the world is constantly changing, and the traditional closed STI environment, including the world of nuclear information, is not keeping up with today’s changes. (author)

  14. Optical network democratization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejabati, Reza; Peng, Shuping; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2016-03-06

    The current Internet infrastructure is not able to support independent evolution and innovation at physical and network layer functionalities, protocols and services, while at same time supporting the increasing bandwidth demands of evolving and heterogeneous applications. This paper addresses this problem by proposing a completely democratized optical network infrastructure. It introduces the novel concepts of the optical white box and bare metal optical switch as key technology enablers for democratizing optical networks. These are programmable optical switches whose hardware is loosely connected internally and is completely separated from their control software. To alleviate their complexity, a multi-dimensional abstraction mechanism using software-defined network technology is proposed. It creates a universal model of the proposed switches without exposing their technological details. It also enables a conventional network programmer to develop network applications for control of the optical network without specific technical knowledge of the physical layer. Furthermore, a novel optical network virtualization mechanism is proposed, enabling the composition and operation of multiple coexisting and application-specific virtual optical networks sharing the same physical infrastructure. Finally, the optical white box and the abstraction mechanism are experimentally evaluated, while the virtualization mechanism is evaluated with simulation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  16. Democratic cultural policy : democratic forms and policy consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The forms that are adopted to give practical meaning to democracy are assessed to identify what their implications are for the production of public policies in general and cultural policies in particular. A comparison of direct, representative, democratic elitist and deliberative versions of democracy identifies clear differences between them in terms of policy form and democratic practice. Further elaboration of these differences and their consequences are identified as areas for further res...

  17. The democratic role orientation by journalists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svith, Flemming

    This paper investigates the democratic role orientation in news media and the perception and preference in the population towards the democratic practice of these news media.......This paper investigates the democratic role orientation in news media and the perception and preference in the population towards the democratic practice of these news media....

  18. DUBNA: Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The political upheaval in what was the Soviet Union was reflected in an Extraordinary Plenipotentiaries Committee of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Member States, held in Dubna, near Moscow, on 10-13 December, with representatives of eleven sovereign republics of the former Soviet State taking part

  19. Democratic parenting: paradoxical messages in democratic parent education theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Shlomit; Gastil, John

    2013-06-01

    Some prominent parent education theories in the United States and other Western countries base their educational viewpoint explicitly on democratic values, such as mutual respect, equality and personal freedom. These democratic parenting theories advocate sharing power with children and including them in family decision making. This study presents a textual analysis of two such theories, the Adlerian model of parent education and the Parent Effectiveness Training (PET) model, as they are embodied in two original bestselling textbooks. Through content and argumentation analysis of these influential texts, this study examines the paradoxes inherent in these two theories when they articulate how to implement fully democratic principles within the parent-child relationship. We discover that in spite of their democratic rationale, both books offer communication practices that guide the child to modify misbehaviour, enforce parental power, and manipulate the child to make decisions that follow parental judgment, and thus do not endorse the use of a truly democratic parenting style. We suggest, as an alternative to the democratic parenting style, that parents be introduced to a guardianship management style, in which they do not share authority with children, but seek opportunities for enabling children to make more autonomous decisions and participate in more family decision making.

  20. Statement dated 1 June 1994 by a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The attached text of a statement by a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, dated 1 June 1994, is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. This text was received by the Secretariat before the withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the Agency

  1. Is John Locke a democrat?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

      Over recent years there has been a tendency to present John Locke as an equalitarian democrat (Ashcraft) and being close to the political views of the levellers (Waldron). This is not a completely new interpretation (Kendall, 1941), but contrasts with the prevalent view presented in textbooks (......, criteria for a democratic process, and the institutions of polyarchy. The conclusion has implications for the relationship between political liberalism and constitutionalism on the one hand and democracy on the other....

  2. Meritocratic administration and democratic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornell, Agnes; Lapuente, Victor

    2014-01-01

    , in democracies with meritocratic administrations, incumbents are credibly constrained from undertaking partial policies because their hands are tied in terms of managing the staff policy of the state apparatus. Consequently, countries with meritocratic bureaucracies have greater prospects for democratic...... stability. Empirically, we illustrate the mechanisms with two well-documented cases of democratic transitions that enshrined a politicized administration – Spain (1876–1936) and Venezuela (1958–1998) – and one transition that kept a meritocratic bureaucracy, Spain (1975–)....

  3. Effects of a community scorecard on improving the local health system in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo: qualitative evidence using the most significant change technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lara S; Labrecque, Guillaume; Batonon, Isatou; Salsi, Viviana; Ratnayake, Ruwan

    2015-01-01

    More than a decade of conflict has weakened the health system in the Democratic Republic of Congo and decreased its ability to respond to the needs of the population. Community scorecards have been conceived as a way to increase accountability and responsiveness of service providers, but there is limited evidence of their effects, particularly in fragile and conflict-affected contexts. This paper describes the implementation of community scorecards within a community-driven reconstruction project in two provinces of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Between June 2012 and November 2013, 45 stories of change in the health system were collected from village development committee, health committee, community members (20 men and 18 women) and healthcare providers (n = 7) in 25 sites using the Most Significant Change technique. Stories were analyzed qualitatively for content related to the types and mechanisms of change observed. The most salient changes were related to increased transparency and community participation in health facility management, and improved quality of care. Quality of care included increased access to services, improved patient-provider relationships, improved performance of service providers, and improved maintenance of physical infrastructure. Changes occurred through many different mechanisms including provider actions in response to information, pressure from community representatives, or supervisors; and joint action and improved collaboration by health facility committees and providers. Although it is often assumed that confrontation is a primary mechanism for citizens to change state-provided services, this study demonstrates that healthcare providers may also be motivated to change through other means. Positive experiences of community scorecards can provide a structured space for interface between community members and the health system, allowing users to voice their opinions and preferences and bridge information gaps for both

  4. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The new members since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.43) are: Kazakhstan and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The Democratic People's Republic of Korea withdrew from membership of the Agency as of 13 June 1994. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the 121 States became members of the Agency, as well as those States whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but who have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  5. 75 FR 28543 - GMUG Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ...) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to gather the... about the roles of members, support of the committee and other pertinent information, elect a...

  6. 76 FR 7531 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ...) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to orientate new committee members to the Secural Rural Schools Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and...

  7. Democratic Public Discourse in the Coming Autarchic Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Ilie Farte

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to tackle the problem of living together – as dignified human beings – in a certain territory in the field of social philosophy, on the theoretical grounding ensured by some remarkable exponents of the Austrian School − and by means of the praxeologic method. Because political tools diminish the human nature not only of those who use them, but also of those who undergo their effects, people can live a life worthy of a human being only as members of some autarchic or self-governing communities. As a spontaneous order, every autarchic community is inherently democratic, inasmuch as it makes possible free involvement, peaceful coordination, free expression and the free reproduction of ideas. The members of autarchic communities are moral individuals who avoid aggression, practice self-control, seek a dynamical efficiency and establish (together with their fellow human beings a democratic public discourse.

  8. 76 FR 19176 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 89) to be held May 11-20, 2011. The primary matters to be considered at MSC... --Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security --Capacity-building for the... business --Report of the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend these two meetings up...

  9. 78 FR 32699 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Safety of Navigation to be... --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the seating... system ``BeiDou'' in the maritime field --International Telecommunication Union (ITU) matters, including...

  10. 77 FR 47491 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the seating... Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes... --Amendment 37-14 to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and supplements, including...

  11. DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND THE POOR: ADJUSTING TO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CIU

    what actually constitute the fundamental challenges of the Nigerian democratic ... Democratic governance has inherent checks and balance principles that ..... billion on less than $2 a day globally (WDI, 2012), with Africa accounting for a large.

  12. Advancing Democratic Leadership through Critical Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Kimberly A.

    1995-01-01

    Examines how the concepts advanced by critical theorists exemplify democratic leadership. The concept of democratic leadership is explored as a moral imperative of human issues, and the implications of leadership behavior that emulate the principles of democracy are discussed. (SLD)

  13. Methods of legitimation: how ethics committees decide which reasons count in public policy decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kyle T

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, liberal democratic societies have struggled with the question of how best to balance expertise and democratic participation in the regulation of emerging technologies. This study aims to explain how national deliberative ethics committees handle the practical tension between scientific expertise, ethical expertise, expert patient input, and lay public input by explaining two institutions' processes for determining the legitimacy or illegitimacy of reasons in public policy decision-making: that of the United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and the United States' American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). The articulation of these 'methods of legitimation' draws on 13 in-depth interviews with HFEA and ASRM members and staff conducted in January and February 2012 in London and over Skype, as well as observation of an HFEA deliberation. This study finds that these two institutions employ different methods in rendering certain arguments legitimate and others illegitimate: while the HFEA attempts to 'balance' competing reasons but ultimately legitimizes arguments based on health and welfare concerns, the ASRM seeks to 'filter' out arguments that challenge reproductive autonomy. The notably different structures and missions of each institution may explain these divergent approaches, as may what Sheila Jasanoff (2005) terms the distinctive 'civic epistemologies' of the US and the UK. Significantly for policy makers designing such deliberative committees, each method differs substantially from that explicitly or implicitly endorsed by the institution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. democratic approaches to environmental education: dream or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    processes of democratic pedagogy are often antithetical to the processes of contemporary schooling. Based on a case study of an attempt at democratic pedagogy in an Australian primary school, this paper explores some of the factors that may ... individual citizens for participation in and commit- ment to democratic ...

  15. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-26

    Jun 26, 2015 ... including communication; sensitivities to other cultures and people; scientific and professional behavior; desire for knowledge; personal management skills; compassion for animals and people; and personal integrity and ethics. All of these factors have been identified as important in selecting for successful.

  16. Democratic management and architecture school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Aparecida de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is a conceptual and theoretical research on school organization and its democratization, focusing on one aspect of an objective nature: its architecture. The study was based on the academic literature on democratization and theoretical contribution of Michel Foucault, with regard to the analysis of space as a resourcecontrol, surveillance and training, going through a historical review of the modelconstruction of school buildings in Brazil. It is therefore a sociological analysis of the school environment, in relation to the democratization process of basic education, understood as ensuring that the conditions of access and permanence to a universalquality education, and conceived and gestated from collective interests of its users.We conclude that the architecture of public schools in Brazil do not provides democratic management, either by format controller of buildings constructed in the republican period, either by the current economic priority for the construction of public school buildings, which includes little or no space for collective activities. The character of the buildings remains controller, no more for its architecture, but made possible by technological development, which allows monitoring by video cameras, which is made with the permission and support of community.

  17. Deliberative Democratic Evaluation in Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hreinsdottir, Anna Magnea; Davidsdottir, Sigurlina

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the merit of using deliberative democratic evaluations is studied in light of ten questions asked by House and Howe, which defined the approach and raise issues of interests, representation, and choice of stakeholders, power balances and procedures for controlling them, participation, reflection and deliberation. Suggestions by…

  18. Introducing Children to Democratic Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Janet; Brophy, Jere

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have been studying children's knowledge, thinking, and attitudes about government for several decades. However, the studies focusing on elementary students, and especially primary students, have little or nothing to say about children's ideas about democracy or democratic government. That is because children at these ages have not yet…

  19. 78 FR 49260 - Trademark Public Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... office automation.'' 35 U.S.C. 5(b)(3). The Committee also includes three (3) non-voting members.... While away from home or regular place of business, each member shall be allowed travel expenses...

  20. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF... alternate is selected shall serve in place of that member on the committee, and shall have and be able to... members of the committee shall serve for terms of two years: Provided, That four of the initially selected...

  1. The ESO Scientific and Technical Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léna, P.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1978, the structure of ESO involves a Scientific and Technical Committee (STC) which advises the Council on scientific and technical matters. This committee meets twice a year, usually at Garehing; its members are nominated by the Council and their term is 4 years. The STC has 10 members, who are as evenly distributed as possible among member countries, although indeed mainly chosen for their scientific abilities. The chairman is invited to attend Council meetings and to report to the members.

  2. AGU Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  3. Communication dated 3 June 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The texts of an Interview by a Spokesman for the General Department of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, dated 3 June 1994, and Relevant Information, are being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. These texts were received by the Secretariat before the withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the Agency

  4. Communications dated 2 and 6 June 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The texts of two telex communications, dated 2 and 6 June 1994, which the International Atomic Energy Agency received from the General Department of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea are being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. These texts were received by the Secretariat before the withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the Agency

  5. 1976 compilation of national nuclear data committees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This list of currently existing National Nuclear Data Committees, and their memberships, is published with the object of promoting the interaction and enhance the awareness of nuclear data activities in IAEA Member States. The following Member States have indicated the existence of a nuclear data committee in their countries: Bangladesh, Bolivia, Bulgaria, France, Hungary, India, Japan, Romania, Sweden, USSR, United Kingdom, USA, Yugoslavia

  6. Laying the Foundations for Democratic Behavior - A Comparison of Two Different Approaches to Democratic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola HUANG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A democracy is a society in which everyone has equal rights and is able to participate in decision-making processes. Consequently, in a democratic society, democratic behavior is essential. This work investigates the question: In what ways and to what extent can alternative models of education support the development of democratic skills in children? To explore this question, the author analyzes and compares two different approaches to democratic education: The Sudbury approach and the democratic free school approach. The study is based on qualitative research participant observation and open-ended interviews conducted at different Sudbury and democratic free schools in the US.

  7. Democratizing the Multinational Corporation (MNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Hallin, Carina Antonia

    2017-01-01

    insights that can be used strategically if management at headquarters is cognizant about its existence and able to collect this information. We introduce the notion of democratizing the strategic engagement of managers and employees at all levels and locations of the multinational corporation (MNC......) as an essential leadership paradigm. The implied interaction between slow central analytical reasoning at headquarters and updated insights from fast decentralized initiatives in local subsidiaries constitutes an effective dynamic responsive mechanism. This dynamic interaction implies that critical strategic...

  8. Democratization of philosophy of technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Kumar Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Technology is a form of culture. Technology is shaping the theoretical framework of our social existence. The technological form of life is part and parcel of culture, just as culture in the human sense inescapably implies technologies. There are unfathomable effects of technology on human culture and society. This paper presents the background and the editorial introduction to the special issue: symposium on Education, Technology, & Democracy: Democratization of Technologies.

  9. Ethiopia: A Democratic Developmental State?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fesseha Mulu Gebremariam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ruling Ethiopia People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF in its notable second reform appraisal held in the aftermath of the 2005 national election concluded that the utmost priority of the government should be realizing fastest and sustainable economic growth that fairly benefits its citizens’ unless the very existence of the country wouldn’t be guaranteed. Given the history of poverty reduction in developing countries, particularly in Africa, EPRDF realized that it is unthinkable to eradicate poverty from Ethiopia adopting neo-liberalism. Above all, the miraculous economic transformation of the South East Asian countries like South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong has proved that there is another way to development, not just neo-liberalism. Accordingly, EPRDF, after examining South Korea’s and Taiwan’s history of economic development in particular where both countries have had a large section of rural population unlike Hong Kong and Singapore where both are urban, found ‘developmental state’ relevant to Ethiopia. However, unlike these countries which were originally under non-democratic regimes where their leaders fear the rural peasant and external aggression from their communist rivals, EPRDF has had a great support of rural and urban population with no imminent foreign threat(s, and decided to execute the ideology rather under the umbrella of democracy. Therefore, employing secondary sources, this desk study aims to analyze whether Ethiopia is a ‘democratic developmental state?’ And, concludes that given the practices of the government vis-a-vis the principles of democracy and developmental state, Ethiopia couldn’t be taken as best model for democratic developmental state, rather emerging developmental state.

  10. 45 CFR 703.9 - Reimbursement of members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement of members. 703.9 Section 703.9... AND FUNCTIONS OF STATE ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 703.9 Reimbursement of members. (a) Advisory Committee members may be reimbursed by the Commission by a per diem subsistence allowance and for travel expenses at...

  11. Democratic values, emotions and emotivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore the relation between democratic values and emotions. The author argues that democratic values and emotional judgments are inter-reducible: political agents use emotional judgments to reflexively evaluate normative paradigms of political life. In the first part of the paper, the author describes the state of emotions in contemporary political philosophy and identifies Charles Stevenson’s ethical conception of emotivism as the first comprehensive attempt to neutrally conceptualize emotions in moral and political thinking. The second part of the paper explores the shortcomings of emotivism and finds an adequate alternative in Martha Nussbaum’s concept of emotional judgment as the one that contains beliefs and values about social objects. In the final part of the paper, the author identifies that moral and political disagreements emerge in democracies from ranking of the importance of political objects. The evaluation criteria for this type of ranking is derived from democratic values which are reducible to agents’ emotional judgments. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179076

  12. Democratizing the world health organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pas, R; van Schaik, L G

    2014-02-01

    A progressive erosion of the democratic space appears as one of the emerging challenges in global health today. Such delimitation of the political interplay has a particularly evident impact on the unique public interest function of the World Health Organization (WHO). This paper aims to identify some obstacles for a truly democratic functioning of the UN specialized agency for health. The development of civil society's engagement with the WHO, including in the current reform proposals, is described. The paper also analyses how today's financing of the WHO--primarily through multi-bi financing mechanisms--risks to choke the agency's role in global health. Democratizing the public debate on global health, and therefore the role of the WHO, requires a debate on its future role and engagement at the country level. This desirable process can only be linked to national debates on public health, and the re-definition of health as a primary political and societal concern. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Viewpoint: Decision-making in committees

    OpenAIRE

    Li Hao; Wing Suen

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in the theory of committee decision-making. A committee consists of self-interested members who make a public decision by aggregating imperfect information dispersed among them according to a pre-specified decision rule. We focus on costly information acquisition, strategic information aggregation, and rules and processes that enhance the quality of the committee decision. Seeming inefficiencies of the committee decision-making process such as over-cau...

  14. The Refugee Crisis as a European Democratic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryssoula Kapartziani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The institutional European Union is facing two types of crisis. On the one hand, it needs to manage the current refugee’s influx efficiently and on the other hand it needs to deal with the democratic deficit that emerged by Europe’s incapacity to make the required decisions and gain the justification of its actions from its own people. This article aims firstly to highlight the legal framework (rule of law that governs the asylum and migration procedures as well as the democratic gap that these provisions created in the different member states, as a crystal clear example of how a national competence became supranational. Furthermore, it illustrates the refugee profile, as a human being with acquired human rights through the theories of H. Arendt and the U. Beck. Lastly, the cosmopolitan approach is suggested in order to overcome the refugee crisis but a well-established integration should be the long term goal of Europe.

  15. 76 FR 72204 - Renewal of Advisory Committee Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    .... II. Structure The Committee shall consist of 17 members appointed by the Bank's Board of Directors on..., services, and State government, with not less than three members being representative of the small business... members being representative of the [[Page 72205

  16. The ESO Observing Programmes Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, B. E.

    1982-06-01

    Since 1978 the ESO Observing Programmes Committee (OPC) has "the function to inspect and rank the proposals made for observing programmes at La Silla, and thereby to advise the Director General on the distribution of observing time". The members (one from each member country) and their alternates are nominated by the respective national committees for five-year terms (not immediately renewable). The terms are staggered so that each year one or two persons are replaced. The Chairman is appointed annually by the Council. He is invited to attend Council meetings and to report to its members.

  17. Antibody Scientific Committee | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically, the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program. The members of the Antibody Scientific Committee include:

  18. 76 FR 44017 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ...] Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to... and former members of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee. FDA intends to make background...

  19. Communication dated 4 April 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The text of the Statement by the Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea dated 4 April 1994 is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

  20. Communication dated 3 May 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The text of an Interview by a Spokesman of the Foreign Ministry of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea concerning the replacement of fuel rods at the 5-Megawatt Experimental Nuclear Power Station, dated 3 May 1994, is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

  1. Communication dated 20 April 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The text of a Memorandum of the Foreign Ministry of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea dated 20 April 1994 is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

  2. Communications dated 18 and 19 March 1994 received from the permanent mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Texts of the following communications received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, concerning IAEA safeguards inspections, are being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the Request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

  3. Communication dated 14 May 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The text of an Interview by a Spokesman of the Foreign Ministry of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, dated 14 May 1994, is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

  4. Communication dated 24 March 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The text of the Statement by a Spokesman of the General Department of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea dated 24 March 1994 is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

  5. Laying the Foundations for Democratic Behavior - A Comparison of Two Different Approaches to Democratic Education

    OpenAIRE

    Viola HUANG

    2014-01-01

    A democracy is a society in which everyone has equal rights and is able to participate in decision-making processes. Consequently, in a democratic society, democratic behavior is essential. This work investigates the question: In what ways and to what extent can alternative models of education support the development of democratic skills in children? To explore this question, the author analyzes and compares two different approaches to democratic education: The Sudbury approach and the democr...

  6. A new research reactor? Report by the Select Committee for an inquiry into the contract for a new reactor at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    ) of the Committee that disagrees with the Majority Report Conclusions and Recommendations. It is argued that even by overstating opposition to the Government's decision and its implementation and understating support for it, a rational analysis of the main body of the report contents could not reach the Conclusions and Recommendations. On the contrary, the other supplementary report, lodged by the Democrat member of the Committee, indicates that the Australian Democrats support the majority report. However, one of their main concern is the issue of radioactive wate management, so if research reactors did not produce such waste (or if a solution was in place to deal with the nuclear waste), then the scientific justification for operating this kind of facility was considered to be powerful indeed. Copyright (2001) Commonwealth of Australia

  7. Chinese Debates on the Democratization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer Møller Christensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The new economic importance of the Chinese economy has created Chinese expectations that the country will be able to regain a political and cultural position in the world in accordance with this economic status. But for China to become a respected member of world society, one of the most severe obstacles is its, from a western perspective, undemocratic political system. The article describes the lively debate going on among Chinese intellectuals of diverse political-ideological convictions about what kind of democracy should be the model for China’s future political system. The liberally oriented intellectuals want a political system very much like American liberal constitutional democracy, while intellectuals on the left side of the political spectrum want a democracy with a clear socialist basis. Although Chinese intellectuals form a minority in society, these intellectual debates are sure to have influence on both public opinion and opinions and attitudes among political decision makers inside the Chinese Communist Party. Further investigations will have to establish to what degree the perceptions of China's political future and democratization are reflected in the political attitudes among the Chinese in general, and how they are perceived inside the confines of political decision making in the Chinese Communist Party. Only then will it be possible to answer the questions: "What kind of democracy do the Chinese want?" and "What kind of democracy are the Chinese going to get?"

  8. Annex 5. Monitoring committee

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Head of monitoring committee: the Research Commission of the govern­ment of French Polynesia. Panel members Representatives of the following organisations: IRD centre in Papeete Oceanologic Center of the Pacific/Ifremer Investment Promotion Authority Environment Division EPIC Vanille Institut Louis-Malardé Gepsun “Natural Substances process engineering” technology platform (cf. Abbreviations) Fisheries Division Economic Affairs Division External Trade Division Development of Industry and the...

  9. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Main points examined at the meeting of 24 June 2009 Results of the 2009 MARS exercise The Committee took note of the results of the 2009 MARS exercise presented by the Head of the HR Department, expressing satisfaction for the early availability of the statistics and for the fact that the analysis of the results covered the last three years. Status report on the work on the five-yearly review The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Gildemyn on the data collection procedure for the 2010 five-yearly review (staff, fellows, associate members of the personnel, CHIS) and of the proposed work schedule. Implications for employment conditions of the discussions at the Finance Committee and Council on 17 and 18 June 2009 The Chairman briefly reported on the discussions at the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in June 2009, on the 2010-2014 medium-term plan and the 2010 preliminary draft budget, as well as on the modified strategy and goals for 2009. The Committee ...

  10. The Democratic Process: Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaw, Donald, Ed.

    When the Berlin Wall (East Germany) came down, it symbolically foretold the end of the Soviet Union domination of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. This resource guide examines the process toward democratization occurring in those regions. The guide updates the available classroom material on the democratic process. It is divided into three…

  11. Democratic Legitimacy and the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    This is an introduction to a Special Issue that first considers representative and deliberative conceptions of democratic legitimacy in the EU, and then presents empirical research on how the institutions of the EU are attempting to increase the democratic legitimacy of the multi-level political

  12. The Arab Media: Localizing Its Democratic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    of others’” and therefore could be viewed as a legitimate function of the state. 32 Noam Chomsky , Necessary Illusions: Thought Control in Democratic...Social Movements.” Canadian Journal of Sociology 24, no. 1 (Winter 1999): 1–34. Chomsky , Noam. Necessary Illusions: Thought Control in Democratic

  13. Improving democratic governance through institutional design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Skelcher, Chris

    2010-01-01

    the democratic governance of regulatory policies in Europe, and highlight the way in which civic participation and democratic ownership is given equal weight to economic competitiveness. We then discuss the potential for institutionalized participatory governance to develop and its prospects for improving...

  14. Conceptualizing Education Policy in Democratic Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Laura B.

    2009-01-01

    Although theorists and policy makers agree that schooling should be democratic, what this exactly means often varies. This article establishes a conceptual model for analyzing education policy in democratic societies, based on the key concepts of equality, diversity, participation, choice, and cohesion. The model facilitates the design,…

  15. The Democratic Vision of Carl Schmitt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Hviid

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to justify two propositions. One, that Schmitt’s political vision is indeed democratic and second, that Schmitt’s democratic vision, plebiscitary or leadership democracy, is better adapted to our modern political condition and the challenges confronting modern...

  16. Peace and Development : Democratization, Poverty Reduction and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Peace and Development : Democratization, Poverty Reduction and Risk Mitigation in Fragile and Post Conflict States. Both the social science literature and policymakers tend to take for granted that poverty reduction, risk mitigation and democratization are mutually reinforcing. This basic assumption was first challenged ...

  17. Discussing the democratic deficit: effects of media and interpersonal communication on satisfaction with EU democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.; van Spanje, J.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The perception of a democratic deficit in the European Union (EU) is widespread. In which circumstances is this perception affected by mass media and interpersonal communication? To answer this question, we analyze data from representative samples of citizens in 21 EU member states (N = 22,806) and

  18. Democratization in the Arab World: Prospects and Lessons from Around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    making, and transitional justice (holding former regime members to account for abuses); (4) state and social cohesion, including social cleavages, insur ...Encarnacion (2009), p. 5. 15 Pinto (2010), pp. 348–350. 118 Democratization in the Arab World gave Western governments, especially West Germany ...based on liberalization, privatization, and deregulation of the economy similar to the program that Carlos Menem implemented in Argentina. The

  19. Historical Precedents, Trans-Historical Strategies, and the Myth of Democratization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Estera

    1992-01-01

    Outlines coincidences between the birth of Dada and the birth of Fluxus. Charts the adoption of similar ahistorical strategies by members of both movements as they attempted to position themselves historically. Questions the assumption that democratization of the arts is the natural result of artistic actions that attempt to break down the line…

  20. Factors influencing the effectiveness of research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppli, C A; Fraser, D

    2007-05-01

    Research ethics committees - animal ethics committees (AECs) for animal-based research and institutional research boards (IRBs) for human subjects - have a key role in research governance, but there has been little study of the factors influencing their effectiveness. The objectives of this study were to examine how the effectiveness of a research ethics committee is influenced by committee composition and dynamics, recruitment of members, workload, participation level and member turnover. As a model, 28 members of AECs at four universities in western Canada were interviewed. Committees were selected to represent variation in the number and type of protocols reviewed, and participants were selected to include different types of committee members. We found that a bias towards institutional or scientific interests may result from (1) a preponderance of institutional and scientist members, (2) an intimidating atmosphere for community members and other minority members, (3) recruitment of community members who are affiliated with the institution and (4) members joining for reasons other than to fulfil the committee mandate. Thoroughness of protocol review may be influenced by heavy workloads, type of review process and lack of full committee participation. These results, together with results from the literature on research ethics committees, suggested potential ways to improve the effectiveness of research ethics committees.

  1. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online

  2. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  3. 77 FR 40323 - Notice of Invitation for Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics AGENCY: National Agricultural Statistics..., State agriculture representatives, and agriculture-related business and marketing experts. Members serve... annually. All meetings are open to the public. Committee members are reimbursed for official travel...

  4. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany – results and a comparison of two surveys performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The objective of this project was to evaluate the quality and quantity of initial applications for a clinical trial according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP ordinance (German: GCP-Verordnung, GCP-V, the quality of evaluations of those applications by Ethics Committees (ECs/Investigational Review Boards (IRBs in Germany as well as the pattern of EC objections in their reasoned opinions (vote. In order to identify a change over time, the results of the present survey were also compared with a survey performed in 2008.Methods: Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective EC in charge of the coordinating principle investigator (coordinating EC in 2011, a written survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa was conducted in 2012. The answers to the questionnaire were analyzed descriptively. Since the data set collected in 2011 was structurally identical with the data set gained in 2007 both surveys were compared.Results: Of the 24 companies represented on the vfa Clinical Research/Quality Assurance Subcommittee, 75% (18 took part in the survey. Survey evaluation was based on a total of 251 applications of these 18 companies submitted to 43 ECs. These account for about 21% of 1,214 applications for authorization of commercial and non-commercial phase I–IV clinical trials submitted to the regulatory authorities (BfArM and PEI in 2011.In comparison to 2007, a lower amount of applications (n=251 in 2011 vs. n=288 in 2007 was submitted to a slightly higher number of ECs (43 in 2011 vs. 40 in 2007. The amount of objections increased by 21% from 1,299 (2007 to 1,574 (2011 resulting in an average of 4.5 (2007 vs. 6.3 (2011 objections per application. Overall, the analysis of both formal and content related objections revealed almost the same pattern as in the previous survey. In total, the most frequent objections applied to the patient information and consent

  5. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany--results and a comparison of two surveys performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Hagen; Busta, Susanne; Jost, Bertfried; Bethke, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the quality and quantity of initial applications for a clinical trial according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP) ordinance (German: GCP-Verordnung, GCP-V), the quality of evaluations of those applications by Ethics Committees (ECs)/Investigational Review Boards (IRBs) in Germany as well as the pattern of EC objections in their reasoned opinions (vote). In order to identify a change over time, the results of the present survey were also compared with a survey performed in 2008. Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective EC in charge of the coordinating principle investigator (coordinating EC) in 2011, a written survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa) was conducted in 2012. The answers to the questionnaire were analyzed descriptively. Since the data set collected in 2011 was structurally identical with the data set gained in 2007 both surveys were compared. Of the 24 companies represented on the vfa Clinical Research/Quality Assurance Subcommittee, 75% (18) took part in the survey. Survey evaluation was based on a total of 251 applications of these 18 companies submitted to 43 ECs. These account for about 21% of 1,214 applications for authorization of commercial and non-commercial phase I-IV clinical trials submitted to the regulatory authorities (BfArM and PEI) in 2011. In comparison to 2007, a lower amount of applications (n=251 in 2011 vs. n=288 in 2007) was submitted to a slightly higher number of ECs (43 in 2011 vs. 40 in 2007). The amount of objections increased by 21% from 1,299 (2007) to 1,574 (2011) resulting in an average of 4.5 (2007) vs. 6.3 (2011) objections per application. Overall, the analysis of both formal and content related objections revealed almost the same pattern as in the previous survey. In total, the most frequent objections applied to the patient information and consent form followed in descending order by trial

  6. Whose Canon? Culturalization versus Democratization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Bjurström

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Current accounts – and particularly the critique – of canon formation are primarily based on some form of identity politics. In the 20th century a representational model of social identities replaced cultivation as the primary means to democratize the canons of the fine arts. In a parallel development, the discourse on canons has shifted its focus from processes of inclusion to those of exclusion. This shift corresponds, on the one hand, to the construction of so-called alternative canons or counter-canons, and, on the other hand, to attempts to restore the authority of canons considered to be in a state of crisis or decaying. Regardless of the democratic stance of these efforts, the construction of alternatives or the reestablishment of decaying canons does not seem to achieve their aims, since they break with the explicit and implicit rules of canon formation. Politically motivated attempts to revise or restore a specific canon make the workings of canon formation too visible, transparent and calculated, thereby breaking the spell of its imaginary character. Retracing the history of the canonization of the fine arts reveals that it was originally tied to the disembedding of artists and artworks from social and worldly affairs, whereas debates about canons of the fine arts since the end of the 20th century are heavily dependent on their social, cultural and historical reembedding. The latter has the character of disenchantment, but has also fettered the canon debate in notions of “our” versus “their” culture. However, by emphasizing the dedifferentiation of contemporary processes of culturalization, the advancing canonization of popular culture seems to be able to break with identity politics that foster notions of “our” culture in the present thinking on canons, and push it in a more transgressive, syncretic or hybrid direction.

  7. DEMOCRATIC ATTITUDES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge TAÇMAN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to determine the democratic attitudes of the classroomteachers. This study is a descriptive research. In this research, democratic attitude scala which was developed by“published for the attitude research labaratory” and adapted to Turkish educational system by Gözütok (1995 wasused. Research group consisted fifty teachers from four private primary schools in Ankara. The data were analyzed byone way ANOVA. According of the results of the research, democratic attitudes of teachers have been discriminated onteachers’ sexuality, seniority and graduate level

  8. Enhanced democratic learning within the Aalborg Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    2010-01-01

    The Aalborg PBL Model [Kjersdam & Enemark, 1997; Kolmos et al., 2004] is an example of a democratic learning system [Qvist, 2008]. Writing one project each semester in teams is an important element in the model. Medicine with Industrial Specialisation - a study at the Faculties of Engineering......, Science and Medicine at Aalborg University - has combined the Aalborg Model with solving cases as used by other models. A questionnaire survey related to democratic learning indicates that the democratic learning has been enhanced. This paper presents the results....

  9. Decision-making in pigeon flocks: a democratic view of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Paulo E; Marques, Paulo A M

    2012-07-15

    When travelling in groups, animals frequently have to make decisions on the direction of travel. These decisions can be based on consensus, when all individuals take part in the decision (i.e. democratic decision; social information), or leadership, when one member or a minority of members make the decision (i.e. despotic decision; personal information). Here we investigated whether decision-making on the navigation of small flocks is based on democratic or despotic decisions. Using individual and flock releases as the experimental approach, we compared the homing performances of homing pigeons that fly singly and in groups of three. Our findings show that although small groups were either governed (i.e. when individuals in the flock had age differences) or not (i.e. when individuals in the flock had the same age) by leaders, with concern to decision-making they were all ruled by democratic decisions. Moreover, the individual homing performances were not associated with leadership. Because true leaders did not assume right away the front position in the flock, we suggest that as in human groups, starting from a central position is more effective as it allows leaders to not only transmit their own information but also to average the tendencies of the other group members. Together, the results highlight the importance of democratic decisions in group decision-making.

  10. Human research ethics committees: examining their roles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Marilys; Gillam, Lynn; Rosenthal, Doreen; Bolitho, Annie

    2012-07-01

    Considerable time and resources are invested in the ethics review process. We present qualitative data on how human research ethics committee members and health researchers perceive the role and function of the committee. The findings are based on interviews with 34 Australian ethics committee members and 54 health researchers. Although all participants agreed that the primary role of the ethics committee was to protect participants, there was disagreement regarding the additional roles undertaken by committees. Of particular concern were the perceptions from some ethics committee members and researchers that ethics committees were working to protect the institution's interests, as well as being overprotective toward research participants. This has the potential to lead to poor relations and mistrust between ethics committees and researchers.

  11. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  12. Ethics Committee or Community? Examining the identity of Czech Ethics Committees in the period of transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Jiri; Zamykalova, Lenka; Mesanyova, Marie

    2010-09-01

    Reflecting on a three year long exploratory research of ethics committees in the Czech Republic authors discuss the current role and identity of research ethics committees. The research of Czech ethics committees focused on both self-presentation and self-understanding of ECs members, and how other stakeholders (representatives of the pharmaceutical industry) view them. The exploratory research was based on formal and informal communication with the members of the ethics committees. Members of the research team took part at six regular voluntary meetings of the ethics committees' members, organised by the Forum of Czech Ethics Committees, and at three summer schools of medical ethics. There were realised twenty-five semi-structured interviews as well as six focus group sessions and a participant observation of several regular meetings of three ethics committees. On the grounds of experience from the interviews a simple questionnaire survey was realised among the members of the ethics committees. The ethics committees comprise a community of members working voluntarily, without claims to remuneration or prestige; the unifying goal is protection of subjects of research. The principal working methods are dialogue and agreement. The members of the ethics committees thus, among other things, create an informal community, which can be to a certain extent seen as a Kantian ethical community in a weak sense. The phenomenon of ethics committees can also be described by terms of an epistemic community and a community of practice. These concepts, which are borrowed from other authors and areas, are used as a way how to think of ECs role and identity a bit differently and are meant as a contribution to the current international debate on the topic.

  13. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members : M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines: In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff ...

  14. 75 FR 28542 - Superior Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to orient the new Superior Resource Advisory Committee members on their roles... following business will be conducted: Overview of the roles and responsibilities of the Superior Resource...

  15. 12 CFR 620.30 - Audit committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... shareholders; review the impact of any significant accounting and auditing developments; review accounting policy changes relating to preparation of financial statements; and review annual and quarterly reports..., financial reporting and disclosure, or accounting procedures. (b) Independence. Every audit committee member...

  16. Measuring the democratic anchorage of governance networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotel, Trine; Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob

    There has been a growing debate about the democratic problems and potentials of governance networks among political scientists and public managers. While some claim that governance networks tend to undermine democracy, others argue that they have the potential to improve and strengthen democracy....... This debate is found wanting in two respects. First of all, there has been far too little discussion about what democracy means in relation to pluricentric governance networks. Second, the current debate builds on the assumption that it is possible to give a clear-cut answer to the question of the democratic...... problems and merits of governance networks. This assumption is highly questionable, and prevents a more nuanced assessment of the democratic performance of governance networks. As such, it diverts the focus of attention away from the fact that governance networks may be democratic in some respects...

  17. Democratic innovations: designing institutions for citizen participation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Graham

    2009-01-01

    At a time when there is growing disillusionment with the institutions of advanced industrial democracies, there is also increasing interest in new ways of involving citizens in the democratic process...

  18. The democratizing impact of governance networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    impact of governance networks. It claims that the initial celebration of the pluralization of public governance and the subsequent call for a democratic anchorage of governance networks should give way to a new concern for how governance networks can strengthen and democratize political leadership. Tying......Initially, governance networks were intended as tools for making public governance more effective. Yet, scholars have argued that governance networks also have the potential to democratize public governance. This article provides an overview of theoretical arguments pertaining to the democratizing...... political leadership to networked processes of collaborative governance fosters ‘interactive political leadership’. The article presents theoretical arguments in support of interactive political leadership, and provides an illustrative case study of a recent attempt to strengthen political leadership...

  19. NPPCI - topics in the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenbein, D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes research and development activities in the field of computerized operator support systems, self-powered detectors, boiling diagnostic and loose part detection systems in the German Democratic Republic

  20. Democratic Leadership Doesn't Just Happen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Catherine L.

    1977-01-01

    The research cited and the inservice experiences with teachers described suggest that attitude screening criteria and a training program show promise for producing administrators and teachers with democratic leadership abilities. (Author/IRT)

  1. Strengthening Democratic Governance through ICTs : Post Election ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strengthening Democratic Governance through ICTs : Post Election ... has had several consequences, culminating in the disputed general elections of December 2007. ... Linking research to urban planning at the ICLEI World Congress 2018.

  2. 77 FR 47490 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ...: --Adoption of the agenda --Decisions of other IMO bodies --Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS... facilities --Consideration of operational and technical coordination provisions of maritime safety... Vice-Chairman for 2014 --Any other business --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the...

  3. 77 FR 72431 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... other IMO bodies --Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS): --Review and modernization of the... operational and technical coordination provisions of maritime safety information (MSI) services, including the... business --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the...

  4. 78 FR 42945 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy AGENCY... American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy... its 20 members. ARRA requires that one member have expertise in health information privacy and...

  5. "The President" Was a Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, George C.

    1976-01-01

    From 1970 until 1974, the Seattle Community College District was directed by a four-member executive committee, rather than by one chief executive officer. The history of this period is recounted, and advantages and disadvantages of the management system are identified. In sum, the system is satisfactory only in the short-run. (NHM)

  6. 78 FR 71706 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... fifth meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The fifth meeting of... Aviation Consumer Protection (ACACP) and announced those persons appointed as members. The committee's...

  7. 78 FR 55327 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... fifth meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The fifth meeting of... Consumer Protection and announced those persons appointed as members. The committee's charter, drafted in...

  8. 76 FR 46279 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ...The Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee) will hold a meeting via teleconference on Tuesday, August 23, 2011 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time (E.T.). The primary purpose of this meeting is to review sections of the Committee's draft report to the NIST Director. The sections of the draft report that the Committee will consider at the meeting will be posted on the SGAC Web site at http:// www.nist.gov/smartgrid. Interested members of the public will be able to participate in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number.

  9. The Members of the Agency. List of 20 November 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    On 20 November 1971 the Members of the Agency were the 102 States listed. It is to be noted that the United Arab Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo became the Arab Republic of Egypt and the Republic of Zaire on 2 September and 27 October 1971 respectively.

  10. VA Education Benefits: Actions Taken, but Outreach and Oversight Could Be Improved. Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives. GAO-11-256

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provided $9 billion in education benefits to service-members and veterans in fiscal year 2010, mostly through the new Post-9/11 GI Bill. In providing education benefits, VA relies on State Approving Agencies (SAA) to approve schools; and on schools to report students' enrollment status. US Government…

  11. Vietnam Education Foundation: Recent Improvements Made in Internal Controls, but Weaknesses Persist. Report to the Chairman and Ranking Member, Committee on Foreign Relations, U.S. Senate. GAO-10-442

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jess T.

    2010-01-01

    The Vietnam Education Foundation (VEF) Act of 2000 established VEF as an independent agency of the executive branch. A 13-member board of directors provides primary oversight. VEF also receives guidance from other entities in carrying out its mission to further bilateral relations between the United States and Vietnam through educational exchanges…

  12. Improving drug policy: The potential of broader democratic participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alison; Lancaster, Kari; Diprose, Rosalyn

    2018-05-01

    Policies concerned with illicit drugs vex governments. While the 'evidence-based policy' paradigm argues that governments should be informed by 'what works', in practice policy makers rarely operate this way. Moreover the evidence-based policy paradigm fails to account for democratic participatory processes, particularly how community members and people who use drugs might be included. The aim of this paper is to explore the political science thinking about democratic participation and the potential afforded in 'deliberative democracy' approaches, such as Citizens Juries and other mini-publics for improved drug policy processes. Deliberative democracy, through its focus on inclusion, equality and reasoned discussion, shows potential for drug policy reform and shifts the focus from reliance on and privileging of experts and scientific evidence. But the very nature of this kind of 'deliberation' may delimit participation, notably through its insistence on authorised modes of communication. Other forms of participation beyond reasoned deliberation aligned with the ontological view that participatory processes themselves are constitutive of subject positions and policy problems, may generate opportunities for considering how the deleterious effects of authorised modes of communication might be overcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Organizing Committee Advisory Committee 187

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organizing Committee. V M Datar (Chairman). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. D C Biswas (Convener). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. K Mahata (Secretary). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Z Ahmed. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. P V Bhagwat.

  14. The Members of the Agency: List of 3 October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    This Revision of INFCIRC/2 has been issued to inform the Member States that with effect from 3 October 1990, the German Democratic Republic acceded to the Federal Republic of Germany and the two German states have united to form one sovereign state, which as a single member of the IAEA remains bound by the provisions of the Statute. As from the date of unification, the Federal Republic of Germany will act in the International Atomic Energy Agency under the designation of ''Germany''

  15. Ethical bodies: are they possible under democratic systems? The Turkish example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Berna

    2009-09-01

    In this article, the relationship between ethics bodies and democratic concepts will be introduced. One should bear in mind that the relationship between the flourishing of ethics committees (EC) and democracy is by no means undirectional. The line of causation can easily be reversed as a higher level of democracy is likely to lead to a spurt in such committees at different levels of society. It is not a coincidence that they appear in larger numbers in relatively more open and democratic societies. In this sense, their sheer existence might be taken as a sign of a higher level of awareness for openness and democracy. EC seems to have some functions theoretically: To contribute to the eradication of corruption in society; To increase the accountability of different sections of the population; To play an important part in increasing the awareness about the rights and duties; To contribute to the spread of self-disciplining behavior in society; One final point to be emphasized is that for ethical committees to fulfill the above functions they should have a clear set of guidelines, powers to enforce them and effective deterrents to prevent wayward behavior. The principal question of how it does works in Turkey--a country located at the junction of Europe and Asia--ought to be perceived from the point of view of a medical ethicist from a developing country.

  16. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  17. Communications dated 27 and 28 May 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The texts of the communications received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea are being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea: Document presented by the DPRK Delegation to the IAEA Delegation at their Working-Level Consultation on 27 may 1994 (Attachment 1); interview by a Spokesman of the Foreign Ministry of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea of 28 May 1994 (Attachment 2)

  18. Democratic learning in the Aalborg Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    A democratic learning system can be defined as a system where decisions, processes and behaviour related to learning are established through argumentation (discussion) or negotiation (dialog), voting or consensus (alone or in combination) between those affected by the decision simultaneously...... reaching the learning outcomes, the technical and professional knowledge and insight. In principle the participants must be equal with equal rights and feel committed to the values of rationality and impartiality. The Aalborg Model is an example of a democratic learning system although not 100% democratic......, processes and behaviour related to learning can be established through argumentation (discussion) or negotiation (dialog), voting or consensus (alone or in combination) within the group simultaneously reaching the learning outcomes, the technical and professional knowledge and insight. This article...

  19. Democratic Learning Processes: Conceptual and Historical Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann-Dorte; Rasmussen, Palle

    2009-01-01

    In this article democratic learning is conceptualised with inspiration from two academic traditions, one being the conceptions of citizenship, political identities and deliberative democracy in political sociology; the other theories and research on social and lifelong learning. The first part......'s empowerment and inclusion in the Danish democratic model. On the background of these two analyses the authors finally discuss some current democratic problems with integrating the diversity represented by ethnic minority groups. The discussion emphasizes the learning theory perspective on the initiative...... of the article outlines the authors' understanding of the core concepts involved. In the second part these conceptual discussions are related to two themes: the question of public adaptation of historical experiences in connection with the German reunification and the learning perspectives related to women...

  20. Public Policies – Embodiments of Democratization Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Ţicu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Public policies are the most practical part of the triad polity-politics-policy. Public policies are related to the practical areas of planning, implementation and evaluation of the governmental activities. From this perspective, to talk about a perfect public policy (or which aspires to perfection means to speak about an efficient institutional system of a state as a sign of its degree of democratization. This article aims to explore “the cuisine” of democratic systems taking into account the applied perspective of public policy functionality, a type of functionality which is determined by a particular decision, by a kind of rationality or motivation of the actors involved or by a type of an organizational culture. Thus, the study of democracies involves an analytical approach developed at a micro level (the types of parties, institutional designs, election systems, public policies becoming indices of democratization for every state system.

  1. 29 October 2013 - Former Director-General of IAEA H. Blix on the occasion of the Thorium Energy Conference at CERN with Chair of the ThEC13 Organization Committee E. Lillestol and Author of the book “Atome Vert” (Green Atom) J.-C. de Mestral; in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Machine Protection & Electrical Integrity Group, Performance Evaluation Section Member A. Verweij.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    29 October 2013 - Former Director-General of IAEA H. Blix on the occasion of the Thorium Energy Conference at CERN with Chair of the ThEC13 Organization Committee E. Lillestol and Author of the book “Atome Vert” (Green Atom) J.-C. de Mestral; in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Machine Protection & Electrical Integrity Group, Performance Evaluation Section Member A. Verweij.

  2. Democratic design experiments: between parliament and laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Brandt, Eva; Ehn, Pelle

    2015-01-01

    For more than four decades participatory design has provided exemplars and concepts for understanding the democratic potential of design participation. Despite important impacts on design methodology participatory design has however been stuck in a marginal position as it has wrestled with what has...... been performed and accomplished in participatory practices. In this article we discuss how participatory design may be reinvigorated as a design research programme for democratic design experiments in the light of the de-centring of human-centredness and the foregrounding of collaborative...

  3. The Democratic Potential of Theatre Talks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Ejgod

    2014-01-01

    approach to a target-oriented approach to audience development in which the content of the performance should be matched with certain audience segments. And fourth, the article points to an outcome of the experience related to the challenging of one own view point and thus expanding ones horizon....... of democratization of culture and the democracy theory by James S. Fishkin. The analysis is based on the empirical material of 31 theatre talks carried through as a part of an audience development project and is focused on four different aspects of the democratic potential of theatre: First, how the theatre talks...

  4. Adult education for democratic citizenship in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2009-01-01

    In 2001 a new emphasis on learning for democratic citizenship has been championed by the European Commission's Communication on Making a European area of lifelong learning a reality.  The communication recognizes active citizenship as one of the four "broad and mutually supporting objectives....... The article introduces the core principles of a European study aiming at investigating, from a comparative perspective, ways in which adults can achieve competencies relevant for democratic citizenship. Furthermore it presents and discusses selected findings. The findings suggest that, in spite of the shift...

  5. The Social Democrats and the issue of civil nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalona, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    As the Fukushima accident had a noticeable impact on energy policies of some European countries, notably Germany, Switzerland and Italy, the author reports an analysis of the position of social-democrats at the European level (with the example of the European socialist party) and at national levels (in the different parties of countries possession a significant nuclear fleet). The author discusses the factors which are the background of 'pro-' and 'anti-' nuclear positions. He comments the evolution of positions (initial choice of the nuclear program or opposition to it) since the 1970's, and comments the present positions. He notices that the PSE has not a well defined position due to the absence of a consensus within its members. He comments the position of the German SPD, of the Swedish SAP, of the British Labour Party, and of the French PS, and discusses the rationale of these positions

  6. After the Arab Spring: Democratic Aspirations and State Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    on an unprecedented scale, and the resulting frustration has led to the biggest refugee flows in recent memory. What went wrong? This short course offers an overview of the structural shortcomings of Arab states and societies, which help us understand why the democratic awakening did not happen but instead “has given......The popular protests that erupted in 2010 and quickly remade the political map of the Arab world surprised almost everybody. We all knew the terrible state of Arab governance, marked as it was by rents, repression and regression, still no-one predicted that the people would ever rise. For decades......, the Arabs had looked like an exception to global trends towards greater participation and accountability in public life, towards more sensible economic policies and more permissive social mores. Today, the Arab world is in deep crisis. Of the 22 member states of the Arab League, at least five have...

  7. The Romanian Social Democratic Party versus the authoritarian monarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Grecu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article approaches the Romanian social-democratic collaboration during 1938-1940 with the authoritarian monarch regime. Even though the party leaders had diverging political views, regards to the acceptance or the non-acceptance of the authoritarian regime, the influential PSDR members held leading positions within the single party and the corporate parliament and within the union structures. The positions were offered by the regime, so that the union leaders would stop instigating workers to go on strike, and to accept the governmental policies. The freedom of speech and the political actions were ceded to the monarch, who governed at the place of the political parties and he controlled the unions, by using the guilds.

  8. Form Characteristics of Regional Security Organizations - The Missing Link in the Explanation of the Democratic Peace

    OpenAIRE

    Dembinski, Matthias; Freistein, Katja; Weiffen, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    This paper contributes both to the debate on the effects of regional security organizations and to the debate on democratic peace. It argues that even if international organizations as such may not be able to influence the conflict behavior of their member states, the subgroup of interdemocratic institutions is well suited to do so. The form of interdemocratic institutions differs in two significant respects from the form of traditional institutions: they are more densely connected via transn...

  9. Democratic Chaos: How Taiwanese Democracy Destabilized Cross-Strait Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newberry, David A

    2005-01-01

    Since 1988, democracy in Taiwan has evolved and developed a great deal. Experts argue whether this growth constitutes "democratic consolidation" but there is no contention of the idea that the ROC is more democratic now versus pre-1988...

  10. Do democratic institutions and foreign direct investment affect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do democratic institutions and foreign direct investment affect economic growth? Evidence from ... International Journal of Development and Management Review ... The importance of sound democratic institutional structures and foreign direct investment for enhancing economic growth is well documentedin literature.

  11. Consensual Character of Democratic Constitutional Principles and Human Rights

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahož, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2013), s. 15-28 ISSN 1805-8396 Institutional support: RVO:68378122 Keywords : democratic consensus * fundamental democratic principle * legitimacy of state power Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  12. Agreed framework of 21 October 1994 between the United States of America and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The attached text of the Agreed Framework between the United States of America and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, signed in Geneva on 21 October 1994, is being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Resident Representative of the United States of America

  13. 77 FR 22297 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... the exception of travel and per diem for official Committee related travel, Committee members shall... point of view and in a manner that is free from conflict of interest. The Department, when necessary... exception of travel and per diem for official Committee related travel, subcommittee members shall serve...

  14. 77 FR 68747 - Reestablishment of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... establishment of wage schedules for all appropriated fund and non-appropriated fund wage areas of blue-collar... per diem for official Committee related travel, Committee members shall serve without compensation... per diem for official Committee-related travel, Subcommittee members shall serve without compensation...

  15. The Text of the Agreement between the German Democratic Republic and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-04-27

    The text of the Agreement between the German Democratic Republic and the Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members.

  16. 76 FR 13436 - National Advisory Committee for Labor Provisions of U.S. Free Trade Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... point of contact for the NAALC and the Labor Provisions of U.S. Free Trade Agreements. The committee is... Labor Affairs serves as the U.S. point of contact under the FTAs listed above. The committee shall... Committee. Members of the Committee will not be compensated for their services or reimbursed for travel...

  17. 76 FR 2686 - Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [DA 10-2320] Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory... appointment of members of the Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee (``Committee'' or... change of the Committee's popular name to the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (``VPAAC...

  18. Saving Democratic Education from Itself: Why We Need Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2013-01-01

    We need homeschooling to save education in a liberal democracy from taking a religious form--what I call Democratic Education. Democratic Education emerges when the democratic identity and narrative become elevated to the highest priority when thinking about educating human beings. This elevation becomes particularly dangerous when other…

  19. The Promotion of Democratic Behavior and the Role of Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saqib; Khan, Irfanullah; Khan, Ahmad Ali; Jan, Farooq; Ahmad, Riaz; Rauf, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    This study is conducted to measure the influence of social media over the democratic behavior of the students. Social media is the main component of political participation in democratic societies and the study of democratic behavior is a highly specialized sub-field in political and social science. The study was concerned with the reasons that to…

  20. How democratic are Networks?- A framework for Assessing the Democratic Effects of Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Löfgren, Karl

    : How can we assess the democratic effects of formal network mobilisation?  The article will present a tentative framework deriving criteria from both traditional democratic theory, as well as new theories on democratic governance and collaborative planning, which can be deployed for empirical studies......There has, since the end of the 1980s, been a growing interest in western democracies for formally involving citizens in various local planning activities through network governance. The overarching goal has been to increase efficiency in local planning. Equally, it has also been accompanied...... by an underlying idea of enhancing public participation and mobilising the citizens, thereby strengthening local democracy. Even though much is written about these initiatives, the actual democratic effects of these activities have been notably overlooked in the literature. Both among scholars, as well...

  1. Cultivating Practitioners of Democratic Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Novella Zett

    2016-01-01

    How can we support campus-based practitioners of civic and community engagement in moving from normalized engagement toward practices that engage others democratically and respectfully across borders created by social race, class, gender, status, and other markers of difference? The article presents a framework derived from practice theory, a…

  2. Kant's categorical imperative: a foundation for democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the prevalence of a monstrous anti-democratic vice such as corruption. Rocked by a decline in morality and national consciousness in both public and private life, the practice of democracy in Africa and Nigeria in particular since ... a cardinal moral theory in Immanuel Kant.s ethical philosophy presented in his work ...

  3. Desert, Liberalism and Justice in Democratic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Olafur Pall

    2012-01-01

    Liberal democratic education, as advocated in recent accounts of citizenship education or civic education, is often seen as incompatible with moral education or character education rooted in specific views regarding the virtues. This contrast relies on well established philosophical differences between liberal views of justice and democracy, on…

  4. Democratic Republic of Congo Jobs Diagnostic

    OpenAIRE

    Aterido, Reyes; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Merotto, Dino; Petracco, Carly; Sanchez-Reaza, Javier

    2018-01-01

    The economy of the Democratic Republic of Congo is not creating sufficient jobs for its young and rapidly growing workforce. Although the Congolese economy has experienced fast growth and poverty has declined, further reducing poverty will require more dynamic job creation and continued reductions in fertility rates. The current youth bulge and potential demographic dividend will open a un...

  5. A Critical Ethnography of Democratic Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Marissa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this critical ethnography was to investigate how music educators can approach the development of students' music listening abilities democratically in order to deepen students' musical understandings and, by teaching through music, create pathways for student-teacher transactions that are inclusive, educative, ethical and…

  6. Theorizing Democratic Education from a Senian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesare, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing body of literature and general interest in the intersection between the capabilities approach (CA) and education, little work has been done so far to theorize democratic education from a CA perspective. This essay attempts to do so by, first, getting clear about the theory of democracy that has emerged from Amartya Sen's…

  7. Creating Better Schools through Democratic School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Antonio, Diosdado M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of implementing democratic school leadership via advisory school councils in Philippine public secondary schools. Through an experiment with empirical surveys and interviews, this study reveals that the experimental group had higher levels of commitment, empowerment and trust compared with the control group after one…

  8. Leadership Education Priorities for a Democratic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the priorities for leadership education in a democratic society is a complex, challenging responsibility, not a task to be taken lightly. It is complex on one level in that to be a leader in schools "today is to understand a profoundly human as well as a professional responsibility." It is challenging on another level in that preparing…

  9. Leadership Education Priorities in a Democratic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William Tyler

    2010-01-01

    Is there still an effort to include democratic ideals in public education? Some claim that it is no longer a priority, the result of a lack of common definition or perceived benefits. In today's policy driven climate, school leaders must transition to new and more effective approaches to enhancing learning and teaching. Aspiring principals/leaders…

  10. Private Sector Contracting and Democratic Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMartino, Catherine; Scott, Janelle

    2013-01-01

    Public officials are increasingly contracting with the private sector for a range of educational services. With much of the focus on private sector accountability on cost-effectiveness and student performance, less attention has been given to shifts in democratic accountability. Drawing on data from the state of New York, one of the most active…

  11. Religion, Democratic Community, and Education: Two Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Mario Osbert

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the mediating role that education plays between religion and democratic community. The paper is situated in the Canadian context and examines this mediation through two questions: First, what is the relationship between religion and education and what is the contribution of this relationship to and within a pluralist society?…

  12. Journal Editorship: Mentoring, Democratic, and International Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    This essay builds on a review of studies in education. Journal editorship is explored from the mentoring, democratic, and international perspectives. Trends are examined within the publishing culture around these three editorial functions. Theoretical groundwork is provided for exploring contemporary journal editorship and its challenges and…

  13. The Complicated Pursuit of Democratic Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Brian

    2018-01-01

    This article describes one secondary social studies teacher's attempts to build a pedagogically democratic classroom. The teacher designs curriculum around large essential questions, connects content to the present lives of students, and creates space for students to make their own decisions and choices. The teacher is convinced that she has…

  14. Global human rights awareness, education and democratization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihr, A.

    The 1990s was the era of human rights awareness, democratic transitions, and growing involvement of international organizations and the nongovernmental sector in human rights education (HRE). The UN Decade for HRE from 1995–2004 was not only born out of the initiatives and pressures of

  15. The Third Wave of Democratization in Indonesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delin, Azizan

    2000-01-01

    .... For half a century, authoritarianism was dominant in Indonesia, but like all dictatorships, Indonesia subsequently had to return to democracy. Pressures from within the authoritarian government and Indonesian society dictated the democratization process. However, the long term prospects for unstable democracy remain unclear.

  16. Phenomenological mass matrices with a democratic warp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppe, A.

    2018-01-01

    Taking into account all available data on the mass sector, we obtain unitary rotation matrices that diagonalize the quark matrices by using a specific parametrization of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix. In this way, we find mass matrices for the up- and down-quark sectors of a specific, symmetric form, with traces of a democratic texture.

  17. Democratic Leadership: Guidelines for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Barbara Seeley

    1980-01-01

    Democratic leadership is not always desirable and should be employed only in certain situations. A 1977 study of 315 teachers suggests that when teachers perceive the subject matter under consideration to be important to them, participatory decision making is significantly related to favorable job attitudes. (Author/JM)

  18. Towards Democratic Leadership: Co-principal Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Marian

    2003-01-01

    A case study of a New Zealand primary school coprincipalship describes the impact of some intergroup misunderstandings and struggles over power. Concludes that building a democratic school community requires a set of considerations and practices different from those promoted within a market-managerial approach. (Contains 7 notes and 51…

  19. A Code of Ethics for Democratic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Ricardo; Klinker, JoAnn Franklin

    2012-01-01

    Democratic leadership rests on sacred values, awareness, judgement, motivation and courage. Four turning points in a 38-year school administrator's career revealed decision-making in problematic moments stemmed from values in a personal and professional code of ethics. Reflection on practice and theory added vocabulary and understanding to make…

  20. 'Democratic Leadership'--A Contradiction in Terms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Draws on a range of country contexts to shed light on the ways in which the practice of leadership is shaped by national aspirations. Examines whether there is a set of ideas, arrangements, and activities that appear to sustain new forms of leadership that support democracy, or whether democratic leadership of schools is a chimera. (Contains 29…

  1. A Democratic Framework for Educational Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Educational theorists frequently invoke rights claims to express their views about educational justice and authority. But the unyielding nature of rights claims presents a significant quandary in democratic contexts, given the tension between rights claims and majoritarian democracy. Educational theorists have given limited attention to this…

  2. Democratizing English as an International Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneire, Marc

    The aim of this paper is threefold. The first section shows how the political uses of language engendered by both western-style liberalism on the one hand and various forms of nationalism on the other lead to the negation of democratic ideals. Because of the current international situation, political aspects of language are receiving more and more…

  3. Democratic Governance in Sub-Saharan Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    there was general consensus that the “democratic experiment” had taken root in Africa ... African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance is of particular importance in this context. The .... of governmental work through results in the interests of citizens. ... declarations impact on the reality of political rule in Africa?

  4. AFRICAN STATES AND GLOBAL CHALLENGES IN DEMOCRATIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    governing requires an ability to balance the differing needs and expectations of both local .... subsequently tables place-shaping as solution – using powers and influence ... democratic ideals and local government practices work at cross- purposes. .... values, it must be part of everyday life in localities and their communities.

  5. 75 FR 64728 - Cooperative Operating Philosophy-Serving the Members of Farm Credit System Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... seven principles are voluntary and open membership, democratic member control, member economic... System (System) institutions are required to operate.\\1\\ The FCA emphasizes cooperative principles by... principles in the examination function and Financial Institution Rating System (FIRS) used to categorize the...

  6. 34 CFR 350.35 - What are the requirements for the composition of an advisory committee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research... committee? The majority of a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center advisory committee's members must be comprised of individuals with disabilities who are users of rehabilitation technology, or their parents...

  7. Mobilization Potential and Democratization Processes of the Coalition for Clean and Fair Elections (Bersih in Malaysia: An Interview With Hishamuddin Rais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hooi Khoo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, protests and popular mobilization have become pronounced elements in Malaysian politics. Bersih (clean demonstrations are notably the most outstanding protest events in Malaysian history. Bersih is a group of 89 non-governmental organizations (NGOs pushing for a thorough reform of the electoral process in Malaysia through rallies and demonstrations. Five opposition parties initiated the idea of Bersih in 2005 and included several NGOs in the ‘project’ later on. After the first Bersih street protests in November 2007 (Bersih 1.0, the political parties and the NGOs reached the ‘compromise pact’ that led to the formation of Bersih 2.0 in 2010 as a non-partisan movement free from any political interference. This interview explores the linkages to the broader democratization process in Malaysia from the perspective of Hishamuddin Rais (Isham, a prominent grassroots activist. Isham spent 20 years in political exile after the Baling student protest of 1974. He became active again in 1998 after the ouster of then Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, the current leader of the opposition coalition. Isham was a member of the Bersih Steering Committee for two years until he stepped down in 2012.

  8. Inferred referendum: a rule for committee decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolsky, A; Sanathanan, L

    1979-01-01

    A new method of social choice is presented. The result of the method coincides with that of majority voting when it does not produce an intransitivity among the alternatives under consideration. When majority voting would produce an intransitivity, the method orders the alternatives in the same way as the transitive constituency would whom the committee members are most likely to represent. Analysis of the application of the method to three alternatives shows that the resulting order depends only on the committee members' votes between pairs of alternatives; the resulting order is less sensitive to irrelevant alternatives than the orders provided by other schemes; when majority voting provides an intransitivity, the hypothesis that, in fact, the committee's constituency is as assumed is almost as likely as the hypothesis that it precisely mirrors the committee.

  9. 76 FR 77778 - Amendment to Notice of Establishment of the Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... Operation The Committee shall consist of a maximum of 40 private sector members appointed by the Secretary... private sector members, the Secretary of Transportation and the Administrator of the Environmental... as appropriate in making appointments of private sector members. The Committee chair and vice chair...

  10. Political Ideology, Trust, and Cooperation: In-group Favoritism among Republicans and Democrats during a US National Election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Daniel; Tybur, Joshua M; Wu, Junhui; Antonellis, Christian; Van Lange, Paul A M

    2018-04-01

    Theories suggest that political ideology relates to cooperation, with conservatives being more likely to pursue selfish outcomes, and liberals more likely to pursue egalitarian outcomes. In study 1, we examine how political ideology and political party affiliation (Republican vs. Democrat) predict cooperation with a partner who self-identifies as Republican or Democrat in two samples before ( n = 362) and after ( n = 366) the 2012 US presidential election. Liberals show slightly more concern for their partners' outcomes compared to conservatives (study 1), and in study 2 this relation is supported by a meta-analysis ( r = .15). However, in study 1, political ideology did not relate to cooperation in general. Both Republicans and Democrats extend more cooperation to their in-group relative to the out-group, and this is explained by expectations of cooperation from in-group versus out-group members. We discuss the relation between political ideology and cooperation within and between groups.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF AUDIT COMMITTEE CHARACTERISTICS ON REAL EARNINGS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyaningsih Supriyaningsih

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Current study tests the impact of audit committees to the real earnings management.Using the manufacturing public listed companies from Indoensia Stock Exchange from 2012 until 2014, we found that that financial and accounting expertise of audit committee members and audit committee size have positive effect on real earnings management. Furthermore, we also found that the dual positions of the audit committee chairman have a negative effect on earnings management. The Tenure of audit committee chairman however, has no impact on real earnings management.

  12. A networked voting rule for democratic representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Alexis R.; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Brigatti, Edgardo; Moreno, Yamir

    2018-03-01

    We introduce a general framework for exploring the problem of selecting a committee of representatives with the aim of studying a networked voting rule based on a decentralized large-scale platform, which can assure a strong accountability of the elected. The results of our simulations suggest that this algorithm-based approach is able to obtain a high representativeness for relatively small committees, performing even better than a classical voting rule based on a closed list of candidates. We show that a general relation between committee size and representatives exists in the form of an inverse square root law and that the normalized committee size approximately scales with the inverse of the community size, allowing the scalability to very large populations. These findings are not strongly influenced by the different networks used to describe the individuals' interactions, except for the presence of few individuals with very high connectivity which can have a marginal negative effect in the committee selection process.

  13. A networked voting rule for democratic representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, Edgardo; Moreno, Yamir

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a general framework for exploring the problem of selecting a committee of representatives with the aim of studying a networked voting rule based on a decentralized large-scale platform, which can assure a strong accountability of the elected. The results of our simulations suggest that this algorithm-based approach is able to obtain a high representativeness for relatively small committees, performing even better than a classical voting rule based on a closed list of candidates. We show that a general relation between committee size and representatives exists in the form of an inverse square root law and that the normalized committee size approximately scales with the inverse of the community size, allowing the scalability to very large populations. These findings are not strongly influenced by the different networks used to describe the individuals’ interactions, except for the presence of few individuals with very high connectivity which can have a marginal negative effect in the committee selection process. PMID:29657817

  14. [The Editorial Advisory Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    1996-12-01

    Since 1970, Revista Médica de Chile applies the peer review system as a main step in the selection and improvement of the manuscripts to be published. Over 150 experts participate in this process annually, reviewing up to 5 manuscripts per year. The final decision with regards to to the acceptability of a manuscript remains a responsibility of the Editor. The reviewers are selected by the Editor and his Associates among clinical investigators, prominent subspecialits and basic scientists, according to the nature of the manuscript. Most of them work in Chile. Their names are published and their confidential work is acknowledged in a special chronicle published in the Revista once a year. A small number of these reviewers appears in every issue of the journal identified as Members of its Editorial Advisory Committee. They have been selected by the Editors among those reviewers who deal with a greater number of manuscripts and also those experienced specialists whose opinion is requested when an exceptional conflict of opinions is raised by the authors and their reviewers. After 5 to 10 years of a highly praised collaboration, the previous Committee has been changed and new names were included, starting in this issue of Revista Médica de Chile.

  15. Explaining the democratic anchorage of governance networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skelcher, Chris; Klijn, Erik-Hans; Kübler, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Advances in understanding the democratic anchorage of governance networks require carefully designed and contextually grounded empirical analysis that take into account contextual factors. The article uses a conjectural framework to study the impact of the national democratic milieu...... on the relationship between network governance and representative institutions in four European countries: the United Kingdom, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Denmark. The article shows that the distinction between majoritarian and consensus democracy as well as the varying strength of voluntary associations...... are important contextual factors that help explain cross-national differences in the relationship between governance networks and representative institutions. We conclude that a context of weak associationalism in majoritarian democracies facilitates the instrumentalization of networks by government actors...

  16. Building a Democratic Model of Science Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhadi Ibnu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Earlier in the last century, learning in science, as was learning in other disciplines, was developed according to the philosophy of behaviorism. This did not serve the purposes of learning in science properly, as the students were forced to absorb information transferred from the main and the only source of learning, the teacher. Towards the end of the century a significant shift from behaviorism to constructivism philosophy took place. The shift promoted the development of more democratic models of learning in science which provided greater opportunities to the students to act as real scientist, chattering for the building of knowledge and scientific skills. Considering the characteristics of science and the characteristics of the students as active learners, the shift towards democratic models of learning is unavoidable and is merely a matter of time

  17. Human Rights and Democratization of the Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abner Barrera Rivas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relationship between the freedom of the press, conceived and practiced by the big media, and the human right to an independent and truthful information, as understood and proposed by some international treaties, agreement, conventions and declarations concerning freedom of opinion and freedom of expression as human rights. For this reason are taken into account the controversies aroused by media and some progressive governments in South America in the past fifteen years. The article presents and analyzes arguments advanced with respect to human rights that civil society demands when receiving the information, and the rights big media’s owners hold. Given that private media companies’ priority is profit, the information becomes, then, just another consumer product. It is concluded that this situation is a real problem for the education and configuration of a democratic society, and the proposal is to democratize media to protect the human rights of all.

  18. The agricultural and the democratic transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Erich; Paldam, Martin

    Long-run development (in income) causes a large fall in the share of agriculture commonly known as the agricultural transition. We confirm that this conventional wisdom is strongly supported by the data. Long-run development (in income) also causes a large increase in democracy known...... as the democratic transition. Elsewhere we have shown that it is almost as strong as the agricultural transition. Recently, a method has been presented to weed out spuriousness. It makes the democratic transition go away by turning income insignificant, when it is supplemented by a set of formal controls. We show...... that the same method makes the agricultural transition go away as well. Hence, it seems to be a method that kills far too much, as suggested by the subtitle. This suggestion leads to a discussion of the very meaning of long-run causality....

  19. Democratization and Transitional Justice in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula NASCIMENTO ARAUJO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brazil experienced a long process of political transition featured by an intense game of political and social forces, in which different actors with different democratization projects clashed. Despite the leadership of the transition process have been in the hands of conservative elites linked to the military dictatorship, broad sectors of the oposition and of the lefts, as well as representants of social movements, disputed the transitional space and expanded the initial design of the regime. This long transition —marked by negotiations, frustrations and resilience— reflected on the transitional justice model adopted by the country. Almost 30 years after the end of military dictatorship, the Truth Commission established by President Dilma Rousseff in 2012, drew attention to issues related to memory, justice and reparation and showed that the democratization process, in some respects, is still incloncluded. This article aims to restore this historical process highlighting some of its characteristics and specificities.

  20. Democratic Deliberation Procedures : Theoretical and Practical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutui Viorel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : In contemporary political philosophy, the focus of the most important controversies is on the deliberative model of democracy. These controversies concern not only the theoretical problem of providing the best justification for a deliberative model of democratic legitimacy, but also the practical problem of designing the best deliberative procedure that will secure the implementation of deliberative democracy. In this paper I will present and analyze some of the most important deliberative designs: deliberative polls, citizens’ juries, consensus conferences and planning cells. I argue that these deliberative events can have a significant impact on the political behavior of a democratic community. However, I explain that all of them have only a limited influence on the policy-making activities in local and central governing structures. This is the reason why I believe we could only supplement and never fully replace the traditional aggregative procedures of democracy (voting and bargaining with a deliberative design.

  1. Possibilities of consensus: toward democratic moral discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, B

    1991-08-01

    The concept of consensus is often appealed to in discussions of biomedical ethics and applied ethics, and it plays an important role in many influential ethical theories. Consensus is an especially influential notion among theorists who reject ethical realism and who frame ethics as a practice of discourse rather than a body of objective knowledge. It is also a practically important notion when moral decision making is subject to bureaucratic organization and oversight, as is increasingly becoming the case in medicine. Two models of consensus are examined and criticized: pluralistic consensus and overlapping consensus. As an alternative to these models, the paper argues that consensus refers to the dialogic aspects of a broader normative conception of democratic moral agency. When the preconditions for that dialogic democratic practice are met, consensus has a justificatory role in ethics; when they are not, consensus, as distinct from mere agreement, does not emerge and can have no moral authority.

  2. Leadership Style Right in the Democratic

    OpenAIRE

    Harlen, Togu

    2015-01-01

    Each leader has a leadership style that is different tobe adapted to the work environment so as to avoidinternal conflicts between superiors and subordinates.No leadership style that has been attached since theman was still in the womb, but some are derived fromexperience and knowledge about leadership.In an era of democratization takes leaders who have ademocratic leadership style that promotes democraticvalues that exist so that the subordinate was given theopportunity to cooperate and coor...

  3. Fast thinking: Implications for democratic politics

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Colin; Stoker, Gerry; Barr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A major programme of research on cognition has been built around the idea that human beings are frequently intuitive thinkers and that human intuition is imperfect. The modern marketing of politics and the time-poor position of many citizens suggests that ‘fast’, intuitive, thinking in many contemporary democracies is ubiquitous. This article explores the consequences that such fast thinking might have for the democratic practice of contemporary politics. Using focus groups with a range of de...

  4. Revisiting Liberal Democratic Universalism: A Critical Rhetoric of the Liberal Democratic World Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Joy E. Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Liberal democracy has become the predominant political regime in the 21st century even in countries that have little or no history of ‘democratic structures and practices’. However, it seems as though setting up a functional, stable, and viable democratic state is harder than overthrowing autocratic rulers. This rhetorical criticism explores gridlocks that hamper the development of universal liberal democratic values by emphasizing the Western hegemonic status of defining what liberal democracy is. It is pertinent to look into this dominant role considering that it is through these values that actions, policies, and other values are to be construed and judged. This paper aims to (1 highlight the role of moral cosmopolitanism as the initial step of Western hegemony, (2 identify the paradox of defining liberal democracy as universal but treating it as a particular, and (3 discuss the ironies of democratic imperialism and its hindrance to self-determination. This paper hopes to shed some light in the importance of various interpretations, definitions, and adaptations of liberal democratic values depending on the context of the society incorporating, its culture, its values, and its identity, in order to find a more comprehensive definition of democracy.

  5. Scientific literacy for democratic decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoubian, Hagop A.

    2018-02-01

    Scientifically literate citizens must be able to engage in making decisions on science-based social issues. In this paper, I start by showing examples of science curricula and policy documents that capitalise the importance of engaging future citizens in decision-making processes whether at the personal or at the societal levels. I elucidate the ideological underpinnings behind a number of the statements within those documents that have defined the trajectory of scientific literacy and have shaped what ought to be considered as personal and societal benefits. I argue that science curricula and policy documents can truly endorse scientific literacy when they embed principles of democratic education at their core. The latter entails fostering learning experiences where some of the underlying assumptions and political ideologies are brought to the conscious level and future citizens encouraged to reflect upon them critically and explicitly. Such a proposal empowers the future citizens to engage in critical deliberation on science-based social issues without taking the underlying status quo for granted. I end up the paper by situating the preparation of scientifically literate citizens within a framework of democratic education, discuss conditions through which a curriculum for scientific literacy can serve democratic decision-making processes, and provide modest recommendations.

  6. Political Corruption, Democratic Theory, and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Navot

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available According to recent conceptual proposals, institutional corruption should be understood within the boundaries of the institution and its purpose. Political corruption in democracies, prominent scholars suggest, is characterized by the violation of institutional ideals or behaviors that tend to harm democratic processes and institutions. This paper rejects the idea that compromises, preferences, political agreements, or consent can be the baseline of conceptualization of political corruption. In order to improve the identification of abuse of power, the concept of political corruption should not be related directly to democratic institutions and processes; rather, it should be related to ideals whose content is independent of citizens’ preferences, institutions and processes. More specifically, I articulate the relations between political corruption and the notion of subjection, and include powerful citizens in the category of political corruption. Yet, I also suggest redefining under what conditions agents are culpable for their motivations in promoting private gain. By doing this, we better realize how democratic institutions can be the source of corruption and not just its victims. Such a redefinition, I propose finally, is the basis for the distinction between individual and institutional corruption.

  7. In Defense of Critical Democratic Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Isaacs

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A powerful positivist and neoliberal ideology in education masquerades more or less unharmed as the meritocratic myth promised under the cloak of democracy. Yet some students and teachers are beginning to interrogate the success-only orientations of neoliberalism in the face of crumbling school systems where many students fail. These students and teachers are not oblivious to the stark realities that characterize their daily existence, as they live under a dark cloud of mass unemployment and inequality where many struggle to “succeed”. Additionally, trained consciousness reveals the pockmarked version of democracy that admits only a few and is attendant with an authoritarian, disciplinary practice that breeds resistance towards education rather than the envisioned freedom it is purported to usher in. These inconsistent positions as an experience of education, by especially marginal students, is intensifying within a neoliberal discourse and invites the intense consideration of the place of critical democratic pedagogy as a more appropriate approach toward democratic teaching and learning practices. Within this context, I explore the theoretical and practical dimensions of critical pedagogy to provide an expanded view of teaching and learning in post-democratic South African education.

  8. The Scientific & Democratic Revolution in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Flecha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The main issue dealt with in this theoretical paper is the explanation of the starting scientific and democratic revolution both in the educative field and in the educative research. In addition, evidence-based arguments are included to provide validity of some affirmations. The first section argues that the social sciences are the daughters and an essential part of democracy. A few historical arguments about the way in which the dominant classes have slowed down the scientific progress and the development of people that make it possible. In the second section, it is analyzed the opposition of feudal universities to this unstoppable beginning of what could be called the scientific and democratic revolution. At the same time, we deal with its ambivalent character requiring to be supported and to be criticized so that it can be improved. In the third section, we expound the way in which this progress has provide some conditions that makes it possible to overcome the strong gender-based violence happening in our institutions of higher education and makes it also possible that women who were persecuted are now transforming our universities. Influences and criticism to our university feudalism, made by social movements such as the named 'Spanish Revolution', appear in the fourth section. In the fifth and last section, we offer a proposal to promote the scientific, democratic, and revolutionary approach of the university.

  9. The withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has informed the Government of the United States of America, as depository of the Agency's Statute, in a diplomatic note dated 13 June 1994, that the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has decided to withdraw from the IAEA as of 13 June 1994. The Director General of the IAEA was notified of this withdrawal by a letter dated 15 June 1994 from the Resident Representative of the United States of America to the IAEA. The text of this letter and the enclosed diplomatic note from the DPRK are attached hereto. In accordance with Article XVIII, D of the Statute, the Board of Governors was informed on 15 June 1994 (GOV/INF/748). In compliance with the request of the Resident Representative of the United States of America, the Member States of the Agency are informed by this INFCIRC

  10. International Project Management Committee: Overview and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the purpose and composition of the International Project Management Committee (IMPC). The IMPC was established by members of 15 space agencies, companies and professional organizations. The goal of the committee is to establish a means to share experiences and best practices with space project/program management practitioners at the global level. The space agencies that are involved are: AEB, DLR, ESA, ISRO, JAXA, KARI, and NASA. The industrial and professional organizational members are Comau, COSPAR, PMI, and Thales Alenia Space.

  11. Between Democratic Security and Democratic Legality. Constitutional Politics and Presidential Re-election in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Boesten

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the political and legal debate of the declaration of unconstitutionality of the referendum that sought the re-election presidential second term in 2010. On the other hand, it exposes the debate between those who spoke of bias and political argument in the court ruling related to the idea of “democratic security”; while others speak of the persistence of “democratic legality” consisting of autonomy guaranteed legal reasoning from deliberative processes. Finally, it is noted that the degree of institutionalization of discourse of the Court is an important factor that speaks in favor of it’s independence.

  12. 41 CFR 102-3.130 - What policies apply to the appointment, and compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... committee staff person who is not a current Federal employee serving under an assignment must be appointed... the appointment, and compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee members, staff, and experts... compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee members, staff, and experts and consultants? In developing...

  13. The Democratizing Power of the Internet in Southeast Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    .... A review of the existing democratization literature, coupled with quantitative analysis of the societal impact of computer networking technologies, suggests that the level of Internet connectivity...

  14. E-survey with researchers, members of ethics committees and sponsors of clinical research in Brazil: an emerging methodology for scientific research Inquérito pela Internet com pesquisadores clínicos, membros de comitês de ética e patrocinadores de pesquisa clínica no Brasil: uma metodologia emergente para pesquisa científica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Mansoldo Dainesi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The growth of Internet users enables epidemiological studies to be conducted electronically, representing a promising methodology for data collection. METHODS: Members of Ethics Committees, Clinical Researchers and Sponsors were interviewed using questionnaires sent over the Internet. Along with the questionnaire, participants received a message explaining the survey and also the informed consent. Returning the questionnaire meant the consent of the participant was given. No incentive was offered; two reminders were sent. RESULTS: The response rate was 21% (124/599, 20% (58/290 and 45% (24/53 respectively for Ethics Committees, Researchers and Sponsors. The percentage of return before the two reminders was about 62%. Reasons for non-response: participant not found, refusal to participate, lack of experience in clinical research or in the therapeutic field. Characteristics of participants: 45% of Ethics Committee participants, 64% of Researchers and 63% of Sponsors were male; mean age (range, respectively: 47 (28-74, 53 (24-72 and 40 (29-65 years. Among Researchers and Sponsors, all respondents had at least a university degree and, in the Ethics Committees group, only two (1.7% did not have one. Most of the questionnaires in all groups came from the Southeast Region of Brazil, probably reflecting the highest number of clinical trials and research professionals in this region. CONCLUSION: Despite the potential limitations of a survey done through the Internet, this study led to a response rate similar to what has been observed with other models, efficiency in obtaining responses (speed and quality, convenience for respondents and low cost.INTRODUÇÃO: O crescimento de usuários da Internet possibilita que estudos epidemiológicos sejam conduzidos eletronicamente, representando uma promissora metodologia para coleta de dados. MÉTODOS: Membros de Comitês de Ética, pesquisadores clínicos e patrocinadores foram entrevistados com

  15. Activities of the research committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Shirai, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Osugi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishida, T.; Shimazaki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-01-01

    The department of Nuclear Energy System serves as a secretarial of the following four research committees organized by JAERI; Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, Atomic and Molecular Data Research Committee, Research Committee on Reactor Physics and Research Committee on Marine Reactors. The purpose and the expected task of each committee are summarized here. The detailed activities of each committee are presented in this paper. (author)

  16. 78 FR 63279 - Third Meeting: RTCA Tactical Operations Committee (TOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Operations Committee (TOC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation... hereby given for a meeting of the Tactical Operations Committee (TOC). The agenda will include the following: November 19, 2013 Opening of Meeting/Introduction of TOC Members Official Statement of Designated...

  17. 77 FR 43135 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... second meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The second meeting of... Aviation Consumer Protection and announced those persons appointed as members. By notice dated June 13...

  18. 76 FR 20336 - Defense Audit Advisory Committee (DAAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Accounting/Audit Competencies 4:30 DAAC Member Involvement in Service Audit Committees 4:45 Conclusion (c..., work badge, social security card). Special Accommodations: Individuals requiring special accommodation...

  19. 76 FR 64325 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... 2004 (Pub. L. 108-360). The Committee is composed of 12 members appointed by the Director of NIST, who...-U.S. citizens must also submit their country of citizenship, title, and employer/ sponsor. Mrs...

  20. 75 FR 18787 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... the NEHRP Reauthorization Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-360). The Committee is composed of 15 members....S. citizens must also submit their country of citizenship, title, employer/sponsor, and address with...

  1. 77 FR 64314 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-360). The Committee is composed of 12 members appointed by the Director of... number to Michelle Harman. Non-U.S. citizens must also submit their country of citizenship, title, and...

  2. 9 CFR 147.43 - General Conference Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... committee members will include, but not be limited to: Advertisements in at least two industry journals... Plan. (2) Advise and make yearly recommendations to the Department with respect to the NPIP budget well...

  3. 76 FR 19970 - Hiawatha East Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... chairperson by the committee members. (3) Receive materials explaining roles of the RAC and process for...

  4. 77 FR 46375 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) (the Act) and operates in compliance with... review with the Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee members their roles and...

  5. 76 FR 44574 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. DATES: The...

  6. 75 FR 11104 - Del Norte Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory...; (4) discussion of Committee member and Designated Federal Official roles and (5) review operational...

  7. 75 FR 48306 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the... questions about the roles of members, support of the committee and other pertinent information, elect a...

  8. 75 FR 44757 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. DATES: The... Designated Federal [[Page 44758

  9. 76 FR 12692 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the... questions about the roles of members, support of the committee and other pertinent information, elect a...

  10. 76 FR 13124 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. DATES: The...

  11. Transparency in Canadian public drug advisory committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg-Yunger, Zahava R S; Bayoumi, Ahmed M

    2014-11-01

    Transparency in health care resource allocation decisions is a criterion of a fair process. We used qualitative methods to explore transparency across 11 Canadian drug advisory committees. We developed seven criteria to assess transparency (disclosure of members' names, disclosure of membership selection criteria, disclosure of conflict of interest guidelines and members' conflicts, public posting of decisions not to fund drugs, public posting of rationales for decisions, stakeholder input, and presence of an appeals mechanism) and two sub-criteria for when rationales were posted (direct website link and readability). We interviewed a purposeful sample of key informants who were conversant in English and a current or past member of either a committee or a stakeholder group. We analyzed data using a thematic approach. Interviewing continued until saturation was reached. We examined documents from 10 committees and conducted 27 interviews. The median number of criteria addressed by committees was 2 (range 0-6). Major interview themes included addressing: (1) accessibility issues, including stakeholders' degree of access to the decision making process and appeal mechanisms; (2) communication issues, including improving internal and external communication and public access to information; and (3) confidentiality issues, including the use of proprietary evidence. Most committees have some mechanisms to address transparency but none had a fully transparent process. The most important ways to improve transparency include creating formal appeal mechanisms, improving communication, and establishing consistent rules about the use of, and public access to, proprietary evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Careerism, Committee Assignments and the Electoral Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Jonathan N.; Sala, Brian R.

    1996-01-01

    Most scholars agree that members of Congress are strongly motivated by their desire for reelection. This assumption implies that members of Congress adopt institutions, rules, and norms of behavior in part to serve their electoral interests. Direct tests of the electoral connection are rare, however, because significant, exogenous changes in the electoral environment are difficult to identify. We develop and test an electoral rationale for the norm of committee assignment "property rights...

  13. Monumentality on space and cultural democratization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Alves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a reflection on the idea of monumentality in political and religious power, and its reconversion of a democratic society. There are 3+1 types of cultural exhibition space that are analyzed: the traditional palace or the church, which contain great works of classical art, inside of the historic centers; the art galleries associated with market economy, tend to stimulate the city centre area, and the autonomy of the architectural object in the vicinity of the traditional city. Lastly it is referred the case study - Silo Cultural Space - inside the Norteshopping, but arranged in a peripheral form, which is distinguished by an apparent proximity to multiple public.

  14. THE DEMOCRATIC CONTROL OF MILITARY FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smail Oštraković

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition requirement for post communism countries, especially the part that is about military forces is to establish those civil-military relation that will have prepared projects for awareness evolving of society and military about necessity of democratic control over military sector of country through development of many different communication forms and shapes. Before everything, it means the entire freedom and independence of media at access to military forces as the topic and subject of its interests and also the organization of public military communication system as integral part of information-communication system in society

  15. Equal rights as the center of democratization

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Well-stated modern political or democratic theory is rights-based. Meaningful democracy rests as a precondition on the equal rights of citizens. This idea stems from Rousseau’s distinction between a general will*one which is impersonal and tends toward equality, that is, the equal basic rights of citizens*and a transitory will of all. For instance, absent equal basic rights, one might imagine a possible world in which what I have called a self-undermining series of wills of all, or the ...

  16. The democratic question in Florestan Fernandes

    OpenAIRE

    Tótora, Silvana

    1999-01-01

    O papel da questão democrática na análise da revolução burguesa na obra de Florestan Fernandes é reconstruído a partir da ênfase no caráter radical que ela assume numa obra que se recusa a separar o problema substantivo da democracia do problema da revolução social.The role played by the democratic question in the analysis of the bourgeois revolution in Brazil by Florestan Fernandes is reconstructed on the basis of the emphasis on the radical character it takes in a work in which no distincti...

  17. European Committee for Future Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvey, John

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 21 years ago, in December 1962, Viktor Weisskopf and Cecil Powell, then respectively CERN's Director General and Chairman of the Scientific Policy Committee, called together a group of European high energy physicists to advise on steps to reach higher energy. The CERN PS had been in operation since 1959, its experimental programme was well established and the time had come to think of the future. The Chairman of the group, which later took the title 'European Committee for Future Accelerators', was Edoardo Amaldi and his influential report, presented to the CERN Council in June 1963, reviewed the whole structure and possible development of the field in the CERN Member States. Its proposals included the construction of the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), and of a 300 GeV proton accelerator which was then envisaged as being the major facility of a second CERN Laboratory elsewhere in Europe

  18. The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, Keith; Ball, David J

    2005-01-01

    The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management is charged with recommending to Government, by July 2006, options for the long term management of the UK's radioactive waste legacy. These options should inspire public confidence. Now, more than halfway into the time allotted, we, as two former members of the Committee, express our concerns at the wayward approach that has been adopted. The Committee has placed emphasis on gaining public confidence but this has been done at the expense of recruiting the best scientific expertise in the management of radioactive waste, an act which we believe will actually undermine public confidence. Furthermore, given also the immense importance of this decision to public safety, national security and the national interest, we believe urgent steps should be taken to review the Committee's process, its management and its sponsorship. (opinion)

  19. Statement of Honorable Donald C. Winter Secretary of the Navy Before the House Armed Services Committee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    Mr. Chairman, Mr. Ranking Member, and Members of the Committee, it is an honor to appear before you representing the brave men and women of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps active, reserve...

  20. 77 FR 76515 - Osage Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... sign-up sheet at the meeting for those wishing to speak during the public comment period. The meeting... and Introduction; (2) Overview of prior meeting and action tracking; (3) Members' round robin to share... subcommittee activities; (5) Future Committee activities; (6) Public comments which will be scheduled for 45...

  1. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... committee shall include the appointment, compensation, and oversight of the independent public accountant... public accountant the basis for the reports issued under this part. (1) Each insured depository... members who are large customers of the subsidiary institution. (c) Independent public accountant...

  2. 77 FR 53920 - NASA Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... Administration, and in accordance with the Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies signed... Council and eight (8) Committees: Aeronautics; Audit, Finance and Analysis; Commercial Space; Education... agencies, of which NASA is a member) on U.S. space- based PNT policy, planning, program management, and...

  3. Report of the Committee on Government Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, R. Stephen; And Others

    This report presents in detail a unicameral government structure with supporting student and faculty caucuses, recommended for the University of New Hampshire by its Committee on Government Organization to (1) provide maximum participation to all members of the university community on a fair and equitable basis, and (2) provide a more efficient…

  4. Influencing Republicans' and Democrats' attitudes toward Obamacare: Effects of imagined vicarious cognitive dissonance on political attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel; Feldman, Lauren A; Blackman, Shane F

    2018-04-16

    The field of experimental social psychology is appropriately interested in using novel theoretical approaches to implement change in the social world. In the current study, we extended cognitive dissonance theory by creating a new framework of social influence: imagined vicarious dissonance. We used the framework to influence attitudes on an important and controversial political attitude: U.S. citizens' support for the Affordable Care Act (ACA). 36 Republicans and 84 Democrats were asked to imagine fellow Republicans and Democrats, respectively, making attitude discrepant statements under high and low choice conditions about support for the ACA. The data showed that vicarious dissonance, established by imagining a group member make a counterattitudinal speech under high-choice conditions (as compared to low-choice conditions), resulted in greater support for the Act by Republicans and marginally diminished support by Democrats. The results suggest a promising role for the application of vicarious dissonance theory to relevant societal issues and for further understanding the relationship of dissonance and people's identification with their social groups.

  5. Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members [fr

  6. Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members [es

  7. Micro Black Holes and the Democratic Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    Unitarity implies that the evaporation of microscopic quasi-classical black holes cannot be universal in different particle species. This creates a puzzle, since it conflicts with the thermal nature of quasi-classical black holes, according to which all the species should see the same horizon and be produced with the same Hawking temperatures. We resolve this puzzle by showing that for the microscopic black holes, on top the usual quantum evaporation time, there is a new time-scale which characterizes a purely classical process during which the black hole looses the ability to differentiate among the species, and becomes democratic. We demonstrate this phenomenon in a well-understood framework of large extra dimensions, with a number of parallel branes. An initially non-democratic black hole is the one localized on one of the branes, with its high-dimensional Schwarzschild radius being much shorter than the interbrane distance. Such a black hole seemingly cannot evaporate into the species localized on the oth...

  8. Micro black holes and the democratic transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvali, Gia; Pujolas, Oriol

    2009-01-01

    Unitarity implies that the evaporation of microscopic quasiclassical black holes cannot be universal in different particle species. This creates a puzzle, since it conflicts with the thermal nature of quasiclassical black holes, according to which all of the species should see the same horizon and be produced with the same Hawking temperatures. We resolve this puzzle by showing that for the microscopic black holes, on top of the usual quantum evaporation time, there is a new time scale which characterizes a purely classical process during which the black hole loses the ability to differentiate among the species and becomes democratic. We demonstrate this phenomenon in a well-understood framework of large extra dimensions, with a number of parallel branes. An initially nondemocratic black hole is the one localized on one of the branes, with its high-dimensional Schwarzschild radius being much shorter than the interbrane distance. Such a black hole seemingly cannot evaporate into the species localized on the other branes that are beyond its reach. We demonstrate that in reality the system evolves classically in time, in such a way that the black hole accretes the neighboring branes. The end result is a completely democratic static configuration, in which all of the branes share the same black hole and all of the species are produced with the same Hawking temperature. Thus, just like their macroscopic counterparts, the microscopic black holes are universal bridges to the hidden sector physics.

  9. Democratizing Authority in the Built Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Michael P [UC Berkeley; Kolb, John [UC Berkeley; Chen, Kaifei [UC Berkeley; Culler, David [UC Berkeley; Katz, Randy [UC Berkeley

    2017-11-08

    Operating systems and applications in the built environment have relied upon central authorization and management mechanisms which restrict their scalability, especially with respect to administrative overhead. We propose a new set of primitives encompassing syndication, security, and service execution that unifies the management of applications and services across the built environment, while enabling participants to individually delegate privilege across multiple administrative domains with no loss of security or manageability. We show how to leverage a decentralized authorization syndication platform to extend the design of building operating systems beyond the single administrative domain of a building. The authorization system leveraged is based on blockchain smart contracts to permit decentralized and democratized delegation of authorization without central trust. Upon this, a publish/subscribe syndication tier and a containerized service execution environment are constructed. Combined, these mechanisms solve problems of delegation, federation, device protection and service execution that arise throughout the built environment. We leverage a high-fidelity city-scale emulation to verify the scalability of the authorization tier, and briefly describe a prototypical democratized operating system for the built environment using this foundation.

  10. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  11. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  12. The audit committee : Management watchdog or personal friend of the CEO?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruynseels, L.M.L.; Cardinaels, E.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure that audit committees provide sufficient oversight over the auditing process and quality of financial reporting, legislators have imposed stricter requirements on the independence of audit committee members. Although many audit committees appear to be “fully” independent, anecdotal

  13. Barriers and challenges in clinical ethics consultations: the experiences of nine clinical ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Reidar; Akre, Victoria; Førde, Reidun

    2009-10-01

    Clinical ethics committees have recently been established in nearly all Norwegian hospital trusts. One important task for these committees is clinical ethics consultations. This qualitative study explores significant barriers confronting the ethics committees in providing such consultation services. The interviews with the committees indicate that there is a substantial need for clinical ethics support services and, in general, the committee members expressed a great deal of enthusiasm for the committee work. They also reported, however, that tendencies to evade moral disagreement, conflict, and 'outsiders' are common in the hospitals. Sometimes even the committees comply with some of these tendencies. The committees agree that there is a need to improve their routines and procedures, clarify the committees' profile and field of responsibility, to make the committees well-known, to secure adequate operating conditions, and to develop organizational integration and support. Various strategies to meet these challenges on a local, regional or national level are also explored in this paper.

  14. Democratic Schooling in Norway: Implications for Leadership in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Jorunn

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the meaning of an education based on democratic values and the implications for school leadership in practice. Based on findings from a case study in a Norwegian upper secondary school, the study describes democratic school leadership in practice, with particular attention to the distribution of power and leadership in the…

  15. The Media, Corruption and Democratic Accountability in Nigeria's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transparency and accountability are essential pillars of democratic government the world over. These virtues are significant in measuring the success or otherwise of any democratic system. Apart from the activities of anti-graft agencies in combating corruption in the society, the mass media are often looked upon as ...

  16. Educating for Participation: Democratic Life and Performative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    A democratic life is a form of associated living that requires people to participate in a pluralistic dialogue in different spheres of the civic society: government, community, and work. Higher education classes have a leading role in preparing students for participation in a democratic society; however, more could be done, in particular focusing…

  17. The Potential Perils of Praise in a Democratic Interactive Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrivee, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Teacher praise can undermine the development of fundamental democratic values. This article presents styles of teacher talk in line with the principles and goals of democratic leadership and interactive teaching. Advocated discourse patterns encourage self-evaluation and self-reflection, enabling students to develop standards for judging their own…

  18. Internet Backbone in the Democratic Republic of Congo : Feasibility ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Internet Backbone in the Democratic Republic of Congo : Feasibility Study and Advocacy. During 7-10 February 2005, representatives of five francophone African countries (Cameroon, Morocco, Niger, Sénégal, and the Democratic Republic of Congo - DRC) met to consider ways and means of galvanizing the appropriation ...

  19. Media Literacy: A Central Component of Democratic Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Susie; Brocato, Kay; Hopper, Peggy F.; Sanders, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Educators from Europe, Latin America, and the United States convened to explore issues inherent in democratic citizenship. Media literacy, a central component of democratic citizenship, was studied in depth. Data from the camp were examined for evidence of the participants' understandings of media literacy and how it might be taught. Results…

  20. A toolbox for democratic and parcticipatory methods in education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    With the trends in the use of social software and social media, a more informal and democratic online culture is developing, especially in younger generations. This culture is increasingly conflicting with traditional teaching styles. One of these trends involves the introduction of more democratic

  1. Thinking Differently about Guidance: Power, Children's Autonomy and Democratic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millei, Zsuzsa

    2012-01-01

    This article critiques guidance approaches to discipline, that are employed in early childhood environments with an aim to create democratic environments for children, and as part of "good" practices. Advocates of guidance claim that this is a more humane or democratic approach to discipline that empowers children, and therefore, power…

  2. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Continuing a Research Reactor Project Project. Extension Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-11-18

    The text of the Project Extension Agreement between the Agency and the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in connection with the Agency's additional assistance to that Government in continuing a research reactor project is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. This Agreement entered into force on 27 September 1966.

  3. Social accountability in primary health care in West and Central Africa: exploring the role of health facility committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodenstein, Elsbet; Mafuta, Eric; Kpatchavi, Adolphe C; Servais, Jean; Dieleman, Marjolein; Broerse, Jacqueline E W; Barry, Alpha Amadou Bano; Mambu, Thérèse M N; Toonen, Jurrien

    2017-06-13

    Social accountability has been emphasised as an important strategy to increase the quality, equity, and responsiveness of health services. In many countries, health facility committees (HFCs) provide the accountability interface between health providers and citizens or users of health services. This article explores the social accountability practices facilitated by HFCs in Benin, Guinea and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The paper is based on a cross-case comparison of 11 HFCs across the three countries. The HFCs were purposefully selected based on the (past) presence of community participation support programs. The cases were derived from qualitative research involving document analysis as well as interviews and focus group discussions with health workers, citizens, committee members, and local authorities. Most HFCs facilitate social accountability by engaging with health providers in person or through meetings to discuss service failures, leading to changes in the quality of services, such as improved health worker presence, the availability of night shifts, the display of drug prices and replacement of poorly functioning health workers. Social accountability practices are however often individualised and not systematic, and their success depends on HFC leadership and synergy with other community structures. The absence of remuneration for HFC members does not seem to affect HFC engagement in social accountability. Most HFCs in this study offer a social accountability forum, but the informal and non-systematic character and limited community consultation leave opportunities for the exclusion of voices of marginalised groups. More inclusive, coherent and authoritative social accountability practices can be developed by making explicit the mandate of HFC in the planning, monitoring, and supervision of health services; providing instruments for organising local accountability processes; strengthening opportunities for community input and feedback; and

  4. Advisory Committee Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    An advisory committee is generally comprised of persons outside the education profession who have specialized knowledge in a given area. The committee advises, makes recommendations, and gives service to the college and its students, instructors, and administrators. At Black Hawk College, there are four types of advisory committees: community,…

  5. Neoliberal Ideology and Democratic Learning. A Response to "Challenging Freedom: Neoliberalism and the Erosion of Democratic Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop-Margison, Emery James; Ramirez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    In "Challenging Freedom: Neoliberalism and the Erosion of Democratic Education," the author suggests that the presumed decline of democratic learning in public schooling follows from two primary forces: (a) the metaphysical implications of Cartesian psychophysical dualism that support an ontological understanding of the self as distinct…

  6. Committees review activities at December meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Education and Human Resources Committee reported having approved participation in the Association for Women Geoscientist's (AWG) national survey. During the summer of 1983 the AWG designed a 75-question survey targeted to women but also applicable to men. The survey consisted of five sections (in addition to such demographics as age, salary, education, job area, and society membership): feelings and attitude toward job, career/family balance, sexual harassment and discrimination, opinions on national energy and conservation policy, and attitude toward AWG. The questionnaire was mailed to AWG members (just over 1000) and to AGU female members (about 1300). Survey participants were asked to give copies to their male colleagues to create a comparison group. About 25% of the 800 responses were from men. The responses were split about 50/50 between AWG and AGU members. The Education and Human Resources Committee will have the results from the survey presented at their next meeting in Cincinnati, May 15.

  7. 75 FR 34972 - Notice of Invitation for Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics AGENCY: National Agricultural Statistics... agriculture-related business and marketing experts. Members serve staggered 2-year terms, with terms for half.... Committee members are reimbursed for official travel expenses only. Send questions, comments, and requests...

  8. 75 FR 12814 - Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... 3:30 p.m. to hold discussions with VAMC key staff members on services, benefits, delivery challenges... with VARO key staff members on services, benefits, delivery challenges and successes. The Committee... leadership from all three administrations and work on their report during this period. The Committee will...

  9. Effectiveness of the current method of calculating member states' contributions

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    At its Two-hundred and eighty-sixth Meeting of 19 September 2001, the Finance Committee requested the Management to re-assess the effectiveness of the current method of forecasting Net National Income (NNI) for the purposes of calculating the Member States' contributions by comparing the results of the current weighted average method with a method based on a simple arithmetic average. The Finance Committee is invited to take note of this information.

  10. Global communications: democratic access for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In preparation for the 1995 World Conference on Women, women of the Latin American Information Agency prepared a statement for the UN about the importance of communications and information in the contemporary world and the role of women in the media. The statement includes the following specific suggestions: 1) that the UN promote the democratization of communications with a gender focus, 2) that women be assured access to new communications technologies that empower their communicational capacity, 3) that steps be taken to ensure that media content projects a positive and nondiscriminatory image of women, and 4) that guidelines be drawn up to promote labor equality between the genders and a greater presence of women in decision-making positions in the media.

  11. The Democratic Invention. A Reading of Lefort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Sirczuk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will present the way in which Lefort interprets modern democracy as a new form of society in regard to the sources of law and legitimacy. Lefort is a thinker who is difficult to place within the context of contemporary political theory: he not only defends democracy against Marxism but also thinks that this form of society cannot be circumscribed within the limits of the modern state, nor be understood through the categories that the tradition of political philosophy has developed to distinguish between political regimes. Lefort combines the defense of democracy with a radical critique of the established order. He identifies the democratic invention with the institution of a dynamic that makes, by right, the radical questioning of law the source of political legitimacy.

  12. Democratic reinforcement: A principle for brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stassinopoulos, D.; Bak, P.

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a simple ''toy'' brain model. The model consists of a set of randomly connected, or layered integrate-and-fire neurons. Inputs to and outputs from the environment are connected randomly to subsets of neurons. The connections between firing neurons are strengthened or weakened according to whether the action was successful or not. Unlike previous reinforcement learning algorithms, the feedback from the environment is democratic: it affects all neurons in the same way, irrespective of their position in the network and independent of the output signal. Thus no unrealistic back propagation or other external computation is needed. This is accomplished by a global threshold regulation which allows the system to self-organize into a highly susceptible, possibly ''critical'' state with low activity and sparse connections between firing neurons. The low activity permits memory in quiescent areas to be conserved since only firing neurons are modified when new information is being taught

  13. Civil Society, Democratic Space, and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelmani Jaysawal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Civil Society envisages the growth of civilization in a way that the society is in “civilized form.” It has been prominent in Social science since time immemorial. Till 18th century, it was synonymous with the state or political society. It was more or less direct translation of Cicero’s Societas’ Civilis and Aristotle’s Koinonia politike. According to Karl Marx, “Civil Society embraces the whole material intercourse of individuals within a definite stage of development of productive forces.” Civil Society is an arena where modern man legitimately gratifies his self-interest and develops his individuality, but also learns the value of group action, social solidarity which educates him for citizenship and equips him to participate in the political sphere of the state. It provides “networks of civic engagement” within which reciprocity is learned and enforced, trust is generated. An active and diverse civil society plays a valuable role in advancement of democracy. It seeks to ensure that citizen’s interests are taken seriously. The social work intervention may not be democratically envisaged until it is promulgated by civic engagement through Civil Society. Methodology: This is a descriptive study which consists of secondary source of data collection based on reports, books, periodic journals, web-based articles. There have been utilized three case studies for reaching the findings of study. This article will highlight on role of civil society in providing democratic space and assisting social workers to ensure inclusive growth through conglomeration of state and individuals.

  14. Inter-Society Research Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Higuchi, Masahisa.

    1996-01-01

    World-wide tendencies and circumstances for nuclear power cannot be said to be moving full of sail with a favorable wind, due to nuclear power plant accidents and comparatively little economical benefit. The present Nuclear Power Plant situation is that some personnel understand a need for the development from the viewpoint of efficient energy usage in the world and environmental problems like global warming. At the same time others oppose future nuclear development from the viewpoint of safety problems and economic cost. These issues may end nuclear development worldwide. Nuclear development must be considered from an international viewpoint and other various aspects. Therefore, all countries concerned should cooperative in the adjustment of research carried out by each country. Nuclear power's future must be efficient in the utilization of limited resources (money, manpower and facilities). It is concluded that the ISRC should only discuss technical matters on nuclear engineering, independent from political influence. Societies agreeing to this idea, provide the ISRC with money and/or manpower and/or facilities. The ISRC will consist of a research program committee and research task forces. Members of the Research Program Committee are the chairmen of the research task forces who are also society representatives. The Committee will discuss research programs and resources. The research task forces will consist of one society representative chairman and specialists on the program

  15. 77 FR 38768 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ...The Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee) will hold a meeting via teleconference on Friday, July 27, 2012 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time (ET). The primary purposes of this meeting are to review updates on the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel transition plan, review the status of the research subcommittee and the August Smart Grid Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, and plan for a fall meeting. Interested members of the public will be able to participate in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number.

  16. 78 FR 63232 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    .... Please note that the meeting may close early if the committee has completed its business. ADDRESSES: The... Commission will brief members on its cybersecurity activities. Finally, the EOP will facilitate a roundtable discussion with members on the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Cybersecurity Framework...

  17. The Democratic Surplus that Constitutionalised the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    This article questions the very foundation of the doctrine of a so-called “democratic deficit” in the EU. Yet in order to argue beyond nationalist myths, clear-cut concepts are necessary. Speaking about democracy in the EU, the article exposes four dimensions that constitute a “democratic surplus...... nation-state, the EU, secondly, is not build by nobles and monarchs, nor by war. Third, a separation of powers is obvious. And fourth, this article demonstrates how the EU rescued the democratic nation-state....

  18. School education and democratic management of teaching: perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo Augusto Campos Masson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the management of education from the debate on the democratic management of social institutions, in particular, the school. It reflects on the changes that have occurred in the school due to the presence of new students belonging to the subaltern classes and the possibility of the democratic management of teaching being an important instrument for overcoming school failure. It discusses aspects of Brazilian legislation on the theme and the possibilities arising from the growth of political conservatism oppose initiatives to democratic management of education.

  19. The Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee's report on radioactive waste management practices in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee (RWMAC) is the independent body that advises the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions and the Secretaries of State for Scotland and for Wales on issues relating to radioactive waste management. The terms of reference of the RWMAC, and a list of its Members, are given in Annex 1 to this Report. A group of 16 RWMAC Members examined the management of radioactive waste in Switzerland during a study visit to that country made between 8 and 12 October 1996. The aim of the visit was to acquire first hand knowledge of a set of practices adopted outside the United Kingdom by visiting radioactive waste management facilities and holding discussions with those involved, whether as operators, regulators or advisors to Government. This Report describes what the group saw, records the information collected, and sets out its findings. Switzerland's political system, with the emphasis placed on referenda, encourages popular participation in the democratic process. This may appear to have slowed down the provision of management facilities for radioactive wastes. From a longer term perspective, however, it is clear that such facilities may only really be viable in locations where there is sufficient local support. The quality of the arguments, from both supporters and opponents of nuclear power, is clear evidence of the importance which needs to be attached to the views of those affected. In order to build on what has already been achieved, notably in storage and research, those concerned with radioactive waste management in Switzerland continue to recognise this underlying principle

  20. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    .... FDA-2013-N-1380] Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination AGENCY: Food... announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. This document removes the Veterinary Advisory Committee from the Agency's list of standing advisory committees. DATES: This rule is...

  1. Is Democratization a Sound Strategy for Combating Fundamentalist Islam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    .... The United States' current National Security Strategy (NSS) prepossess to counter the growth of radical Islam through the promotion of human rights and freedom by the process of democratization throughout the world...

  2. Democratic survival in Latin America (1945-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal PÉREZ-LIÑÁN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Why do democracies survive or break down? In this paper, it returns to this classic question with an empirical focus on Latin America from 1945 to 2005. The argument deviates from the quantitative literature and a good part of the qualitative literature on democratic survival and breakdown. It is argued that structural variables such as the level of development and inequalities have not shaped prospects for democratic survival in Latin America. Nor, contrary to findings in some of the literature, has economic performance affected the survival of competitive regimes. Instead, it is focused on the regional political environment and on actors’ normative preferences about democracy and dictatorship and their policy radicalism or moderation. It is argued that 1 a higher level of development did not increase the likelihood of democratic survival in Latin America over this long time; 2 if actors have a normative preference for democracy, it is more likely to survive; and 3 policy moderation facilitates democratic survival.

  3. Overcoming the Obstacles to Establishing a Democratic State in Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Dennis O

    2007-01-01

    .... This project looks at several of those obstacles to democracy in Afghanistan, to include the absence of a democratic history and tradition, an endemic culture of corruption, a pervasive narcotics...

  4. EZI- NA-ULO AND UMUNNA: IN SEARCH OF DEMOCRATIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ike

    Anthony Ufearoh. Abstract. This write-up intends to locate democratic ideals the traditional Igbo .... quintessential leader in the communalist leadership system of the traditional .... style is 'inclusionary' rather than 'exclusionary'. Representation.

  5. Transportation management and security during the 2004 Democratic National Convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-05

    The transportation operations plan for the 2004 Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Boston, Massachusetts, was not a typical transportation plan driven by goals such as mobility and air quality. The DNC was the first national political convention...

  6. Giving voice to the voiceless through deliberative democratic school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are several DDSG approaches that can be employed in creating elements for stakeholder empowerment and in driving deliberative democratic school governance forward. These include inclusion, motivational communication, consensus, deliberation/ dialogue, collaboration, and conflict resolution. Some school ...

  7. Introduction Public Sector Reforms and the Quest for Democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seriane.camara

    substantive (or emancipatory) democracy in the long run”. Democratic .... the paradigm focused exclusively on short-term macro-economic stabilization, with little ..... Paper presented at the Guy Mhone Memorial Conference on Public Sector.

  8. Foreign private capital inflows in Nigeria's democratic dispensation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FPCI) in Nigeria in the current democratic dispensation with a view to finding out whether the inflows have recorded significant increase since the institution of Democracy in the country. Relevant theories and empirical data were reviewed.

  9. [Responsibilities of ethics committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, K

    2000-05-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical research projects are submitted to ethical committees (institutional review boards) for approval. New therapeutic developments have to be evaluated by these committees to protect patients/volunteers. Thus, the responsibility of ethical committees is increasing. The "Nürnberger Kodex" and the "Declaration of Helsinki" are the background for these evaluations. According to the German drug law the physician is obligated by law to submit the protocol to such a committee. In addition, local state physician authorities require such a procedure. Important considerations during the review process besides ethical aspects are the informed consent, which should be written in an understandable form, and the obligations of the insurance.

  10. Consensus, contracts, and committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J D

    1991-08-01

    Following a brief account of the puzzle that ethics committees present for the Western Philosophical tradition, I will examine the possibility that social contract theory can contribute to a philosophical account of these committees. Passing through classical as well as contemporary theories, particularly Rawls' recent constructivist approach, I will argue that social contract theory places severe constraints on the authority that may legitimately be granted to ethics committees. This, I conclude, speaks more about the suitability of the theory to this level of analysis than about the ethics committee phenomenon itself.

  11. Can the EU’s constitutional framework accommodate democratic politics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicluna Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The robustness of the EU’s constitutional framework – and its ability to accommodate democratic politics – is challenged as never before. The growing disconnect between formally democratic procedures and substantive choice is well illustrated by the Greek crisis. Since its first bailout in May 2010, Greece has held four general elections and a referendum. Yet, the anti-austerity preferences of the Greek electorate have not been effectively translated into policy.

  12. Democratic Capitalism and Philanthropy in a Global Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltan J. Acs; Sameeksha Desai

    2007-01-01

    Democratic capitalism has become the popular paradigm in the modern world, and it is spreading further through globalization. It is a model based on growth, expansion and constant innovation. However, it is accompanied by social problems which may worsen despite overall gains in wealth. In this paper, we suggest that democratic capitalist societies may benefit from the application of what has been a primarily American institution: Philanthropy. We present the Entrepreneurship-Philanthropy Cyc...

  13. Freed to Learn: Five Fundamental Concepts of Democratic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo J. FAHEY

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Children are natural learners each with distinct interests, abilities and rates of cognitive, emotional and social growth. Democratic Education institutionalizes five key concepts to free these natural instincts and individual differences to drive community self-governance and individual self-directed learning within a formal schooling environment. This paper summarizes the five concepts fundamental to Democratic Education and suggests how they can be applied within a school setting.

  14. The democratizing potential of the Internet in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Kevin J

    1997-01-01

    This thesis argues that the Internet is likely to he a strong, positive facilitating factor for the transition to and consolidation of democracy for states in Southeast Asia. U.S. policy makers intent on promoting democracy in Southeast Asia should consider the Internet's potential as a tool for promoting democratization. A review of the existing democratization literature, coupled with quantitative analysis of the societal impact of computer networking technologies, suggests that the level o...

  15. Introduction and Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Véronique; Piette, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Véronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del Olmo

  16. Democrats and republicans can be differentiated from their faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas O Rule

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals' faces communicate a great deal of information about them. Although some of this information tends to be perceptually obvious (such as race and sex, much of it is perceptually ambiguous, without clear or obvious visual cues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we found that individuals' political affiliations could be accurately discerned from their faces. In Study 1, perceivers were able to accurately distinguish whether U.S. Senate candidates were either Democrats or Republicans based on photos of their faces. Study 2 showed that these effects extended to Democrat and Republican college students, based on their senior yearbook photos. Study 3 then showed that these judgments were related to differences in perceived traits among the Democrat and Republican faces. Republicans were perceived as more powerful than Democrats. Moreover, as individual targets were perceived to be more powerful, they were more likely to be perceived as Republicans by others. Similarly, as individual targets were perceived to be warmer, they were more likely to be perceived as Democrats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that perceivers' beliefs about who is a Democrat and Republican may be based on perceptions of traits stereotypically associated with the two political parties and that, indeed, the guidance of these stereotypes may lead to categorizations of others' political affiliations at rates significantly more accurate than chance guessing.

  17. An Examination of Democratic Attitudes of Primary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gulec

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As democracy can develop better in a society of democratic people, democracy education can also get its intended goals better in a democratic school environment. As the most influential people in a school environment were teachers, this study, too, aimed to determine their levels of democratic attitudes. In the present study, 60 primary school teachers working in the schools attached to the Bursa Metropolitan Municipality were surveyed. The relationships between their attitudes and some variables were studied. These variables included school they work, age, gender, marital status, number of children they have, education level, teaching experience and number of broth-ers or sisters. The questionnaire used for this study was validated by Aydogan & Kukul (2003 based on previous studies made by Gomleksiz (1988, Yildirim (1994 and Atasoy (1997. For the validity of the questionnaire, Cronbach Alpha coefficient (0.829 was calculated. The results suggest that teachers show very positive attitude with a score of 103. When the items were examined individually, some significant relationships were found with the variables. Teachers should have positive democratic attitudes in order to give lessons of democracy to their students. An appropriate and encouraging environment should be prepared in order for students to gain desired democratic outcomes. In a democratic environment, teachers’ positive attitudes will help their students to gain critical thinking skills, effective discussion skills, capability for fighting against inequity, cooperation and collaboration skills, and showing empathy and respect for diversity.

  18. 77 FR 27832 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... organizations --Relations with non-governmental organizations --World Maritime Day --International Maritime... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7879] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee...-second Session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Technical Co-operation Committee (TCC 62...

  19. Opinion poll tests support for democratic initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    A national opinion poll designed to test public support for a position paper on energy policy for the Clinton Administration and the new Congress, was released February 9 at a Capitol Hill press conference sponsored by the Environmental and Energy Study Institute. The poll, conducted by the Democratic polling firm Greenberg/Lake and Republican pollster Lance Tarrance, found voters want energy efficiency, conservation, and renewable energy as top priorities for the nation's energy policy. It also found voters are willing to seek these policies with tough regulation, tax incentives, and their own behavior. Also, voters appear to support taxes on pollution and energy use, whether the income is used to decrease taxes on personal income, or to reduce the deficit. However, voters oppose gas taxes and are divided on taxes for fossil fuels. Support for energy taxes increases if revenues generated by them are dedicated to deficit reduction. The poll also revealed: the public's desire for less emphasis on polluting sources of energy such as oil and coal; low levels of support for nuclear power; support for government initiatives to increase the fuel efficiency of consumer goods such as appliances and automobiles; opposition to a substantial increase in the gasoline tax; and support for green taxes on polluting sources of energy use at the same time policy makers remove federal tax subsidies on fuels that pollute

  20. Energy technology and American democratic values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Today, the benefits of liberal democracy have increasingly been cast into doubt. The debate over alternative energy policies illustrates the problems associated with liberal democracy. For many, it is the realization that energy choices and the selection of social and political values amount to much the same thing. Simply put, energy policy decisions, and the concomitant energy technologies, carry implications of an ethical, social and political nature. The argument of the social and political effects of energy technology flows from the more general thesis that all forms of technological practice condition social and political relations. That is, technological systems, beyond performing the specific functions for which they were designed, act upon and influence social and political arrangements. Seen in this light, energy technologies are as important to the promotion and preservation of this country's political values as are its institutions and laws. Further, there is evidence to suggest that this country's cherished democratic value of freedom is slowly being eclipsed by the values attendant to corporate capitalism and its singular pursuit of growth. It is this dominance of economic values over political values which provides the environment within which the technological debate is waged. Ultimately, tracing the historic linkage between property and liberty, it is concluded that the preservation of our freedom require new thinking regarding the present configuration of ownership patterns. The questions surrounding energy policy serve to illuminate these concerns.

  1. Democratizing data science through data science training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Fierro, Lily; Kamdar, Jeana; Gordon, Jonathan; Stewart, Crystal; Bhattrai, Avnish; Abe, Sumiko; Lei, Xiaoxiao; O'Driscoll, Caroline; Sinha, Aakanchha; Jain, Priyambada; Burns, Gully; Lerman, Kristina; Ambite, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    The biomedical sciences have experienced an explosion of data which promises to overwhelm many current practitioners. Without easy access to data science training resources, biomedical researchers may find themselves unable to wrangle their own datasets. In 2014, to address the challenges posed such a data onslaught, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative. To this end, the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (TCC; bigdatau.org) was funded to facilitate both in-person and online learning, and open up the concepts of data science to the widest possible audience. Here, we describe the activities of the BD2K TCC and its focus on the construction of the Educational Resource Discovery Index (ERuDIte), which identifies, collects, describes, and organizes online data science materials from BD2K awardees, open online courses, and videos from scientific lectures and tutorials. ERuDIte now indexes over 9,500 resources. Given the richness of online training materials and the constant evolution of biomedical data science, computational methods applying information retrieval, natural language processing, and machine learning techniques are required - in effect, using data science to inform training in data science. In so doing, the TCC seeks to democratize novel insights and discoveries brought forth via large-scale data science training.

  2. On New Beginnings and Democratic Legitimacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Larsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to discuss the enigma of revolutionary new political beginnings of constitutional orders. The problem is that when a political community is constituted, the act of constituting per definition is unconstitutional or extra-legal. For this reason the question of new beginnings is a political and not a legal question. The question of what the authority of the constituent act is presents an important question since the constitution is the fundamental law from which the legitimacy or authority of all other laws is derived. The problem for this paper is whether and in what way it is possible to think new beginnings that are not merely institutionalizations of factual relations of domination or arbitrary acts of violence. This problem is discussed on basis of two revolutionary theories in the tradition of constituent power—Emmanuel Sieyès and Hannah Arendt—that both understand power to emanate from below and not from above whereby they both, though in different way, present arguments against the understanding that new beginnings merely are institutionalizations of relations of domination and arbitrary acts of violence. The question of whether and to what extent they are successful and whether their theories are democratic will finally be discussed.

  3. Decision Making in Liver Transplant Selection Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Michael L; Biggins, Scott W; Huang, Mary Ann; Argo, Curtis K; Fontana, Robert J; Anspach, Renee R

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to receive a liver transplant, patients must first be placed on the waiting list – a decision made in most transplant centers by a multidisciplinary committee. The function of these committees has never been studied. Objectives To describe decision making in liver transplant committees and identify opportunities for process improvement. Design Observational multi-center Setting We observed 63 meetings and interviewed 50 committee members at 4 liver transplant centers. Study Subjects Transplant committee members. Measurements Recorded transcripts and field notes were analyzed using standard qualitative sociological methods. Results While the structure of meetings varied by center, the process was uniform and involved reviewing possible reasons for patient exclusion using primarily inductive reasoning. Stated justifications for excluding patients were a) too well, b) non-hepatic comorbidities or advanced age, c) too sick in the setting of advanced liver disease, d) substance abuse, or e) other psychosocial barriers. Dominant themes identified included members’ angst over deciding who lives and dies, a high correlation between psychosocial barriers to transplant and patients’ socioeconomic status, and the influence of external forces on decision making. Consistently identified barriers to effective group decision making were: 1) unwritten center policies, and 2) confusion regarding advocacy versus stewardship roles. Limitations The use of qualitative methods provides broad understanding but limits specific inferences. These four centers may not be reflective of every transplant center nationwide. Conclusion The difficult decisions made by these committees are reasonably consistent and always well-intentioned, but might be improved by more explicit written policies and clarifying roles. This process may help inform resource allocation in other areas of medicine. Primary funding source The Greenwall Foundation. PMID:22007044

  4. The Evolution of American Hospital Ethics Committees: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew; Jurchak, Martha

    2016-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, legal precedent, governmental recommendations, and professional society guidelines drove the formation of hospital ethics committees (HECs). The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization's requirements in the early 1990s solidified the role of HECs as the primary mechanism to address ethical issues in patient care. Because external factors drove the rapid growth of HECs on an institution-by-institution basis, however, no initial consensus formed around the structure and function of these committees. There are now almost 40 years of empirical studies on the composition, administration, and activities of HECs in the United States. We conducted a systematic review of the available empirical literature on HECs to describe their evolution. As HECs changed over time, they increased their total number of members and percentage of members from nursing and the community. Although physicians increasingly chaired these committees, their presence as a percentage of overall members declined. The percentage of administrative members remained steady, although committees became increasingly likely to have at least one administrative member. HECs were also increasingly likely to report to an administrative body or to the board of trustees or directors rather than to the medical staff. Finally, consultation volume increased steadily over time. There has not, however, been a national survey of the composition of ethics committees, their administration, or volume of consultation in more than 10 years, despite increasing calls for professional standards and quality improvement assessments among HECs. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  5. The notion of participatory democracy in relation to local ward committees: The distribution of power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leepo J. Modise

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article comprises four important parts: first, the two important components of democracy, namely participatory and non-participatory or representative democracy will be discussed with special reference to the distribution of powers. Second, it will address the roles and responsibilities of ward committees within the democratic society. Third, the ethical question of the basis of the committee members’ capacity to serve on the ward committees in relation to coercive leadership (tyranny of the majority will be investigated. Fourth, the theological standpoint on the distribution of powers or participatory democracy and the role of the church to improve participatory democracy will be discussed. The research question is the following: What can be done by the country to improve participatory democracy in South Africa, through engagement with ward committees?

  6. The medical school curriculum committee revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricson, W D; Payer, A F; Rogers, L P; Markus, J F

    1993-03-01

    Numerous study commissions have contended that departmental territoriality and lack of coordinated planning are stagnating contemporary medical education. As a cure, these commissions have recommended the creation of centralized academic management units empowered to oversee revitalization of the curriculum through a series of reforms, including better definition of graduation competencies, community-based training, interdisciplinary courses, problem-based learning, and modernization of evaluation strategies. To determine the extent to which these recommendations were being adopted, in 1990 the authors sent a questionnaire on curriculum committee functions, current innovation efforts, and future priorities to academic administrators and members of medical school curriculum committees at 143 North American medical schools. Responses were received from administrators (primarily associate deans for academic affairs) at 118 schools and committee members (primarily faculty) at 111 schools. Recommendations for enhancing curriculum committee effectiveness were also elicited. The authors conclude that centralization of curricular management has occurred at very few institutions, and that the commonly mentioned reforms are being adopted at a modest pace. The results are analyzed in light of theories of the institutional change process and strategies for introducing educational innovations into established institutions.

  7. News from the Staff Association Executive Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    On 17 April, the Staff Council proceeded to the election of the Executive Committee of the Staff Association and the members of the Bureau. First of all, why a new election of the Executive Committee elected in April 2018 after that of December 2017 (Echo No. 281)? Quite simply because a Crisis Executive Committee with a provisional Bureau had been elected for a period from 1st January to 16 April 2018 with defined and restricted objectives (Echo No. 283). Therefore, on 17 April, G. Roy presented for election a list of 12 persons, including five members for the Bureau, who agreed to continue their work within the Executive Committee, based on an intensive programme with the following main axes: Crèche and School and in particular the establishment of a foundation; Concertation: review and relaunch of the concertation process; Finalisation of the 2015 five-yearly review; Preparation and start of the 2020 five-yearly review; Actuarial reviews of the Pension Fund and the CHIS; Internal enquiries and...

  8. Committee on Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCIENCE ADVISOR WASHINGTON, DC -- Today, House Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY23) and Advisor nominee Dr. John H. Marburger. The Senate Commerce Committee has scheduled a nomination hearing for this afternoon, and Boehlert and Grucci have been invited to testify. Dr. Marburger was nominated

  9. LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prof. B. B. P. Gupta

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Bengaluru. 83rd ANNUAL MEETING. 3–5 November 2017, NEHU, Shillong. LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE. Local Organizing Committee. 1. Prof. S. K. Srivastava. Chairman. Vice-Chancellor, NEHU, Shillong. 2. Prof. B. B. P. Gupta. Organising Secretary. Department of Zoology ...

  10. Institutional Ethics Committee Regulations and Current Updates in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahuli, Amit V; Mahuli, Simpy A; Patil, Shankargouda; Bhandi, Shilpa

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the review is to provide current updates on regulations for ethics committees and researchers in India. Ethical dilemmas in research since time immemorial have been a major concern for researchers worldwide. The question "what makes clinical research ethical" is significant and difficult to answer as multiple factors are involved. The research involving human participants in clinical trials should follow the required rules, regulations, and guidelines in one's own country. It is a dynamic process, and updates have to be learned by researcher and committee members. The review highlights the ethical regulation from the Drug Controller General of India, Clinical Trial Registry of India, and Indian Council of Medical Research guidelines. In this article, the updates on Indian scenario of the Ethical Committee and guidelines are compiled. The review comes handy for clinical researchers and ethics committee members in academic institutions to check on the current updates and keep abreast with the knowledge on regulations of ethics in India.

  11. ACCU: a committee that addresses Users' needs

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    This year, the Advisory Committee of CERN Users (ACCU) celebrates its 25th anniversary. Created in its modern form in December 1988 - at a time when the number of users was about 1,500 - the committee still defends the interests of today’s users, now numbering around 11,000.   Actually, the first ACCU was established in 1977. Demanded by the rising number of Users, the need for such a committee arose during the 127th Meeting of Committee of Council (as stated in this official document): “In view of the large number and diversity of CERN Users, it has become apparent for some time that it would be useful to have an organised channel of consultation between the CERN direction and a representative group of CERN Users.” Michael Hauschild, ACCU Secretary since 2010, explains: “At that time, there were fewer ACCU members, and not all the countries were represented. With the birth of the modern form of the committee, in 1988, the decision to have representatives ...

  12. A clash of civilizations? Examining liberal-democratic values in Turkey and the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jeffrey C

    2008-12-01

    Turkey's proposed entry into the European Union (EU) has been undermined by Europeans' perceptions of Turkish-European cultural differences, particularly regarding the liberal-democratic values that the EU promotes (democracy, rule of law, and respect for and appreciation of minority/human rights). Yet, cross-national research on values has not focused on Turkey, the EU, and these liberal-democratic values, leaving assumptions of cultural differences and their explanations untested. Through analyses of World and European Values Survey data (1999-2002), this article asks whether people in Turkey have the same values regarding democracy, rule of law (versus religious and authoritarian rule), and minority/human rights as people in EU member and candidate states (as of 2000)? What factors explain these values? I find that people in Turkey support democracy to the same extent as people in EU member and candidate states, but people in Turkey are more supportive of religious and authoritarian rule and are less tolerant of minorities. Although the 'clash of civilizations' thesis expects liberal values to be ordered according to countries' religious traditions, with western Christian the most supportive and Islamic the least, only for tolerance of minorities values is this pattern found. Instead, economic development most consistently explains differences between Turkey and EU member and candidate states in support for these values. I conclude with calls for theoretical refinement, particularly of the clash of civilizations thesis, along with suggestions for future research to examine more Muslim and Orthodox countries; I discuss the debate over Turkey's EU entry.

  13. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  14. The Incentive Effect of Scores: Randomized Evidence from Credit Committees

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Paravisini; Antoinette Schoar

    2013-01-01

    We design a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the adoption of credit scoring with a bank that uses soft information in small businesses lending. We find that credit scores improve the productivity of credit committees, reduce managerial involvement in the loan approval process, and increase the profitability of lending. Credit committee members' effort and output also increase when they anticipate the score becoming available, indicating that scores improve incentives to use existing in...

  15. 2015 Executive Committee: the strength of continuity

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    The year 2015 will see few changes in the composition of the Executive Committee. On the one hand, Oliver Boetcher enters and becomes the representative of the Staff Association in the Management Board of EN Department. On the other hand, Jaap Panman, who will retire in 2015, leaves the Committee at the end of 2014. We would like to thank Joël Lahaye, who was the departmental representative for EN in 2014, and Jaap for their contributions. The other members of the Committee continue to assume their respective duties, thus ensuring that your Staff Association will have a solid, experienced, effective and cohesive team to cope with the challenges of the new year, with, among others, the key issues of pensions and the 2015 five-yearly review. Your staff delegates hope to be able to count on the active support of all of you to defend the interests of the personnel, past, present, and future, and their families. Sandrine BAUDAT FP Member Oliver BOETCHER EN Member Rachel BRAY GS Memb...

  16. 7 CFR 932.129 - Nomination procedures for producer members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... choose the district in which the producer will vote and notify the Committee of that choice. If the... producer wishes to participate shall be the producer's choice. (4) Any member of a producer's family (husband, wife, son or daughter) may vote on behalf of an owner-operated, landlord-tenant, family...

  17. Training for an effective health and safety committee in a small business setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crollard, Allison; Neitzel, Richard L; Dominguez, Carlos F; Seixas, Noah S

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety committees are often heralded as a key element of successful health and safety programs, and are thought to represent a means of engaging workers in health and safety efforts. While the understanding of the factors that make these committees effective is growing, there are few resources for how to assist committees in developing these characteristics. This paper describes one approach to creating and implementing a training intervention aimed at improving health and safety committee function at one multilingual worksite. Short-term impacts were evaluated via questionnaire and qualitative observations of committee function. Results indicated high satisfaction with the training as well as modest increases in participation, cooperation, role clarity, and comfort with health and safety skills among committee members. The committee also made considerable achievements in establishing new processes for effective function. Similar interventions may be useful in other workplaces to increase health and safety committee success.

  18. Cooperation with COMECON members in coke chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medricky. Z

    1987-05-01

    Discusses activities of the coking industry division of the standing committee for iron metallurgy of the COMECON. The following cooperation fields are analyzed: raw material basis for coking industry, coal charge preparation and methods for reducing proportion of coking coal in a coal charge (heat treatments, formed coke processes, partial briquetting, pelletizing, increasing coking temperature, packing etc.), coking technology, coke quenching, screening, chemical processing of coal gas, environmental protection in the coking industry, environmental effects of coking, pitch coke production, methods for increasing labor productivity. Research programs coordinated by member countries are reviewed. Programs in which Czechoslovakia participates are discussed.

  19. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Horst Wenninger (left) in animated discussion with Alexander Höchli, member of the Institutional Committee of Forum Engelberg and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden.

  20. Colloquium on the Past, Present and Future of the Nuclear Law Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarri, Luis; Schwartz, Julia; Dussart-Desart, Roland; Pelzer, Norbert; Leger, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Law Committee (NLC) celebrated its 50. anniversary in February 2007. To mark the occasion, a colloquium was organised on 6 February 2007 in conjunction with the committee's regular meeting in Paris, France. Those attending included nearly all former NLC chairs and former heads of NEA Legal Affairs. This document brings together the available presentations given at this colloquium: 1 - Welcoming Address (Luis Echavarri); 2 - The Nuclear Law Committee - A Historical Perspective (Julia Schwartz); 3 - The NEA Nuclear Law Committee - From the Viewpoint of a Committee Member (Norbert Pelze); 4 - Memorable Moments from Special guests; 5 - The Prospects for Nuclear Law (Marc Leger); 6 - Concluding Remarks (Roland Dussart-Desart)

  1. Panel Discussion : Report of the APS Ad-Hoc Committee on LGBT Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Barthelemy, Ramon; Garmon, Savannah; Reeves, Kyle; APS Ad-Hoc Committee on LGBT Issues Team

    Following the presentation of the findings and recommendations of the APS Ad-Hoc Committee on LGBT Issues (C-LGBT) by Committee Chair Michael Falk, a panel discussion will be held featuring several members of the committee. The discussion will focus on how APS can best ensure the recommendations of the committee are carried out in a timely fashion and other ideas on future APS efforts toward LGBT inclusion in physics. Discussion topics will also include the research and other input that shaped the committee's findings and recommendations.

  2. Organizational forms of medical care in the event of radiation accidents in the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nack, P.; Arndt, D.; Schuettmann, W.

    1977-01-01

    Medical care of radiation casualties in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) is organized on two levels. On the level of users the responsible Medical Officers guarantee both the routine control of persons occupationally exposed to radiation and first aid in the event of accidents. On the second level medical treatment is given either in the Clinical Department of the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection or in specialized national health system clinics having facilities for intensive medical care. A decision on hospitalization is made according to the conditions of the accident and the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic measures as a rule are based on consultations between the responsible Medical Officer and the departments of the Board (Emergency Assistance Service, Clinical Department, Consultative Committee). For serious cases where haematological complications can be expected, a central medical clinic with facilities for bone-marrow transplants is available. The casualties are treated in local clinics which are provided with continuous support and advice by the Board. This support consists in: (i) immediate activity by a consultative committee of the Board's physicians and scientists experienced and trained in radiation protection and the treatment of radiation accidents; (ii) the requirement of compulsory examination methods and take-over of specialized laboratory investigations; and (iii) the use of a mobile emergency measuring system in cases of additional incorporation. It is the main principle of medical care in case of radiation accidents to consult, as early as possible, a medical consultative committee of the Board in the field of radiation protection at each step of medical care. (author)

  3. Members of Parliament on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    at political party meetings and at public meetings and hearings. However, the upcoming of new social media like Facebook provides new, interesting platforms for this conversation. And many opinion makers and scholars have high expectations for the democratic potential of these platforms. The paper examines......Key to the idea of a democratic public sphere has always been the ongoing conversations between citizens as well as between citizens and politicians (Koch, Mansbridge, Habermas etc.). The conversations between politicians and citizens in the Danish political system have traditionally taken place...

  4. Assessing Political Dynamics in Contemporary Malaysia: Implications for Democratic Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surain Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines political dynamics in Malaysia and assesses the prospects for change in the direction of greater political liberalization. It focuses on the 12th General Election of 2008 and its implications for opportunities and challenges for liberal democratic change in Malaysia. It discusses the role of the internet-based new media in shaping an emerging public sphere, and some factors affecting the changing role of non-Malay voters in the political process. This article argues that democratization in Malaysia is already occurring, albeit at a gradual pace; it is being pushed by the new political forces of civil society actors, newly empowered opposition parties, and the internet-based media. The boundaries of this emerging democratic space is simultaneously being shaped and contested by the political competition between status-quo and reformist forces in this society. Some institutional changes have expanded the parameters of democratic space, although the entrenched dominant institutions of the ruling regime continue to wield sufficient amounts of institutional capacity to subvert any consolidation of these democratic changes for now.

  5. Evaluation of the audit committees of government ministries in Namibia: Their compositions, functions and regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Winnie Kandandu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the underlying study to this paper is to evaluate the audit committees in the government ministries in Namibia; by assessing their composition, the function and regulations that govern committees. The study used a qualitative approach of inquiry. A purposive sampling method was used as the researcher selected ministries with audit committees. Thematic and content analysis was used in this study. Both primary and secondary and data were used. On primary data, interviews were conducted and recorded with a voice recorder. Secondary data was during the review of existing literature on the subject. The study found that from the 4 government ministries with audit committees, only one ministry consisted of independent members as well as an independent chairperson, while 3 ministries are chaired by members within their organisations. There was clear evidence of lack of accounting / financial /auditing competence among the committee members. This trend is contrary to the best practice which requires that the chairperson of the audit committees be independent of the ministry as well as the members of the audit committee. The finding indicates possibility of lack of capacity to carry out the functions of audit committees; weak internal control systems; chances of conflict of interest and complacency due to the lack of independence. There is avenue for further research as more ministries in Namibia are now establishing their audit committees, especially as the Namibian Code of Corporate Governance (the NamCode gains more popularity among the public sector.

  6. Recommendations of the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) at the Robert Koch Institute – 2017/2018

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Koch-Institut

    2017-01-01

    The Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) is an independent expert committee, consisting of 12 to 18 members, as stipulated in the Infection Against Protection Law [Infektionsschutzgesetz (IfSG)]. The members are appointed by the German Federal Ministry of Health in consultation with the federal state health authorities for a period of 3 years. In accordance with the IfSG the committee provides recommendations on vaccinations and other measures for the specific prophylaxis of commun...

  7. Struggling for the Soul of the Nation: Educational Policy, Democratic Leadership, and Radical Democracy in Neoliberal Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Two conditions are crucial in preparing radical democratic leaders for a democratic society. In this article, the author argues against instrumental rationality and for radical democratic leaders with a critical perspective in education and schools.

  8. Communications Received from Members regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and Other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    On 1 September 1978 the Director General received similar letters of that date from the Resident Representatives of Poland and the German Democratic Republic to the Agency relating to the commitments of these Members under Article III, paragraph 2, of the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

  9. Is evidence-based medicine about democratizing medical practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorgård, Keld

    2014-01-01

    The authoritarian standpoint in medicine has been under challenge by various groups and researchers since the 1980s. The challenges have been ethical, political and medical, with patient movements at the forefront. Over the past decade, however, a deep challenge has been posed by evidence......-based medicine (EBM), which has challenged the entire strategy of medical treatment from the point of view of a self-critical, anti-authoritarian and hereby also (it has been claimed) a more democratic medical practice. Previously, the challenges arose out of the patient rights perspective. EBM, by contrast......, was taken to challenge the way doctors consider their medical practice as a whole. The present paper puts this claim of democratization into a historical context. Two dimensions of the democratization hypothesis are discussed and it is argued that they are insufficient to capture the substantial changes...

  10. Democratic elements in group and project organized PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    2006-01-01

    beyond it to the school and the community” (Marris, 2003:274) then implementing democratic learning systems as The Aalborg Model are important for supporting and promote democratic bildung of students in higher education. This article defines at a – start - what should be understood by a democratic......, run processes and decide behaviour. It is what a pilot investigation referred in this article indicate. The meaning of this seems to be far behind the study itself and qualifications of the students to the labour marked. If it is true that ”the building of community begins in the classroom but extends...... learning system. It contrasts it to an authoritarian or elitist systems. Then it brings the results from an investigation of 9 process analyses’ written at the end of the second semester 2005 by project groups from The Technical Natural Scientific Basic Year at Aalborg University and concludes...

  11. What do we know about adult education for democratic citizenship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the findings from the study of research literature on Adult Education for Democratic Citizenship, carried out in nine EU memner states. The literature review was designed as the building block for a European Stocktaking study on lifelong learning for democratic citizenship...... through adult education. This article begins by describing the context of the study, and introducing the study aims and core principles. This is done in section 1 and 2. In section 3, the article introduces and discusses substantive features which emerged from scholarly investigation at national level....... Implications for further research are discussed in the concluding section, which presents the main argument of this paper. Despite countries unique characterizations, there is a general concern on citizens´conduct in democratic societeies in Europe, but relative limited attention on the specific contribution...

  12. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Main issues examined at the meeting of 2 October 2009 The October 2009 meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee was entirely devoted to preparation of TREF’s meeting on 21-22 October. The Committee took note of, discussed and agreed on clarifications needed to some of the documents and presentations that the Management intended to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: Equal opportunities The Committee took note of a preliminary report on equal opportunities at CERN drawn up by D. Chromek-Burckhart, the Equal Opportunities Officer, and T. Smith, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel, containing in particular a proposal for a new process for resolving harassment conflicts. Technical analysis of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme - Actuary’s Report The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Charpentier, Chairman of the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHIS Board), on the 2009 actuarial report on the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Th...

  13. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The Committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had enrolled in the short-term saved leave scheme: approx. 58% had signed up for 1 slice, 14% for two slices, 5% for three slices and 23% for four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PR...

  14. The Refugee Crisis as a European Democratic Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Chryssoula Kapartziani; Katerini Papathanasiou

    2016-01-01

    The institutional European Union is facing two types of crisis. On the one hand, it needs to manage the current refugee’s influx efficiently and on the other hand it needs to deal with the democratic deficit that emerged by Europe’s incapacity to make the required decisions and gain the justification of its actions from its own people. This article aims firstly to highlight the legal framework (rule of law) that governs the asylum and migration procedures as well as the democratic gap that th...

  15. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Continuing a Research Reactor Project. A Second Supply Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1971-10-04

    As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency provided to the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in connection with a research reactor project, a Second Supply Agreement has been concluded between the Agency and the Governments of the Congo and the United States of America. This Agreement entered into force on 15 April 1971, and the text is reproduced herein for the information of all Members.

  16. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Continuing a Research Reactor Project. A Second Supply Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency provided to the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in connection with a research reactor project, a Second Supply Agreement has been concluded between the Agency and the Governments of the Congo and the United States of America. This Agreement entered into force on 15 April 1971, and the text is reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  17. The Text of the Agreement of 20 July 1977 between the Agency and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the Application of Safeguards in Respect of a Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-11-14

    The text of the Agreement of 20 July 1977 between the Agency and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of safeguards in respect of a research reactor facility is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 23, on 20 July 1977.

  18. The Text of the Agreement of 20 July 1977 between the Agency and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the Application of Safeguards in Respect of a Research Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The text of the Agreement of 20 July 1977 between the Agency and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of safeguards in respect of a research reactor facility is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 23, on 20 July 1977

  19. Note by the IAEA Secretariat in connection with the statement of 11 October 1993 by the Minister of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (INFCIRC/422)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The attached Note by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in connection with the statement of 11 October 1993 by the Minister of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (INFCIRC/442) is being circulated for the information of Member States

  20. Constitutional Democracy and Caretaker Committee in Nigeria Local Government System: An Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude C Okafor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The 1976 Local Government Reform among other landmark changes unified the local government system in Nigeria, and the 1979 constitution made local governments the third tier of government and provided for a system of local government by democratically elected councils. More recently, elected local government councils have been dissolved and replaced with Transition Committees or Caretaker Committees appointed by the Governors’ of their respective states. This paper therefore, examines the impact of the caretaker committees in Nigerian Local Government on the practice of constitutional democracy. The discussion is framed by the theoretical perspectives and Nigerian literature on local government and constitutional democracy, and by the recent phenomenal wave of dissolving elected local government councils and subsequent replacement with caretaker committees. Contrary to popular belief, that local government as the third tier of government has failed to achieve the objective for which it was created, this paper observes that party politics has been the bane of Nigerian local government since its inception, and that democratically elected local councils with political and financial autonomy are the major conditions for an effective and efficient multi-purpose local government system in Nigeria.

  1. Constitutional Politics, Constitutional Texts and Democratic Variety in Central and Eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Blokker, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In the paper, it is argued that democratization in Central and Eastern Europe involves important forms of differentiation of democracy, rather than merely convergence to a singular – liberal-democratic, constitutional - model. One way of taking up democratic differentiation in post-communist societies is by analysing the constitutional documents of the new democratic orders, and the constitutional politics leading to the foundational documents. In a first step, the paper analyses constitution...

  2. [The role of bioethics committees in the systems protecting scientific biomedical research participants in France and in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarkowski, Marek; Sieczych, Alicja

    2013-08-01

    Bioethics committees are along with ethic regulations and rules of law one of three main pillars in the system of protection of scientific biomedical research participants. Although principal directives for bioethics committees are established by international guidelines, detailed regulations may differ in particular states. The aim of this article was to compare two bioethic committees systems: French and Polish one. Historical beginnings of the bioethics committees system in France and in Poland are briefly mentioned, Subsequently, the networks of bioethics committees in both countries are compared. Although the number of bioethics committees (Research Ethic Committees) in both countries is comparable, the procedure of their establishment varies. French committees are based on administrative division of the country and divide on regional and interregional committees. In Poland, bioethics committees are established by medical universities, medical research and development units or regional chambers of physicians and dentists. In France there is no equivalent of Appeal Bioethics Committee, however one could appeal from the negative bioethics committee's opinion. The composition of French bioethics committees is more diverse and half of the members are not related to medical professions. Members of French committees are named on indefinite term by headmaster of Regional Health Agency after having been chosen in competition for the post. In Poland members are called on three-year-term but the rotation of members is not overwhelming since there is no limit of terms for one member. French legal solutions seems more secure for scientific bioethics research participants. For this reason, a detailed research on legislation in other countries is necessary before introducing any new regulations in Polish law.

  3. Nuclear committee plays it straight: and draws criticism from all quarters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanouette, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee appointed after the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island angered everyone, but succeeded in highlighting many of the operating and regulatory problems plaguing nuclear power. The now defunct committee received mixed reviews, some calling it a waste of time and money, and others seeing it as a model for solving policy disputes. A review of the committee members and their two controversial studies describes the areas of disagreement

  4. Proceedings of the technical committee on high conversion and high burnup reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiroya, Seiji; Kanda, Keiji; Sekiya, Tamotsu

    1990-02-01

    The present issue is the proceedings of 'the Technical Committee on High Conversion and High Burnup Reactors' held at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) on December 12 and 22, 1988. In this committee, members so much concerned with this theme were asked to report their recent accomplishment and activities. By such a program, the committee was intended to make a survey of future direction of research in this type of reactor. (J.P.N.)

  5. Design committee makes major headway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Work of Ontario's Market Design Committee (MDC), charged with recommending the detailed steps to restructuring the electric power industry in Ontario was described. In its short life of only a few weeks, MDC had to create a series of strenuous internal rules in order to accomplish the enormous task of restructuring the industry in the relatively short time set out in the Government's White Paper in February 1998. Most of this article is devoted to describing the nature and functions of the Independent Market Operator (IMO), more commonly referred to as the Independent System Operator or the dispatch and control centre for the electrical system. The IMO will be governed by a board of 15 members consisting of a CEO, end-users, generation providers, marketers and transmission providers. Five independent members will be appointed by the Government from a list suggested by market participants to represent the broad industry and public interest. The IMO will be created as a not-for-profit, statutory corporation using a special act of the Ontario Legislature. Special needs identified by MDC will be drawn mostly from the Ontario Corporation Act, with operating procedures included as by-laws. The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) and the IMO are envisaged as having a relationship somewhat similar to the Ontario Securities Commission's role in overseeing the Toronto Stock Exchange. The involvement of the Independent Power Producers' Society of Ontario (IPPSO) in the work of the MDC is also described

  6. Kuwentong Buhay ng Isang Pambansa- Demokratikong Rebolusyonaryong Bakla sa Rehiyon ng Katimugang Mindanao (A Life Story of a Gay National-Democratic Revolutionary in Southern Mindanao Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowell D. Madula

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In February 2005, the New People’s Army facilitated its f irst gay (male to male marriage in Compostela Valley. Guerillas Ka Jose and Ka Andres have sworn before the red flag to become partners as they wage a nationaldemocratic revolution. Members of the LGBT community have long been deprived of their right to marry persons they love. The stance of the Roman Catholic Church remains the biggest hurdle why same-sex marriage in the Philippines has yet to be allowed. Despite this, there are still some who are pushing for this. The national-democratic revolution of the Communist Party of the Philippinesnew People’s Army-National Democratic Front of the Philippines (CPP-NPANDFP is one of the most organized removolution in the history of the country. Aside from political and economic changes, the group is also pushing for a cultural revolution. This includes changes in the ideological perspective to and among members of the LGBT community. This study attempts to analyze the life and experiences of gay members of the CPP-NPA-NDFP from the Southern Mindanao Region. Experiences from gender identif ication until the participation to the national-democratic revolution are part of the life story.

  7. Justice and care: decision making by medical school student promotions committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Emily P; Gruppuso, Philip A

    2017-06-01

    The function of medical school entities that determine student advancement or dismissal has gone largely unexplored. The decision making of 'academic progress' or student promotions committees is examined using a theoretical framework contrasting ethics of justice and care, with roots in the moral development work of theorists Kohlberg and Gilligan. To ascertain promotions committee members' conceptualisation of the role of their committee, ethical orientations used in member decision making, and student characteristics most influential in that decision making. An electronic survey was distributed to voting members of promotions committees at 143 accredited allopathic medical schools in the USA. Descriptive statistics were calculated and data were analysed by gender, role, institution type and class size. Respondents included 241 voting members of promotions committees at 55 medical schools. Respondents endorsed various promotions committee roles, including acting in the best interest of learners' future patients and graduating highly qualified learners. Implementing policy was assigned lower importance. The overall pattern of responses did not indicate a predominant orientation toward an ethic of justice or care. Respondents indicated that committees have discretion to take individual student characteristics into consideration during deliberations, and that they do so in practice. Among the student characteristics with the greatest influence on decision making, professionalism and academic performance were paramount. Eighty-five per cent of participants indicated that they received no training. Promotions committee members do not regard orientations of justice and care as being mutually exclusive and endorse an array of statements regarding the committee's purpose that may conflict with one another. The considerable variance in the influence of student characteristics and the general absence of committee member training indicate a need for clear delineation of the

  8. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLOOMQUIST, DOUGLAS D.

    2002-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2002, a 15-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece (the Trivelpiece Committee) was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 7-9, 2002 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the National Nuclear Security Administration of the Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE). The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of-state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding

  9. Deployment of the Military in Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Implication for Democratization in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    political leadership , interparty alliances, and legislatures by which society constitutes itself politically to select and monitor democratic government... democratically elected civilian leadership .” Matei, “New Conceptualization,” 31. Young posits expertise, essential duties, responsibility, and corporateness as...CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION: IMPLICATION FOR DEMOCRATIZATION IN SRI LANKA by Don Kapila Sarath Kumara Dolage December 2016 Thesis Advisor: Anshu

  10. Why We Need to Question the Democratic Engagement of Adolescents in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Isolde; Veugelers, Wiel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, academics in various disciplines have stressed the need to address democratic deficits in Europe as well as lacunae in the citizenship development of European youth. In this article we explore the value of various types of democratic engagement for strengthening the democratic character of local and…

  11. Finding Autonomy in Activity: Development and Validation of a Democratic Classroom Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun Hye; Glassman, Michael; Kim, Yunhwan

    2013-01-01

    This paper developed a Democratic Classroom Survey to measure students' perceived democratic environment of the classroom. Perceived democratic environment is one of the most important variables for understanding classroom activity and indeed any type of group activity, but actually measuring perceptions in an objective manner has been…

  12. Election of the new Executive Committee: Combining continuity and renewal

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    In agreement with the Staff Association’s Statutes the new Staff Council elected on Tuesday, 8 December, a new President and his Executive Committee for a two-year mandate 2016–2017. Alessandro Raimondo, the only candidate for president, presented a list of delegates for an Executive Committee, which combines continuity and renewal. These are important assets to start working in early 2016 on the implementation of the decisions of the 2015 Five-Yearly Review, especially in the field of the career structure. Alessandro RAIMONDO GS President / Président Céline GROBON PH Vice-president / Vice-président Catherine LAVERRIÈRE DGS Vice-president / Vice-président Juan GARCIA PEREZ TE Treasurer / Trésorier Ghislain ROY BE Secretary / Secrétaire Sandrine BAUDAT FP Member / Membre Oliver BOETTCHER EN Member / Membre Rachel BRAY GS Member / Membre Nicolas DELRUELLE TE Member / Membre Gianni DEROMA GS Mem...

  13. Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration's actions to respond to the ACHRE's findings and recommendations

  14. Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration`s actions to respond to the ACHRE`s findings and recommendations.

  15. Glued structural members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell C. Moody; Jen Y. Liu

    1999-01-01

    Glued structural members are manufactured in a variety of configurations. Structural composite lumber (SCL) products consist of small pieces of wood glued together into sizes common for solid-sawn lumber. Glued-laminated timber (glulam) is an engineered stress-rated product that consists of two or more layers of lumber in which the grain of all layers is oriented...

  16. CERN welcomes new members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Lithuania is on course to become an associate member of CERN, pending final approval by the Lithuanian parliament. Associate membership will allow representatives of the Baltic nation to take part in meetings of the CERN Council, which oversees the Geneva-based physics lab.

  17. 77 FR 65585 - Renewal of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Data Users Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... the U.S. economy, including the labor, business, research, academic and government communities, on... reports, and on gaps between or the need for new Bureau statistics. The Committee will function solely as.... All committee members will have extensive research or practical experience using BLS data. The...

  18. 75 FR 28667 - Joint CFTC-SEC Advisory Committee on Emerging Regulatory Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... members, (iii) discussion of Committee agenda and organization; (iv) discussion of the Joint CFTC-SEC... make recommendations related to market structure issues that may have contributed to the volatility, as... ``Joint CFTC-SEC Advisory Committee'' to facilitate the organization and distribution of comments between...

  19. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research... responsibility for appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  20. 77 FR 16866 - Request of Recommendations for Membership for Directorate and Office Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... opportunities in science and engineering; performance assessment; and business and operations. A primary... underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Committee members serve for varying term.... [email protected] ; fax: (703) 292-9042. Advisory Committee for Business and Jeffrey Rich, Office of...

  1. Committee Structure and its Implications for Monetary Policy Decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Berk (Jan Marc); B.K. Bierut

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the implications for the setting of interest rates when monetary policy decisions are taken by a committee, in which a subset of members may meet prior to the voting in the committee and therefore has the possibility to reach consensus ex ante to vote unanimously ex post.

  2. 76 FR 15307 - Notice of Staff Attendance at Southwest Power Pool Strategic Planning Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... Power Pool Strategic Planning Committee Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of its staff may attend the meeting of the Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) Strategic Planning Committee (SPC), as noted below. Their attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach...

  3. 29 CFR 525.24 - Advisory Committee on Special Minimum Wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advisory Committee on Special Minimum Wages. 525.24 Section 525.24 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Special Minimum Wages. The Advisory Committee on Special Minimum Wages, the members of which are appointed...

  4. 78 FR 54621 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Island 02905. The purpose of the orientation meeting is to inform the newly appointed Committee members... information may contact the Eastern Regional Office at 202-376-7533. Persons needing accessibility services...

  5. 78 FR 47274 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Minnesota Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... meeting will also include an orientation to new members of the Committee. This meeting is available to the... Federal Relay Service at 1-800-977-8339 and providing the Service with the conference call number and...

  6. 76 FR 50453 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... advisory committees. The purpose of the planning meeting is to discuss future activities. Members of the....usccr.gov , or to contact the Eastern Regional Office at the above e-mail or street address. Deaf or...

  7. Social Justice, Civil Society and the Dramatist in Democratic Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria as a democratic nation-state is ailing. One of the consequences of this ailment is the cascading standard of social justice in the country. Instead of correcting the trend, the leaders continue to rationalize every action taken by government and describe Nigeria's democracy as being unique to the cultural environment, ...

  8. Youth, Poverty, and Use of ICTs: Constructing New Democratic ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Youth, Poverty, and Use of ICTs: Constructing New Democratic Public Spheres. Violence toward youth in Brazil is among the highest in the world. However, youth in poor and violent neighbourhoods of Rio de Janeiro are using new technologies to make their voices heard. Brazil has achieved remarkable economic success ...

  9. Unalienated Recognition as a Feature of Democratic Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheingold, Alison

    2012-01-01

    The current era of standards and accountability in U.S. public schooling narrows recognition and assessment to an almost exclusive focus on the production of test scores as legitimate markers of student achievement. This climate prevents rather than encourages democratic forms of exchange within and across social worlds. Via a case study of one…

  10. Ancient Athenian Democratic Knowledge and Citizenship: Connectivity and Intercultural Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundara, Jagdish S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the implications that ancient Athens had for modern representative democracies and the links that can be made to the philosophical principles that form the essence of intercultural education. Such an exploration shows that modern democratic societies have ignored many key aspects of the important legacy left to us by these…

  11. June Four: A Chronicle of the Chinese Democratic Uprising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989

    This book presents more than 200 photographs along with a chronological record from the "Ming Pao News," covering the events in People's Republic of China from the death of Hu Yaobang on April 15, 1989, which precipitated the Chinese student democratic movement, to the crushing of the movement at Tiananmen Square by the Chinese army on…

  12. Whole School Meetings and the Development of Radical Democratic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Serious re-examination of participatory traditions of democracy is long overdue. Iconically central to such traditions of democratic education is the practice of whole School Meetings. More usually associated with radical work within the private sector, School Meetings are here explored in detail through two examples from publicly funded…

  13. Democratic Citizenship and Service Learning: Advancing the Caring Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how service learning can promote the development of a "caring self" in college students by drawing on the ideas of John Dewey, George Herbert Mead, and contemporary critical theorists. Links this caring self to democratic citizenship and uses students' narratives to illustrate how it develops through service learning contexts.…

  14. Democratic Miseducation: Preparing Students for Democracies That Do Not Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Geoffrey M.

    The political educator takes the perspective that, in Thomas Hobbes's phrase, "man is not born fit for society." To make him so fit, contemporary political educators seek to develop individual autonomy and democratic affect, which would have the added task of reforming all of society in the future. The current consensus holds that the…

  15. Latino Demographics, Democratic Individuality, and Educational Accountability: A Pragmatist's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Aleman, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    In an era of heightened teacher and school accountability, what are the implications of standards-based reform for individual Latino children and their democratic self-realization? The educational demography of the fastest-growing and largest ethnic group in the United States suggests that the future of Latino self-realization is in jeopardy.…

  16. A Systemic Approach to Building Peace in the Eastern Democratic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communities emerging from violent conflict confront complex challenges that are specifi c from one context to another. The 2002 Peace Accord for the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) signed in Pretoria, South Africa, marked a post-confl ict chapter for the country and inaugurated a range of actors and strategies to ...

  17. Political Microcultures: Linking Civic Life and Democratic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    At the core of democratic citizenship is deliberation: citizens' tendency and capacity for debating issues of common importance. This study considers civic organizations--often found to be political mobilizers--as political microcultures: environments for political discourse that structure participants' understanding of the practice of…

  18. Democratic School Leaders: Defining Ethical Leadership in a Standardized Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl-Pepin, Cynthia; Aiken, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to learn from active educational leaders engaged in the practice of democratic, ethical leadership. In this article, we share findings of a qualitative study that used narrative inquiry to examine the stories of eight educational leaders. We discuss three themes arising from the participants' narratives that define…

  19. Democratic School Leadership Reforms in Kenya: Cultural and Historical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwan, Julius; Anderson, Lesley; Bennett, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    In this article we discuss students', teachers' and school principals' perceptions of democratic school leadership reforms in Kenya. The article is based on a study that was conducted in two phases. In phase one (conducted between September and December 2007), interviews were undertaken with 12 school principals in which understandings of…

  20. Giving voice to the voiceless through deliberative democratic school governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonceba Mabovula

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available I focus on the role of learners in the governance of secondary schools. I seek to promote a voice for learner expression as guaranteed in the national Department of Education's guidelines for Representative Council of Learners as part of promoting democratic governance. The potential, limitations, constraints, conse­quen­ces, and challenges facing learners in the school governance structure need to be revealed and debated. The views of school principals were solicited by means of unstructured open-ended questionnaires. Six problem areas emerged from the data. The irony is that although the democratisation of school governance has given all stakeholders a powerful voice in school affairs, learners' voices are, seemingly, being silenced. In attempting to resolve the problem, a new model of democratic school governance to be known as 'deliberative democratic school governance' (DDSG is suggested. There are several DDSG approaches that can be employed in creating elements for stakeholder empowerment and in driving deliberative democratic school governance forward. These include inclusion, motivational communication, consensus, deliberation/ dialogue, collaboration, and conflict resolution. Some school governance stake­holders and schools may use only one or a few of these strategies to create spaces for learner voices in their respective schools.

  1. The democratic horizons of the museum: Citizenship and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlgren, P.; Hermes, J.; Witcomb, A.; Message, K.

    2015-01-01

    Change is sweeping through the world of museums, technologically, financially, and ideologically, impacting on the sociocultural evolution of their roles and status. We seek to contribute to ongoing reflections by offering a conceptual framework that links museums with democratic theory, to

  2. Peoples Democratic Party in the Fourth Republic of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Mukhtar Katsina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Their nature and functions make political parties central to democratic governance especially in the new democracies of Africa that face the challenge of building strong and enduring democratic institutions. It is accepted that the existing trend in most of these democracies of one big party dominating the political space weakens democracy and undermines its prospects for consolidation. Big parties—usually the ruling ones—exhibit tendencies such as absence of internal democracy that are antithetical to democratic governance. While observations such as these are incontestable, there is little understanding into the nature, character, ideology, and internal structure of big parties generally. In this article, I attempt to address this concern. Specifically, I examine the nature, structure, and ideology of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP, Nigeria’s ruling party at the federal level with considerable strength at local level between 1999 and 2015. Relying on data obtained from multiple sources, I investigate the process of its formation, the nature of its ideology, internal organization, its electoral strength, and how absence of internal democracy contributed significantly to its defeat in 2015 general elections.

  3. Transitional justice and peacebuilding in the Democratic Republic of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Almost two decades ago, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) was confronted with a vicious cycle of internationalised armed conflicts in which between six and ten million people are estimated to have been killed. Those conflicts were resolved through peace agreements between the leaders of the warring parties ...

  4. The Ethics of a Democratically-Based Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gale A.

    1993-01-01

    The elite model of education postulates that only a select few have the intellectual capacity, moral values, and personal commitment to make "good" decisions for society. A democratically based classroom, where students are respected for their intellectual abilities, personal integrity, and commitment to achievement, fosters successful…

  5. Political Education in the Former German Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Wayne; Dumas, Alesia

    1996-01-01

    Investigates civic education curricular reform in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR). Discusses the problems inherent in reforming an entire educational system, from textbooks to teachers, originally designed for Marxist-Leninist purposes. Examines the German state educational structure and the role that the main political parties play in…

  6. DEMOCRATIZING JOURNALISM? Realizing the Citizen's Agenda for Local News Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costera Meijer, I.

    2010-01-01

    Media scholars and journalists expect local media to function as vital institutions for the creation and maintenance of a democratic political and public arena and a general sense of social cohesion and public connection (Aldridge, 2007; Couldry et al., 2007; Franklin, 2006; Rosenstiel et al.,

  7. Re-imagining democratic citizenship education: Towards a culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After a decade of implementing liberal conceptions of democratic citizenship education in public schools in South Africa, questions need to be asked about its credibility and success. We commence this article by analysing the Department of Basic Education's (DoBE, 2011) recently produced Building a culture of ...

  8. Antecedent causes of a measles resurgence in the Democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Despite accelerated measles control efforts, a massive measles resurgence occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) starting in mid-2010, prompting an investigation into likely causes. Methods: We conducted a descriptive epidemiological analysis using measles immunization and surveillance ...

  9. Religious Networks in Post-conflict Democratic Republic of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With reference to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), religious groups wield enormous influence in the public space as providers of social services in a polity that has been characterised by years of misrule, declining state capacity and protracted conflict. The conflict in the DRC has deepened the imperative for ...

  10. The Dissociative University: Pragmatist Reconstructions in Democratic Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    The American university is in transition, witnessing major changes to its institutional structures and processes. While the 1960s and 1970s were decades of progressive democratization in American higher education, today's university is more aligned with the economic theory of neoliberalism. Existing at the intersection of two dominant but…

  11. the attrition of democratic gains in africa: an appraisal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper uses historical trajectory to demonstrate how patronage, ethnicity, electoral authoritarianism and extension of presidential term limit erodes democratic gains in Africa. The paper concludes that in order for democracy to flourish in Africa, the structural factors need to be addressed. Key Words: Democracy, Term ...

  12. Administrative Leadership and the Democratic Community as a Social Ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Fazal

    Democratic participation in education suggests that communities will be served best when decision-making is decentralized and when people--teachers, parents, and students alike--are encouraged to participate directly in making decisions that affect them. In contrast, the notion of administrative leadership implies hierarchical elevation of chief…

  13. Exposure to the American flag polarizes democratic-republican ideologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eugene Y

    2017-12-01

    Some prior research has suggested that exposure to the American flag tilts Americans towards Republicanism, while others have proffered that it brings outs a common 'together' perspective instead. We explore a third possibility - that it may actually polarize Americans' political ideology. It is generally accepted that exposure to an environmental cue can shift attitudes and behaviours, at least partly or temporarily, in a manner that is consistent with that cue. Yet, the same cue can mean different things to different people. In the same vein, given how national identity and political ideology are intertwined in the United States, we hypothesize that the American flag should heighten different political beliefs depending on individuals' political ideology. To Democrats, being American is to support Democratic values, but to Republicans, being American is to support Republican values. The American flag thus should heighten Democrats of their Democratic identity, and it should heighten Republicans of their Republican one. The results of an experiment with 752 American respondents who were representative of the US population supported this polarizing effect of the American flag. The theoretical and policy implications of the findings are offered. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  14. New public management reforms in Nigerian democratic governance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper brings concepts and ideas from around the world about the need for and ways of achieving more responsive and accountable new public management within the framework of democratic governance. The paper adopts a content analysis method through the use of secondary data. The findings of the paper ...

  15. The Need for Media Education in Democratic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential for media and technology to act as a democratizing force and the challenges to democracy posed by partisanship and the explosion of political media spending, media education and the preparation of active citizens in schools is virtually nonexistent. This essay presents the case for revitalizing media education for the age of…

  16. Economic Assessment of Sanitation Interventions in Lao People's Democratic Republic

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    Access to improved sanitation is a major concern in the Lao People s Democratic Republic. Only 63 percent of the population of the country had access to improved sanitation facilities in 2010. Sanitation conditions are worse in rural areas. This study aims to generate evidence on the costs and benefits of sanitation improvements Lao PDR.

  17. School Democratization in Prefigurative Form: Two Brazilian Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Tristan

    2010-01-01

    Recent moves towards greater pupil participation in school decision-making have in part been based on instrumental rationales, such as increases in test scores and improvements in behaviour. This article assesses a different approach--that of the "prefigurative"--through which the school embodies the democratic society it aims to create.…

  18. The Role of Democratic Governing Bodies in South African Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenni

    2002-01-01

    School governance reform in post-apartheid South Africa aimed to democratize schooling while accommodating diverse school histories of underdevelopment or self-management. Analysis of relevant legislation shows the reform was structured to allow representative democracy and partnerships. But two recent studies suggest that governance reforms have…

  19. Governing Insecurity: Democratic Control of Military and Security ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P H Stoker

    democratic control of military and security institutions is strategic to democratisation for two main reasons: firstly because these institutions have a peculiar intimate relationship to political power and secondly because their security functions, including the management of insecurities that may be generated by democratisation ...

  20. Decision Making for Democratic Leadership in a Guided Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, JoAnn Franklin; Hoover, J. Duane; Valle, Fernando; Hardin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Experience in problem-based learning, authentic experiences, on-the-job decision making, and critical reflection on decisions made formed the conceptual framework of an internship to develop democratic leadership as a professional ethic in interns. Interns in an on-the-job guided internship examined decisions over a 13-week period as they…

  1. The History of the Democratic Adult Education Movement in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Esther; Tellado, Itxaso; Yuste, Montserrat; Larena-Fernández, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Traditional adult education in Spain treated the learner as a mere object that could be shaped by the educator. Although current practices of the democratic adult education movement in Spain reveals a completely opposite standpoint on adult education, there has been little analysis of the several influences converging and…

  2. Public Libraries and the Decline of the Democratic Dogma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael H.

    1976-01-01

    We are now witnessing what I prefer to call the decline of the democratic dogma in this country; the people seem to be losing their unmitigated faith in the basic and most cherished of American beliefs; their faith in the value of universal public enlightenment. (Author)

  3. Democratic Life Skill 1: Guiding Children to Find a Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Dan

    2012-01-01

    "Democratic life skills" are social-emotional capacities that children need to be productive citizens and healthy individuals in a modern, diverse society. The construct for these skills comes from many sources. One helpful source is Maslow's concept of two coexisting sets of motivational needs in each individual: one set for security, belonging,…

  4. Educational Conservatism and Democratic Citizenship in Hannah Arendt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Ramona; Popescu, Gheorghe H.; Nica, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to gain a deeper understanding of Arendt's educational philosophy, her perspective of political involvement as a kind of political education, and natality as the fundamental nature of education. The current study has extended past research by elucidating Arendt's view of participatory democratic politics, her…

  5. The Democratic Deficit and School-Based Management in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Megan; Ehrich, Lisa Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to apply the theory of the democratic deficit to school-based management with an emphasis on Australia. This theory was developed to examine managerial restructuring of the Australian Public Service in the 1990s. Given similarities between the use of managerial practices in the public service and government schools, the…

  6. Ella Flagg Young: Pioneer of Democratic School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, L. Dean; McCarthy, Martha M.

    1998-01-01

    Ella Flagg Young was the first woman superintendent of a large-city school system (Chicago, 1909-15) and the first woman president of the National Education Association (1910). A colleague of Dewey, Young pioneered democratic administrative practices in a scientific management era and organized school councils to give teachers a greater voice in…

  7. Implications of male migration on female status in the Democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, wives often reported conflicts with their in-laws, were overwhelmed by family responsibilities, had difficulties raising children and feared that their husbands might acquire HIV from other women or marry at their place of destination. Key words: male migration, gender roles, role conflict, Democratic Republic of ...

  8. Youth Voice in Nigerian School-based Management Committees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashiru Bako Umar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, School-Based Management Committees (SBMCs aim to provide an opportunity for all stakeholders, particularly the vulnerable groups in the school’s host communities such as young people and women to partake in school governance. Research on the experiences of youth voice in the committees is scant, however, as much of the existing literature on SBMCs focuses on program outcomes. Using qualitative research interviews, observations, and document analysis, this study addressed this gap by exploring how youth participate and express themselves in two SBMCs in Niger State, Nigeria. The findings, which were derived from 19 youth and adult participants, were drawn from SBMC members out of which 12 were youth between the ages 13 and 25, while 7 were adults aged 40 and above. The participants revealed that youth committee members expressed their voice in the committees through participating in a number of committee activities. Specifically, the youth participated in decision-making during meetings, aided in the construction of committee projects, undertook administrative/managerial functions and monitored the committee’s projects. They also participated in revenue generation, planning, school visits and supervision, advocacy, and sensitization campaigns.

  9. Cooperative diplomacy: Citizens, sovereignty, and the logic of democratic enlargement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndungu, Anthony Mark

    2000-12-01

    The contemporary theory of international regimes holds that governments collaborate when they reach a consensus on a centralized supervisory mechanism for resolving compliance, monitoring, and distributive questions. Yet, in the least likely case of international nuclear security, governments have repeatedly established major international regimes without such a consensus, even though undetected defection would impose substantial long-term costs on those continuing to comply, and seriously complicate attempts at retaliation. For example, despite more than ten years of almost continuous East-West negotiations, governments could not reach a consensus on the compliance questions related to the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) safeguards regime. Yet, threshold and potential nuclear powers, such as France and India, respectively, exempted themselves from the IAEA's safeguards regime, but gained access to the knowledge, facilities and materials intended exclusively for full participants. Similarly, France, Italy, and Germany failed to agree on a centralized mechanism for supervising the production of nuclear warheads for a Western European nuclear force. Indeed, even the member states of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) could not agree on an effective centralized mechanism for supervising the regional production of fissionable materials. Yet, under the 1958 United States-EURATOM Nuclear Cooperation agreement, the United States agreed to expand its sales of enriched uranium and other special nuclear materials to the discordant members of EURATOM, who jointly assumed responsibility for an independent regional system of safeguards. Finally, the U.S. and Soviet governments could not agree on a centralized mechanism for solving the compliance questions related to the Partial Test Ban Treaty concluded in 1963, but the two superpowers and the U.K. left the resolution of those questions to the domestic authorities of the signatory states. I hypothesize

  10. Corporate Governance Role of Audit Committees in the Banking Sector: Evidence from Libya

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulaziz Abdulsaleh

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the practices that should be taken into consideration by audit committees as a tool of corporate governance in Libyan commercial banks by investigating various perceptions on this topic. The study is based on a questionnaire submitted to audit committeesmembers at Libyan commercial banks, directors of internal audit departments as well as members of board of directors at these banks in addition to a number of external auditors and academic staff from Libyan un...

  11. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, J.C.; Perey, F.G.

    1981-04-01

    This report was prepared for the DOE Nuclear Data Committee, and covers work performed at ORNL since April 1980 in areas of nuclear data of relevance to the US applied nuclear energy program. The report was mostly generated through a review of abstracts of work completed to the point of being subjected to some form of publication in the open literature, formal ORNL reports, ORNL technical memoranda, progress reports, or presentation at technical conferences. As much as possible the complete abstract of the original publication has been reproduced with only minor editing. In a few cases progress reports were written specifically for this publication. The editors have selected the material to be included in this report on the basis of perceived interests of DOE Nuclear Data Committee members

  12. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, J.C.; Perey, F.G.

    1980-04-01

    This report was prepared for the DOE Nuclear Data Committee and covers work performed at ORNL since April 1979 in areas of nuclear data of relevance to the US applied nuclear energy program. The report was mostly generated through a review of abstracts of work completed to the point of being subjected to some form of publication in the open literature, formal ORNL reports, ORNL technical memoranda, progress reports, or presentation at technical conferences. As much as possible the complete abstract of the original publication is reproduced with only minor editing. In a few cases progress reports were written specifically for this publication. The editors selected the materials to be included in this report on the basis of perceived interests of DOE Nuclear Data Committee members and cannot claim completeness. Material is grouped as follows: Nuclear Cross Sections for Technology conference, cross section measurements, data analyses, and Nuclear Data Project activities for 1979. 2 figures

  13. 75 FR 27614 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Environment Protection Committee. --Consideration of the report of the Maritime Safety Committee... Session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Council to be held at the IMO headquarters in... HNS Convention. --World Maritime University: --IMO International Maritime Law Institute: --Protection...

  14. 77 FR 76164 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... atmospheric pollution --Development of international measures for minimizing the transfer of invasive aquatic... pollution hazards of chemicals and preparation of consequential amendments --Additional guidelines for... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8133] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee...

  15. Supporting Members and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  16. 76 FR 18966 - Listing Standards for Compensation Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... director. For this purpose, remuneration includes any payment in exchange for goods or services. Section... the board of directors and to be ``independent,'' as defined in the listing standards of the exchanges... requirements for members of the compensation committee of the board of directors of an issuer. In accordance...

  17. 77 FR 38421 - Listing Standards for Compensation Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ..., in any capacity other than as a director. For this purpose, remuneration includes any payment in... of a listed issuer's compensation committee to be a member of the board of directors and to be... annual meeting of shareholders (or a special meeting in lieu of the annual meeting) at which directors...

  18. installation of the ITER committee industry. Participants guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept. This guide presents the ITER project and objectives and the associated organizations in France, the recommendations and actions for ITER, the industrial mobilization, the industrial committee and its members, technological sheets for the enterprises and the statistical document of the SESSI. (A.L.B.)

  19. 76 FR 29191 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... project proposals and will be soliciting for additional projects. The purpose of the meeting is to review submitted projects and vote on project proposals to recommend for funding. DATES: The meeting will be held... be conducted: Review proposed projects. If Committee members have enough information, they may choose...

  20. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee request list - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-03-01

    The 1986 UK request list for chemical nuclear data has been reviewed in detail by members of the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee. New requirements for data measurements and evaluations have been identified, and specific requests have been withdrawn. A new UK request list has evolved, and is given in the form of tabulations covering measurements and evaluations. (author)

  1. 78 FR 10595 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Outreach for new RAC Replacement members. SUMMARY: Interested citizens are... information, please contact Donna Nemeth at 360-956-2274 or Bill Shelmerdine at 360-956- 2282. Dated: February...

  2. 77 FR 65359 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Outreach for new RAC members. SUMMARY: Interested citizens are invited to... information, please contact Donna Nemeth at 360-956-2274 or Bill Shelmerdine at 360-956- 2282. Dated: October...

  3. 77 FR 47047 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Committee Act (Public Law No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that agencies publish these notices in the.... ADDRESSES: Renaissance DuPont Hotel, 1143 New Hampshire Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20037. FOR FURTHER...: In keeping with procedures, members of the public are welcome to observe the business of the Biomass...

  4. 75 FR 57438 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the... Resource Advisory Committee members on their roles and responsibilities. DATES: The meeting will be held on... following business will be conducted: Overview of the roles and responsbilities of the Chippewa National...

  5. 75 FR 65551 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... from passenger ships. --Review of damage stability regulations for ro-ro passenger ships. --Legal and... SOLAS chapter II-1 subdivision and damage stability regulations. --Consideration of IACS unified... 2012. --Any other business. --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee. Members of the public may attend...

  6. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Summer is coming, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 25 € instead of 31 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your Staff Association member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.  

  7. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  8. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is coming, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  9. [Comment on] BOSP members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  10. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldridge Jocelyne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All 31 medical schools responded. 19 medical schools had a fitness to practise committee dealing with medical students only. Three had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and dentistry. One had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and veterinary medicine. Eight had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and two or more other programmes, such as dentistry, nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, dietetics, social work, pharmacy, psychology, audiology, speech therapy, operating department practice, veterinary medicine and education. Conclusion All 31 UK medical schools with undergraduate programmes have a fitness to practise committee to deal with students whose behaviour has given rise to concern about their fitness to practise. The variation in governance structures for student fitness to practise committees/panels can in part be explained by variations in University structures and the extent to which Universities co-manage undergraduate medicine with other courses.

  11. Powernext 2002: 32 members 30% monthly growth a positive result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The 1996 European Directive on electricity deregulation was transposed into French law by the Act of February 10, 2000 (Modernization and Development of the Public Electricity Service). On April 12, 2000, a steering committee headed by Euronext Paris launched a feasibility study into the creation of an organised electricity market in France. The other members of the committee were BNP-Paribas, Electrabel, Societe Generale, TotalFinaElf and the French and Belgian transmission system operators, RTE and Elia. The committee's work culminated in the formation on July 30, 2001 of a company - Powernext SA - to run a power exchange, to be called Powernext. Powernext adopted a market model that would ensure liquidity, transparency and orderly trading at all times. The model is based on a close working relationship with the pan-European clearing house Clearnet and RTE. (author)

  12. 78 FR 32698 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8340] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee... Technical Co-operation Committee --Protection of vital shipping lanes --Periodic review of administrative... of the Organization since the twenty-eighth regular session of the Assembly --External relations...

  13. 75 FR 43156 - Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), DoD. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting. SUMMARY: Under the... Defense announces that the Missile Defense Advisory Committee will meet on August 4 and 5, 2010, in...

  14. Beyond form and functioning: Understanding how contextual factors influence village health committees in northern India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Scott

    Full Text Available Health committees are a common strategy to foster community participation in health. Efforts to strengthen committees often focus on technical inputs to improve committee form (e.g. representative membership and functioning (e.g. meeting procedures. However, porous and interconnected contextual spheres also mediate committee effectiveness. Using a framework for contextual analysis, we explored the contextual features that facilitated or hindered Village Health, Sanitation and Nutrition Committee (VHSNC functionality in rural north India. We conducted interviews (n = 74, focus groups (n = 18 and observation over 1.5 years. Thematic content analysis enabled the identification and grouping of themes, and detailed exploration of sub-themes. While the intervention succeeded in strengthening committee form and functioning, participant accounts illuminated the different ways in which contextual influences impinged on VHSNC efficacy. Women and marginalized groups navigated social hierarchies that curtailed their ability to assert themselves in the presence of men and powerful local families. These dynamics were not static and unchanging, illustrated by pre-existing cross-caste problem solving, and the committee's creation of opportunities for the careful violation of social norms. Resource and capacity deficits in government services limited opportunities to build relationships between health system actors and committee members and engendered mistrust of government institutions. Fragmented administrative accountability left committee members bearing responsibility for improving local health without access to stakeholders who could support or respond to their efforts. The committee's narrow authority was at odds with widespread community needs, and committee members struggled to involve diverse government services across the health, sanitation, and nutrition sectors. Multiple parallel systems (political decentralization, media and other village groups

  15. Beyond form and functioning: Understanding how contextual factors influence village health committees in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kerry; George, Asha S; Harvey, Steven A; Mondal, Shinjini; Patel, Gupteswar; Ved, Rajani; Garimella, Surekha; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-01-01

    Health committees are a common strategy to foster community participation in health. Efforts to strengthen committees often focus on technical inputs to improve committee form (e.g. representative membership) and functioning (e.g. meeting procedures). However, porous and interconnected contextual spheres also mediate committee effectiveness. Using a framework for contextual analysis, we explored the contextual features that facilitated or hindered Village Health, Sanitation and Nutrition Committee (VHSNC) functionality in rural north India. We conducted interviews (n = 74), focus groups (n = 18) and observation over 1.5 years. Thematic content analysis enabled the identification and grouping of themes, and detailed exploration of sub-themes. While the intervention succeeded in strengthening committee form and functioning, participant accounts illuminated the different ways in which contextual influences impinged on VHSNC efficacy. Women and marginalized groups navigated social hierarchies that curtailed their ability to assert themselves in the presence of men and powerful local families. These dynamics were not static and unchanging, illustrated by pre-existing cross-caste problem solving, and the committee's creation of opportunities for the careful violation of social norms. Resource and capacity deficits in government services limited opportunities to build relationships between health system actors and committee members and engendered mistrust of government institutions. Fragmented administrative accountability left committee members bearing responsibility for improving local health without access to stakeholders who could support or respond to their efforts. The committee's narrow authority was at odds with widespread community needs, and committee members struggled to involve diverse government services across the health, sanitation, and nutrition sectors. Multiple parallel systems (political decentralization, media and other village groups) presented

  16. Expert Committee on College Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Joy, V. P.; Raman Nair, R.; Ayub, M.

    1994-01-01

    Importance of library and information services in higher education was emphasized in India by many committees of Government of India from 1917 including Calcutta University Commission under Sir Michael Saddler, University Education Commission (1949) chaired by Dr. S. Radhakrishnan, Ranganathan Committee (1958), Education Commission (1966) chaired by D.S. Kothari, as well as Sen Committee, Mehrotra Committee etc of UGC. But as education being a State subject; union government could not go beyo...

  17. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences--National Research Council. Plasma sciences represent a broad and diverse field. The PLSC has accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general health of the field as whole. Although select advisory bodies have been created to address specific issues that affect plasma science, such as the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC), the PLSC provides a focus for the plasma science community that is unique and essential. The membership of the PLSC is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include accelerators and beams, space physics, astrophysics, computational physics and applied mathematics, fusion plasmas, fundamental experiments and theory, radiation sources, low temperature plasmas, and plasma-surface interactions. The PLSC is well prepared to respond to requests for studies on specific issues. This report discusses ion of the PLSC work

  18. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members

  19. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.67) is Cambodia which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 November 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 151 Member States became Members

  20. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.64) is Nepal which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 8 July 2008. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 145 Member States became Members